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Listening to the news can feel like a journey. But 1A guides you beyond the headlines – and cuts through the noise. Let's get to the heart of the story, together – on 1A.

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Episodes

The News Roundup For July 19, 2024

The U.S. Secret Service is under scrutiny following the attempted assassination of former President Donald Trump at a rally in Pennsylvania last weekend. The Republican National Convention wrapped up on Thursday in Milwaukee and featured a mix of calls for unity, doubling down on party lines, border security talk, and a slew of misinformation.Meanwhile, President Biden is both publicly and privately facing pressure from top Democrats to drop out of the race.On Tuesday reporting emerged from CNN that the Biden administration had informed the Secret Service of an unspecified threat to Trump from Iran before the July 13 campaign rally. And Netanyahu is set to visit Washington next week, where he will meet with President Biden and address Congress. We cover all this and more during this week's Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/07/241h 28m

The Terror Of Tornadoes

Sirens echoed this week across several states in the Midwest.According to the National Weather Service, a storm system made up of several thunderstorms – known as a derecho – developed over Iowa and swept through parts of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin. This year has seen almost a thousand tornadoes. The first of which was reported near Galveston, Texas, on January 5.We get into what happened with those twisters and what we know about their uptick in frequency. We discuss what role, if any, climate change plays in all this.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/07/2431m 48s

The Value Of A Technical Education In 2024

As the price of four-year colleges balloon and the job market becomes increasingly unstable, a new batch of workers are going another route: technical school.Students enrolled in vocational-focused community colleges increased 16 percent from 2022 to 2023, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.A technical college in Florida says almost all their programs are close to capacity. And in Maine, enrollment in career and technical schools passed 10,000 students statewide for the first time.We discuss what a technical education looks like today and how beneficial the path can be for students. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/07/2431m 26s

Game Mode: 2024 In Games, So Far

On this edition of Game Mode, we take a look at the games that are giving us a thrill so far in 2024. And we look at some games that have disappointed.What can the success or failure of this year's games tell us about the video game industry? The industry spans from tech companies like Microsoft, all the way down to solo developers. It's expected to be worth $189 billion this year.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/07/2432m 4s

'If You Can Keep It': The Attempted Assassination Of Donald Trump

Details are still emerging after the shooting at a Pennsylvania rally held by Donald Trump.The shooting is being investigated as an assassination attempt. The former president says he was injured shot in his right ear. One person was killed, and two other rally attendees were critically injured. We break down what we know about the shooting and the security failures that led to this weekend's events.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/07/2438m 32s

A Conversation-ish With Gary Janetti

Gary Janetti has built a solid following on Instagram, entertaining his one million followers with stories of travel, observations on life and...his ability to critique blueberries and annoying children like no other. His new book "We Are Experiencing a Slight Delay" is a collection of essays, reflecting on travel, adventure (misadventure) and love. Interspersed with recollections of his trips are personal meditations on dining alone, journeys to diverse destinations and the importance of kindness while being a visitor.Emmy nominated television writer, Gary Janetti joins us to talk about his new book. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/07/2432m 40s

The News Roundup For July 12, 2024

Question marks continue to plague the candidacy of President Joe Biden. The GOP is reworking its platform ahead of the Republican National Convention, softening some of the more intense portions that have received media attention.Boeing is set to plead guilty to criminal fraud charges related to the crashes of two 737 Max jetliners that killed 346 people.NATO leaders gathered in Washington this week to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the organization's founding. An Israeli Defense Force strike killed dozens of Palestinians in front of a school near Khan Younis.We cover all this and more during this week's News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/07/241h 26m

How NDAs Left The Office And Entered Our Homes

One legal document has quietly reigned supreme in American board rooms, film sets, and sometimes even homes: non-disclosure agreements.But NDAs aren't just for employees anymore. More and more people around the country are using and signing these documents to protect personal, sensitive information.A new feature from New York Magazine explores how NDAs have become "the defining legal document of our time." We speak to the writer of that piece.What discuss what's fueling the move and its impact. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/07/2435m 50s

The Voracious World Of Competitive Eating

Nathan's Famous International Hot Dog Eating Contest has been hosted every summer on Coney Island since 1972. Competitors eat as many dogs as they can in 10 minutes, hoping to claim the "Mustard Belt" and a grand prize $10,000. According to Nathan's, nearly 40,000 spectators flocked to Coney Island to watch this year's contest. Nielsen reports its annual television viewership at nearly a million people. Competitive eaters train hard to be able to take part in these kinds of events.We discuss the science behind competitive eating and our fascination with watching these kinds of competitions.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/07/2431m 27s

The Writers' Room: Flying High And Loving Deeply With Romantasy

Romantasy is a popular literary genre that blends elements of fantasy and romance. It's also one of the fastest growing. Between 2022 and 2023, romantasy novel sales increased by 42 percent.What's driving this surge in fantastical romances? And what can they teach us about dreaming big, loving deeply, and not giving up hope even when the odds are stacked against us? Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/07/2433m 49s

'If You Can Keep It': Presidential Immunity, Donald Trump, And Joe Biden's Candidacy

We're processing the landmark ruling the Supreme Court handed down on Monday, July 1, in Trump v. United States.The justices decided that presidents are immune from criminal prosecution for acts they carry out in their official capacity as leaders.So what does that ruling mean for the power of the Oval Office, our democracy, and the former president?We also spend some time talking about the math behind Joe Biden's decision making regarding his candidacy following a poor debate performance.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/07/2443m 42s

The Sounds Of America: Class Of 2024

The Library of Congress is famous for its collection of American cultural treasures.      Each year, the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress chooses just 25 pieces of audio to showcase the rich heritage of America's recorded sound.   Every year, in partnership with the Library of Congress, 1A profiles some of the newest inductees into the National Recording Registry. Think of it as the country's audio "hall of fame." We profile some of this year's entries from notable artists, including Bill Withers, Blondie, Jefferson Airplane, Lily Tomlin, and Bobby McFerrin. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/07/241h 29m

Examining The Power Of First Ladies In American History

They have the ear of the most powerful person in the country. They pillow talk with the president. They are... the first ladies.As Americans celebrate with fireworks and talks of the Founding Fathers, it's the women behind these presidents that leave an often overlooked mark.Abigail Adams wrote a letter to future president John Adams to "remember the ladies" while drafting the Declaration of Independence. The country's first ladies play a significant and unique role – and it's always evolving. We talk about the role and some of America's most memorable first ladies. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/07/2435m 14s

U.S. Surgeon General Murthy Tackles Mental Health, And Disinformation

Being healthy in America these days looks a little different than it did in years gone by.We sit down with U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to talk about how he's tackling the job this time around. He also served as surgeon general under the Obama administration.Murthy has set a few priorities for this term, including addressing loneliness, youth mental health, and health disinformation. And last week he announced gun violence as a public health crisis.We discuss what we can expect from him and his office. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/07/2433m 0s

What Happens When A College Shuts Its Doors For Good?

School's out and summer is in session. But for some, this season is anything but relaxing. That's because many colleges have shut their doors, for good. Since the onset of the pandemic, colleges have been shutting down rapidly, now at a rate of one every week.We discuss what happens to students and faculty when their college closes, and why so many of them finding it difficult to stay open.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/07/2434m 16s

'If You Can Keep It': The End Of The Supreme Court's Term

Going into the beginning of July, we take stock of the Supreme Court's recent term, including a rush of a dozen cases it released in the last week.The Supreme Court considered controversial topics this summer, including Donald Trump and presidential immunity, charges against Jan. 6 rioters, emergency abortion care, gun rights for people with a history of domestic violence, interactions between the government and social media companies, and the discretion that federal agencies can have in implementing laws.As part of our weekly politics series "If You Can Keep It," we hear from our legal experts about what the court's decisions mean for the country and for the stakes of this election.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/07/2439m 47s

The News Roundup For June 28, 2024

President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump meet in Atlanta, Georgia for a memorable debate.The Supreme Court temporarily blocks the Environmental Protection Agency's "Good Neighbor Plan" and blocks the multibillion Purdue opioid settlement, finding it inappropriately protected the Sackler family. And the Court sides with the Biden Administration in a challenge to Idaho's strict abortion ban.Meanwhile, Bolivia foils a military coup attempt. Army General Juan José Zúñiga is arrested hours after he led troops and tanks to storm the presidential palace in the capital, La Paz.In Kenya, protests resume a day after President Ruto makes a dramatic U-turn and withdraws contentious tax hikes. And Israel warns it can send Lebanon "back to the Stone Age" as the United Nations humanitarian affairs chief warns a conflict would be "potentially apocalyptic."We cover all this and more during this week's News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/06/241h 26m

Ask A Grillmaster

Since the dawn of mankind, humans have been have been taking food to fire. After thousands of years — and probably tons of really awful woolly mammoth meat — we've learned to make grilling taste good. With summer here and summer holidays just around the corner, it's almost impossible to head outside and not catch a whiff of a grill somewhere. But the world of grilling has gone through a lot of innovation since our ancestors first held ingredients to the sacred fire. We're here to help you make sense of it all. For our latest installment of our "Ask A..." series, we're asking grillmasters all about their craft and answering your questions.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/06/2434m 55s

Best Of: SOS: Saving Keystone Species

What do bison, beaver, wolves and sea otters all have in common?They're keystone species. That means they have an outsized impact on their ecosystem. It took humans driving some of these to near extinction to realize just how important they are.Now animals like the American Bison and North American Beaver are some of the Endangered Species Act's most notable success stories. As part of our series marking the 50th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, we're taking a closer look at the efforts to save keystone species.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/06/2437m 10s

Journalist And Historian Nick Bryant On America's "Forever War"

What are the consequences of America's unresolved history?That's the question raised by a new book by journalist and historian Nick Bryant, "The Forever War: America's Unending Conflict with Itself." The book maps a path from the founding of the United States to the current political state of the country, and argues that the political divisiveness we see today is a natural part of the country's story.Nick Bryant joins us to talk about the lessons we can learn from America's history, and what that history can tell us about the stakes of the election.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/06/2433m 31s

'If You Can Keep It': Immigration Plans For A Second Term

Voter surveys show Americans list immigration and the southern border as a top concern in this election year.At the Southern border, encounters between law enforcement and people seeking entry reached their highest numbers on record last December.Trump has seized on the issue in the campaign and President Biden recently changed asylum rules for people arriving at the border.We discuss how U.S. immigration policy could change in the next four years when it comes to protected status, deportations, and more.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/06/2433m 2s

The News Roundup For June 21, 2024

America's top doctor weighs in and says social media should come with a health warning like a pack of cigarettes. In Maryland, Governor Wes Moore is pardoning more than 175,000 convictions for marijuana. And baseball pays tribute to the "Say Hey Kid" the late, great Willie Mays.Meanwhile, Russia's President Putin and North Korea deepen, what western leaders have dubbed 'a dangerous bromance.' Israel raises the prospect of 'all-out war' with Hezbollah. The U.S. sends new military aid to Israel.In France, President Macron rolls the dice as the country prepares to vote in an election being watched far beyond its borders. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/06/241h 25m

