Fully Booked by Kirkus Reviews

Fully Booked by Kirkus Reviews

By PodcastOne

Get the ultimate insider's scoop on the best new books. The editors at Kirkus Reviews interview your favorite authors, tell you whether or not the books on the bestseller list are worth the read, give you behind-the-scenes insights, and introduce you to great books you may otherwise never find.

Episodes

James Nestor

Journalist James Nestor discusses Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art (Riverhead, May 26), a deep dive into the history and function of the human respiratory system, and the changes we can make to start breathing better today. Then Kirkus’ editors make their weekly reading recommendations, with books by Jeremy Tankard and Hermione Tankard, Lisa Allen-Agostini, and Ilhan Omar.
26/05/2046m 45s

Jim Newton

Veteran journalist Jim Newton discusses Man of Tomorrow: The Relentless Life of Jerry Brown (Little, Brown, May 12), a brilliant biography of California’s self-reliant, iconoclastic longest-serving governor. Then our editors offer their reading recommendations for the week, with books by Sarah S. Brannen and Lucia Soto, Candy J. Cooper and Marc Aronson, and Curtis Sittenfeld
19/05/2051m 2s

Walter Thompson-Hernandez

NYT multimedia reporter Walter Thompson-Hernandez discusses The Compton Cowboys: The New Generation of Cowboys in America’s Urban Heartland (William Morrow, April 28), chronicling a year in the lives of the men and women fighting to keep black cowboy culture alive in Los Angeles. And in a sponsored interview, we talk with child psychologist Dr. Abigail Gewirtz, author of When the World Feels Like a Scary Place: Essential Conversations for Anxious Parents & Worried Kids (Workman, May 12). Then our editors make their weekly reading recommendations, with books by Carlos Hernandez, Gene Luen Yang and Gurihiru, Erik Larson, and Joanna Hershon.
12/05/201h 7m

Tori Amos

On this episode Tori Amos discusses the powerful new memoir chronicling her journey through music and activism. Resistance: A Songwriter’s Story of Hope, Change, and Courage (Atria, May 5) interweaves song lyrics and wide-ranging personal stories, exploring the artist’s charge in the face of threats to freedom and democracy. In a sponsored interview, we talk with Caldecott-winning author-illustrator Matthew Cordell, whose latest book is Hello, Neighbor! The Kind and Caring World of Mr. Rogers (Holiday House, April 7). Then our editors make their weekly reading recommendations, with books by Carlos Hernandez, Gene Luen Yang and Gurihiru, Erik Larson, and Joanna Hershon.
05/05/2059m 56s

Jennifer Weiner

#1 New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Weiner joins us this week to discuss Big Summer (Atria, May 5). This delightful fiction features fat acceptance Instagram influencer Daphne Berg, who journeys to Cape Cod to be a bridesmaid in her long-lost, über-privileged best friend’s beachfront wedding and gets mixed up in a murder mystery. Told with signature wit and charm, Weiner’s 14th novel is sure to be one of this summer’s big books. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Leslie Bulion and Robert Meganck, George M. Johnson, Shaun Bythell, and Kevin Nguyen.
28/04/2053m 56s

Sopan Deb

On this week’s episode, New York Times reporter and standup comic Sopan Deb discusses Missed Translations: Meeting the Immigrant Parents Who Raised Me (Dey Street, April 21). Deb’s “refreshing” debut memoir is the story of his journey to India (and select parts of New Jersey) in search of answers to the many questions surrounding his family’s estrangement. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Vikram Madan, Deborah Wiles, John Freeman, and C Pam Zhang.
21/04/2050m 25s

Chelsea Bieker

On this episode, Chelsea Bieker discusses Godshot (Catapult, March 31), a dynamic debut novel set in the drought-stricken town of Peaches, California: 14-year-old Lacy May Herd and her mother, a beautiful woman with a troubled past, are acolytes of Gifts of the Spirit church. Pastor Vern, their Christ-like leader, promises to bring back the rains to the land - as he’s reputed to have done before - if his congregants remain devout and carry out the “assignments” he gives them. Kirkus: “A dark, deft first novel about the trauma and resilience of both people and the land they inhabit.” (starred review) Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Carole Boston Weatherford and Michele Wood, Dean Atta, David Carr, and Mary Pauline Lowry.
14/04/2057m 46s

Julia Alvarez

Legendary poet, author, and essayist Julia Alvarez joins us on this episode to discuss Afterlife (Algonquin Books, April 7), her first adult novel in 14 years. A modern “Book of Job,” it is the story of Antonia Vega, a recently widowed and retired English professor, who’s discovering life’s next chapter. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by David Elliott and Rob Dunlavey, Samira Ahmed, and Emily St. John Mandel.
07/04/2055m 41s

Dean Koontz

Bestselling thriller icon Dean Koontz joins us on this week’s episode to discuss DEVOTED, the heart-pumping novel kicking off a new five-book deal with Thomas & Mercer. The standalone thriller centers on a brilliant mute 11-year-old boy, his attentive artistic mother, and a dangerous old acquaintance with the power to upend their lives and wreak havoc worldwide. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by N. K. Jemisin, Maira Kalman, Jenny Valentine, and Ernesto Cisneros.
31/03/2053m 50s

Cathy Park Hong

Kirkus’ editors lead this episode with an acknowledgement of the COVID-19 pandemic and special segment on quarantine reading. Host Megan Labrise welcomes poet and essayist Cathy Park Hong, author of Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning (One World, March 3), “a fierce and timely meditation” on her lived experience as a Korean American woman and artist. Then our editors rejoin with their weekly reading recommendations, including books by Brandy Colbert, Ashley Woodfolk, Ross Gay, and Lily King.
24/03/201h 5m

Deb Olin Unferth

This week’s guest is Deb Olin Unferth, author of Barn 8 (Graywolf Press, March 3), a blazing heist story starring a sharp and funny 15-year-old from Brooklyn who, through a series of misfortunes over a number of years, becomes a U.S. egg industry auditor and foments a revolution. Kirkus: “If this novel isn’t a movement, it has enough heart to start one” (starred review). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Carole Lindstrom and Michaela Goade, Gene Luen Yang, Rebecca Solnit, and Lorrie Moore.
17/03/2049m 8s

Deb Olin Unferth

This week’s guest is Deb Olin Unferth, author of Barn 8 (Graywolf Press, March 3), a blazing heist story starring a sharp and funny 15-year-old from Brooklyn who, through a series of misfortunes over a number of years, becomes a U.S. egg industry auditor and foments a revolution. Kirkus: “If this novel isn’t a movement, it has enough heart to start one” (starred review). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Carole Lindstrom and Michaela Goade, Gene Luen Yang, Rebecca Solnit, and Lorrie Moore.
17/03/2049m 8s

Kate Elizabeth Russell

Kate Elizabeth Russell discusses her highly anticipated debut novel, My Dark Vanessa, about an affair between a 15-year-old student and her 42-year-old English teacher at a boarding school in Maine. The narrative flows between 2000, when the affair takes root, and 2017, when The MeToo movement forces Vanessa, as a struggling thirtysomething, “to confront the abusive relationship that defines her sexual and romantic past” (starred review). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Maya Tatsukawa, Samantha Mabry, Andy Greene, and Hilary Mantel.
10/03/2047m 44s

Jan Eliasberg

On this special episode - The Woman Episode, sponsored by Sourcebooks - director and screenwriter Jan Eliasberg discusses her debut novel, Hannah’s War, a thrilling story inspired by the life of the brilliant unsung woman who discovered nuclear fission. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books from Sayantani DasGupta, David Enrich, and Quan Barry.
03/03/2055m 48s

Charlotte Alter

On this episode, TIME national correspondent Charlotte Alter discusses We Are the Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America. Centering on 10 millennial political officials, from Mayor Pete Buttigieg to Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Alter’s new nonfiction offers a spirited analysis of the events that shaped them and the many ways they’re diverging from their predecessors. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books from Nikki McClure, Alechia Dow, Ezra Klein, and Aravind Adiga.
25/02/2056m 56s

ROMAN DIAL

On this episode, Alaskan explorer and ecologist Roman Dial discusses The Adventurer’s Son, a highly affecting account of the tragic disappearance of his 27-year-old son, Cody Roman Dial, from Costa Rica’s Corcovado National Park in 2014. “A poignant, highly moving memoir of tragic circumstances and a lifelong love of exploring” (Kirkus). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books from Margaret McNamara (ill. by Micah Player), Jenny Offill, and Jenn Shapland.
27/02/2050m 41s

Roman Dial

On this episode, Alaskan explorer and ecologist Roman Dial discusses The Adventurer’s Son, a highly affecting account of the tragic disappearance of his 27-year-old son, Cody Roman Dial, from Costa Rica’s Corcovado National Park in 2014. “A poignant, highly moving memoir of tragic circumstances and a lifelong love of exploring” (Kirkus). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books from Margaret McNamara (ill. by Micah Player), Jenny Offill, and Jenn Shapland.
18/02/2053m 14s

Ross Mathews

TV personality and bestselling author Ross Mathews joins us on this week’s episode to discuss Name Drop: The Really Good Celebrity Stories I Usually Only Tell at Happy Hour (Atria). Mathews graciously brings us behind the scenes of talk shows and awards shows, and shares some of his best red carpet interview tips with host Megan Labrise. And in a sponsored interview, Megan talks with actor, musician, comedian, and writer Steven Banks, author of Middle School Bites (Holiday House), a funny new middle-grade novel for vampire-werewolf-zombie fans. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, with books from Megan Dowd Lambert and Jessica Lanan, Juleah del Rosario, and Douglas Stuart.
11/02/201h 5m

Lidia Yuknavitch

New York Times bestselling novelist Lidia Yuknavitch (The Book of Joan, etc.) joins us on this week’s episode to discuss Verge, a passionate short story collection featuring characters on the brink. She and host Megan Labrise discuss the qualities of misfits, communities as organisms, and gut-punch endings. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books from Candace Fleming (ill. by Eric Rohmann), Justina Ireland, Roman Dial, and Kiley Reid.
04/02/2055m 38s

Laura Huang

On this episode, Harvard Business School professor Laura Huang discusses Edge: Turning Adversity into Advantage, an atypical career management guide that teaches readers to overcome implicit bias by turning stereotypes into strengths. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books from Cheryl Wills (ill. by Sue Cornelison), Maria Padian, Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman, and Miranda Popkey.
28/01/2050m 57s

Ian Rankin

Scottish crime writer Ian Rankin joins us on this week’s episode to talk about something quite mysterious: Westwind, a little-known, standalone techno-thriller he wrote in 1990, is being publishing for the first time in the United States. Rankin discusses what it’s like to revisit this early work after 30 years, what prompted him to do so, and the challenges his best-known character, Detective Inspector John Rebus, might encounter if he began his law enforcement career in the 2020s instead of the 1980s. Then our editors offer their reading recommendations for the week, with books by Julie Paschkis (ill. by Margaret Chodos-Irvine), Lamar Giles, Patrick Radden Keefe, and Benjamin Black.
21/01/2046m 56s

