TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

By TED

Every weekday, TED Talks Daily brings you the latest talks in audio. Join host and journalist Elise Hu for thought-provoking ideas on every subject imaginable — from Artificial Intelligence to Zoology, and everything in between — given by the world's leading thinkers and creators. With TED Talks Daily, find some space in your day to change your perspectives, ignite your curiosity, and learn something new.

Episodes

How great leaders innovate -- responsibly | Ken Chenault

In times of uncertainty, leaders have a responsibility to inspire hope. Sharing hard-won wisdom, business leader Ken Chenault talks about what it takes to enact positive, enduring change -- and why it's more important than ever to invest in responsible innovation that uplifts people and centers equality and fairness.
19/05/2212m 17s

The workplace, redefined by women of color | Deepa Purushothaman

Corporate inclusion visionary Deepa Purushothaman shares how women of color can advocate for themselves in workplace settings where they are undervalued, discriminated against and overlooked -- and how companies can foster working cultures that empower everyone to achieve success. (This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
18/05/2219m 15s

A creator-led internet, built on blockchain | Adam Mosseri

As digital assets like cryptocurrency and NFTs become more mainstream, design thinker and head of Instagram Adam Mosseri believes that creators are uniquely positioned to benefit. These blockchain-enabled technologies could remove the need for a "middleman" in the form of large social media platforms, allowing creators to more freely distribute their work and connect with their audiences. He explains how this new age of the internet will give way to "the greatest transfer of power from institutions to individuals in all time."
17/05/2213m 32s

Why Africa needs community-led conservation | Resson Kantai Duff

Conservation efforts in Africa have typically been led by "parachute conservationists" -- outsiders who drop in thinking they have all the answers, hire locals to implement them and then disappear. But conservationist Resson Kantai Duff has a better way to save wildlife in Africa: let locals lead these efforts themselves. She calls for a major shift in how conservation in Africa works, showing why the people closest to the land are the ones best fit to care for it.
16/05/2213m 27s

Listen now: Season 2 | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

Can you really boost your metabolism? Is blue light actually ruining your sleep? How much vaginal yeast is healthy, and when is it ... too much? Body Stuff is back for a second season to bust the lies you're told -- and sold -- about your personal health. Join Dr. Jen Gunter as she addresses common myths, from the incredible ways your sense of taste and smell work to some harmful misconceptions about opioids and the biggest pain on our backs (literally). Whether you're curious to learn more about the world inside you or want to escape the online hot takes that promise to tell you how to optimize your health, this season dives even deeper into how your body really works. Produced in partnership with Transmitter Media. Listen to Season 1 and other podcasts from the TED Audio Collective now at youtube.com/tedaudiocollective.
15/05/221m 5s

The future of the food ecosystem -- and the power of your plate | Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli

Many people across the world don't have access to healthy food -- while in other places tons of food go to waste. Social entrepreneur Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli thinks we can take bold steps to fix this problem. She lays out what it would take to build a more equitable, sustainable food system that nourishes all people and asks us to widen our perspectives before eating our next meal.
14/05/2210m 56s

The crime-fighting power of cross-border investigative journalism | Bektour Iskender

Organized crime operates across national borders -- to keep up, investigative journalists need to do the same. TED Fellow Bektour Iskender gives the inside scoop on his efforts to unveil secret, insidious operations in his home country of Kyrgyzstan, and how he worked with a team of journalists to uncover corruption and spark a national movement. He shares three key insights on how global networks of investigative journalists protect the world not just from smugglers and thieves but from dictators and warmongers.
13/05/229m 15s

How to stop banks from investing in dirty energy | Lucie Pinson

Money is pollution's biggest driving force -- particularly, the cash invested in dirty energy projects, says financial responsibility campaigner Lucie Pinson. She shares a three-pronged approach to stop banks from funding fossil fuel companies, including what she calls "collaborative blackmailing" (it's more ethical than it sounds). By demanding more accountability from polluting companies and encouraging ethical banking, Pinson shows how to cut off the problem at its source.
12/05/2211m 24s

The case for a 4-day work week | Juliet Schor

The traditional approach to work needs a redesign, says economist Juliet Schor. She's leading four-day work week trials in countries like the US and Ireland, and the results so far have been overwhelmingly positive: from increased employer and customer satisfaction to revenue growth and lower turnover. Making the case for a four-day, 32-hour work week (with five days of pay), Schor explains how this model for the future of work could address major challenges like burnout and the climate crisis -- and shares how companies and governments could work together to make it a reality.
11/05/2211m 37s

My long walk across India for women's freedom | Srishti Bakshi

There are 600 million women in India -- yet they are rarely seen outdoors after sunset because of safety concerns like harassment and catcalls. On a mission to create safer public spaces, women's rights advocate Srishti Bakshi talks about how she embarked on a 2,300-mile walk across the length of India (a distance equivalent to traveling from New York City to Los Angeles), conducting driving workshops to empower women's mobility across the country. "The more women see other women in public spaces, the more safe, independent and empowered each of us will be," Bakshi says.
10/05/229m 52s

The most powerful untapped resource in health care | Edith Elliott and Shahed Alam

Whether we're rushing a child to the emergency room after a fall or making chicken soup for a feverish spouse, love inspires us to act when a family member gets sick. Global health activists Edith Elliott and Shahed Alam believe we can harness this power to create better health outcomes for everyone. Learn how their organization Noora Health works with doctors and nurses in India and Bangladesh to train the family members of hospital patients with essential skills to support their sick loved ones -- and how they plan to expand their reach to support 70 million caregivers who care for more than one billion people over the next six years. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
09/05/229m 12s

A bold plan to transform access to the US social safety net | Amanda Renteria

Digital public servant Amanda Renteria has seen that the millions of people who rely on government welfare services are often discouraged from seeking them out, frustrated by long lines and unnecessarily complicated processes. At Code for America, Renteria is helping develop human-centered technology that "respects you from the start, meets you where you are and provides an easy, positive experience." She details the four factors that hinder effective delivery of government benefits and explains Code for America's plan to bring user-centric, digital-first social services to more than 13 million Americans and unlock 30 billion dollars in benefits for low-income families. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
08/05/228m 29s

A transparent, easy way for smallholder farmers to save | Anushka Ratnayake

A safe space to save money is life-changing -- especially for the 60 million smallholder farmers in West Africa (the majority being women) who often live on less than two dollars a day. Poverty fighter Anushka Ratnayake introduces her nonprofit myAgro, which offers farmers a place to save small amounts of money and allows them to access those funds as they need them. Over the next five years, myAgro plans to reach a million farmers in West Africa, providing a stress-free, transparent and convenient system that empowers agricultural entrepreneurs by putting the purchasing power it takes to run a successful farm in their hands. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
07/05/227m 58s

An election redesign to restore trust in US democracy | Tiana Epps-Johnson

Election infrastructure in the United States is crumbling, says technologist Tiana Epps-Johnson, and, even worse, election officials are increasingly being attacked simply for doing their jobs. How can the country rebuild trust in its local and national elections? Epps-Johnson describes how the US Alliance for Election Excellence, a nonpartisan collaborative of election officials, technologists, designers and other experts, is working across all 50 states to improve the performance of systems serving 240 million voters, ensuring everyone has access to a fair, trustworthy and modern democratic process. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change. If you want to hear even more about Epps-Johnson's work, stick around after the talk on the "TED Talks Daily" podcast, where she digs deeper into her ideas.)
06/05/228m 47s

Mental health care that disrupts cycles of violence | Celina de Sola

In Latin American countries like El Salvador, homicide rates are alarmingly high thanks in large part to a vicious cycle of violence -- people don't have a chance to heal from recurrent individual and collective trauma. With her team at Glasswing International, de Sola is hoping to break this cycle by equipping government employees like teachers and police officers with the skills and knowledge they need to provide mental health care to those who need it most. Their goal: to transform more than 2,000 frontline institutions in 25 of the highest risk municipalities in Central America with community-based approaches to mental health support, reaching nearly 10 million people along the way. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
05/05/228m 8s

How ancient Arctic carbon threatens everyone on the planet | Sue Natali

What will happen to the planet if climate change melts what's left of Arctic permafrost? Shedding light on this overlooked threat, Arctic geologist Sue Natali reveals the true danger of heating up the iciest place on the planet: the release of ancient carbon that will dramatically worsen our climate problems. In this urgent talk, she introduces a new initiative, Permafrost Pathways, and their work to measure permafrost carbon emissions, fuse Indigenous solutions with modern technologies and protect the rights of Arctic residents. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
04/05/228m 12s

Why Indigenous forest guardianship is crucial to climate action | Nonette Royo

Indigenous communities have looked after their ancestral forests for millennia, cultivating immense amounts of knowledge on how to protect, nourish and heal these vital environments. Today, 470 million Indigenous people care for and manage 80 percent of the world's biodiversity -- yet their legal rights to these lands are inexplicit and subject to exploitation by illegal loggers, miners and companies. Human rights lawyer Nonette Royo describes how her team at the Tenure Facility, an organization that provides legal assistance to Indigenous people by taking their land rights battles to court, will help these communities secure and defend 50 million hectares of forests over the next five years. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
03/05/228m 54s

A safe pathway to resettlement for migrants and refugees | Becca Heller

"Human migration is both inevitable and growing. What are we as a global community doing to address it?" asks human rights lawyer Becca Heller, who believes that every refugee and migrant deserves a safe pathway to resettlement. Through her work with the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP), Heller is showing how the power of the law can help displaced people find homes. By providing access to legal information and services, IRAP champions a functional, rights-based legal system that empowers resettlers to find long-lasting safety. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change. If you want to hear even more about Heller's work, stick around after the talk on the "TED Talks Daily" podcast, where she digs deeper into her ideas.)
02/05/2211m 9s

Why people and AI make good business partners | Shervin Khodabandeh

What happens when the data-driven capabilities of AI are combined with human creativity and ingenuity? Shining a light on the opportunities this futuristic collaboration could bring to the workplace, AI expert Shervin Khodabandeh shares how to redesign companies so that people and machines can learn from each other.
29/04/2210m 33s

The restorative power of medical tattoos | Becky Barker

Tattoos can transform and empower people, with some seeking them out to reconnect with their bodies due to scarring, physical abnormalities or the aftermath of a procedure or illness. Paramedical tattooist Becky Barker shares the art and craft of medical tattooing, explaining how this expansive field helps improve the quality of life for breast cancer survivors -- and anyone looking to renew themselves in ways that are more than skin-deep.
28/04/2214m 7s

How mRNA medicine will change the world | Melissa J. Moore

The secret behind medicine that uses messenger RNA (or mRNA) is that it "teaches" our bodies how to fight diseases on our own, leading to groundbreaking treatments for COVID-19 and, potentially one day, cancer, the flu and other ailments that have haunted humanity for millennia. RNA researcher Melissa J. Moore -- Moderna's chief scientific officer and one of the many people responsible for the rapid creation and deployment of their COVID-19 vaccine -- takes us down to the molecular level, unraveling how mRNA helps our bodies' proteins maintain health, prevent disease and correct errors in our genetic code. "We have entered an entirely new era of medicine," Moore says.
27/04/2218m 0s

The funding gap in start-up investing | Temie Giwa-Tubosun

"It is time to close the funding gap for Black female-led start-ups the world over," says entrepreneur Temie Giwa-Tubosun, whose company LifeBank delivers life-saving medical supplies to remote areas in Africa. Today, LifeBank operates successfully across the continent, but Giwa-Tubosun knows that barriers to funding prevent many other brilliant business ideas from blossoming. She highlights examples of impactful women-led ventures around the world -- and challenges investors to help more of them thrive.
26/04/227m 53s

A future worth getting excited about | Elon Musk

What's on Elon Musk's mind? In conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, Musk details how the radical new innovations he's working on -- Tesla's intelligent humanoid robot Optimus, SpaceX's otherworldly Starship and Neuralink's brain-machine interfaces, among others -- could help maximize the lifespan of humanity and create a world where goods and services are abundant and accessible for all. It's a compelling vision of a future worth getting excited about. (Recorded at the Tesla Texas Gigafactory on April 6, 2022)
25/04/221h 8m

We can make COVID-19 the last pandemic | Bill Gates

Building a pandemic-free future won't be easy, but Bill Gates believes that we have the tools and strategies to make it possible -- now we just have to fund them. In this forward-looking talk, he proposes a multi-specialty Global Epidemic Response and Mobilization (GERM) team that would detect potential outbreaks and stop them from becoming pandemics. By investing in disease monitoring, research and development as well as improved health systems, Gates believes we can "create a world where everyone has a chance to live a healthy and productive life -- a life free from the fear of the next COVID-19."
22/04/2214m 46s

A new economic model for protecting tropical forests  | Nat Keohane

To solve the climate crisis, we need to make tropical forests worth more alive than dead, says environmental economist Nat Keohane. Highlighting the urgent need to stop deforestation and the carbon pollution it brings, he details the work of the LEAF Coalition -- a first-of-its-kind public-private partnership that's channeling one billion dollars into protecting tropical forests -- and shares three building blocks for a robust market for forest carbon that enables economies to thrive while protecting natural resources.
21/04/228m 59s

An Olympic champion's mindset for overcoming fear | Allyson Felix

Getting pregnant as a track and field athlete is often called the "kiss of death" -- a sign your athletic career will soon end. Olympic champion, entrepreneur and proud mother Allyson Felix thinks it shouldn't be that way. She tells the story of starting a family while fighting to change her former sponsor's maternity policy -- and paving the way for others to get greater protection and more support. Her message is a testament to the power of believing in and advocating for yourself. "You don't have to be an Olympian to create change for yourself and others," she says. "Each of us can bet on ourselves."
20/04/229m 17s

A vision for sustainable energy in Africa | Chibeze Ezekiel

Africa needs new energy sources to fuel its development, but the continent should invest in renewable energy instead of cheap, polluting alternatives like coal, says climate inclusion activist Chibeze Ezekiel. He tells the story of how he worked with local communities in Ghana to halt the construction of the country's first coal power plant -- and encouraged the government to prioritize investments in renewable energy instead. "Development and clean, breathable air should not be mutually exclusive," Ezekiel says.
19/04/227m 2s

Elon Musk talks Twitter, Tesla and how his brain works — live at TED2022 | Elon Musk

In this live, unedited conversation, Elon Musk -- the head of Tesla, SpaceX, Neuralink and The Boring Company -- digs into the recent news around his bid to purchase Twitter and gets honest about the biggest regret of his career, how his brain works, the future he envisions for the world and a lot more. (This conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson was recorded live at TED2022 on April 14, 2022. If you want to hear even more, head over to "The TED Interview" podcast, where Musk and Anderson sat down at the new Tesla Gigafactory in Texas to discuss some of the radical innovations he's working on -- including Tesla's intelligent humanoid robot, SpaceX's Starship and Neuralink's brain-machine interfaces.)
18/04/2253m 1s

Ukraine's fight to keep educating its children | Zoya Lytvyn

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has destroyed so much -- including hundreds of schools, where the country's children were forging their futures -- but it has not stopped Ukrainians from pursuing knowledge and curiosity. In a deeply moving talk, education leader Zoya Lytvyn shares her first-hand experience evacuating Kyiv and takes us inside the ongoing effort to continue educating children amid war and destruction. "As long as our children keep learning and our teachers keep teaching -- even while they are starving in shelters under bombardment, even in refugee camps -- we are undefeated," she says.
14/04/226m 57s

The likability dilemma for women leaders | Robin Hauser

When women lead, bias often follows. Documentarian Robin Hauser dives into the dilemma between competence and likability faced by women in leadership roles, detangling the unconscious beliefs and gendered thinking that distort what it means to be a good leader.
13/04/229m 41s

Stand with Ukraine in the fight against evil | Garry Kasparov

Ukraine is on the front line of a war between freedom and tyranny, says chess grandmaster and human rights advocate Garry Kasparov. In this blistering call to action, he traces Vladimir Putin's rise to power and details his own path from chess world champion to pro-democracy activist in Russia. His message is a challenge to global leaders to rise in support of Ukraine -- and to choose life and love over death and hatred. "The price of stopping a dictator always goes up with every delay and every hesitation," he says. "Meeting evil halfway is still a victory for evil."
12/04/2214m 58s

We could kick-start life on another planet. Should we? | Betül Kaçar

"Life makes our planet an incredibly exotic place compared to the rest of the known universe," says astrobiologist Betül Kaçar, whose research uses statistics and mathematical models to simulate ancient environments and gather insights into the origins of existence. In this fascinating talk, she explores how a deeper understanding of chemistry could lead to the "secret sauce" for sparking life on other planets -- and asks us to ponder an important question: If we could kick-start life in the universe, should we?
11/04/2210m 51s

Listen now: Season 5 | WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant, a TED Audio Collective podcast, is back for a fifth season! Organizational psychologist Adam Grant knows that you spend a quarter of your life at work -- in this show, he talks to some of the world's most unusual professionals to discover how to enjoy it. From breaking down "The Great Resignation" to identifying the work culture that's right for you, this season is packed with actionable insights to help you make work not suck. Listen wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe to the TED Audio Collective on youtube.com/tedaudiocollective
10/04/223m 23s

The rhythm and rhyme of memory, solitude and community | Rosanne Cash

"Music can unlock a frozen memory that melts into the seeds of our creativity," says musician Rosanne Cash. Reflecting on the power of memory, solitude and community, she performs "The Sunken Lands" and "Particle And Wave" and meditates on some of life's most poignant and bittersweet themes.
08/04/2211m 58s

NFTs, the metaverse and the future of digital art | Elizabeth Strickler

In need of a brief yet illuminating lesson on the obsession with NFTs? Elizabeth Strickler breaks down the acronym and explains the fundamentals of non-fungible tokens, sharing how these digital assets are changing the landscape for artists and content creators looking to cash in on their creations -- in and out of the metaverse.
07/04/220s

5 promising factors propelling climate action | Gabriel Kra

Given the scale of the challenge, the conversation around climate change is often tinged with doom and gloom. But climate tech investor Gabriel Kra thinks we need to reframe the crisis as a source of tremendous opportunity. He offers five big reasons to be optimistic about climate -- starting with the fact that many of the world's best minds are focused and working on building a clean future for all.
06/04/2211m 26s

The deep sea's medicinal secrets | Sam Afoullouss

Under the sea, untold wonders await in the form of untapped medicinal potential. Chemist Sam Afoullouss dives into the science behind natural remedies, explaining why the ocean's great (and still largely unexplored) biodiversity is ideal for deriving and inspiring future treatments -- if we protect its waters and the marine life within them.
05/04/220s

Live drawings of the human experience | Jarrett J. Krosoczka

In this live drawing performance and poignant autobiographical journey, author and illustrator Jarrett J. Krosoczka sketches some life-shaping moments, showing us how drawing and storytelling can help us honor and remain close to those we've lost.
04/04/229m 21s

What it's like to be a war refugee | Zarlasht Halaimzai

Living under the constant threat of violence has a lasting effect -- even after you escape from danger, says writer and refugee advocate Zarlasht Halaimzai. One of the millions of people worldwide who have been forcibly displaced by conflict, Halaimzai now helps others overcome the devastation of war. In this poignant, vital talk, she articulates the lingering trauma of being expendable -- and shares how belonging to a community can help bring back feelings of long-lost safety.
02/04/2213m 17s

The 100 tampons NASA (almost) sent to space -- and other absurd songs | Marcia Belsky

Performing two original songs, stand-up comedian, writer and musician Marcia Belsky shares comical commentary on some peculiar aspects of our culture -- from Instagram-stalking your crush to fending off mansplainers on social media -- and lampoons NASA's notorious decision to provide astronaut Sally Ride with an egregious supply of tampons for her six-day trip to space in 1983.
01/04/2212m 58s

What my gender transition taught me about womanhood | Paula Stone Williams

After leading a well-established life as a pastor, father and husband, Paula Stone Williams could no longer deny her truth and transitioned. In this conversational and at times humorous reflection, Williams offers her perspective on the everyday experiences lost, gained and once taken for granted in her journey of trans womanhood.
31/03/220s

How webtoons are changing movies and TV | Hyeonmi Kim

Pop culture is changing thanks to a different kind of storytelling, says digital strategist Hyeonmi Kim. They're called webtoons: comic-like illustrations published in short segments and meant to be read on a smartphone in five to 10 minutes. Kim breaks down how webtoons have leapt from phones to the big screen (Netflix's "Hellbound," anyone?) and how they're bringing a new, diverse generation of creators into TV and movie scriptwriting.
30/03/228m 12s

3 ways to find hope in hopeless times | Wajahat Ali

It can be hard to remain hopeful during seemingly hopeless times. Sharing hard-won wisdom on how to not give up when the going gets tough, writer Wajahat Ali talks about the challenges he faced with his daughter's cancer diagnosis and the COVID-19 pandemic, detailing three actionable things we can all do to find the silver linings in our lives -- and invest in hope where we can. (This talk and conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
29/03/2216m 40s

Goats, blockchain and the future of money | Fariel Salahuddin

What if smallholder farmers could use their produce and livestock to pay for goods and services? TED Fellow and alternative currency enthusiast Fariel Salahuddin is working to make this a reality in places including rural Pakistan, where basic necessities like water and electricity are often expensive or inaccessible. She explores how the way we exchange value has evolved over time -- from bartering to blockchain -- and shares a new perspective on currency that promotes self-reliance for farmers and creates a more inclusive economy.
28/03/229m 10s

