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Listening to the news can feel like a journey. But 1A guides you beyond the headlines – and cuts through the noise. Let's get to the heart of the story, together – on 1A.

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Episodes

Repairing America's Foreign Policy

How has foreign policy changed since the presidency of Donald Trump?For decades, the U.S. aimed to create a more interconnected and globalized international landscape that would lift all boats, creating a more democratic world and a safer United States. But all of that changed in 2016. Donald Trump's presidency shook the very foundations of what the U.S. traditionally tried to achieve abroad. His administration pushed a populist agenda, strained alliances, and praised dictators.How is the Biden administration taking on the challenge of repairing international relations?We discuss that and the role that foreign policy will play in the upcoming presidential elections with Alexander Ward, a national security reporter for POLITICO and author of the new book "The Internationalists: The Fight to Restore American Foreign Policy After Trump."Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/02/24·40m 43s

Local News Is Dying: What's Killing It?

Local newsrooms are struggling to stay alive. Major outlets, including public radio stations, continue to lay-off journalists.While some of those layoffs can be chalked up to the economic impact of the pandemic or private equity firms that buy and shut down newspapers – a lot of it is the online migration of advertising.But what it means for you is fewer reliable sources to tell you what's going on and why. Americans in "news deserts" tend to rely on social media to get the latest on their communities and beyond. But relying on social media for information can be less than awesome.We discuss what can be done to keep Americans looking for news about where they live informed — especially in an election year.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/02/24·40m 6s

The News Roundup For February 23, 2024

This week the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that embryos were children, establishing a legal precedent that will affect reproductive rights in the state.The court argued that the Wrongful Death of a Minor Act "applies to all children, born and unborn, without limitation." The Biden administration is weighing action to make it more difficult for migrants at the southern border to pass initial screenings for asylum and to make it easier for those who don't pass the screening to be deported.In election news, the Biden election campaign continued to amass cash. The president raised $42 million during the month of January. Julie Chavez Rodriguez, Biden's campaign manager, said the amount was "an indisputable show of strength to start the election year."We cover all this and more during the news roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/02/24·43m 17s

Ukraine Aid Is At A Standstill. What Does That Mean For The War?

It's been nearly two years since Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine began. With Putin's forces making strategic gains in the eastern part of the country, there's increasing international pressure for the U.S. to step up its military aid. America has provided more than $47 billion in support to Ukraine since the war began. But a new package of aid is stalled in Congress. Last week, the Senate passed a foreign aid package that included $61 billion for Ukraine. That was blocked by the Republican-controlled House which insisted it include a border security package. So what does that mean for the war going forward? And how do European allies view the need for American aid?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/02/24·26m 50s

Personhood In Alabama And A Veto At The U.N.

Three Alabama couples stored frozen embryos at a fertility clinic in the state. A patient wandering around the clinic dropped the embryos, making them unusable. On Friday, the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that the couples could sue for wrongful death in an unprecedented decision that means frozen embryos are now considered "children" in the state. The court argued that the Wrongful Death of a Minor Act "applies to all children, born and unborn, without limitation." What does this decision mean for reproductive rights beyond abortion? Also: this week, emotions are running high at the United Nations Security Council. "The veto of this draft resolution is not only regrettable... it is absolutely reckless and dangerous against shielding Israel even as it commits the most shocking crimes," said Riyad Mansour, Palestinian ambassador to the United Nations.Those comments came after the United States vetoed an Arab-backed and widely supported U.N. resolution. It demanded an immediate humanitarian cease-fire in the Israel-Hamas war. Where does this leave negotiations now?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/02/24·22m 53s

The Art Of Doing Nothing

Twiddling your thumbs is often associated with wasting time. But feel shame about thumb-twiddling no longer. In a world of calendars and to-do lists, something has got to give. We so often fear doing nothing, missing out, or getting behind. Our smartphones make it increasingly hard to disconnect from the attention economy. But studies show there are benefits to dilly-dallying when it comes to your work and your health. We'll discuss what it takes to reap the benefits of doing absolutely zilch on any given day. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/02/24·33m 11s

A Brief History Of Eyeliner

William Shakespeare once said that the eyes are the window to the soul. We make eye contact with others to show that we're listening, to connect, or simply as a way of saying, "I see you."Cultures around the world have understood the power of eyes for centuries. If you travel to India, Chad, Japan, Iran, or just around the corner from your house, you'll probably see the same thing around the eyes of the people who live there: eyeliner. In her new book, "Eyeliner: A Cultural History," Lebanese-British journalist Zahra Hankir explores beauty, power, identity, and resistance through the lens of the iconic cosmetic. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/02/24·30m 36s

The News Roundup For February 16, 2024

It's been another busy week. Closed-door hearings in the case of the classified documents former President Donald Trump kept at his Mar-a-Lago estate began this week. U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon first met with Trump's team and the special counsel's prosecutors on Monday.Meanwhile, America's political turmoil surrounding the 2024 presidential election is hot conversation at the Munich Security Conference. Former President Trump's remarks last week suggesting he wouldn't come to the aid of Europe in the event of a Russian invasion are causing concern among U.S, allies.Israel attacked Rafah Sunday evening, killing many Palestinians who had fled to the city to seeking shelter.And in South America, Guyana has accused Venezuela of violating international law in a dispute over a swath of oil-rich territory.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/02/24·1h 26m

The High-Carbon Lifestyles Of The Rich And Famous

The 2024 Super Bowl was the most watched television event in history with over 123 million viewers. Many eyes watching were trained on Taylor Swift as she made the journey from Tokyo to Las Vegas in a highly scrutinized flight on a private jet.A total of 882 private planes flew into Las Vegas during and just before Super Bowl Sunday. One report found the world's richest 10 percent make up for 50 percent of the global emissions through investments, personal consumptions, and other means.Last week, Swift threatened legal action against a Florida student who's been tracking the jet travel of the rich and famous.We talk about personal responsibility, climate change, the rules for the rich, and more.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/02/24·36m 26s

Love Languages And Other Relationship Myths, Debunked

What's your love language? Acts of service, words of affirmation, physical touch, gifts, or quality time?The concept has been around since the early 1990s. Gary Chapman, a Baptist pastor, published a book in 1992 called, "The Five Love Languages: Secrets to Love That Lasts." But new research is debunking the popular love languages theory. And there's little evidence linking it to happier partnerships. For Valentine's Day, we speak with a researcher and relationship experts about what really makes for healthy relationships.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/02/24·32m 47s

Jeffrey Rosen On 'The Pursuit Of Happiness'

The Declaration of Independence promises the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.At a time when the language and intent of the Constitution are under intense scrutiny, one legal scholar is particular is out to explore what the founders may have meant when they defined that last part as an inalienable right.Nowadays, most of us think of happiness as something that results from the pursuit of pleasure. But writer and historian Jeffrey Rosen says the Founding Fathers had other ideas.We talk to Rosen, the president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, about his latest book, "The Pursuit of Happiness," and what the founders had in mind for our country.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/02/24·31m 59s

The Senate Border Bill And What's At Stake For Ukraine

Last week, Senate Republicans blocked a bipartisan border bill that would send billions in wartime aid to Ukraine, Israel, and other nations. The bill links the GOP requests for stricter immigration policy changes to Democrat requests for foreign aid. It unraveled last week in a surprise turn, but Senate Democrats still hope to push a plan forward.We get into what's at stake for Ukraine without U.S. support and discuss how the southern border has become a leveraging tool for a divided Congress.Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/02/24·38m 25s

Local Spotlight: 'Murder In Boston'

In October 1989, a white man named Charles Stuart called 911 in distress, saying a Black man had shot him and his wife, Carol, in their car. Carol died from the wound and police cracked down hard on the predominantly-Black Boston neighborhood of Mission Hill, looking for the killer.It turned out, Charles had committed the crime. He was seen jumping from a bridge not long after he became the police's main suspect.The Boston Globe recently revisited the story in a series of articles and a podcast produced in association with HBO, "Murder in Boston: The untold story of the Charles and Carol Stuart shooting." An HBO docuseries about the story is also currently streaming on Max.Their investigation revealed new findings about the case that stirred a media and police frenzy, as well as the subsequent backlash.For this installment of Local Spotlight, we speak with the host of the podcast, who is also a longtime reporter on The Boston Globe's staff.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/02/24·1h 15m

The News Roundup For February 9, 2024

The Supreme Court began hearing oral arguments this week concerning whether former President Donald Trump will be included on the Colorado primary ballot due to his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.Meanwhile, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's rejection of Hamas' proposed terms for a ceasefire means Egyptian, U.S., and Qatari negotiators are gearing up for another round of negotiations.Ukraine is shaking up its military hierarchy despite having reportedly killed 890 Russian soldiers in in 24 hours this week. A U.S. deal to send aid to Ukraine fell through.Former Chilean President Sebastián Piñera died in a helicopter crash this week, sending the country he led for two terms into mourning.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/02/24·1h 16m

Zach Woods On Making NPR Into An Animated Comedy

A new show is poking fun at, well, us. Peacock's latest, "In the Know" is set in a public radio station. This includes nervous producers on the mic for pledge drives, and NPR's third most popular host, Lauren Caspian.The host is played by Zach Woods, who is best known for his roles in "Silicon Valley" and "The Office." He's now making his directorial debut with "In the Know." It's a stop animation show that includes live-action, unscripted interviews with celebrities like Roxanne Gay, Jonathan Van Ness, and Mike Tyson. We sit down with creator and star Zach Woods to talk all about it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1aLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/02/24·30m 33s

The Power Of Psychedelic Therapy For Members Of The Military

Many people hear the term "psychedelics" and think of hippies, acid, and the music of the 1960s. But it may soon take on a whole different meaning for the U.S. military. Last December, Congress passed legislation that included funding for clinical trials of psychedelic-assisted therapy for active-duty service members. And just last month, the Department of Veterans Affairs announced that it will also begin funding psychedelic-assisted therapy to treat veterans with PTSD and depression. This comes at a time when suicide rates amongst active-duty service members are at an all-time high.We dive into what psychedelic-assisted therapy is and the effect it could have on active-duty and veteran mental health. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/02/24·32m 24s

In Good Health: Medical Missteps For Women With Heart Disease

It's American Heart Month.When it comes to heart disease and heart attacks, women commonly face misdiagnoses and delays in receiving care.These medical missteps mean women are twice as likely as men to die after having a heart attack. That's according to the European Society of Cardiology.That's also one of many reasons the CDC says heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. New technological advancements are also helping women have more agency over their heart health. We discuss how women can better understand the risk factors of heart disease. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/02/24·28m 16s

The South Carolina Primary, Foreign Policy, And The 2024 Election

The U.S. and Britain launched a series of air and missile strikes against Iranian targets over the weekend. The strikes were in retaliation for a drone strike that killed three American service members and wounded 40 others at a base in Jordan last Sunday.The offensive comes at a time when foreign policy is beginning to become more relevant in the 2024 election. The Democratic primary in South Carolina took place this weekend, with President Joe Biden walking away with the win as expected.We discuss foreign policy and its impacts on the election. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/02/24·36m 18s

The News Roundup For February 2, 2024

This week, the House passed a bipartisan tax bill that expands the child tax credit and expands tax cuts for businesses. The bill, however, is expected to have to satisfy several demands from Senate Republicans before it makes it to President Joe Biden's desk.Secretary of State Antony Blinken issued a dire warning this week, claiming the Middle East is at its most volatile state since the Yom Kippur war between Israel and its neighbors in 1973. He's currently on a trip around the eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East, meeting with leaders to discuss tensions and relationships in the regions.The director of the CIA also commented on the state of global conflicts. William Burns said Tuesday that cutting off U.S. aid to Ukraine would be a mistake of "historic proportions."The FBI also got in on the action, with Director Christopher Wray revealing that Chinese hackers are getting ready to "wreak havoc and cause real-world harm" to U.S. citizens and institutions.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/02/24·1h 26m

The Zero-Proof Movement Goes Beyond Dry January

The popularity of Dry January is part of a larger zero-proof movement here in the U.S. Non-alcoholic sales totaled half a billion dollars in sales as of July 2023. One poll found that 21 percent of adults said they would be cutting back on drinking to begin 2024. Restaurants and bars are offering more mocktails on their menus. Even brands like Guinness and White Claw are adding non-alcoholic options to their lineups.During the first year of the pandemic, alcohol sales saw the largest increase in over 50 years. Is the zero-proof movement a backlash to the boozy pandemic? We take a closer look at non-alcoholic brews and concoctions.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/02/24·35m 31s

Florida's Unregulated Kratom Market

In the United States, Kratom is sold in its concentrated form, oftentimes in potent capsules or liquid shots. Kratom is a tropical plant with leaves that contain a chemical compound with similar effects to opioids. The Kratom industry is worth roughly $1.5 billion, but unregulated.For this installment of our "Local Spotlight" series, we take a closer look at The Tampa Bay Times investigation into kratom in Florida. Reporters found that more than 580 died from a kratom-involved overdose in Florida the last decade. Most of those deaths involved other substances too, but 46 were due to kratom alone. We discuss what we know about Kratom, its possibilities, dangers and why it's unregulated. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/01/24·35m 40s

Mass Shootings And Accountability

Are parents criminally responsible if their child commits a mass shooting? That's the question being debated in Oxford, Michigan, where a trial on parental responsibility after a tragic shooting is underway. On Nov. 30, 2021, a 15-year-old student opened fire at Oxford High School in Michigan, killing four students and injuring seven others. The gunman received a life sentence last year. Now, his parents, Jennifer and James Crumbley, are facing involuntary manslaughter charges.We discuss what accountability looks like when shootings involving minors occur. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/01/24·32m 29s

What Trump's Legal Battles Mean For The GOP Race

As the curtain falls on the New Hampshire primary, Democrats and Republicans are looking ahead to South Carolina and Super Tuesday. And even though Nevada is next on the calendar, the nomination process there is looking unconventional for Republicans. GOP frontrunner and former President Donald Trump is still facing 91 criminal charges across four different court cases. How are these cases affecting Trump's campaign and the overall GOP strategy? We discuss what we should keep an eye out for during these primary races. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/01/24·43m 9s

The News Roundup For January 26, 2024

The path to victory for GOP hopefuls not named Donald Trump is growing slimmer. The 45th president walked away winner of both the Iowa Caucus and the New Hampshire GOP primary. The United Auto Workers union endorsed the campaign of President Joe Biden this week and the president and Vice President Kamala Harris held their first rally in Virginia.Meanwhile, this week talks between Israel and Hamas, mediated by the US, Qatar and Egypt remain underway for deal calling for a two-month pause in fighting.Turkey's parliament voted this week to approve Sweden's bid to join NATO. Now, Hungary's government is the last hurdle the Sweden must clear to gain full membership to the bloc.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/01/24·1h 26m

Preparing For The Age Of AI Scams

If a loved one called you in a panic asking for help—maybe they just got arrested or kidnapped and needed money immediately. What would you do? Here's the thing, the voice on the other end of the line might not be them. It could be AI.Artificial Intelligence is now making it possible to clone someone's voice – and use it to trick family or friends. Scammers are taking advantage of the technology to con panicked loved ones out of hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars. AI is also being used to devise more realistic romance scams and AI generated videos, also known as deepfakes. Washington has been watching. A bipartisan group of House lawmakers introduced the No AI Fraud Act this month. The bill would protect Americans' likenesses and voices against AI-generated fakes. We learn more about these scams and what people can do to protect themselves from falling victim.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/01/24·33m 18s

Game Mode: Saving Classic Video Games

Think back to your earliest video game memories. As technology changes and video games become increasingly released only on digital, many of the titles you grew up on may be unplayable today.87% of classic video games — those released before 2010 — are in danger of being lost to time. That's according to a study from the Video Game History Foundation. In this edition of Game Mode, our series where we cover video games and the gaming industry, we'll talk about the efforts being made to preserve classic video games.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/01/24·30m 11s

Ask An Intimacy Coordinator

When you look up the word "intimate" in the dictionary, there are a few definitions. They include things like warmth, private, sex, personal, and familiarity.Our "Ask A" series returns, this time to talk to intimacy coordinators about their work.Parts of Hollywood production teams have practiced parts of the role for years. But the job itself is still in its youth.We discuss what it takes to do this work and the impact it's had on workspaces so far. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/01/24·34m 37s

Republican Hopefuls Eye New Hampshire

The Iowa caucuses are in the rearview mirror. Now, the GOP candidates have their sights set on the Granite State.Former President Donald Trump, who has had a busy month in court facing 91 criminal felony charges, traded jabs with his opponents on the campaign trail in New Hampshire ahead of Tuesday's primary. Meanwhile, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis dropped out of the race ahead of the South Carolina primary– where opponent Nikki Haley served six years as governor. Meanwhile, Democrats in New Hampshire will also cast their ballots Tuesday, but President Biden will not be on it. Democrats in New Hampshire who want to cast their vote for Biden will have to write his name in.We discuss what's at stake in New Hampshire for both parties.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/01/24·31m 50s

The News Roundup for January 19, 2024

The Biden Administration asks the Supreme Court to intervene in Texas where National Guardsmen are preventing federal agents from accessing a swathe of land that's a popular crossing spot for migrants.A stopgap spending bill to keep the government funded passed. Meanwhile, Pakistan carried out deadly strikes against targets inside Iran, retaliating for attacks by Iran earlier this week that followed similar attacks in Iraq and Syria. Israeli officials disagree over the way forward in Gaza. And Lai Ching-te, Taiwan's vice president, and the candidate put forward by the ruling Democratic Progressive Party, won the presidential election in Taiwan.We discuss all this and more during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/01/24·1h 23m

Chronic Absenteeism Is Changing K-12 Education

In the years since COVID-19 forced schools to move instruction online, we've seen a renewed effort to get kids back into the classroom.Chronic absenteeism has doubled since before the pandemic. Now, more than 14 million kids are chronically absent, according to education advocacy nonprofit Attendance Works.And this is happening as schools grapple with the lowest reading and math test scores in decades. We discuss the trend and what it tells us about what's at stake if we don't get kids back to class.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/01/24·35m 11s

What's New With COVID-19?

If it seems like everyone is sick – it might be the trifecta of viruses circulating the country.Health officials say RSV, flu, and a new strain of COVID are leading to an uptick in respiratory illnesses in most states. And the Centers for Disease Control say JN.1, the latest COVID variant, is spreading quickly.Meanwhile, research on long COVID is telling us more about how the virus can linger in the body as a chronic disease.We discuss the new variant and what we're learning about long COVID.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/01/24·35m 30s

The Iowa Caucuses Recap

The stakes are high in Iowa, as voters head to the polls in record-breaking cold and snow.It's the first contest in the Republican presidential primary. Donald Trump maintains a lead among GOP voters. And according to a new poll, Republican county chairs in Iowa feel the same.We discuss what the results of the Iowa caucus tell us about the right's playing field this election season. We also take a look at what we've learned from the 2020 Democratic caucus.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/01/24·34m 1s

In Good Health: How Caffeine Affects Our Body

Caffeine is the most used psychoactive stimulant across the world. According to the National Coffee Association, 60 percent of Americans drink coffee every day. That's more than any other beverage, including tap water. And 85 percent of people in the U.S. have one caffeinated beverage per day, according to the National Institutes of Health.Coffee and tea aren't the only way to get a caffeine fix anymore. Synthetic caffeine sources are increasingly available through energy drinks and other supplements.For this installment of our In Good Health series, we discuss the good, the bad, and the risky when it comes to our caffeine consumption. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/01/24·30m 44s

The News Roundup For January 12, 2024

Former President Donald Trump warned of unrest and "bedlam" this week following a hearing in an appeals court over his attempts to overturn the results of the 2020 election. The former real estate mogul warned that if he were to be found guilty and lose the 2024 election, the potential for violence would skyrocket. Following an incident on an Alaska Airlines flight, the federal government has grounded all Boeing 737-9 MAX jetliners. A door was ripped off the airplane, which the pilots returned safely to the ground. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken is back in the Middle East. He said this week that the cost of the conflict between Israel and Hamas being paid by the civilians, especially the children, of Gaza is far too high and that Palestinians displaced from their homes must be allowed to return. Ecuadorian President Daniel Noboa said this week that the country is "at war" with drug gangs in Guayaquil, the country's largest city, who are holding prison staff hostage and briefly captured a television station. We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/01/24·1h 27m

Listener Picks: How To Make The Most Of Your Neighborhood

Last May, United States Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy released an advisory addressing the epidemic of "loneliness and isolation."The Surgeon General's advisory underscores the negative impacts that loneliness and isolation have on our mental, emotional, and physical well-being.One way to offset the negative impacts of loneliness and isolation can be simply saying hello to your neighbors, according to a 2023 Gallup poll. It's a simple practice — taking as little as seconds to minutes of conversation to get a quick chat in. For this installment of our "Listner Picks" series, we discuss how we can we be a good neighbor in a time of isolation.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/01/24·35m 24s

Listener Picks: America's Love Of Professional Wrestling

Last year, Endeavor, the parent company of the UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) purchased World Wrestling Entertainment, the largest professional wrestling company in the world, for $9.3 billion. The sale is one indication of many of the continued prominence and popularity of professional wrestling. The movie "The Iron Claw," starring an all-star cast of Zac Efron, Lily James, and Jeremy Allen White, opened in theaters in December. It tells the story of the Von Erich brothers, pro-wrestling stars from the 1980s. For this installment of our "Listener Pick" series, we discuss the popularity of professional wrestling in America. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/01/24·33m 7s

Listener Picks: What Dangers Do Social Media Bots Pose To Democracy?