Inside Out 2 And How We Think About Our Feelings

It's not often that we sit and think about feelings: what they are, where they come from, and why they're happening. We just feel them. Almost ten years ago, one movie gave voice to what may be an indescribable experience: discovering your feelings. That movie was Inside Out. This weekend, Inside Out 2 premiered in theaters. It follows 13-year-old Riley as a few new feelings are added to the mix as she enters her teen years: Envy, Ennui, Embarrassment, and Anxiety. We talk to screenwriter Dave Holstein and experts about what it means to discover your feelings throughout your childhood – and your adulthood, too. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/06/2433m 11s

BEST OF: SOS: 50 Years After The Endangered Species Act

Scientists predict that more than 1 million species could go extinct in the coming decades. It's been 50 years since Congress passed the Endangered Species Act in 1973 to protect plants and animals in the U.S. from extinction. Over 99 percent of the more than 1,600 species listed as endangered or threatened have survived.But the work to protect our nation's biodiversity is far from over. Just last month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that it was delisting 21 species from the act due to extinction. It included one species of bat and 10 kinds of birds. We discuss what the Endangered Species Act has accomplished in 50 years and how we should think about the next 50 years of conservation.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/06/2435m 43s

1A Movie Club: "Tuesday"

Death is the greatest paradox of our lives. It's something we all experience, yet it's one of the hardest things to accept. This tension is at the heart of the new movie "Tuesday," from A24, which we're talking about for this month's movie club. In the film, Death is a literal bird who visits those about to pass away. The film was released in theaters earlier this month. It stars actor and comedian Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Lola Petticrew, and Arinze Kene. We hear from Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and the film's director Daina O. Pusic about how the movie came to be and their biggest challenges working on it. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/06/2433m 48s

'If You Can Keep It': The Objectives of Project 2025

Project 2025 has been critiqued as a radically socially conservative and Christian nationalist proposal with the power to greatly disrupt the government.But what exactly does it aim to do? And what is the likelihood that it could go into effect?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/06/2431m 8s

The News Roundup For June 14, 2024

On Thursday, the Supreme Court declined to limit access to mifepristone – a medication commonly used in abortions and miscarriage care. The unanimous decision was on procedural grounds – not on the substance of the case.U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken is on his eighth visit to the Middle East since the start of the war in October. The U.S.-proposed ceasefire has gained global support but has not been fully embraced by either Israel or Hamas.Massive protests erupted on the streets of Buenos Aires as Argentina's Senate passes a bill advancing President Javier Milei's planned economic overhaul.France's right-wing party, the National Rally party, was one of many that made gains in European Union elections. And French President Emmanuel Macron dissolves the parliament and calls for snap elections that will take place on June 30 and July 7.We cover all this and more during this week's News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/06/241h 25m

How We Can Help Protect Sports Bettors From Addiction

Ever since a 2018 Supreme Court decision legalized sports betting, the industry has exploded.Now, 38 states plus the District of Columbia allow sports gambling – and Americans are taking advantage. Over $20 billion worth of bets were placed during the Super Bowl this year.In 2023, Americans ponied up a record $113 billion. Apps like DraftKings and FanDuel make placing your bets in seconds easier than ever.But as these apps grow in popularity, so do concerns. The National Council on Problem Gambling, which operates a gambling helpline, says calls are on the rise and callers are skewing younger.We discuss the industry of online gambling and sports betting. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/06/2441m 20s

Best Of: In Good Health: The Nation's Hydration Fixation

Everything's bigger in America. The portions, the cars, and now, our water bottles.Does it seem like everyone is carrying around a 30-ounce tumbler? The reusable water bottle industry is a multi-billion dollar business. But don't forget about plastics. The sales of single-use bottled water also continue to rise.We discuss how much of the hype around water is marketing versus science for the latest installment of In Good Health. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station an d subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/06/2432m 47s

What Migraines Mean For The Women Who Suffer Them

A migraine is the third most common illness in the world, affecting over 1 billion people.Women are especially susceptible to migraine attacks. Three times as many women experience migraine compared to men.Why do migraines affect women more? And what has this meant for how the condition is understood and treated by the medical community and beyond?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/06/2434m 50s

'If You Can Keep It': Young Voters In 2024

Wisconsin follows Arizona, Georgia, Michigan and Nevada in bringing charges against so-called fake electors.What do we know about the case in Wisconsin and how it compares to these other states?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/06/2434m 39s

The News Roundup For June 7, 2024

This week, President Biden issued an executive order on Tuesday that significantly restricts asylum at the U.S.- Mexico border.On Tuesday, Trump's lawyers asked the judge who oversaw the criminal trial in New York to lift the gag order placed on him. The order prevents Trump from attacking witnesses, the jury, and others involved in the case.Meanwhile in Gaza, an Israeli strike killed at least forty people when it hit a school-turned-shelter run by the United Nations agency for Palestinian refugees. Israel claimed that the school was being used as a Hamas compound, but did not provide evidence.This week, world leaders gathered in Normandy to commemorate the 80th anniversary of D-Day.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/06/241h 25m

The Summer 2024 SCOTUS Roundup

The Supreme Court is busy this summer.Before the term ends in July, the Court will decide whether former President Donald Trump is immune from criminal charges for actions taken while in office. It could upend over three hundred Jan. 6 prosecutions, including Trump's, in a case about obstruction.But the Supreme Court's public approval rating remains historically low. Justice Samuel Alito's refusal to recuse himself from the Jan. 6 proceeding despite the hanging of controversial flags outside his homes has only deepened the Court's crisis of confidence.We talk about all the Supreme Court cases to watch this summer and the Court's integrity. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/06/2436m 36s

Best Of: The Psychology Of Jury Selection

It's a right guaranteed not once, but twice in our constitution – a trial by jury. And many of us are asked to serve on them, whether we want to or not.Whether jury duty is a responsibility you dread or relish, the trial of former President Trump in Manhattan put the spotlight on the jury selection process – one that happens every day in courthouses across the country.We speak with legal experts about the role juries play in our justice system – and the psychology of jury selection. We also hear from someone who's served on a jury for another high-profile case.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/06/2434m 32s

Unpacking The Results Of The Indian Election

The results for the biggest election in the world are now in. Incumbent Prime Minister Narendra Modi, a Hindu nationalist, won a landslide victory, but with a smaller margin than expected.Since April, India conducted a multi-phased a general election with 970 million eligible voters.What does his victory mean for this country of 1.4 billion people? We discuss what another five years of Modi leadership means for the groups that he and his party have targeted, like; Indian Muslims, journalists, and the main political opposition. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/06/2433m 5s

'If You Can Keep It': The Historic Criminal Conviction Of Donald Trump

It's a big Monday. The first after the historic criminal conviction of Donald Trump.He's the first former or sitting president to be found guilty in a criminal trial. In his case – guilty not once, but on all 34 counts charged against him.We focus this hour on what the guilty verdict means for the GOP as well as talking about what's next for the case in the legal system. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/06/2433m 3s

The News Roundup for May 31, 2024

Former President Donald Trump has been found guilty on all counts in his criminal hush money trial.Israeli Defense Force missiles hit a camp of displaced Palestinians in Rafah on Sunday, igniting an inferno.And a look at election results in India and South Africa.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/05/241h 25m

Addressing Mental Health Across Cultures

For children of immigrants who are straddling two worlds, mental health can be a unique struggle. According to a 2020 study, children of immigrants had nearly double the rate of psychological distress than their immigrant parents. And this population is only growing, with one in four children in the U.S. currently being a child of immigrants.Therapy is bound by many Western ideas and rooted in whiteness. How to deal with the expectations, guilt, and dialogues of the bicultural experience can be a difficult road. That's where Sahaj Kaur Kohli comes in. She's the creator of Brown Girl Therapy, an online mental health space for children of immigrants and those in BIPOC communities. We discuss her experiences and what guidance and tools she gives to those navigating their bicultural identity.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/05/2431m 30s

Looking Back On 20 Years Of Same-Sex Marriage

In 2004 Massachusetts became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage after the state's Supreme Court found that their Constitution could no longer exclude same-sex couples from civil marriage rights.That watershed decision from Goodridge vs. Department of Health paved the way for LGBTQ+ rights across the country, which eventually saw same-sex marriage federally legalized in 2015. Since then, more than 700,000 same-sex couples have married across the country.But what prompted the fight for same-sex marriage in the first place? And where does the fight for equal rights under the law stand today?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/05/2431m 43s

The Political Power Of Theater

Between 1935 and 1939, thirty million Americans had the chance to see a play thanks to Federal Theater Project. Nearly a century later, the theater's place in American life is shrinking.Today, we look back on this one-of-kind federal project that believed in the power of theater, and we look forward to the role theater might play in upholding democracy even as the arts in America are being undermined.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/05/2433m 23s

Ask A Stunt Actor

Action and adventure films are big business. Last year, they accounted for more than half of box office earnings. And what's a great action flick without some bad-ass stunts stunts. The car chases, the fight scenes, and epic super-hero showdowns are all thanks to Hollywood's most daring: stunt performers.For the latest in our "Ask A" Series, we're talking to the professionals behind the danger and excitement on set.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/05/2429m 53s

The News Roundup for May 24, 2024

The final chapter of former president Donald Trump's hush money case is imminent.The International Criminal Court is seeking to issue arrest warrants for several top Hamas leaders and Israeli officials including Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.And Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is criticizing his country's western allies.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/05/241h 23m

The Realities And Ethics Of Pig Organ Transplants In Humans

With CRISPR technology, scientists can edit pig genes to be more compatible with a human body, or at least that's the hope.But a future of endless kidneys bred from pigs is still far away. The experimental surgeries that allowed for a pig kidney transplant were covered under the FDA's compassionate use care and clinical studies have yet to be conducted.What is the state of kidney transplantation? And what might the future look like?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/05/2435m 7s

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Back To Black' And Talks Biopics

Has someone ever asked you what "your story" is? For some, that question is a nightmare. Where do you begin? What parts are important? And are the parts you think are important, actually that crucial?Are you telling it the right way? One Hollywood art form bravely tries to do that, but about other well-known figures. That's the biopic. For this edition of the 1A Movie Club, we talk about the latest, "Back to Black." The movie tries its best to illustrate the story of Amy Winehouse. We discuss how well the biopic succeeds at telling the Winehouse's story. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/05/2430m 11s

From Cicadas To Crickets, Insects As Cuisine

We recently did a show about the cicada double brood emergence. Billions of them are above ground this year. And the conversation... took a bit of a turn... towards whether they can be eaten. (They can.)Some of you are certainly thinking you'd never eat a bug. But more than 2 billion people around the world eat insects as part of their standard diet.When we had that conversation, our host, Jenn White, would have described her enthusiasm to taste insects as... mild. But a lot changed since our conversation with our guests for the cicada show. Including her willingness to try eating ants and crickets. We discuss why so many of us are opposed to eating insects when it's been a staple for cultures for centuries. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/05/2435m 54s

'If You Can Keep It': Election Security In 2024

At 1A, when it comes to election coverage, we focus on the stakes, not the chatter.And nothing could be more high-stakes than the country's ability to conduct elections safely and with integrity.Harassment and the threat of violence are causing a high attrition rate among the nation's election workforces. But there are still folks out there preparing to meet these threats, both physical and virtual.We discuss how election workers are being protected. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/05/2431m 23s