Kiley Reid

On this episode, author Kiley Reid explains why she’s calling her hotly anticipated debut novel “a comedy of good intentions.” Such a Fun Age explores the complicated relationship between Emira Tucker, a 25-year-old black babysitter living in Philadelphia, and her employer, Alix Chamberlain, a white thirtysomething blogger/influencer/mother of two. Reid’s fun, funny, and incisive novel is, “Charming, challenging, and so interesting you can hardly put it down,” Kirkus writes (starred review). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Rebecca Roanhorse, Anna-Marie McLemore, and Randall Munroe.
14/01/2042m 40s

Kate Murphy

Thanks for listening to Fully Booked - - but when’s the last time you felt like someone truly listened to you? Journalist Kate Murphy joins us on this week’s episode to discuss You’re Not Listening: What You’re Missing and Why It Matters, an investigation into why we’re not listening to one another, what we can do to reverse the trend, and the deleterious effects of distraction and disinterest on our bodies and society. Then our editors each share several of their most anticipated books of 2020.
07/01/201h 5m

Sarah Knight

12/31 Episode: Just in time for the New Year, “anti-guru” Sarah Knight shows how saying “yes” a little less might vastly improve your life. She joins us to discuss her latest book, F*ck No! How to Stop Saying Yes When You Can’t, You Shouldn’t, or You Just Don’t Want To, the fifth in her internationally bestselling self-help series of “No F*cks Given Guides.” Then our editors offer up their reading recommendations for the week, with books by Kaya Doi, Andrew Fukuda, and the Washington Post.
31/12/1943m 41s

2019 Fully Booked Year-in-Review

12/24 Episode: Happy holidays, listeners! On this week’s episode, editor-in-chief Tom Beer joins host Megan Labrise for the Fully Booked Year-in-Review, reintroducing two of their favorite interviews from 2019. First up is National Book Award winner Susan Choi (Trust Exercise), followed by visionary fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi (I.M.: A Memoir). Then our editors join with a look back at the spiciest book world scandals of the year. Trust us: you won’t want to miss it.
24/12/191h 28m

Carolina De Robertis

This week’s episode celebrates Kirkus’ Best Books of 2019 with special guest Carolina De Robertis, whose fourth novel, Cantoras, was a Best Fiction pick and Kirkus Prize finalist. (Our best books lists are the 100 top titles in fiction, nonfiction, YA, and children's literature, chosen from the more than 7,000 books we reviewed this year.) Then our editors highlight some hidden gems from the Best Books lists.
17/12/1954m 53s

Shannon Pufahl

On this week’s episode, debut author Shannon Pufahl suggests her new novel, On Swift Horses, might make you a better card player (but she could be bluffing). Set in the late 1950s, her unique Western centers on the lives and luck of two characters questioning the hands they’ve been dealt. Megan also talks with #1 New York Times bestselling author and polymath Maggie Stiefvater, in an interview sponsored by Scholastic Press. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week.
10/12/190s

Fully Booked Holiday Gift Guide Extravaganza 2019!

It's the second annual Fully Booked Holiday Gift Guide Extravaganza! Editor-in-chief Tom Beer joins Megan in rounding up all the books you’ll want to give (and get) this December. Guests include Toshi Reagon, author of an introduction to a gorgeous new edition of Octavia Butler’s “Parable” novels, and Vicky Bennison, author of Pasta Grannies, a story-filled cookbook that’ll have you whipping up gnocchi like a nonna in no time. Then our editors join with their top gift picks, including books by Anouck Boisrobert (illus. by Louis Rigaud, trans. by Kevin St. John), Nahoko Uehashi (trans. by Cathy Hirano), Dayton Duncan and Ken Burns, and the editors at Phaidon Press.
03/12/191h 11m

Kirkus Prize Panel- Live from Texas Book Festival 2019

In the second of two special episodes recorded live at the Texas Book Festival, Editor-in-Chief Tom Beer joins Megan to moderate the Kirkus Prize Panel, featuring the winners and finalists of this year’s awards for fiction, nonfiction, and young readers’ literature. Young readers literature winner Jerry Craft, nonfiction winner Saeed Jones, and Kirkus Prize finalists Carolina De Robertis, Laila Lalami, Kwame Alexander, Kadir Nelson, Lauren Castillo, Rosalind Harvey, and Alicia D. Williams each share a little bit about their celebrated work. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Cece Bell, Geraldine McCaughrean, Prince (with Dan Pipenbring), and Kevin Wilson.
26/11/191h 14m

Jodie Adams Kirshner

Law professor and bankruptcy expert Jodie Adams Kirshner discusses Broke: Hardship and Resilience in a City of Broken Promises, which Kirkus calls, “Eye-opening and sometimes heartbreaking …. A significant work of social sciences and urban studies” (starred review). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Kwame Mbalia, Lance Rubin, and Leigh Bardugo.
19/11/1945m 11s

Samantha Power

Ambassador Samantha Power joins Megan in conversation for this special episode of Fully Booked, recorded live for CSPAN2/BookTV at the Texas Book Festival in October. Power’s phenomenal autobiography, The Education of an Idealist, charts her rise to Washington insider, serving beside President Barack Obama on National Security Council and, later, as the U.S.’s 28th Permanent Representative to the United Nations. Bold, humane, and incredibly personal, The Education of an Idealist should be required reading for anyone who wants to make a difference in the world. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Alan Gratz, ed. Sangu Mandanna, Ronan Farrow, and Talia Hibbert.
12/11/191h 25m

Alex Dimitrov and Dorothea Lasky

Fire signs Alex Dimitrov and Dorothea Lasky join us on this week’s episode to discuss poetry, the zeitgeist, and their hotly anticipated new book, Astro Poets: Your Guides to the Zodiac. This compelling compendium (think Linda Goodman’s Sun Signs, updated for the Beyoncé years) extends the collaborative wit, lyricism, and heart of their viral Twitter account @poetastrologers. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Lupita Nyong'o (illus. by Vashti Harrison), Cynthia Hand, Elton John, and Elizabeth Strout. This week also features a sponsored indie interview with Teri Case.
05/11/191h 0m

David Owen

On this week’s episode, New Yorker staffer, sustainability expert, and tinnitus sufferer David Owen discusses the fascinating science of sound. His latest book, Volume Control: Hearing in a Deafening World, is a peek into the complicated machinery of the inner ear, a history of American Sign Language and deaf education, and an entreaty to listeners to protect their ears. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Kate DiCamillo, Camryn Garrett, and Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey.
29/10/1946m 55s

Holly George-Warren

Two-time Grammy nominee, music journalist, and professor Holly George-Warren joins us on this week’s episode to discuss the bold and brilliant life of the legendary Janis Joplin. George-Warren’s latest, Janis: Her Life and Music, is “A top-notch biography of one of the greatest performers to emerge from a brilliant era” (*starred review*). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Ibtihaj Muhammad (with S.K. Ali, illus. by Hatem Aly), Ruta Sepetys, Garrett Graff, and Ann Patchett.
22/10/1959m 56s

Saeed Jones

Award-winning poet and former BuzzFeed culture editor Saeed Jones joins us to discuss his exquisite memoir, How We Fight for Our Lives. His story of growing up black and gay in the South in the Nineties and Aughts, “marks the emergence of a major literary voice,” Kirkus writes in a starred review. (Nonfiction editor Eric Liebetrau calls it one of the best memoirs he’s ever read, period.) Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Ashley Bryan, Tochi Onyebuchi, Jim Mattis, and Cathleen Schine.
15/10/191h 1m

2019 Kirkus Prize Special Episode

We’re just two weeks away from this year’s Kirkus Prize ceremony in Austin, Texas! On October 24, three of the authors of this year’s best books, as determined by judges’ panels comprised of eminent writers, Kirkus critics, booksellers, and librarians, will take home $50,000 each. In this special episode of Fully Booked, editor-in-chief Tom Beer interviews Kirkus Prize writer-judges Min Jin Lee (fiction), Jack E. Davis (nonfiction), and Mitali Perkins (young readers’ literature) about the responsibility of judging, the deliberation process, what makes a book prizeworthy, and much more. You won’t want to miss this behind-the-scenes look at one of the richest literary awards in the world.
10/10/1952m 17s

Leigh Bardugo

#1 New York Times-bestselling YA author Leigh Bardugo joins us on this week’s episode to discuss her hotly anticipated adult debut, Ninth House, a literary fantasy set in a spooky world not unlike New Haven, Connecticut... Starring Galaxy “Alex” Stern, a high school dropout from LA who’s recruited to oversee the occult activities of Yale University’s secret societies, Ninth House is a “compulsively readable novel [that] leaves a portal ajar for equally dazzling sequels,” Kirkus writes (*starred review*). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Jason Reynolds, Kim Liggett, Malcolm Gladwell, and Margaret Atwood.
08/10/1955m 45s

Patricia Wiltshire

Since 1994, forensic ecologist, botanist, and palynologist Patricia Wiltshire has been using her expertise to aid police forces in England and beyond in proving - through microscopic environmental evidence - that a suspect was present where a crime occurred. That a getaway car did indeed cross a fallow field. That a dead body was buried in early summer, not late fall. On this week’s episode, she discusses her stunning new memoir The Nature of Life and Death: Every Body Leaves a Trace. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Sonia Sotomayor (ill. Rafael López) and Marc Favreau.
01/10/1952m 54s

Leslie Jamison

In 2014 Leslie Jamison established herself as one of the savviest and most soulful American essayists writing today. On this episode, she discusses the symbiotic relationship between memoir, journalism, and criticism in her latest collection, Make It Scream, Make It Burn. After the break, Megan speaks with writer and memoirist Nefertiti Austin, author of Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America (sponsored interview). Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Kwame Alexander and Dawud Anyabwile, Morgan Parker, and David McCullough.
24/09/1952m 49s

Jacqueline Woodson

National Book Award winner Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming, 2014) discusses her stunning new novel, Red at the Bone. Realistic fiction at its finest, Red at the Bone thoughtfully contends with decisions, desire, consequences, gentrification, and the Great Migration, as a Brooklyn family celebrates a sonorous cotillion in their Park Slope brownstone in spring 2001. Woodson talks craft, cultural touchstones, and an artist’s debt to past and future generations. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Carol Anderson and Tonya Bolden, Toni Morrison, and Salman Rushdie.
17/09/1947m 39s

Jacqueline Woodson

National Book Award winner Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming, 2014) discusses her stunning new novel, Red at the Bone. Realistic fiction at its finest, Red at the Bone thoughtfully contends with decisions, desire, consequences, gentrification, and the Great Migration, as a Brooklyn family celebrates a sonorous cotillion in their Park Slope brownstone in spring 2001. Woodson talks craft, cultural touchstones, and an artist’s debt to past and future generations. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Carol Anderson and Tonya Bolden, Toni Morrison, and Salman Rushdie.
17/09/1947m 39s