2024 is the biggest global election year in history. More than 60 countries, representing half the world's population, will head to the polls.And the people vying to be elected will use all manner of tactics to get a leg up on their competitors – including social media bots.Across social media sites, it's estimated that there are billions of bots – which are partially or fully automated social profiles intended to be passed off as humans. These automated accounts are often used to drum up perceived support for political candidates, giving us a false sense of how popular they really are.Social media companies, like Twitter, TikTok, and Meta have come under fire in recent years for not doing enough to stem the spread of disinformation and propaganda on their platforms from such bad actors.Our panel of experts explains how bots warp reality and what we know about the dangerous forces behind them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/01/24·34m 11s

What The Trump Lawsuits Mean For The 2024 Election

The Supreme Court said it will hear a case to determine whether former President Donald Trump will appear on Colorado's primary ballot due to his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.The original decision is based on language from the Fourteenth Amendment. Maine's secretary of state issued a similar decision. Trump appealed both rulings last week. The court's decision to hear the appeal has major implications for the 2024 election and beyond. The former president also faces a slew of other legal challenges, including four criminal cases and multiple civil suits.We discuss what this means for the country's democracy. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/01/24·34m 57s

The News Roundup For January 5, 2024

Former President Donald Trump asked the Supreme Court this week to overturn the Colorado Supreme Court's decision to keep him off the ballot for the 2024 election. He's also appealed a decision by Maine's top election official to do the same.Meanwhile, South Africa has accused Israel of perpetrating a genocide in Gaza in the United Nation's highest court. The case will likely drag on for years as Israeli Defense Forces continue their military campaign against Hamas. Several explosions close to the tomb of slain Iranian commander Qassem Soleimani killed hundreds of people during a ceremony marking the anniversary of his death. Islamic State has claimed responsibility. As tensions in the Middle East rise, analysts fear a widening regional conflict. And ahead of elections in his country this year, Russian President Vladimir Putin has promised to intensify attacks against his military targets in Ukraine. We discuss all this and more during the first News Roundup of 2024.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/01/24·1h 24m

The Third Anniversary Of January 6

It's been three years since a group of insurrectionists, emboldened by former President Donald Trump, attacked the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to overturn the results of the 2020 election.More than 1,069 people were arrested for their involvement in the attack and over 500 have been sentenced. But has justice really been served?Trump is running for reelection this year. And despite being the first president in the history of the United States to face criminal charges, he has remained the top Republican candidate for the 2024 election.As we approach the anniversary of one the most politically scandalous days in U.S. history, we reflect on the lessons learned. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/01/24·33m 35s

2024 is the year of the ballot box

2024 will be a historic year for elections all around the world.According to The Economist, 76 countries will be heading to the polls, that's more than half of the world's population. That of course includes the United States, as well as places like Brazil, Mexico, and the members of the E.U. But not every election will be free and fair. Russia's authoritarian reign will likely not come to an end, but the stakes are high in Taiwan where the presidential election could set the tone for relations with China. 2024 will be a test of the state of democracy in the world today. We highlight some of the most consequential contests.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/01/24·35m 31s

Best Of: Ask A Playwright

While Shakespeare is long gone, but theater – and thus playwriting – is very much alive.Theater, in contrast to television or film, offers a unique chance for audiences to come together and experience a one-of-a-kind production. Playwrights, in collaboration with actors, directors, and stage crew work, are chiefly responsible for bringing that magic to life.For this installment of our "Ask A" series – where we talk to interesting people about what they do and why it matters – we speak to a group of playwrights about the power of storytelling on stage. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/01/24·33m 23s

The 1A Movie Club's Favorite Movies Of 2023

Before we leave 2023 behind, we're looking back on the movies it gave us.We got blockbuster moments like Barbenheimer, a showdown between two very different but highly anticipated movies releasing in theaters on the same day.There were also moments of original content that might make you laugh like "Bottoms," and ones that might make you cry like "The Holdovers" or "Past Lives."And the other historical moment: new contracts for the Writers Guild and Screen Actors Guild after historic months of striking. That pushed some other highly anticipated movies like "Dune: Part 2" and "Challengers" to 2024. Before we look forward to them — we look back on 2023 with the 1A Movie Club.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/01/24·34m 23s

1A Record Club: The Best Songs Of 2023

We're wrapping up the year in music.It was a big year for boygenius, an indie supergroup made up of Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers, and Lucy Dacus. Their album "The Record" was nominated for album of the year. And they received five Grammy nods altogether.Another first this year – the song "Ella Baila Sola" by Eslabon Armado and Peso Pluma became the first regional Mexican song to ever reach the top 10 of the U.S. Billboard charts after going viral on TikTok. And what's old is new again. Tracy Chapman's 1988 hit "Fast Car" had a resurgence after a cover by country singer Luke Combs went platinum in July.We'll discuss some of the biggest music stories, songs, and maybe some hits you missed, from the last year.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/12/23·1h 22m

Best Of: Confronting The Nation's Crisis Of Care

By 2030, the Census Bureau estimates that the nation's population will consist of more adults over 65 than children.As the youngest of the baby boomers enter their sixties, and younger adults are having children later in life, many Americans – from Gen Z to Gen X – are finding themselves sandwiched between taking care of elderly parents and young kids at the same time.Today's 65-year-olds have a 70 percent likelihood of needing long-term care in the future, all while the supply of home health aides is dwindling. Nursing homes are also increasingly costly and inaccessible for families of low and moderate incomes.We discuss what it's like to balance caring for young kids and aging adults simultaneously and managing your money or time as a family caregiver.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/12/23·31m 58s

How Trust Works

Everyday, we're being asked to trust in something. We trust that our jobs will pay us on time. We trust that our partners will come home in the evening. We trust that our apartment won't suddenly collapse on us, that our neighbors won't steal our mail, and that our kids will be safe at school. But what happens when that trust is broken? According to one 2013 study from the Journal of Couple and Family Psychology, 60 percent of couples cited a partner's unfaithfulness as the reason for their divorce. Trust isn't just an issue in relationships. A 2022 Gallup poll found that Americans' trust in major institutions like the Supreme Court and Congress is at a historic low. How can trust be repaired once it's broken? And why is often so easy to lose in the first place? Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/12/23·36m 30s

Best Of: Linking Math And Games Across The World

Marcus du Sautoy is a mathematician who loves games, travel, and, unsurprisingly, math. His new book is titled "Around the World in 80 Games: A Mathematician Unlocks the Secrets of the Greatest Games." In it, du Sautoy tours the world's games, exploring how they are built around (and can be won using) mathematics.We discuss how math and games are interwoven worldwide, and learn the history of some of our favorite games. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/12/23·34m 13s

The Search For The Perfect Christmas Classic

Christmas comes but once a year. But Christmas music? Well, that seems to come earlier and earlier each year. Brenda Lee made headlines this month when her 1958 tune, "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree," made the Billboard's Hot 100 chart for the first time. That's 65 years after the original was recorded, proving some classics never go out of style. But the world of Christmas songs isn't always good times and cheer. For decades, Christmas music in America reflected the country's mood – happy and not so happy. Some can be right down sobering like Nat King Cole's version of "The Little Boy That Santa Claus Forgot," while others stay forgotten under the tree. We dive into the world of Christmas music, and discuss what makes a great Christmas song. We also revisit the documentary "Jingle Bell Rocks!" as it celebrates its 10th anniversary. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/12/23·43m 22s

Game Mode: The Best Video Games Of 2023

2023 was a big year in games."The Legend of Zelda: Tears of the Kingdom" brought a new installment to a beloved series, six years after the last game. It broke sales records and became the best-selling Zelda game to date. And it wasn't the only blockbuster game this year. Marvel's "Spider-man 2," "Final Fantasy 16," "Diablo 4," and "Super Mario Wonder" were released this year as well. But at the 2023 Game Awards, the big winner was "Baldur's Gate 3" — scoring five awards, including game of the year. We recap the year in video games and check in with Adam Smith, lead writer on "Baldur's Gate 3." Later we revisit our Legend of Zelda conversation from earlier this year. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/12/23·1h 24m

The News Roundup For December 22, 2023

The Colorado Supreme Court disqualified former President Donald Trump from their primary ballot for the 2024 election this week. Congress is in gridlock again over funding for the war in Ukraine. House Republicans held a bill passed by the Senate that would send money to Ukrainian Volodymyr Zelenskyy's troops hostage over immigration restrictions.Meanwhile, a Hamas political chief was in Egypt this week for discussions with Israeli officials who proposed a pause of violence in exchange for around 40 hostages. Talks were reportedly less than fruitful.Pope Francis cleared the way this week for Catholic priests to give blessings to same-sex couples, angering conservative officials in the Vatican.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/12/23·1h 24m

Best Of: Why Does Flying Have To Suck?

Complaints against U.S. airlines hit a record high in 2022. And it's not getting any better. Consumer complaints nearly doubled in the first three months of this year, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.With only four major airlines in the U.S., there's little choice for consumers in the market. And with air travel expected to reach a record high this holiday season, many will be subjected to the worst of travel: long lines, high prices, and of course, awful airplane food.But why does our time in flight have to be riddled with anguish? And what can be done to make the skies friendly again?For that, we're turning to Ganesh Sitaraman, a professor at Vanderbilt University Law School and director of the Vanderbilt Policy Accelerator. He's also out with the new book, "Why Flying is Miserable: And How to Fix It."Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/12/23·28m 9s

The Joys Of Chinese Cuisine

Years ago, if you opened your kitchen drawer, you'd probably find a stack of takeout menus. There's a good chance one of those menus would've been for a Chinese restaurant. Despite the decline of these doorstep stuffers, Chinese food remains a popular dinnertime choice in the U.S. and around the world. According to a 2023 Pew Research study, Chinese restaurants were found in every U.S. state and in 70 percent of all U.S. counties. We discuss how Chinese food become so popular outside of China, and why the cuisine is so beloved and misunderstood.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/12/23·30m 25s

How To Deal With The Holiday Spending Rush

It's the holiday season which means bright lights and parties. It can also mean an unusually high credit card bill.From gift giving, to travel, to that item you just had to buy for yourself, end-of-year spending is up. Black Friday shoppers spent a record $9.8 billion dollars online this year. Shoppers spent a record $12.4 billion on Cyber Monday. But not everyone is putting cash upfront. Buy Now/Pay Later usage hit an all-time high in November, with an increase of over 42 percent from last year, according to Adobe Analytics. And half of Americans expect to take on debt to pay for the holidays, according to the personal finance company Achieve. We discuss the best way to deal with the rush of holiday expenditures. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/12/23·40m 41s

Heading Back To The American Mall

Retail experts have long said that U.S. malls are dying out. But a recent market analysis paints a different picture.According to a report from Coresight Research published in June, foot-traffic in top-tier malls was up 12 percent in 2022 compared to before the pandemic. Last year, these same malls had more than 95 percent occupancy rates. Younger shoppers are in part driving this resurgence. Approximately 73 percent of Gen-Z shoppers said they visited a mall in the past month. We discuss why malls are making a comeback and how they're keeping up with online shopping. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/12/23·34m 23s

Comedian Dara Ó Briain On The Irish Experience

For Irish comedian Dara Ó Briain life right now is just grand.He's been involved in the comedy world since the late 90's.His long list of TV shows and stand-up tours includes the BBC's "Mock the Week," which was on air for 17 years. But Ó Briain has been known to talk about a range of topics from science and history to the Irish experience.His "So...Where Were We" tour, comes to the U.S. early next year. In this latest show, he talks about searching for his birth mother and more.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/12/23·32m 25s

The News Roundup For December 15, 2023

Special counsel Jack Smith went to the Supreme Court on Monday asking the justices to quickly rule on whether or not former President Donald Trump can be prosecuted for his alleged efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election. The Biden administration has signaled it may be willing to cave to House GOP demands on immigration restrictions. In return, the White House is hoping to secure funding for Ukraine's fight against the Russian invasion. Meanwhile in Dubai, this year's UN climate conference COP28 came to a close with the participating nations agreeing on a historic first calling for a global transition away from fossil fuels. The United States has once again vetoed a resolution calling for a ceasefire in Gaza at the UN Security Council.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/12/23·1h 26m

More People Are Putting Their Hopes Of Parenthood On Ice

Egg freezing, or oocyte preservation, was once considered an experimental procedure. But since the American Society for Reproductive Medicine dropped that designation in 2012, more people than ever are putting their hopes of parenthood on ice. There was a 400 percent increase in the number of people freezing their eggs between 2012 and 2020 according to the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technology.Employers like Starbucks and Walmart are offering fertility benefits to attract and retain workers. And fertility industry startups are also capitalizing on demand for services that either help delay parenthood or make parenthood a possibility. We discuss the physical, emotional, and financial realities of egg freezing and its accessibility. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/12/23·33m 27s

Mercury Stardust Helps Renters Feel At Home

More than a third of Americans rent instead of own their home, according to the 2022 Census. That number is likely to increase. More than half of Gen Z say renting is a better option than buying a house, and a report from the Wall Street Journal found that more high-income earners are choosing to rent over making the big purchase. As more Americans rent, they face some unique challenges: absent landlords, bait-and-switch apartments, and figuring out whether hanging that heavy mirror on the wall is worth the headache later.Mercury Stardust is a professional home maintenance technician and is known widely as the Trans Handy Ma'am on social media. On TikTok, she helps her 2.5 million followers through all the DIY tasks of rental repairs and to make apartments feel more like homes.If you're not on TikTok, you're in luck. Mercury is out with the new book, "Safe and Sound: A Renter-Friendly Guide to Home Repair." Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/12/23·34m 25s

The Evolving Nature Of Cyber Warfare

Hacking and cyber attacks aren't just about flashing pop-ups and phishing emails anymore.Groups of online criminals have become bolder and more sophisticated these last few years. Attacks happen on a much larger scale these days, targeting small towns, hospitals, and even K-12 schools. The hacking groups use complicated malware to get in and lock up those systems.Ransomware groups like Lockbit have made several attacks and threats this year. And cyber has proven an increasingly crucial aspect of the war in Ukraine.We discuss the latest on the cyber attacks of 2023 and what we might expect in 2024.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/12/23·28m 21s

America's Love Of Drive-thrus

Drive-thrus are a quintessentially American phenomenon. The first was in the U.S. and they spread quickly nationwide in the mid-20th century due to the rise of car culture and the highway system.Now, estimates suggest there are around 200,000 drive-thrus across the country. They grew in popularity during the pandemic. Drive-thrus have a history of innovation. Fast food companies are experimenting with new technology at their fast food windows, like AI chatbots or elevator food delivery systems that cut out human-to-human interaction.Drive-thrus also offer more than just fast food. Drive-thru funeral homes, banks, and convenience stores save people the step of getting out of their cars.We discuss the history and future of America's drive-thrus.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/12/23·32m 54s

The News Roundup For December 8, 2023

House Speaker Mike Johnson is playing hardball with the Senate. He told Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer this week that he can't pass any funding for Ukraine's fight against the Russian invasions through the House unless it was paired with immigration reforms.Meanwhile, leaked audio of Israeli hostages previously held by Hamas details their anger with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Audio of a meeting between them and the prime minister reveals their disapproval of the government's conduct while handling their situation.A former U.S. diplomat was charged this week with espionage. Ex-ambassador Victor Manuel Rocha is accused of spying for Cuba.And Former U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson was heckled as he attempted to apologize for the deaths of British citizens during the pandemic. We cover the biggest headlines during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/12/23·1h 26m

SOS: Preserving Biodiversity Around The World

Plants and animals across the world are struggling for many reasons. Most of those reasons are caused by human activities. But within the last 50 years, we've taken some steps to try and ease that. Some places like Gorongosa National Park have the world's most hopeful stories of wildlife recovery. And that recovery is just as important to wildlife as it is to the community.There are a few international bodies dedicated to biodiversity conservation: IPBES, the United Nations Biodiversity Conference (COP 15), CITES. Those organizations don't include each country's own plan for conservation.For this episode of our series, "SOS: Save Our Species." We take a closer look at how these organizations work together. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/12/23·33m 54s

SOS: Reintroducing Endangered Species

A million species are under the threat of extinction, scientists say.Since the passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973, 11 species on that list have been declared extinct in the United States. One tool being used to combat the extinction crisis is species reintroduction — the process of re-establishing a species population in an area they've been driven out of. Reintroduction has been successful in the U.S. before, with a variety of species, including black-footed ferrets, which were once among the rarest mammals in the world.We discuss how decisions over reintroductions are made and check in on the battle over a gray wolf release program in Colorado.This episode is part of our series, "SOS: Save Our Species," which takes a closer look at the Endangered Species Act and its impact 50 years later. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/12/23·33m 38s

SOS: Saving Keystone Species

What do bison, beaver, wolves and sea otters all have in common?They're keystone species. That means they have an outsized impact on their ecosystem. It took humans driving some of these to near extinction to realize just how important they are.Now animals like the American Bison and North American Beaver are some of the Endangered Species Act's most notable success stories. As part of our series marking the 50th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, we're taking a closer look at the efforts to save keystone species.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/12/23·38m 14s

SOS: 50 Years After The Endangered Species Act

Scientists predict that more than 1 million species could go extinct in the coming decades. It's been 50 years since Congress passed the Endangered Species Act in 1973 to protect plants and animals in the U.S. from extinction. Over 99 percent of the more than 1,600 species listed as endangered or threatened have survived.But the work to protect our nation's biodiversity is far from over. Just last month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that it was delisting 21 species from the act due to extinction. It included one species of bat and 10 kinds of birds. We discuss what the Endangered Species Act has accomplished in 50 years and how we should think about the next 50 years of conservation.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/12/23·35m 47s

The News Roundup For December 1, 2023

New York Rep. George Santos' time in Congress could come to an end this week. A vote to expel him is expected on Friday. He had already previously refused to resign.Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger died this week at the age of 100. He played a part in some of the darkest moments of the Cold War.Meanwhile, the war resumed between Israel and Hamas on Friday, after the last truce extension expired. And in the West Bank four people, including an 8-year-old boy, were killed as the Israeli Defense Force raided the Jenin refugee camp this week.The Department of Justice charged a man accused of taking payment from the Indian government for the assassination of a Sikh leader and U.S. citizen in New York.We cover all these headlines and more during this week's News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/12/23·1h 24m

Best Of: 'The Golden Bachelor' And Finding Love After 60

For the first time in the franchise's 21-year history, ABC's "The Bachelor" is surprising viewers with "The Golden Bachelor", where all the contestants are over 60. And the bachelor himself is 72. Whether you're a fan of the show or not, the series is airing at a time when many older Americans are finding themselves single. According to a new analysis by Bowling Green State University's National Center for Family and Marriage Research, divorce rates among people 65 and older tripled between 1990 and 2021. And roughly half of women over 65 are un-partnered. That's according to a Pew Research survey from 2020. We discuss what it's like to try and find love in your later years.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/11/23·30m 10s

WeWork's Bankruptcy And The Future Of Coworking Spaces

WeWork – the shared office space company – was once hailed as a revolutionary way to work, with a $47 billion valuation to match.But earlier this month, the company filed for bankruptcy. WeWork reported more than $18 billion in debt and around $100 million in unpaid rent.And while the bankruptcy may be the final nail in WeWork's proverbial coffin, many other coworking spaces have cropped up all around the country.We discuss what the future of remote work will look like and how coworking spaces fit into that future.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/11/23·36m 38s

Best Of: What We Get Wrong About Forgiveness

In June 2015, nine people died at Charleston's Emanuel A.M.E. Church, victims of a racist shooter's rampage.Some of the victims' relatives publicly forgave the murderer, including Chris Singleton, whose mother, Sharonda Coleman Singleton, was killed. Philosopher Myisha Cherry was struck by the story and its response. Some, she says, paid more attention to the inspirational story of forgiveness than the racial hatred behind the shooting.In her new book, Professor Cherry seeks to understand what forgiveness means and why we venerate it. Sometimes, she argues, forgiveness can do more harm than good, especially if it lets the perpetrator of wrongdoing off the hook – whether that be a person, system or anything else.We discuss forgiveness – what it means and its effect. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/11/23·31m 3s

Linking Math And Games Across The World

Marcus du Sautoy is a mathematician who loves games, travel, and, unsurprisingly, math. His new book is titled "Around the World in 80 Games: A Mathematician Unlocks the Secrets of the Greatest Games." In it, du Sautoy tours the world's games, exploring how they are built around (and can be won using) mathematics.We discuss how math and games are interwoven worldwide, and learn the history of some of our favorite games. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/11/23·34m 13s

'The Big Dig': The Legacy Of The Costliest Highway Project

Whether it's high-speed rail or highway reconstruction, infrastructure projects in the U.S. are often associated with high price tags and lengthy timelines. Perhaps no project captures this better than Boston's Central Artery Tunnel project, more commonly known as the Big Dig. It's the nation's most expensive highway project. And it took more than two decades to plan and build.Ian Coss, host of GBH News' "The Big Dig" joins us to discuss the lessons we can take away from projects like Boston's.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/11/23·1h 8m

The 1A Record Club Listens To Dolly Parton's 'Rockstar'

Dolly Parton's resume is as big as her hair. And at age 77 she's adding another title to it: "Rockstar."Her new album was released on Nov. 17. It's a mix of covers of classic rock songs, featuring collaborations with a whopping list of who's who in Rock-n-Roll. And there are almost 30 tracks – give or take a few – depending on the version of the album that you buy. With 9 new singles, "Rockstar" is Dolly's most significant foray into Rock and Roll music.While Dolly has fully embraced a new "Rockstar" persona – down to the black studded outfits – glimmers of rockstar have existed in Dolly's previous eras. Over the past fifty years, Dolly has won plenty of awards and accolades for her songwriting, becoming one of music's most prolific songwriters.Sit back and grab yourself a cup of ambition. For this edition of the 1A Record Club – Dolly Parton's new album "Rockstar" and what her latest musical evolution represents.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/11/23·43m 49s

Best Of: 'Strange Planet' Satirizes The Absurdities Of Everyday Life

The wildly popular webcomic "Strange Planet" has attracted millions of followers by pointing out absurdities in everyday life.Beings on Strange Planet live in a place very similar to Earth and behave very similarly to humans. They just talk about it differently. On Strange Planet, coffee is "jitter liquid," socks are "foot tubes," alcohol is "mild poison," kissing is "mouth pushing," and raccoons are "greyscale finger bandits."The successful webcomic is expanding to books, merchandise, and now a new show on Apple TV+, co-created by "Strange Planet" creator Nathan W. Pyle and "Rick and Morty" co-creator Dan Harmon.We talk to Pyle about the show and his inspiration. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/11/23·30m 14s

Best Of: The 1A Record Club Celebrates 50 Years Of Hip-Hop

Hip-hop is many things – unapologetic, lyrical, rhythmic, and above all, ubiquitous.Since its nebulous "creation" at a party in the Bronx in 1973, hip-hop has become one of the world's most popular genres and cultural expressions.It's also evolved drastically. It's given way to various subgenres – like gangsta rap and drill – and provided the means for talented emcees to be heard around the world.But hip-hop doesn't exist without its controversy. The genre has been seen by many since its inception as a tool to further misogyny, violence and capitalist exploitation.We celebrate Hip-Hop's 50th birthday by discussing the history of the genre and what its future could look like. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/11/23·34m 57s

Best Of: How To Add Some More Spice To Your Life And Diet

Chances are you uses spices everyday. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, spice consumption per capita among Americans has more than tripled since 1966. But spices aren't just about taste. They can also be beneficial to our health. One 2019 study from the Journal of A.O.A.C. International found that certain spices can lower the risk of chronic disease and help fight inflammation. We talk about how can you incorporate spices into your dishes at home with a spice shop owner, a professional chef, and a doctor.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/11/23·32m 36s

Why Does Flying Have To Suck?