The News Roundup For May 17, 2024

President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump agreed on terms this week to face off in two televised debates before the general election this November. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg was left "speechless" this week after a coalition of airlines banded together to sue his department over new rules concerning junk fees and making it easier for customers to receive refunds.As Russia continues to make gains in its full-scale invasion of Ukraine, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has canceled all his trips abroad. As paramilitary forces surrounded the Sudanese town of El Fasher, civil groups are warning that millions of people trapped in the city could be in danger. Dozens have been killed in fighting last weekend.Qatar's prime minister expressed concern over the state of peace talks between Israel and Hamas, saying that they were almost at a standstill.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/05/241h 25m

Best Of: Meg Jay Helps Us Navigate, Understand, And Review Our Twenties

What do you remember about being in your twenties? Maybe it was the best time of your life. Maybe it brought challenges that you had to learn to overcome as you entered adulthood.And if you're in your twenties now, life probably looks a lot different for you than it did for your parents. Meg Jay is a psychologist and author. In her new book, "The Twentysomething Treatment: A Revolutionary Remedy for an Uncertain Age," she explores the way our twenties set up the rest of our lives, and how the uncertainties that come with entering adulthood affect our brain.We sit down with her to talk about growing up, becoming an adult, and how our twenties stay with us all our lives.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/05/2431m 6s

In Good Health: How We Live With Chronic Illness

Over half of adults in America live with a chronic illness.Nearly 1 in 5 people who have heart disease or have had a cardiac arrest also have depression. And for people who have been diagnosed with cancer around 42 percent have experienced depression. Today, as part of our series "In Good Health," we talk about the intersection between chronic conditions like heart disease and our mental wellbeing. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/05/2431m 12s

Scientific Method: The Cicadas Are Coming

What has red eyes, lives underground for years, and screeches all summer long? That would be cicadas. And they're here. And more are coming.For the first time in over two hundred years, billions of cicadas are digging their way up from underground in a rare biological occurrence. Scientists are calling it a double brood emergence because two cicada broods will be above ground at the same time. Depending on where you live, you might have already seen them flying around or their infamous exoskeletons skins.For this installment of Scientific Method, our series where we speak to experts about the latest in the science world, we're talking about cicadas. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/05/2423m 19s

'If You Can Keep It': The Rising Cost Of Running A Campaign

Maryland is one of three states holding primaries tomorrow. It's also attracting outsized national attention because of the outsized amount of money being spent.Maryland's Senate race is the third most expensive nationwide behind California and Texas. That's thanks largely to the self-financed campaign of wealthy Democrat David Trone. He currently serves in the House.He's part of a wave of self-funded candidates nationwide. That rise coincides with the ever-surging cost of funding a campaign. Political ad spending in the 2024 election cycle is expected to exceed $16 billion.We discuss the cost of campaigns and how they're funded. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/05/2442m 4s

Why Birds Are Having A Harder Time Migrating And How We Can Help

Billions of birds are making their way around the world right now as part of their annual spring migration.But climate change, habitat loss, and human infrastructure are making that journey harder for a lot of species.That's why conservation and government groups come together twice a year to celebrate World Migratory Bird Day – but maybe they also just want an excuse to talk about our feathered friends.Either way, we're happy to oblige.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/05/2438m 53s

The News Roundup For May 10, 2024

The Biden campaign is growing increasingly nervous over the growing trend of campus protests in support of Palestinians. Party strategists are predicting a torrid time at this summer's Democratic National Convention as President Biden comes under fire for his handling of Israel's war against Hamas in Gaza and recent incursion into Rafah.Meanwhile, the Israeli government ordered the removal of Al Jazeera from within its borders this week. Officials confiscated broadcast equipment from the network, and Israeli television stopped broadcasting the channel.Chinese President Xi Jinping has been making the rounds in Europe this week. He was hosted by French President Emmanuel Macron. Xi also praised Hungary's "independent" foreign policy ahead of a meeting with the country's president, Viktor Orbán.We cover all this and more during this week's News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/05/241h 25m

Jen Psaki On Talking, Politics, And Talking Politics

Jen Psaki wants everyone to work on their communication skills.She's the former press secretary for the Biden administration. She's out with a new book called "Say More: Lessons from Work, the White House, and the World."In it, she points to deteriorating communication skills as one source of our intractable political disagreements.We talk to Psaki about talking, politics, and talking politics.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/05/2432m 59s

What Reclassifying Marijuana Could Mean For Research And Drug Policy

For the last 50 years, the government has classified Marijuana as a schedule one drug.Last Tuesday, Attorney General Merrick Garland did initiate the process to reclassify marijuana as a schedule three drug. Those substances are considered by the Drug Enforcement Agency to have moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence.This recommendation does not make marijuana legal at the federal level. But for the first time, the government is acknowledging marijuana's potential medical benefits.We discuss what this move means for marijuana research, and drug policy more broadly.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/05/2425m 4s

Boeing, Whistleblowers, And Consumer Concern Over Airplane Safety

In less than two months, two whistleblowers who came forward about Boeing's unsafe production standards have died. Then on Tuesday, an emergency slide that fell off a plane mid-air was found near the residence of a lawyer who was already suing the company.While flying over Oregon, a piece of a Boeing 737 MAX came off mid-flight. There were no fatalities, but an audit by the Federal Aviation Administration found dozens of issues in the manufacturing process. This led to two senate panel hearings on Boeing's safety culture, where more whistleblowers came forward.So, how concerned should consumers be about airplane safety? What is being done to prevent further incidents? And can Boeing turn things around?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/05/2434m 5s

'If You Can Keep It': The Role Of Third-Party Candidates In The 2024 Election

Third parties and third-party candidates are not a new phenomenon in American politics. But this year, the stakes of their candidacies are especially high.The list of third-party candidates running this year includes Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and Cornel West, both of whom are running as Independents. Jill Stein returns to the campaign trail as a representative of the Green Party.What role do third parties play in elections? And how could they influence this year's presidential one—even if they don't win it?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/05/2433m 20s

The News Roundup For May 3, 2024

University administrations' responses to students staging protests in support of Palestinians have varied wildly from campus to campus across the country. The House passed the Antisemitism Awareness Act of 2023 in response to the protests. The bill attempts to codify a definition of antisemitism. Meanwhile, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken urged Hamas this week to negotiate a deal for a ceasefire in its conflict with Israel. However, Hamas leaders don't want to accept the deals that have been offered as none guarantee an end to Israel's bombardment of Palestinian-occupied areas.And in Australia, President Anthony Albanese is taking a stand against domestic violence, describing the crime as a "national crisis."We cover the most important stories from around the world in the international hour of the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/05/241h 24m

Using Data To Better Understand Pregnancy

Economist Emily Oster became a big name in pregnancy advice 10 years ago with her book "Expecting Better: Why The Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong – And What You Really Need To Know."Her latest book is called "The Unexpected: Navigating Pregnancy During And After Complications." She co-wrote it with Maternal Fetal Medicine Dr. Nathan Fox.We talk about some of those complications and how patients can get better care from their doctors.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/05/2430m 45s

The Impact Of Internet Culture On The Toy Industry

For children across the country and the world, they're the centerpieces of weekend mornings, family holidays, and prized collections.We're talking about toys.The global toy industry is at a crossroads. How dolls, action figures, puzzles, skibidi toilets, and more find their way into the hands of kids is changing. The role that the internet and influencers play in getting kids excited about a franchise or specific toy is growing rapidly.But is the toy industry keeping up? Amid an uncertain economic climate worldwide, buyers for brick-and-mortar stores that sell toys are playing it safe and sticking with traditional offerings.We discuss what the toy industry is doing to keep up with the times. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/05/2428m 12s

Parsing The Pro-Palestinian Protests On Campuses Across The Country

Pro-Palestinian protests and encampments have sprung up on college campuses across the country.Hundreds of students and professors have been arrested. Calls for universities to end their ties to Israel and for the U.S. to negotiate a ceasefire are growing.We check in on the protests across the country and what they tell us about how equipped colleges and universities are to deal with student protests.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/04/2435m 33s

'If You Can Keep It': Trump, The Supreme Court, And Immunity

Last Thursday, the Justices heard arguments in a case all about presidential immunity. At the heart of the case is whether former President Donald Trump is immune from charges related to conspiring to overturn the 2020 election. The case is a first for the Supreme Court that could impact not only former president Trump but all future presidents, as stated by Justice Brett Kavanaugh.And the timing is just as significant as the outcome with the November election just six months away.We discuss the case and the impact the outcome could have. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/04/2432m 34s

The News Roundup For April 26, 2024

The Supreme Court heard arguments this week in a case concerning presidential immunity. Former President Donald Trump is claiming he should be shielded from prosecution over his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.President Biden signed a bill this week that included a provision that would ban the popular social media app TikTok in the U.S. unless its parent company, ByteDance, sells the company.Congress passed bipartisan legislation to provide military aid to Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan.Meanwhile, Russia is not backing down in its invasion of Ukraine. Despite the siege of over two years.And Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is in hot water after calling Muslims "infiltrators" during a campaign rally this week.We cover all this and more during this week's News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/04/241h 27m

The Psychology Of Jury Selection

It's a right guaranteed not once, but twice in our constitution – a trial by jury. And many of us are asked to serve on them, whether we want to or not.Whether jury duty is a responsibility you dread or relish, the trial of former President Trump in Manhattan put the spotlight on the jury selection process – one that happens every day in courthouses across the country.We speak with legal experts about the role juries play in our justice system – and the psychology of jury selection. We also hear from someone who's served on a jury for another high-profile case.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/04/2434m 32s

Untangling The Multiple Parts Of Medicare

Nearly 67 million people use some form of the federal government's health insurance program, which is for those over 65 and younger people with some disabilities. But untangling the multiple different parts can be a headache.And then there's Medicare Advantage.Unlike traditional Medicare, which is through the government, Medicare Advantage is a privatized insurance plan. With the help of some star-studded commercials, it's become increasingly popular.But it's also become controversial. According to a 2023 study from the Brown University School of Public Health, nearly half of those who signed up for Medicare Advantage left their plans by the end of five years.We try to untangle Medicare, Medicare Advantage and answer your questions about health care as a senior.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/04/2432m 40s

1A Record Club: Taylor Swift And 'The Tortured Poets Department'

Taylor Swift dropped her latest album, "The Tortured Poets Department," at midnight on Friday. Like she did with her previous album, "Midnights", she posted a surprise for fans a few hours later: 15 extra tracks on the album. That brings the total track listing to 31 songs.She's released four albums since 2020, plus four re-recorded albums. Her Eras Tour sold out stadiums across the U.S. last year, and it continues through 2024. The hold Taylor Swift has on much of our popular consciousness defies comparison with other current artists.We discuss Swift's new music and where it fits in her catalogue. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/04/2425m 35s

'If You Can Keep It': The Candidates And Climate Change

Here in the U.S., we can't have a people, a country, and a democracy – without, well: the Earth.Yes, the very large globe that we're sitting on right now. Many of you may be celebrating that today for Earth Day. Throughout this election season, we've asked you what's sending you to the ballot box. So far, your responses suggest that climate- is your third most dominant concern after "Trump" and "Democracy." For this installment of our weekly politics series, 'If You Can Keep It', we look at how each presumptive nominee for the 2024 presidential election is talking about climate and energy policy. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/04/2431m 36s