Ibram X. Kendi

New York Times bestselling author Ibram X. Kendi joins us on this week’s episode to discuss How to Be an Antiracist, a powerful primer for combatting racism. Kendi, who is founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University, uses his own journey from racist to antiracist to show how anyone can choose their words and deeds to actively participate in building an antiracist society. And in a sponsored interview, NYT Children’s Books Editor Maria Russo joins us to discuss How to Raise a Reader, a genial guide for bibliophilic parents written with NYTBR Editor Pamela Paul. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by David Yoon, Cara Wall, and Petina Gappah.
10/09/1955m 39s

Lauren Markham

Writer, journalist, and educator Lauren Markham joins us on this week’s podcast to discuss the YA adaptation of The Far Away Brothers: Two Teenage Immigrants Making a Life in America. “One of the most searing books on illegal immigration since Sonia Nazario’s Enrique’s Journey” (starred review), it’s the unforgettable story of Ernesto and Raúl Flores, identical twins growing up in rural El Salvador until the threat of gang violence forces them to flee to the United States. She and Megan talk ethical storytelling, what it means to be an unaccompanied minor, and why she chose to adapt the book for young readers. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Thanhha Lai, Ibram X. Kendi, and Carolyn Forché.
03/09/1943m 11s

Jill Heinerth

Elite cave diver Jill Heinerth joins on this week’s podcast to discuss her vivid new memoir, Into the Planet. It’s a deep dive into the formative experiences that taught her to face and harness fear, enabling her to build a remarkable career that has taken her to the literal ends of the earth. Heinerth shares the narrative arc of a dive, what it’s like to explore places on earth less traveled than the face of the moon, and the responsibilities that come along with being the Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s first-ever Explorer in Residence. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Shannon Hale (ill. LeUyen Pham), Rainbow Rowell, Ian Urbina, and Bruce Holsinger.
27/08/1947m 54s

Leah Price

Reports of death of the book may be greatly exaggerated. English professor and book historian Leah Price joins us on this week’s podcast to discuss What We Talk About When We Talk About Books, a series of essays chronicling the evolution of the book, from codex through paperback and .pdf. She and Megan talk shifting reading habits, bookish myths, and the fact that a “golden age of reading” may never have existed. Then our editors join with their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Brandy Colbert and Mara Rockliff.
20/08/1954m 37s

Charles King

In Gods of the Upper Air: How a Circle of Renegade Anthropologists Reinvented Race, Sex, and Gender in the Twentieth Century, Georgetown University professor Charles King chronicles the lives of cultural anthropology founder Franz Boas and the female scientists he encouraged to explore civilizations around the globe, including Ruth Benedict, Ella Cara Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, and Margaret Mead. Charles and Megan talk cultural relativism, how anthropology differs from other disciplines, Hurston’s work in Jamaica and Haiti, and the struggle to debunk theorists who would divide the world into “us” and “them.” Then our editors offer their weekly reading recommendations, with books by Mo Willems, Stacey Lee, Howard Stern, and Taffy Brodesser-Akner.
13/08/1959m 30s

Candace Bushnell

Force of nature Candace Bushnell revolutionized our understanding of 20th-century dating and mating in Sex and the City. Her latest book isn’t *exactly* a sequel but a companion: following a new group of fifty-something female friends as they deal with divorce, online dating, and sex. Candace and Megan talk menopause, profound loss, fresh starts, and Candace’s signature blend of sharp, funny fiction inspired by her own life. And in a sponsored interview, Megan speaks with singer-songwriter Rhett Miller about the inspiration for his debut picture book, No More Poems! A Book in Verse that Just Gets Worse. Then our editors offer their weekly reading recommendations, with books by Daria Peoples-Riley, Katie Henry, and Jennifer Weiner.
06/08/1959m 25s

Sarah MacLean

This week we’re thrilled to welcome New York Times-bestselling romance novelist Sarah MacLean, whose artistry and activism are helping to push the genre in exciting new directions. Her latest book, Brazen and the Beast (“Bareknuckle Bastards” series, book two), is the story of Henrietta “Hattie” Sedley, a voluptuous, business-savvy, Victorian-era noblewoman with ambitious plans to claim her due in business and in pleasure. Sarah and Megan talk body positivity, women’s empowerment, genre-specific vocabulary, and more. Then our editors offer reading recommendations for the week, including books by Gail D. Villanueva, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz (adapted by Jean Mendoza, Debbie Reese), and Elizabeth Gilbert.
30/07/1959m 21s

Laura Lippman

On this week’s episode, Megan interviews modern noir superstar Laura Lippman, whose latest standalone novel, Lady in the Lake, is inspired by two real-life crimes committed in 1960s Baltimore: the unsolved drowning of 35-year-old Shirley Parker and the murder of 11-year-old Esther Lebowitz. They talk opening sentences, the transgressive nature of watching, Lippman’s recent Washington Post piece (“Is it ok for white authors to write black characters? I’m trying.”), and more. Then our editors offer their weekly reading recommendations, with books by Blair Thornburgh, Cassandra Clare et al, Jeff Gordinier, and Linda Holmes.
23/07/191h 6m

Nicole Dennis-Benn

In a special segment recorded live at Austin Central Public Library, Clay interviews pioneering novelist Nicole Dennis-Benn about writing women’s lives and the inspiration for her powerful sophomore novel, Patsy, “a profound book about sexuality, gender, race, and immigration that speaks to the contemporary moment” (starred review). Then our editors offer their reading recommendations for the week, with books by Brian Floca, Sam Quinones, Jim Ottaviani (ill. Leland Myrick), and Colson Whitehead.
16/07/191h 3m

Rick Atkinson

In a special segment recorded live at Austin Central Public Library, Clay interviews Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Rick Atkinson, author of the Liberation Trilogy (An Army at Dawn, etc.), about the first book in his new Revolution Trilogy, The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-11777. Then our editors offer their reading recommendations for the week, including books by Katherine Johnson, Rory Power, Bill Streever, and Ocean Vuong.
09/07/191h 14m

Lauren Mechling

With vim and virtuosity, debut author Lauren Mechling captures the messiness, testiness, comfort, competition, and fun of female friendship. Her novel, How Could She, is the cringingly funny story of swiftly titling dynamics between three New York City thirtysomethings on the cusp of several life-changing events. Mechling joins us on this week’s episode to discuss friends/frenemies, the compromises we make to “have it all,” podcasting, the Toronto-New York cultural exchange, and more. Then our editors recommend books by Sean Williams, Rick Atkinson, and Mary Beth Keane.
02/07/1944m 51s

Linda Holmes

On this week’s episode, we’re delighted to welcome Linda Holmes, host of NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast, to discuss her sparkling debut novel, Evvie Drake Starts Over (that’s “‘Evvie like Chevy, not Evie like Max Greevey.’”). Evvie is a smart, vibrant thirty-something from small-town Maine who loses her husband and takes a tenant, a handsome Major League Baseball pitcher who’s lost his mojo, maybe for good. We talk the “yips,” platonic soulmates, auditory writing, cultural criticism, and more. Then our editors recommend books by Kwame Alexander, Kat Cho, and Kristen Arnett.
25/06/1946m 44s

Blake Crouch- Live from BookExpo America

#1 New York Times-bestselling author Blake Crouch (Dark Matter) is our guest on this week’s episode, recorded live at BookExpo America. Crouch met Clay and Megan at an undisclosed location at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in New York City to discuss his mysterious new novel, Recursion, a sci-fi thriller centering on two characters’ complex relationships to time, grief, memory, and one another. And our editors recommend books by Rosanne Parry, Sophie Cameron, Anna Fifield, and Elin Hilderbrand.
18/06/1950m 6s

Amanda Montell

This week we’re working blue in an episode that might have you seeing red: Linguist and journalist Amanda Montell joins us to discuss Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language, a sparkling analysis of our quirky, biased gendered vernacular. Montell shines a light on curse words, code switching, grammar, pronunciation patterns, and how we might make language more inclusive moving forward. Then our editors present their top picks in books this week.
11/06/1956m 12s

Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark- hosts of "My Favorite Murder"

On this very special episode of Fully Booked, podcast royalty Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark (“My Favorite Murder”) join us to discuss their joint memoir, Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered: The Definitive How-To Guide, a book that’s funny & fearsome & close to the bone. Then our editors present their top picks in books this week.
04/06/1951m 0s

Oscar Cásares

On this week’s episode, Oscar Cásares joins Clay and Megan to discuss Where We Come From, a compassionate portrait of life along the Texas-Mexico border at Brownsville and Matamoros, centering on one woman’s reluctant involvement with a human smuggling ring. “In some ways timely, this quiet, delicate book delivers a truly timeless emotional punch,” Kirkus writes (starred review). Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
28/05/1957m 34s

Julia Phillips

In Julia Phillips’ stunning debut novel, Disappearing Earth, two sisters are taken from a seaside city on a summer day, affecting the lives of women and girls in diverse communities throughout Russia’s majestic Kamchatka Peninsula. She joins us on this week’s podcast to discuss her “unusual, cleverly constructed thriller” (starred review) and race, class, and culture in the Russian Far East. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
21/05/1952m 41s

John Burnham Schwartz

John Burnham Schwartz joins us on this week’s episode to discuss The Red Daughter, a novel inspired by the remarkable life of Svetlana Alliluyeva, Joseph Stalin’s youngest child, whose 1967 defection from the Soviet Union to the United States caused an international uproar. A surprising personal connection gave Schwartz unprecedented access to historical documents that helped him tell her intriguing story. After the interview, our editors join with their top book recommendations for the week.
14/05/1953m 15s

A.S. King

We’ve never read anything quite like YA star A.S. King’s “stunningly original” new novel, Dig, the meditative saga of a white Pennsylvania family with agricultural roots and a few dirty secrets. On this week’s episode, King discusses confronting racism, classism, and misogyny in an informed and compassionate way, and our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
07/05/1957m 43s

Christian Kiefer

In Christian Kiefer’s Phantoms, a white American Vietnam vet contends with legacies of racism, violence, and imperialism in a small agricultural town in Placer County, California. Kiefer joins us on this week’s podcast to discuss the incandescent new novel, which Kirkus calls, “certainly anti-war, certainly condemning our country’s dark past ... full of quavering beauty, unbreakable love, and fragile, relentless hope” (starred review). Then our editors join with their weekly book recommendations.
30/04/1937m 15s

Susan Choi

When it comes to Susan Choi’s inventive new novel, Trust Exercise, believe the hype. Set primarily at an exclusive performing arts high school in an unnamed southern city, it’s the story of a steamy, driver-license-less teen love affair … that morphs, via shocking shifts in perspective, into a profound interrogation of how personal mythologies - and perceptions of trauma and abuse - are written and rewritten over time. Choi joins us on this week’s episode for a deep dive into Trust Exercise, followed by our editors’ weekly book recommendations.
23/04/1940m 54s

Helen Ellis

On this episode of Fully Booked, American housewife, humorist, professional poker player, and native Alabaman Helen Ellis teaches Clay and Megan all about “Southern Lady Code” (“a technique by which, if you don’t have something nice to say, you say something not so nice in a nice way”) as they discuss her delightful, double-entendre-stuffed essay collection by the same name. Then our editors join with top picks in books this week.
16/04/1949m 10s