Complaints against U.S. airlines hit a record high in 2022. And it's not getting any better. Consumer complaints nearly doubled in the first three months of this year, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.With only four major airlines in the U.S., there's little choice for consumers in the market. And with air travel expected to reach a record high this holiday season, many will be subjected to the worst of travel: long lines, high prices, and of course, awful airplane food.But why does our time in flight have to be riddled with anguish? And what can be done to make the skies friendly again?For that, we're turning to Ganesh Sitaraman, a professor at Vanderbilt University Law School and director of the Vanderbilt Policy Accelerator. He's also out with the new book, "Why Flying is Miserable: And How to Fix It."Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/11/23·28m 9s

The News Roundup For November 17, 2023

It's been a busy week for the GOP in Congress. Lawmakers managed to avoid another government shutdown. House Speaker Mike Johnson's grace period in his new role seems to be over. US President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping met for the first time in a year at a summit in San Francisco. The two leaders spent time together as after many months of tensions between the two nations.New polling indicates that there's a significant gap in politician rhetoric and public sentiment on Israel's war on Gaza, with a growing number of Americans believing the IDF has gone too far in its efforts to fight Hamas.Meanwhile, Israeli military strikes on the Al Shifa hospital in Gaza City continued this week, as they focus in on what the IDF claim are Hamas operation centers in medical facilities. Palestinians working in Gaza's main hospital are burying their dead in a mass grave. We cover the most important stories this week during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/11/23·1h 24m

A Brief History Of Eyeliner

William Shakespeare once said that the eyes are the window to the soul. We make eye contact with others to show that we're listening, to connect, or simply as a way of saying, "I see you."Cultures around the world have understood the power of eyes for centuries. If you travel to India, Chad, Japan, Iran, or just around the corner from your house, you'll probably see the same thing around the eyes of the people who live there: eyeliner. In her new book, "Eyeliner: A Cultural History," Lebanese-British journalist Zahra Hankir explores beauty, power, identity, and resistance through the lens of the iconic cosmetic. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/11/23·29m 25s

Best Of: Game Mode Gets Cozy

It's been over three years since "Animal Crossing: New Horizons" was released. It became one of the best-selling video games of the year — moving over 42 million copies, almost four times as much as the previous edition of the game.It also renewed interest in a video game trend known for finding magic in mundane tasks: cozy gaming. Games like "Stardew Valley," "Harvest Moon," and "Unpacking," where the objective is less about shooting, fighting, or space colonization and more about gentle verbs — tending, farming, and homemaking.And the video game industry is taking notice. We discuss the impact and popularity of cozy gaming. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/11/23·31m 25s

What United States Vs. Rahimi Could Mean For Gun Rights Of Domestic Abusers

Guns, and who gets to have access to them, is one of the most hotly debated issues in our country. The Supreme Court will weigh in on gun rights once more in the coming months in the case of a 23-year-old Texas man named Zackey Rahimi.His case challenges a federal law that's been around for nearly two decades that strips gun ownership rights from people under domestic violence protection orders.How should the high court regulate who gets access to guns? And how might the outcome of the case shape gun rights as we know them?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/11/23·30m 54s

Ask A War Photojournalist

The first photographs of a major military conflict were taken during the Crimean War of the 1850s. Nearly 175 years later, photojournalists are on the ground, on the frontlines of conflicts around the world, documenting history.They do so at great risk to themselves. So far, at least five photojournalists have died during the Israel-Hamas War, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists."You see the spirit of human beings when everything else is stripped away," says photojournalist Lynsey Addario. "That's what drives me to keep going back. At the end of the day, people can be horrible, but they can also be extraordinary and wonderful."We discuss how photojournalists in conflict zones do their work and the impact of witnessing the atrocities of war first-hand.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/11/23·31m 13s

The News Roundup For November 10, 2023

This was an off-year election week to remember. In Kentucky, Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear retained control of his office after making abortion a central issue of his campaign.Five GOP candidates took the debate stage in Miami this week, all doing their best to grab the attention of Republican primary voters. WeWork, the office-sharing giant, filed for bankruptcy this week. In 2019, the company was valued at $47 billion.We cover the most important stories from around the country in the domestic hour of the News Roundup.Meanwhile, the U.S. is signaling its desire for more Palestinian governance over Gaza and the West Bank once the war ends. And worldwide, October is being recorded as the hottest-ever month, meaning 2023 is on track to be the hottest-ever year.We cover all these stories and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/11/23·1h 24m

The GOP Hopefuls Take The Debate Stage For The Third Time

Five Republican presidential hopefuls faced off in Miami on Wednesday night for the third GOP debate, the last one of 2023.Former President Donald Trump will, once again, not be on the stage. Instead, he'll be at a rally in a suburb of Miami nearby.The debate comes as many states went to the polls – Kentucky re-elected their Democratic governor, Democrats flipped Virginia's state house and Ohio voted to enshrine the right to abortion in its Constitution. Foreign policy is expected to dominate the debate as Israel's war on Gaza enters the fourth week. We recap the night and discuss what the candidates said about issues like abortion, the economy and foreign policy.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/11/23·43m 9s

Confronting The Nation's Crisis Of Care

By 2030, the Census Bureau estimates that the nation's population will consist of more adults over 65 than children.As the youngest of the baby boomers enter their sixties, and younger adults are having children later in life, many Americans – from Gen Z to Gen X – are finding themselves sandwiched between taking care of elderly parents and young kids at the same time.Today's 65-year-olds have a 70 percent likelihood of needing long-term care in the future, all while the supply of home health aides is dwindling. Nursing homes are also increasingly costly and inaccessible for families of low and moderate incomes.We discuss what it's like to balance caring for young kids and aging adults simultaneously and managing your money or time as a family caregiver.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/11/23·31m 58s

What Happens When Private Security Patrols Public Streets?

If you live near a bustling downtown or shopping center, you may have noticed an increase in private security during the last couple of years. Even places like hospitals, jails, or the occasional Walgreens and gas station have turned to hiring their own security. According to The New York Times, most major cities now have at least three times as many security guards as police officers on their streets. In the past couple of weeks, private security guards began patrolling areas in Austin, Texas, and Raleigh, North Carolina. This uptick comes as police departments across the country are struggling to find recruits. As private security replaces its public counterpart, questions about training, regulation, and accountability echo through American communities. Especially considering it's easier for some communities to afford it than it is for others.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/11/23·33m 0s

The Challenges Of Reporting The War In Gaza

War is inherently difficult to cover in real-time. The war between Israel and Hamas is no different. The Committee to Protect Journalists has called the death toll among journalists in the conflict unprecedented with at least 36 journalists killed since the war began last month. What kind of challenges are reporters met with? How do those challenges affect the coverage you're getting as a consumer of news?We discuss what it looks like to cover one of the most complicated conflicts. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/11/23·31m 7s

The News Roundup For November 3, 2023

House Republicans are set to put forward a bill to send aid to Israel to the tune of $14.3 billion. Idaho made its first "abortion trafficking" arrest this week. A mother and son were arrested and charged with kidnapping for taking an underage girl across state lines for an abortion without her parents' knowledge. Meanwhile, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency is losing its aid workers as Israel continues to bomb Gaza. At least 70 of those workers have died in the attacks. International leaders are looking to begin a peace process as the violence and humanitarian situation in Gaza worsens. The Panama Canal is cutting down on the number of ships allowed to pass through. The El Niño weather pattern is contributing to a drought in the country.We cover the most important stories during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/11/23·1h 26m

'Pharmageddon' And The Future Of Retail Pharmacies

Pharmacists say they're overworked and understaffed and have been for years. So they planned a "Pharmageddon" – three days of nationwide walkouts at CVS and Walgreens. The walkouts come after protests from pharmacy workers at Walgreens last month, and multiple walkouts at CVS stores in Kansas City. Although complaints have been ongoing, the scale of the walkouts was difficult to confirm. And change has been hard to come by. Pharmacy worker complaints come as big box retailers face other struggles. Last month, Rite Aid filed for bankruptcy. CVS, RiteAid, and Walgreens locations have been closing stores across the country.We discuss the state of retail pharmacies today, and what these shakeups mean for the communities relying on them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/11/23·32m 58s

The Evolution Of Día De Los Muertos

It's easy to mistake Día de los Muertos for Halloween. Skeletons and marigolds, like the vivid orange macabre of jack-o-lanterns, are synonymous with the tradition. So are the food and treats prepared for loved ones who have passed away. While both traditions evolved from a complicated intertwining of pagan and Christian beliefs and traditions, the push to keep Día de los Muertos a separate tradition from Halloween and faithful to its indigenous roots is as complex as the history of the holiday itself. Introduced in the U.S. as part of the Chicano Movement in the 1960s and '70s, Día de los Muertos celebrations have become a part of fall festivities in towns and cities around the country. We take a closer look at the history and evolution of Día de los Muertos stateside.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/11/23·29m 1s

How Horror Creates Meaning

Different kinds of horror stories can be scary, dreadful, terrifying, and even gross. But they can also be rich with meaning. There's no lack of horror subjects and subgenres to venture into, whether it's slashers, zombies, monsters, ghosts, or vampires. And more niches like highway horror or found footage.The number of jump scares per horror movie is the lowest it's ever been since 2014, according to The Washington Post.We discuss the meaning behind different types of horror stories and different tropes.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/10/23·33m 36s

What's Next For Mike Johnson And Donald Trump?

All 220 House Republicans present voted for Louisiana Republican Mike Johnson as the body's next speaker. He was the fourth candidate put forward by the GOP in the three weeks since they ousted former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy.Meanwhile, former President Donald Trump's legal issues continue to mount. His daughter, Ivanka, as well as his sons, Eric and Donald Jr., will soon have to testify in a New York civil case concerning financial fraud.This is one of several cases Trump is facing, including allegations that he sought to interfere with the 2020 election results in Georgia and that he mishandled classified documents at his club in Florida.We discuss all the latest and take a closer look at what's on the new speaker's agenda in terms of legislation. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/10/23·32m 24s

The News Roundup For October 27

After three weeks of a vacancy, and multiple failed candidates, House Republicans finally named their speaker: Louisiana Rep. Mike Johnson.Also this week, Ford and the United Auto Workers Union have reached a tentative deal that would see an end to the strike end and a pay raise for the union members.Meanwhile, Israel prepares for a ground war as the humanitarian situation in Gaza grows worse by the day. Palestinians in Gaza are quickly running out of food and water, and the healthcare system has collapsed.And Chinese Defense Minister Li Shangfu was removed from his position two months after he was last seen in public.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/10/23·1h 23m

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Killers Of The Flower Moon'

For this month's Movie Club, we're discussing "Killers of the Flower Moon," a new film by director Martin Scorsese that some say could be his last. The film is based on a book by the same name by journalist David Grann. Set in the 1920s, it tells the story of the mysterious murders of more than 60 wealthy Osage Native Americans. The murders were brutal and went largely unchecked by local and state police in Oklahoma. The movie stars Lily Gladstone, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Robert De Niro. We discuss the movie, what it gets right about Native American culture, and what it means for the future of films featuring Indigenous characters.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/10/23·34m 27s

The State Of Israeli Politics

Benjamin Netanyahu campaigned to be Israel's prime minister on the promise that he'd keep Israel safe.Now, as the leader of one of the most right-wing governments in the country's history, he's tasked with shepherding Israel through a crisis after the Oct. 7 attack by Hamas — the militant and political group that rules Gaza — killed more than 1,400 people.A poll in the Ma'ariv newspaper suggests up to 80% of Israelis believe Netanyahu must take responsibility for the security failures that led to the October 7th attack.The country was already facing internal upheaval as Netanyahu's government pushed to overhaul the judiciary system.We discuss the latest updates on Israeli domestic politics.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/10/23·42m 50s

Who Represents The Palestinian People?

Since Hamas's deadly attack on Israel on Oct. 7, a lot has been said about the militant and political group and whether or not they represent the Palestinian people.Hamas has been declared a terrorist group by dozens of countries, including the United States. And many Palestinians in Gaza think the political party is corrupt. The Palestinian Liberation Organization, which controls the West Bank and is led by Mahmoud Abbas, has condemned Hamas's violence.It's been over 15 years since the last parliamentary election that brought Hamas to power, one that many Palestinians weren't old enough to vote in. We discuss how Palestinian leadership and how war and displacement has shaped the lives of Palestinians. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/10/23·44m 20s

Best Of: What Is Cultivated Meat?

Cultivated meat is green-lit in the U.S. That's meat grown in a lab.Two food technology companies — UPSIDE Foods and GOOD Meat — are letting people try their cultivated meat. But you can't grab any off grocery shelves quite yet. For now, it's available to the public at Bar Crenn in San Francisco and China Chilcano in Washington D.C. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service approved their labels and the Food and Drug Administration left with no questions after they did a pre-market consultation with the companies on their product.We discuss how this meat is grown and its potential impact on the meat industry.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/10/23·34m 1s

The News Roundup For October 20, 2023

President Joe Biden flew to Israel this week for a brief visit amid the country's preparation for a ground invasion of Gaza. During his brief, 7-hour stay, he managed to help push through a deal for humanitarian aid trucks to travel through Egypt to Gaza.Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Defense has ordered some 2,000 troops to prepare to deploy to the Middle East to support the Israeli military in its siege of Gaza. India's Supreme Court refused to legalize same-sex marriage this week, disappointing millions of LGBTQ+ couples, activists, and allies.And Poland's election finished with major losses for the country's nationalist right. We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/10/23·1h 22m

Diversity, Craft Beer, And The Future Of The Brewing Industry

Whether it's an ale, lager, stout, or sour, people all over the U.S. are trying their own craft beer recipes at home. Some turn them into businesses.The number of craft breweries in the U.S. is at an all-time high according to the Brewers Association, with more than 9,500 across the country. But the industry is changing. Organizations like Beer Kulture and The Michael James Jackson Foundation for Brewing and Distilling are funding technical scholarships for people of color interested in the business. Films like "One Pint at a Time" highlight the lack of diversity in the industry.We discuss what it takes to be in the brewing business these days and how people in the industry are trying to diversify it. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/10/23·31m 46s

An Airstrike At Gaza Hospital Kills Hundreds

An air strike has hit the al-Ahli hospital in Gaza City where thousands were seeking safety and treatment.Hamas has blamed an Israeli airstrike, while the Israeli military said the hospital was hit by a rocket fired by Palestinian militants. The health ministry said at least 500 people had been killed.Hundreds of Palestinians had taken refuge in al-Ahli, other hospitals, and United Nations buildings in Gaza City, hoping they would be spared bombardment after Israel ordered all residents of the city and surrounding areas to evacuate to the southern Gaza Strip.The attack spurred protests in Ramallah in the Occupied West Bank and condemnation. Egypt's foreign minister said that Cairo considers this "deliberate bombing of civilians to be a serious violation of international, humanitarian law and of the most basic values of humanity."We discuss the latest humanitarian situation in Gaza and ask whether the rules of war were breached.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our websiteLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/10/23·29m 30s

Why How We Talk About Gender Matters

Back in 2015, Schuyler Bailar made headlines for being the first openly transgender athlete to compete on a Division 1 NCAA sports team.Now, he's an advocate for transgender inclusion. His new book is called "He/She/They: How We Talk About Gender and Why It Matters."In the years since Schuyler raced as a member of the Harvard men's swim team, the battle over transgender inclusion in sports has become more contentious.Since 2020, 18 states have passed laws restricting participation in sports for trans women and girls and five other states passed laws applying to all trans athletes, according to an ESPN analysis.We discuss why the way we talk about gender matters. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/10/23·33m 56s

The Humanitarian Crisis In Gaza

As Israel's military prepares for a ground war, the humanitarian crisis in Gaza has become increasingly dire with water, food, and fuel in dangerously low supply.Hundreds of thousands of Gazans are fleeing south after the Israeli Government told residents to evacuate.Israel cut off fuel, electricity, and water in retaliation for Hamas' surprise attack last Saturday. Israel says more than 1,400 Israelis have been killed and at least 199 taken hostage. Over the weekend, the Palestinian death toll from Israeli airstrikes surpassed 2,750 according to the Gaza Health Ministry.But the enclave is one of the most densely populated places in the world. About half of Gazans are children under 18. And most have nowhere to go.We discuss the mounting humanitarian crisis and what comes next for Gazans and the world as an Israeli ground invasion approaches.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/10/23·34m 43s

The News Roundup For October 13, 2023

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken traveled to Israel this week to reaffirm U.S. support for the country's war against Hamas. He told Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that America would 'always be there' for Israel at a joint press conference.House Republicans are beginning to coalesce around Majority Leader Steve Scalise as their pick to succeed Rep. Kevin McCarthy has the chamber's speaker. However, Scalise faces an uphill battle to obtain the 217 votes he'll need to be confirmed in the role.The Gaza Strip is in the midst of a humanitarian crisis after the Israeli government ordered a complete siege of the territory. Israeli authorities are cutting off access to food, power, and water.Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi and Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohamed bin-Salman discussed the "need to end war crimes in Palestine" in one of their first calls since restoring diplomatic relations between their two countries.Afghanistan was hit by a large earthquake in its western region mere days after two other quakes killed more than 1,000 people. So far, authorities have announced that 100 are injured and at least one person was killed.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/10/23·1h 25m

How Our Relationships With Our Phones Affect Us

A report from Common Sense Media found that teens get over 230 of these distracting notifications each day. Some get over four thousand. But teens aren't the only ones inundated.According to market research company Insider Intelligence, American adults spend four and a half hours a day on their phones. Smartphones and social media apps are lauded by their industries for their addictive design.Now, lawmakers in Utah, New Jersey, and North Carolina are taking action to protect kids from the reach of social media. We discuss how our phones' constant presence affects us and what we can do to claim back our focus.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/10/23·34m 0s

Ask A Playwright

While Shakespeare is long gone, but theater – and thus playwriting – is very much alive.Theater, in contrast to television or film, offers a unique chance for audiences to come together and experience a one-of-a-kind production. Playwrights, in collaboration with actors, directors, and stage crew work, are chiefly responsible for bringing that magic to life.For this installment of our "Ask A" series – where we talk to interesting people about what they do and why it matters – we speak to a group of playwrights about the power of storytelling on stage. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/10/23·33m 23s

Game Mode Gets Cozy

It's been over three years since "Animal Crossing: New Horizons" was released. It became one of the best-selling video games of the year — moving over 42 million copies, almost four times as much as the previous edition of the game.It also renewed interest in a video game trend known for finding magic in mundane tasks: cozy gaming. Games like "Stardew Valley," "Harvest Moon," and "Unpacking," where the objective is less about shooting, fighting, or space colonization and more about gentle verbs — tending, farming, and homemaking.And the video game industry is taking notice. We discuss the impact and popularity of cozy gaming. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/10/23·31m 25s

Israel Declared War On Hamas After Hundreds Were Killed In Surprise Attacks

Israel has not suffered a blow like this in 50 years. Death tolls are hard to verify. But Israeli officials say more than 600 Israelis have been killed in attacks from Gaza since Saturday. As many as 100 Israeli soldiers and civilians were kidnapped when Palestinian militants crossed the border and raided communities. Retaliatory Israeli air strikes have killed more than 400 people in the Gaza Strip, with 2,300 wounded, Palestinian officials say.We get the latest and hear how the U.S. and the world are responding. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/10/23·31m 36s

The News Roundup For October 6, 2023

Former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy lost his position this week as eight Republicans joined House Democrats in stripping him of his title. The House will now have to vote for a new Speaker. Migrant deaths have more than doubled at the border in El Paso, Texas, this year as scorching heat has made conditions for crossings incredibly dangerous. The toll of 148 deaths is a record high.Meanwhile, the war in Ukraine continues as some analysts suggest global support for Volodymyr Zelenskyy's forces is waning. And U.K. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is calling for continental solutions as migrants continue to make their way to the borders of the European Union.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/10/23·1h 25m

From Solar Panels To National Policies, What Climate Solutions Actually Help?