How science fiction can shape our reality | Your Undivided Attention

The meta-crisis is so vast: climate change, exponential technology, addiction, polarization and more. How do we grasp it, let alone take steps to address it? One of the thinking tools we have at our disposal is science fiction. To the extent that we co-evolve with our stories, science fiction can prepare us for the impending future -- and empower us to shape it. On this episode on Your Undivided Attention, a podcast from the TED Audio Collective, we're thrilled to have one of the greatest living science-fiction writers: Kim Stanley Robinson. His most recent novel is "The Ministry for the Future," a sweeping epic that reaches into the very near future and imagines what it would take to unite humanity and avoid a mass extinction. Whether or not you've read the book, this episode has insights for you. And if this episode makes you want to read the book, our conversation won't spoil it. Listen to more podcasts from TED at youtube.com/tedaudiocollective.
27/03/2228m 1s

The creativity and community behind fanfiction | Cecilia Aragon

The wildly diverse, thoughtful and hilarious world of fanfiction -- where writers reimagine favorite stories like "Harry Potter," "Pokémon," "My Little Pony" and more -- is ever-growing and becoming a vital social and learning tool. Author, professor and fanfiction writer Cecilia Aragon has observed how this incredible outlet for creativity encourages and empowers young people to embrace their imagination. Detailing her research into the vast online fanfiction community, Aragon shares its potential to foster a sense of belonging, strengthen writing skills and shape the future of literature.
26/03/2214m 52s

Why all melodies should be free for musicians to use | Damien Riehl

Evoke a familiar tune in a song and get slapped with a lawsuit ... it's a tale almost as old as copyright itself. Lawyer and technologist Damien Riehl digs into why "owning" a melody is a ludicrous legal assertion and composes a radical solution for the musical woes of songwriters everywhere.
25/03/220s

The African swamp protecting Earth's environment | Vera Songwe

The peatlands of Africa's Congo Basin are a vast expanse of swamp and greenery that act as one of the world's most effective carbon sinks -- and they're under threat of environmental destruction. Economist Vera Songwe explains how putting a price on the carbon stored in the peatlands would not only help protect this vital resource but also recognize and reward the African communities that have contributed little to climate change. "This is not just about decarbonization," Songwe says. "This is also about development with dignity."
24/03/226m 52s

The future will be shaped by optimists | Kevin Kelly

"Every great and difficult thing has required a strong sense of optimism," says editor and author Kevin Kelly, who believes that we have a moral obligation to be optimistic. Tracing humanity's progress throughout history, he's observed that a positive outlook helps us solve problems and empowers us to forge a path forward. In this illuminating talk, he shares three reasons for optimism during challenging times, explaining how it can help us become better ancestors and create the world we want to see for ourselves and future generations.
23/03/229m 48s

The hidden power of sad songs and rainy days | Susan Cain and Min Kym

Have you ever wondered why you like sad music? Do you find comfort or inspiration in rainy days? In this profound, poetic talk, author Susan Cain invites you to embrace the feeling of longing -- or the place where joy and sorrow meet – as a gateway to creativity, connection and love. Accompanied by the splendid sounds of violinist Min Kym, Cain meditates on how heartache unexpectedly brings us closer to the sublime beauty of life.
22/03/2216m 4s

Powerful photos that honor the lives of overlooked women | Smita Sharma

In some parts of the world, girls are as likely to be married off or trafficked as they are to be educated. Photojournalist and TED Fellow Smita Sharma thoughtfully depicts overlooked girls and young women, while making sure not to disrupt the lives of her subjects in the process. Her work shows what might otherwise remain hidden -- the first step to changing the story.
21/03/2210m 11s

The counterintuitive psychology of insurance | Orit Tykocinski

The real reason you buy insurance may have as much to do with pleasing your psyche as it does protecting your wallet. Behavioral psychologist Orit Tykocinski explores the connection between insurance and the reality-distorting risks of "magical thinking" that may make you reconsider your own rationale.
19/03/220s

Why entrepreneurship flourishes in the countryside | Xiaowei R. Wang

"To see and understand the countryside is a crucial part of moving towards a more livable future for everyone," says coder, artist and organizer Xiaowei R. Wang. They've observed that some of the most careful, thoughtful innovation is happening in the world's rural communities, like Chinese chicken farmers using biometrics tracking and blockchain to improve supply chain transparency. In this talk, they advocate for a new perspective on the countryside: not as places lacking in tech or digital media literacy but as centers of humble innovation that emphasize community and sustainability.
18/03/228m 11s

The power of purpose in business | Ashley M. Grice

What's a company's purpose? It's not the same as mission or vision, which change when leadership changes. Strategist Ashley M. Grice explains the power of purpose to push boundaries of innovation and bring clarity to every aspect of an organization, from the top floor to the shop floor.
17/03/229m 36s

Climate change isn't a distant threat -- it's our reality | Selina Neirok Leem

Every year, ocean levels rise and high tides flood the low-lying Marshall Islands in the Pacific, destroying homes, salinating water supplies and disrupting livelihoods. In a stirring poem and talk, youth climate warrior Selina Neirok Leem explains why adaptation using Indigenous solutions is the only choice for people on the front lines of climate change. "These islands are our ancestors, our predecessors, our homes," Leem says. "We are at the risk of losing all of that for something we contributed very little to."
16/03/226m 6s

3 things men can do to promote gender equity | Jimmie Briggs

"It is time for a gender reckoning, beginning with men authentically confronting our internal selves and each other," says essayist and intersectional justice advocate Jimmie Briggs. In this call to action for gender equity, he unpacks how traditional notions of masculinity harm society and offers three ways men can help promote personal safety, dignity and empowerment for all.
15/03/229m 11s

Self-assembling robots and the potential of artificial evolution | Emma Hart

What if robots could build and optimize themselves -- with little to no help from humans? Computer scientist Emma Hart is working on a new technology that could make "artificial evolution" possible. She explains how the three ingredients of biological evolution can be replicated digitally to build robots that can self-assemble and adapt to any environment -- from the rocky terrain of other planets to the darkest depths of the ocean -- potentially ushering in a new generation of exploration.
14/03/2210m 6s

How to design mosquitoes out of cities | Cameron Webb

As cities adopt greener, more sustainable designs, there's risk of a dangerous and unwelcome tenant moving in: mosquitoes. Researcher Cameron Webb explains what urban planners and the general public need to understand about mosquitoes -- the deadliest animals on the planet -- in order to avoid future outbreaks of disease carried by these pesky insects.
12/03/220s

War in Ukraine -- and what it means for the world order | Ian Bremmer

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has created previously unthinkable changes in geopolitics, seemingly overnight. In this vital conversation, political analyst Ian Bremmer takes a closer look at the global implications of the war, including NATO and the EU's renewed sense of purpose, the spiral of escalation, energy politics and the significant, potentially permanent shifts in the world order. (This talk and conversation, hosted by TED global curator Bruno Giussani, was part of a TED Membership event on March 10, 2022. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
11/03/2249m 9s

The critical role of Black mothers -- and how to support all moms | Anna Malaika Tubbs

Throughout US history, the stories of influential Black mothers have been purposefully obscured -- at a high cost to us all. Sociologist Anna Malaika Tubbs unmasks the lies and designs behind this strategic erasure and highlights the scientific, cultural and historical contributions of Black mothers. Listen in as she details how we can change the narrative to move forward. (This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
10/03/2221m 33s

How to share public money fairly | Maja Bosnic

"We have the right to demand budgets to be equitable, to be fair," says economist Maja Bosnic. One way to get there is to make them gender-responsive. With examples from the nearly 80 countries around the world already factoring gender into public finance decisions, she shares how budgets that actively account for gender don't just lead to equality -- they're also more efficient and effective.
09/03/2212m 4s

"A seat at the table" isn't the solution for gender equity | Lilly Singh

Women and girls are conditioned to believe success is "a seat at the table." Creator, actress and author Lilly Singh thinks we need to build a better table. In this hilarious, incisive talk, Singh traces the arc of her career from up-and-coming YouTuber to history-making late-night talk show host, offering four ways to build a more inclusive society where girls are encouraged and empowered to do great things.
08/03/2219m 55s

3 ways your company's data can jump-start climate action | Massimo Russo

From helping build smart cities to supporting the sustainable energy sector, the possibilities of big data are endless. But many companies are still wary of sharing data that could expose them to risk and diminish their competitive advantage. What if uniting towards a common goal could help them overcome these fears? Data cooperation expert Massimo Russo shares three ways to jump-start a virtuous cycle of data sharing -- and how it can lead to better climate change solutions.
07/03/229m 25s

A next-generation solution to the climate crisis | Nkosilathi Nyathi

The climate crisis has been largely caused by irresponsible adults in developed countries, but it's the children of developing nations -- like Zimbabwean environmental activist Nkosilathi Nyathi -- that suffer from the most disastrous consequences. In a world where climate catastrophe feels almost unstoppable, we must involve everyone in finding solutions -- especially young people, who have the most at stake. "My generation has more to offer than ever before," Nyathi says. "We live climate change in a way our parents' generation did not."
05/03/227m 8s

Why US laws must expand beyond the nuclear family | Diana Adams

The nuclear family model may no longer be the norm in the US, but it's still the basis for social and economic benefits like health care, tax breaks and citizenship. Lawyer and LBGTQIA advocate Diana Adams believes that all families, regardless of biological relationship or legal marriage, are deserving of equal legal rights and recognition. They present a vision for how US laws can benefit all families -- from same-sex bonds to multi-parent partnerships -- and explain how a more inclusive definition of family could strengthen your relationships and community.
04/03/2218m 8s

What seaweed and cow burps have to do with climate change | Ermias Kebreab

Scientists have long known that cows are a huge source of the greenhouse gas methane, contributing up to four percent of emissions globally. But could there be a way to make cattle less -- ahem -- gassy? Animal scientist Ermias Kebreab talks through an ingenious solution to reduce methane-rich cow burps by feeding cattle something growing below the surface of the ocean: seaweed.
03/03/229m 1s

The war in Ukraine could change everything | Yuval Noah Harari

Concerned about the war Ukraine? You're not alone. Historian Yuval Noah Harari provides important context on the Russian invasion, including Ukraine's long history of resistance, the specter of nuclear war and his view of why, even if Putin wins all the military battles, he's already lost the war. (This conversation, hosted by TED global curator Bruno Giussani, was part of a TED Membership event on March 1, 2022. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
02/03/2249m 33s

My secret to creating real magic | Christina Tosi

In an infectiously joyous talk, Milk Bar founder Christina Tosi shares the sugary jolt of her first food memory and behind-the-scenes stories of her bakery's famously inventive cakes, cookies and treats. This talk may make you hungry -- but it'll also leave you a resonant message about how breaking the rules and challenging your assumptions can make for a sweet life.
01/03/2213m 14s

The carbonless fuel that could change how we ship goods | Maria Gallucci

Every day, tens of thousands of cargo ships, filled to the brim with goods, release heavy pollution into the air as they make their way across the ocean. In this eye-opening talk, reporter Maria Gallucci introduces a planet-friendly alternative that could fuel these globe-trotting vessels: green ammonia. Listen as she makes the case for this game-changing solution that has the potential to clean up the world's dirtiest ships.
28/02/227m 19s

Salvation | Conversations with People Who Hate Me

A young trans man and his mother speak about her struggle to accept his gender identity. Listen and subscribe to Conversations with People Who Hate Me, and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective, at audiocollective.ted.com.
27/02/221h 6m

Are ad agencies, PR firms and lobbyists destroying the climate? | Solitaire Townsend

An unnoticed industry worth two trillion dollars a year is influencing almost every carbon emission. Sustainability solution seeker Solitaire Townsend calls this sector the "X industry" (where "X" stands for influence), and it includes professional services like advertising and PR firms, management consultancies, corporate law firms, lobbyists and more. In this eye-opening talk, she exposes the industry's massive but largely invisible influence on the environment -- and proposes ways they can use their creativity, inventiveness and knowledge to fix climate change instead of contributing to it.
23/02/229m 36s

The "greenhouse-in-a-box" empowering farmers in India | Sathya Raghu Mokkapati

For smallholder farmers in India, agriculture has long been an unreliable source of income -- crops that flourish one season can fail the next, thanks to heat, pests and disease. But climate risk is now making the profession nearly impossible. TED Fellow Sathya Raghu Mokkapati is determined to change that with "greenhouse-in-a-box": a small, low-cost, easy-to-build structure aimed at helping farmers weather sizzling summers, increase monthly revenues and grow more food with less water.
22/02/226m 27s

What you can do to prevent Alzheimer's | Lisa Genova

Alzheimer's doesn't have to be your brain's destiny, says neuroscientist and author of "Still Alice," Lisa Genova. She shares the latest science investigating the disease -- and some promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer's-resistant brain. TED Talks Daily listeners get a special treat after the talk: a catch-up interview with Lisa Genova on the exciting new developments in this field. And to make sure you never miss an episode, subscribe to TED Talks Daily on your favorite podcast platform.
21/02/2213m 56s

A playful approach to creating music | TED Radio Hour

As kids, play comes naturally. But over time, it gets replaced by work. This hour, TED speakers explore how to reconnect with play -- to spark creativity, combat despair and find our way in the world. In this segment, host Manoush Zomorodi talks to Grammy winner Jacob Collier, who makes a case for why we should emphasize play, passion and curiosity over practice. This is part of a three-part series on Work, Play and Rest. To listen to the whole episode and check out the series, find TED Radio Hour on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.
20/02/2218m 41s

Climate action needs new frontline leadership | Ozawa Bineshi Albert

We can't rely on those who created climate change to fix it, says climate justice organizer Ozawa Bineshi Albert. An Indigenous woman living in the heart of oil and gas country in the US, she's observed an alarming disconnect between empty promises made by corporations and the actual needs of communities on the ground. In this call for urgency and a shift in values, she advocates for climate policy to center frontline leaders and outlines some grassroots-led projects -- from water protection efforts in Minnesota to off-grid solar power in Arizona -- that have already sparked real change.
18/02/2213m 54s

Why play is essential for business | Martin Reeves

To thrive in today's competitive economy, you need to constantly reimagine your business. So what's the secret to sustained success? Strategist Martin Reeves makes a pitch for embracing play to spark innovative business ideas -- and invites you to try out a series of imagination games that he uses to get leaders to stretch their thinking and dream up new possibilities.
17/02/2211m 5s

Why is China appointing judges to combat climate change? | James K. Thornton

Why is China appointing thousands of judges to environmental courts and training prosecutors to bring cases to them, even if it means suing the government? Eco-lawyer James Thornton takes us inside the country's growing effort to use the power of the courts to address environmental problems -- a little-known story that indicates China could become a champion of legal action on climate.
16/02/2211m 35s

The tragedy of air pollution -- and an urgent demand for clean air | Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah

"Breathing clean air is every child's human right," says grassroots campaigner Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, sharing the heartbreaking story of her seven-year-old daughter, Ella Roberta, whose asthma was triggered to a fatal point by air pollution. Now, Adoo-Kissi-Debrah is on a mission to raise awareness about the harmful effects of unsafe air on our health and the planet. In this moving talk, she details why governments have an urgent responsibility to take action on air pollution -- and ensure that all children have a chance to live full and healthy lives.
15/02/228m 3s

You deserve the right to repair your stuff | Gay Gordon-Byrne

A self-declared "repair geek," Gay Gordon-Byrne is a driving force behind the right-to-repair movement, which aims to empower people to fix their stuff. She describes how the movement is gaining legislative momentum and breaks down how the global shift away from "throwaway society" can literally turn trash into treasure in a circular economy -- so we can all experience that "Yes! I fixed it!" feeling.
14/02/2210m 20s

The evolution of marriage with Esther Perel | Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Debbie Millman talks to therapist and author Esther Perel about marriage, polyamory and adultery. Listen and subscribe to Design Matters with Debbie Millman and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
13/02/2235m 24s

How film captures the space between hope and despair | Mounia Akl

When Lebanon was rocked by a massive explosion at the port of Beirut, filmmaker Mounia Akl came face-to-face with chaos -- and the power of art to create some sense of order. In this poetic, moving talk, Akl shares the story of how she and her crew finished their film as the city recovered from disaster, discovering the truth that comes out of us in times of crisis and creating a new understanding of home in the process.
11/02/2212m 31s

4 kinds of regret -- and what they teach you about yourself | Daniel H. Pink

Regret is one of our most powerful emotions -- and also one of the most misunderstood. Over the past two years, author Daniel H. Pink has collected a trove of more than 16,000 regrets from people in 105 countries in an effort to better understand this mysterious emotion. He shares the key patterns that emerged (it all boils down to the same four core regrets, he says) and explains how to transform your own regrets in order to create the life you've always wanted to live. (This talk and conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
10/02/2222m 59s

How to fix the "bugs" in the net-zero code | Lucas Joppa

Lucas Joppa, Microsoft's first chief environmental officer, thinks about climate change through the lens of coding, and he says the world's current net-zero approach simply won't compute. So how do we create a system that actually accounts for all the world's carbon emissions -- and helps us get to zero (as in zero additional carbon added to the atmosphere by 2050)? Joppa shares three "bugs" in our current net-zero code, a four-point plan for fixing them – and how logic can help us change the current course of climate change.
09/02/2210m 26s

The ocean's ingenious climate solutions | Susan Ruffo

The ocean is often thought of as a victim of climate change, in need of human protection. But ocean expert Susan Ruffo says that mindset needs to shift. From storing carbon to providing protection to coastal communities, Ruffo highlights the ocean's ready-made solutions to the climate crisis and asks: With more than eighty percent of the ocean still unexplored, what new solutions are waiting to be discovered?
08/02/228m 47s

The origins of blackface and Black stereotypes | Dwan Reece

If you're wondering why blackface -- mimicking people of African descent via stereotypes and makeup-darkened skin -- is a big deal, then perhaps a little history lesson can help demystify the outcry. Dwan Reece, curator at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, explains how this practice permeates the American psyche and culture (in theater, music, books and beyond) and why it's not simply harmless fun, but a legacy of oppression.
07/02/220s

Got millet? How marketing could improve the lives of African farmers | Zoë Karl-Waithaka

From "got milk?" to "avocados from Mexico," marketing influences what you eat more than you may realize. But despite the known power of food marketing, farmers in Africa are more likely to receive funding for seed and fertilizer than they are for advertising geniuses. Agricultural development expert Zoë Karl-Waithaka outlines three ways industry, governments, NGOs and others can help African farmers improve their livelihoods -- and positively impact society, the economy and the environment.
04/02/2210m 53s

How wind energy could power Earth ... 18 times over | Dan Jørgensen

Over the last two decades, the wind power industry has grown at a dizzying pace. (Fun fact: a single rotation from one of the world's most powerful wind turbines can generate enough electricity to charge more than 1,400 cell phones.) Building off this exponential growth, Denmark's climate minister Dan Jørgensen lays out his plan to end the country's oil industry by 2050 and transition to a fossil-free future powered by wind energy.
03/02/2210m 49s

How to fix two of the most broken systems in the US | Nick Turner and Whitney Pennington Rodgers

In an engaging, insightful conversation, criminal justice reformer Nick Turner breaks down the ways the US criminal legal system perpetuates centuries-old racial and economic inequality. He joins TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers to outline why the best way to actually deliver justice and safety is to shrink the system and recognize the humanity of those caught in it.
02/02/2216m 12s

Sex education should start with consent | Kaz

Consent can be a tricky topic to talk about in sex education curriculums, but it doesn't have to be. In this hilarious and relatable talk, sex educator and TED Fellow Kaz offers a fresh look at teaching young people about the core principles of consent -- and shows how demystifying this topic leads to healthier and more satisfying relationships for people of all ages.
01/02/2210m 27s

Sustainable cooling that doesn't warm the planet | Rachel Kyte

"The way we cool things down is heating the planet even more," says sustainable development expert Rachel Kyte -- and the solutions go well beyond just fixing air-conditioning. She identifies four major areas with transformative solutions -- from roofs painted with bright white paint to solar control glass to more efficient cold chains for vaccines -- that can be implemented in fair and sustainable ways. Learn more about what a community designed for cool could look like.
31/01/2210m 20s

The mind-bending art of deep time | Katie Paterson

Short-sightedness may be the greatest threat to humanity, says conceptual artist Katie Paterson, whose work engages with deep time -- an idea that describes the history of the Earth over a time span of millions of years. In this lively talk, she takes us through her art -- a telephone line connected to a melting glacier, maps of dying stars – and presents her latest project: the Future Library, a forested room holding unread manuscripts from famous authors, not to be published or read until the year 2114.
28/01/226m 26s

A different understanding of American patriotism | Deval Patrick

American democracy cannot be great until it is good, says lawyer, Harvard professor and former governor of Massachusetts Deval Patrick. A self-identified patriot, Patrick stands behind the fundamental values and civic ideals that he believes make the US unique -- and outlines how the country has strayed from those same edicts. Calling for a collective patriotism free from cynicism and fatalism, Patrick underlines the urgency to reset national aspirations in order to save democracy.
27/01/2215m 28s

4 ways to redefine power at work to include women of color | Rha Goddess and Deepa Purushothaman

With many women of color considering exiting the workforce due to unfair conditions, it's time to reshape systems in order to put an end to this massive loss of talent. Exposing the harmful repercussions of racist, toxic organizational cultures, soul coach Rha Goddess and corporate inclusion visionary Deepa Purushothaman share four pathways to reimagine work so women of color are centered as leaders. Instead of aspiring to a "seat at the table", they urge us to remake the whole table -- and stop fighting for "one broke-ass chair."
26/01/2212m 59s

The new reality of fashion is digital | Gala Marija Vrbanic

Picking an outfit? Take inspiration from this thrilling talk about digital fashion: the new, weird and wonderful world of fashion designed for our virtual worlds. Watch as Gala Marija Vrbanic, a leader in this emerging field, showcases what you could wear across your digital channels -- be it TikTok, Instagram or in the metaverse -- and shares how it could infinitely expand the creative possibilities of fashion, identity and self-expression.
25/01/224m 41s