The News Roundup For April 19, 2024

As Donald Trump's trials continue over the course of the spring, Joe Biden is taking advantage of his rival's absence from the campaign trail. A Boeing whistleblower made headlines this week, telling the Senate that the aircraft manufacturer is "putting out defective airplanes."Meanwhile, Israel, with the help of the U.S., more or less successfully defended itself from a missile and drone attack launched by Iran after the former killed Iranian officials in an attack on an embassy in Syria.As the Russian invasion of Ukraine continues, The BBC has now confirmed that more than 50,000 Russian troops have died in the conflict.We cover the week's biggest headlines. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/04/241h 26m

The Connections Between American Guns And The Migrant Crisis

According to the Department of Justice's Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, at least 70 percent of firearms found in crime scenes in Mexico can be traced back to the neighbors to the north.Some 250,000 people crossed the southern border into the U.S. in December of last year. The majority of those were people from Mexico.And survey data pulled by Reuters from the Kino Border Initiative, a large migrant shelter in Nogales, Mexico, shows that violence, not economic factors, is forcing many families to leave Mexico.We discuss what work is being done to stop the flow of guns into Mexico. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/04/2433m 14s

Best Of: How To Become A Supercommunicator

Imagine you're at a dinner party and the conversation turns to the latest news. Everyone has a different opinion. People begin raising their voices.You notice the person beside you isn't talking, they're just watching. They turn to you and make a joke and you immediately relax. You hadn't even realized how tense you were. They then ask what you think about the news. When you respond, they're attentive. When they look at you, you feel seen. They ask you another question and another. Before you know it, an hour has passed, and the arguing has died down around you.Your dinner party partner is what journalist Charles Duhigg calls a supercommunicator. In his new book, "Supercommunicators: How to Unlock the Secret Language of Connection," by the same name, he explores what makes conversations work and how we can all be better at them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/04/2443m 4s

What Donald Trump's Indictments Mean For The Election And Our Legal System

We've never been here before. A former president is being tried in criminal court while he's running for reelection.Donald Trump faces four separate indictments. And only one of them will go to trial before November. That's a case that got underway yesterday in a Manhattan courtroom with jury selection. Trump is charged with falsifying business documents ahead of the 2016 election to cover up payments he made to adult film star Stormy Daniels.We discuss what the treatment of a former president reveal about our legal system more broadly, and what sets the case in New York apart.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/04/2431m 29s

'If You Can Keep It': The Legacy Of Roe V. Wade In The 2024 Election

Almost two years ago, The Supreme Court ruled in the Dobbs case, overturning Roe v. Wade and declaring that access to abortion is not protected in the United States Constitution.A lot has happened in the time since then. Nationwide, citizens are arguing in the courts, legislatures, and ballot boxes over whether abortion should be banned, and if so, under what circumstances.For this week's installment of our weekly politics series, "If You Can Keep It," we take a closer look at abortion and politics. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/04/2436m 51s

The News Roundup For April 12, 2024

The Arizona Supreme Court handed down a landmark abortion ruling this week, invoking an 1864 law that forbids abortions except to save a mother's life, and punishes providers with prison time should they choose to facilitate the procedure.In other judicial news, an appeals court judge has rejected former President Donald Trump's effort to delay his hush money trial as he appeals a gag order.Also from the courts, the parents of a Michigan school shooter were sentenced to 10 to 15 years in prison for involuntary manslaughter.In global news, Joe Biden has spoken out about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's actions in his campaign against Hamas in Gaza.Biden also spent time this week with Japanese officials, promising a new era of strategic coordination this week alongside Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.And after eight years of deadlock, the European Union passed a new asylum and migration pact.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/04/241h 24m

Meg Jay Helps Us Navigate, Understand, And Review Our Twenties

What do you remember about being in your twenties? Maybe it was the best time of your life. Maybe it brought challenges that you had to learn to overcome as you entered adulthood.And if you're in your twenties now, life probably looks a lot different for you than it did for your parents. Meg Jay is a psychologist and author. In her new book, "The Twentysomething Treatment: A Revolutionary Remedy for an Uncertain Age," she explores the way our twenties set up the rest of our lives, and how the uncertainties that come with entering adulthood affect our brain.We sit down with her to talk about growing up, becoming an adult, and how our twenties stay with us all our lives.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/04/2431m 6s

Driverless 18-Wheelers Are Hitting The Roads In Texas. How Are They Being Regulated?

We're hitting the open road.There are an estimated 3.5 million freight drivers in the U.S., according to the American Trucking Association.But some of those big rigs could soon be going driverless. Automated 18-wheelers are already hauling freight in Dallas. What's being done to keep those of us sharing the road with these road-bots safe?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/04/2434m 32s

What's Next For Women's Basketball After This Year's March Madness

Millions of people watched the NCAA women's basketball tournament over the past few weeks. The last three rounds of the tournament sold out and set viewership records, especially games involving the Iowa Hawkeyes and their star point guard, Caitlin Clark.On Sunday, Iowa faced off against the undefeated South Carolina Gamecocks in the most-watched basketball game on ESPN since 2019. South Carolina pulled ahead in the second half to win it all, 87-75.We talk about how the women's March Madness tournament got so big this year and the role Clark and other star players, like Angel Reese of LSU, played in turning out an unprecedented audience. What's next for women's basketball at the collegiate and professional levels after this year's burst of enthusiasm and viewership?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/04/2432m 22s

'If You Can Keep It': Donald Trump, White Evangelicals, And The 2024 Election

With his several divorces, violent rhetoric, and long list of criminal charges, former President Donald Trump may not be your idea of a God-fearing Christian. But that hasn't stopped him from appealing to his Christian base.Roughly 8 out of 10 white Evangelicals supported Trump in the 2016 general presidential election. And a recent Pew Research survey found that among religious groups, white Evangelical Protestants had a more positive opinion of Trump than any other group, whereas the majority of Jewish Americans, Black protestants, and atheists all had an unfavorable opinion of Trump.Despite their outsized political power, the white Evangelical church is shrinking. According to the Public Religion Research Institute, about 14 percent of the population identifies as white and evangelical. That's compared 25 percent in the 1990s.Today, we focus on white Evangelical Christians and the effect they will have on the 2024 election.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/04/2433m 48s

The News Roundup For April 5, 2024

Former President Donald Trump posted the $175 million bond in his New York civil fraud judgement thanks to some help from a supporter. Democrat Tina Smith is pushing to repeal the 1873 Comstock Act because she says it could be "misused" by Supreme Court justices to try to ban abortion nationwide.And the women's March Madness tournament is doing numbers. Monday night's game between Iowa and LSU boasted an audience of 12.3 million people, a record for women's college basketball game.In global news, outrage is echoing through America and the world following an Israeli Defense Force attack on a convoy of World Central Kitchen workers providing aid to the people of Gaza. At least 7 workers died.NATO is putting together a $108 billion fund to help Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy's forces repel a Russian invasion at the country's eastern border.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/04/241h 22m

Unpacking The Aftermath Of The Baltimore Bridge Disaster

The port of Baltimore, one of the nation's busiest, remains partially shut down, more than a week after a giant cargo ship collided with the Key Bridge.Last Tuesday, when the ship hit, eight construction workers were there that night making road repairs. Six workers were killed as a result of the collision.What concerns remain about safety in the port? What impact will this have on the economy, locally, nationally, and abroad?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/04/2432m 30s

The 1A Record Club Listens To Beyoncé's 'Cowboy Carter'

This ain't Texas. It's 1A. And today, our record club is listening to some Beyoncé. Her new album, "Cowboy Carter," clocks in at 27 tracks and a little over an hour. The musical powerhouse plays a string of sounds rooted in country music. She even throws in her takes on some of the genre's classics. But Black artists have long pioneered the country genre. We break down the sounds Beyoncé explores in her latest project and how Black artists have long been excluded from the genre.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/04/2432m 11s

The April Solar Eclipse Means Business

If you're just now planning travel for next week's total solar eclipse, you may be a little behind.Hotels are booked up and campgrounds are sold out in and around towns in the eclipse's path of totality.Nearly 4 million people are expected to make the trip to the viewing zone which stretches from Maine to Texas.Local businesses are taking advantage of the extra foot traffic, from hosting watch parties to rolling out solar eclipse-themed menus. How are cities and local businesses preparing for the spending boom? And what should you do to prepare if you plan on traveling to see the solar event?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/04/2428m 35s

If You Can Keep It: NBC, Social Media, And Preserving Democracy

It's been about a week since NBC fired former RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel just days after hiring her as a contributor.The network drew a ton of backlash for the decision after it aired an interview with McDaniel done by Meet the Press host Kristen Welker, in which McDaniel openly criticized the Republican party and reversed course on some claims she made in the years after the 2020 election.So why was she hired? And what does this politics-to-pundit pipeline say about the state of our democracy? We examine the role of television networks that the media plays in our elections and governance.We also take a look at the role social media plays in moderating what kind of political information makes its way to our screens.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/04/2436m 33s

The News Roundup For March 29, 2024

A container ship collided with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore this week causing it to collapse into the Patapsco River. Now, officials have suspended the search for four missing construction workers who are presumed dead. The remains of two others were recovered.The Supreme Court heard arguments this week in a case that could affect Americans' access to the abortion pill mifepristone.In global news, Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Monday that "radical Islamists" were responsible for an attack on a concert venue in Moscow last Friday that killed at least 137 people and injured over 100 more. Hamas is calling for the cessation of aid delivery by air, saying that people in Gaza and other areas to which Palestinians have fled are putting themselves in danger trying to get to packages that have fallen in hazardous places.We cover the week's biggest headlines. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station an d subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/03/241h 21m

In Good Health: The Nation's Hydration Fixation

Everything is bigger in America. The portions, the cars, and now, our water bottles.Does it seem like everyone is carrying around a 30-ounce tumbler? The reusable water bottle industry is a multi-billion dollar business. But don't forget about plastics. The sales of single-use bottled water also continue to rise.We discuss how much of the hype around water is marketing versus science for the latest installment of In Good Health. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station an d subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/03/2432m 47s

Fareed Zakaria On Global Politics, World Events, And Revolutions

When it comes to explaining global politics and world events, few faces are more familiar to viewers than Fareed Zakaria's.He hosts CNN's international affairs show, "GPS," which debuted in 2008. He's also a best-selling author and columnist for The Washington Post.And now, he's gathered his insights covering and commenting on world events into a new book called "Age of Revolutions: Progress and Backlash from 1600 to the present."He highlights revolutions past to help us understand the revolutionary moment we're living in.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/03/2433m 31s

Best Of: The Power Of Psychedelic Therapy For Members Of The Military

Many people hear the term "psychedelics" and think of hippies, acid, and the music of the 1960s. But it may soon take on a whole different meaning for the U.S. military. Last December, Congress passed legislation that included funding for clinical trials of psychedelic-assisted therapy for active-duty service members. And just last month, the Department of Veterans Affairs announced that it will also begin funding psychedelic-assisted therapy to treat veterans with PTSD and depression. This comes at a time when suicide rates amongst active-duty service members are at an all-time high.We dive into what psychedelic-assisted therapy is and the effect it could have on active-duty and veteran mental health. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/03/2432m 24s