Mary Laura Philpott

What happens when a Type A needs a plan B? Essayist and bookseller Mary Laura Philpott joins us on this week’s episode for a funny and frank discussion of I Miss You When I Blink, a memoir-in-essays about reinvention, confirmation bias, and identity crisis at home and abroad. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
09/04/1942m 16s

Ross Gay

Inspired by an invigorating walk in Italy, award-winning poet Ross Gay set an intention to write on delight each day for one year. He joins us on this week’s “Rebels Issue” episode to discuss The Book of Delights, a collection of essays contending with the sweet and bitter of everyday life, from plants, animals, politics, and racism to pop music, dreams, and expressions of joy. And our editors offer their top picks in revolutionary books with the power to change hearts and minds.
02/04/1954m 14s

Margaret Leslie Davis

This week’s episode is sponsored by Holiday House, publishers of Music for Mister Moon, a notable new picture book from Philip C. Stead and Erin E. Stead, the author and illustrator of 2011 Caldecott Medal Book A Sick Day for Amos McGee. Make sure to stay tuned for our intriguing interview with Erin E. Stead later in the podcast. In our lead interview, Margaret Leslie Davis joins Clay and Megan to discuss the most important book in the history of printing, the Gutenberg Bible. Her exciting new nonfiction, The Lost Gutenberg: The Astounding Story of One Book’s Five-Hundred-Year Odyssey, chronicles one exceptional copy’s various owners, including the boldest female book collector in American history. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
26/03/191h 2m

Margaret Leslie Davis

This week’s episode is sponsored by Holiday House, publishers of Music for Mister Moon, a notable new picture book from Philip C. Stead and Erin E. Stead, the author and illustrator of 2011 Caldecott Medal Book A Sick Day for Amos McGee. Make sure to stay tuned for our intriguing interview with Erin E. Stead later in the podcast. In our lead interview, Margaret Leslie Davis joins Clay and Megan to discuss the most important book in the history of printing, the Gutenberg Bible. Her exciting new nonfiction, The Lost Gutenberg: The Astounding Story of One Book’s Five-Hundred-Year Odyssey, chronicles one exceptional copy’s various owners, including the boldest female book collector in American history. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
26/03/191h 2m

Preet Bharara

Former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara joins us on this week’s episode to discuss Doing Justice: A Prosecutor’s Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
19/03/1956m 8s

Namwali Serpell

This week's Woman Episode is sponsored by Penguin Young Readers Group. Meet Laurie Halse Anderson (Speak), Stacey Lee, and Joy McCullough, three YA authors who look to the past to tend a feminist future, in our Woman Issue and online at Kirkus.com. Enter to win the Woman Issue Prize Pack, which includes an Away Luggage carry-on, IPad, Airpods and 4 feminist reads, here: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/contest/feminist-reads-prize-pack/. In our lead interview, meet Namwali Serpell, whose brilliant debut novel could be *the* big book of 2019. She joins us on this week's episode to discuss The Old Drift, the genre-bending tale of three generations of three Zambian families whose histories entwine in mysterious and magical ways. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
12/03/1953m 4s

Jacob Tobia

This week’s episode is sponsored by Scholastic. Check out the details in this week’s episode about the giveaway contest Kirkus and Scholastic are doing for young adult writer Bill Konigsberg’s latest novel, The Music of What Happens, plus our intriguing interview with Bill in this episode. And in our lead interview, we talk to Jacob Tobia. Life as a gender nonconforming person hasn’t always been easy for Jacob Tobia, but it has come with a fair heap of fabulousness. On this week’s podcast, the Los Angeles-based writer, producer, and performer joins us to discuss Sissy: A Coming-of-Gender Story, an incisive, sometimes fraught, often funny account of interrogating their identity and confronting gender-based trauma. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
05/03/1958m 14s

Isaac Mizrahi

The incomparable Isaac Mizrahi - fashion designer, performer, talk show host, crossword puzzle aficionado, visionary - joins us on this week’s episode to discuss his generous and funny new memoir, I.M. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
26/02/1958m 44s

Dave Cullen

Acclaimed journalist Dave Cullen changed the way we think and talk about mass shootings with a definitive account of the 1999 Columbine massacre and its aftermath. On this week’s Fully Booked, he joins us to discuss Parkland: Birth of a Movement, a heartbreaking and hopeful chronicle of the student-led revolution launched just hours after the 2018 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Our editors join later in the episode with their top picks in books this week.
19/02/191h 5m

Marie Benedict

You may have heard of Hedy Lamarr … but what you don’t know about the glamorous movie star might shock you. On this week’s Fully Booked, historical novelist Marie Benedict joins us to discuss The Only Woman in the Room, a New York Times bestseller based on the incredible true story of Lamarr’s escape from Austria, journey to Hollywood, and invention of a secret weapon against Nazi Germany that made her a pioneer in wireless communications. Then our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
12/02/1948m 4s

Elizabeth McCracken

In Elizabeth McCracken’s latest novel, a woman seemingly drops from the sky (she’s discovered in a cemetery, with a bowling ball, a candlepin, and fifteen pounds of gold nearby). On this week’s episode, McCracken drops by the recording studio to discuss Bowlaway, the story of three generations of alley owners in a small Massachusetts town, and touches on genealogy, the Great Molasses Flood of 1919, and nearly life-sized, fully articulated wooden women, in fiction and the home. And our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
05/02/1942m 10s

Pam Houston

With the money she made from her first book, Cowboys Are My Weakness, 31-year-old Pam Houston bought a 120-acre ranch near the headwaters of the Rio Grande. She joins us on this week’s episode—25 years later—to discuss Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country, a profound new essay collection expressing a deep appreciation for the lessons she learned from the land.
29/01/1955m 21s

Kristen Roupenian

Kristen Roupenian proved short stories can go viral. Soon after publication in the New Yorker, “Cat Person” became a full-fledged cultural phenomenon—the magazine’s second “most popular” piece of 2017, right behind Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein exposé—forever altering Roupenian’s life. She joins us on this week’s podcast to discuss that experience, power dynamics in a patriarchy, and her debut short story collection, You Know You Want This; and our editors offer their top picks in books this week.
22/01/1952m 19s

Victoria Loustalot

Self-proclaimed skeptic Victoria Loustalot’s first encounter with a real-life psychic left her with more questions than answers. But when some of the seer’s predictions came true, Loustalot began an earnest investigation into the “modern mystical complex.” She joins us on this week’s episode to discuss her witty, wondrous third memoir, Future Perfect: A Skeptic’s Search for an Honest Mystic, and our editors share their top picks in book this week.
15/01/1958m 35s

Brad Meltzer

Ultrabestselling novelist Brad Meltzer is back with a thrilling new nonfiction based on little-known fact, The First Conspiracy: The Secret Plot Against George Washington and the Birth of American Counterintelligence. On this episode, Meltzer speaks candidly with Clay and Megan about the plot against the General, plot (in general), and working with longtime collaborator Josh Mensch. And our editors join with their top picks in books this week.
08/01/1958m 19s

Lucy Worsley

One need not be a royalist to enjoy Lucy Worsley’s radiant new biography of Queen Victoria, the “hard-working, energetic, [and] resilient” woman who saved the status of the British monarchy. Worsley, an English historian, author, curator, and television presenter, joins us on this week’s Fully Booked for a spirited discussion of Queen Victoria: Twenty-Four Days That Changed Her Life, and our editors name their most anticipated books and trends of 2019.
01/01/1955m 47s

Fully Booked End of Year Review 2018

Happy holidays, Fully Booked fans! In this special episode, Clay and Megan reintroduce two of their favorite 2018 interviews — Susan Orlean and David Sedaris. Thanks for listening! We’ll see you in the new year.
25/12/1853m 50s

Christopher Goffard

Investigative journalist Christopher Goffard’s stories grab you, shake you, and don’t let go. On this week’s Fully Booked, Goffard joins Clay and Megan to discuss Dirty John and Other True Stories of Outlaws and Outsiders, “a collection of swift-flowing pieces about outliers, liars, victims, and victimizer” (Kirkus) whose unforgettable titular tale inspired a megapopular podcast and Bravo TV show. Nonfiction editor Eric Liebetrau rounds out the hour with continuing coverage of the Best Books of 2018.
18/12/1853m 56s

Karina Longworth

The first person we meet in Karina Longworth’s Seduction: Sex, Lies, and Stardom in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood *isn’t* Howard Hughes—it’s screenwriter Frederica Sagor— a clue to the true focus of her provocative popular history. On this week’s Fully Booked, Clay and Megan chat with the author and creator of the You Must Remember This podcast about the highly varied experiences of the talented and ambitious women in Hughes’s orbit (1920s-1950s) and nonfiction editor Eric Liebetrau signs on for continuing coverage of the Best Books of 2018.
11/12/1852m 30s

Fully Booked Holiday Gift Guide

It’s the first-ever Fully Booked Holiday Gift Guide Extravaganza! The eggnog flows freely as Clay and Megan round up the crème de la crème in photography, cooking, games, health, beauty, and more. Guests include photographer Beowulf Sheehan (Author: The Portraits of Beowulf Sheehan), Brooklyn-based restauranteur Doug Crowell (Kindness & Salt: Recipes for the Care & Feeding of Your Friends & Family), bookseller Abby Fennewald of Book People in Austin, and YA editor Laura Simeon with continuing coverage of the Best Books of 2018.
04/12/181h 30m

Phoebe Robinson

In Everything’s Trash, But It’s Okay, Phoebe Robinson offers readers a beacon of light and hope for these dumpster fire times. This frank and funny second essay collection by the NYT-bestselling author, cultural critic, and 2 Dope Queens cohost tackles feminism, race, class, body image, Bono, and much more. Today’s episode of Fully Booked features a standup set and Q&A by Robinson, recorded live at the Texas Book Festival, as well as continuing coverage of the Best Books of 2018 with children’s editor Vicky Smith.
27/11/181h 36m

Anita Lo

Michelin-starred chef Anita Lo hasn’t always been lucky in love … but the fruit of her solitude is sweet. On this week’s podcast, she joins Clay and Megan for a spirited discussion of Solo: A Modern Cookbook for a Party of One, a personal and playful collection of repasts for the unattached. Lo proves to be an unforgettable guest, serving up stories of an only-in-New-York dating disaster and an only-in-Mongolia dining experience, and children’s editor Vicky Smith signs on for continuing coverage of the Best Books of 2018.
20/11/1851m 46s

Jonathan Lethem

Part madcap comedy, part post-Election 2016 primal scream, Jonathan Lethem’s The Feral Detective is a veritable carnival of hardboiled delights from the author of Motherless Brooklyn. On this week’s episode, Lethem joins Clay and Megan in eternal debates- East Coast vs. West Coast, Democrat vs. Republican, Rabbits vs. Bears (trust us)- and fiction editor Laurie Muchnick introduces the Best 100 Fiction Books of 2018.
13/11/1858m 25s