Climate records have been broken non-stop this year.2023 saw the earth's hottest summer on record. The record-breaking heat continued into September. The year also saw extreme weather including the Canadian wildfires that scorched 37 million acres of land, roughly the size of the state of New York.News like this can be disheartening. But we've heard from many of you about springing into action to fight climate change, even if it's cautiously optimistic.We discuss what can be done at home, in your community, and on a larger scale through policy and industry action to fight climate change.This conversation is part of NPR's Climate Week which puts a spotlight on solutions.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/10/23·34m 28s

'The Golden Bachelor' And Finding Love After 60

For the first time in the franchise's 21-year history, ABC's "The Bachelor" is surprising viewers with "The Golden Bachelor", where all the contestants are over 60. And the bachelor himself is 72. Whether you're a fan of the show or not, the series is airing at a time when many older Americans are finding themselves single. According to a new analysis by Bowling Green State University's National Center for Family and Marriage Research, divorce rates among people 65 and older tripled between 1990 and 2021. And roughly half of women over 65 are un-partnered. That's according to a Pew Research survey from 2020. We discuss what it's like to try and find love in your later years.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/10/23·29m 25s

Carl Hiaasen, Banned Books, And Censorship In Schools

The American Library Association found that the number of books facing challenges for censorship is up 20 percent for the first eight months of this year compared to 2022. That includes more than 800 books in school districts across 37 states. More than 300 books were removed from Florida schools last year, according to a list released by the Florida Department of Education. Some of those books, written by author Carl Hiaasen, who knows this landscape too well. The longtime Miami Herald national columnist and author has witnessed several of his books be removed from schools, prisons, and libraries. He's already had several events canceled on the nationwide tour of his latest young adult book, "Wrecker."We discuss the banned book environment, and the impact these bans have on students and libraries nationwide. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/10/23·31m 42s

The Science Of Synesthesia And Super Sensors

Joy Milne met her husband Les in high school. Nearly 15 years after they met, Joy smelled something different about Les. The scent wouldn't go away, and a decade later, Les was diagnosed with Parkinson's. It turned out, Joy's nose was detecting the disease, long before doctors could.Joy's hyperosmia, or super-smelling ability, helped develop a non-invasive swab test for Parkinson's. Hers is one of many stories in the new book "Fearfully and Wonderfully Made: The Astonishing New Science of the Senses." Author Maureen Seaberg is a super sensor too. She joins us to discuss why some of us have superior senses, and how we can all harness that power. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/10/23·30m 21s

The News Roundup For September 29, 2023

A New York Judge has determined that former President Donald Trump and his adult sons committed fraud and canceled the Trump Organization's business certification.Congress is running out of time to pass a funding bill that would avoid a partial government shutdown before Oct. 1. And tributes are being paid to Senator Dianne Feinstein. Her death was announced Friday morning. She was 90.Meanwhile, support for Ukraine is beginning to waiver in the United States as Republican congresspeople squabble over aid for President Volodymyr Zelenskyy's forces. In Canada, protesters are demonstrating outside the Indian consulate, calling for the expulsion of India's top diplomat. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau accused the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government of having a Sikh leader in Canada killed.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/09/23·1h 24m

A Closer Look At The Second 2024 GOP Primary Debate

Seven Republicans qualified for last night's presidential primary debate: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, former Vice President Mike Pence, businessman Vivek Ramaswamy, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, and South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott.At the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California, the candidates gathered on stage without the current front-runner: former President Donald Trump, who was, at the same time, meeting with auto workers in Michigan.Where are the candidates finding space for alignment and disagreement with both Trump and each other?We discuss the event and the significance of Trump's absence. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/09/23·31m 36s

Dessa On 'Bury the Lede' And Making Pop Music Through Pain

What music have you turned to during hard times? That's the question Dessa's latest album hopes to answer.The award-winning rapper, singer, writer, and podcast (and sometimes 1A) host has been in the game for a while. She came up as part of the Minneapolis rap collective, Doomtree. She was featured in 2016's chart-topping "Hamilton Mixtape," and she's collaborated with the Minnesota Orchestra on a number of performances and even a live album. She's also the author of "My Own Devices: True Stories from the Road on Music, Science, and Senseless Love."But like many of us, her last few years weren't easy. And her new music, including "Hurricane Party" and pop-forward "Chopper," is her way of reckoning with — and dancing away — those feelings.We discuss Dessa's new album with her and the influence of pop music. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/09/23·32m 17s

How To Add Some More Spice To Your Life And Diet

Chances are you uses spices everyday. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, spice consumption per capita among Americans has more than tripled since 1966. But spices aren't just about taste. They can also be beneficial to our health. One 2019 study from the Journal of A.O.A.C. International found that certain spices can lower the risk of chronic disease and help fight inflammation. We talk about how can you incorporate spices into your dishes at home with a spice shop owner, a professional chef, and a doctor.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/09/23·32m 36s

Who Do We Think Gets To Think About The Roman Empire?

How much do you think about the Roman Empire?It's a question that men the world over were asked by friends and loved ones who use the video-sharing app TikTok in recent days.A recent viral trend asserts that dudes spend a surprising amount of time ruminating on barbarian invasions, Hadrian's Wall, fights in the Coliseum, and much more.It's a fun silly trend. But it illustrates a broader point about how we think about who thinks about history. (We think about this a lot.)We discuss what how we think about the Roman Empire says about us.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/09/23·29m 13s

The News Roundup For September 22, 2023

House Republicans are struggling to agree on a temporary spending bill which would prevent a government shutdown at the end of the month. Democrats have made no offers to help House Speaker Kevin McCarthy.The Biden administration announced the creation of the American Climate Corps this week. The organization will train and support young people working to fight climate change, preserve environments, and promote clean energy.Meanwhile in the U.K. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is catching flak this week for scaling back his country's climate goals in a press conference this Wednesday.And Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich appeared in a Moscow court this week to appeal his imprisonment on espionage charges. The appeal was returned to a lower court to deal with procedural violations.1A Guest Host Todd Zwillich guides us through the biggest headlines of the week for this edition of the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/09/23·1h 23m

Rory Stewart On 'How Not To Be A Politician'

The United Kingdom has had five prime ministers since it voted to leave the European Union in 2016. Rory Stewart once came close to being one of them. But he decided to quit party politics in 2019.He now enjoys a degree of popularity in the U.K. His high profile has raised talk that 10 Downing Street could still be a future address for this nomadic rising star.Stewart has walked across Asia, taught at Harvard, served as a diplomat in Iraq, and served as a Conservative MP. He is also a Global Ambassador for the charity Give Directly and a co-host of the podcast "The Rest is Politics."His background and trajectory put him on a path to reach high office. But then came Brexit, Boris Johnson, and a level of carelessness that he writes about in his new memoir, called "How Not to Be A Politician."We sit down with Stewart and discuss his memoir and podcast. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/09/23·32m 26s

What We Get Wrong About Forgiveness

In June 2015, nine people died at Charleston's Emanuel A.M.E. Church, victims of a racist shooter's rampage.Some of the victims' relatives publicly forgave the murderer, including Chris Singleton, whose mother, Sharonda Coleman Singleton, was killed. Philosopher Myisha Cherry was struck by the story and its response. Some, she says, paid more attention to the inspirational story of forgiveness than the racial hatred behind the shooting.In her new book, Professor Cherry seeks to understand what forgiveness means and why we venerate it. Sometimes, she argues, forgiveness can do more harm than good, especially if it lets the perpetrator of wrongdoing off the hook – whether that be a person, system or anything else.We discuss forgiveness – what it means and its effect. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/09/23·31m 3s

In Good Health: When A Popular Decongestant Doesn't Work

Last week, an FDA advisory panel unanimously agreed that Phenylephrine, a common ingredient in many over-the-counter decongestant medications, is ineffective. The decision could affect hundreds of products including Sudafed PE, NyQuil Severe Cold and Flu, and Benadryl Allergy Plus Congestion. This comes as COVID cases continue to rise and as we head into fall allergy season. Studies also show that human-caused climate change is making allergies more intense and last longer. For this edition of In Good Health, our panel of experts discusses the best alternatives for relief and how you should prepare for the colder months as sicknesses surge.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/09/23·33m 5s

Google's Power And The Biggest Tech Monopoly Trial In 25 Years

It's hard to deny Google's power when it comes to the internet. In the Merriam-Webster dictionary, "google" is even a verb. The U.S. Department of Justice wants to do something about that. It's taking on Google in the biggest tech monopoly trial in 25 years. The DOJ is accusing the company of abusing its power to become the dominant search engine. Google controls around 90 percent of the U.S. search engine market and is worth 1.7 trillion dollars. We discuss the trial, how the U.S. is regulating tech, and what implications this case has for tech business around the world.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/09/23·29m 32s

The News Roundup For September 15, 2023

Speaker Kevin McCarthy directed the House of Representatives to open an impeachment inquiry over the business dealings of President Joe Biden's family this week. And on Thursday Biden's son Hunter was indicted on three gun charges.American auto workers are on strike. Thousands of UAW members followed through on their promise to walk off the job if companies don't reach an agreement by 11:59 p.m. Thursday evening.Meanwhile, in Libya, the death toll is expected to climb as high as 20,000 after floods ripped through the eastern part of the country this week after Tropical Storm Daniel. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un expressed his full support for Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine when the two met this week.We cover these headlines and more with 1A Guest Host Todd Zwillich during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/09/23·1h 23m

1A Movie Club: The Best Of The Bad

The 1995 film "Showgirls" starring Elizabeth Berkley was one of the largest commercial failures of its time. With a budget of $45 million, (nearly $90 million in 2023 dollars), the film ended up losing more than $8 million and was widely panned by critics. Berkeley said the movie was so bad she became a "pariah" in Hollywood.But nearly 30 years after its release, "Showgirls" maintains a cult following with midnight showings at independent theaters and deep-dive essays exploring its themes by culture critics.Americans love their share of bad movies. From "The Room" to "Troll 2," you can find entire online communities and podcasts dedicated to unpacking these works of... art.We discuss what it is we love the most about bad movies. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/09/23·29m 48s

Why Panic Attacks Happen And How To Prevent Them

Matt Gutman has spent decades in front of cameras and microphones as a newscaster, reporting on current events across the globe. His calm, cool demeanor belied his internal struggle with a lifetime of panic.Matt is one of many Americans who suffer from panic attacks. He tried pharmaceuticals, psychedelics and therapy. His journey is documented in the new book "No Time To Panic: How I Curbed My Anxiety and Conquered a Lifetime of Panic Attacks." We talk to Matt and psychiatrist Dr. Ellen Vora about why panic attacks happen and how to prevent them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/09/23·36m 51s

The Diversity Problem With Corporate America

This summer, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down affirmative action in higher education. That means colleges and universities can no longer consider a student applicant's race when building their student bodies.The decision was a victory for Edward Blum, the legal activist who founded Students for Fair Admissions. The organization won the landmark case it brought against Harvard University and the University of North Carolina.Now, Blum and other conservative legal firms, have set their sights on diversity efforts in corporate America.We discuss the legal challenges against venture capital funds, law firm fellowships, and federal contracting programs that all aim to uplift Black professionals and businesses.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/09/23·30m 19s

How Hawaii Is Keeping History And Culture In Mind As It Rebuilds

Recovery and rebuilding efforts are underway in Hawaii a month after the deadly fires that swept through Maui. Some 115 people were killed and thousands were displaced by the fires which began in the town of Lahaina.Along with the homes and businesses lost to the fires in Maui, cultural institutions are also struggling to rebuild. The land around Lahaina is significant to Hawaii's history and heritage. A network of community leaders has kept Lahaina's cultural history intact. But with the fires came the destruction of that sacred land. We discuss the impact of the cultural loss due to the Maui wildfires, and what rebuilding and recovery mean for Native Hawaiians. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/09/23·35m 39s

The News Roundup For September 9, 2023

Another government shutdown is looming as the calendar shifts to the month of September. Congress has until the 30th to settle up on a short-term funding bill that would keep the lights on in Washington. Special Counsel Jack Smith is not making Donald Trump's life any easier. Smith has charged the former president with four counts over his attempt to overthrow the results of the 2020 election. Meanwhile, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken met with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to reassure Ukrainian leaders that they could continue to count on American support in their fight against the Russian invasion. And North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is expected to travel to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin to discuss their respective conflicts with the U.S. And abortion restrictions grow in the United States, Mexico is moving in the opposite direction. The country's supreme court did away with all federal penalties and decriminalized abortion this week. We cover these headlines and a whole lot more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/09/23·1h 28m

The Benefits Of Birdnesting After Divorce

Some parents who are no longer married are trying a strategy called birdnesting. It's an arrangement where children remain in their family home while the parents cycle in and out of the house. The hope for this approach is that it offers stability to young people during a time of major change. According to the University of Illinois at Chicago's Psychiatry College of Medicine, children of divorce have a greater risk of developing mental health disorders like anxiety and depression. We discuss how much co-parenting arrangements like nesting offset the negative effects of divorce on kids and what you need to know before you try nesting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/09/23·30m 21s

The Passion And Politics Of Pickleball

Over the past three years, the number of Americans who reported playing pickleball went from 5 million to 36.5 million according to the Association of Pickleball Professionals.As the sport builds in popularity among amateur players, professional pickleball is also getting an influx of cash from sporting celebrities like Lebron James and Kevin Love.We host a panel conversation about the passion and politics of pickleball.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/09/23·32m 28s

What Is Cultivated Meat?

Cultivated meat is green-lit in the U.S. That's meat grown in a lab.Two food technology companies — UPSIDE Foods and GOOD Meat — are letting people try their cultivated meat. But you can't grab any off grocery shelves quite yet. For now, it's available to the public at Bar Crenn in San Francisco and China Chilcano in Washington D.C. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service approved their labels and the Food and Drug Administration left with no questions after they did a pre-market consultation with the companies on their product.We discuss how this meat is grown and its potential impact on the meat industry.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/09/23·34m 7s

Best Of: Spending Time In 'Your Mama's Kitchen'

Whether your mom was a natural cook or a reluctant one. Or if your other parent was the one throwing down in the kitchen, food and the place where it's made live inside of us long after we've eaten. What we inherit from our parents' kitchen and pass along as adults is at the center of a new podcast by award-winning journalist Michele Norris.It's called "Your Mama's Kitchen." Former first lady Michelle Obama joins Michele for the first episode. We speak to Michele about how our experiences in the kitchen shape us outside of it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/09/23·31m 19s

The News Roundup For September 1, 2023

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell froze when answering questions asked by reporters about whether he would run for re-election. It's the second such incident involving the Kentucky senator. It has sparked discussions about the age at which politicians should step aside.A white shooter in Jacksonville, Florida, killed three Black people this week. The gunman shot at shoppers and employees at a Dollar General store in a predominantly Black area of the city. The incident is being investigated as a hate crime.Meanwhile, the U.S. Embassy in Haiti is urging Americans in the country to leave amid political unrest and rising gang violence. If they are to stay, authorities warn against traveling within the country and engaging with large groups of people.Former Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan's conviction and prison sentence were suspended by a court in Islamabad. He was released on bail.We cover all the biggest news from around the world during this week's News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/09/23·1h 28m

The 'New' Homeschoolers

The pandemic forced many families into homeschooling — and a surprising number of them are sticking with it.In the 2021 and 2022 school year, homeschool enrollment rose by 30 percent. That's according to research from Stanford University and the Urban Institute.The most dramatic shift in homeschool enrollment was among Black families. According to a 2020 Census Household Survey, homeschooling among Black families in the fall of 2020 was five times higher than it was in the spring of 2020.We discuss why more parents are opting to homeschool their kids for good and the kind of regulation that comes with homeschooling. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/08/23·34m 34s

What's Happening In Afghanistan Two Years After The U.S. Left?

On Aug. 30, 2021, the U.S. completed its full withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, bringing the 20-year-long war to an end.Two weeks earlier, on Aug. 15, with fewer troops to block their path, the Taliban took over Kabul.Since then, the Taliban has controlled Afghanistan. Girls are now banned from attending school past sixth grade. Independent media, including newspapers and radio stations, have been shut down. Protestors, journalists, and activists are being arrested.We look back on the U.S. war in Afghanistan and what's happening in the country now.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/08/23·31m 1s

Is Rent Control The Answer To Rising Evictions?

The pandemic made monthly rent payments soar, rising 15 percent between 2020 and 2022.Evictions are also on the rise since the pandemic, with some cities seeing filings increases by as much as 50 percent, according to Princeton University's Eviction Lab. This has led some cities and states to consider rent regulations. This month, a group of economists sent a letter to the Biden Administration in support of national rent regulation. It's a sign of a possible shift in what historically has been one of the most agreed-upon topics among economists – probably ever. We discuss rent control and which regulations actually work. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/08/23·30m 51s

Best Of: Seeking Thrills And Staying Safe On Roller Coasters

While you may not be a fan of the heart pumping, adrenaline boosting feeling of a roller coaster's twists and turns, for others, it's the best part of the warmer months or even a core memory of their childhood. But recently, two roller coasters hit the headlines for less than awesome reasons. Riders at a Wisconsin festival were stuck upside down for around three hours after a mechanical failure. And a North Carolina man spotted a massive crack in a coaster support beam after his family had been on the ride.We discuss the safety of roller coasters and what's next for coaster engineering.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/08/23·32m 20s

The News Roundup For August 25, 2023

The racketeering case against Donald Trump and his co-conspirators in Fulton County, Georgia, progressed this week. Former New York City Mayor and Trump ally Rudy Giuliani surrendered to authorities this week at the Atlanta jail where the defendants in the case are being booked.Overseas, the head of the Wagner military group Yevgeny Prigozhin reportedly died in a plane crash in Russia this week. In June, Prigozhin ordered his troops to march on Moscow in defiance of Russian President Vladimir Putin and his military leaders.In a big moment for Prime Minister Narendra Modi's country, India landed a rover on the south pole of the moon.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/08/23·1h 22m

How Cable News Changes American Politics And Culture

For more than 80 years, cable television has been at the center of American politics and culture. While streaming platforms have driven many families to cut the cord, there are still more than 72 million active cable subscribers according to the National Cable and Telecommunications Association.News remains a huge part of Americans' cable television diet. But the industry is at a crossroads, with cable subscriptions down 30 percent over the past decade. Giants of the industry like CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC have cut their staffs.We discuss how cable news has shaped our politics and culture and its role in the 2024 Presidential election.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/08/23·32m 6s

Best Of: The Human Labor Powering AI Engines

As anxieties over automation mount, AI is already responsible for the employment of millions of workers globally.From chatbots to text-to-image generators, AI relies on human workers labeling and annotating the millions of images and words it references. But the work of feeding information to AI can be tedious, with unreliable pay and few opportunities for growth.We discuss the workforce powering AI and Congress' plans to regulate the industry. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/08/23·28m 9s

'Strange Planet' Satirizes The Absurdities Of Everyday Life

The wildly popular webcomic "Strange Planet" has attracted millions of followers by pointing out absurdities in everyday life.Beings on Strange Planet live in a place very similar to Earth and behave very similarly to humans. They just talk about it differently. On Strange Planet, coffee is "jitter liquid," socks are "foot tubes," alcohol is "mild poison," kissing is "mouth pushing," and raccoons are "greyscale finger bandits."The successful webcomic is expanding to books, merchandise, and now a new show on Apple TV+, co-created by "Strange Planet" creator Nathan W. Pyle and "Rick and Morty" co-creator Dan Harmon.We talk to Pyle about the show and his inspiration. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/08/23·30m 16s

What We Know About Trump's Latest Criminal Indictment

Former President Donald Trump is facing his fourth criminal indictment — this time for attempting to overturn election results in Georgia.Trump has denied the charges, but the alleged crimes facing the presidential candidate are piling up. We talk about where the latest indictment fits in with the others and what happens next with our panel of guests.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/08/23·34m 27s

The News Roundup For August 18, 2023

Former President Donald Trump was indicted again this week. He's been charged alongside 18 other co-defendants by a grand jury in Georgia for conspiring to unlawfully keep himself in office in the wake of the 2020 election under the state's racketeering law.Wildfires continue to ravage Maui. The death toll in the wildfires has reached 110, but is sure to climb in the coming days.Meanwhile, the United Nations issued a warning over the situation in Sudan this week. More than 1 million people have fled the country since fighting broke out in April. North Korea has officially confirmed U.S. soldier Travis King is in the country. North Korean officials are claiming King came to their country to escape unequal and inhumane treatment in the U.S. military.We cover all this and more during this edition of the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/08/23·1h 21m

Plugged In: Local Governments And The IRA

The Inflation Reduction Act is one year old this week, but what has it actually accomplished? That depends on where you are. While the law provides billions of dollars for the U.S. to transition away from fossil fuels, it's up to local governments to allow the big renewable energy development needed to meet the country's net-zero emissions goal. We discuss the biggests challenges for local governments when it comes to using IRA funding. Later we talk to Bureau of Land Management Director Tracy Stone-Manning. We discuss the funding the Bureau received from the IRA and what it's covering. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/08/23·33m 11s

Spending Time In 'Your Mama's Kitchen'

Whether your mom was a natural cook or a reluctant one. Or if your other parent was the one throwing down in the kitchen, food and the place where it's made live inside of us long after we've eaten. What we inherit from our parents' kitchen and pass along as adults is at the center of a new podcast by award-winning journalist Michele Norris.It's called "Your Mama's Kitchen." Former first lady Michelle Obama joins Michele for the first episode. We speak to Michele about how our experiences in the kitchen shape us outside of it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/08/23·31m 24s

Plugged In: How The IRA Is Changing Housing In America

The average American home generates roughly 10 thousand kilowatt hours of electricity every year according to the Energy Information Administration. Millions of Americans are transitioning to solar energy. A Pew Research poll last year found 8 percent of households have solar installed already and 39 percent said they're considering making the switch.But the expensive upfront cost of installing solar (on average $16,000 to $23,000) has kept a lot of people from making the switch.We discuss available options for homeowners and renters.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/08/23·35m 43s

Plugged In: How The IRA Is Changing America

It's been nearly a year since the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 narrowly passed.President Joe Biden's sweeping climate bill has high hopes for fighting climate change, including a pledge to cut U.S. emissions in half by 2030. Some initiatives are working.We discuss the IRA and what other laws need to be passed to progress the fight against climate change.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/08/23·40m 43s

The News Roundup For August 11, 2023

President Joe Biden is keeping his monument streak going, this time selecting more than 404,000 hectares of land near the Grand Canyon for protection. The move is welcome news for activists and members of Indigenous nations in the area.It was a busy week for the U.S. overseas, as well. U.S. officials were in Niger this week to attempt facilitating talks between supporters of the captive president and leaders of coup. They were not been allowed to see or speak with President Mohamed Bazoum.And the Biden administration has crafted new regulations on how American businesses can invest in Chinese enterprises. We cover these stories and so much more during this week's News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/08/23·1h 26m