The 1A Record Club Listens To Shakira's 'Las Mujeres Ya No Lloran'

Shakira released her first new album in seven years, "Las Mujeres Ya No Lloran." The cross-genre, cross–culture singer's 12th album is expected to cover her most recent breakup and journey of self-discovery. She says that making the album was "an alchemical process" where "[her] tears transformed into diamonds." We dive into the musical world that Shakira has built, including a career that's spanned multiple continents, languages, cultures, and audiences. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/03/2435m 12s

The News Roundup For March 22, 2024

This week in news, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has to come up with $454 million in under a week. The bond is part of a ruling handed down by a New York court that found that Trump, his son, and his organization conspired to inflate the value of their assets. Trump has indicated that he is unable to pay.In news that seems somewhat overdue, the EPA has moved to ban the most common form of asbestos, which causes cancer and kills tens of thousands of Americans a year. Meanwhile overseas, despite warnings from U.S. President Joe Biden, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is renewing his vow to launch an attack on the city of Rafah, where many Palestinians fled for shelter from violence elsewhere in Gaza.In expected news, Russian President Vladimir Putin won reelection to his position in another sham election. And the U.S. is no longer one of the world's top-20 happiest countries according to the World Happiness Report, while Nordic countries, maintained their hold on the top spots.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/03/241h 17m

Best Of: Ask An Intimacy Coordinator

When you look up the word "intimate" in the dictionary, there are a few definitions. They include things like warmth, private, sex, personal, and familiarity.Our "Ask A" series returns, this time to talk to intimacy coordinators about their work.Parts of Hollywood production teams have practiced parts of the role for years. But the job itself is still in its youth.We discuss what it takes to do this work and the impact it's had on workspaces so far. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/03/2434m 37s

The Future Of TikTok In The US

Some 170 million Americans use the social video app TikTok, according to the company.And scrolling through it – you'll see everything from discussions about economics, and foreign policy to viral dance trends. Lawmakers are concerned that TikTok poses a national security threat because of who owns it – Beijing-based Bytedance.Wisconsin Republican Mike Gallagher sponsored a bipartisan bill that overwhelmingly passed the house in a 352-65 vote. It calls for TikTok to divest from its China-based parent company in six months, or face a ban in the US.President Joe Biden has said he would sign the bill into law, but it faces an uncertain future in the Senate.We discuss the future of TikTok in the US. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/03/2430m 48s

Being an LGBTQ+ Student In The US Today

What do LGBTQ+ youth in America need right now?The death of Nex Benedict was ruled as a suicide by a medical examiner in Oklahoma. Hundreds of anti-Trans legislation has been proposed and passed by state legislatures since 2021.According to a Washington Post analysis of FBI data, hate crimes at schools nationwide are on the rise. The steepest increases are in conservative states that have implemented bills restricting queer expression. We discuss what LGBTQ+ students need to feel supported in the current hostile environment. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/03/2436m 8s

1A Remaking America: Alabama's New Congressional Map

A new congressional map drawn up in Alabama produced 19 candidates to choose from this primary season. That's something Alabama doesn't see often in its elections. Today we're bringing you a conversation we had earlier this month in Birmingham, Alabama. We were back as part of our Remaking America collaboration with six partner stations across the country, including WBHM. Remaking America looks at the state of our democracy, and trust in our government. We discuss the importance of competitive elections in a democracy, and how much power voters have. We hear part of that conversation that we taped a few days after Alabama voted in the Super Tuesday primaries.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/03/2434m 45s

If You Can Keep It: Democrats Lose Ground With Key Voting Blocs

Let's take a moment to focus on the stakes of the 2024 election: for the people, for the country and for our democracy. New data analysis shows that Democratic support among Black, Latino and Asian American voters is the lowest it's been in over 60 years. That's according to polling data collected by Financial Times journalist John Burn-Murdoch. According to a recent Gallup poll, this decline has largely happened in the past few years.We discuss what losing a portion of important voting blocs means for Democrats and their political strategy. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/03/2434m 45s

The News Roundup For March 15, 2024

After months of discussion about his advanced age, President Joe Biden leaned into the issue of his health and mental acuity in his first ad of the general election.A former Boeing whistleblower, John Barnett, was found dead this week of apparent self-inflicted wounds.His lawyers told CNN they saw no indication as to why Barnett would take his own life and were devastated at the news. Meanwhile in Haiti, Haiti's prime minister has announced his resignation amid rampant gang violence, a major jailbreak, and a state of emergency. And we get to the latest in Gaza, where aid from around the world is finally flowing in. The World Food Programme successfully delivered food for 25,000 people. We discuss all this and more during this episode of the Friday News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/03/241h 23m

How F1 Is Shifting Gears In The US

It's a day at the races for 1A! The popularity of F1 in the US skyrocketed after Liberty Media bought Formula 1 in 2017. Netflix's Drive to Survive helped boost interest in the sport (for both new and old fans) during the height of the pandemic. Netflix's series has remained popular ever since and is now in its sixth season. But among all the glitz and glamor, F1 is not without controversies, which could make it a hard sell for American audiences. We discuss where F1 fits in America's racing scene, and what it'll take for the US to full embrace the sport. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/03/2437m 24s

Best Of Game Mode: Saving Classic Video

Think back to your earliest video game memories. As technology changes and video games become increasingly released only on digital, many of the titles you grew up on may be unplayable today.87% of classic video games — those released before 2010 — are in danger of being lost to time. That's according to a study from the Video Game History Foundation. In this edition of Game Mode, our series where we cover video games and the gaming industry, we'll talk about the efforts being made to preserve classic video games.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/03/2430m 11s

How To Become A Supercommunicator

Imagine you're at a dinner party and the conversation turns to the latest news. Everyone has a different opinion. People begin raising their voices.You notice the person beside you isn't talking, they're just watching. They turn to you and make a joke and you immediately relax. You hadn't even realized how tense you were. They then ask what you think about the news. When you respond, they're attentive. When they look at you, you feel seen. They ask you another question and another. Before you know it, an hour has passed, and the arguing has died down around you.Your dinner party partner is what journalist Charles Duhigg calls a supercommunicator. In his new book, "Supercommunicators: How to Unlock the Secret Language of Connection," by the same name, he explores what makes conversations work and how we can all be better at them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/03/2443m 4s

'If You Can Keep It': All Eyes Turn To Georgia

Super Tuesday might be over, but election season is just ramping up.President Joe Biden and presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump held dueling campaign rallies in Georgia over the weekend.We continue our election series, "If You Can Keep It," and dig into some of the biggest political stories of the week. For this installment, we discuss the Georgia primary and check in with local election officials.The state's elections have a sordid history with one of the candidates almost certainly set to stand come November.We discuss what Georgia tell us about the general election and the state of our democracy more broadly. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/03/2432m 41s

ICYMI: Ramadan Begins In Gaza As Famine Stalks The Territory

Muslims around the world are fasting for Ramadan. The holy month began in Gaza with ceasefire talks at a standstill, hunger worsening across the territory, and no end in sight to the Israel-Hamas war.In the city of Rafah, war-weary Palestinians shopped at an open-air market to find whatever they could.More than 31,100 people have been killed in Gaza since the war started on Oct. 7. That latest tally is from Gaza's health ministry. More than two-thirds of Palestinians killed in ongoing air strikes from Israel are women and children.Where does the possibility of a ceasefire stand as Ramadan begins?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/03/2411m 34s

The 1A Movie Club Explores The Audience Impact Of The Oscars

It's that time of year again.Time for Hollywood's finest to sport their finest as they head to the Oscars to find out which movies will be honored with cinema's highest achievement.But how much does an Academy Award actually move the needle for the average movie goer? Does the bestowal of a statue put butts in seats in theaters? How much do you care about awards when you decide what to watch? We discuss the impact and potential benefit of awards in the age of streaming. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/03/2427m 56s

The News Roundup For March 8, 2024

President Biden delivered his State of the Union address Thursday evening. It was fiery, but was it enough to convince voters that he deserves four more years?Super Tuesday saw 16 states and one American territory report their primary results this week. As expected, President Biden and former President Donald Trump won big, setting up a rematch for the presidency come this November.Meanwhile, authorities warn that famine in Gaza is imminent after Israeli attacks on aid trucks in areas where Palestinians have sought refuge.The U.S. says it will build a port on the Gaza coast to bring more aid to starving Palestinians. In his State of the Union, President Biden's message to the Israeli government last night was direct. Every month since June of 2023 has set some kind of record for high temperatures for that time of year. The surface of the world's oceans is at its hottest ever.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/03/241h 23m

Health News Roundup: The Cyber Attack On UnitedHealth Group

A cyber attack on one of the biggest healthcare companies in the U.S. is disrupting pharmacies and hospitals throughout the country. The company attacked, Change Healthcare, is owned by UnitedHealth Group, the biggest processor of medical claims in the nation.The Department of Health and Human Services released a plan encouraging private health funding to the organizations hardest hit by the hack. We discuss the attack and other healthcare news, including; rising drug prices, the latest on reproductive rights, and discuss the end of the federal free at-home Covid test program. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/03/2432m 20s

The 2024 Super Tuesday Roundup

Another Super Tuesday is in the books and the race to the White House is underway. Millions of Americans finished primary voting yesterday across 16 states and one US territory – solidifying some of the matchups we'll be watching come November.It's looking like a rematch – with former President Donald Trump taking on the incumbent president, Joe Biden.Nikki Haley may have won Vermont's delegates, but after numerous defeats elsewhere, she's decided to bow out of the presidential race.But what about other races on the ballot?We discuss the latest – who's up, who's down – and break down the results. Later on, we e take a look at voting at the state and local levels. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/03/241h 19m

Best Of: How Trust Works

Everyday, we're being asked to trust in something. We trust that our jobs will pay us on time. We trust that our partners will come home in the evening. We trust that our apartment won't suddenly collapse on us, that our neighbors won't steal our mail, and that our kids will be safe at school. But what happens when that trust is broken? According to one 2013 study from the Journal of Couple and Family Psychology, 60 percent of couples cited a partner's unfaithfulness as the reason for their divorce. Trust isn't just an issue in relationships. A 2022 Gallup poll found that Americans' trust in major institutions like the Supreme Court and Congress is at a historic low. We discuss trust and why often it's so easy to lose in the first place.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/03/2436m 30s

ICYMI: Strapping In For Super Tuesday 2024

This week, we're broadcasting from one of the states holding their primary election today – Alabama.Votes are also being cast across the country. After some uncertainty, we now know Donald Trump is eligible to appear on the ballot in all the remaining contests.On Monday, all nine Supreme Court justices rejected a move by Colorado voters, who cited a provision of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, to bar the Republican frontrunner from appearing on the state's ballot.We work through what that means for the election this year – and any future attempt to disqualify the former president.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/03/2412m 1s

'If You Can Keep It': Covering The 2024 Election Responsibly

According to an October poll, only around 30 percent of Americans trust the media to report on news fairly.It raises the question as we head into Super Tuesday and a long election year: How can the press responsibly cover the 2024 election?Some news organizations have already committed to working differently this year. The Arizona Mirror announced last week that it's ditching "junk food" election coverage.We discuss how media can best center voters and ignore the noise ahead of complex, and in many cases misleading, news cycles. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/03/2441m 15s