Kirkus Prize Panel- Live from the Texas Book Festival 2018

Kirkus Reviews asked the finalists for the 2018 Kirkus Prize—which recognizes excellent literature every year, from picture books to adult books, rewarding three writers $50,000 each—to talk about their new books at the recent Texas Book Festival in Austin. This week’s episode, which is sponsored by Penguin Young Readers Group, is a recording of that panel of prominent, nationally known writers of many genres. Join us as the writers talk about their inspirations.
06/11/1854m 20s

Joseph Fink

Joseph Fink is one of the creators of the popular Welcome to Night Vale and Alice Isn’t Dead podcasts. Now Alice Isn’t Dead is a suspenseful novel filled with misshapen serial killers, an exhausted long haul trucker who believes her wife isn’t deceased even though there was a funeral for her, and a bunch of missing people. Megan and Clay ask Fink about the inspirations for Alice Isn’t Dead and our editors pipe up with their fave picks!
30/10/1849m 17s

Glory Edim

Glory Edim is the founder of Well-Read Black Girl, which has blossomed from an online sensation to a book club to a fascinating anthology of essays by well-known and debut writers discussing their lives as readers and thinkers. We ask Edim about the anthology in this week’s episode. And our editors reveal which bestsellers are worth your reading time!
29/10/1858m 0s

Susan Orlean

In late April 1986, as the world was learning about the Chernobyl disaster, the beautiful central library of Los Angeles Public Library system was burning. A troubled actor named Harry Peak was arrested for starting the fire. The Library Book is Susan Orlean’s fascinating story of the attack; in typical Orlean fashion, the story gets deeper and weirder than its ostensible subject. And we also bring our editors on the line to talk about which bestsellers they think you ought to be reading this week!
29/10/181h 14m

Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera

Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera are two of the most popular young adult writers publishing today; Albertalli’s novel Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda became the hit movie Love, Simon. The two writers collaborated to write What If It’s Us, a sweet novel about a summer romance between Ben and Arthur. The editors talk about Banned Books Week and reveal which bestsellers are worth your time!
29/10/181h 5m

Lisa Unger

Bestselling thriller writer Lisa Unger’s new novel, Under My Skin, is about a young woman struggling with the aftermath of her husband’s murder finds herself in escalating danger in this novel of psychological suspense. Unger brings the reader along as her narrator's grip on reality is tested and keeps the twists coming in this standout thriller. Megan and Clay and our children’s and YA book editors Vicky Smith and Laura Simeon talk about the finalists for the 2018 Kirkus Prize for Young Readers’ Literature and they also talk about some great new books!
29/10/181h 1m

Gary Shteyngart

This week, we talk to Gary Shteyngart about his new novel, Lake Success, about a hedge fund manager on the skids who takes a cross-country Greyhound bus trip to reconnect with his college girlfriend, leaving his wife to deal with their autistic 3-year-old. The novel is smart, relevant, fundamentally warm-hearted, and hilarious. Megan and Clay talk about the finalists of the 2018 Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction and our editors reveal which new bestsellers are worth your time!
29/10/181h 4m

Jill Lepore

This week, we’re asking New Yorker staff writer and Harvard historian Jill Lepore about her great new book of the entire history of the U.S., These Truths, which our reviewer calls “a splendid rendering—filled with triumph, tragedy, and hope—that will please Lepore’s readers immensely and win her many new ones.” Megan and Clay also talk about the new Bob Woodward book, Fear: Trump in the White House, and our editors reveal their picks for the best reads this week!
18/09/1853m 24s

Sarah Weinman

This week, we talk to the author of one of the most-anticipated nonfiction books of the fall: Sarah Weinman, whose The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Kidnapping That Scandalized the World is a tantalizing, entertaining true-life detective and literary story whose roots were hidden deep in a novel that has perplexed and challenged readers for decades. This episode is sponsored by Baker & Taylor, a leading distributor of books, video and music to libraries, institutions, and retailers. To learn more about how Baker and Taylor can help your library visit www.baker-taylor.com.
11/09/1856m 11s

DeRay McKesson

This week, Megan and Clay talk to civil rights activist and Pod Save the People host DeRay McKesson. His new book, On the Other Side of Freedom: The Case for Hope, is a compelling account of technology-powered protest. And it’s a fascinating read, full of his personal stories in addition to his ideas about activism. We also preview some of the great interviews on our site right now from our recent Legends Issue and our editors pipe up with their favorite new reads!
07/09/1854m 1s

Randy Kennedy

In Randy Kennedy's debut novel, PRESIDIO, two estranged brothers and an unexpected passenger embark on a road trip through Texas to recover stolen money. What starts out as a literary meditation on all that space in West Texas becomes a propulsive literary thriller. Megan and Clay talk about Keanu Reeves' publishing imprint and our editors speak up with their favorite picks for this week!
07/09/1857m 0s

Kim Brooks

Making a quick trip into a store, Kim Brooks was only gone for five minutes, leaving her 4-year-old son in his car seat inside the locked car, with the windows ajar. Yet those moments transformed her life in more ways than she could have imagined. Megan and Clay ask Brooks about that day and her investigation of "helicopter parenting," SMALL ANIMALS, which is one of this fall's most anticipated books. Curious to know a few of this fall's other big books? Megan and Clay reveal their best bets and our editors join the podcast to talk about this week's most exciting books! Visit GetQuip.com/Kirkus to get your first Quip Toothbrushes refill pack FREE! Check out MeUndies.com/Kirkus for 15% off your first pair of underwear
07/09/1857m 0s

Meg Wolitzer & Jewell Parker Rhodes

The film version of Meg Wolitzer's novel THE WIFE, starring Glenn Close, is being released this Friday, so Megan and Clay are asking Wolitzer in this week's podcast about the adaptation. And beloved children's writer Jewell Parker Rhodes stops by the studio to talk about her tough but touching new novel, GHOST BOYS. And our editors reveal which new books are really worth your time!  Visit GetQuip.com/Kirkus to get your first Quip Toothbrushes refill pack FREE! Check out MeUndies.com/Kirkus for 15% off your first pair of underwear
07/09/181h 5m

Guy Branum and Kody Keplinger

This week's episode is brought to you by Scholastic. Megan and Clay ask comedian Guy Branum about his wickedly smart and funny memoir, MY LIFE AS A GODDESS: A MEMOIR THROUGH (UN)POPULAR CULTURE, including that time in college when he wrote an article about Chelsea Clinton and got a special visit from the Secret Service. And we catch up with Scholastic young adult writer Kody Keplinger, whose new novel, THAT'S NOT WHAT HAPPENED, is a timely page-turner with a fascinating premise: a school shooting survivor is determined to correct untrue stories about the tragic event. And our editors reveal which new books they think are really worth your time! Visit GetQuip.com/Kirkus to get your first Quip Toothbrushes refill pack FREE! Check out MeUndies.com/Kirkus for 15% off your first pair of underwear
07/09/181h 4m

Catherine Coulter

PARADOX is the 22nd mystery by bestseller Catherine Coulter starring detectives Sherlock and Savich but it’s far from the 22nd novel Coulter's written during her career. She’s also written numerous romance novels and co-writes a series of thrillers with J.T. Ellison. We talk to the pro this week about what it’s like writing about the FBI, the writer who taught her well, and living in a politicized America. Our editors also join us to talk about their best bets for new books to read. Visit GetQuip.com/Kirkus to get your first Quip Toothbrushes refill pack FREE! Check out MeUndies.com/Kirkus for 15% off your first pair of underwear
07/09/1855m 0s

Michael Scott Moore

This week, we talk to the author of one of 2018's most unique books, THE DESERT AND THE SEA: 977 DAYS CAPTIVE ON THE SOMALI PIRATE COAST. Michael Scott Moore is a journalist who was curious why some Somalian men became pirates...and then he was kidnapped by them. Megan and Clay talk about some outrageously priced books and our editors reveal which new books are their best bets!  Visit GetQuip.com/Kirkus to get your first Quip Toothbrushes refill pack FREE! Check out MeUndies.com/Kirkus for 15% off your first pair of underwear
07/09/1857m 0s

Megan Abbott

In Megan Abbott's smart new thriller, GIVE ME YOUR HAND, Kit Owens, a rising star in a famous laboratory can track her success back to the one person in her life she'd like to forget. And that person doesn't want to leave Kit alone. "It will take more than a cold shower to still the blood thumping in your ears when you finish this," our reviewer writes in a starred review. Megan and Clay catch up with Megan on this week’s episode. Jump over to MeUndies.com/KIRKUS for your TWENTY PERCENT OFF your first pair, FREE shipping and a ONE HUNDRED PERCENT Satisfaction Guarantee Visit GetQuip.com/Kirkus to get your first Quip Toothbrushes refill pack FREE!
07/09/1855m 0s

Ottessa Moshfegh

The protagonist of Ottessa Moshfegh's new novel, MY YEAR OF REST AND RELAXATION, doesn't just take some time off from her job; she spends a year hibernating with strong sedatives, in the hope that she'll emerge transformed. The novel is a nervy modern-day rebellion tale that isn't afraid to get dark or find humor in the darkness and we ask Moshfegh about writing it. Megan and Clay recommend some overlooked summer reading picks and our editors talk about their favorite reads this week.
07/09/1851m 0s

Angie Thomas

Angie Thomas' debut novel, THE HATE U GIVE, has spent an astounding 69 weeks on the New York Times young adult bestseller list and will be released as a movie this fall. In the novel, 16-year-old Starr Carter is a black girl and an expert at navigating the two worlds she exists in: her black neighborhood, and the other at her suburban, mostly white high school. Walking the line between the two becomes immensely harder when Starr is present at the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend by a white police officer. We caught up with Thomas recently and asked her about writing the novel. And our editors reveal which books are this week's best bets!
07/09/181h 1m

David Sedaris

This week, Megan and Clay ask David Sedaris about the snapping turtle he tried to feed his benign tumor to (the turtle's name was Granddaddy; the serious drift in his new collection of essays, CALYPSO; and what his siblings think about being written about so often by him. Have you ever wondered why your grade school English teacher insisted you stop ending a sentence with a preposition? We have the answer. And our editors reveal their favorite new books!
07/09/1850m 0s

Cassandra Clare

This week, we catch up with one of the bestselling YA writers publishing today – Cassandra Clare. She talks to us about her latest books, her upcoming series, and what it's like wanting to satisfy a lot of fans who have different ideas about what her characters should be doing. Megan and Clay speculate on the working method James Patterson and Bill Clinton used to co-write THE PRESIDENT IS MISSING and our editors reveal which new bestsellers are worth your time!
07/09/1849m 0s

Jessica Knoll

This week, we're all about great summer reads. We talk to Jessica Knoll, whose debut, LUCKIEST GIRL ALIVE, was a major bestseller; her new thriller, THE FAVORITE SISTER, is an addictive thriller in which the set of a reality TV show gets a little too real and a star is murdered. But the novel is also a trenchant, deep dissection of contemporary feminism. And our editors join us to reveal their favorite summer reads!
07/09/1857m 0s