The 1A Record Club Celebrates 50 Years Of Hip-Hop

Hip-hop is many things – unapologetic, lyrical, rhythmic, and above all, ubiquitous.Since its nebulous "creation" at a party in the Bronx in 1973, hip-hop has become one of the world's most popular genres and cultural expressions.It's also evolved drastically. It's given way to various subgenres – like gangsta rap and drill – and provided the means for talented emcees to be heard around the world.But hip-hop doesn't exist without its controversy. The genre has been seen by many since its inception as a tool to further misogyny, violence and capitalist exploitation.We celebrate Hip-Hop's 50th birthday by discussing the history of the genre and what its future could look like. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/08/23·34m 57s

In Good Health: COVID's Summer Surge

COVID is surging across the globe for the fourth consecutive summer. In the United States, the latest tracking data from the CDC shows a 12 percent rise in hospitalizations due to the virus.Dr. Paul Offit is the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He's also on the FDA Vaccine Advisory Panel.He says the rise in COVID cases due to summer travel is expected. The severity of illness for most people is very low relative to previous summers.In the latest installment of In Good Health, we learn about the slate of new vaccines coming out in this fall for the flu, COVID, and RSV and explore how prepared the United States is for future pandemics.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/08/23·30m 21s

The Debate Over Deep-Sea Mining

If you sank deep into the ocean, where the light no longer reaches, you would see, sitting on the seabed floor, nodules that look just like unassuming rocks.Those grayish clusters are actually filled with vital metals like cobalt, nickel, and copper, which are materials used in the construction of electric cars.Companies and governments are eager to begin deep sea mining for the metals, claiming it would aid in the shift to a greener economy. Others argue this mining could wreak havoc on the marine life we still know so little about. Two weeks ago, international talks about deep-sea mining regulations ended without any rules being set in place. We discuss how harmful the extraction of these metals can be and the future of deep-sea mining. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/08/23·33m 30s

The Issue Of Religious Public Charter Schools

In June, a state board voted 3-to-2 to approve plans for St. Isidore of Seville Virtual Catholic School. It's named after the seventh-century patron saint of the internet. And it would be the first publicly-funded religious charter school in the country. The school is slated to go online in the fall of 2024 but is already facing legal challenges. On July 31, the Oklahoma Parent Legislative Action Committee filed a lawsuit to block the school from receiving taxpayer funds.We discuss the separation of church and state in public education, and what St. Isidore's approval could mean for other schools around the country.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/08/23·35m 22s

The News Roundup For August 4, 2023

Former President Donald Trump was indicted again this week, this time on four charges related to his efforts to overturn the results of the 220 election.Moscow's business district was hit by a drone strike this week, the second attack of its kind on the city since May. And in Ukraine, Russian shelling damaged a landmark church in Kherson and wounded several people.Several countries are evacuating their citizens and personnel from Niger following the military coup that ousted President Mohamed Bazoum last Wednesday.And the United States Women's National Team has qualified for the Round of 16 at the 2023 Women's World Cup. The team failed to win at least two of its group-stage games for the first time in its history.We cover all this and more during this edition of the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/08/23·1h 25m

1A Remaking America: Guiding Growth In Up-And-Coming Cities

The U.S. population has grown by more than 20 million people since 2010. But where those new Americans end up is not even across the board.The populations of half of all counties in the U.S. shrank from 2010 to 2020, while those of most metropolitan areas continued to grow.People flock to booming cities for good reasons: jobs, educational opportunities, cultural and recreational activities. But traffic can be a nightmare and housing costs are off the charts.We discuss why and how cities grow, and what impacts growth has on residents and take a look at Utah, the fastest-growing state in the U.S.This show is part of 1A's "Remaking America" project looking at how our government is – and is not – working for everyone. It's a partnership with six public radio stations, including KUT in Austin, Texas.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/08/23·33m 42s

How US Abortion Politics Jeopardize A Global AIDS Relief Program

About 20 years ago, Congress pretty much agreed on one thing: PEPFAR.President George W. Bush introduced the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in his 2003 State of the Union address. Since then, it's been renewed with little fuss every five years. But abortion politics are changing that, Politicians are reacting to allegations that PEPFAR funds are being used to "promote abortion on demand." Congress needs to decide if it will renew the program by the end of September.We discuss PEPFAR and how the politics around the program became so fraught. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/08/23·32m 43s

Best Of: In Search Of The Elusive Lesbian Bar

In the 1980s there were roughly 200 lesbian bars across the country. Today, there are less than 30, according to The Lesbian Bar Project.While many gay bars cater to men, spaces for queer women have dwindled.Two years ago, Krista Burton began her journey to find out why. In her book, "Moby Dyke: An Obsessive Quest To Track Down The Last Remaining Bars In America," Krista traveled to 20 self-proclaimed lesbian bars to speak to patrons and owners.We talk to Krista about her book and discuss why these spaces are disappearing.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/08/23·39m 24s

How Extreme Heat Affects Our Mental Health

Extreme temperatures remind us just how much heat can affect our physical health in dangerous and sometimes deadly ways. More than 600 people die each year in the U.S. from heat-related illnesses. But emerging research shows that hot days can affect our mental health, too. Emergency room visits for mental health issues across age groups rise along with the temperature. And the heat can affect everything from our sleep and mood to our susceptibility to anxiety and depression. We discuss how we can prepare for the effects of heat waves on our brains and bodies.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/07/23·35m 28s

The News Roundup For July 28, 2023

A Congressional hearing on UAPs yielded some surprising information this week. Three military veterans appeared before lawmakers on Wednesday, one of whom alleged that the U.S. had recovered "non-human biologics" from supposed UAP crash sights.Overseas, the situation surrounding the military takeover in Niger continues to develop. Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum was taken into custody this week by a group of soldiers. The U.S. and UN have raised concerns about regional stability.And heat waves and natural disasters fueled by climate change in Europe and America are making life for citizens unbearable. This includes thousands fleeing their homes in Greece as wildfires rage across the country.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/07/23·1h 28m

Microsoft, Activision Blizzard, And The Future Of Gaming

Microsoft's intention to purchase video game developer Activision Blizzard was first announced in January 2022.The Federal Trade Commission issued a complaint against the deal, saying it would harm competition in the gaming market. That case went to trial — and Microsoft came out on top,And the deal still faces roadblocks in the United Kingdom, where the Competition and Markets Authority initially blocked the deal and is now holding a hearing to review it next month.But despite those roadblocks, the deal is set to close. And it may change the business of video games for the foreseeable future. We discuss the buyout and how this acquisition could affect the future of gaming. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/07/23·33m 6s

The Fraught Future Of Volunteer Firefighting

Firefighters and fire departments perform a critical service in our communities, including responding to medical emergencies and helping mitigate the effects of natural disasters.But more than 70 percent of fire departments are staffed by volunteers, according to the U.S. Fire Administration.Volunteer fire departments are having to contend with dips in volunteerism and heightened standards for fire and emergency response teams.All the while, climate emergencies are becoming more frequent and dangerous.We discuss volunteer fire departments, and the demands and future of volunteer firefighting. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/07/23·35m 3s

What Nutrition Labels Really Tell Us About Our Food

Many of us have likely felt confused by food labels before. But nutrition facts can offer important information about what we're consuming. There are several efforts underway to make the labels on our food more clear for consumers. Earlier this year, a bill was introduced in California that would change the language around expiration dates from "sell by" or "enjoy by" to "use by" or "best if used by" to minimize confusion. And last month, the FDA said it would test out putting nutrition labels on the front of packages in hopes of making them more accessible. We discuss food labels; what you like and hate about them, how to read them, and what they may look like in the future. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/07/23·33m 58s

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Barbie'

For this month's edition of the 1A Movie Club, we're seeing "Barbie." The film's star-studded cast includes Margot Robbie, Ryan Gosling, Issa Rae, Kate McKinnon, and Will Ferrell — just to name a few. There's even a Barbie album with original songs from Lizzo, Charli XCX, Billie Eilish, and Gosling.The highly anticipated movie arrives in theaters this weekend. It has promised to deliver for Barbie lovers and haters alike.So how did the iconic doll translate to the big screen?We discuss with our Movie Club Panel and Guest Host Celeste Headlee. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/07/23·32m 53s

The News Roundup For July 21, 2023

New temperature records were set in the southwest U.S. as climate change continues to push global temperatures to their extremes.Meanwhile, U.S. Special Climate Envoy John Kerry spent time in China this week discussing climate change and carbon with officials in President Xi Jinping's government. Little progress seems to have been made. And President Joe Biden invited Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to visit him at the White House before the end of the year. Biden, however, is also urging Netanyahu to not push proposed judicial reforms in his home country.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/07/23·1h 27m

Composer Ludwig Göransson On 'Oppenheimer'

Ludwig Göransson isn't a stranger to the power music can play in film.He's the composer behind the blockbuster "Black Panther" series, which earned him an Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2019. Now, he's back with "Oppenheimer." It's a historical epic that tells the life story of the father of the atomic bomb.He joins us to talk about his many collaborations and the music that shapes his life and work.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/07/23·32m 11s

Strikes Are On The Rise; Are Labor Unions Missing Their Moment?

Strikes. Picketing. Protests. One thing has become clear across dozens of industries in recent years. Workers are dissatisfied.To resolve some of their workplace qualms, many workers have taken to organizing. But unions, and the collective bargaining agreements they try to secure, are often stalled by employers.Enter, strikes.A study from Cornell found that strikes were up by 52 percent in 2o22 and involved more than 224,000 workers. And while more than 16 million workers in the United States (about 1 in 10) were represented by a union in 2022, the share of workers represented by a union is declining.That's because union jobs are growing at a slower rate than non-union jobs.It's all happening at a time when most Americans are expressing support for unions. The tight labor market is also in the worker's favor. So, why aren't unions booming?We discuss unions, strikes, and the future of the labor movement. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/07/23·35m 18s

In Good Health: The Complexities Of Autoimmune Disease

About one in ten people have an autoimmune disease, according to a population study of more than 2.2 million people. Autoimmune disease varies widely, and falls into subspecialties across the medical world: dermatology, gastroenterology, neurology , and more — and getting a diagnosis for an autoimmune disease can be long and difficult.Autoimmune diseases affect women and women of color on a far more frequent basis. Lupus is one of these diseases, affecting African American women three times more than white women. We discuss why the diagnostic process for an autoimmune disease is so complicated and why rates of disease are higher for women and women of color.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/07/23·33m 36s

How To Get The Backyard Garden Of Your Dreams

It's about that time of year when your garden may be looking lush or... a little sad. And with this weekend's heatwave hitting a large swath of the U.S., it's getting harder to keep plants alive. Research from the University of Colorado Boulder found that people who started gardening not only experienced decreased levels of stress and anxiety but also reduced risk of chronic diseases. Gardening may be good for the body and soul, but it can also be frustrating. We assemble a group of expert gardeners to answer all your planting questions and make your backyard garden dreams come true – or at least try.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/07/23·33m 51s

The News Roundup For July 14, 2023

Vermont and New York are bracing for more rain and flooding. The capital of the Green Mountain state, Montpelier, was swamped this week after storms dumped two months' worth of water on the city in two days. President Joe Biden declared an emergency in the state and authorized the Federal Emergency Management Agency to begin distributing aid.Meanwhile, overseas, President Biden met with NATO leaders in Lithuania this week and promised heads of state that the U.S. would remain committed to its allies despite "extreme elements" of the GOP signalling otherwise.The Brazilian government announced that deforestation in the Amazon rainforest is down by more than a third this year, so far.The longest-serving prime minister of the Netherlands announced he would step down this week, paving the way for a general election.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/07/23·1h 25m

1A Remaking America: The First Amendment And LGBTQ Rights

More than 20 states across the country have public accommodation laws to prevent businesses from discriminating against customers based on things like race, gender, religion, or sexual orientation.But a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision could put these protections at risk. Last month, in a 6-to-3 decision, the court ruled in it would be unconstitutional under the First Amendment for Lorie Smith, the plaintiff in 303 Creative v. Elenis, to have to create a message she opposes – in this case, a wedding website for a same-sex couple. The case raises big questions about what counts as creative speech under the First Amendment and also about questions about the fate of anti-discrimination protections across the country.We unpack the implications of the Supreme Court decision with legal and First Amendment scholars. This show is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/07/23·37m 20s

Local Spotlight: The Black Opry Residency's Impact On Americana Music

Americana music encompasses country, bluegrass, folk, and blues and has deep roots in Black musical traditions.Long before Lil Nas X pushed the boundaries of what constitutes country music, Black musicians across Americana were reclaiming space in the genre.Many of those musicians found celebration and support in the Black Opry, a collective of Black artists that perform Americana music, founded online by Holly G in Nashville.This year, the Black Opry partnered up with WXPN to launch the Black Opry Residency, a weeklong program that provides resources and support for unsigned Black Americana musicians.We explore how and why the residency program came to be and what it means for the future of Black Americana musicians.This is a part of our series called "Local Spotlight," where we'll cover local stories that deserve national attention. Have a suggestion about what we should feature? You know where to find us.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/07/23·31m 30s

Seeking Thrills And Staying Safe On Roller Coasters

While you may not be a fan of the heart pumping, adrenaline boosting feeling of a roller coaster's twists and turns, for others, it's the best part of the warmer months or even a core memory of their childhood. But recently, two roller coasters hit the headlines for less than awesome reasons. Riders at a Wisconsin festival were stuck upside down for around three hours after a mechanical failure. And a North Carolina man spotted a massive crack in a coaster support beam after his family had been on the ride.We discuss the safety of roller coasters and what's next for coaster engineering.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/07/23·32m 20s

In Good Health: How Chronic Noise Exposure Affects The Human Body

Noise is unavoidable. Whether it's the rumbling of a freight train as it moves along the tracks in your backyard or the constant drip of your leaky faucet – we're surrounded by it.Qualities of sound, like frequency and loudness, impact how your body responds to a particular source of noise.A growing body of research says that chronic noise exposure is putting nearly a third of Americans at heightened risk of hypertension, stroke, and heart attacks.In this installment of our series, "In Good Health," we explore noise and its impact on our lives. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/07/23·32m 26s

The News Roundup For July 7, 2023

A federal judge told the Biden administration officials and several federal agencies this week to stop communicating with social media platforms. The decision is in response to a lawsuit brought by several states against the administration concerning efforts to combat misinformation.More than 20 mass shootings occurred across the country this holiday week. At least 20 people were killed and more than 120 were injured in shootings in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, and Fort Worth.Meanwhile, an Israeli Defense Force operation in the occupied West Bank city of Jenin left at least twelve Palestinians dead and more than one hundred and twenty injured. Tuesday was the hottest day ever recorded on Earth. The record for global temperature is one that scientists are predicting will be shattered many times in the coming years.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/07/23·1h 25m

The Human Labor Powering AI Engines

As anxieties over automation mount, AI is already responsible for the employment of millions of workers globally.From chatbots to text-to-image generators, AI relies on human workers labeling and annotating the millions of images and words it references. But the work of feeding information to AI can be tedious, with unreliable pay and few opportunities for growth.We discuss the workforce powering AI and Congress' plans to regulate the industry. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/07/23·28m 9s

How Youth Sports Affect America's Kids

Kids these days are busy.Even when school is out and it's time to close the books (or maybe, a laptop) time in the summer can fill up quickly. Often, with sports. Whether they're kicking a ball with the neighbors, going to the park for a game of pick-up basketball, traveling in Little League, heading to the Y for a swim, or even hitting a heavy bag, sports are everywhere in our early lives. But getting involved in organized sports as a kid can be expensive. Some communities pull together to offer discounted programs or transportation for kids who don't have access to it.We discuss how youth sports have changed over the years and what factors go into picking the right sport. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/07/23·30m 24s

The Savory Story Of Hot Dogs And America

First introduced by immigrants in the 1800s, hot dogs have become synonymous with sports, summer, and the Fourth of July. And no other food starts debates quite like hot dogs – what's the best way to cook them? What's the best brand? What toppings are and aren't allowed? Are they sandwiches? Should we even eat them?We discuss the evolution of one of America's favorite foods and talk about some of your favorite ways to top them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/07/23·40m 20s

Best Of: I Love You, Man: The Male Friendship Recession

Friendships are one of the few relationships that we choose. They can last longer than our romantic relationships and be just as intimate. They can take on the role of family if our own falls short. Having friends is an important part of the human experience. But over the past few years, adult friendship has been on the decline. And men are suffering the most from it. According to the Survey Center on American Life, the percentage of men with at least six close friends has fallen by half since 1990. One in five single men says he has zero close friends. We speak to two psychologists who specialize in friendships and men. We also hear from two guys who've been best friends for 30 years on how they keep the love alive.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/07/23·33m 17s

The News Roundup For June 30, 2023

In a 6-3 ruling, the court struck down race-conscious admissions at two universities, setting the stage for other college and university admissions policies.Meanwhile, Canadian wildfires are wreaking new havoc in the Upper Midwest of the US, creating dense smog and unsafe air qualities in major American cities.Around the world, the questions of what's next for Russia after a dramatic but short-lived mutiny was cut short by the leader of the Wagner Group – Yevgeny Progozhin?Violent protests in France begin again after a teenager is killed during a police stop.The Swedish government approves a Quran-burning demonstration outside of a mosque, coinciding with the Muslim holiday of Eid-al-Adha.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/06/23·1h 21m

The History And Potential Of MDMA

MDMA, also known as ecstasy or molly, is illegal. It is listed as a Schedule 1 drug by the U.S. federal government (the same group as marijuana and psilocybin, or magic mushrooms).In recent years, a growing body of academic research has suggested potential benefits of MDMA. One study found that MDMA-enhanced therapy dramatically reduced PTSD symptoms. Another showed that psychedelics like MDMA could reopen so-called critical periods of time when brains are especially impressionable and open to learning.Rachel Nuwer's new book, "I Feel Love: MDMA and the Quest for Connection in a Fractured World," explores the history and potential of the so-called love drug.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/06/23·30m 21s

The Opioid Crisis Is Causing Grandparents To Become Caregivers Again

The U.S. is battling a years-long, devastating opioid epidemic. Last year saw 79,770 reported opioid-involved drug overdose deaths, a 1.5 percent decrease from the previous year, according to data from the CDC.Nevertheless, the opioid crisis has upended traditional family structures. Many parents have died from overdosing, become incarcerated, or are otherwise unable to care for their children due to substance abuse.As a result, more and more children are being raised primarily by their grandparents in what are known as grandfamilies.Grandfamilies face unique challenges, as caregivers contend with stigma, dwindling income, deficits in technological savvy, and health issues related to aging.What kind of support do grandfamilies need to raise successful children? We explore how the opioid crisis is affecting grandparent caregivers with a panel of experts.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/06/23·35m 5s

The Problem With Solitary Confinement In The U.S.

More than 122,000 people in the U.S. are estimated to be in solitary confinement, according to a report by Solitary Watch and Unlock the Box. That number is far greater than previous estimates.The United Nations says that prolonged solitary confinement can be psychological torture. We talk with our panel about the use of solitary confinement across the U.S. in federal and state prisons as well as local jails.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/06/23·35m 59s

370 Years Later, Connecticut Is Exonerating Accused Witches

In May, legislators in Connecticut passed a resolution to exonerate people accused of being witches in the seventeenth century.Dozens of people were killed, mostly women, over accused witchcraft in the U.S. in the 1600s and early 1700s. It's estimated that nearly 50,000 people were killed in Europe based purely on superstition.We talk with our guests about the phenomenon of witch trials, their lasting impact, and what exoneration can mean to us now in 2023.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/06/23·35m 52s

The News Roundup For June 23, 2023

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito penned an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal trying to get ahead of a report released by ProPublica detailing unreported trips he took with a billionaire who had business before the court.Meanwhile, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed Congress this week. The search for a submarine carrying tourists to the wreck of the Titanic gripped the attention of people around the world. Hope of finding the five people aboard has now passed. And at least seven Palestinians were killed in an Israeli military raid in the Jenin refugee camp in the occupied West Bank. Hundreds more were injured as soldiers fired live ammunition.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/06/23·1h 26m

A Year After Roe v. Wade Was Overturned

A year ago, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, upending abortion law across the country. With Roe v. Wade overturned, what could replace it? WNYC's Supreme Court podcast "More Perfect" takes up that question in a two-part series. The two episodes focus on the origins of the viability line—that's the line that determines when a fetus is viable outside the womb.That line was around 24 weeks as defined by Roe v. Wade. Now it's whenever the state decides. We discuss the viability line in post-Roe America. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/06/23·31m 23s

A Conversation With Celebrated Carpenter Mark Ellison

For carpenter Mark Ellison, a house, a staircase, a doorway are opportunities for beauty. Ellison has been called many things, including the best carpenter in New York City and the man who builds impossible things. His specialty is lavish and challenging projects, and his clients have included the late David Bowie and the late Robin Williams. But in his new book, "Building: A Carpenter's Notes on Life and the Art of Good Work," Ellison is less interested in these extravagant projects and more interested in what they've taught him: how to build a life worth living. We speak about that life and what he's learned in it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/06/23·32m 25s

How Genealogy Is Used To Track Black Family Histories

Our names are important to us. They tell us who we are and often, who we come from.So imagine suddenly discovering the last name you've always carried... might not actually be the name you should have. For Black Americans, genealogy can fill in the blanks left by the legacy of slavery and racism in the U.S. Services like the Freedmen's Bureau and Slave Voyages provide free access to records and documents to help with that search.We talk about the power of genealogy in fostering knowledge and connection for Black Americans.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/06/23·30m 42s

Best Of: 1A Remaking America: The Birmingham Movement, 60 Years Later

On May 2, 1963, hundreds of school-age kids in Birmingham, Alabama, woke up with a plan. Through coded messages broadcast by local radio DJs, they were given the signal to leave the classroom and meet at the park for a peaceful protest against segregation in the city. These actions by students brought national attention—and a new momentum—to the civil rights movement, support for which had been waning as more adults were jailed and reluctant to be arrested.Civil rights leaders, including James Bevel, recruited young people to participate in a peaceful demonstration which became known as the Children's Crusade. Hundreds of kids were arrested by police for parading without a permit. Images of police dogs and firehoses being used on students in the city highlighted the injustices in Birmingham and prompted President John F. Kennedy to express support for federal civil rights legislation. We discuss the Children's Crusade and it's impact 60 years later. This conversation was recorded in April as part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country, including WBHM. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/06/23·47m 26s

The News Roundup For June 16, 2023

Former President Donald Trump pleaded not guilty to 37 counts of mishandling classified documents this week. GOP politicians are split on the matter. The Supreme Court upheld the Indian Child Welfare Act on Thursday. The law gives priority to Native tribes when children from the community are up for adoption.Meanwhile, the United Nations is reporting that a record number of people around the world have been displaced by war, climate crises, and human rights abuses. And the European Union is moving to regulate the usage of artificial intelligence. It's the first governing body in the world to tackle the issue in a major way.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/06/23·1h 26m

Strike A Pose: Ballroom Culture Since The '70s

Forget the waltz and the tango. For this show, we're headed to a different kind of ball. In these spaces, Houses compete in different walking and dancing competitions.It's long influenced important parts of American pop culture. Beyoncé's "Renaissance," Madonna's "Vogue", the award-winning show "Pose,"and HBO Max's reality show "Legendary" all highlight or borrow from ballroom culture. Its history has also been recorded in documentaries like "Paris Is Burning" or the more recent "How Do I Look."We discuss the history of ballroom culture, what it looks like today, and how it can be a place for political organization.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/06/23·33m 42s

Best Of: Where Does Nuclear Energy Fit In A Carbon-Free Future?