Brian Klaas On Chance, Chaos, And Why Everything We Do Matters

Have you ever wondered what would change if you could rewind your life and redo one small moment? Brian Klaas, a professor of Global Politics at University College London, explores this theme in a new book called "Fluke: Chance, Chaos, and Why Everything We Do Matters." He argues that tiny, chance moments can change our individual lives, maybe even the course of history on a global scale. Klaas offers several examples of big events that could have gone down very differently had one small thing been slightly altered.The 1997 Zambian coup attempt in Southern Africa was prevented – almost literally, by a thread. The U.S. bombed Hiroshima and Nagasaki and killed hundreds of thousands of people in 1945. Kyoto, originally considered for targetting, was spared because a U.S. official had vacationed there with his wife 19 years earlier and asked President Harry Truman to spare it.Klaas joins us to discuss why social scientists, and all of us, could benefit from acknowledging the world is chaotic and uncertain, and why in an interconnected world, everything we do matters.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/03/2428m 40s

The News Roundup For March 1, 2024

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell announced he will retire from his position on Capitol Hill in November. The GOP leader leaves behind a legacy of partisan gamesmanship, fundraising advocacy, and thwarted oversight.Michigan sends a message. Could its primary shape US foreign policy between now and November?Meanwhile, in Russia, thousands showed up to pay their respects to Alexei Navalny – despite the risk of arrest. Gaza's Health Ministry says the number of people killed in the blockaded territory since October 7th has now surpassed 30,000. We cover all the biggest news from around the world. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/03/241h 23m

How Nostalgia Can Carry Us Through Tough Times

"Ah, those were the good old days."Who hasn't thought something like this before? These feelings of warmth and longing can be about a time in our personal lives or about an era in history. The feeling is called nostalgia.Nostalgia is something we all experience, and according to psychologists, the past can help us make sense of the present and can even offer us tools for a more resilient future.We discuss nostalgia; it's complications and how we can learn to use it for good. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/02/2432m 20s

'If You Can Keep It': The Michigan Primary Roundup

There was a chance that this week's Michigan primaries would be a pair of sleeper contests. A sitting president and a former president are running in both races. They've each already racked up wins in other states by large or overwhelming margins. But Michigan has proven a bit more lively than expected. The media spotlight has been fixed on the perpetual swing state due to the still active, if lopsided, Republican primary. And on the Democratic side, President Joe Biden swept another contest. But the details are what matter. There were concerns that a protest vote against the president would follow more than a month of real-life protests over his handling of Israel's war against Hamas.We discuss what happened during Michigan primaries and the impact voters who want to make sure Biden heard their discontent. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/02/2435m 51s

Repairing America's Foreign Policy

How has foreign policy changed since the presidency of Donald Trump?For decades, the U.S. aimed to create a more interconnected and globalized international landscape that would lift all boats, creating a more democratic world and a safer United States. But all of that changed in 2016. Donald Trump's presidency shook the very foundations of what the U.S. traditionally tried to achieve abroad. His administration pushed a populist agenda, strained alliances, and praised dictators.How is the Biden administration taking on the challenge of repairing international relations?We discuss that and the role that foreign policy will play in the upcoming presidential elections with Alexander Ward, a national security reporter for POLITICO and author of the new book "The Internationalists: The Fight to Restore American Foreign Policy After Trump."Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/02/2440m 43s

Local News Is Dying: What's Killing It?

Local newsrooms are struggling to stay alive. Major outlets, including public radio stations, continue to lay-off journalists.While some of those layoffs can be chalked up to the economic impact of the pandemic or private equity firms that buy and shut down newspapers – a lot of it is the online migration of advertising.But what it means for you is fewer reliable sources to tell you what's going on and why. Americans in "news deserts" tend to rely on social media to get the latest on their communities and beyond. But relying on social media for information can be less than awesome.We discuss what can be done to keep Americans looking for news about where they live informed — especially in an election year.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/02/2440m 6s

The News Roundup For February 23, 2024

This week the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that embryos were children, establishing a legal precedent that will affect reproductive rights in the state.The court argued that the Wrongful Death of a Minor Act "applies to all children, born and unborn, without limitation." The Biden administration is weighing action to make it more difficult for migrants at the southern border to pass initial screenings for asylum and to make it easier for those who don't pass the screening to be deported.In election news, the Biden election campaign continued to amass cash. The president raised $42 million during the month of January. Julie Chavez Rodriguez, Biden's campaign manager, said the amount was "an indisputable show of strength to start the election year."We cover all this and more during the news roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/02/2443m 17s

Ukraine Aid Is At A Standstill. What Does That Mean For The War?

It's been nearly two years since Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine began. With Putin's forces making strategic gains in the eastern part of the country, there's increasing international pressure for the U.S. to step up its military aid. America has provided more than $47 billion in support to Ukraine since the war began. But a new package of aid is stalled in Congress. Last week, the Senate passed a foreign aid package that included $61 billion for Ukraine. That was blocked by the Republican-controlled House which insisted it include a border security package. So what does that mean for the war going forward? And how do European allies view the need for American aid?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/02/2426m 50s

Personhood In Alabama And A Veto At The U.N.

Three Alabama couples stored frozen embryos at a fertility clinic in the state. A patient wandering around the clinic dropped the embryos, making them unusable. On Friday, the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that the couples could sue for wrongful death in an unprecedented decision that means frozen embryos are now considered "children" in the state. The court argued that the Wrongful Death of a Minor Act "applies to all children, born and unborn, without limitation." What does this decision mean for reproductive rights beyond abortion? Also: this week, emotions are running high at the United Nations Security Council. "The veto of this draft resolution is not only regrettable... it is absolutely reckless and dangerous against shielding Israel even as it commits the most shocking crimes," said Riyad Mansour, Palestinian ambassador to the United Nations.Those comments came after the United States vetoed an Arab-backed and widely supported U.N. resolution. It demanded an immediate humanitarian cease-fire in the Israel-Hamas war. Where does this leave negotiations now?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/02/2422m 53s

The Art Of Doing Nothing

Twiddling your thumbs is often associated with wasting time. But feel shame about thumb-twiddling no longer. In a world of calendars and to-do lists, something has got to give. We so often fear doing nothing, missing out, or getting behind. Our smartphones make it increasingly hard to disconnect from the attention economy. But studies show there are benefits to dilly-dallying when it comes to your work and your health. We'll discuss what it takes to reap the benefits of doing absolutely zilch on any given day. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/02/2433m 11s

A Brief History Of Eyeliner

William Shakespeare once said that the eyes are the window to the soul. We make eye contact with others to show that we're listening, to connect, or simply as a way of saying, "I see you."Cultures around the world have understood the power of eyes for centuries. If you travel to India, Chad, Japan, Iran, or just around the corner from your house, you'll probably see the same thing around the eyes of the people who live there: eyeliner. In her new book, "Eyeliner: A Cultural History," Lebanese-British journalist Zahra Hankir explores beauty, power, identity, and resistance through the lens of the iconic cosmetic. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/02/2430m 36s

The News Roundup For February 16, 2024

It's been another busy week. Closed-door hearings in the case of the classified documents former President Donald Trump kept at his Mar-a-Lago estate began this week. U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon first met with Trump's team and the special counsel's prosecutors on Monday.Meanwhile, America's political turmoil surrounding the 2024 presidential election is hot conversation at the Munich Security Conference. Former President Trump's remarks last week suggesting he wouldn't come to the aid of Europe in the event of a Russian invasion are causing concern among U.S, allies.Israel attacked Rafah Sunday evening, killing many Palestinians who had fled to the city to seeking shelter.And in South America, Guyana has accused Venezuela of violating international law in a dispute over a swath of oil-rich territory.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/02/241h 26m

The High-Carbon Lifestyles Of The Rich And Famous

The 2024 Super Bowl was the most watched television event in history with over 123 million viewers. Many eyes watching were trained on Taylor Swift as she made the journey from Tokyo to Las Vegas in a highly scrutinized flight on a private jet.A total of 882 private planes flew into Las Vegas during and just before Super Bowl Sunday. One report found the world's richest 10 percent make up for 50 percent of the global emissions through investments, personal consumptions, and other means.Last week, Swift threatened legal action against a Florida student who's been tracking the jet travel of the rich and famous.We talk about personal responsibility, climate change, the rules for the rich, and more.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/02/2436m 26s

Love Languages And Other Relationship Myths, Debunked

What's your love language? Acts of service, words of affirmation, physical touch, gifts, or quality time?The concept has been around since the early 1990s. Gary Chapman, a Baptist pastor, published a book in 1992 called, "The Five Love Languages: Secrets to Love That Lasts." But new research is debunking the popular love languages theory. And there's little evidence linking it to happier partnerships. For Valentine's Day, we speak with a researcher and relationship experts about what really makes for healthy relationships.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/02/2432m 47s

Jeffrey Rosen On 'The Pursuit Of Happiness'

The Declaration of Independence promises the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.At a time when the language and intent of the Constitution are under intense scrutiny, one legal scholar is particular is out to explore what the founders may have meant when they defined that last part as an inalienable right.Nowadays, most of us think of happiness as something that results from the pursuit of pleasure. But writer and historian Jeffrey Rosen says the Founding Fathers had other ideas.We talk to Rosen, the president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, about his latest book, "The Pursuit of Happiness," and what the founders had in mind for our country.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/02/2431m 59s

The Senate Border Bill And What's At Stake For Ukraine

Last week, Senate Republicans blocked a bipartisan border bill that would send billions in wartime aid to Ukraine, Israel, and other nations. The bill links the GOP requests for stricter immigration policy changes to Democrat requests for foreign aid. It unraveled last week in a surprise turn, but Senate Democrats still hope to push a plan forward.We get into what's at stake for Ukraine without U.S. support and discuss how the southern border has become a leveraging tool for a divided Congress.Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/02/2438m 25s

Local Spotlight: 'Murder In Boston'

In October 1989, a white man named Charles Stuart called 911 in distress, saying a Black man had shot him and his wife, Carol, in their car. Carol died from the wound and police cracked down hard on the predominantly-Black Boston neighborhood of Mission Hill, looking for the killer.It turned out, Charles had committed the crime. He was seen jumping from a bridge not long after he became the police's main suspect.The Boston Globe recently revisited the story in a series of articles and a podcast produced in association with HBO, "Murder in Boston: The untold story of the Charles and Carol Stuart shooting." An HBO docuseries about the story is also currently streaming on Max.Their investigation revealed new findings about the case that stirred a media and police frenzy, as well as the subsequent backlash.For this installment of Local Spotlight, we speak with the host of the podcast, who is also a longtime reporter on The Boston Globe's staff.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/02/241h 15m

The News Roundup For February 9, 2024

The Supreme Court began hearing oral arguments this week concerning whether former President Donald Trump will be included on the Colorado primary ballot due to his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.Meanwhile, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's rejection of Hamas' proposed terms for a ceasefire means Egyptian, U.S., and Qatari negotiators are gearing up for another round of negotiations.Ukraine is shaking up its military hierarchy despite having reportedly killed 890 Russian soldiers in in 24 hours this week. A U.S. deal to send aid to Ukraine fell through.Former Chilean President Sebastián Piñera died in a helicopter crash this week, sending the country he led for two terms into mourning.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/02/241h 16m