Rick Bragg

Rick Bragg has been telling stories about his family for decades now, including his bestselling books ALL OVER BUT THE SHOUTIN' and AVA'S MAN. His new book, THE BEST COOK IN THE WORLD, is about the "working-class mountain food" of his native Alabama and his mother, who does wonders with all kinds of Southern food. Megan and Clay talk about "trauma envy" among writers and our editors join us to talk about this week's bestellers.
07/09/1856m 0s

Barbara Ehrenreich

Barbara Ehrenreich is the notable writer who tackles whatever subjects interest her most: American poverty, the American idea of "positivity," and now, in NATURAL CAUSES, she returns with research and rumination on the complexity of our human bodies and the misconceptions of our minds. She urges that we recognize that death is natural, and that we enjoy our lives while we can. Megan and Clay talk about the summer books they're most excited about and our editors join the podcast to reveal which bestsellers are actually worth your time!
07/09/1858m 0s

Jesmyn Ward

This week, Kirkus Reviews editor Clay Smith interviews two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward live on stage from her recent book tour event in Austin, Texas. Ward's novel SING, UNBURIED, SING is the story of a family in rural Mississippi taking a road trip to the notoriously brutal Parchman prison, where a family member is being released. As with the best and most meaningful American fiction these days, old truths are recast in the novel in new realities rife with both peril and promise.
07/09/181h 3m

David Duchovny

This week, our hosts catch up with David Duchovny, who in addition to being an actor and musician, is a novelist (three times over!). His latest, MISS SUBWAYS, is an entertaining, postmodern fairy tale that tests the boundaries of love and fate. And our editors reveal which new books they think are well worth your time!
07/09/181h 1m

Joy Press, Adrienne Sharp and Ben Fritz

Fully Booked goes to Hollywood this week! We catch up with some of the leading writers covering Hollywood: Joy Press, who profiles the women who've been transforming television in STEALING THE SHOW; Adrienne Sharp, whose new novel, THE MAGNIFICENT ESME WELLS, is set in the old studio system of Hollywood and in Las Vegas in the 1950's; and Ben Fritz, whose book THE BIG PICTURE: THE FIGHT FOR THE FUTURE OF MOVIES, reveals why Hollywood is sticking to safe, reliable movies like superhero series. Meet us under the palm trees.
07/09/181h 4m

Marcia Gay Harden and Melissa Broder

When Oscar-winning actress Marcia Gay Harden’s mother began to show signs of Alzheimer's disease, Harden decided to try to capture her memories before they were gone. Harden's new book, THE SEASONS OF MY MOTHER, is an affectionate memoir about a spirited mother-daughter relationship and Harden tells us about the book on this week's episode. Why do we always talk about mermaids instead of mermen? In Melissa Broder's buzzy debut novel, THE PISCES, a disaffected academic struggling with a breakup finds love in the arms of a merman. It's a fascinating tale of obsession and erotic redemption told with black humor and biting insight. And our editors stop by to talk about the new books they think are worth your time!
07/09/1855m 0s

Luis Alberto Urrea and Cutter Wood

This week, we talk to Luis Alberto Urrea, whose new novel, THE HOUSE OF BROKEN ANGELS, is getting great reviews, including a starred review from Kirkus, whose reviewer writes that the novel is, "a family saga that asks what it means to be American." We also catch up with Cutter Wood, whose debut true crime book, LOVE AND DEATH IN THE SUNSHINE STATE allows Wood to tackle a true-crime story and, in the process, discover some uncomfortable truths about himself. And our editors reveal which new books they think are worth your time.
07/09/181h 2m

Cecile Richards and Alex Wagner

This week, in our special Woman Episode sponsored by Sourcebooks, we catch up with Cecile Richards, the outgoing president of Planned Parenthood who has led that organization through many bruising tussles with political leaders. Her new memoir, MAKE TROUBLE, is just out this month. We also talk to Alex Wagner, the CBS correspondent and writer; her new book FUTUREFACE: A FAMILY MYSTERY, AN EPIC QUEST, AND THE SECRET TO BELONGING, is a fascinating story about her complicated search for her ancestry. And our editors reveal the best books written by women that are out this week!
07/09/181h 5m

Sloane Crosley and Don Graham

In bestseller Sloane Crosley's new essay collection, LOOK ALIVE OUT THERE, the witty, perceptive writer confronts middle age, and she's not exactly loving it. What was life like on the set of the big-budget, Hollywood epic, GIANT, starring Rock Hudson, Elizabeth Taylor, and James Dean (egos clashed, for starters). Don Graham has written GIANT, the definitive account of the making of the movie and we’re asking him about it on this week's episode. And our editors tell us which new books they think are really worth your time!
07/09/181h 1m

Gayle Forman and Michael Benson

A trio of struggling teens meets by chance in Central Park and becomes everything to one another in bestseller Gayle Forman's new YA novel, I HAVE LOST MY WAY. We catch up with Forman in this week’s episode and also see what it was like for Michael Benson to write the definitive account of the making of the film 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY. Benson's new book is titled SPACE ODYSSEY and it’s fascinating. And our editors reveal which books they think you ought to dig into this week!
07/09/1859m 0s

Daniel Ziblatt and Dr. Daniela J. Lamas

With a title like HOW DEMOCRACIES DIE, you’d be forgiven if you assumed the book is a dire read. The nationally bestselling book actually has some hope in it; we ask the book’s co-author, Daniel Ziblatt, about the state of American democracy in this week’s episode. We also ask Dr. Daniela J. Lamas about the research she did to write YOU CAN STOP HUMMING NOW: A DOCTOR’S STORIES OF LIFE, DEATH AND LIFE IN BETWEEN. And our editors share their insights about the best new books to read!
07/09/1858m 0s

Alan Hollinghurst and Laurie Kilmartin

Alan Hollinghurst's new novel, THE SPARSHOLT AFFAIR, is about a young gay man growing up as his father is involved in a major sex scandal in Great Britain in the late Sixties. This week, we ask the Booker Prize winner about the novel and his career. We also catch up with comedy writer Laurie Kilmartin about her irreverent, thoughtful new book, DEAD PEOPLE SUCK: A GUIDE FOR SURVIVORS OF THE NEWLY DEPARTED. And our editors tell you which new bestsellers are worth your time!
07/09/1854m 0s

Jorge Ramos and Shannon Hitchcock

Univision anchor Jorge Ramos famously got into a tussle with Donald Trump when he was a candidate for the presidency; his new book, STRANGER, reveals what happened after that incident and explains Ramos' point that immigrants make America a better, not worse, place. We also ask Shannon Hitchcock why she set her new middle-grade novel, ONE TRUE WAY, in 1977 North Carolina as two seventh-grade girls fall for one another. And we talk to our editors about which bestsellers are worth your reading time!
07/09/1851m 0s

Dhonielle Clayton and Elizabeth Crook

Dhonielle Clayton's new YA novel THE BELLES, which Kirkus gave a starred review to, is on the New York Times bestseller list, but that’s not the only reason to celebrate Clayton: she’s also a co-founder of We Need Diverse Books and has been holding publishers accountable for publishing more diverse writers. We also check in with historical novelist Elizabeth Crook, whose new novel THE WHICH WAY TREE is a gripping, fascinating story set in Civil War-era Texas. And our editors reveal which bestsellers are worth your time!
07/09/180s

Jason Matthews and Danielle Lazarin

Jason Matthews is a former CIA agent whose writing career has turned out pretty spectacularly: his debut thriller, RED SPARROW, will be a movie starring Jennifer Lawrence and Joel Edgerton released on March 2. The latest novel in his bestselling RED SPARROW trilogy, THE KREMLIN'S CANDIDATE, is timely and thrilling. We also check in with Danielle Lazarin, whose debut collection of stories, BACK TALK, our critic calls "sensitive, intricate, and quietly powerful;" her stories give voice to women learning to live on their own terms. And our editors let you know which bestselling books are worth a read!
07/09/1858m 0s

Tayari Jones and Mark Updegrove

Tayari Jones's new novel, AN AMERICAN MARRIAGE, was recently chosen by Oprah for her book club and is No. 2 on the New York Times bestseller list. The novel is, at its heart, a love story, but a love story warped by racial injustice. We also catch up with presidential historian Mark Updegrove, whose latest book, THE LAST REPUBLICANS, broke news recently for divulging that both Bush presidents didn't vote for Donald Trump. And our editors reveal which bestsellers are worth your reading time!
07/09/181h 0m

Neal Shusterman and Francisco Cantu

Young adult writer Neal Shusterman isn’t just a bestseller; he's also won the National Book Award. His new novel, THUNDERHEAD, is, our critic says, an "intelligent and entertaining blend of dark humor and high death tolls." We ask him about it on this week’s episode. Francisco Cantú is being praised for his debut memoir, THE LINE BECOMES A RIVER; a former Border Patrol agent, Cantú writes beautifully about what's really happening on the U.S.-Mexico border. And our editors reveal which bestsellers are really worth your time!
07/09/1851m 0s

Kristin Hannah and Joseph Cassara

This week, we catch up with Kristin Hannah, author of the international bestseller THE NIGHTINGALE. Her new novel, THE GREAT ALONE, is a nail-biter about a trouble Vietnam vet who takes his family to rural Alaska to live off the land as they encounter harsh winters, hungry animals, and the vet's increasingly paranoid mind. Megan talks to debut novelist Joseph Cassara, whose novel THE HOUSE OF IMPOSSIBLE BEAUTIES, set in queer Harlem in the 1980s, our reviewer calls "fierce, tender, and heartbreaking." And our editors reveal which new bestsellers are up to snuff!
07/09/1850m 0s

Bryan Mealer and Jessica Fellowes

This week, we talk to bestseller Bryan Mealer, whose new memoir, THE KINGS OF BIG SPRING, is an affecting account of his family's life in the tumultuous, wild oil industry of West Texas. And Downton Abbey fans will want to check out our interview with Jessica Fellowes, the niece of Downton Abbey's creator; the first in her new series of mysteries, THE MITFORD MURDERS, is just out now. Our editors then join us for their thoughts about which bestselling books are worth your time!
07/09/1855m 0s

David Frum and Sarah Vaughn

This week, we catch up with David Frum, a prominent conservative writer who’s not a fan of the current administration in the White House; his new book is titled TRUMPOCRACY. We also talk to Sarah Vaughn, whose new novel, ANATOMY OF A SCANDAL, is about a handsome British politician—also the prime minister’s oldest, closest friend—who finds himself on trial for rape. And our editors let you know about the best bets for new, excellent books out this week!
07/09/181h 1m

Robert Harris and Leni Zumas

Robert Harris is one of the most revered historical novelists writing today. His new novel, MUNICH, is about old friends who reunite in hopes of derailing Hitler’s war machine. The author of POMPEII and numerous other bestsellers, Harris joins us on the podcast this week. We also talk to Leni Zumas, whose novel RED CLOCKS is about the lives of five women in a small Oregon town who are affected by the outlawing of abortion and an imminent ban on single parenthood. And our editors share their thoughts about this week's bestselling books.
07/09/1857m 0s