Experts have repeatedly said that the world has to stop burning fossil fuels if we want to avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis.The latest United Nations climate report reminded us just how soon that needs to happen. The U.S. should cut two-thirds of fossil fuels in the next decade.When it comes to carbon-free energy, many people think of renewables like solar or wind. But there's also the nuclear option. Nuclear currently accounts for 20 percent of our electricity production, according to the Energy Information Administration. We discuss where nuclear energy fits into a carbon-free future and how safe the nuclear power we already have is.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/06/23·32m 19s

1A Remaking America: The Anti-Dollar Store Movement

The most common store in the U.S.? It's not Target, not Walmart, or Walgreens.It's Dollar General.The chain boasts more than 19,000 locations across the country. According to the American Public Health Association, dollar stores are the fastest-growing food retailers in the country, but they don't usually provide the same amount of fresh produce as conventional grocery stores.Now, dozens of cities are moving to limit the number of dollar stores opening in their communities.We discuss the playbook city reps are using to regulate their local market.This show is part of 1A's "Remaking America" project looking at how our government is – and is not – working for everyone.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/06/23·29m 17s

Best Of: How Climate Change Factors Into Home Insurance Pricing

In 2021, the structural damage from wildfires, floods, and other climate-related disasters totaled $145 billion, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Homeowners are feeling the effects. Between 2021 and 2022, 90 percent of them saw an increase in their home insurance premiums, according to a Policygenius report.Earlier this month, Colorado Democrats introduced a bill that would offer homeowners state-run insurance if private companies declined to cover them. The move comes in response to the growing wildfire risk in the state. We discuss homeowner's insurance in high-risk areas and whether or not it's the right answer. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/06/23·35m 37s

The News Roundup For June 9, 2023

The East Coast deals with the impact of smoke from wildfires in Canada that's blown south. Images out of New York City this week show haze and orange skies. Justice Department prosecutors have informed Former President Donald Trump's legal team that he is being investigated for the mishandling of classified documents.Meanwhile, tensions between the U.S. and China grow and tempers flared at an annual defense summit held in Singapore.Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva takes a stand against the deforestation of the Amazon rainforest. He unveiled a plan on Monday to stop the illegal felling of trees in the rainforest. We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/06/23·1h 24m

I Love You, Man: The Male Friendship Recession

Friendships are one of the few relationships that we choose. They can last longer than our romantic relationships and be just as intimate. They can take on the role of family if our own falls short. Having friends is an important part of the human experience. But over the past few years, adult friendship has been on the decline. And men are suffering the most from it. According to the Survey Center on American Life, the percentage of men with at least six close friends has fallen by half since 1990. One in five single men says he has zero close friends. We speak to two psychologists who specialize in friendships and men. We also hear from two guys who've been best friends for 30 years on how they keep the love alive.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/06/23·33m 17s

In Search Of The Elusive Lesbian Bar

In the 1980s there were roughly 200 lesbian bars across the country. Today, there are less than 30, according to The Lesbian Bar Project.While many gay bars cater to men, spaces for queer women have dwindled.Two years ago, Krista Burton began her journey to find out why. In her book, "Moby Dyke: An Obsessive Quest To Track Down The Last Remaining Bars In America," Krista traveled to 20 self-proclaimed lesbian bars to speak to patrons and owners.We talk to Krista about her book and discuss why these spaces are disappearing.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/06/23·39m 29s

The State Of American Baseball

Major League Baseball made some changes to the way the game is played in recent years. Some of the new rules include bigger bases, limits on shifting, and a new pitch timer.The minor leagues were the testing grounds for these new rules. But many teams are finding their own ways to make the game engaging for the community. Even ones not affiliated with the MLB are trying to make it worth it for a family spending a hot summer day in the stadium.We talk about the state of the game and hear your thoughts on America's Pastime. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/06/23·36m 57s

Isabel Allende And "The Wind Knows My Name"

Isabel Allende is no stranger to the experience of being an immigrant and refugee. When a military coup overthrew the Chilean presidency in 1973—led by her cousin, Salvador Allende—her family fled to Venezuela, where she penned her first novel "The House of Spirits."Her latest book, "The Wind Knows My Name," juxtaposes the experiences of a child fleeing Nazi-occupied territory in Europe in 1938, and another child fleeing danger in El Salvador and facing family separation at the U.S. border in 2019.We discuss Allende's newest novel and how literature can help make sense of the complex world around us. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on our website, www.the1a.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/06/23·36m 3s

The 1A Record Club Remembers Tina Turner

More than 60 years — that's how long Tina Turner's music career blessed crowds. With her powerful vocals, she brought house after house down with her thrilling performances. She died last week at her home in Switzerland. She was 83 years old. The numbers are impressive. But the impact she had on those who listened to her music is what many are remembering in the wake of her passing. We get the 1A Record Club together to remember Turner and talk about her legacy.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/06/23·42m 35s

The News Roundup For June 2, 2023

The House passed a deal to raise the debt ceiling this week in an attempt to avoid an economic disaster. Now, it moves to the Senate where amendments are expected.Meanwhile, overseas a top Russian official said U.K. lawmakers are legitimate military targets after the British foreign secretary argued that Ukraine has the right to use military force within Russia's borders.A new law passed in Uganda would sentence a gay person to life in prison and maybe even the death penalty. The bill's signing prompted criticism from human rights groups. And Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has won another four years in office after being pushed to a runoff election.We cover all this and more during the this edition of the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/06/23·1h 28m

Local Spotlight: The Straw Purchase Of Firearms In Philadelphia And Nationwide

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) defines the straw purchase of firearms as "purchasing a gun for someone who is prohibited by law from possessing one, or for someone who does not want his or her name associated with the transaction."City officials have tried to enact tougher policies aimed at curbing the practice but were Other cities and states have found ways to push back on illegal trafficking. The issue has attracted federal attention, too. The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act passed last summer, stiffened penalties for straw purchasing.We zoom in on the issue in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, before getting the nationwide picture from the ATF director.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/06/23·37m 48s

1A Remaking America: The Outlook For Trans Youth In Texas

This has been a record year for legislation aimed at trans youth. More than a dozen states have passed laws limiting gender-affirming care for minors.This month Texas became the largest state to do so. The new state law bans hormone therapies, puberty blockers, and gender-affirming surgeries for people under the age of 18. It also includes language about "weaning" trans youth off medication that is not "medically appropriate." Medical experts say there is no safe way to do so.It passed both chambers of the state legislature and is on Republican Gov. Greg Abbott's desk. Abbott said he would sign the bill. We discuss the bill and what it means for families and medical providers. We also revisit our conversation from November 2022 in Austin, Texas.This show was part of 1A's Remaking America collaboration with six partner stations around the country, including KUT in Austin. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/05/23·1h 11m

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'The Little Mermaid'

"The Little Mermaid" is back. This time, the Disney classic is reimagined in live action.Many elements from the 1989 cartoon musical have stayed the same — there's a singing crab, a mermaid king, and a tentacled sea-witch. But a new, diverse cast brings the characters to life, or at least to CGI. And they're led by Halle Bailey, who stars as Ariel.We discuss how the remake holds up and the Disney live-action remake formula.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/05/23·35m 50s

In Good Health: Living With Sleep Disorders

It's estimated that sleep disorders affect between 50 and 70 million people in America. That includes conditions like sleep apnea, insomnia, and narcolepsy. But depictions of living with a sleep disorder — like those in The Simpsons — don't always get it right.Even without a disorder, how we sleep has a major impact on our health. It affects our immune system, hormones, and heart health.The American Academy of Sleep Medicine Foundation helps fund sleep research and clinics like CHI-PAP in Chicago, but treatments for sleep issues are still costly. Getting a sleep study done in a lab usually costs between $1,000 and $10,000.We discuss sleep disorders, how we treat them, and sleep hygiene.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/05/23·43m 46s

The News Roundup For May 26, 2023

Talks in Washington on the debt ceiling are reportedly not going well. President Joe Biden has remained upbeat in his public comments on the situation. But Congressional Republicans say there's still a ways to go before they'll agree to any sort of deal.Florida Republican Governor Ron DeSantis attempted to announce his 2024 Presidential bid via Twitter Spaces this week. However, the online meeting was marred by technical difficulties, despite the social media platform's owner, Elon Musk, being present.Meanwhile, the head of the Wagner mercenary group fighting in Ukraine said that he's lost more than 20,000 troops during the invasion. Meanwhile, the European Union is exploring ways to send billions of dollars in frozen Russian assets to Ukraine to fund its war effort.Elsewhere in Europe, countries are taking steps to fight climate change. France banned short flights in order to cut emissions from the use of jet fuel and Germany is considering banning gas boilers.And we remember the legendary Tina Turner who passed away on Wednesday, at the age of 83, in her home in Switzerland.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/05/23·1h 24m

ICYMI: In The 'Garden of Evil' With Clarence Thomas' Friend Harlan Crow

This week, The Atlantic magazine published an exclusive interview with Harlan Crow, the ultra-rich real estate developer whose friendship and financial relationship with Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is the subject of much scrutiny. The interview was done by Atlantic staff writer Graeme Wood at Crow's home in Dallas, Texas. Crow told Wood, "My hope is that this is the last conversation I have on this topic in public."Wood joins Jenn White with the latest.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/05/23·11m 42s

'Animal Liberation Now' And The Case For More Humane Treatment Of Animals

Fifty years ago, Princeton University ethicist Peter Singer made the case that humans assume they're morally superior to other animals and that their actions against them are justified.At the time, speciesism was a radical concept that was adopted by some animal rights groups but was largely ignored by the general public.Today, roughly 10 to 15 percent of Americans identify as vegan or vegetarian according to researchers at Oklahoma State and Kansas State University. But Singer argues there's still much more progress that needs to be made on animal rights.His new book "Animal Liberation Now" revisits the themes of his 1975 seminal classic, Animal Liberation, and examines how the animal rights movement intersects with climate change, social justice, and more.We discuss his latest book and the animal rights movement. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/05/23·32m 50s

One Year After The Uvalde School Shooting, Questions Still Go Unanswered

Today marks one year since the mass shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, left 19 children and two teachers dead.Even though nearly 400 officers were at the scene, it took over an hour for police to get to the gunman. The police response was widely viewed as a failure, but investigations into what exactly happened that day remain ongoing. The families of the victims are still searching for answers. So far this year, there have been 22 school shootings and 234 mass shootings in the U.S. We discuss the shooting in Uvalde a year later. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/05/23·45m 1s

What To Expect From The 2023 Cannes Film Festival

Every year, thousands flock to the south of France to watch the most anticipated movie premieres from directors around the world.The titles on show at this year's Cannes Film Festival are stirring up excitement in cinephiles everywhere and for good reason. It's also happening amid a backdrop of social and political unrest in France, and a weeks-long writers' strike in Hollywood.We dive into all the happenings from Cannes with a panel of experts.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/05/23·30m 3s

Why Maternal Mortality Increased During The Pandemic

The U.S. has the highest number of pregnancy-related death of any developed nation. During the pandemic, those numbers increased. According to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, maternal mortality rose for the third consecutive year in 2021. And while the CDC's report covers maternal mortality during the height of the pandemic, factors like age and other pregnancy-related illnesses contributed to the number of deaths reported. We discuss why Americans continue to die during childbirth and what resources expecting parents have to combat the crisis.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/05/23·33m 18s

The Big Take: Women's Pro Tackle Football Takes The Field

We collaborated with our friends at Bloomberg News to bring you the 'Life and Debt' series. We covered everything from the federal debt ceiling, medical debt, credit cards, and the impact of student loans. Today we're bringing you an episode of Bloomberg News' daily podcast, The Big Take.Bloomberg Businessweek contributor Mary Pilon joins host Wes Kosova this episode to talk about the promise–and challenges–of building a fanbase for the Women's Football Alliance, an all-female, full-contact league that has 60 teams in four divisions across 32 states. And we head to a nighttime practice of the DC Divas, to hear from the players and coaches about why they love the game and what it means for women to play tackle football. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/05/23·33m 9s

The News Roundup For May 19, 2023

Joe Biden is coming home. The President is cutting his trip to Japan for the G7 meeting short to help negotiate a deal ahead of the debt ceiling deadline on June 1.Meanwhile, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has been busy. In recent days, he's met with the Pope, French President Emmanuel Macron, and U.K. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak to drum up support for his country's war against the Russian invasion.The CIA is urging Russian citizens to share secrets about its country's war efforts with the U.S. in a new video posted to Telegram, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/05/23·1h 27m

Life And Debt: What's Next For Student Loan Borrowers

According to the Education Data Initiative, the average student loan debt balance is upwards of $40,000. And the cost of college keeps rising. Over the past 20 years, college tuition at in-state public universities has risen 175 percent. The numbers can be dizzying, especially for recent high school grads.Currently, the Supreme Court is deciding the fate of President Joe Biden's student relief plan. At the same time, the pandemic-era pause on student loan payments is set to end. For over three years now, borrowers haven't had to pay a dime, but it all may be about to change.We wrap up our Life and Debt series in collaboration with Bloomberg to look at student debt and what comes next for student loan borrowers.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/05/23·37m 51s

Life And Debt: Getting The Hospital Bill

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau reported last year that there's around $88 billion of medical debt in collections, and about 43 million Americans have medical debt on their credit report. Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion – three major credit reporting companies in the U.S. – have eased how much medical debt impacts someone's credit score. The companies no longer include medical debt that is paid off or less than a year old on a report.But a medical bill can be plenty stressful before it goes to a debt collector. People often turn to crowdfunding sources like GoFundMe to help pay those costs when they get them.We continue our series with Bloomberg News with a discussion about medical debt in the U.S. and how we deal with it. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/05/23·42m 38s

Life and Debt: Why Credit Card Debt Is At A Historic High

Credit cards seem like a great deal. But interest rates, late fees, and the cycle of debt can come back to bite cardholders. Nearly half of U.S. credit card owners had an average of more than $5,200 in outstanding debt in 2022. Credit card debt overall is at a historic high. In the last three months of 2022, credit card balances in the U.S. rose from $61 billion to nearly $990 billion according to the Federal Reserve Bank in New York. It's likely to surpass $1 trillion this year.We discuss why credit card debt is so high and what cardholders can do to break the cycle of debt.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/05/23·41m 10s

Life And Debt: Unpacking The Federal Debt Ceiling

Congressional leaders will meet with President Joe Biden next week to discuss the federal debt ceiling as they face a looming deadline to avoid a default on U.S. debt obligations. The Treasury Department has warned that if an agreement isn't reached prior to June 1, there could be severe implications for global markets and the U.S. economy. The federal debt ceiling has been in place for more than a hundred years. But it's been the subject of consistent conflicts internally between congressional leaders and the White House for more than a decade now. We discuss debt ceiling and potential solutions to avoid a government default. It's the first installment of our ongoing series with Bloomberg: Life and Debt.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/05/23·44m 8s

The Sounds Of America: 'Wang Dang Doodle'

It made for an unlikely hit in 1966.The authentic Chicago blues sound of "Wang Dang Doodle" packed a punch and put a hole through the popular and poppier tunes at the time.Koko Taylor was born Cora Walton in Tennessee in 1935. For this song, she teamed up with blues composer, bassist, and producer Willie Dixon.She was backed by a team that included Buddy Guy and a cast of characters featuring "Automatic Slim" and "Razor Totin' Jim."Taylor went on to become one of the great voices of Chicago Blues. But what is a "Wang Dang Doodle?"We hear from singer Bonnie Raitt, actor Dan Akroyd, artist Shemekia Copeland, and producer Bruce Iglauer.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/05/23·19m 38s

The News Roundup For May 12, 2023

Border restrictions put into place during the pandemic ended this week. The controversial policy known as Title 42 expired on May 11, and states on the Southern border are preparing for a surge of migrants.Republican Congressman from New York George Santos turned himself in this week to authorities over charges of stealing money from his campaign, lying to donors, and lying to Congress.Former President Donald Trump was found liable for sexually abusing and defaming E. Jean Carroll by a New York jury this week.Meanwhile, Ukrainian forces broke through advancing Russian forces near the city of Bakhmut. The Pentagon announced another $1.2 billion in aid for Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy's forces.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/05/23·1h 27m

Best Of: Arguing For The Good In Bad English

"Um, like, literally, you know?"If those words sound to you like nails on a chalkboard, you're not alone. At NPR, we get lots of messages from listeners critiquing the way our hosts, reporters, and guests speak. Why does what we say and how we say it irk so many so much?Language norms are standardized over time, most often by groups with the most power in society. Words that some dismiss often have greater meaning, value, and history than you might expect.We talk to sociolinguist Valerie Fridland about why she's arguing for the good in so-called bad English.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/05/23·43m 46s

Remaking America: Crossing State Lines For Abortion Care

Abortions are now illegal in 12 states, according to the Guttmacher Institute. That means many pregnant people now have to travel hundreds of miles to get an abortion.When Roe v. Wade was still the law of the land, it took on average 30 minutes for an abortion patient to get to a clinic. Now it takes an hour and ten minutes, according to a 2022 study from the Journal of the American Medical Association.Abortion patients now have to go to "safe haven" states like Kansas. But can these states keep up with the increased demand?We discuss safe haven states, and how grassroots groups are helping those seeking abortions get there. This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. The series explores Americans' trust in institutions and the health of our democracy.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/05/23·42m 0s

The Rise Of The AR-15

The AR-15 is the best-selling rifle in America.According to polling by The Washington Post and Ipsos, about 1 in 20 adults, or roughly 16 million people in the U.S., own an AR-15.It's been used in 10 of the 17 most deadly mass shootings in the United States since 2012. And while they weren't initially designed for civilian use, they've become a powerful symbol for pro-gun advocates.We get into the rise and history of the AR-15, and how its cultural legacy impacts the gun law debate.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/05/23·43m 35s

Hollywood Writers Continue Striking

It's been more than a week since the 11,500 television and film writers that make up the Writers Guild of America have gone on strike. Thousands of writers have joined picket lines to demand higher compensation, increase the number of writers hired per show, and regulation on how networks and streaming companies can use artificial intelligence.This is the first writer's strike in 15 years. The last strike lasted 100 days. Many industry analysts believe this one could last even longer given the number of production companies involved in the negotiating process and their varied demands.We assemble a panel of writers, academics, and industry experts to discuss the strike and how it could impact the future of film and television.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our websiteLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/05/23·42m 57s

The Coronation, The Kohinoor Diamond, And Its Colonial Past

Diamonds are more than just pretty objects. Passed down over centuries, they can tell the story of their pasts. But that story isn't always a happy one. For many South Asians, the diamond that invokes this painful colonial history is the Kohinoor diamond. It's one of the largest diamonds in the world. And it was taken during British colonial rule in the 19th century from what is now modern-day India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Today, the diamond belongs to the British royal family. But the death of Queen Elizabeth last September revived calls for its return.We discuss how artifacts taken during colonial periods should be handled in modern times, and what empires owe the people they've colonized.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/05/23·31m 45s

The Sounds of America: The Super Mario Bros. Theme Song

Winifred Phillips is a video game music composer. She describes this history-making entry into the National Recording Registry as, "one of the, if not the most memorable game music melodies ever created."The audio that's selected for the Registry is based on their historical, cultural or aesthetic importance to American society. The registry includes all kinds of audio: from music and radio broadcasts, to speeches, audiobooks, and comedy performances.For this installment of Sounds of America, we profile music that was composed for a video game. The original Super Mario Brothers was released by Nintendo in 1985 on the Nintendo Entertainment System.To help tell the story behind the Super Mario Brothers video game theme music, we speak to its composer Koji Kondo, Super Mario actor Charles Martinet, video game music composer Winifred Phillips, and author Jeff Ryan.The Sounds of America is produced by Jennie Cataldo for Accompany Studios.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/05/23·17m 26s

The News Roundup For May 5, 2023

On Monday, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen told lawmakers that the federal government could run out of money to pay its debts as soon as June 1 if the debt ceiling isn't raised. The Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing surrounding Supreme Court ethics. Justice Clarence Thomas reportedly accepted more luxury gifts from a billionaire Republican donor that he failed to disclose. On Thursday, Russia claimed that Ukraine tried to assassinate its president, Vladimir Putin, by attacking the Kremlin with a drone. According to Russian officials, no one was harmed. Ukraine has denied the allegations.It will be a weekend of pomp and pageantry in the United Kingdom as Charles is officially crowned King on Saturday. The country has been gearing up all this week.We discuss the week's biggest headlines during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/05/23·1h 28m

1A Movie Club: 'Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret'

Judy Blume's 1970's classic book, "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret." The novel wasn't initially well-received when it was published, being banned in libraries and schools, including the one Blume's children went to. It follows an 11-year-old Margaret stepping into the world of adolescence (breasts, boys, and periods included) and exploring her religious identity along the way. Her father, Jewish, and her mother, Christian, kept religion out of Margaret's upbringing to allow her to decide her faith for herself. Now, the story has the film treatment by writer-director Kelly Fremon Craig. For this edition of the 1A Movie Club, we discuss periods, adolescence, and grappling with your identity.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/05/23·40m 6s

1A Remaking America: State-Sanctioned Homeless Encampments

Close to 600, 000 people in the U.S. don't have a home of their own, according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Of those in America experiencing homelessness, 40 percent of them are living outdoors or in buildings not meant for human habitation.Often, this takes the form of homeless encampments. Equally often, cities cities spend time and money forcing people out of them. One option cities are looking to are sanctioned encampments. These are places where unhoused folks can pitch a tent and live without the threat of law enforcement telling them to leave. They can have varying degrees of services, from basic sanitation like porta-potties, to on-site case management. We discuss camping bans, homeless navigation centers, and housing-first approaches. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. This show was part of 1A's Remaking America collaboration with six partner stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/05/23·38m 24s

Best Of: The Problem With Politeness And The Matter With Manners

We are all – to some degree – stressed. And that can affect just how much we feel like saying hello to that person on the street or holding the elevator for the person we see around the corner.We discuss whether small gestures of manners and etiquette matter anymore.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/05/23·34m 14s

1A Remaking America: The Birmingham Movement, 60 Years Later

On May 2, 1963, hundreds of school-age kids in Birmingham, Alabama, woke up with a plan. Through coded messages broadcast by local radio DJs, they were given the signal to leave the classroom and meet at the park for a peaceful protest against segregation in the city. These actions by students brought national attention—and a new momentum—to the civil rights movement, support for which had been waning as more adults were jailed and reluctant to be arrested.Civil rights leaders, including James Bevel, recruited young people to participate in a peaceful demonstration which became known as the Children's Crusade. Hundreds of kids were arrested by police for parading without a permit. Images of police dogs and firehoses being used on students in the city highlighted the injustices in Birmingham and prompted President John F. Kennedy to express support for federal civil rights legislation. We discuss the Children's Crusade and it's impact 60 years later. This conversation was recorded in April as part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country, including WBHM. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/05/23·47m 20s

How Are States Spending Opioid Settlement Funds?