Zach Woods On Making NPR Into An Animated Comedy

A new show is poking fun at, well, us. Peacock's latest, "In the Know" is set in a public radio station. This includes nervous producers on the mic for pledge drives, and NPR's third most popular host, Lauren Caspian.The host is played by Zach Woods, who is best known for his roles in "Silicon Valley" and "The Office." He's now making his directorial debut with "In the Know." It's a stop animation show that includes live-action, unscripted interviews with celebrities like Roxanne Gay, Jonathan Van Ness, and Mike Tyson. We sit down with creator and star Zach Woods to talk all about it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1aLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/02/2430m 33s

The Power Of Psychedelic Therapy For Members Of The Military

Many people hear the term "psychedelics" and think of hippies, acid, and the music of the 1960s. But it may soon take on a whole different meaning for the U.S. military. Last December, Congress passed legislation that included funding for clinical trials of psychedelic-assisted therapy for active-duty service members. And just last month, the Department of Veterans Affairs announced that it will also begin funding psychedelic-assisted therapy to treat veterans with PTSD and depression. This comes at a time when suicide rates amongst active-duty service members are at an all-time high.We dive into what psychedelic-assisted therapy is and the effect it could have on active-duty and veteran mental health. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/02/2432m 24s

In Good Health: Medical Missteps For Women With Heart Disease

It's American Heart Month.When it comes to heart disease and heart attacks, women commonly face misdiagnoses and delays in receiving care.These medical missteps mean women are twice as likely as men to die after having a heart attack. That's according to the European Society of Cardiology.That's also one of many reasons the CDC says heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. New technological advancements are also helping women have more agency over their heart health. We discuss how women can better understand the risk factors of heart disease. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/02/2428m 16s

The South Carolina Primary, Foreign Policy, And The 2024 Election

The U.S. and Britain launched a series of air and missile strikes against Iranian targets over the weekend. The strikes were in retaliation for a drone strike that killed three American service members and wounded 40 others at a base in Jordan last Sunday.The offensive comes at a time when foreign policy is beginning to become more relevant in the 2024 election. The Democratic primary in South Carolina took place this weekend, with President Joe Biden walking away with the win as expected.We discuss foreign policy and its impacts on the election. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/02/2436m 18s

The News Roundup For February 2, 2024

This week, the House passed a bipartisan tax bill that expands the child tax credit and expands tax cuts for businesses. The bill, however, is expected to have to satisfy several demands from Senate Republicans before it makes it to President Joe Biden's desk.Secretary of State Antony Blinken issued a dire warning this week, claiming the Middle East is at its most volatile state since the Yom Kippur war between Israel and its neighbors in 1973. He's currently on a trip around the eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East, meeting with leaders to discuss tensions and relationships in the regions.The director of the CIA also commented on the state of global conflicts. William Burns said Tuesday that cutting off U.S. aid to Ukraine would be a mistake of "historic proportions."The FBI also got in on the action, with Director Christopher Wray revealing that Chinese hackers are getting ready to "wreak havoc and cause real-world harm" to U.S. citizens and institutions.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/02/241h 26m

The Zero-Proof Movement Goes Beyond Dry January

The popularity of Dry January is part of a larger zero-proof movement here in the U.S. Non-alcoholic sales totaled half a billion dollars in sales as of July 2023. One poll found that 21 percent of adults said they would be cutting back on drinking to begin 2024. Restaurants and bars are offering more mocktails on their menus. Even brands like Guinness and White Claw are adding non-alcoholic options to their lineups.During the first year of the pandemic, alcohol sales saw the largest increase in over 50 years. Is the zero-proof movement a backlash to the boozy pandemic? We take a closer look at non-alcoholic brews and concoctions.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/02/2435m 31s

Florida's Unregulated Kratom Market

In the United States, Kratom is sold in its concentrated form, oftentimes in potent capsules or liquid shots. Kratom is a tropical plant with leaves that contain a chemical compound with similar effects to opioids. The Kratom industry is worth roughly $1.5 billion, but unregulated.For this installment of our "Local Spotlight" series, we take a closer look at The Tampa Bay Times investigation into kratom in Florida. Reporters found that more than 580 died from a kratom-involved overdose in Florida the last decade. Most of those deaths involved other substances too, but 46 were due to kratom alone. We discuss what we know about Kratom, its possibilities, dangers and why it's unregulated. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/01/2435m 40s

Mass Shootings And Accountability

Are parents criminally responsible if their child commits a mass shooting? That's the question being debated in Oxford, Michigan, where a trial on parental responsibility after a tragic shooting is underway. On Nov. 30, 2021, a 15-year-old student opened fire at Oxford High School in Michigan, killing four students and injuring seven others. The gunman received a life sentence last year. Now, his parents, Jennifer and James Crumbley, are facing involuntary manslaughter charges.We discuss what accountability looks like when shootings involving minors occur. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/01/2432m 29s

What Trump's Legal Battles Mean For The GOP Race

As the curtain falls on the New Hampshire primary, Democrats and Republicans are looking ahead to South Carolina and Super Tuesday. And even though Nevada is next on the calendar, the nomination process there is looking unconventional for Republicans. GOP frontrunner and former President Donald Trump is still facing 91 criminal charges across four different court cases. How are these cases affecting Trump's campaign and the overall GOP strategy? We discuss what we should keep an eye out for during these primary races. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/01/2443m 9s

The News Roundup For January 26, 2024

The path to victory for GOP hopefuls not named Donald Trump is growing slimmer. The 45th president walked away winner of both the Iowa Caucus and the New Hampshire GOP primary. The United Auto Workers union endorsed the campaign of President Joe Biden this week and the president and Vice President Kamala Harris held their first rally in Virginia.Meanwhile, this week talks between Israel and Hamas, mediated by the US, Qatar and Egypt remain underway for deal calling for a two-month pause in fighting.Turkey's parliament voted this week to approve Sweden's bid to join NATO. Now, Hungary's government is the last hurdle the Sweden must clear to gain full membership to the bloc.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/01/241h 26m

Preparing For The Age Of AI Scams

If a loved one called you in a panic asking for help—maybe they just got arrested or kidnapped and needed money immediately. What would you do? Here's the thing, the voice on the other end of the line might not be them. It could be AI.Artificial Intelligence is now making it possible to clone someone's voice – and use it to trick family or friends. Scammers are taking advantage of the technology to con panicked loved ones out of hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars. AI is also being used to devise more realistic romance scams and AI generated videos, also known as deepfakes. Washington has been watching. A bipartisan group of House lawmakers introduced the No AI Fraud Act this month. The bill would protect Americans' likenesses and voices against AI-generated fakes. We learn more about these scams and what people can do to protect themselves from falling victim.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/01/2433m 18s

Game Mode: Saving Classic Video Games

Think back to your earliest video game memories. As technology changes and video games become increasingly released only on digital, many of the titles you grew up on may be unplayable today.87% of classic video games — those released before 2010 — are in danger of being lost to time. That's according to a study from the Video Game History Foundation. In this edition of Game Mode, our series where we cover video games and the gaming industry, we'll talk about the efforts being made to preserve classic video games.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/01/2430m 11s

Ask An Intimacy Coordinator

When you look up the word "intimate" in the dictionary, there are a few definitions. They include things like warmth, private, sex, personal, and familiarity.Our "Ask A" series returns, this time to talk to intimacy coordinators about their work.Parts of Hollywood production teams have practiced parts of the role for years. But the job itself is still in its youth.We discuss what it takes to do this work and the impact it's had on workspaces so far. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/01/2434m 37s

Republican Hopefuls Eye New Hampshire

The Iowa caucuses are in the rearview mirror. Now, the GOP candidates have their sights set on the Granite State.Former President Donald Trump, who has had a busy month in court facing 91 criminal felony charges, traded jabs with his opponents on the campaign trail in New Hampshire ahead of Tuesday's primary. Meanwhile, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis dropped out of the race ahead of the South Carolina primary– where opponent Nikki Haley served six years as governor. Meanwhile, Democrats in New Hampshire will also cast their ballots Tuesday, but President Biden will not be on it. Democrats in New Hampshire who want to cast their vote for Biden will have to write his name in.We discuss what's at stake in New Hampshire for both parties.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/01/2431m 50s

The News Roundup for January 19, 2024

The Biden Administration asks the Supreme Court to intervene in Texas where National Guardsmen are preventing federal agents from accessing a swathe of land that's a popular crossing spot for migrants.A stopgap spending bill to keep the government funded passed. Meanwhile, Pakistan carried out deadly strikes against targets inside Iran, retaliating for attacks by Iran earlier this week that followed similar attacks in Iraq and Syria. Israeli officials disagree over the way forward in Gaza. And Lai Ching-te, Taiwan's vice president, and the candidate put forward by the ruling Democratic Progressive Party, won the presidential election in Taiwan.We discuss all this and more during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/01/241h 23m

Chronic Absenteeism Is Changing K-12 Education

In the years since COVID-19 forced schools to move instruction online, we've seen a renewed effort to get kids back into the classroom.Chronic absenteeism has doubled since before the pandemic. Now, more than 14 million kids are chronically absent, according to education advocacy nonprofit Attendance Works.And this is happening as schools grapple with the lowest reading and math test scores in decades. We discuss the trend and what it tells us about what's at stake if we don't get kids back to class.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/01/2435m 11s

What's New With COVID-19?

If it seems like everyone is sick – it might be the trifecta of viruses circulating the country.Health officials say RSV, flu, and a new strain of COVID are leading to an uptick in respiratory illnesses in most states. And the Centers for Disease Control say JN.1, the latest COVID variant, is spreading quickly.Meanwhile, research on long COVID is telling us more about how the virus can linger in the body as a chronic disease.We discuss the new variant and what we're learning about long COVID.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/01/2435m 30s

The Iowa Caucuses Recap

The stakes are high in Iowa, as voters head to the polls in record-breaking cold and snow.It's the first contest in the Republican presidential primary. Donald Trump maintains a lead among GOP voters. And according to a new poll, Republican county chairs in Iowa feel the same.We discuss what the results of the Iowa caucus tell us about the right's playing field this election season. We also take a look at what we've learned from the 2020 Democratic caucus.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/01/2434m 1s

In Good Health: How Caffeine Affects Our Body

Caffeine is the most used psychoactive stimulant across the world. According to the National Coffee Association, 60 percent of Americans drink coffee every day. That's more than any other beverage, including tap water. And 85 percent of people in the U.S. have one caffeinated beverage per day, according to the National Institutes of Health.Coffee and tea aren't the only way to get a caffeine fix anymore. Synthetic caffeine sources are increasingly available through energy drinks and other supplements.For this installment of our In Good Health series, we discuss the good, the bad, and the risky when it comes to our caffeine consumption. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/01/2430m 44s

The News Roundup For January 12, 2024

Former President Donald Trump warned of unrest and "bedlam" this week following a hearing in an appeals court over his attempts to overturn the results of the 2020 election. The former real estate mogul warned that if he were to be found guilty and lose the 2024 election, the potential for violence would skyrocket. Following an incident on an Alaska Airlines flight, the federal government has grounded all Boeing 737-9 MAX jetliners. A door was ripped off the airplane, which the pilots returned safely to the ground. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken is back in the Middle East. He said this week that the cost of the conflict between Israel and Hamas being paid by the civilians, especially the children, of Gaza is far too high and that Palestinians displaced from their homes must be allowed to return. Ecuadorian President Daniel Noboa said this week that the country is "at war" with drug gangs in Guayaquil, the country's largest city, who are holding prison staff hostage and briefly captured a television station. We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/01/241h 27m

Listener Picks: How To Make The Most Of Your Neighborhood

Last May, United States Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy released an advisory addressing the epidemic of "loneliness and isolation."The Surgeon General's advisory underscores the negative impacts that loneliness and isolation have on our mental, emotional, and physical well-being.One way to offset the negative impacts of loneliness and isolation can be simply saying hello to your neighbors, according to a 2023 Gallup poll. It's a simple practice — taking as little as seconds to minutes of conversation to get a quick chat in. For this installment of our "Listner Picks" series, we discuss how we can we be a good neighbor in a time of isolation.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/01/2435m 24s

Listener Picks: America's Love Of Professional Wrestling

Last year, Endeavor, the parent company of the UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) purchased World Wrestling Entertainment, the largest professional wrestling company in the world, for $9.3 billion. The sale is one indication of many of the continued prominence and popularity of professional wrestling. The movie "The Iron Claw," starring an all-star cast of Zac Efron, Lily James, and Jeremy Allen White, opened in theaters in December. It tells the story of the Von Erich brothers, pro-wrestling stars from the 1980s. For this installment of our "Listener Pick" series, we discuss the popularity of professional wrestling in America. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/01/2433m 7s

Listener Picks: What Dangers Do Social Media Bots Pose To Democracy?