A.J. Finn and Christopher J. Yates

Debut writer A.J. Finn's thriller THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW has been sold in 37 countries and Fox 2000 picked up the film rights. The story of an agoraphobic woman who swears she sees a violent act in the brownstone across from hers in Manhattan, the novel is rife with references to classic films and "crackles with tension," our reviewer says. Violence also is at the heart of Christopher J. Yates' psychological thriller, GRIST MILL ROAD, which our reviewer writes in a starred review is, "mesmerizing and impossible to put down." And our editors weigh in with their thoughts about which bestsellers are worth your time.
07/09/1856m 0s

James Lee Burke, Irene Latham and Charles Waters

Bestseller James Lee Burke is one of America's most beloved crime writers, with 36 novels and two short story collections to his name. The latest novel in his Dave Robicheaux series, ROBICHEAUX, is "another 15 rounds of high-fatality crime, alcohol-soaked ruminations, and heaven-storming prose," according to our reviewer. And the authors of CAN I TOUCH YOUR HAIR? POEMS OF RACE, MISTAKES AND FRIENDSHIP, Irene Latham and Charles Waters, both join the podcast to talk about their unique collaboration on this children's book. We also welcome our new Young Adult Editor, Laura Simeon, as the editors talk this week about the publishing trends they hope disappear in 2018!
07/09/181h 6m

Kirkus Prize Panel at the Texas Book Festival

Earlier this fall, Kirkus Reviews announced the 18 finalists of the 2017 Kirkus Prize. The three winners of the Prize each received $50,000 in November. Five of the finalists attended the Kirkus Prize panel at the Texas Book Festival: Jack E. Davis (THE GULF); Karen English (IT ALL COMES DOWN TO THIS); Patricia Lockwood (PRIESTDADDY): Madeleine Stratford (ME TALL, YOU SMALL); and Laura Dassow Walls (HENRY DAVID THOREAU: A LIFE). In this episode, we hear from these excellent writers as they talk about the ideas behind their latest books.
07/09/1853m 0s

Ladee Hubbard and Julie Buntin

This week, we put a spotlight on some of the most (unfairly!) overlooked books of 2017, books we think deserve your attention. We talk to Ladee Hubbard about her sharp, insightful novel about a family with peculiar superpowers, THE TALENTED RIBKINS. Julie Buntin also joins the podcast to talk about her novel, MARLENA, which our reviewer calls "as unforgettable as it is gorgeous." And our editors weigh in with some of their favorite overlooked books of the year.
07/09/1856m 0s

Scott Eyman and Ivy Pochoda

This week, we talk to bestselling film historian Scott Eyman, whose new book, HANK & JIM, is about the 50-year friendship of actors Henry Fonda and James Stewart. We also ask Ivy Pochoda about her latest novel, WONDER VALLEY. And our editors let you know which bestselling books are worth your time and which you might want to avoid!
07/09/181h 3m

Paul Kix and Fiona Mozley

This week, we interview Paul Kix, a debut writer whose new nonfiction book THE SABOTEUR is one of the most thrilling nonfiction reads of 2017. It’s about French aristocrat Robert de la Rochefoucauld, who could’ve sat through World War II but instead became a resistance commando sabotaging the Nazis. And we also catch up with British novelist Fiona Mozley, whose new novel ELMET was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Lastly, our editors divulge their picks for bestsellers they think you ought to read and the bestsellers you don’t need to spend you time on.
07/09/1858m 0s

LIVE at the Texas Book Festival

Welcome to the Texas Book Festival episode of Fully Booked! The Texas Book Festival is one of the nation’s largest and oldest book festivals and the Fully Booked crew had a lot of fun there a few weeks ago. In this episode, you’ll first hear the interview Kirkus editor Clay Smith did with Walter Isaacson in the House Chamber of the Texas State Capitol during the Festival. Isaacson is the author of the number one New York Times bestselling new bio of Leonardo da Vinci. Then Megan sits down with Roger Hodge, whose new nonfiction book, TEXAS BLOOD, is about his family’s life along the Texas-Mexico border. And at the end of this episode, Megan and Clay gather some interesting responses from people attending the Festival.
07/09/181h 4m

Anne Rice, Christoper Rice and Joan Silber

You know who Anne Rice is and that her son Christopher Rice is a bestselling novelist too. But they've never collaborated together until this week, when they publish RAMSES THE DAMNED: THE PASSION OF CLEOPATRA, the sequel to THE MUMMY (1989). We catch with both of them during this episode. And Joan Silber's brand-new novel IMPROVEMENT has critics raving, including this starred review from our critic: "There is something so refreshing and genuine about this book." She tells us about creating the novel. Our children's and teen editor Vicky Smith talks about a few of her picks of the Best Picture Books of 2017 and our editors tell you which bestsellers are worth your time.
07/09/1859m 0s

Matthew Weiner and Juli Berwald

In this weeks episode, we ask MAD MEN creator Matthew Weiner about entering the world of publishing as he debuts his first novel, HEATHER, THE TOTALITY, in which the difficulties created for a Manhattan family by the renovation of the apartment upstairs include a homicidal stalker. And science writer Juli Berwald joins us to talk about SPINELESS, her fascinating new book about jellyfish (and what its like to grow a spine while studying animals who don't have one). And our editors talk about this week's bestsellers, with our fiction editor Laurie Muchnick focusing on the Best Fiction Books of 2017!
07/09/1858m 0s

Peter Wohlleben and Anne Fadiman

We gave a rare starred review to Peter Wohlleben's new book THE INNER LIFE OF ANIMALS Wohlleben is also the author of the bestselling book, THE HIDDEN LIFE OF TREES. Wohlleben joins us from Germany to answer our questions about the emotional lives on animals and how we are treating them well or wrongly. And we also catch up with Anne Fadiman, whose new memoir, THE WINE LOVER'S DAUGHTER, is "not unlike imbibing several equally felicitous glasses of wine, their salutary effects leaving one pleasantly sated," according to our reviewer. And our editors speak up with their choices of which bestsellers you ought to read and which you can safely skip.
07/09/181h 0m

Joe Hill and Lindsey Fitzharris

Happy Halloween! Joe Hill, the best-selling author of the long novel THE FIREMAN, has a new book of four creepy novellas, STRANGE WEATHER, that each feature some decidedly hostile, freaky weather incidents. We catch up with Hill in this week's episode. But how about some real-world horror? We ask Lindsey Fitzharris about her new nonfiction book of medical history, THE BUTCHERING ART: JOSEPH LISTER'S QUEST TO TRANSFORM THE GRISLY WORLD OF VICTORIAN MEDICINE. And our editors recommend three spooky reads!
07/09/1858m 0s

Deanne Stillman and Caitlin Doughty

Wait, what? The great Lakota chief Sitting Bull and the force behind the famous Wild West show, Buffalo Bill (who also slaughtered Native Americans), were friends? In this week's episode, we talk to one of America's most insightful writers about the West, Deanne Stillman, whose book BLOOD BROTHERS: THE STRANGE FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN SITTING BULL AND BUFFALO BILL, is just out this week. Then we talk with death expert (your heard us right), Caitlin Doughty, as we ask her about FROM HERE TO ETERNITY: TRAVELING THE WORLD TO FIND THE GOOD DEATH. And our editors stop by to tell us which bestsellers this week are worth your time!
07/09/1852m 0s

Scott Kelly and Khizr Khan

Scott Kelly is the American who has spent the longest amount of time in space and this week, he's on Fully Booked talking about what life up there is like and about writing his new memoir, ENDURANCE. We talk to another American hero, Khizr Khan, whose new book, AN AMERICAN FAMILY, offers insight into what it was like for Khan to become a star at the Democratic National Convention. And our editors stop by to give you their thoughts about this week's bestsellers!
07/09/181h 0m

Roz Chast and Carmen Maria Machado

This week, we check in with beloved New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast, whose new book of cartoons, GOING INTO TOWN, is a funny, and even practical, love letter to New York City. Carmen Maria Machado's entrance to the world of books may be the dramatic of the year: her debut short story collection, HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES, is a finalist for the 2017 Kirkus Prize and a finalist for the National Book Award. We ask her about it all in this episode. And our editors pipe up with their thoughts about this week's bestsellers.
07/09/1858m 0s

Celeste Ng LIVE from BookPeople

This week's episode is a special live taping of Celeste Ng's recent event at BookPeople in Austin, Texas. Ng's new novel, LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE, has just hit the New York Times bestseller list and is hard to put down. "As in EVERYTHING I NEVER TOLD YOU, Ng conjures a sense of place and displacement and shows a remarkable ability to see -- and reveal -- a story from different perspectives," our critic writes in a starred review. We also check in with a few of BookPeople's booksellers about which new books they're loving.
07/09/181h 1m

James McBride and Attica Locke

Does a writer have a duty to be moral? And what happens when a writer tries to be wise? We talk to National Book Award-winning writer James McBride on this week's episode about his new story collection, FIVE-CARAT SOUL, and those vexing questions. And were also joined by Attica Locke, whose new thriller, BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD, is a "deftly-plotted whodunit" according to our reviewer in a starred review. And our editors talk about the newly named 2017 Kirkus Prize finalists!
07/09/181h 0m

Kurt Andersen and Rene Denfeld

When did Americans come to shun reality? If your answer is "recently," Kurt Andersen, the author of the entertaining book FANTASYLAND: HOW AMERICA WENT HAYWIRE: A 500-YEAR HISTORY, wants you to reconsider. We delve into the book in this week's episode. We also talk to Rene Denfeld, author of the new novel, THE CHILD FINDER, in which a gifted investigator combs Oregon's snowy mountain forests for a missing girl. And our editors reveal which bestsellers this week they think you ought to try out!
07/09/181h 4m

Daniel Mendelsohn and Eleanor Henderson

We travel to ancient Greece in this week's episode with Daniel Mendelsohn, author of AN ODYSSEY: A FATHER, A SON, AND AN EPIC, in which Mendelsohn's 81-year-old father asks to sit in on the seminar about THE ODYSSEY his son is teaching (complications ensue). We also catch up with Eleanor Henderson, whose new novel, THE TWELVE-MILE STRAIGHT, is an ambitious novel set in the South in 1930. And our editors check in with their latest recommendations!
07/09/181h 12m

Salman Rushdie and John Freeman

Salman Rushdie joins us this week on Fully Booked to talk about his new novel, THE GOLDEN HOUSE, a sort of GREAT GATSBY for our time: everyone is implicated, no one is innocent, and no one comes out unscathed, no matter how well padded with cash, as our reviewer puts it in a starred review. And if the widening gap between rich and poor in America concerns you, check out our interview with John Freeman, the editor of TALES OF TWO AMERICAS. Lastly, our editors weigh in with their recs for some excellent new books to read!
07/09/1858m 0s

Cherise Wolas

This week, we talk to debut novelist Cherise Wolas about THE RESURRECTION OF JOAN ASHBY. "Can you be a mother and also be an artist -- or, by extension, pursue any serious ambition at all?" our reviewer asks in our starred review of the novel. "This is the question taken up with urgency and all due complexity in lawyer and film producer Wolas' debut novel." And our editors speak up with their recommendations of what to read, and what to skip!
07/09/1831m 0s