Could we treat Alzheimer's with light and sound? | Li-Huei Tsai

What if we could use brain waves to treat Alzheimer's? Professor and neuroscientist Li-Huei Tsai details a promising new approach to artificially stimulate gamma brain waves using light and sound therapy, to increase connectivity and synchrony and delay the onset of this deadly disease. This non-invasive therapy has already been shown to work in mice -- now it's on to human clinical trials, with the potential to usher in a brighter future for everyone. (Followed by a Q&A with head of TED Chris Anderson)
24/01/2212m 43s

Nick Offerman | Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Reflecting on his remarkable life and career, Nick Offerman (best known for his iconic portrayal of Ron Swanson on "Parks and Recreation") shares his insights on acting, marriage and the current state of the world. This is an episode of Design Matters with Debbie Millman, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. Every week, Debbie has a conversation with an incredibly creative person about how they design the arc of their life. If you enjoy the episode, follow the podcast wherever you listen.
23/01/221h 3m

How to fix broken supply chains | Dustin Burke

Supply chain challenges are real, but they're not new, says global trade expert Dustin Burke. In the face of disruptions ranging from natural disasters to pandemics, how do we make sure supply chains can keep up? Burke offers a combination of solutions -- from companies sharing risk to better forecasting disruptions -- to help create a more resilient, efficient tomorrow.
22/01/2210m 59s

What if women built the world they want to see? | Emily Pilloton-Lam

Only four percent of construction workers are female -- that's totally unacceptable, but it's also a huge opportunity both for women and for the trades, says youth educator and builder Emily Pilloton-Lam. She makes the case for putting power (and power tools) into the hands of young women and gender-expansive youth, dreaming of inclusive construction sites and daring to ask: What if women built the world they want to see? (Plus, Pilloton-Lam dazzles with a live demo of her own woodworking skills ... while giving the talk.)
21/01/2212m 51s

What you need to know about carbon removal | Gabrielle Walker

What do woolly pigs have to do with climate change? They're part of a vital, ingenious and evolving strategy to take carbon out of the sky and store it safely -- in trees, soils, the ocean, buildings, rocks and deep underground. Every carbon removal approach takes some combination of natural resources, human ingenuity and technology, says climate thinker Gabrielle Walker. If we get the mix right, we can clean up the environmental mess we've made, reverse the processes behind climate change and give nature a chance to heal. "What goes up must now come down," she says.
20/01/2211m 16s

How radical hospitality can change the lives of the formerly incarcerated | Reuben Jonathan Miller

For the nearly 20 million Americans with a felony record, punishment doesn't end after their prison sentence. Sociologist Reuben Jonathan Miller sheds light on the aftershocks of mass incarceration through the stories of people who've lived it, left it and still have to grapple with punishing policies after their release. A challenge to rethink the criminal justice system in the US -- and make a place in society for all people, even those who've done harm.
19/01/2218m 0s

The unexpected, underwater plant fighting climate change | Carlos M. Duarte

Once considered the ugly duckling of environmental conservation, seagrass is emerging as a powerful tool for climate action. From drawing down carbon to filtering plastic pollution, marine scientist Carlos M. Duarte details the incredible things this oceanic hero does for our planet -- and shows ingenious ways he and his team are protecting and rebuilding marine life.
18/01/2211m 58s

How moms shape the world | Anna Malaika Tubbs

Mothers undeniably impact and shape history -- but their stories are often left out or misrepresented, says sociologist and author Anna Malaika Tubbs. This erasure limits policies to support mothers and their essential roles in society. Citing the remarkable lives of Alberta King, Louise Little and Berdis Baldwin (the mothers of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin, respectively), Tubbs emphasizes the need to shift the perspective on motherhood at a cultural level -- to better reflect the presence, power and influence of moms as our first leaders, caretakers and teachers. "Would the world be different today if we had been telling their stories all along?" she asks.
17/01/2212m 21s

How to break down barriers and not accept limits | Candace Parker

What can't Candace Parker do? A two-time NCAA champion, two-time Olympic gold medalist and two-time WNBA champion, Parker knows what it takes to fight for your dreams. In this inspiring talk, she shares what she's learned during a career spent not accepting limits -- and how her daughter taught her the best lesson of all. "Barrier breaking is about not staying in your lane and not being something that the world expects you to be," she says. "It's about not accepting limitations."
14/01/2211m 16s

Why great leaders take humor seriously | Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas

There's a mistaken belief in today's working world that leaders need to be serious all the time to be taken seriously. The research tells a different story. Based on the course they teach at Stanford's Graduate School of Business, behavioral scientist Jennifer Aaker and corporate strategist Naomi Bagdonas delve into the surprising power of humor: why it's a secret weapon to build bonds, power, creativity and resilience -- and how we can all have more of it.
13/01/2210m 8s

How visual storytelling creates better health care | Sam Hester

Comics creator Sam Hester is part of a growing movement within health care: graphic medicine. In short, literally drawing attention to a patient's needs and goals with pictures to foster better and more accessible caretaking. Hester shares how illustrating small details of her mother's medical story as she struggled with mysterious symptoms alongside her Parkinson's and dementia led to more empathy, understanding, communication and peace of mind.
12/01/2210m 15s

How to realistically decarbonize the oil and gas industry | Bjørn Otto Sverdrup

Bjørn Otto Sverdrup leads the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which gathers the CEOs of twelve of the world's largest oil and gas companies around an ambitious goal: to get one of the sectors contributing most to climate change to drastically lower their own carbon emissions. He describes a possible path for the industry to pivot to net-zero operations, reimagining the role it could play in helping decarbonize the economy and changing how we consume energy -- and he calls for setting a price on carbon. (Followed by a Q&A with Countdown cofounder Lindsay Levin)
11/01/2213m 39s

How biochar removes CO2 from the air -- and helps farmers thrive | Axel Reinaud

Biochar is a kind of charcoal that removes CO2 from the atmosphere, helping yield healthy crops and even producing abundant renewable energy in the form of electricity as it's made. This exciting climate change fighter is ready for scaling now. Entrepreneur Axel Reinaud outlines three ways to make this material more accessible to farmers -- so that our food system, energy grid and the climate can all reap the benefits.
10/01/2211m 27s

The architectural mastermind behind modern Singapore | Liu Thai Ker

Cities designed like families can last for generations. Skeptical? Look to master architect Liu Thai Ker, who transformed Singapore into a modern marvel with his unique approach to sustainable urban design. Liu shares creative wisdom and perspective on how marrying a humanist heart, a scientific mind and an artistic eye creates a resilient marriage of form and function. A talk that both humbles and inspires.
08/01/2215m 16s

The creativity, innovation and ingenuity languishing in US prisons | Brittany K. Barnett

The freedom journey doesn't end when someone is released from prison. In many ways, it begins. Attorney and entrepreneur Brittany K. Barnett fights to free people from prison and champions restoring and nurturing the creative ingenuity of justice-impacted people. She shares stories of the innovation languishing in America's prisons -- and a vision for investing in people whose unjust sentences interrupted their dreams to bring great things to the world.
07/01/2212m 41s

What makes a job "good" -- and the case for investing in people | Warren Valdmanis

Businesses need to stop cutting labor costs and start investing in people, says social impact investor Warren Valdmanis. In this perspective-shifting talk, he breaks down the essential ingredients of a "good" job -- which is more than just the size of a paycheck -- and shares why they're key to building great companies.
06/01/2211m 22s

Language shouldn't be a barrier to climate action | Sophia Kianni

Most scientific literature is written only in English, creating an alarming knowledge gap for the 75 percent of the world who don't speak it. That's a big problem for climate change -- because it's hard to take action on something you don't understand. With Climate Cardinals, an international youth-led nonprofit that's working to make the climate movement more accessible, activist and social entrepreneur Sophia Kianni is furthering the global transfer of knowledge by translating and sourcing crucial climate resources into more than 100 languages. A barrier-breaking talk about the collective effort we'll need to protect the future of our planet.
05/01/226m 42s

How to protect your mental well-being online -- from a Gen-Zer | Peachy Liv

Whether you have one follower or a million, we've all witnessed nastiness and hate speech on social media. YouTube content creator and mental well-being motivator Peachy Liv advocates for a kinder, more respectful digital world -- and urges us all to reflect before we share our thoughts online. Hear her tips for dealing with cyberbullying and personal insights on how we can all make the internet a safer place.
04/01/229m 49s

Do you need to do a detox? | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

Put down the cayenne-lemon water, and step away from the "diet" teas, says Dr. Jen Gunter. She's joined by a hepatologist who explains why these cleanses and "natural" detoxes can do more harm to your body (and bank account) than good, and shares what you can do to keep your body's natural detox system running smoothly. Thanks to Dr. Kaveh Hoda and Dr. Alan Levinovitz for sharing their insights on this episode.
03/01/2232m 8s

How every child can thrive by five | Molly Wright

"What if I was to tell you that a game of peek-a-boo could change the world?" asks seven-year-old Molly Wright, one of the youngest-ever TED speakers. Breaking down the research-backed ways parents and caregivers can support children's healthy brain development, Wright highlights the benefits of play on lifelong learning, behavior and well-being, sharing effective strategies to help all kids thrive by the age of five. She's joined onstage by one-year-old Ari and his dad, Amarjot, who help illustrate her big ideas about brain science. (This TED Talk was produced in collaboration with Minderoo Foundation as an educational tool for parents and caregivers around the world and is supported by UNICEF.)
01/01/227m 38s

The life-changing power of assistive technologies | Jane Velkovski

"This chair is my legs -- this chair is my life," says accessibility champion Jane Velkovski, who uses a wheelchair after being diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). With clarity and poise, he shares how his first motorized wheelchair empowered him with independence and ability -- and why assistive technology should be available to anyone who needs it. "Freedom of movement, no matter on legs or on wheels, is a human right," he says.
31/12/2112m 44s

A bold plan to protect 30 percent of the Earth's surface and ocean floor | Enric Sala

As a diver in the 1970s, marine ecologist Enric Sala saw once-lush oceanscapes reduced to underwater deserts -- but later, in marine preserves across the globe, he also witnessed the ocean's power to rejuvenate itself when left to its own natural devices. Could rewilding the planet help us restore biodiversity and reduce the impacts of climate change? Sala presents the 30x30 initiative: a global plan to protect 30 percent of the Earth's surface and the ocean floor by 2030.
30/12/219m 21s

A king cobra bite -- and a scientific discovery | Gowri Shankar

A king cobra has enough venom to kill 10 people in a single bite. Recounting his near-death experience after being bitten by one of these majestic yet deadly snakes, conservationist and TED Fellow Gowri Shankar shares the epiphany he had when the antivenom failed: there's more than one unique species of king cobra.
29/12/215m 53s

The need for family reunification -- to make families whole again | Elizabeth Zion

"I want all families to be made whole, to be reunified, to be together -- as is our right," says writer, poet and student Elizabeth Zion. In this profoundly moving talk, Zion shares the impacts of family separation, including her personal struggles with homelessness and poverty -- and points a way toward moral and just policies that recognize the human rights of migrant families.
28/12/2111m 40s

The many reasons to eat a plant-based diet | Derek Sarno

Vegan chef (and head chef of TED Countdown Summit) Derek Sarno is on a mission to unleash the mighty power of plants, creating nutritious food from mushrooms and vegetables that's full of texture and flavor -- and good for the planet. He dishes out some creative cooking inspiration and shares how his personal journey led him to create amazing food that avoids animal suffering.
27/12/214m 22s

"Being Human" | Naima Penniman

In this stunning spoken-word performance, poet and "freedom-forging futurist" Naima Penniman celebrates the wonders of the natural world and humanity's connection to it. "I wonder if the sun debates dawn some mornings," she says.
24/12/214m 11s

Why a free and fair internet is more vital than ever | Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa

Without the internet, how would you have coped with the pandemic -- from work and school, to maintaining your closest relationships? In the digital age, reliance on the internet is so common and seems ubiquitous, yet billions of people worldwide still go without it. Digital transformation strategist Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa advocates for collective access to the opportunities and potential the internet provides, underscoring the necessity of free and fair digital rights for all.
23/12/219m 19s

Dreams and details for a decarbonized future | Jim Hagemann Snabe

As chairman of the world's largest maritime shipping company, Jim Hagemann Snabe thinks a lot about how goods get where they need to go and the impact their journey has on the planet. Leading the effort to decarbonize shipping by 2050, he shares a plan to convert green electricity into green liquid fuel to power vessels in a process called "power-to-X" -- and urges global leaders to join the voyage towards an innovative, sustainable and fast-approaching future.
22/12/2111m 42s

How to escape the cynicism trap | Jamil Zaki

Some days, it's hard to be optimistic. But cynicism -- the idea that people are inherently selfish, greedy and dishonest -- is making humanity lonelier and more divided, says psychologist Jamil Zaki. Presenting fascinating research on cooperation, empathy and trust, Zaki makes the scientific case for optimism and shows us how to break out of the cynicism trap.
21/12/2112m 40s

Use your voice, vote and wallet for climate action | Halla Tómasdóttir

Recently back from the COP26 UN climate conference in Scotland, former Icelandic presidential candidate Halla Tómasdóttir sums up the outcomes of the gathering, the progress she saw and the work that's left to be done this way: "The most difficult work of our lifetimes has to happen in the next few years." In conversation with TEDWomen curator Pat Mitchell, Tómasdóttir urges us all to recognize our power and to use our voice, vote and wallet to catalyze meaningful climate action.
20/12/2114m 4s

3 ways to lower the barriers to higher education | Adrian K. Haugabrook

Less than seven percent of people worldwide have a bachelor's degree -- and for many, this is simply because the cost of university is too high, says higher education executive Adrian K. Haugabrook. In this barrier-breaking talk, he introduces an innovative approach to expanding access to higher education by driving down costs and rethinking three key things: time, place and how we learn.
18/12/2113m 36s

How we could better predict and stop floods | Virginia Smith

From village to metropolis, global flooding is on the rise, and traditional approaches to managing the swells won't cut it, says water resource engineer Virginia Smith. Giving an overview of the dynamic shift needed to stymie the flow of future storm waters, she explains how each of us can help ensure a sustainable future despite the rising tides.
17/12/2111m 42s

Siri, Alexa, Google ... what comes next? | Karen Lellouche Tordjman

From Siri to Alexa to Google, virtual assistants already permeate our lives. What will the next generation of these digital helpers look and sound like? Customer experience professional Karen Lellouche Tordjman gives us a glimpse of where they're headed -- and breaks down the two key challenges engineers need to crack in order to usher in a new age of truly smart voice assistants.
16/12/2110m 22s

A new way to help young people with their mental health | Tom Osborn

TED Fellow Tom Osborn wants more young people to have access to the mental health support they need. With the Shamiri Institute, he and his team are training 18- to 22-year-olds to deliver evidence-based mental health care to their peers in Kenya -- which has only two psychiatrists for every million people. Hear how their community-first, youth-oriented model could become a template to help kids across the world lead successful, independent lives.
15/12/216m 29s

A vision of sustainable housing for all of humanity | Vishaan Chakrabarti

By 2100, the UN estimates that the world's population will grow to just over 11 billion people. Architect Vishaan Chakrabarti wants us to start thinking about how we'll house all these people -- and how new construction can fight climate change rather than make it worse. In this visionary talk, Chakrabarti proposes a "Goldilocks" solution to sustainable housing that exists in the sweet spot between single-family homes and towering skyscrapers.
14/12/2110m 21s

3 ways to prepare society for the next pandemic | Jennifer B. Nuzzo

What if we treated the risk of pandemics the same way we treat the risk of fires? In this eye-opening talk, infectious disease epidemiologist Jennifer B. Nuzzo unpacks how the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 sparked a cultural shift in how we defend against fires -- and explains why pandemics demand the same sort of reaction. She breaks down the data we need to gather when facing possible danger, the drills we need to ready ourselves and the defenses that could keep future threats at bay -- so next time, we're prepared.
13/12/2114m 8s

4 steps to hiring fairly -- and supporting criminal justice reform | Nyra Jordan

Many companies have made strides when it comes to prioritizing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), but one group remains largely left out: people who have been involved in the criminal justice system. Social impact investor Nyra Jordan introduces us to "fair chance hiring" -- the practice of hiring people with criminal justice records -- and shares four steps companies can take to make sure everyone has a shot at getting a job.
12/12/2113m 44s

3 questions to build resilience -- and change the world | Sister True Dedication

Every moment of movement is a chance to become more aware of yourself and the world around you, says Zen Buddhist nun Sister True Dedication. Guiding us through the art of "mindful walking," she shares three essential questions to ask yourself to awaken your strength, build resilience and discover your inner peace.
11/12/2116m 6s

Education is a fundamental right for every child | Makhtoum Abdalla

For children growing up in refugee camps, education is a powerful tool of liberation. In this inspiring talk, Makhtoum Abdalla, displaced as a child in Sudan and now living with his family in the Otash camp in Darfur, shares his biggest dream: to ensure all children are educated and taught the skills needed to become "captains of their destiny."
10/12/219m 30s

How going to Mars improves life on Earth | Eric Hinterman

Memory foam, air purifiers, scratch-resistant lenses: these are just a few of the everyday items originally developed for space missions. Aerospace engineer Eric Hinterman invites us to dream big and imagine what technological advancements could come next, explaining why establishing a human presence on Mars is a big step for life on Earth -- and a giant leap toward becoming a space-faring species.
09/12/218m 46s

The end of Roe v. Wade -- and what comes next for reproductive freedom | Kathryn Kolbert

Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision protecting people's right to have an abortion in the United States, will be overturned within a year, says reproductive rights attorney Kathryn Kolbert. In this electrifying call to action, she breaks down the systematic attack against reproductive freedom in the US and envisions what a post-Roe world could look like. "First, we've got to build a badass social justice movement," she says.
08/12/2116m 48s

How to end the pandemic -- and prepare for the next | Maria Van Kerkhove

We will get out of this pandemic, says Maria Van Kerkhove, the COVID-19 Technical Lead of the World Health Organization (WHO). The question is how fast -- and if we'll take what we've learned from the past two years and apply it to the next emerging pathogen. In conversation with TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, Van Kerkhove provides insights on the Omicron variant, details a pandemic preparedness protocol under development at WHO and shares what we all can do to bring the pandemic to a speedy end. "Remain vigilant," Van Kerkhove says. "Everything you do ... will either get us closer to ending this pandemic -- or it will prolong it." (This conversation was recorded on December 3, 2021.)
07/12/2120m 36s

Community investment is the missing piece of climate action | Dawn Lippert

There's been explosive investment in new technologies aimed at decarbonizing the planet. But climate investor Dawn Lippert says something key is missing from this strategy: investment in the local people these solutions would affect most. She shares how she's bridging the gap between investment in new tech and local communities -- by getting closer to the places where ideas are being put into action.
06/12/2111m 41s

The dream of educating Afghan girls lives on | Shabana Basij-Rasikh

In this deeply moving talk, educator Shabana Basij-Rasikh shares the harrowing story of evacuating more than 250 students, staff and family members from the School of Leadership, Afghanistan (SOLA) -- the country's first and only all-girls boarding school -- to Rwanda after the Taliban took power in 2021. An exceptional story of hope, resilience and dreaming big for future generations of Afghan girls -- and a challenge for the world to not look away.
03/12/2116m 49s

How gratitude rewires your brain | Christina Costa

When a psychologist who studies well-being ends up with a brain tumor, what happens when she puts her own research into practice? Christina Costa goes beyond the "fight" narrative of cancer -- or any formidable personal journey -- to highlight the brain benefits of an empowering alternative to fostering resilience in the face of unexpected challenges: gratitude.
02/12/2110m 0s

The value of kindness at work | James Rhee

Kindness can go a long way when it comes to reshaping a business. Having saved a fashion company from the brink of bankruptcy, entrepreneur James Rhee shares the value of investing in a culture of compassion at work -- and shows why we should all lead with our hearts.
01/12/2115m 36s

The powerful women on the front lines of climate action | Farwiza Farhan

When it comes to big problems like climate change, we tend to focus on big solutions -- but many of the best ideas come from people on the ground, facing day-to-day conservation battles. Sharing her effort to protect the Leseur ecosystem in Indonesia (the last place on Earth where the Sumatran rhino, tiger, elephant and orangutan still roam together in the wild), TED Fellow and conservationist Farwiza Farhan explains the challenges women face on the front lines of forest preservation within patriarchal societies -- and the resilient, world-changing power they hold.
30/11/217m 23s

It's impossible to have healthy people on a sick planet | Shweta Narayan

The doctrine of "first, do no harm" is the basis of the Hippocratic Oath, one of the world's oldest codes of ethics. It governs the work of physicians -- but climate and health campaigner Shweta Narayan says it should go further. In this essential talk, she highlights the interdependence of environmental and human health and emphasizes the necessity of placing health at the heart of all climate solutions.
29/11/219m 6s

3 steps to getting what you want in a negotiation | Ruchi Sinha

We negotiate all the time at work -- for raises, promotions, time off -- and we usually go into it like it's a battle. But it's not about dominating, says organizational psychologist Ruchi Sinha. It's about crafting a relationship, understanding your needs and the other person's. Her three key steps will help you master this essential skill.
26/11/215m 0s