The settlement of opioid lawsuits means that states are seeing an influx of money. Purdue, Walgreens, and Johnson & Johnson are just a few of the companies pumping over $50 billion into state and municipal budgets for addiction treatment and prevention.But what that treatment and prevention looks like is up to interpretation. Conversations about how to spend the money are turning contentious. In Pennsylvania, advocates are pushing back against some of that money going to law enforcement. In New York and San Francisco, groups pushing to fund safe injection sites are running into roadblocks.And there's another issue. Many states aren't being transparent about how the funds are being spent.Aneri Pattani of Kaiser Health News shares her reporting on where those settlement funds are going. We discuss how states are spending that money, and what goes into making those decisions. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/05/23·43m 49s

The Sounds Of America: 'Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)'

Every year, 25 audio recordings are added to the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress. The registry contains recordings of all types, from music and radio broadcasts to dramatic performances and speeches. This does not mean they necessarily originated in America or that they were created by Americans. But all have had some significant impact on American culture or history. Our series, "The Sounds of America" takes a closer look at some of these selections.This edition profiles the British pop duo Eurythmics, best known for their 1983 hit "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This).Eurythmics members Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart take us inside the story of the song, the part played by a U.S. disc jockey, being dirt poor, and the role of a cow.The Sounds of America is produced by Jennie Cataldo for Accompany Studios.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/04/23·17m 21s

The News Roundup For April 28, 2023

It was a big week at the White House. President Joe Biden announced his plans to run for reelection in 2024. Washington became the 10th state to ban the sale of semi-automatic rifles like the AR-15.Meanwhile, supply shortages are impacting the citizens of Sudan as the fighting in its capital Khartoum continues, despite the agreement of a three-day truce. Thousands of people are fleeing as foreign governments are working to get visitors and diplomats out of the country.Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy spoke with Chinese President Xi Jinping for the first time since his country was invaded by Russia. However, during the phone call, Chinese officials reportedly never spoke the words "Russia" or "war."We cover the most important stories during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/04/23·1h 29m

What's Changed A Decade After The Rana Plaza Collapse?

On April 23, 2013, a group of garment factories collapsed in Rana Plaza near Dhaka, Bangladesh. The accident killed more than 1,100 people and injured at least 2,500. It's considered the deadliest accident in the history of the modern garment industry.It's been a decade, but the garment industry is still far from safe for workers. Factories like the one in Rana Plaza aren't unique to Bangladesh. And safety for these workers is not just an issue overseas. We discuss what's changed in the decade since the Rana Plaza collapse. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/04/23·38m 44s

New State Laws Are Rolling Back Regulations On Child Labor

Lawmakers in Republican-led states are proposing and passing legislation to roll back child labor regulations.In states like Iowa, Missouri, Ohio, and Arkansas, newly passed or pending laws allow companies to hire children without work permits and allow children to work longer hours under more dangerous conditions in places like construction sites, meat packing plants, and automobile factories.Meanwhile, the Biden administration is struggling to enforce existing federal regulations on child labor.We discuss how child labor laws are changing from state to state.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/04/23·27m 39s

Tucker Carlson Is Out At Fox. What Happened?

In a statement on Monday, the Fox News said it's parting ways with its biggest star, Tucker Carlson. Before his firing, Carlson had the most-watched show on cable news, with more than 3 million viewers each night. His influence didn't just reach voters, but lawmakers too.We discuss what Tucker Carlson's departure means for the future of conservative media and the Republican party.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/04/23·37m 49s

In Good Health: Experiencing And Treating Infertility

One in six people across the globe experiences infertility, according to a report the World Health Organization published this month.Going through fertility treatment can be a long, hard process and very costly.For the first discussion in our new series "In Good Health," we talk about what it's like to experience infertility and seek treatment for it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/04/23·37m 19s

Efforts To Rescue Ukrainian Children Kidnapped By Russia Are Underway

An estimated 16,000 Ukrainian children have been taken to Russia or Russian-controlled territory since the start of the war. That's according to Ukraine's National Information Bureau. But some human rights experts place the number in the hundreds of thousands. The International Criminal Court has issued an arrest warrant for Russian President Vladimir Putin for the unlawful transfer of children out of Ukraine. We discuss the latest in the war and the fight to get Ukrainian children back home. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/04/23·30m 2s

The Sounds Of America: 'Pale Blue Dot'

Every year, 25 audio recordings are added to the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress. Each has been chosen because of its historical, cultural, or aesthetic importance to our nation's audio heritage.In this edition of "The Sounds of America," we speak about a recording from astrophysicist and author Carl Sagan. He was committed to making science more accessible through his speaking engagements, his media projects (such as the television series "Cosmos"), and his popular science books.In 1994, Sagan published a book called "Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space." It was inspired by a photograph of Earth taken from so far away in space that the planet looks like a pale blue dot. Sagan voiced the audiobook of Pale Blue Dot himself. And this recording has been selected for the 2023 National Recording Registry.Want to add a recording you think should be added to the National Recording Registry? Your nomination must meet three conditions; there needs to be an existing physical copy of the recording, it has to be at least ten years old, and it has to have had some significant impact on American culture. Just send the library an email recregistry@loc.gov.The Sounds of America is produced by Jennie Cataldo for Accompany Studios.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/04/23·17m 26s

The News Roundup For April 21, 2023

Dominion Voting Systems settled its lawsuit with Fox Corp. this week for $787.5 million, making it one of the most expensive defamation payouts in American history. An 84-year-old white man was charged this week for the shooting of a Black teenager who mistakenly went to the wrong address in Kansas City, Mo., to pick up his siblings. Ralph Yarl, the victim, survived the attack and is recuperating at home with his family.Meanwhile, violence continues to plague Sudan as warring factions ignore agreed-upon ceasefires meant to allow citizens and diplomats to evacuate and humanitarian workers to administer aid.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/04/23·1h 26m

Arguing For The Good In Bad English

"Um, like, literally, you know?"If those words sound to you like nails on a chalkboard, you're not alone. At NPR, we get lots of messages from listeners critiquing the way our hosts, reporters, and guests speak. Why does what we say and how we say it irk so many so much?Language norms are standardized over time, most often by groups with the most power in society. Words that some dismiss often have greater meaning, value, and history than you might expect.We talk to sociolinguist Valerie Fridland about why she's arguing for the good in so-called bad English.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/04/23·43m 46s

How Climate Change Factors Into Home Insurance Pricing

In 2021, the structural damage from wildfires, floods, and other climate-related disasters totaled $145 billion, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Homeowners are feeling the effects. Between 2021 and 2022, 90 percent of them saw an increase in their home insurance premiums, according to a Policygenius report.Earlier this month, Colorado Democrats introduced a bill that would offer homeowners state-run insurance if private companies declined to cover them. The move comes in response to the growing wildfire risk in the state. We discuss homeowner's insurance in high-risk areas and whether or not it's the right answer. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/04/23·39m 21s

The Pragmatism Of Community Violence Prevention Programs

There have been 164 mass shootings in the U.S. just this year, according to the National Gun Violence Archive.As gun legislation stalls in Congress, gun violence in the U.S. continues to rise, leaving states and cities to grapple with safety measures on their own. One solution is gaining traction: community violence prevention programs. During the first four years of Baltimore's program, researchers found homicides dropped by 32 percent. They also identified some challenges these programs face.We discuss what exactly these programs do and how effective they really are. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/04/23·42m 20s

Eating And Dancing At The 'Lakeside Supper Club'

Supper clubs burst onto the scene in America in the 1930s. Back then, they were places where you could get a meal and dance.One fictional venue, set in northern Minnesota, is the stage for a new book by J. Ryan Stradal.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. You can also connect with us on our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/04/23·33m 18s

Clarence Thomas, Undisclosed Luxury Trips, And Supreme Court Ethics

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas has been on the bench for almost 32 years. For more than 25 of those years, he's been close with a billionaire Republican donor. A ProPublica investigation found that Justice Thomas went on luxury trips with Dallas billionaire Harlan Crow for 20 years and did not include them on his financial disclosures. Justice Thomas said he consulted with his colleagues at the beginning of his tenure on the court. It was his understanding that he didn't need to report "personal hospitality from close personal friends."The Senate Judiciary Committee plans on holding a hearing to discuss the Supreme Court's ethical standards. We discuss the rules that govern what justices can do and who they can have relationships with. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/04/23·36m 8s

The 2023 Sounds Of America

The Library of Congress is famous for its collection of American cultural treasures.     And each year, the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress chooses just 25 pieces of audio to showcase the rich heritage of America's recorded sound — an audio hall of fame.Those being inducted this year have just been announced. The inductees include Madonna and Mariah Carey, the Super Mario Bros. theme, and Daddy Yankee's "Gasolina."For the return of our series, The Sounds of America, we sat down with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden to talk about this year's new honorees. We later revisit one of the selections from 2021.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/04/23·44m 47s

The News Roundup For April 14, 2023

Amid an uncertain future surrounding the abortion medication mifepristone, Democratic governors across the nation are stockpiling the drug in order to protect abortion access in their states.A young, racist gun enthusiast is reportedly responsible for one of the worst intelligence leaks in Pentagon history. The man worked at a military base and posted classified material about Ukraine's efforts in its fight against Russia to a Discord server.Chinese President Xi Jinping is spending his time these days meeting with global leaders. So far he's met with French President Emmanuel Macron. Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva landed on Wednesday for his visit.Two people are dead and some 20 people are missing after a migrant boat sank off the coast of Tunisia this week. The U.N. reports that 441 migrants have died crossing the Mediterranean so far in 2023.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/04/23·1h 25m

Ask An Astronaut

NASA recently announced the crew members for the upcoming Artemis II Mission – among them, the first woman and person of color to go to the moon. The initial mission objective is to land on the lunar surface in 2025.According to NASA, this trip will serve as the foundation for its next ambitious mission: send astronauts to Mars.We sit down with two former NASA astronauts and answer your questions. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. You can also connect with us on our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/04/23·32m 56s

Where Abortion Pill Access Stands

The Trump-appointed Texas judge has ruled to revoke the FDA's approval of mifepristone – a drug used in miscarriage care and medication abortions.Soon after, in Washington, a different federal judge ruled to keep mifepristone available. Many legal experts are saying Supreme Court intervention might not be far off.What do the conflicting court hearings mean for access to abortion pills in America?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. You can also connect with us on our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/04/23·36m 21s

The Problem With Politeness And The Matter With Manners

We are all – to some degree – stressed. And that can affect just how much we feel like saying hello to that person on the street or holding the elevator for the person we see around the corner.We discuss whether small gestures of manners and etiquette matter anymore.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/04/23·36m 9s

1A Remaking America: Behavior And Discipline In Public Schools

Several states have adopted or introduced legislation this year about student behavior and school discipline. Many of these bills would make it easier to kick students out of the classroom anywhere between a day and a year.Proponents say getting tougher on students will empower teachers, keeping them on the job amidst a nationwide educator shortage. Opponents point to the impact that punitive measures have on students of color and students with disabilities.We take a look at a recently adopted law in Kentucky and what research says about punitive versus restorative practices in schools.This show was part of 1A's Remaking America collaboration with six partner stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/04/23·38m 4s

Why Colleges Are Leaving The U.S. News Rankings

For 40 years, U.S. News and World Report has released rankings of the nation's top colleges, universities, and graduate schools. They've been used in advertising materials for schools and showcased in the national media. But in recent months, dozens of the nation's top-ranked institutions have stopped providing data to the publication.Yale University Law School was the top law school in the country in the U.S. News ranking for years, then chose to stop cooperating in November of last year. Forty more law schools, including 12 of the top 14 ranked in the country followed suit. Some undergraduate schools also decided they would no longer participate in the U.S. News and World Report rankings.We discuss how important these rankings should be for prospective students. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/04/23·37m 52s

The News Roundup For April 7, 2023

Former President Donald Trump was indicted this week. He was arraigned in a New York City courthouse on Tuesday and plead not guilty to 34 counts of falsifying business records.Extreme weather continues to ravage many parts of the South. At least 32 people have been killed in the region by multiple tornadoes.Sunday's NCAA women's basketball championship game drew record viewership this year. The LSU Tigers defeated the Iowa Hawkeyes 102 to 85.Meanwhile overseas, Finland joined the North Atlantic Treaty Organization this week, doubling the alliance's border with Russia. Now, all eyes turn to Sweden as the country faces an uphill battle for membership.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/04/23·1h 24m

The State Of The Cleanup Efforts In East Palestine

It's been two months since a train derailed in East Palestine, Ohio, and spilled toxic materials into the surrounding environment.Since then, officials have deemed the town safe, but residents are saying otherwise. To complicate matters, CNN reported that a group of CDC researchers fell ill while investigating the possible health effects of the disaster. At the center of the controversy is Norfolk Southern, the rail company responsible for the spill. Last week, the Department of Justice announced a lawsuit against the company for violating the Clean Water Act.While increased concern over derailments has led to bipartisan action to improve rail safety measures. We check in on cleanup efforts in East Palestine and talk about what can be done to prevent another disaster like it from happening again.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/04/23·32m 15s

1A Remaking America: Safeguarding Free And Fair Elections Ahead Of 2024

It's clear that baseless allegations about the mechanics of elections are still circulating, and they're powerful enough to shape events — and keep affecting our elections.A bevy of other partisan-led efforts, including court cases and state-level legislation, are shifting election policy ahead of 2024.We discuss how states will continue to ensure free and fair elections.This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country, including WBHM. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/04/23·37m 36s

Donald Trump Becomes The First President Charged With Criminal Activity

Donald Trump has become the first president – former or current – charged with criminal activity. In a 34-count felony indictment, prosecutors allege that Trump conspired to illegally influence the 2016 presidential election through hush money payments to two women who said they had sexual encounters with him. The charges stem from an investigation led by Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg.The former president has called the indictment "political persecution" and pled not guilty to all counts.We go over the charges, answer your questions, and talk about what happens next.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/04/23·40m 58s

Some States Want To Say Where You Can And Can't Be In Drag

Republicans in state legislatures across the U.S. have found their focus for the 2023 legislative session: drag.But drag has been around for a long, long time.Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee signed one of these drag-restricting bills into law on March 3. But a federal judge blocked the law from taking effect on April 1.The law would prohibit people in Tennessee from being in drag in public places or where it could be seen by people under the age of 18. It defines drag as "adult cabaret."Other states like Texas have more than one bill on the legislative floor that would ban drag. We discuss these bills, the response to them, and whether or not they violate free speech.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/04/23·36m 45s

The Future Of Democracy In Israel

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has delayed the planned overhaul of the country's judicial system, but his people are still taking to the streets in protest.The government's plans to weaken Israel's supreme court have been subject to months-long demonstrations and general strikes. Most recently, walkouts across several industries closed Israel's schools and airports for a day.The move to suspend the legislation comes after Netanyahu fired Israel's head defense official, Yoav Gallant, for advocating against the legislation.Now, Netanyahu's party is in talks with the opposition, with hopes of reaching a compromise.With the clocking ticking for a resolution, we look at the country's national security and foreign relations hanging in the balance We discuss what Netanyahu plans to do next. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/04/23·37m 37s

The News Roundup For March 31, 2023

A shooter entered and attacked an elementary school in Nashville this week, killing three children and three adults. President Joe Biden said he could do no more on his own to address gun violence and asked Congress to act. Republicans signaled there was little more they were willing to do to address the issue.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has, for the moment, backed down from proposed reforms to his country's Supreme Court. His citizens, however, are still taking to the streets in protest.A fire claimed the lives of at least 38 people in an immigration detention center in the Mexican city of Juarez.The president of Ghana has intervened in his parliament's efforts to pass an aggressively anti-LGBTQ bill, saying that "substantial elements" of the bill have been changed. The move comes as Vice President Kamala Harris visits the country.We cover these stories and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/04/23·1h 30m

Where Does Nuclear Energy Fit In A Carbon-Free Future?

Experts have repeatedly said that the world has to stop burning fossil fuels if we want to avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis.The latest United Nations climate report reminded us just how soon that needs to happen. The U.S. should cut two-thirds of fossil fuels in the next decade.When it comes to carbon-free energy, many people think of renewables like solar or wind. But there's also the nuclear option. Nuclear currently accounts for 20 percent of our electricity production, according to the Energy Information Administration. We discuss where nuclear energy fits into a carbon-free future and how safe the nuclear power we already have is.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/03/23·32m 20s

Vaccination Nation: How Do You End A Pandemic?

On May 11, the United States will end the public health emergency declaration over COVID-19. As the emergency phase of the pandemic winds down, so too have infection rates. But the CDC still links about 2,000 deaths a week to COVID. And the end of COVID's emergency status will mean big changes in how Americans receive COVID care, including access to tests and vaccines. In this edition of our series Vaccination Nation, we talk about what it means for a pandemic to end, and how these changes will impact you and your family.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/03/23·35m 35s

As Interest Rates Soar, Who's Able To Buy A Home?