Gabrielle Zevin and F.C. Yee

Gabrielle Zevin is best-known for her bestseller from a few years ago, THE STORIED LIFE OF A.J. FIKRY; today we ask her about her new novel, YOUNG JANE YOUNG, which is funny, insightful, and a real pleasure to read. We also catch up with debut YA writer F.C. Yee, whose humorous debut novel, THE EPIC CRUSH OF GENIE LO, is just out. And our editors pipe up with their suggestions of which bestsellers to read and which to avoid!
07/09/1855m 0s

Linda Castillo and Ayobami Adebayo

Who knows more about the Amish than almost anyone? A bestselling thriller writer who lives in Amarillo, Texas named Linda Castillo. This episode, we ask Castillo about the latest in her Kate Burkholder series, DOWN A DARK ROAD. Debut novelist Ayobami Adebayo also joins us to talk about her affecting novel, STAY WITH ME. And children's-teen editor Vicky Smith takes the stage to highlight an excellent new novel and one you can safely avoid.
07/09/1852m 0s

Karin Slaughter and Ellen Ullman

We gave a rare starred review to bestselling thriller writer Karin Slaughter's new novel THE GOOD DAUGHTER. Slaughter talks to us on todays episode about why she sets all of her novels in Georgia, what it's like being a continual bestseller, and where she gets her ideas from. And pioneering tech worker and writer Ellen Ullman also joins us to talk about her new memoir, LIFE IN CODE: A PERSONAL HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY, which our critic calls, "a sharply written, politically charged memoir of life in the data trenches." Our editors talk about which bestsellers they think are worth your time and which you can safely skip!
07/09/181h 9m

Tom Perrotta and Heather Harpham

Tom Perrotta - the author of THE LEFTOVERS (which became the HBO series), LITTLE CHILDREN, and ELECTION, among others - has a funny, brand-new novel, MRS. FLETCHER, that our reviewer says is "more spot-on satire with heart and soul from a uniquely gifted writer." We also talk to memoir writer Heather Harpham about her honest new memoir, HAPPINESS. And if you're looking for a few good summer reads, our editors are here to help you out!
07/09/1858m 0s

Ace Atkins and Jardine Libaire

This week, we catch up with bestselling thriller writer Ace Atkins and ask him about the latest in his series of crime novels starring detective Quinn Colson, who's on the trail of bank robbers and sex traffickers in THE FALLEN. We also talk to Jardine Libaire, whose new novel WHITE FUR has been picked up for development by Amazon Studios. And our editors pipe up with their latest recommendations!
07/09/1858m 0s

Daryl Gregory and Monica Hesse

We talk to the author of one of the most intriguing summer novels published this year, SPOONBENDERS, by Daryl Gregory, the story of a family of people gifted with psychic abilities. And Monica Hesse joins us to talk about her new nonfiction book, AMERICAN FIRE, about a series of odd arsons in Virginia. That book is turning out to be a great summer read, too. Our editors also join us to give their takes on which bestsellers are worth your time.
07/09/181h 1m

Gin Phillips and Joshua Cohen

You may not have heard of Gin Phillips since she's a debut writer but we think her thriller FIERCE KINGDOM has the potential to be a huge summer hit. We also talk to Joshua Cohen, whose insightful and funny new novel MOVING KINGS packs a lot into a short amount of pages. And we ask our senior editors which bestsellers out this week are worth the read!
07/09/181h 2m

Nina George, Matthew Klam and Meg Gardiner

Nina George is the mega-bestselling author of THE LITTLE PARIS BOOKSHOP; she's in our studio this week to answer our questions about her brand-new novel, THE LITTLE FRENCH BISTRO. We also catch up with Matthew Klam, whose anticipated, funny new novel, WHO IS RICH?, is just out. And thriller and Edgar Award winner Meg Gardiner stops by the studio to talk about UNSUB, her new thriller loosely based on the Zodiac killings. Find out which bestsellers our editors think you ought to race out and buy and which you can safely avoid!
07/09/181h 11m

Samantha Irby and Finn Murphy

Samantha Irby's essays (some of which originated from her popular blog Bitches Gotta Eat) are both hilarious and moving. As she's working on producing an FX series based on her work, we talk to Irby about her new, best-selling collection of essays, WE ARE NEVER MEETING IN REAL LIFE. And who says long-haul truckers cant be writers too? Finn Murphy's new memoir THE LONG HAUL is a fascinating glimpse into life on the American road. And our senior editors call in with recommendations about which bestsellers are worth your time.
07/09/1858m 0s

Roxane Gay and Katherine Heiny

Roxane Gay may be best known for her essay collection, BAD FEMINIST, but she joins the podcast this week to talk to us about her new memoir, HUNGER: A MEMOIR OF (MY) BODY, one of the most anticipated books of the year. We also catch up with Katherine Heiny, whose debut novel, STANDARD DEVIATION, is "an amusingly engaging take on long-term marriage with a lovably loopy character at its center," as our critic puts it in a starred review. And our expert editors tell you which bestsellers are worthy of your time.
07/09/1841m 0s

James Patterson and Gerda Saunders

You probably know that James Patterson is a mega-bestseller but do you know what really keeps him up at night? It's not what you might expect, as he reveals in this weeks episode. We also talk to Gerda Saunders, whose new memoir, MEMORY'S LAST BREATH, is a "fiercely honest" account of her life with dementia. Our reviewer calls MEMORY'S LAST BREATH a "courageous, richly textured, and unsparing memoir." And our sharp-eyed editors give us the low-down on which bestsellers are worth it to purchase and which you can safely avoid.
07/09/181h 1m

John Grisham and Lisa Lucas

John Grisham joins the podcast this week to talk about his new thriller, CAMINO ISLAND; we ask Lisa Lucas, the Executive Director of the National Book Foundation, about diversity in publishing, among other topics; and our editors recommend some great summer reads!
07/09/1846m 0s

David Sedaris and Nathan Hill

We talk to David Sedaris about his new book, THEFT BY FINDING, a collection of his diary entries that allows you to see the source material for some of his funniest stories. He tells us in this episode the names of some beloved spiders he has known. We also catch up with Nathan Hill, whose debut novel THE NIX was a breakout bestseller in 2016; the paperback version was recently published. And our editors drop in to tell us which bestselling books are worth your time and which...aren't!
07/09/181h 2m

J. Courtney Sullivan and Ada Calhoun

This week, we catch up with bestselling novelist J. Courtney Sullivan, whose brand-new novel SAINTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS is an "expertly spun family drama," according to our critic, about two sisters whose dark family secret has consequences for years to come. And Ada Calhoun's new nonfiction book WEDDING TOASTS I'LL NEVER GIVE is an expanded version of the popular column on the same subject she wrote for the "Modern Love" column in the New York Times. Looking for new bestsellers to read? Our editors tell you which to avoid and wish to read!
07/09/1855m 0s

Chris Whipple and Rakesh Satyal

Fully Booked now has a hotline number (888-245-0618) where readers can leave messages asking for advice about what they should read next, for example. We introduce calls from our listeners in this episode (and one of them is a real doozy). What exactly does the Chief of Staff at the White House do? Your'e not certain? Neither were we until we talked to filmmaker and writer Chris Whipple about his deeply reported and fascinating new bestseller, THE GATEKEEPERS: HOW THE WHITE HOUSE CHIEFS OF STAFF DEFINE EVERY PRESIDENCY. We also chat up editor and novelist Rakesh Satyal, author of the funny, uplifting new novel NO ONE CAN PRONOUNCE MY NAME. And our editors spill the beans on which bestsellers you should race out and read and which you can safely skip!
07/09/181h 12m

David Grann and Lisa Ko

Bestselling writer David Grann (THE LOST CITY OF Z) has another new book, KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON, that uncovers a crime (actually, a massacre) that most Americans know nothing about: the murders of Osage Indians in Oklahoma in the 1920's, just as the Osage were accumulating vast wealth from the vast oil reserves under their land. And guess who the perpetrators were? We're not saying in this interview with Grann, although he discloses some fascinating elements of the crime. We also check in with Lisa Ko, whose hotly anticipated debut novel THE LEAVERS has already racked up a big award (from Barbara Kingsolver, no less!). And Kirkus' editors give us the good news/bad news on which bestsellers to seek out and which to skip.
07/09/181h 2m

All Things L.A. with Carl Reiner, Stephen Galloway, Edan Lepucki and Melissa de la Cruz

If the first thing you think of when you think of Los Angeles is movie stars, palm trees, and traffic, there's nothing wrong with that. But what about all the great writers who call L.A. home? In this special L.A. episode recorded during the recent Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, we talk with Hollywood Reporter features editor Stephen Galloway about his new bio of Sherry Lansing; comedian Carl Reiner; novelist Edan Lepucki; and bestselling YA writer Melissa de la Cruz. Join us on this all-things-L.A. episode!
07/09/181h 8m

Mohsin Hamid and Lesley Nneka Arimah

Mohsin Hamid, the bestselling author of the new novel EXIT WEST, calls in to the podcast to talk to us about writing characters who try to be decent people in an age of cynicism, while co-host Megan Labrise asks debut fiction writer Lesley Nneka Arimah about her story collection, WHAT IT MEANS WHEN A MAN FALLS FROM THE SKY. And our senior editors pipe up to tell you which bestselling books you should race out and read and which you might want to ignore.
07/09/181h 4m

Dani Shapiro and Daniel Suarez

Dani Shapiro is one of America's most respected memoir writers; her latest, HOURGLASS, hits close to home (its about her marriage), so of course Fully Booked is there to get up close and personal with Shapiro. We also talk to bestselling thriller writer Daniel Suarez, whose latest, CHANGE AGENT, may have you rethinking your plans for the future. And our senior editors pipe up about which of the most popular books you've been hearing about are actually worth your time!
07/09/181h 1m

John Waters and Anastasia Higginbotham

We talk to hilarious filmmaker and writer John Waters about a serious subject: how to create a life as an artist. And we ask children's book writer Anastasia Higginbotham why she titles her latest book TELL ME ABOUT SEX, GRANDMA. And Kirkus' editors give you the inside scoop on which bestsellers you ought run out and buy...and which you can safely ignore!
07/09/181h 8m

George Saunders and Lamar Giles

In the debut episode, George Saunders, author of the bestselling novel LINCOLN IN THE BARDO, reveals what it was like getting inside President Lincoln's soul and we talk to YA writer Lamar Giles about his latest novel, OVERTURNED, and why he fights to ensure diverse characters, written by diverse writers, appear on bookstore shelves. Wondering which new, bestselling books our expert book critics think are worth your time (and which ones you should avoid!)? Kirkus Reviews senior editors join us to tell you the what's what.
07/09/1857m 0s

Fully Booked by Kirkus Reviews Teaser

"Fully Booked by Kirkus Reviews" premieres Tuesday, April 4, 2017.
07/09/1845m 0s
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