The forest is our teacher. It's time to respect it | Nemonte Nenquimo

For thousands of years, the Amazon rainforest has provided food, water and spiritual connection for its Indigenous inhabitants and the world. But the endless extraction of its natural resources by oil companies and others is destroying the lives of those who live there, says Waorani leader Nemonte Nenquimo, and threatening the overall stability of Earth's biosphere. In this powerful talk, she reminds us of the destruction that continues to happen to the world's largest tropical rainforest -- and demands respect for Mother Nature. "The forest is our teacher," she says. (Filmed in Ecuador by director Tom Laffay and associate producer Emily Wright, in collaboration with Amazon Frontlines. In Spanish with subtitles.)
25/11/218m 12s

What working parents really need from workplaces | Angela Garbes

What if we started treating parenting like the real work it is? Podcast host and CEO Angela Garbes details how working families have evolved -- and how companies haven't -- and gives insight into what parents really need from their colleagues and workplaces.
24/11/214m 51s

An action plan for solving the climate crisis | John Doerr and Ryan Panchadsaram

"How much more damage do we have to endure before we realize that it's cheaper to save this planet than to ruin it?" asks engineer and investor John Doerr. In conversation with Countdown cofounder Lindsay Levin, Doerr and systems innovator Ryan Panchadsaram lay out six big objectives that -- if pursued with speed and scale -- could transform society and get us to net-zero emissions by 2050. An action plan to solve the world's climate crisis, backed up by a proven system for setting goals for success.
23/11/2111m 41s

The science of preserving sight | Joshua Chu-Tan

As you get older, your eyes worsen and become susceptible to a disease called age-related macular degeneration -- the leading cause of blindness, with no cure in sight. Sharing the science of how your vision works, researcher Joshua Chu-Tan offers breakthrough insights on a lesser-known RNA that could change the treatment for this disease, preserving the gift of sight for longer and improving the quality of life for millions of people.
22/11/2114m 21s

Your self-driving robotaxi is almost here | Aicha Evans

We've been hearing about self-driving cars for years, but autonomous vehicle entrepreneur Aicha Evans thinks we need to dream more daringly. In this exciting talk, she introduces us to robotaxis: fully autonomous, eco-friendly shuttles that would take you from place to place and take up less space on the streets than personal cars. Learn how this new technology works -- and what a future where we hail robotaxis would look like.
19/11/2111m 11s

A program to empower Black teachers in the US | Larry Irvin

TED Fellow and education innovator Larry Irvin envisions a world where every child can see themselves reflected in their teachers. With his team at Brothers Empowered to Teach, Irvin is providing pathways to careers in education for Black men, who currently make up less than three percent of all teachers in the US -- offering training, personal and professional development and job placement. He shares how their holistic, people-centered approach is changing education.
18/11/216m 11s

An ever-evolving map of everything on Earth | Jack Dangermond

What if we had a map of ... everything? Jack Dangermond, a visionary behind the geographic information system (GIS) technology used to map and analyze all kinds of complex data, walks us through the interconnected technologies gathering information about every crack and corner of the Earth. Learn how this "living atlas" and "geospatial nervous system" can help us better understand our changing planet -- and let nature guide our actions towards a more sustainable future.
17/11/215m 57s

The crucial intersection of climate and capital | Nili Gilbert

The financial sector often talks of decarbonizing investment portfolios as a way to fight climate change. But portfolios can be "cleaned" without having any real impact on the problem, says investment expert Nili Gilbert. Bringing science to finance, she unpacks how investors can actually help decarbonize the world -- a costly endeavor, estimated at three to five trillion dollars per year between now and 2050 -- and ensure the climate transition is just, global and interconnected. "Changing the markets can be a way to change the world," she says.
16/11/2110m 2s

3 rules to help you build a successful business | Julissa Prado

Have an idea you're yearning to turn into a business? Julissa Prado, founder and CEO of Rizos Curls, explains how she was inspired by the Latino and immigrant communities she grew up in -- and shares 3 principles that guide her in her work.
15/11/214m 31s

Super speed, magnetic levitation and the vision behind the hyperloop | Josh Giegel

What if your hour-long commute was reduced to just minutes? That's the promise of the hyperloop: a transit system designed around a pod that zooms through a vacuum-sealed space (roughly the size of a subway tunnel) at hyper-speed, powered by next-generation batteries and state-of-the-art magnetic levitation. In the visionary talk, Josh Giegel, the hyperloop's very first passenger, shares how this zipping innovation could launch us into a faster, cleaner future of transportation.
13/11/218m 46s

Tracking the whole world's carbon emissions -- with satellites and AI | Gavin McCormick

What we know today about global greenhouse gas emissions is mostly self-reported by countries, and those numbers (sometimes tallied manually on paper!) are often inaccurate and prone to manipulation. If we really want to get serious about fighting climate change, we need a way to track carbon pollution in real-time and identify the worst culprits, says high-tech environmental activist Gavin McCormick. Enter Climate TRACE: a coalition of scientists, activists and tech companies using satellite imagery, big data and AI to monitor and transparently report on all of the world's emissions as they happen -- and speed up meaningful climate action. A powerful, free, global tool to match the scale of a civilization-threatening crisis.
12/11/2111m 20s

The rise of predatory scams -- and how to prevent them | Jane Walsh

Questionable phone calls, concerning emails, heart-rending stories from a sudden new friend in need of endless financial support: elder abuse can take many forms, says lawyer Jane Walsh. And as technology becomes more sophisticated, susceptibility to tricks and scams will increase -- no matter a person's age or intellect. Walsh spotlights the rise of this predatory crime, why it goes undetected and how you can protect your loved ones' kindness, dignity and self-respect from being manipulated.
11/11/2113m 53s

How your brain invents your "self" | Anil Seth

Who are you, really? Neuroscientist Anil Seth lays out his fascinating new theory of consciousness and self, centered on the notion that we "predict" the world into existence. From sleep to memory and everything in between, Seth explores the reality we experience in our brains -- versus the world as it objectively might be. (This talk and conversation, hosted by TED science curator David Biello, was part of a TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
10/11/2123m 20s

How small countries can make a big impact on climate change | Nicola Sturgeon

When it comes to tackling climate change, the size of a country doesn't matter -- it's their ambition that counts, says First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon. In a rousing talk, she shares examples of small nations -- from Bhutan and Fiji to her own Scotland -- whose leadership and climate action are galvanizing change on the international stage. (Followed by a brief Q&A with TED's global curator Bruno Giussani about the Cambo oil field project)
09/11/219m 20s

How to reduce bias in your workplace | Kim Scott and Trier Bryant

We all have bias -- especially the unconscious kind -- and it's preventing us from doing our best work. Gone unchecked, bias can make employees feel resentful, frustrated and silenced, and it can even lead to outright discrimination and harassment. Check out three key ways to reduce bias at work, according to Just Work cofounders Kim Scott and Trier Bryant.
08/11/215m 48s

The problem of vaccine spoilage -- and a smart sensor to help | Nithya Ramanathan

Refrigerators do much more than store your groceries -- they're also vital to preserving and distributing vaccines. Illustrating the realities of (and threats to) global vaccine supply chains, technologist and TED Fellow Nithya Ramanathan describes how smart sensors placed in fridges that store medical supplies can provide crucial, real-time data and ensure people get the life-saving care they need.
06/11/215m 52s

The creative power of your intuition | Bozoma Saint John

Great ideas are like electricity -- they snap into sharp focus and sprint from place to place. What's the best way to capture them? Bozoma Saint John, Chief Marketing Officer at Netflix, makes a compelling case to move away from an overreliance on data when making big decisions -- and calls on us all to tap into the power of our intuition and become creative trailblazers.
05/11/2112m 20s

A tailored history of who wears what -- and why | Richard Thompson Ford

From puffy trousers to pantsuits and everything in between, law professor and author Richard Thompson Ford takes us on a fascinating tour through the history of fashion and the evolution of dress codes that still influence style today, tracing the real consequences people face for the way they dress. He offers an insightful and eye-opening explanation about why people care so much about what others wear -- and explains why you should think twice before calling the fashion police.
04/11/2111m 13s

Why paternity leave benefits everyone | Shu Matsuo Post

Paternity leave has many benefits for dads, their partners and their babies -- but did you know it also has surprising benefits for companies? This is what author Shu Matsuo Post learned from his seven transformative months of paternity leave -- and he says it can create more equal and diverse workplaces and even boost productivity.
03/11/215m 44s

How to make radical climate action the new normal | Al Gore

A net-zero future is possible, but first we need to flip a mental switch to truly understand that we can stop the climate crisis if we try, says Nobel laureate Al Gore. In this inspiring and essential talk, Gore shares examples of extreme climate events (think: fires, floods and atmospheric tsunamis), identifies the man-made systems holding us back from progress and invites us all to join the movement for climate justice: "the biggest emergent social movement in all of history," as he puts it. An unmissable tour de force on the current state of the crisis -- and the transformations that will make it possible to find a way out of it.
02/11/2115m 46s

The fastest way to slow climate change now | Ilissa Ocko

"Cutting methane is the single fastest, most effective opportunity to reduce climate change risks in the near term," says atmospheric scientist Ilissa Ocko. That's because, unlike carbon dioxide, methane's warming power doesn't come from a gradual buildup over time but is almost entirely from recent emissions. Ocko identifies three main sources of methane pollution which, if addressed, could dramatically slow down the rate of global warming within years -- not decades. "This is the methane moment," Ocko says.
01/11/2110m 2s

The haunting truth of ghost stories | Coya Paz Brownrigg

Ghost stories reveal much more than the ghouls and spirits that haunt them. Settle in for a spooky delight as theater educator Coya Paz Brownrigg lays out three types of bone-chilling tales and exhumes the grave truths they hold about longing, meaning and the cultural value of eerie encounters.
31/10/2111m 52s

A new perspective on the journey to net-zero | Amina J. Mohammed

Climate action can be a vehicle to deliver dignity, opportunity and equality for all. UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed invites us to reimagine what the journey to net-zero could look like if we invest in people's climate efforts while prioritizing the 17 Sustainable Development Goals -- a blueprint of interlinked global goals to protect humanity and our warming planet. "It's time to make some serious noise to transform our world," she says.
30/10/217m 59s

AI isn't as smart as you think -- but it could be | Jeff Dean

What is AI, really? Jeff Dean, the head of Google's AI efforts, explains the underlying technology that enables artificial intelligence to do all sorts of things, from understanding language to diagnosing disease -- and presents a roadmap for building better, more responsible systems that have a deeper understanding of the world. (Followed by a Q&A with head of TED Chris Anderson)
28/10/2118m 31s

How to turn around a city | Irma L. Olguin Jr.

Computer skills aren't what's stopping people from breaking into the tech industry, says social entrepreneur Irma L. Olguin Jr. More often, the biggest hurdles are things like access to childcare, transportation and financial stability. In this visionary talk, Olguin Jr. introduces the work she's done to uplift and empower people in her community in Fresno, California -- and shows how it can be a model to elevate "underdog" communities across the world.
28/10/2113m 9s

Stuck in the gig economy? Try platform co-ops instead | Trebor Scholz

Co-ops date back almost 200 years, run by groups of people that work together to own and operate a company. What does it look like when this tried-and-true business model merges with the digital economy? Trebor Scholz introduces the "platform cooperative," a new way to create democratic companies of empowered workers -- and develop a better, fairer alternative to the gig economy.
27/10/2112m 54s

Can China achieve its ambitious climate pledges? | Hongqiao Liu

In 2020, China's President Xi Jinping pledged that China would both peak its emissions by 2030 and achieve net-zero emissions by 2060 -- a change that will require action at an unheard-of scale and speed. Can the country actually achieve this ambitious vision? In this forward-looking talk, environmental journalist and analyst Hongqiao Liu explores what the world's largest carbon emitter (and second-largest economy) will need to do to get there.
26/10/219m 17s

Visions for the future | Kai-Fu Lee and Chen Qiufan

How will the rise of artificial intelligence change our world? Former head of Google China Kai-Fu Lee and science-fiction writer Chen Qiufan (aka Stanley Chan) set out to answer this question in their new book "AI 2041: Ten Visions for the Future." In this wide-ranging discussion, they imagine different possibilities -- both from the imaginative lens of science fiction and with a perspective on what is actually plausible. (This conversation, hosted by TED technology curator Simone Ross, was part of a TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
25/10/2128m 33s

How your nature photos can help protect wild animals | Tanya Berger-Wolf

We're losing animal and plant species at such a swift, unprecedented rate that it's nearly impossible to keep up. Computational biologist Tanya Berger-Wolf demonstrates how harnessing the power of artificial intelligence and one of the internet's biggest resources -- public images and video -- supports the crucial collection of data to save threatened wildlife. Learn how your everyday photos, alongside the work of passionate citizen scientists, could help drive conservation decisions, and slow or even reverse damage to biodiversity worldwide.
23/10/219m 25s

3 tips for leaders to get the future of work right | Debbie Lovich

Work that's dictated by a fixed schedule, place and job description doesn't make sense anymore, says leadership expert Debbie Lovich. In light of the cultural shift towards remote work sparked by the pandemic, Lovich gives three essential tips to leaders so employees can keep their autonomy (while remaining productive), companies can let go of rigid bureaucracy and we can all reshape work to better fit our lives.
22/10/2112m 13s

A close-to-home solution for accessible childcare | Chris Bennett

Childcare needs a transformation -- but rather than investing billions in new buildings and schools, what if we could unlock the potential of people already nearby? Entrepreneur Chris Bennett offers an innovative way to tackle the shortage of childcare worldwide and connect families to safe, affordable and high-quality options in their own communities.
21/10/219m 2s

How much clean electricity do we really need? | Solomon Goldstein-Rose

To fight climate change, we need to clean up the global electricity system by replacing fossil fuel power plants with clean generation -- right? Climate author Solomon Goldstein-Rose thinks we need to do much more than that. Replacement isn't enough, he explains in this compelling talk: we need to rapidly develop a new global system capable of producing 12 times the amount of clean electricity we generate today. He shares four reasons why we need that expansion -- first, to electrify everything in all parts of the world (not just the wealthy ones) -- as well as some intriguing ideas for how we can get there.
20/10/219m 46s

How we could eat real meat without harming animals | Isha Datar

What if you could eat chicken nuggets without harming a chicken? It's possible through "cellular agriculture," says Isha Datar. In a talk about cutting-edge science, she explains how this new means of food production makes it possible to eat meat without the negative consequences of industrial farming -- and how it could fundamentally change our food systems for the better. "It's our once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get a second chance at agriculture," she says.
19/10/2112m 40s

Introducing: Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi | TED Audio Collective

We all want to know if we're normal -- do I have enough friends? Should it take me this long to get over my ex? Should I move or stay where I am? Endlessly curious data journalist Mona Chalabi needs to know, and she's ready to dive into the numbers to get some answers. But studies and spreadsheets don't tell the whole story, so she's consulting experts, strangers and even her mum to fill in the gaps. The answers might surprise you, and make you ask: Does normal even exist? Follow Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi wherever you get your podcasts.
18/10/212m 25s

The bad math of the fossil fuel industry | Tzeporah Berman

We currently have enough fossil fuels to progressively transition off of them, says climate campaigner Tzeporah Berman, but the industry continues to expand oil, gas and coal production and exploration. With searing passion and unflinching nerve, Berman reveals the delusions keeping true progress from being made -- and offers a realistic path forward: the Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty. Learn more about the global initiative for transparency and accountability in phasing out fossil fuels forever, supported by the Dalai Lama, Nobel Prize laureates and many more.
16/10/2113m 30s

Why skin disease is often misdiagnosed in darker skin tones | Jenna C. Lester

Skin is one of the most powerful predictors of health, yet nearly half of all new dermatologists admit to feeling uncomfortable identifying health issues on darker skin tones -- resulting in poorer health outcomes for patients of color. In this crucial talk, TED Fellow and dermatologist Jenna C. Lester shares her effort to extend medical training beyond its current limited scope and ensure all medical students get trained in the full spectrum of diseases as they appear in all patients, regardless of skin tone.
15/10/215m 40s

The billion-dollar campaign to electrify transport | Monica Araya

The roadmap to ending pollution from transportation is here, says electrification advocate Monica Araya. In conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, Araya introduces Drive Electric: a global campaign to retire the polluting internal combustion engine in time to avoid climate disaster. And she shares some exciting news: a breakthrough funding commitment from the Audacious Project that puts the project well on its way to realizing a billion-dollar plan to supercharge the transition to electric vehicles over the next five years. Learn more about the coalition of 70 organizations powering this global action -- and the role all cities, politicians and citizens can play to secure a zero-emission transport future. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
14/10/2111m 26s

What you discover when you really listen | Hrishikesh Hirway

"Every conversation has the potential to open up and reveal all the layers and layers within it, all those rooms within rooms," says podcaster and musician Hrishikesh Hirway. In this profoundly moving talk, he offers a guide to deep conversations and explores what you learn when you stop to listen closely. Stay tuned to the end to hear a performance of his original song "Between There and Here (feat. Yo-Yo Ma)."
13/10/2115m 13s

A roadmap for young changemakers | Melati Wijsen

Activism is a tough job, especially for young people yearning for immediate change -- something climate activist Melati Wijsen has learned over ten years of pushing for environmental protection, starting at age 12 in her home on the island of Bali, Indonesia. How can young changemakers acquire the skills they need and keep from burning out? Wijsen offers three pieces of advice for anybody seeking to make lasting, sustainable progress.
12/10/218m 2s

5 tips for dealing with meeting overload | Cindy Solomon

Could this meeting have been an email? The phenomenon of "calendar creep," where meetings completely take over your work days, is wasting time, energy and productivity -- but you can take back control. Leadership expert Cindy Solomon shares her five tips for clearing up your schedule and getting your calendar to work for you, not against you.
11/10/215m 8s

How humanity doubled life expectancy in a century | Steven Johnson

Doubling human life expectancy in a century is our greatest achievement, says author Steven Johnson. How did we make it happen -- and can we keep it going? Backed by fascinating historical anecdotes, he shares some life-lengthening innovations and reminds us of three key things needed to make sure all of humanity enjoys these advancements in health.
08/10/2113m 49s

A more accurate way to calculate emissions | Charlotte Degot

Greenhouse gases are colorless, scentless and invisible, making them exceptionally hard to measure. Fortunately, some tools and techniques can help -- one of the most powerful being artificial intelligence, says green technologist Charlotte Degot. By processing massive amounts of data on carbon emissions, she explains how AI makes it possible for corporations to set meaningful climate targets, more accurately track their progress and, most importantly, reduce pollution over time.
07/10/219m 25s

The brain science of obesity | Mads Tang-Christensen

Your belly and your brain speak to each other, says obesity researcher Mads Tang-Christensen. Offering scientific proof that obesity is a disease influenced by genetics and the environment, he introduces a molecule discovered in both the brain and gut that helps control appetite -- and which could be engineered to promote healthy weight loss for those living with obesity.
06/10/219m 49s

How NFTs are building the internet of the future | Kayvon Tehranian

In this revelatory talk, technologist Kayvon Tehranian explores why NFTs -- digital assets that represent a certificate of ownership on the internet -- are a technological breakthrough. Learn how NFTs are putting power and economic control back into the hands of digital creators -- and pushing forward the internet's next evolution.
05/10/219m 37s

Want to truly succeed? Lift others up while you climb | Amber Hikes

It's up to all of us to create a more inclusive and diverse workplace. No matter where you are in your career journey, it's essential that you help others grow, even as you are growing yourself, says ACLU Chief Equity Officer Amber Hikes. She lays out three ways we can help each other succeed -- and empower and advance those who historically have been left behind.
04/10/215m 33s

The art of paying attention | Wendy MacNaughton

In an invitation to slow down and look at the world around you, graphic journalist Wendy MacNaughton illustrates how drawing can spark deeply human, authentic connections. Ready to try? Grab a pencil and join MacNaughton for this delightful talk. "Drawing is looking, and looking is loving," she says.
02/10/2113m 19s

3 ways community creates a healthy life | Olivia Affuso

Maintaining a healthy weight takes more than diet and exercise, says physical activity epidemiologist Olivia Affuso. In this actionable talk, she shows how you can kickstart a healthy life by tapping into the collective power of a community that supports and motivates your health goals.
01/10/219m 9s

The Black history of twerking -- and how it taught me self-love | Lizzo

Twerking is mainstream now ... but do you know where it came from? Superstar Lizzo traces booty shaking to a traditional West African dance and tells how Black women across generations kept the rhythm alive, from blues and jazz singers to modern rap and hip-hop performers. With her characteristic energy, she shares how twerking empowered her to love her own body -- and explains why understanding its origins helps protect Black culture from erasure and misappropriation. (And, yes, she twerks on stage.)
30/09/2113m 50s

Why the passport needs an upgrade | Karoli Hindriks

It's time to give paper passports a digital upgrade, says entrepreneur Karoli Hindriks. Looking to Estonia's technology-driven government for inspiration, she envisions a world where immigration is no longer hindered by bureaucracy and needless repetition. Travel with her to a future beyond borders where universal digital passports replace paper ones -- and where outdated systems stop wasting our time and money.
29/09/2110m 10s

How employers steal from workers -- and get away with it | Rebecca Galemba

When you work, you expect to be paid for it. Except, for millions of Americans employed across a range of industries like restaurants and construction, that's not always the case. Anthropologist Rebecca Galemba explores the multibillion-dollar problem of wage theft and how employers get away with it, highlighting the changes needed for them to pay up -- and fairly.
28/09/219m 38s

3 rules for better work-life balance | Ashley Whillans

Have you answered a work email during an important family event? Or taken a call from your boss while on vacation? According to behavioral scientist and Harvard Business School professor Ashley Whillans, "always-on" work culture is not only ruining our personal well-being -- but our work, as well. She shares which bad habits are stopping us from getting what we need out of our free time and three practical steps for setting boundaries that stick.
27/09/215m 6s