For some Americans, the dream of ownership is becoming less of a reality.A new report from the National Association of Realtors shows the rate of first-time homebuyers is at its lowest point since the organization began tracking the data in 1981. Also, the race and gender gap in homeownership is widening. The pandemic helped skyrocket home prices. And as the number of available homes remains slim, affordability continues to be an issue. We discuss the market and what it'll take for homeownership to become possible for most Americans again.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/03/23·38m 23s

The Government's Plan To Fix A Broken Organ Transplant System

Last week, the government announced plans to completely overhaul the organ transplant system in America. This includes breaking up The United Network for Sharing Organs (UNOS)'s multi-decade monopoly.For those who need an organ transplant, the process is far from easy. On average, 17 people die each day awaiting transplants. More than 100,000 people are currently on the transplant waiting list according to the Health Resources and Services Administration. UNOS has been criticized for exacerbating the organ shortage. An investigation by the Senate Finance Committee released last year found that the organization lost, discarded, and failed to collect thousands of life-saving organs each year.We discuss the government's plan for overhaul and what it means for those whose lives are on the line.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/03/23·41m 3s

1A Remaking America: The End Of Pandemic SNAP Benefit Boosts

More than 40 million Americans receive federal SNAP benefits. Congress boosted these benefits during the pandemic. But the public health emergency is ending on May 11, along with the SNAP boosts. Just as these cuts end, Congress is debating the future of SNAP. Republican lawmakers are calling for stricter work requirements, while Democrats say current funding levels are nowhere near adequate.We discuss how food-insecure Americans, and the food banks that help them, are making do.This show was part of 1A's Remaking America collaboration with six partner stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/03/23·33m 3s

The News Roundup For March 24, 2023

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell announced Wednesday that the Fed would be increasing interest rates for a ninth time in a row. And he was blunt about the reason why he was raising the rate by a quarter of one percentDespite reports that Donald Trump would be indicted this week – well he hasn't been. At least not yet. The grand jury in Manhattan has been hearing evidence of a hush money payment former President Donald Trump made during the 2016 presidential campaign. Meanwhile, protests in Israel continued this week. Thousands of people flooded the streets yesterday for a so-called "Day of Shutdown." They were demonstrating against an ongoing overhaul of their country's judicial system by the right-wing government..Somalia is one of the poorest countries in the world. It's been battered by years of war and decades of political instability. And now it is facing another drought.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/03/23·1h 28m

The 1A Record Club Sits Down With Hozier

Andrew Hozier-Byrne has a lot to celebrate.Later this year, he'll celebrate the 10-year anniversary of his debut single and biggest hit "Take Me To Church."It's been four years since he release his last album, "Wasteland, Baby!"His newest project is called "Eat Your Young." It's a three-song EP inspired by "Dante's Inferno."He talks to us about his latest work, his upcoming third album, and what he's learned from nearly a decade of stardom.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/03/23·35m 12s

Investigating the 1958 Death of James Brazier

The fourth season of "Buried Truths" investigates the death of a Black man in a town known for its violent, racist treatment of people of color. In 1958, James Brazier died of brain damage days after police beat him on his front lawn.A local police officer, Weyman B. Cherry, was notoriously violent with Black residents. His Georgia County earned the moniker "Terrible Terrell."We talk to Klibanoff about investigating the cold case and "Terrible Terrell."Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/03/23·33m 2s

Alaska, The Willow Project, and The Future of Fossil Fuels

On March 13 the Biden administration approved a new oil venture in Alaska called the Willow Project. More than 4.6 million people petitioned against its approval.It will allow the energy company ConocoPhillips to drill for oil in the National Petroleum Reserve on Alaska's Northern slope. The company says it will produce 180,000 barrels of oil per day.But will the Willow Project turn into a "carbon-bomb?"Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/03/23·35m 38s

The Future Of Sperm-Related Birth Control

The burden of finding the right birth control method typically falls to the person who can get pregnant. Some 90 percent of females have taken a contraceptive at some point in their lives, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.Currently, there are just two birth control options for people who produce sperm: a vasectomy or condoms. That could change soon. Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College discovered that a drug used to treat eye disease temporarily stopped sperm production in mice – hours later, fertility was restored. The researchers think they've taken a step toward developing a potential non-hormonal birth control drug that can be taken in the hours before sex to stop sperm from swimming. We discuss why it's taken so long to develop a birth control pill for sperm and how birth control for men could change reproductive politics.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/03/23·35m 16s

The 1A Movie Club Recaps The 2023 Oscars

Hollywood's biggest night has come and gone. And it was a memorable one, even in the run-up.Excluding Michelle Yeoh of "Everything Everywhere All At Once", this year's slate of best actor nominees were entirely white. That's three years after the academy announced new diversity guidelines in response to 2015's Oscars-so-white campaign. We discuss where the Oscars go from here and what they tell us about the state of movie-going. Later, we revisit our conversation with Best Actor winner Ke Huy Quan, and Best Director Winners Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert from 2022. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/03/23·50m 38s

The News Roundup For March 17, 2023

Silicon Valley Bank collapsed this week, sending shockwaves through the financial world. A judge in Texas heard arguments in a lawsuit against a widely-used abortion medication. The Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine filed the suit to overturn the FDA's approval of pills that account for more than half of abortions in the U.S.The Biden administration approved a drilling project in Alaska's National Petroleum Reserve that would supposedly produce 180,000 barrels of oil a day. Environmental activists said this approval would violate the president's climate goals.Also this week, the Biden administration is demanding that the Chinese-owned social media app TikTok be sold. Otherwise, it risks a nationwide ban.And Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said this week that his country is safer than the U.S. This was his response to critics after four Americans were attacked by cartel gunmen, leaving two dead.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/03/23·1h 28m

Colleges And Universities Are Betting Big On Sports Gambling

The NCAA College Basketball tournament kicks off Tuesday. Millions of Americans are expected to watch and bet on the NCAA College Basketball tournament that kicked off this week. According to a new survey from the American Gaming Association, 68 million Americans are expected to place over $15 billion in bets on the tournament this year. As sports gambling becomes increasingly popular on mobile platforms, colleges and universities are getting in on the action through multi-million dollar partnerships that allow companies to advertise on campuses.Investigations from The New York Times and the PBS Newshour found at least five major colleges (Michigan State, LSU, Maryland, University of Denver, and the University of Colorado) have partnered with companies like Caesar's Sports Book and PointsBet.We discuss what responsible gambling practices look like and what reporters found in their investigations.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/03/23·35m 55s

1A Remaking America: What Happens To A Community When A Hospital Closes?

Madera Community Hospital closed in December and has now filed for bankruptcy. The emergency room now sits empty, and labor and delivery services have stopped. The hospital's three rural clinics are also closed. Some 136 rural hospitals closed between 2010 and 2021, according to the American Hospital Association. According to a January report from the Center for Healthcare Quality and Payment Reform, about 600 hospitals are currently at risk of closing in the U.S.We traveled to Fresno as part of our Remaking America collaboration with six partner stations across the country, including KVPR in California's Central Valley. Earlier this month, we brought the community together to talk about the hospital closure, which has left more than 150,000 residents without an emergency room within 30 miles and has put a strain on emergency room departments in Fresno and Merced. This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations, including KVPR in Fresno, California. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/03/23·28m 39s

The USDA Is Making Sure Your Organic Food Is Organic: Does It Matter?

This month, the USDA is implementing stronger oversight of organic products in order to reduce fraud. For a growing number of Americans buying organic, that's good news. The industry reached $63 billion in sales between 2020 and 2021.We discuss what the organic label actually means and the kind of benefits you can expect. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/03/23·32m 54s

Using Diabetes Medication To Treat Conditions Other Than Diabetes

Some Americans are turning to a group of diabetes medications for something other than relief from the disease. Drugs like Ozempic and Wegovy are making headlines for their ability to stimulate weight loss. This is a problem for diabetes patients who need the medication and can't get it. A rise in demand for these medications has led to shortages. But should potentially life-saving medication be available to those whose lives aren't at risk? We speak to two doctors getting at the heart of these questions and a woman who's been using these medications to improve her health.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/03/23·37m 15s

1A Remaking America: Crime, The Senate, And Washington D.C.

Dozens of Democratic senators voted alongside their Republican counterparts last week on the issue of crime and safety in our nation's capital. The Senate voted 81-14 to block a criminal code rewrite that was unanimously approved by the D.C. City Council.The criminal code overhaul included major changes to criminal sentencing – including reducing maximum sentences for carjacking and eliminating mandatory minimums.We discuss the intersection of politics and criminal justice policy and what say Congress should have over D.C.'s affairs.This show was part of 1A's Remaking America collaboration with six partner stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.  Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/03/23·33m 31s

Gadget Lab: We Really Recommend This Episode

We partnered with our friends at WIRED to bring you a special episode of their podcast Gadget Lab. For this episode of Gadget Lab, the team takes a look at recommendation algorithms. The modern internet is powered by recommendation algorithms. But some of these algorithms can lead to some weird places, occasionally taking users down dark internet rabbit holes or showing harmful content. Lawmakers and researchers have criticized recommendation systems before, but these methods are under renewed scrutiny now that Google and Twitter are going before the US Supreme Court to defend their algorithmic practices.We hear how recommendation algorithms work, how they're studied, and how they can be both abused and restrained.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/03/23·35m 9s

The News Roundup For March 10, 2023

In domestic headlines, the Biden administration is considering reviving a policy that would detain families of migrants who enter the country outside conventional channels.In Texas, five women are filing a lawsuit against the state claiming the abortion ban put their lives, and well-being, at risk by denying them necessary medical procedures.Meanwhile overseas, reports from U.S. intelligence officials suggest that a pro-Ukraine group was responsible for blowing up the Russian-controlled Nord Stream pipelines. Ukraine, has denied any involvement in the matter.Four Americans were attacked in Mexico after traveling to the country for cheaper medicine. Two are dead and two are injured after being kidnapped by members of a drug cartel.We cover some of the biggest headlines during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/03/23·1h 27m

The Lessons Learned So Far From Russia's Cyber War On Ukraine

It's been over a year since Russia's launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Cyber weapons have continued to play a major role in the war.Both countries have leveraged 21st-century technologies like smartphones, artificial intelligence, and drones to aid their war efforts.Now, experts are saying Russia plans to scale up its cyber threats, into attacks capable of crippling Ukraine's digital infrastructure and impacting NATO allies.We discuss how we can better understand the cyber tools and tactics Russia is using in this war and what can we do to limit their effects.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/03/23·32m 57s

The Issues Americans Face Getting Insulin

Pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly announced on March 1 that it would cut the cost of its insulin at retail pharmacies by 70 percent. That's for patients with or without insurance. Eli Lilly is one of three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. For years, people in the U.S. who are insulin-dependent have had to ration their insulin or drive to Canada or Mexico to afford it. The patent to insulin was initially sold for $1. We discuss insulin prices in the U.S. have skyrocketed over the years and how much Eli Lilly's decision affect people across the country.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/03/23·36m 13s

Bernie Sanders Thinks It's Okay For You To Be Angry About Capitalism, Too

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has become a leading voice in the American left during his 30 years in Congress. He's been staunchly opposed to increases in military defense spending, has been a strong advocate for gay marriage, and has called on Congress to invest trillions more to combat climate change.But the signature issue that drove two presidential campaigns and garnered millions of followers on social media is his fight against economic inequality and the power of America's billionaire class.It's the focus of his new book, "It's Ok to Be Angry About Capitalism." Sanders details the ways in which our country's current state of capitalism is endangering our healthcare system, our environment, our media ecosystem, our politics, and America's working class.We speak with him about the book, social security, Medicare, ageism in politics, and more.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/03/23·37m 59s

How Child Labor Violations Have Quadrupled Since 2015

Children are working some of the most dangerous jobs in the U.S. according to a new investigation by The New York Times.Child labor violations have nearly quadrupled since 2015, according to data from the Labor Department. This includes some migrant children who are working throughout the manufacturing industry. Interviews with 60 caseworkers found that two-thirds of unaccompanied migrant children end up working full-time. Even with those statistics, some states are still looking to loosen child labor restrictions to meet hiring needs.We discuss how we got here and what needs to be done to address child labor violations.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/03/23·40m 50s

The News Roundup For March 3, 2023

On Wednesday, Eli Lilly, one of the world's biggest pharmaceutical companies, announced it was slashing the price of its most widely prescribed insulin by 70 percent.The U.S. Supreme Court began hearing oral arguments this week related to President Biden's student debt forgiveness plan. Meanwhile, tempers did not calm in the West Bank this week. Following settler attacks on Palestinian villages, the violence has continued, causing Israeli officials to appeal for calm.And President Biden welcomed a new trade deal on Monday, between the European Union and the United Kingdom, saying that its implementation would be vital in maintaining the Good Friday Agreement.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/03/23·1h 24m

1A Remaking America: Can Solar Power Help Fix Drought-Ravaged Farmlands?

The American West is experiencing its worst drought in over 1,000 years. That's making a lot of farmers rethink their sustainability practices and reimagine land that has become infertile.One way to innovate is via solar energy. Solar panels can make use of depleted land and help offset a farm's energy costs. They also preserve groundwater and help with crop growth.But the transition isn't always cheap. Could expanding solar on farmland make it harder and more expensive to feed America?We go to California where there's plenty of sun and an appetite to reach aggressive climate goals to hear about the possibilities.This show was part of 1A's Remaking America collaboration with six partner stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/03/23·33m 58s

The Kids Aren't Alright: The Post-Pandemic Teen Mental Health Crisis

In the wake of the pandemic, many people are struggling with their mental health regardless of their age.But recently published data from the CDC is shedding light on how teens are faring.The numbers show that 4 in 10 U.S. high schoolers experienced persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness in 2021. Nearly a quarter seriously considered attempting suicide.We discuss how parents can help teens navigate this tumultuous period. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/03/23·32m 39s

The State Of Hospice Care

Hospice care in the United States began as a social movement in the 1960s and '70s. What was once provided mainly by nonprofits, is now a $22.4 billion industry. Now, more than 70 percent of hospice clinics are for-profit businesses.And the rate of Americans choosing hospice is only going up. More than half of Americans will spend their final days in hospice. We check in on the hospice care industry — what it is, how it works, and what you need to know to prepare end-of-life services.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/02/23·32m 16s

Can Cities Go Green Without Driving Gentrification?

Cities across the country are using green space to combat the effects of climate change. Many are going beyond tree planting by rezoning abandoned infrastructure — like railroads and suspended highways — to create expansive, vibrant urban parks.But new data shows that this environmental revitalization is driving gentrification and displacing people in low-income communities.How can cities balance the impact of green gentrification with the need to adopt more climate-resilient developments?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/02/23·32m 50s

The News Roundup For February 24, 2023

President Joe Biden was in Europe this week, prompting commentary from his critics. Arizona Rep. Andy Biggs says he wants future funding to Ukraine pulled and disagrees that it's America's job to defend the country's sovereign borders.While in Europe, President Biden crossed into Kyiv by train on Monday, aboard what's been dubbed "Rail Force One." The surprise trip lasted less than a day. But it sent a big message. It's the first time the president has visited Ukraine since Russia's full-scale invasion of the country a year ago.At least 11 Palestinians were killed Wednesday in a raid by Israeli military forces in the occupied West Bank. More than 100 people were injured.And Nigerians head to the polls. More than 90 million voters will have a say in who next leads Africa's most populous country. President Muhammadu Buhari is term-limited. There are 18 people on the ballot to replace him.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/02/23·1h 26m

Officials Are Playing The Blame Game After The East Palestine Train Derailment

What do you do when a train carrying toxic chemicals crashes in your town?East Palestine, Ohio, is finding out the hard way. A train derailed earlier this month, but the mess still hasn't been cleaned up. Now officials are playing the blame game, with East Palestine residents stuck in the middle. Trains roll through America's small towns every day. So who's responsible when things go so wrong? We discuss what's next for East Palestine residents. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/02/23·36m 53s

Know It All: AI And Police Surveillance

Today, artificial intelligence is being used by law enforcement for facial recognition and even predictive policing. It can help solve and prevent crimes, but it's not foolproof. That's resulted in wrongful arrests and continued racial profiling in policing. Outside the U.S., so-called "safe cities" use AI and big data for "Big Brother" surveillance systems.We ask how much these technologies can curb crime, and at what cost to our freedom.This show is part of our series in collaboration with WIRED; "Know It All: 1A and WIRED's Guide to AI." Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/02/23·32m 47s

Know It All: Where AI Helps And Hurts In Health Care

AI is being used for all kinds of tasks in health care — whether it's administrative ones like taking notes, parsing through patient data, or providing some extra help with reading images. Some AI platforms like Bayesian Health are helping filter through loads of data that get put into a health system. And some clinicians are testing out what AI can and can't do quite yet, like a team at Emory University who found out an AI system could detect a patient's self-reported race based on a chest scan. For this episode of "Know It All: 1A and WIRED's Guide to A.I.", we're exploring what AI in health care looks like today and its potential.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/02/23·34m 48s

Know It All: ChatGPT In The Classroom

ChatGPT is incredibly popular online, boasting more than 100 million monthly active users within just two months of its launch last November.The program is powered by a language model that is programmed to produce human dialogue. Users can feed it a prompt, and ChatGPT will predict how it should respond. This makes teachers nervous. Educators are concerned the application will fundamentally change how writing is taught and will impact students' abilities to craft ideas on their own. Meanwhile, other teachers are getting creative with the technology. We assemble a panel of guests to discuss the impact of artificial intelligence on our schools. It's part of our series Know It All: 1A and WIRED's Guide to AI.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/02/23·29m 25s

Know It All: What Is AI And How Will It Shape The Future?

We've partnered with our friends at WIRED for a series all about AI; "Know It All: 1A and WIRED's Guide to A.I." We'll be exploring how AI is transforming education, healthcare, and national security.In this conversation, we unpack how AI works and how we can get ready for the future it's shaping.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/02/23·32m 1s

The News Roundup For February 17, 2023

On Thursday, President Joe Biden broke his silence on the recent downings of UFOs in U.S. airspace. He said U.S. intelligence has no indication that three objects shot down in recent days were surveillance craft from China.Earlier this month, a train carrying hazardous chemicals derailed in East Palestine, Ohio, releasing toxic materials into the town. Last week, some of the chemicals were burned in what officials called a "controlled explosion." Meanwhile, it's been 10 days since twin earthquakes and several aftershocks hit Syria and Turkey. Recovery and aid groups are still working around the clock to get immediate supplies, medicine, and shelter to survivors.And as the one-year anniversary of Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine approaches, the U.S. is expecting Ukraine to launch a spring offensive. Russia has been stepping up its offensive in eastern Ukraine – battling, unsuccessfully, for the city of Vuhledar.We discuss all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/02/23·1h 25m

Police Unions And Effective Change In Law Enforcement

Over two years ago, the death of George Floyd sparked nationwide protests and prompted renewed calls for police reform. Some even came from police unions themselves. But just last month, another Black man died at the hands of American law enforcement. Tyre Nichols was beaten by Memphis police officers during a traffic stop and later died from his injuries. Six police officers have been fired from the department for their actions. Five of the former Memphis police officers charged in the beating are set to be arraigned in court this Friday.As the officers await their trial, the city of Memphis is moving forward with ordinances that address police brutality and officer accountability.We discuss how police reform can actually take place, and how unions can be involved in accountability.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/02/23·31m 46s

A Closer Look At Pedestrian Safety

Since the beginning of the pandemic, traffic deaths have surged in cities across America. 2021 shaped up to be the deadliest for pedestrians in four decades.Data from the Governors Highway Safety Association estimates that drivers hit and killed more than 7,000 pedestrians in 2021, an average of 20 deaths per day.While data from 2022 isn't out yet, estimates indicate that the pedestrian safety crisis has only worsened.To help address the surge, the U.S. Department of Transportation released $800 million dollars in grants as a part of its Safe Streets for All program in February.We discuss the impact this federal investment will have on traffic deaths and how we can make communities safer for pedestrians. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/02/23·29m 35s

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Magic Mike's Last Dance'

He wears a tie without a suit. His chiseled abs make women melt in their seats. And his hips, well, they don't lie. We're talking, of course, about Magic Mike.It's been just over a decade since the first installment in the series was released. The franchise has grown to include live shows all around the world. Now, the third and final film, "Magic Mike's Last Dance," has been released. It opened in theaters on Friday to mixed critical reviews but the film enjoyed a successful weekend at the box office nonetheless. For this episode of the 1A Movie Club, we unpack the magic of 'Magic Mike' and talk about whether his last dance still has the spark.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/02/23·27m 47s

1A Remaking America: Who Gets To Choose When It Comes To School Choice?

The perennial debate over school choice is ramping up once again in state legislatures across the country. At least 11 states are considering or have passed legislation this year that would allow public funds to go toward private school tuition or homeschooling, according to EdWeek. But critics of school vouchers worry they divert money from public schools and that there's little to no oversight of how the money is spent. We take a look at which states have school choice programs, which students they work for, and who they leave behind. This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. The series explores Americans' trust in institutions and the health of our democracy. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/02/23·33m 33s

The News Roundup For February 10, 2023

President Joe Biden delivered his second State of the Union. Intrusions by Republicans and ad-libs by the former Delaware senator made for a feisty address.A Neo-Nazi has been charged by the FBI for attacking power stations in Maryland as part of a plot to wipe out the state's power grid.Meanwhile, a devastating earthquake shook southern Turkey and northern Syria this week causing widespread destruction and death. Rescue efforts are underway, but international politics and regional conflicts have made responding to the disaster complicated.Following a rash of drug overdose deaths, the Canadian province of British Columbia will no longer criminally charge people for possessing small amounts of hard drugsWe cover all this and more during the the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/02/23·1h 26m

Rescue Teams And Civilians Scramble To Save Lives In Turkey

A massive 7.8 magnitude earthquake in southern Turkey has left rescue teams and civilians scrambling to save lives. Since Monday morning, the Turkish, Kurdish, and Syrian people have walked among collapsed buildings looking for loved ones in the rubble. "The needs are very high in northwestern Syria as this [earthquake] adds a dramatic layer for vulnerable [people] who are still struggling after many years of war," said Sebastien Gay, MSF head of mission in Syria.We discuss the destruction caused by the quake and what will come next with journalists, aid organizations, and Middle East experts. .Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/02/23·33m 36s

What We Learned From Biden's 2023 State Of The Union Speech

President Joe Biden gave his second State of the Union speech Tuesday night. It was his first since Republicans have taken control of the House of Representatives.The State of the Union is a chance for the U.S. president to address a large and wide television audience. Last year, Biden's speech amassed more than 38 million viewers.We discuss key takeaways from the address. Later, we take a look at the behind-the-scenes of what goes into writing a presidential speech.How do you craft the perfect speech? And in an increasingly polarized political landscape, how is the role of speech shifting?We pose your questions to a panel of political speechwriters.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/02/23·1h 24m

Racial Inequality In The U.S. Tax System

Tax season is here and a new study is shedding light on inequalities in our tax system. Black taxpayers are at least three times more likely to be audited by the I.R.S than other taxpayers.The study, which was a collaboration between the University of Michigan, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and the U.S Treasury Department, is one of the most detailed ever on race and the tax system. The reason for this racial disparity isn't what you'd expect. The IRS isn't targeting Black taxpayers — the agency doesn't keep data on race. But the outdated algorithms it's using are. Lack of funding is another problem. We speak with a co-author of the study and a leading expert on race and the tax system later in the hour. First, we talk about funding. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/02/23·30m 59s

Remaking America: Recovery High Schools And Teens Facing Addiction

Schools have spent decades trying to prevent teens from using drugs and alcohol. The Office of National Drug Control Policy spent $2.9 billion on drug prevention last year alone, but the success rates of prevention programs remains in question. As part of our "Remaking America" collaboration, we highlight reporting from partner station KUNC on kids facing mental health and substance abuse issues. One possible solution is recovery high schools. There are at least 45 recovery schools across the U.S. dedicated to students with addiction problems.We discuss the unique challenges young people face when seeking treatment, and how schools can do a better job of supporting them.This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Addiction is treatment is available. For help, please call the free and confidential treatment referral hotline (1-800-662-HELP) or visit findtreatment.gov.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/02/23·35m 12s
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