Could you recover from illness ... using your own stem cells? | Nabiha Saklayen

What if diseases could be treated with a patient's own cells, precisely and on demand? Biotech entrepreneur Nabiha Saklayen explains how we could harness advances in biology, machine learning and lasers to create personalized stem cell banks -- and develop medicine uniquely designed for each of our bodies.
24/09/2110m 30s

Has Apple peaked? Plus, celebrities changing Hollywood | After Hours

It's been 10 years since the death of Steve Jobs. Has Apple peaked after 10 years of Tim Cook's leadership, or is the best yet to come? Harvard Business School professors Youngme Moon, Felix Oberholzer-Gee and Mihir A. Desai debate the prospects for Apple -- and discuss the celebrities changing the way Hollywood does business, including Reese Witherspoon, Rihanna and more. After Hours is a member of the TED Audio Collective, a collection of podcasts for the curious. For new episodes every week, follow After Hours wherever you get your podcasts.
23/09/2141m 17s

The intended consequences of helping nature thrive | Ryan Phelan

From a special black-footed ferret to coral that can withstand warming waters, genetic rescue efforts that use genomics and synthetic biology are helping nature thrive. But despite the huge successes of this kind of intervention, conservation innovator Ryan Phelan points out that fear of unintended consequences often stifles innovation -- risking further extinction. She makes the case for embracing the "intended consequences" of genetic tools that have the power to restore Earth's balance, abundance and biodiversity.
22/09/2115m 44s

The link between inequality and anxiety | Richard Wilkinson

Why are global levels of anxiety and depression so high? Social epidemiologist Richard Wilkinson presents compelling data on the impact of inequality on mental health and social relationships in countries around the world. "Inequality," he says, "is the enemy between us."
21/09/218m 30s

Planet City -- a sci-fi vision of an astonishing regenerative future | Liam Young

Get transported on a stunningly rendered, sci-fi safari through Planet City: an imaginary metropolis of 10 billion people, from the brain of director and architect Liam Young. Explore the potential outcomes of an urban space designed to house the entire population of the earth -- and imagine answers to what is possible, and what is sustainable, for the planet.
20/09/219m 52s

The untapped energy source that could power the planet | Jamie C. Beard

Deep beneath your feet is a molten ball of energy the same temperature as the surface of the sun -- an immense clean energy source that could power the world thousands of times over, says technologist and climate activist Jamie C. Beard. How do we tap it? She lays out a surprising solution, and an unlikely alliance, to harvest geothermal energy from the Earth's core and get it to anywhere in the world.
17/09/2115m 6s

An NFL quarterback on overcoming setbacks and self-doubt | Alex Smith

Former NFL quarterback Alex Smith almost died after a particularly rough tackle snapped his leg in 2018 -- yet he was back on the field just two years later. In this inspiring talk, he shares his hard-won insights on overcoming fear, self-doubt and anxiety that could help anyone endure life's challenges. (This talk contains graphic images.)
16/09/2114m 9s

The trans story includes you | Nicole Maines

As actress Nicole Maines points out, we all unwittingly play supporting roles in each others' life stories -- for better or worse. With charm and aplomb, she shares her experience growing up as a trans youth, emphasizing the big and small ways community acceptance can affect the course of a deeply personal journey.
15/09/2113m 16s

The inaccurate link between body ideals and health | Nancy N. Chen

Global obesity rates are on the rise, but body shaming campaigns are doing more harm than good, says medical anthropologist Nancy N. Chen. Reflecting on how the cultural histories of body ideals have changed over time, she offers a new way to view ourselves and our health by enhancing body diversity to close the gap between what's ideal and what's real.
14/09/219m 34s

A smart bra for better heart health | Alicia Chong Rodriguez

Could an everyday clothing item help protect your health? In this quick talk, TED Fellow Alicia Chong Rodriguez introduces us to a smart bra designed to gather real-time data on biomarkers like heartbeat, breath and temperature. Learn how this life-saving gadget could help close the gender gap in cardiovascular research -- and, finally, usher women's health care into the 21st century.
13/09/215m 59s

Life-altering questions about the end of the universe | Katie Mack

In this fascinating conversation, cosmologist and TED Fellow Katie Mack delves into everything from the Big Bang theory to what we see at the edge of the observable universe to a few ways the cosmos might end. Stay tuned to hear Mack recite an original poem on the wonder and marvel of existence. (This conversation, hosted by deputy director of the TED Fellows program, Lily James Olds, was part of a TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
10/09/2115m 37s

The big myth of government deficits | Stephanie Kelton

Government deficits have gotten a bad rap, says economist Stephanie Kelton. In this groundbreaking talk, she makes the case to stop looking at government spending as a path towards frightening piles of debt, but rather as a financial contribution to the things that matter -- like health care, education, infrastructure and beyond. "We have the resources we need to begin repairing our broken systems," Kelton says. "But we have to believe it's possible."
09/09/2113m 59s

A sci-fi vision of life in 2041 | Chen Qiufan

Sci-fi writer Chen Qiufan doesn't fear a dystopian future. Instead, he believes developments in artificial intelligence will make all of our lives better, healthier and safer. He takes us on a tour of the next 20 years of AI and shares some astonishing predictions for the advancements in science and technology that could await us. "For every future we wish to create, we must first learn to imagine it," he says.
08/09/218m 2s

How to stop languishing and start finding flow | Adam Grant

Have you found yourself staying up late, joylessly bingeing TV shows and doomscrolling through the news, or simply navigating your day uninspired and aimless? Chances are you're languishing, says organizational psychologist Adam Grant -- a psychic malaise that has become all too common after many months of the pandemic. He breaks down the key indicators of languishing and presents three ways to escape that "meh" feeling and start finding your flow.
07/09/2116m 0s

When local news dies, so does democracy | Chuck Plunkett

Nearly 1,800 newsrooms have shuttered across the US since 2004, leaving many communities unseen, unheard and in the dark. In this passionate talk and rallying cry, journalist Chuck Plunkett explains why he rebelled against his employer to raise awareness for an industry under threat of extinction -- and makes the case for local news as an essential part of any healthy democracy.
06/09/2111m 11s

How language shapes the way we think | Lera Boroditsky

There are about 7,000 languages spoken around the world -- and they all have different sounds, vocabularies and structures. But do they shape the way we think? Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky shares examples of language -- from an Aboriginal community in Australia that uses cardinal directions instead of left and right to the multiple words for blue in Russian -- that suggest the answer is a resounding yes. "The beauty of linguistic diversity is that it reveals to us just how ingenious and how flexible the human mind is," Boroditsky says. "Human minds have invented not one cognitive universe, but 7,000."
03/09/2114m 12s

The unpaid work that GDP ignores -- and why it really counts | Marilyn Waring

If you: do laundry, are (or have been) pregnant, tidy up, shop for your household or do similar labor, then by GDP standards, you're unproductive. In this visionary talk, economist Marilyn Waring seeks to correct the failures of this narrow-minded system, detailing why we deserve a better way to measure growth that values not just our own livelihood but the planet's as well.
02/09/2117m 19s

A taste of Mexico's ancient chocolate-making tradition | Germán Santillán

Dating back more than 800 years, chocolate is deeply woven into the Indigenous history of Oaxaca, Mexico. TED Fellow Germán Santillán talks about his work reviving the Mixtec technique used to prepare this ancient delicacy by training a new generation of local farmers -- helping create economic opportunity and preserve a delicious legacy at the same time.
01/09/215m 58s

How music can help you find peace after loss | Steven Sharp Nelson

Music can act as a guide, says cellist Steven Sharp Nelson. It has the power to unlock the mind, tap into the heart and bring light in the darkest times. Take a deep breath as Nelson takes you on a melodic, meditative journey that could reconnect you with your closest loved ones -- no matter how near or far they may be.
31/08/2113m 59s

A future with fewer cars | Freeman H. Shen

What if your car could drop you off and then find parking by itself? According to electric vehicle entrepreneur Freeman H. Shen, this technology already exists. He shares his vision for a future where AI-powered electric vehicles will solve many of the problems cars currently cause, like smog, traffic congestion, accidents and, yes, endlessly circling the block looking for somewhere to park.
30/08/216m 57s

Your insecurities aren't what you think they are | WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I can't do this." "I didn't deserve this promotion." "When will they find me out?" If you've had thoughts like these, you aren't alone. Nearly 70 percent of people have experienced imposter syndrome -- even some of the most successful ones! The difference is in how they can use imposter thoughts as fuel, rather than a fire to burn them out. Organizational psychologist Adam Grant shares three steps you can take to harness your own self-doubt as a fuel for success, and why we stand to gain more from embracing our insecurities rather than hiding from them.
27/08/2140m 27s

Can we choose to fall out of love? | Dessa

What's the best way to get over heartbreak? Rapper and writer Dessa came up with an unconventional approach after a chance viewing of Helen Fisher's TED Talk about the brains of the lovestruck. In a wryly funny talk, she describes how she worked with a neuroscientist to try to get her brain to fall out of love with her ex -- and shares wisdom about romance that she gained along the way.
26/08/2111m 40s

How to design the life you want | TEDx SHORTS

Offering tips from the well-known program he helped develop, Bill Burnett, executive director of Stanford's Life Design Lab, illustrates the ways design thinking can be used to help build the life you want. This talk was filmed at TEDxStanford. All TEDx events are organized independently by volunteers in the spirit of TED's mission of ideas worth spreading.
25/08/215m 14s

This could be why you're depressed or anxious | Johann Hari

In a moving talk, journalist Johann Hari shares fresh insights on the causes of depression and anxiety from experts around the world -- as well as some exciting emerging solutions. "If you're depressed or anxious, you're not weak and you're not crazy -- you're a human being with unmet needs," Hari says.
24/08/2120m 31s

How playing an instrument benefits your brain | Anita Collins

When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout. What's going on? Educator Anita Collins explains the fireworks that go off in musicians' brains when they play and examines some of the long-term positive effects of this mental workout. (Directed by Sharon Colman Graham, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Peter Gosling)
23/08/214m 29s

What's normal anxiety and what's an anxiety disorder? | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

Anxiety helps keep us alive. But how can you tell when it crosses the line from survival instinct to serious problem? For the more than 30 percent of Americans who will experience an anxiety disorder, stigma around mental health problems makes it hard to find out. Dr. Jen Gunter breaks down where those stigmas originated, the science behind our brain's threat-detection system, what makes it malfunction and the most effective ways of treating it.
20/08/2136m 24s

You can grow new brain cells. Here's how | Sandrine Thuret

Can we, as adults, grow new neurons? Neuroscientist Sandrine Thuret says that we can, and she offers research and practical advice on how we can help our brains better perform neurogenesis—improving mood, increasing memory formation and preventing the decline associated with aging along the way.
19/08/2111m 4s

The benefits of a bilingual brain | Mia Nacamulli

It's obvious that knowing more than one language can make certain things easier -- like traveling or watching movies without subtitles. But are there other advantages to having a bilingual (or multilingual) brain? Educator Mia Nacamulli details the three types of bilingual brains and shows how knowing more than one language keeps your brain healthy, complex and actively engaged. (Directed by TED-Ed, narrated by Pen-Pen Chen)
18/08/214m 48s

Elise Hu and Debbie Millman: How to pave a new career path | Hit Reset

Elise Hu, host of TED Talks Daily, sits down with designer Debbie Millman to share advice on stepping into the unknown, paving a new career path and exploring something you've never done before.
17/08/2127m 15s

The brain-changing benefits of exercise | Wendy Suzuki

What's the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory -- and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.
16/08/2113m 2s

What happens to the plastic you throw away? | TED Climate

Plastic is everywhere. We know we should cut down on it where we can, but is plastic ever the answer? In this episode of TED Climate, a whole world of plastic you never knew about. Starting with: which bag is best -- paper, plastic or cotton? The answer might surprise you. Host Dan Kwartler breaks down the pros and cons of each bag and which you should carry on your next shopping trip. Then we follow the journey of three different plastic bottles after you throw them away, shedding light on the dangers these disposables present to the world. Plus, three things you can do to put a cap on our plastic problem.
13/08/2111m 43s

Walk with Little Amal, a theatrical journey celebrating the refugee experience | Amir Nizar Zuabi

In a staggering display of creativity and community, theater director Amir Nizar Zuabi introduces "The Walk": a theatrical journey following a nine-year-old refugee girl named Amal (represented by a giant, lifelike puppet) as she makes her way from Turkey to England. Zuabi shares the bold vision behind this cultural odyssey aimed at spreading hope and celebrating the refugee experience -- and joins us live from Turkey as Amal passes through a village.
12/08/219m 28s

How COVID-19 reshaped US cities | Kevin J. Krizek

The pandemic spurred an unprecedented reclamation of urban space, ushering in a seemingly bygone era of pedestrian pastimes, as cars were sidelined in favor of citizens. Highlighting examples from across the United States, environmental designer Kevin J. Krizek reflects on how temporary shifts -- like transforming streets into places for dining, recreation and community -- can become permanent fixtures that make for more livable and sustainable cities.
11/08/219m 41s

An interactive map to track (and end) pollution in China | Ma Jun

China has pledged to be carbon neutral by 2060 -- and its citizens are helping industries across the country reach that goal. Environmentalist Ma Jun introduces the Blue Map, an app that empowers people to report pollution violations in their communities and track real-time environmental data, holding emitters accountable and helping companies along the global supply chain make informed sourcing decisions. Hear how the app uses the power of transparency to motivate more than 14,000 factories (so far) to clean up.
10/08/2111m 51s

Why are stolen African artifacts still in Western museums? | Jim Chuchu

African artifacts shown in museums worldwide are often not borrowed, but stolen -- and TED Fellow Jim Chuchu is on a mission to get them back. Learn the sordid history behind how many of the collections in the West came to be, Chuchu's extensive work tracking and restoring Kenya's cultural heritage and what these efforts can mean for the wider African continent. An urgent call for institutions to reconsider the morality of the objects they "own" and their significance to the communities from which they were taken.
09/08/215m 1s

The fingerprints of life beyond Earth | Clara Sousa-Silva

Is there life on Venus? Quantum astrochemist Clara Sousa-Silva makes the case for a new way to seek and possibly discover habitable planets -- and shares her research into a poisonous, smelly molecule that might signal life beyond Earth.
06/08/217m 58s

The tiny balls of fat that could revolutionize medicine | Kathryn A. Whitehead

What if you were holding life-saving medicine ... but had no way to administer it? Zoom down to the nano level with engineer Kathryn A. Whitehead as she gives a breakdown of the little fatty balls (called lipid nanoparticles) perfectly designed to ferry cutting-edge medicines into your body's cells. Learn how her work is already powering mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines and forging the path for future therapies that could treat Ebola, HIV and even cancer.
05/08/2112m 41s

Don't call people out -- call them in | Loretta J. Ross

We live in a call-out culture, says activist and scholar Loretta J. Ross. You're probably familiar with it: the public shaming and blaming, on social media and in real life, of people who may have done wrong and are being held accountable. In this bold, actionable talk, Ross gives us a toolkit for starting productive conversations instead of fights -- what she calls a "call-in culture" -- and shares strategies that help challenge wrongdoing while still creating space for growth, forgiveness and maybe even an unexpected friend. "Fighting hate should be fun," Ross says. "It's being a hater that sucks."
04/08/2114m 14s

Meet the scientist couple driving an mRNA vaccine revolution | Uğur Şahin and Özlem Türeci

As COVID-19 spread, BioNTech cofounders Uğur Şahin and Özlem Türeci had one goal: to make a safe, effective vaccine faster than ever before. In this illuminating conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, the immunologists (and married couple) share the fascinating story of how their decades of mRNA research powered the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine -- and forecast what this breakthrough science could mean for the future of vaccines and other immunotherapy treatments.
03/08/2124m 50s

Remembering climate change ... a message from the year 2071 | Kim Stanley Robinson

Coming to us from 50 years in the future, legendary sci-fi writer Kim Stanley Robinson tells the "history" of how humanity ended the climate crisis and restored the damage done to Earth's biosphere. A rousing vision of how we might unite to overcome the greatest challenge of our time.
02/08/2110m 8s

3 secrets of resilient people | Lucy Hone

Everyone experiences loss, but how do you cope with the tough moments that follow? Resilience researcher Lucy Hone shares three hard-won strategies for developing the capacity to brave adversity, overcome struggle and face whatever may come head-on with fortitude and grace.
30/07/2116m 5s

The informal settlements reshaping the world | Jota Samper

Creative, sustainable solutions find their home in the thousands of informal neighborhoods across the world. Urban planner Jota Samper believes these often overlooked settlements (also known as slums) should be regarded as hubs of innovation and shares three reasons why giving them the attention they deserve could help change the way humanity coexists -- and cities evolve -- on a global scale.
29/07/2113m 31s

What you need to know about stalkerware | Eva Galperin

"Full access to a person's phone is the next best thing to full access to a person's mind," says cybersecurity expert Eva Galperin. In an urgent talk, she describes the emerging danger of stalkerware -- software designed to spy on someone by gaining access to their devices without their knowledge -- and calls on antivirus companies to recognize these programs as malicious in order to discourage abusers and protect victims.
28/07/2112m 56s

The radical, revolutionary resilience of Black joy | Miracle Jones

In the face of trauma, happiness is resilience: a revolutionary act of thriving despite all odds, rather than wilting or surrendering. Community organizer and activist Miracle Jones offers a heart-to-heart meditation on the role of joy as a form of radical resistance, survival and protection for Black folks in the US and across the world. A warm reminder to embrace the guiding light of hope in the presence of darkness.
27/07/2111m 43s

3 rules for a zero-carbon world | Nigel Topping

Every human and natural system -- from oil extraction to the flight of a flock of starlings -- can be seen as a set of repeating patterns. These patterns can be disrupted for good or for bad, says Nigel Topping, the High Level Climate Action Champion for COP26, the UN's climate change conference set to take place in November 2021 in Glasgow, Scotland. He shares three rules of radical collaboration that could positively disrupt the patterns of the global economy and help humanity tackle the world's greatest threat: climate change.
26/07/2112m 31s

The ancient origins of the Olympics | Armand D'Angour

Thousands of years in the making, the Olympics began as part of a religious festival honoring the Greek god Zeus in the rural Greek town of Olympia. But how did it become the greatest show of sporting excellence on earth? Educator Armand D'Angour explains the evolution of the Olympics. (Directed by Diogo Viegas, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Cem Misirlioglu and Brooks Ball)
23/07/213m 4s

Are wild animals really "wild"? | Emma Marris

Human activity is affecting the planet in dramatic, unsustainable ways -- including destroying the habitats of wild animals. Considering our obligation to care for the creatures we've impacted, environmental writer Emma Marris dives into the ethics of wildlife management, zoos and aquariums, offering her thoughts on how we can help Earth's wildlife flourish. (This conversation, hosted by TED science curator David Biello, was part of a TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
23/07/2114m 3s

The (de)colonizing of beauty | Sasha Sarago

Beauty is about more than the body you inhabit -- it's a way of being that goes beyond genetics or societal ideals. Aboriginal writer and former model Sasha Sarago invites you to decolonize beauty, moving away from the monolithic Eurocentric archetype and towards a more essential, authentic understanding of self that belongs to everyone.
20/07/2111m 10s

Why COP26 is our best chance for a greener future | Alok Sharma

Something powerful is happening around the world. The issue of climate change has moved from the margins to the mainstream, says Alok Sharma, the President-Designate of COP26, the United Nations climate conference set to take place in November 2021 in Glasgow, Scotland. He unpacks what this shift means for the world economy and the accelerating "green industrial revolution" -- and lays out the urgent actions that need to happen in order to limit global temperature rise.
19/07/218m 26s

3 myths about racism that keep the US from progress | Candis Watts Smith

Racism morphs, spreading and hiding behind numerous half-truths and full-blown falsities about where it lives and who embodies it. In this actionable talk, political scientist Candis Watts Smith debunks three widely accepted myths about racism in the US and calls for a nuanced, more expansive definition to support this new era of anti-racist action.
16/07/2110m 21s

How racial bias works -- and how to disrupt it | Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Our brains create categories to make sense of the world, recognize patterns and make quick decisions. But this ability to categorize also exacts a heavy toll in the form of unconscious bias. In this powerful talk, psychologist Jennifer L. Eberhardt explores how our biases unfairly target Black people at all levels of society -- from schools and social media to policing and criminal justice -- and discusses how creating points of friction can help us actively interrupt and address this troubling problem.
15/07/2114m 17s

The missing 96 percent of the universe | Claire Malone

We've misplaced the building blocks of the cosmos -- and particle physicists like Claire Malone are on a mission to find them. Despite scientists hitting a "major snag" in uncovering what exactly makes up dark matter and dark energy, she explains how questioning our fundamental understanding of nature itself invites a different, more meaningful perspective universally.
14/07/2112m 44s

The link between menopause and gender inequity at work | Andrea Berchowitz

Hot flashes, joint pain, anxiety, depression, difficulty sleeping -- these unforgiving menopause symptoms directly impact work but often go overlooked and under-discussed as a taboo topic, says entrepreneur Andrea Berchowitz. She gives practical advice on how to create a menopause-friendly work culture that supports gender equity and diversity retention in the workplace.
13/07/218m 20s

How Dolly Parton led me to an epiphany | Jad Abumrad

How do you end a story? Host of "Radiolab" Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.
12/07/2113m 11s

Documentary films that explore trauma -- and make space for healing | Almudena Toral

Through documentary films following survivors of trauma, TED Fellow Almudena Toral makes invisible psychological scars seen. She shares the heartbreaking story of Adayanci Pérez, a six-year-old girl from Guatemala suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to her encounter with US immigration enforcement. A powerful call to give voice to those who are silenced -- and pressure governments to change their course of action.
09/07/215m 37s

Why you think you're right -- even if you're wrong | Julia Galef

Perspective is everything, especially when it comes to examining your beliefs. Are you a soldier, prone to defending your viewpoint at all costs -- or a scout, spurred by curiosity? Julia Galef examines the motivations behind these two mindsets and how they shape the way we interpret information, interweaved with a compelling history lesson from 19th-century France. When your steadfast opinions are tested, Galef asks: "What do you most yearn for? Do you yearn to defend your own beliefs or do you yearn to see the world as clearly as you possibly can?"
08/07/2111m 37s

What should humans take to space (and leave behind)? | Jorge Mañes Rubio

One day, humans will explore space en masse and live scattered across the solar system on planets like Mars and beyond. Inspired by his time as artist-in-residence at the European Space Agency, TED Fellow Jorge Mañes Rubio wants to rethink what we need to bring on this grand journey -- and more importantly, what we should leave behind. Mañes Rubio takes us on an Earthbound journey through cultural practices and his own designs that blend science, art and ritual, encouraging a bold reimagining of what a future free of prejudice and exploitation could look like.
07/07/219m 16s

Why aren't there more Native American restaurants? | Sean Sherman

When you think of North American cuisine, do Indigenous foods come to mind? Chef Sean Sherman serves up an essential history lesson that explains the absence of Native American culinary traditions across the continent, highlighting why revitalizing Indigenous education sits at the center of a better diet and healthier relationship with the planet.
06/07/2118m 7s

A simple strategy to reclaim your time | TEDx SHORTS

Ashley Whillans shares strategies to help overcome "time poverty," and get the most out of our social relationships and careers. This talk was filmed at TEDxCambridge. All TEDx events are organized independently by volunteers in the spirit of TED's mission of ideas worth spreading. Listen and subscribe to TEDx SHORTS and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
05/07/217m 17s

What you might not know about the Declaration of Independence | Kenneth C. Davis

In June 1776, a little over a year after the start of the American Revolutionary War, the US Continental Congress huddled together in a hot room in Philadelphia to talk independence. Historian Kenneth C. Davis dives into some of the lesser known facts about the process of writing the Declaration of Independence and questions one very controversial omission. (Directed by Karrot Animation, narrated by Kenneth C. Davis)
04/07/213m 23s

How music streaming transformed songwriting | Björn Ulvaeus

Money, money, money ... in the music business, there seems to be little left for the songwriters that fuel it. ABBA co-founder Björn Ulvaeus calls for the industry to support its most valuable asset, breaking down how the streaming revolution impacts creator royalties, careers and craft -- and outlines what can be done to truly thank artists for the music.
02/07/2118m 16s

How to turn grit into a lifelong habit | Angela Duckworth | The TED Interview

What does it take to persevere and succeed, not just in our careers but in all aspects of our lives? For psychologist Angela Duckworth, the answer can be summed up in one concept: grit. She explains the ingredients in grit and the experiences that make one person persist where another gives up -- and offers concrete steps to instill grit early in life and sustain it. Listen and subscribe to The TED Interview and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
01/07/211h 0m

The infinite alchemy of storytelling | Zahra Al-Mahdi

TED Fellow Zahra Al-Mahdi was raised by screens -- "storytelling machines" like TV and the internet that shaped her sense of self and reality. Now a multimedia artist and filmmaker, she challenges common historical narratives and brings a multiplicity of perspectives to the surface. In this dynamic talk, Al-Mahdi traces her development as a storyteller using satire, dark humor and tactile collage techniques to expand what we think we know about ourselves.
30/06/214m 32s

Why we're more honest with machines than people | Anne Scherer

For a genuine conversation, consider talking to a robot; the less humanized, the better. Consumer researcher Anne Scherer shares her findings on why some machines get us to open up better than actual people, revealing fascinating insights about human nature that could lead to more honest interactions in our day-to-day lives.
29/06/2111m 13s

How to heat your home without hurting the planet | Kathy Hannun

Of all the mundane yet astonishing marvels of human ingenuity, knowing what it takes to heat a room to a comfortable temperature is TED Fellow Kathy Hannun's favorite. She takes us on a journey across the planet and under the sea to emphasize the dangers of modern heating, and offers a safer, planet-friendly alternative that taps into the geothermal energy right below our feet.
28/06/215m 16s

What to do when climate change feels unstoppable | Clover Hogan

Today's youth have inherited a big, unprecedented climate problem to solve -- and the eco-anxiety to go with it. Gen-Zer and activist Clover Hogan knows the struggle firsthand, but she also understands the path to climate action starts with the one thing you can control: your mindset. She explains why challenging the stories that keep you feeling powerless can help you take the first step to protecting the planet for generations to come.
25/06/2112m 34s

How deepfakes undermine truth and threaten democracy | Danielle Citron

The use of deepfake technology to manipulate video and audio for malicious purposes -- whether it's to stoke violence or defame politicians and journalists -- is becoming a real threat. As these tools become more accessible and their products more realistic, how will they shape what we believe about the world? In a portentous talk, law professor Danielle Citron reveals how deepfakes magnify our distrust -- and suggests approaches to safeguarding the truth.
24/06/2113m 16s

The life-saving tech helping mothers make healthy decisions | Aparna Hegde

Overcrowded clinics, extensive wait times and overworked doctors are taking a devastating toll on mothers and children in India. In this eye-opening talk, urogynecologist and TED Fellow Aparna Hegde exposes the systemic gaps that lead to preventable deaths every minute -- and introduces scalable, affordable and empowering tech solutions that improve maternal and child health outcomes, upend patriarchal family dynamics and save lives.
23/06/217m 58s

The search for microscopic aliens | Sarah Rugheimer

Astrophysicist and TED Fellow Sarah Rugheimer searches for aliens -- but not the cartoony green kind. She's looking for extraterrestrial microbes by studying how these single-celled organisms emit gases, which could reveal evidence of them throughout the cosmos. Wondering if we're really alone in the universe, Rugheimer identifies two big hurdles to confirming life on another world and offers insight into what finding it might mean for us.
22/06/215m 38s

The emotions behind your money habits | Robert A. Belle

Your money habits reveal a lot about you: your hopes, fears, dreams and other deep personal truths you may not even be aware of, says accountant Robert A. Belle. He shares how taking stock of your transaction history can unlock surprisingly valuable insights about what drives you to spend (and save) -- and provides practical tips on how to perform an "emotional audit" of your expenses.
21/06/218m 43s

How marijuana reform could repair, reclaim and restore communities | Khadijah Tribble

The war on drugs in the United States undid much of the progress of the Civil Rights Movement -- and today, it continues to derail millions within marginalized communities with arrests, convictions and incarcerations for marijuana possession. As more states move to legalize cannabis, social entrepreneur and activist Khadijah Tribble calls for equitable reform that centers on the casualties of the war and its insidious policies and paves a path toward restorative justice.
18/06/2110m 32s

How to find meaning after loss | David Kessler

You may be familiar with the five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. After decades of research and his own experience with tragic loss, grief expert David Kessler ventured beyond that classic framework and sought a sixth, crucial stage: meaning. He shares practical wisdom and strategies for anyone seeking to honor a loved one's memory and move through life in light of personal loss. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
17/06/2112m 52s

A new approach to defending the human rights of migrants | Itamar Mann

In this gripping talk, litigator and TED Fellow Itamar Mann details the perilous boat migrations of asylum seekers crossing the Mediterranean Sea. With a surplus of evidence gathered by researchers and activists, he explains how lawyers are making progress in prosecuting human rights abuses happening on militarized coasts. On a basic human level, Mann speaks to the obligation we have to defend each other's right to a dignified life -- because the future of how we inhabit the planet together depends on it.
16/06/215m 30s

How to be a professional troublemaker | Luvvie Ajayi Jones

Disrupting the status quo can be scary, but sometimes it's necessary to make the world a fairer place. Reclaiming what it means to be a troublemaker, author Luvvie Ajayi Jones shares three questions to ask yourself when tackling fear and standing up for what you believe in -- and urges all of us to speak up in ways that honor ourselves and others. (This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
15/06/2113m 14s

An app that empowers people to solve their legal problems | Rohan Pavuluri

If you can't afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you, right? Not in US civil court. From high legal fees to confusing paperwork and expensive lawyers, it can be difficult to settle civil matters. Entrepreneur and TED Fellow Rohan Pavuluri is working to streamline cumbersome legal processes with an app that empowers people to solve their own legal problems.
14/06/216m 2s

A queer journey from shame to self-love | Crystal Rasmussen

If you've sanded down your edges to fit in, it's time to bring them back -- there's power, value and beauty there, says Crystal Rasmussen. With candor and humility, Rasmussen shares their experience navigating shame, how it manifests in ourselves and the world and the ways drag revealed a path toward self-love and acceptance. A talk for anyone struggling with becoming exactly who they're meant to be -- and a reminder that it's rarely easy but always worth it.
11/06/2110m 30s

The real-life superheroes helping Syrian refugees | Feras Fayyad

Society has a set of stories it tells itself about who refugees are and what they look like, says documentarian and TED Fellow Feras Fayyad. With his films, he's on a mission to separate the facts about refugees from fiction, as a form of resistance -- for himself, his daughter and the millions of other Syrian refugees across the world. A harrowing account, a quest to end injustice and a testament to the power of storytelling.
10/06/216m 33s

A feminist reimagining of Kenya's public transport | Naomi Mwaura

Kenya's minibuses -- known as "matatus" -- offer a convenient, affordable and colorful way for people to get around. But they also pose safety risks and accessibility issues for many of their passengers, especially women. Bringing a feminist perspective, activist and TED Fellow Naomi Mwaura calls for a revolution in public transportation by making routes transparent, protecting passengers from harassment and paving a career path for women in the industry.
09/06/215m 22s

How to support yourself (and others) through grief | Nina Westbrook

In big and small ways, we all experience loss: whether it's the passing of a loved one, the close of a career or even the end of a dream. Explaining how to process many types of sorrow, marriage and family therapist Nina Westbrook highlights the importance of grief as a natural emotion and a powerful lens to help you imagine new futures -- and shares ways to support yourself and others through difficult times. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
08/06/217m 10s

How your body could become its own diagnostic lab | Aaron Morris

We need an inside-out approach to how we diagnose disease, says immuno-engineer and TED Fellow Aaron Morris. Introducing cutting-edge medical research, he unveils implantable technology that gives real-time, continuous analysis of a patient's health at the molecular level. "We're creating a diagnostic lab inside your body," Morris says -- and it may pave the way to diagnosing and treating disease better and faster than ever before.
07/06/215m 19s

Essential questions to ask your future self | Meg Jay

How much do you think about your future self? If your answer is not much, you're not alone. It can be difficult to plan for a version of yourself you haven't met yet, says psychologist Meg Jay. Sharing how to close the empathy gap between you and your future selves, she outlines courageous questions to ask about how your present and future can align, so you can begin to achieve your goals. (This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of a TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
05/06/2110m 16s

The multibillion-dollar US prison industry -- and how to dismantle it | Bianca Tylek

A phone call to a US prison or jail can cost up to a dollar per minute -- a rate that forces one in three families with incarcerated loved ones into debt. In this searing talk about mass incarceration, criminal justice advocate and TED Fellow Bianca Tylek exposes the predatory nature of the billion-dollar prison telecom industry and presents straightforward strategies to dismantle the network of corporations that has a financial interest in seeing more people behind bars for longer periods of time.
04/06/215m 57s

The anxiety that comes from being treated like an outsider | Valerie Purdie-Greenaway

The stress you may feel being otherized or stereotyped can take a significant toll on your health and well-being. In this thoughtful conversation, social psychologist Valerie Purdie-Greenaway reveals the true source of this anxiety (hint: it isn't the individual) and shares strategies on building resilient systems of support for ourselves and others -- so that we can build a more inclusive, empathic and just world. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
03/06/2111m 20s

Who makes judges? | Jessica Kerr

What qualifies someone to become a judge? The answer is surprisingly vague and even taboo to discuss. Lawyer Jessica Kerr sifts through the murky, mysterious process that sits at the center of the Commonwealth judicial system in countries like Australia -- and makes the case for "judge school," a legal education better fit to bring justice, legitimacy and public trust to any court.
02/06/2112m 50s

Playful, wondrous public spaces built for community and possibility | Matthew Mazzotta

Introducing a new type of public space, custom-fit for communities in need of a shot of hope and wonder. Artist and TED Fellow Matthew Mazzotta takes us across the US, sharing delightful projects that refresh space and place, spark collective conversation and reignite a sense of possibility and purpose in their surroundings.
01/06/214m 49s

Climate change will displace millions. Here's how we prepare | Colette Pichon Battle

Scientists predict climate change will displace more than 180 million people by 2100 -- a crisis of "climate migration" the world isn't ready for, says disaster recovery lawyer and Louisiana native Colette Pichon Battle. In this passionate, lyrical talk, she urges us to radically restructure the economic and social systems that are driving climate migration -- and caused it in the first place -- and shares how we can cultivate collective resilience, better prepare before disaster strikes and advance human rights for all.
31/05/2112m 47s

The rigged test of leadership | Sophie Williams

The glass cliff: an experience of taking on a leadership role only to find that your chances of success have been limited before you've even begun. Equality activist Sophie Williams explores the research-backed reasons behind this workplace phenomenon and how it overwhelmingly affects underrepresented groups, despite a facade of progress and inclusion. Learn more about the biases and behaviors that set people up for failure -- and what can be done to make the path to success in leadership better for everyone.
28/05/2113m 28s

What farmers need to be modern, climate-friendly and profitable | Beth Ford

Farming feeds all of us -- yet in rural communities, farmers are under pressure from mounting climate volatility and limited access to modern tools like the internet. How can agriculture stay resilient and grow with the times? Beth Ford, CEO of the farming co-op Land O'Lakes, shares her plan to establish broadband as a basic right nationwide and talks through an exciting range of climate-friendly innovations aimed at making farmers more sustainable and profitable. (This virtual conversation, hosted by TED business curator Corey Hajim, was recorded March 2, 2020.)
27/05/2113m 46s

How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young

Dirt biking is more than just a pastime -- it's an opportunity to disrupt the cycle of poverty and provide enriching STEM education, says TED Fellow Brittany Young. In this perspective-shifting talk, she shares how her team is working with students and street riders to create safe spaces, transferable skills and community.
26/05/215m 56s

Electronic pills that could transform how we treat disease | Khalil Ramadi

Could a small jolt of electricity to your gut help treat chronic diseases? Medical hacker and TED Fellow Khalil Ramadi is developing a new, noninvasive therapy that could treat diseases like diabetes, obesity, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's with an electronic pill. More targeted than a traditional pill and less invasive than surgery, these micro-devices contain electronics that deliver "bionudges" -- bursts of electrical or chemical stimuli -- to the gut, potentially helping control appetite, aid digestion, regulate hormones -- and even stimulate happiness in the brain.
25/05/214m 53s

The death of the universe -- and what it means for life | Katie Mack

The universe started with a bang -- but how will it end? With astonishing visuals, cosmologist and TED Fellow Katie Mack takes us to the theoretical end of everything, some trillions of years in the future, in a profound meditation on existence, wonder and the legacy of humanity within the immensity of time and space.
24/05/216m 24s

The cure for burnout (hint: it isn't self-care) | Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski

You may be experiencing burnout and not even know it, say authors (and sisters) Emily and Amelia Nagoski. In an introspective and deeply relatable conversation, they detail three telltale signs that stress is getting the best of you -- and share actionable ways to feel safe in your own body when you're burning out. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
21/05/2118m 23s

How NASA invented a ventilator for COVID-19 ... in 37 days | Dan Goods

Get the behind-the-scenes story from visual strategist Dan Goods about how a single question launched NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab into action at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, propelling an unprecedented pivot from space-exploring robots to live-saving ventilators. It'll inspire you to wonder: "Is what I'm doing right now the most important thing I can be doing?"
20/05/217m 4s

Introducing Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter | TED Audio Collective

Should I do a juice cleanse? Do I really need eight glasses of water a day? Is it actually possible to "boost" my immune system? You're constantly bombarded with news stories, ads and social media posts telling you how to optimize your health -- but a lot of these sources that pretend to be backed by science have another agenda. Dr. Jen Gunter is here to bust the lies you're told -- and sold -- about your health, debunking some of the stickiest myths out there while helping you to understand how your body really works.
19/05/212m 10s

The best career path isn't always a straight line | Sarah Ellis and Helen Tupper

Conventional wisdom frames the ideal career path as a linear one -- a ladder to be climbed with a single-minded focus to get to the top. Career development consultants Sarah Ellis and Helen Tupper invite you to replace this outdated and limiting model with "squiggly" careers: dynamic, open-ended growth paths tailor-made for your individual needs, talents and ambitions. A radical rethink for anyone who feels restricted and defined by the limits of the corporate ladder.
18/05/219m 27s

Better cybersecurity starts with honesty and accountability | Nadya Bartol

In this practical talk, cybersecurity expert Nadya Bartol brings this crucial topic out into the open, lifting the shame around tech mistakes and offering creative ways to celebrate and reward good cybersecurity habits at work and beyond.
17/05/219m 51s

The science behind how parents affect child development | Yuko Munakata

Parents, take a deep breath: how your kids turn out isn't fully on you. Of course, parenting plays an important role in shaping who children become, but psychologist Yuko Munakata offers an alternative, research-backed reality that highlights how it's just one of many factors that influence the chaotic complexity of childhood development. A rethink for anyone wondering what made them who they are today and what it means to be a good parent.
14/05/2117m 7s

How to discover your "why" in difficult times | Simon Sinek

What has the coronavirus pandemic taught us about ourselves and our relationships? In a deeply personal and wide-ranging conversation, leadership expert Simon Sinek shares his own experience caring for his mental health as the world shut down. He discusses why we need to nurture friendships (in both good times and bad), explains why anyone can be a leader -- and reveals the secret to discovering your "why" in life. (This virtual conversation, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
13/05/2115m 39s

The case for co-ops, the invisible giant of the economy | Anu Puusa

Think capitalism is broken? Try cooperativism, says co-op enthusiast and researcher Anu Puusa. She lays out how cooperatives -- businesses owned, operated and controlled by their members -- can both make money and have a positive impact on the environment and local communities. With co-ops, Puusa says, doing good business and doing good at the same time becomes possible.
12/05/2111m 45s

Get comfortable with being uncomfortable | Luvvie Ajayi Jones

Luvvie Ajayi Jones isn't afraid to speak her mind or to be the one dissenting voice in a crowd, and neither should you. "Your silence serves no one," says the writer, activist and self-proclaimed professional troublemaker. In this bright, uplifting talk, Ajayi Jones shares three questions to ask yourself if you're teetering on the edge of speaking up or quieting down -- and encourages all of us to get a little more comfortable with being uncomfortable.
11/05/2110m 54s

How COVID-19 transformed the future of medicine | Daniel Kraft

The pandemic forced the world to work together like never before and, with unprecedented speed, bore a new age of health and medical innovation. Physician-scientist Daniel Kraft explains how breakthroughs and advancements like AI-infused antiviral discoveries and laboratory-level diagnostic tools accessible via smartphones are paving the way for a more democratized, connected and data-driven future of medicine and personalized care.
10/05/2114m 52s

What's your happiness score? | Dominic Price

How do you rediscover a happier, more purpose-driven (and less productivity-obsessed) self in the wake of the pandemic? Quiz yourself alongside work futurist Dominic Price as he lays out a simple yet insightful four-part guide to assessing your life in ways that can help you reconnect with what's really important.
07/05/2114m 46s

Why children of immigrants experience guilt -- and strategies to cope | Sahaj Kaur Kohli

Children of immigrants in the US often experience a unique kind of guilt, brought on by the pressures of navigating different cultures, living up to their parents' expectations and taking on extra family responsibilities. Mental health advocate Sahaj Kaur Kohli offers helpful strategies for dealing with these difficult feelings -- starting with defining your own values and creating space for self-compassion. (This conversation, hosted by TED speaker development curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
06/05/219m 18s

The future of flying is electrifying | Cory Combs

If you're a frequent flier, you're also a major polluter. What if there was a way to travel the world with less impact on the environment? In this quick, exciting talk, aviation entrepreneur and TED Fellow Cory Combs lays out how electric aircraft could make flying cleaner, quieter and more affordable -- and shares his work on Electric EEL, the largest hybrid-electric plane ever to fly.
05/05/214m 19s

7 tools for building a business people trust | Marcos Aguiar

Why do we trust some companies and not others? Using real-world examples, digital trust advisor Marcos Aguiar decodes this make-or-break quality -- and offers seven tools to help leaders design a foundation of trust into their business ecosystems in order to achieve long-term success.
04/05/2112m 44s

Women and girls, you are part of the climate solution | Rumaitha Al Busaidi

What does gender equality have to do with climate change? A lot more than you might think. Empowering women and girls around the world is one of the most important ways to combat carbon pollution and is projected to reduce CO2-equivalent gases by a total of 80 billion tons. Entrepreneur, scientist and TED Fellow Rumaitha Al Busaidi looks at why women are more likely to be impacted and displaced by climate catastrophes -- and explains why access to education, employment and family planning for all women and girls is the key to our climate future.
03/05/215m 15s

Mystery episode | TED Audio Collective

With this episode, we're having a bit of fun. You're about to hear a great episode of a TED Audio Collective podcast ... but, we can't tell you which one. We're randomly serving different episodes to our global audience. Check back in later, or on a different app? You might get something different! Though we can promise what you'll hear will be true to TED: a curated podcast for the curious, whether it's about business, design, science or philosophy. If you can handle the mystery, stick around -- and dive into our entire portfolio at audiocollective.ted.com.
30/04/2155s

What frogs in hot water can teach us about thinking again | Adam Grant

Why are humans so slow to react to looming crises, like a forewarned pandemic or a warming planet? It's because we're reluctant to rethink, say organizational psychologist Adam Grant. From a near-disastrous hike on Panama's highest mountain to courageously joining his high school's diving team, Grant borrows examples from his own life to illustrate how tunnel vision around our goals, habits and identities can find us stuck on a narrow path. Drawing on his research, he shares counterintuitive insights on how to broaden your focus and remain open to opportunities for rethinking.
29/04/2116m 2s

Why I'm done trying to be "man enough" | Justin Baldoni

Justin Baldoni wants to start a dialogue with men about redefining masculinity -- to figure out ways to be not just good men but good humans. In a warm, personal talk, he shares his effort to reconcile who he is with who the world tells him a man should be. And he has a challenge for men: "See if you can use the same qualities that you feel make you a man to go deeper," Baldoni says. "Your strength, your bravery, your toughness: Are you brave enough to be vulnerable? Are you strong enough to be sensitive? Are you confident enough to listen to the women in your life?"
28/04/2118m 31s

The intergenerational wisdom woven into Indigenous stories | Tai Simpson

The way we behave politically, socially, economically and ecologically isn't working, says community organizer and activist Tai Simpson. Sharing the creation myth of her Nez Perce tribe, she advocates for a return to the "old ways" guided by Indigenous wisdom that emphasize balance, community and the importance of intergenerational storytelling in order to protect what's sacred.
27/04/2117m 39s

Why you should get paid for your data | Jennifer Zhu Scott

The world's most valuable tech companies profit from the personal data you generate. So why aren't you getting paid for it? In this eye-opening talk, entrepreneur and technologist Jennifer Zhu Scott makes the case for private data ownership -- which would empower you to donate, destroy or sell your data as you see fit -- and shows how this growing movement could put power (and cash) back into the hands of people.
26/04/2114m 27s

Earth's original inhabitants -- and their role in combating climate change | Steven Allison

Every environment on the planet -- from forested mountaintops to scorching deserts and even the human gut -- has a microbiome that keeps it healthy and balanced. Ecologist Steven Allison explores how these extraordinarily adaptable, diverse collections of microorganisms could help solve big global problems like climate change and food insecurity -- and makes the case for getting to know Earth's original inhabitants in fascinating ways.
24/04/2110m 28s

The race to build AI that benefits humanity with Sam Altman | The TED Interview

In this new season of The TED Interview, conversations with people who make a case for ... optimism. Not some blind, hopeful feeling, but the conviction that somewhere out there are solutions that, given the right attention and resources, can guide us out of the dark place we're in. For the first episode: artificial intelligence. Will innovation in AI drastically improve our lives, or destroy humanity as we know it? Head of TED Chris Anderson sits down with OpenAI CEO Sam Altman, who makes a case for AI's potential to make the future better for all of us -- and explains how his company is leading that charge with an unusual new business model. Listen and subscribe to The TED Interview and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective wherever you're listening to this.
23/04/211h 9m

3 strategies for effectively talking about climate change | John Marshall

Which sounds more urgent: "global warming" or "pollution blanket overheating planet"? In this actionable talk, communications strategist John Marshall explains why we need to rethink how we talk about climate change -- and offers small but mighty language adjustments to get people to more intuitively understand and care about this existential threat.
22/04/217m 50s

How your memory works -- and why forgetting is totally OK | Lisa Genova

Have you ever misplaced something you were just holding? Completely blanked on a famous actor's name? Walked into a room and immediately forgot why? Neuroscientist Lisa Genova digs into two types of memory failures we regularly experience -- and reassures us that forgetting is totally normal. Stay tuned for a conversation with TED science curator David Biello, where Genova describes the difference between common moments of forgetting and possible signs of Alzheimer's, debunks a widespread myth about brain capacity and shares what you can do to keep your brain healthy and your memory sharp. (This virtual conversation was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
21/04/2122m 25s

The global cooperation that accelerated the COVID-19 vaccines | Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw

Biotech entrepreneur Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw shares lessons learned from the global effort to develop COVID-19 vaccines: namely, the power of collaboration and the importance of equitable access to health care. Learn more about the innovative partnerships that helped create the vaccines -- and how India became a crucial player in the supply chain delivering millions of doses to the world. (This virtual conversation, hosted by TED technology curator Simone Ross, was recorded March 2021.)
20/04/2114m 19s

Can we learn to talk to sperm whales? | David Gruber

Animals are communicating -- but what are they saying? And can we talk back? Marine biologist David Gruber introduces Project CETI: a team of scientists, linguists and AI specialists hoping to decode sperm whale language. Using noninvasive robots and a machine-learning algorithm to collect and analyze millions of sperm whale vocalizations known as coda, the team aims to demystify the communication structures and dialects of these majestic creatures -- and possibly even crack the interspecies communication code. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
19/04/216m 39s

Why good ideas get trapped in the valley of death -- and how to rescue them | TED-Ed

All new products must pass through the "valley of death" before they reach the market. Many never make it out, and sometimes that's OK -- if they don't work, don't fill a need or for any number of reasons. One of the fields where this problem is most pressing is zero-carbon technologies. Why is it vulnerable to this trap, and can we change it? Explore how to break the cycle of the funding gap. [Written by Elizabeth Cox and George Zaidan, directed by Lisa LaBracio, narrated by Jack Cutmore-Scott]
17/04/214m 49s

Navigating career turbulence | WorkLife with Adam Grant

Everyone's career will hit some turbulence at some point. Instead of pushing harder against the headwinds, we're sometimes better off tilting our rudder and charting a new course. In this episode, host Adam Grant speaks with people who have taken unusual steps to battle uncertainty, rethought their approach to finding and landing a job and reached out for help in unexpected places -- as well as an expert on recessions who forecasts the future by looking to the past. Listen and subscribe to WorkLife with Adam Grant and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective wherever you're listening to this.
16/04/2135m 28s

Why corporate diversity programs fail -- and how small tweaks can have big impact | Joan C. Williams

Companies in the US spend billions of dollars each year on diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives, but subtle (and not so subtle) workplace biases often cost these initiatives -- and the people they're meant to help -- big time by undermining their goals. DEI expert Joan C. Williams identifies five common patterns of bias that cause these programs to fail -- and offers a data-driven approach to pinpoint where things go wrong and how to make progress instead.
15/04/2114m 43s

A NASA astronaut's lessons on fear, confidence and preparing for spaceflight | Megan McArthur

How does an astronaut prepare physically and mentally to launch into space? NASA astronaut Megan McArthur, who traveled to the International Space Station in April 2021 as part of the SpaceX Crew-2 mission, shares stellar life lessons on how to cultivate the resolve to do incredible things through preparation -- and a dash of bravery. A rare glimpse at what it takes to literally shoot for the stars. (This virtual conversation, hosted by TEDWomen curator Pat Mitchell, was recorded in November 2020.)
14/04/2110m 52s

4 myths and misunderstandings about doing business in Africa | Nomava Zanazo

Business in Africa is booming -- but international companies are missing out, says emerging markets expert Nomava Zanazo. Rushing in without knowing their customers, businesses underestimate Africans and make costly assumptions about their diversity, preferences and buying power. Sharing the basics about what companies need to know to succeed on the continent, Zanazo debunks four myths and misunderstandings about Africa and its citizens -- and invites businesses from overseas to share in its wealth ... once they've done their research.
13/04/2112m 5s

The giant leaps in language technology -- and who's left behind | Kalika Bali

Thousands of languages thrive across the globe, yet modern speech technology -- with all of its benefits -- supports just over a hundred. Computational linguist Kalika Bali dreams of a day when technology acts as a bridge instead of a barrier, working passionately to build new and inclusive systems for the millions who speak low-resource languages. In this perspective-shifting talk, she outlines what happens when a language is omitted from the digital landscape -- and what can be gained when communities keep pace with the future.
12/04/2116m 21s

The material that could change the world ... for a third time | TED-Ed

Today roads, sidewalks, bridges and skyscrapers are made of a material called concrete. There's three tons of it for every person on earth. It's also played a surprisingly large role in rising global temperatures over the last century. So, what exactly makes concrete problematic, and what can we do to fix it? Explore how scientists are working to create a cleaner, more sustainable concrete. [Written by Elizabeth Cox and George Zaidan, directed by Lisa LaBracio, narrated by Jack Cutmore-Scott, music by André Aires]
10/04/215m 6s

Mantua Townshi‪p‬ | Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala

With each step, you slide 400,000 years back in time. Where are you? Behind a hardware store in New Jersey -- which also happens to be a massive prehistoric graveyard. The only thing that can save it from turning into an apartment complex is geologist Ken Lacovara and a community effort unlike any attempted before. Hear how this town of 15,000 tapped into a 66-million-year-old murder mystery -- and learn why solving it is so important to our own future on earth. Listen and subscribe to Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective wherever you're listening to this.
09/04/2139m 54s

How we can curb climate change by spending two percent more on everything | Jens Burchardt

Would you pay two percent more for the carbon-neutral version of the products you buy and use every day? In this innovative talk, climate pathfinder Jens Burchardt walks us through the costs and considerations of producing planet-friendly products -- from creation to purchase -- and explains why curbing climate change doesn't have to break the bank. It's an inspiring demonstration of how the barriers to a greener world may not be as insurmountable as we think.
08/04/2111m 33s

The routines, rituals and boundaries we need in stressful times | Esther Perel

How do you effectively regulate stress? Therapist Esther Perel discusses the importance of creating routines, rituals and boundaries to deal with pandemic-related loss and uncertainty -- both at home and at work -- and offers some practical tools and techniques to help you regain your sense of self. (This conversation, hosted by TED's Helen Walters, was recorded February 2021.)
07/04/2115m 34s

US politics isn't broken. It's fixed | Katherine M. Gehl

The "broken" US political system is actually working exactly as designed, says business leader and activist Katherine Gehl. Examining the system through a nonpartisan lens, she makes the case for voting innovations, already implemented in parts of the country, that give citizens more choice and incentivize politicians to work towards progress and solutions instead of just reelection.
06/04/2116m 49s

The exploitation of US college athletes | Tim Nevius

Colleges and universities in the US make billions of dollars each year from sports, compromising the health and education of athletes -- who are disproportionately Black -- in the name of money, power and pride. Sports lawyer and former NCAA investigator Tim Nevius exposes how the system exploits young talent and identifies fundamental reforms needed to protect players.
05/04/2110m 11s

Step 1: The Puls‪e‬ | ZigZag

ZigZag, a business podcast about being human, returns with The ZigZag Project: six steps (and episodes) to help you map out a path that aligns your personal values with your professional ambitions. In this first episode, host Manoush Zomorodi shares stories and data from the 150 listeners who volunteered to test the project. Learn why change requires spending time in "the neutral zone" -- and get your first assignment. Listen and subscribe to ZigZag and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective wherever you're listening to this.
02/04/2120m 49s

An honest history of an ancient and "nasty" word | Kate Lister

With candor and cunning, sex historian Kate Lister chronicles the curious journey of an ancient, honest word with innocent origins and a now-scandalous connotation in this uproarious love letter to etymology, queens, cows and all things "cunt." (This talk contains mature language.)
01/04/2119m 11s

Language around gender and identity evolves (and always has) | Archie Crowley

Dictionaries and grammar "rules" don't have the final word on language -- and believing they do can harm more than help, especially for the trans community. Sociolinguist Archie Crowley deconstructs three common myths around language, demonstrating how it's a fluid system that naturally evolves in the direction of inclusion.
31/03/2113m 14s

The future of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy | Rick Doblin

Could psychedelics help us heal from trauma and mental illnesses? Researcher Rick Doblin has spent the past three decades investigating this question, and the results are promising. In this fascinating dive into the science of psychedelics, he explains how drugs like LSD, psilocybin and MDMA affect your brain -- and shows how, when paired with psychotherapy, they could change the way we treat PTSD, depression, substance abuse and more.
30/03/2116m 32s

Why winning doesn't always equal success | Valorie Kondos Field

Valorie Kondos Field knows a lot about winning. As the longtime coach of the UCLA women's gymnastics team, she won championship after championship and has been widely acclaimed for her leadership. In this inspiring, brutally honest and, at times, gut-wrenching talk, she shares the secret to her success. Hint: it has nothing to do with "winning."
29/03/2115m 49s

What science taught me about being a Muslim drag quee‪n‬ | TEDx SHORTS

For a long time, Amrou Al-Kadhi struggled to negotiate the intersections between their queer and Islamic heritage. These identities felt completely polarized, as if their identity were founded on a tectonic fault at constant risk of rupture. Yet, it was the unlikely world of quantum physics that allowed Al-Kadhi to find the magic of contradictions -- and to revel in their intersectional identity. Listen and subscribe to TEDx SHORTS and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
26/03/214m 42s

An election system that puts voters (not politicians) first | Amber McReynolds

From hours-long lines and limited polling locations to confusing and discriminatory registration policies, why is it so hard to vote in the US? Voting rights expert Amber McReynolds offers a proven alternative: a new process, already happening in parts of the country, that could bring accountability, transparency and equity to the outdated and sputtering system that American democracy currently relies on.
25/03/2110m 19s

Why I photograph the quiet moments of grief and loss | Caroline Catlin

The only thing as powerful as our grief is the love we have for those we've lost, says photographer Caroline Catlin. In this meditation on the intersection of life and death, Catlin shares how her personal journey with loss drove her to capture the elusive moments of grace and beauty that exist even in the hardest moments imaginable.
24/03/2113m 29s

Possible futures from the intersection of nature, tech and society | Natsai Audrey Chieza

Biodesigner Natsai Audrey Chieza prototypes the future, imagining a world where people and nature can thrive together. In this wildly imaginative talk, she shares the vision behind her innovation lab, which works at the intersection of nature, technology and society to create sustainable materials and models for the future. Chieza invites us to consider what kind of world we wish for -- and what systemic changes and collaborations need to happen for it to exist.
23/03/218m 42s

The innovations we need to avoid a climate disaster | Bill Gates

The single most important thing for avoiding a climate disaster is cutting carbon pollution from the current 51 billion tons per year to zero, says philanthropist and technologist Bill Gates. Introducing the concept of the "green premium" -- the higher price of zero-emission products like electric cars, artificial meat or sustainable aviation fuel -- Gates identifies the breakthroughs and investments we need to reduce the cost of clean tech, decarbonize the economy and create a pathway to a clean and prosperous future for all. (This virtual conversation, hosted by TED Global curator Bruno Giussani, was recorded in March 2021.)
22/03/2148m 21s

The Power of Spaces | TED Radio Hour

How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes and buildings give us meaning and purpose? In this segment, architect Michael Murphy joins host Manoush Zomorodi to explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. To listen to the whole episode, find TED Radio Hour wherever you're listening to this. And explore the world of the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
19/03/2111m 50s

Online learning could change academia -- for good | Tyler Dewitt

Higher education remains rooted in rigid, traditional structures and tracks -- and it's at risk of getting left behind in favor of expanded access, greater flexibility and tailored learning. Educator Tyler DeWitt explains how innovations in digital content and virtual reality are ushering in the future of learning, emphasizing why academia must adapt to this new reality and embrace an approach to education that works with students' needs -- not against them.
18/03/2113m 56s

How to have constructive conversations | Julia Dhar

"We need to figure out how we go into conversations not looking for the victory, but the progress," says world debate champion Julia Dhar. In this practical talk, she shares three essential features of productive disagreements grounded in curiosity and purpose. The end result? Constructive conversations that sharpen your argument and strengthen your relationships.
17/03/2110m 40s

How synthetic biology can improve our health, food and materials | Emily Leproust

What if we could use biology to restore our balance with nature without giving up modern creature comforts? Advocating for a new kind of environmentalism, scientist and entrepreneur Emily Leproust rethinks modern sustainability at the molecular level, using synthetic biology to create green alternatives. From lab-developed insulin and disease-resistant bananas to airplanes made of super-strong spider silk, she explains how reading and writing DNA can lead to groundbreaking innovations in health, food and materials.
16/03/2111m 7s

What if mental health workers responded to emergency calls? | Leslie Herod

When you report an emergency in the US, police, firefighters or paramedics answer the call. What if mental health professionals responded, too? Colorado State Representative Leslie Herod shares a straightforward and research-backed approach that brings heart and humanity to criminal justice rather than unnecessary fines and arrests -- and keeps crises from escalating into traumatic, or even deadly, events.
15/03/219m 43s

How to challenge conventional wisdom -- and change any industry | How to Be a Better Human

Do you think Hollywood needs to change? How about your own industry? It's difficult to get decision makers to step outside of the tried-and-true and attempt something new. In this episode, host Chris Duffy sits down with Franklin Leonard -- founder and CEO of the Black List, a company that elevates great screenplays and the writers who create them -- to discuss how he shifted the way Hollywood works, and how anyone can catalyze change by questioning whether the conventional wisdom is all convention and no wisdom. Listen and subscribe to How to Be a Better Human and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
12/03/2127m 30s

4 lessons the pandemic taught us about work, life and balance | Patty McCord

The COVID-19 pandemic changed the way we work for good. Can it also change it for the better? Consultant Patty McCord reviews four key insights employers and employees alike gleaned from their shift to working from home -- and shares how companies can use what they learned in lockdown to creatively and innovatively rethink how we do business.
11/03/217m 50s

What is deep tech? A look at how it could shape the future | Antoine Gourévitch

How do companies like SpaceX make sudden breakthroughs on decades-old challenges? Emerging tech expert Antoine Gourévitch explains how deep tech -- a new approach to innovation that merges science, engineering and design thinking -- is unlocking solutions to problems in space exploration, biology, energy and more. As Gourévitch says: "[deep tech] is changing what was once considered impossible into something actively possible, today."
10/03/2110m 59s

Love, sorrow and the emotions that power climate action | Knut Ivar Bjørlykhaug

Picture your favorite place in nature. How would you feel if it disappeared tomorrow? In this love letter to the planet, social worker and environmental activist Knut Ivar Bjørlykhaug invites us to confront the deep, difficult emotions -- love, sorrow and even rage -- born from climate-driven ecological loss in order to act in service of our collective home.
09/03/2112m 50s

The myth of bringing your full, authentic self to work | Jodi-Ann Burey

Calls for authenticity at work ask for passionate people with diverse, fresh perspectives who challenge old ways of thinking. But too often workplace culture fails to support the authenticity of professionals of color and other underrepresented groups, leading instead to backlash and fewer opportunities. Writer Jodi-Ann Burey outlines steps toward exposing privilege and achieving true equity on the job -- and implores those in leadership positions to accept responsibility for change.
08/03/2115m 32s

Should we cry at work? | TED Business

Feelings are complicated. And even more so at work. We like to believe the ultimate professional is stoic, but what important information do we miss when we disregard our emotions on the job? In this episode, Harvard psychologist Susan David helps us break free from the "tyranny of positivity" and embrace the full range of our emotions. After the talk, host Modupe Akinola extends this idea to the workplace by examining a time she shed tears at a meeting with colleagues. Listen and subscribe to TED Business and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
05/03/2124m 6s

Climate change is our reality. Here's how we're taking action | Al Gore, Gloria Kasang Bulus, Nana Firman, Ximena Loría and Tim Guinee

With the Climate Reality Project, Al Gore is helping mold future leaders to build the movement for climate survival and social justice from the ground up. He introduces us to four of the Project's graduates, each of whom confronts climate change on their own terms: Ximena Loría, founder of Misión 2 Grados, an NGO influencing public policy in Central America; Nana Firman, "daughter of the rainforest" and advocate for climate justice among Indigenous peoples; Gloria Kasang Bulus, a Nigerian activist for women and education; and Tim Guinee, a first responder and climate change fighter in upstate New York. Together, they're gathering local actors into a global, grassroots movement that aims to turn the climate fight around.
04/03/216m 46s

My mother's final wish -- and the right to die with dignity | Elaine Fong

After a terminal cancer diagnosis upended 12 years of remission, all Elaine Fong's mother wanted was a peaceful end of life. What she received instead became a fight for the right to decide when. Fong shares the heart-rending journey to honor her mother's choice for a death with dignity -- and reflects on the need to explore our relationship to dying so that we may redesign this final and most universal of human experiences.
03/03/2121m 22s

How compassion could save your strained relationships | Betty Hart

When personal relationships and ideological differences collide, the result can lead to strained relations -- or even years of silence and distance. Actor Betty Hart offers an alternative to cold shoulders and haughty hellos: compassion, and a chance for growth and change instead of losing important time with loved ones.
02/03/2111m 3s

How video game skills can get you ahead in life | William Collis

What does it take to be a pro gamer? Esports expert William Collis charts the rise of the multibillion-dollar competitive gaming industry and breaks down three skills needed to master video games like Fortnite, League of Legends and Rocket League. And watch out, Collis says: these skills can set you up for crushing it at work, too.
01/03/2110m 21s

Cheryl Strayed | Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Debbie Millman talks to author Cheryl Strayed about her childhood, career and the value of taking a very long hike. Listen and subscribe to Design Matters with Debbie Millman and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
26/02/2156m 38s

The value of your humanity in an automated future | Kevin Roose

To futureproof your job against robots and AI, you should learn how to code, brush up on your math skills and crack open an engineering textbook, right? Wrong. In this surprisingly comforting talk, tech journalist Kevin Roose makes the case that rather than trying to compete with the machines, we should instead focus on what makes us uniquely human.
25/02/2110m 49s

The people who caused the climate crisis aren't the ones who will fix it | Angela Mahecha Adrar

Corporations and big business have wrecked the environment, but disadvantaged communities living in "sacrifice zones" -- urban areas heavily polluted and poisoned by industry -- are paying the price, says climate justice leader Angela Mahecha Adrar. Explaining why racial and economic justice must be at the center of climate action, she takes us to the frontline communities that are leading the world to clean, innovative and just climate solutions -- like Cooperativa Tierra y Libertad, a local farm co-op in Washington that's disrupting the multibillion-dollar berry business.
24/02/2112m 38s

Why there's no such thing as objective reality | Greg Anderson

In the grand scheme of history, modern reality is a bizarre exception when compared to the worlds of ancient, precolonial and Indigenous civilizations, where myths ruled and gods roamed, says historian Greg Anderson. So why do Westerners today think they're right about reality and everybody else is wrong? Anderson tears into the fabric of objective reality to reveal the many universes that lie beyond -- and encourages a healthy reimagining of what other possible ways of being human could look like.
23/02/2116m 18s

"Aliens built the pyramids" and other absurdities of pseudo-archaeology | Sarah Kurnick

Aliens have invaded ancient history: they've cropped up in humanity's past through popular television and movies, displacing facts with absurd yet commonplace beliefs like "aliens built the pyramids." Archaeologist Sarah Kurnick illustrates why these misconceptions perpetuate racist and xenophobic notions of history and culture -- and demonstrates how you can help debunk these dangerous, outlandish myths.
22/02/2112m 3s

The US is back in the Paris Agreement. What's next? | John Kerry and Al Gore

On his first day as president, Joe Biden signed a letter of acceptance that set in motion the 30-day process for the United States to re-join the Paris Agreement on climate. On the day the US returns to the accord, John Kerry, the US Special Envoy for Climate, sits down with Nobel Laureate Al Gore to discuss the make-or-break decade ahead of us. Listen as Kerry lays out how the US fits into the global plan to get to net-zero emissions, explains why the COP26 UN climate conference could be humanity's "last best hope" to build international momentum and explores the role of business and youth activists in promoting environmental justice. (This interview features an introduction from Christiana Figueres, the principal architect of the Paris Agreement.)
19/02/2138m 5s

How technology has changed what it's like to be deaf | Rebecca Knill

"Complete silence is very addictive," says Rebecca Knill, a writer who has cochlear implants that enable her to hear. In this funny, insightful talk, she explores the evolution of assistive listening technology, the outdated way people still respond to deafness and how we can shift our cultural understanding of ability to build a more inclusive world. "Technology has come so far," Knill says. "Our mindset just needs to catch up."
18/02/2113m 58s

How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics | Cara Greene Epstein

When catastrophe strikes, art prevails -- and has done so for centuries. In this fascinating talk, writer and director Cara Greene Epstein places the closing of theaters during the coronavirus pandemic in a historical context, exploring how we can use this intermission to imagine a more just, representative and beautiful world, onstage and off.
17/02/2114m 49s

I let algorithms randomize my life for two years | Max Hawkins

What if everything in your life was randomized: from the food you ate to the things you did and the places you traveled? Computer scientist Max Hawkins created algorithms to make decisions like these for him -- and got hooked on the experience for two years. He shares how relinquishing choice sent him across the world and opened him up to the beautiful complexity and richness of life. It makes you wonder: What lies just outside your comfort zone?
16/02/2111m 45s

The political power of being a good neighbor | Michael Tubbs

Michael Tubbs is the youngest mayor in American history to represent a city with more than 100,000 people -- and his policies are sparking national conversations. In this rousing talk, he shares how growing up amid poverty and violence in Stockton, California shaped his bold vision for change and his commitment to govern as a neighbor, not a politician. "When we see someone different from us, they should not reflect our fears, our anxieties, our insecurities," he says. "We should see our common humanity."
15/02/2117m 25s

The hidden history found in your teeth | Carolyn Freiwald

Your teeth carry secrets: centuries of history about your ancestors, from where they lived to what they ate and where they traveled. Bioarchaeologist Carolyn Freiwald traces the story of human migration across the Americas -- from Mayan royalty and Belizean buccaneers to rural Appalachian farmers -- to illustrate what ancient teeth can reveal about you.
12/02/2110m 49s

Technology can't fix inequality -- but training and opportunities could | 'Gbenga Sesan

Centuries of inequality can't be solved with access to technology alone -- we need to connect people with training and support too, says tech inclusionist 'Gbenga Sesan. Sharing the work behind the Paradigm Initiative, a social enterprise in Nigeria that's empowering young people with digital resources and skills, Sesan details a vision for creating life-changing opportunities for generations of people across Africa.
11/02/2110m 42s

Community-powered solutions to the climate crisis | Rahwa Ghirmatzion and Zelalem Adefris

Climate change is the epic challenge of our lives, and community leaders like Rahwa Ghirmatzion and Zelalem Adefris are already working on sustainable, resilient solutions. Through their organizations in Buffalo and Miami, they're focused on durable, affordable housing for under-resourced communities, the most vulnerable to the instability of climate change. Watch for a lesson on how we can work alongside our neighbors to address climate catastrophe and social inequality. (Narrated by Don Cheadle)
10/02/214m 32s

The promise of quantum computers | Matt Langione

What if tiny microparticles could help us solve the world's biggest problems in a matter of minutes? That's the promise -- and magic -- of quantum computers, says Matt Langione. Speaking next to an actual IBM quantum computer, he explains how these machines solve complex challenges like developing vaccines and calculating financial risk in an entirely new way that's exponentially faster than the best supercomputers -- and shares why industries should prepare now for this new leap in computing.
09/02/2112m 9s

A concrete idea to reduce carbon emissions | Karen Scrivener

Concrete is the second most-used substance on Earth (behind water), and it's responsible for eight percent of the world's carbon footprint. Cement researcher Karen Scrivener shares the research behind a pioneering new kind of cement known as LC3, which could slash carbon emissions from this crucial building material by 40 percent, if adopted at scale.
08/02/214m 26s

How to get everyone to care about a green economy | Angela Francis

How do you get the environment to the top of everyone's priority list? You can't, says climate advocate Angela Francis -- but you can get them to care about improving their lives. In this pragmatic talk, she shares her playbook for helping even the most skeptical among us see the benefits of a greener economy on their health, wealth and well-being.
05/02/2111m 11s

How technology changes our sense of right and wrong | Juan Enriquez

What drives society's understanding of right and wrong? In this thought-provoking talk, futurist Juan Enriquez offers a historical outlook on what humanity once deemed acceptable -- from human sacrifice and public executions to slavery and eating meat -- and makes a surprising case that exponential advances in technology leads to more ethical behavior.
04/02/217m 24s

The surprising connection between brain injuries and crime | Kim Gorgens

Here's a shocking statistic: 50 to 80 percent of people in the criminal justice system in the US have had a traumatic brain injury. In the general public, that number is less than five percent. Neuropsychologist Kim Gorgens shares her research into the connection between brain trauma and the behaviors that keep people in the revolving door of criminal justice -- and some ways to make the system more effective and safer for everyone.
03/02/2111m 42s

How a geospatial nervous system could help us design a better future | Jack Dangermond

What if we could better understand the world's biggest challenges simply by looking at a map? Jack Dangermond, a pioneer in geographic information system (GIS) technology that powers the digital maps people around the world use every day, speaks with TED technology curator Simone Ross about how his team is building a geospatial nervous system: a global, interconnected GIS network that reveals patterns, visualizes trends -- and could transform the way we make decisions about nearly everything.
02/02/2122m 12s

When the world is burning, is art a waste of time? | R. Alan Brooks

Is art worth it? "Hell yeah," says graphic novelist R. Alan Brooks -- art has the power to scare dictators, inspire multitudes and change hearts and minds across the world. Reflecting on his journey to become an artist at a time when the world felt like it was burning, Brooks shares how creating something from a place of sincerity and passion can positively impact people in ways you may never know.
01/02/2112m 44s

How to avoid catching prickly emotions from other people | Jessica Garza

Difficult emotions can get under your skin if you're not careful. Sport and performance consultant Jessica Garza calls this the "jumping cholla effect," inspired by a sneaky kind of cactus that detaches and burrows its spines into unsuspecting passersby. In this empowering talk, she shares four mood-regulating strategies to help you gain self-awareness of your feelings, avoid catching other people's emotions and perform at your peak -- whatever the prickly situation may be.
29/01/2111m 8s

My journey mapping the uncharted world | Tawanda Kanhema

Significant pieces of the globe are literally not on the map: they're missing from the most widely used mapping platforms, like Google Street View, leaving communities neglected of vital services and humanitarian aid. In this globetrotting talk, photographer Tawanda Kanhema takes us along on his journey to map 3,000 miles of uncharted areas in Zimbabwe, Namibia and northern Canada -- and shows how we can all contribute to building a more connected world.
28/01/217m 32s

What COVID-19 revealed about US schools -- and 4 ways to rethink education | Nora Flanagan

The abrupt shift to online learning due to COVID-19 rocked the US education system, unearthing many of the inequities at its foundation. Educator Nora Flanagan says we can reframe this moment as an opportunity to fix what's long been broken for teachers, students and families -- and shares four ways schools can reinvent themselves for a post-pandemic world.
27/01/2110m 35s

The joy of shopping -- and how to recapture it online | Nimisha Jain

Shopping is about more than just what you buy: it's a treasure hunt to discover something new, a negotiation to get a great deal, a time to catch up with friends and family. But for many, online shopping has turned the experience into an impersonal, unsatisfactory event. Is there a way to bring back the magic? With exciting examples from companies in India, Thailand and China, consumer expert Nimisha Jain introduces us to "conversational commerce," a new retail model that combines the convenience of a digital experience with the personalized touch of a real, human interaction.
26/01/2111m 23s

The 15-minute city | Carlos Moreno

Living in a city means accepting a certain level of dysfunction: long commutes, noisy streets, underutilized spaces. Carlos Moreno wants to change that. He makes the case for the "15-minute city," where inhabitants have access to all the services they need to live, learn and thrive within their immediate vicinity -- and shares ideas for making urban areas adapt to humans, not the other way around.
25/01/217m 39s

Using your voice is a political choice | Amanda Gorman

For anyone who believes poetry is stuffy or elitist, Amanda Gorman -- the youngest inaugural poet in US history -- has some characteristically well-chosen words. Poetry is for everyone, she says, and at its core it's all about connection and collaboration. In this fierce talk and performance, she explains why poetry is inherently political, pays homage to her honorary ancestors and stresses the value of speaking out despite your fears. "Poetry has never been the language of barriers," Gorman says. "It's always been the language of bridges."
23/01/217m 19s

How vulnerability makes you a better leader | Tracy Young

As the founder of a startup, Tracy Young often worried that employees and investors valued male CEOs more -- and that being a woman compromised her position as a leader. In this brave, personal talk, she gives an honest look at the constraints women face when trying to adapt to a male-dominated business culture -- and shares how she developed the courage and vulnerability to lead as her complete, raw self. (This talk contains a graphic story. Discretion is advised.)
22/01/216m 51s

3 ways to upgrade democracy for the 21st century | Max Rashbrooke

Democracy needs an update -- one that respects and engages citizens by involving them in everyday political decisions, says writer and researcher Max Rashbrooke. He outlines three global success stories that could help move democratic systems forward and protect society against the new challenges this century is already bringing.
20/01/2114m 8s

How a strong creative industry helps economies thrive | Mehret Mandefro

When global leaders think about which industries can fuel economic growth, the arts are often overlooked. But filmmaker Mehret Mandefro says the creative sector actually has the power to grow economies -- while also helping safeguard democracy. In this captivating talk, she shares a behind-the-scenes look at how she's putting culture back on the economic agenda in Ethiopia, and explains why other countries would benefit from doing the same.
19/01/2110m 34s

The US needs a radical revolution of values | Dr. Bernice King

To cultivate a society grounded in equity and love, we must uproot systems of oppression and violence towards Black communities, says Dr. Bernice Albertine King, community builder and daughter of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In a time of mourning and protest, King calls for a revolution of values, allies that engage and a world where anger is channeled into social and economic change. "Freedom is never really won. You earn it and win it in every generation," King says. "Every generation is called to this freedom struggle." (This video, excerpted from a panel featuring Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff, Rashad Robinson and Anthony D. Romero, was recorded June 3, 2020. Watch the full discussion at go.ted.com/endingracism)
18/01/217m 27s

Humanity's planet-shaping powers -- and what they mean for the future | Achim Steiner

Humanity now has incredible power to shape nature and the Earth: the power to destroy and the power to repair, says sustainability champion and UNDP Administrator Achim Steiner. In this action-oriented talk, Steiner shows how this power is putting our own survival at risk -- and takes us on a global tour of individuals and societies that are choosing to write a new, sustainable and equitable chapter for people and the planet.
16/01/219m 29s

How bad data keeps us from good AI | Mainak Mazumdar

The future economy won't be built by people and factories, but by algorithms and artificial intelligence, says data scientist Mainak Mazumdar. But what happens when these algorithms get trained on biased data? Drawing on examples from Shanghai to New York City, Mazumdar shows how less-than-quality data leads to AI that makes wrong decisions and predictions -- and reveals three infrastructural resets needed to make ethical AI possible.
15/01/2110m 8s

How your brain responds to stories -- and why they're crucial for leaders | Karen Eber

How do the world's best leaders and visionaries earn trust? They don't just present data -- they also tell great stories. Leadership consultant Karen Eber demystifies what makes for effective storytelling and explains how anyone can harness it to create empathy and inspire action.
14/01/2114m 3s

4 tips to kickstart honest conversations at work | Betsy Kauffman

Why is it so hard to speak up and productively disagree at work? Leadership and organization coach Betsy Kauffman shows how to bring the candid conversations that usually happen at the watercooler out into the open with four practical strategies you can implement right now to have honest, transparent discussions with your colleagues.
13/01/219m 27s

How carbon capture networks could help curb climate change | Bas Sudmeijer

What if we could build a global waste disposal service for carbon? In this forward-thinking talk, carbon capture advisor Bas Sudmeijer proposes building CO2 networks: partnerships between cities around the world that would share the cost and geological resources needed to trap emissions deep in the earth -- and give us a shot at stalling climate change.
12/01/2111m 5s

6 essential lessons for women leaders | Julia Gillard and Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

In a rich conversation full of practical insights, former Prime Minister of Australia Julia Gillard and former Finance Minister of Nigeria Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala reflect on their experiences as women leaders in positions of global power -- and share six standout lessons on what it takes to lead and build solidarity in the face of gender bias and stereotypes.
11/01/219m 32s

The counterintuitive way to be more persuasive | Niro Sivanathan

What's the best way to make a good point? Organizational psychologist Niro Sivanathan offers a fascinating lesson on the "dilution effect," a cognitive quirk that weakens our strongest cases -- and reveals why brevity is the true soul of persuasion.
09/01/2110m 50s

How AI can help shatter barriers to equality | Jamila Gordon

Jamila Gordon believes in the power of human connection -- and artificial intelligence -- to help people who might otherwise be left behind. Telling the story of her own path from refugee to global tech executive, she shows how AI is helping refugees, migrants and those from disadvantaged backgrounds find jobs and develop the skills they need to work effectively and safely.
08/01/215m 55s

The 1-minute secret to forming a new habit | Christine Carter

You know how resolutions often go: you set a goal and start strong ... then the motivation runs out and feelings of frustration and shame creep in. The struggle is real -- but what if it doesn't have to be? Sociologist Christine Carter shares a simple step to shift your mindset and keep you on track to achieving your grandest ambitions.
07/01/2111m 6s

How to turn moments into momentum | Renee Montgomery

Inspired by the rising movement against racism in the US, WNBA champion Renee Montgomery made an unexpected decision: she opted out of her dream job. As she says in this stirring talk, she wanted to "make it felt," and that meant turning her attention from the court to the community. But you don't have to be a basketball star to make it felt; anyone can turn important moments into meaningful momentum. How will you?
06/01/214m 37s

3 ways companies can support grieving employees | Tilak Mandadi

When we experience loss, grief travels with us everywhere -- even work. What can companies do to support grieving employees? Sharing his own story of unimaginable heartbreak, Tilak Mandadi offers three ways organizations can cultivate a culture of workplace empathy, creating an environment that encourages community, productivity and joy. (This talk contains mature content.)
05/01/2111m 56s

How we could make carbon-negative concrete | Tom Schuler

Concrete is all around us: we use it to build our roads, buildings, bridges and much more. Yet over the last 2,000 years, the art of mixing cement and using it to bind concrete hasn't changed very much -- and it remains one of the world's biggest emitters of carbon. Entrepreneur Tom Schuler previews an innovative way to create concrete, potentially turning it into a carbon sink that traps CO2 from the atmosphere -- while producing a viable building material.
04/01/214m 37s

3 questions to ask yourself about everything you do | Stacey Abrams

How you respond to setbacks is what defines your character, says Stacey Abrams, the first Black woman in the history of the United States to be nominated by a major party for governor. In an electrifying talk, she shares the lessons she learned from her campaign for governor of Georgia -- and some advice on how to change the world. "Be aggressive about your ambition," Abrams says.
01/01/2112m 38s

What your sleep patterns say about your relationship | TEDx SHORTS

Wendy Troxel looks at the cultural expectations that pressure couples into sharing a bed and why some relationships would benefit from sleeping separately. This talk was filmed at TEDxManhattanBeach. All TEDx events are organized independently by volunteers in the spirit of TED's mission of ideas worth spreading. To learn more about TEDxSHORTS, the TEDx program, or give feedback on this episode, please visit go.ted.com/tedxshorts.
31/12/209m 20s

How we can actually pay people enough -- with Paypal CEO Dan Schulman | TED Business

Capitalism urgently needs an upgrade, says PayPal CEO Dan Schulman, and it starts with paying people enough to actually invest in their futures. He explains the epiphany that led PayPal to create a whole new metric for adequate pay, Net Disposable Income, and why investing in employees' financial health is just good business. After the talk, host Modupe Akinola makes the case for going one step further and considering how fair pay might actually mean something pretty different for every employee. Listen and subscribe to "TED Business" and more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at audiocollective.ted.com.
30/12/2020m 42s

The joy of taking out the trash | Aparna Nancherla

Comedian Aparna Nancherla loves to take out the trash. In this funny and sharp meditation on garbage -- "the stuff that our modern, consumerist, carbon-powered culture makes us buy endlessly, and often for no reason" -- she shares thoughts on how to use less in a world that's choking on ever-larger piles of waste.
29/12/203m 14s

The fight for civil rights and freedom | John Lewis and Bryan Stevenson

Civil rights leader and longtime US congressman John Lewis spent his life fighting for freedom and justice for everyone. In this illuminating conversation with lawyer and activist Bryan Stevenson, Lewis discusses the essential importance of voting, shares encouraging words of wisdom for the generation of young people currently organizing in the struggle for racial justice and tells moving stories from his decades of making "good trouble" -- at the Freedom Rides, March on Washington and in the halls of Congress. "When you see something that's not right or fair or just, you have to say something," Lewis says. "You have to do something." (This conversation is part of the TED Legacy Project. Recorded November 19, 2019)
28/12/2023m 46s

An Indigenous Mixtape from Lima, Peru | Far Flung

Meet Liberato Kani, a hip hop artist in Lima, Peru -- or as he says, "the Andean Bronx". At his concerts, a typical call and response you hear is "Quechua es resistencia": Quechua is resistance. Though Quechua is spoken by nearly ten million people, Peru's native language is at risk of dying off because of anti-indigenous prejudice. Liberato and other musicians like Renata Flores are here to save it -- and restore a country's pride while they're at it (Audio only). See more podcasts from the TED Audio Collective at ted.com/podcasts
25/12/2046m 18s

The shadow pandemic of domestic violence during COVID-19 | Kemi DaSilva-Ibru

Mandatory lockdowns, quarantines and shelter-in-place orders meant to contain COVID-19 have created a shadow pandemic of domestic abuse, says physician Kemi DaSilva-Ibru. Sharing alarming statistics on the rise of gender-based violence worldwide, she describes how Nigeria quickly retrained a squadron of basic health care providers to respond to the crisis -- and shares lesson other countries can adopt to keep people safe from harm.
24/12/205m 43s

Why lakes and rivers should have the same rights as humans | Kelsey Leonard

Water is essential to life. Yet in the eyes of the law, it remains largely unprotected -- leaving many communities without access to safe drinking water, says legal scholar Kelsey Leonard. In this powerful talk, she shows why granting lakes and rivers legal "personhood" -- giving them the same legal rights as humans -- is the first step to protecting our bodies of water and fundamentally transforming how we value this vital resource.
23/12/2013m 21s

How to practice effectively...for just about anything | Annie Bosler and Don Greene

Mastering any physical skill takes practice. Practice is the repetition of an action with the goal of improvement, and it helps us perform with more ease, speed, and confidence. But what does practice actually do to make us better at things? Annie Bosler and Don Greene explain how practice affects the inner workings of our brains. [Directed by Martina Meštrović, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Wonder Boy Audio].
22/12/204m 35s

Fossil fuel companies know how to stop global warming. Why don't they? | Myles Allen

The fossil fuel industry knows how to stop global warming, but they're waiting for someone else to pay, says climate science scholar Myles Allen. Instead of a total ban on carbon-emitting fuels, Allen puts forth a bold plan for oil and gas companies to progressively decarbonize themselves and sequester CO2 deep in the earth, with the aim of reaching net-zero emissions by 2050 and creating a carbon dioxide disposal industry that works for everyone.
21/12/2010m 29s
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