2024 is the biggest global election year in history. More than 60 countries, representing half the world's population, will head to the polls.And the people vying to be elected will use all manner of tactics to get a leg up on their competitors – including social media bots.Across social media sites, it's estimated that there are billions of bots – which are partially or fully automated social profiles intended to be passed off as humans. These automated accounts are often used to drum up perceived support for political candidates, giving us a false sense of how popular they really are.Social media companies, like Twitter, TikTok, and Meta have come under fire in recent years for not doing enough to stem the spread of disinformation and propaganda on their platforms from such bad actors.Our panel of experts explains how bots warp reality and what we know about the dangerous forces behind them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/01/2434m 11s

What The Trump Lawsuits Mean For The 2024 Election

The Supreme Court said it will hear a case to determine whether former President Donald Trump will appear on Colorado's primary ballot due to his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.The original decision is based on language from the Fourteenth Amendment. Maine's secretary of state issued a similar decision. Trump appealed both rulings last week. The court's decision to hear the appeal has major implications for the 2024 election and beyond. The former president also faces a slew of other legal challenges, including four criminal cases and multiple civil suits.We discuss what this means for the country's democracy. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/01/2434m 57s

The News Roundup For January 5, 2024

Former President Donald Trump asked the Supreme Court this week to overturn the Colorado Supreme Court's decision to keep him off the ballot for the 2024 election. He's also appealed a decision by Maine's top election official to do the same.Meanwhile, South Africa has accused Israel of perpetrating a genocide in Gaza in the United Nation's highest court. The case will likely drag on for years as Israeli Defense Forces continue their military campaign against Hamas. Several explosions close to the tomb of slain Iranian commander Qassem Soleimani killed hundreds of people during a ceremony marking the anniversary of his death. Islamic State has claimed responsibility. As tensions in the Middle East rise, analysts fear a widening regional conflict. And ahead of elections in his country this year, Russian President Vladimir Putin has promised to intensify attacks against his military targets in Ukraine. We discuss all this and more during the first News Roundup of 2024.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/01/241h 24m

The Third Anniversary Of January 6

It's been three years since a group of insurrectionists, emboldened by former President Donald Trump, attacked the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to overturn the results of the 2020 election.More than 1,069 people were arrested for their involvement in the attack and over 500 have been sentenced. But has justice really been served?Trump is running for reelection this year. And despite being the first president in the history of the United States to face criminal charges, he has remained the top Republican candidate for the 2024 election.As we approach the anniversary of one the most politically scandalous days in U.S. history, we reflect on the lessons learned. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/01/2433m 35s

2024 is the year of the ballot box

2024 will be a historic year for elections all around the world.According to The Economist, 76 countries will be heading to the polls, that's more than half of the world's population. That of course includes the United States, as well as places like Brazil, Mexico, and the members of the E.U. But not every election will be free and fair. Russia's authoritarian reign will likely not come to an end, but the stakes are high in Taiwan where the presidential election could set the tone for relations with China. 2024 will be a test of the state of democracy in the world today. We highlight some of the most consequential contests.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/01/2435m 31s

Best Of: Ask A Playwright

While Shakespeare is long gone, but theater – and thus playwriting – is very much alive.Theater, in contrast to television or film, offers a unique chance for audiences to come together and experience a one-of-a-kind production. Playwrights, in collaboration with actors, directors, and stage crew work, are chiefly responsible for bringing that magic to life.For this installment of our "Ask A" series – where we talk to interesting people about what they do and why it matters – we speak to a group of playwrights about the power of storytelling on stage. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/01/2433m 23s

The 1A Movie Club's Favorite Movies Of 2023

Before we leave 2023 behind, we're looking back on the movies it gave us.We got blockbuster moments like Barbenheimer, a showdown between two very different but highly anticipated movies releasing in theaters on the same day.There were also moments of original content that might make you laugh like "Bottoms," and ones that might make you cry like "The Holdovers" or "Past Lives."And the other historical moment: new contracts for the Writers Guild and Screen Actors Guild after historic months of striking. That pushed some other highly anticipated movies like "Dune: Part 2" and "Challengers" to 2024. Before we look forward to them — we look back on 2023 with the 1A Movie Club.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/01/2434m 23s

1A Record Club: The Best Songs Of 2023

We're wrapping up the year in music.It was a big year for boygenius, an indie supergroup made up of Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers, and Lucy Dacus. Their album "The Record" was nominated for album of the year. And they received five Grammy nods altogether.Another first this year – the song "Ella Baila Sola" by Eslabon Armado and Peso Pluma became the first regional Mexican song to ever reach the top 10 of the U.S. Billboard charts after going viral on TikTok. And what's old is new again. Tracy Chapman's 1988 hit "Fast Car" had a resurgence after a cover by country singer Luke Combs went platinum in July.We'll discuss some of the biggest music stories, songs, and maybe some hits you missed, from the last year.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/12/231h 22m

Best Of: Confronting The Nation's Crisis Of Care

By 2030, the Census Bureau estimates that the nation's population will consist of more adults over 65 than children.As the youngest of the baby boomers enter their sixties, and younger adults are having children later in life, many Americans – from Gen Z to Gen X – are finding themselves sandwiched between taking care of elderly parents and young kids at the same time.Today's 65-year-olds have a 70 percent likelihood of needing long-term care in the future, all while the supply of home health aides is dwindling. Nursing homes are also increasingly costly and inaccessible for families of low and moderate incomes.We discuss what it's like to balance caring for young kids and aging adults simultaneously and managing your money or time as a family caregiver.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/12/2331m 58s

How Trust Works

Everyday, we're being asked to trust in something. We trust that our jobs will pay us on time. We trust that our partners will come home in the evening. We trust that our apartment won't suddenly collapse on us, that our neighbors won't steal our mail, and that our kids will be safe at school. But what happens when that trust is broken? According to one 2013 study from the Journal of Couple and Family Psychology, 60 percent of couples cited a partner's unfaithfulness as the reason for their divorce. Trust isn't just an issue in relationships. A 2022 Gallup poll found that Americans' trust in major institutions like the Supreme Court and Congress is at a historic low. How can trust be repaired once it's broken? And why is often so easy to lose in the first place? Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/12/2336m 30s

Best Of: Linking Math And Games Across The World

Marcus du Sautoy is a mathematician who loves games, travel, and, unsurprisingly, math. His new book is titled "Around the World in 80 Games: A Mathematician Unlocks the Secrets of the Greatest Games." In it, du Sautoy tours the world's games, exploring how they are built around (and can be won using) mathematics.We discuss how math and games are interwoven worldwide, and learn the history of some of our favorite games. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/12/2334m 13s

The Search For The Perfect Christmas Classic

Christmas comes but once a year. But Christmas music? Well, that seems to come earlier and earlier each year. Brenda Lee made headlines this month when her 1958 tune, "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree," made the Billboard's Hot 100 chart for the first time. That's 65 years after the original was recorded, proving some classics never go out of style. But the world of Christmas songs isn't always good times and cheer. For decades, Christmas music in America reflected the country's mood – happy and not so happy. Some can be right down sobering like Nat King Cole's version of "The Little Boy That Santa Claus Forgot," while others stay forgotten under the tree. We dive into the world of Christmas music, and discuss what makes a great Christmas song. We also revisit the documentary "Jingle Bell Rocks!" as it celebrates its 10th anniversary. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/12/2343m 22s

Game Mode: The Best Video Games Of 2023

2023 was a big year in games."The Legend of Zelda: Tears of the Kingdom" brought a new installment to a beloved series, six years after the last game. It broke sales records and became the best-selling Zelda game to date. And it wasn't the only blockbuster game this year. Marvel's "Spider-man 2," "Final Fantasy 16," "Diablo 4," and "Super Mario Wonder" were released this year as well. But at the 2023 Game Awards, the big winner was "Baldur's Gate 3" — scoring five awards, including game of the year. We recap the year in video games and check in with Adam Smith, lead writer on "Baldur's Gate 3." Later we revisit our Legend of Zelda conversation from earlier this year. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/12/231h 24m

The News Roundup For December 22, 2023

The Colorado Supreme Court disqualified former President Donald Trump from their primary ballot for the 2024 election this week. Congress is in gridlock again over funding for the war in Ukraine. House Republicans held a bill passed by the Senate that would send money to Ukrainian Volodymyr Zelenskyy's troops hostage over immigration restrictions.Meanwhile, a Hamas political chief was in Egypt this week for discussions with Israeli officials who proposed a pause of violence in exchange for around 40 hostages. Talks were reportedly less than fruitful.Pope Francis cleared the way this week for Catholic priests to give blessings to same-sex couples, angering conservative officials in the Vatican.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/12/231h 24m

Best Of: Why Does Flying Have To Suck?

Complaints against U.S. airlines hit a record high in 2022. And it's not getting any better. Consumer complaints nearly doubled in the first three months of this year, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.With only four major airlines in the U.S., there's little choice for consumers in the market. And with air travel expected to reach a record high this holiday season, many will be subjected to the worst of travel: long lines, high prices, and of course, awful airplane food.But why does our time in flight have to be riddled with anguish? And what can be done to make the skies friendly again?For that, we're turning to Ganesh Sitaraman, a professor at Vanderbilt University Law School and director of the Vanderbilt Policy Accelerator. He's also out with the new book, "Why Flying is Miserable: And How to Fix It."Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/12/2328m 9s

The Joys Of Chinese Cuisine

Years ago, if you opened your kitchen drawer, you'd probably find a stack of takeout menus. There's a good chance one of those menus would've been for a Chinese restaurant. Despite the decline of these doorstep stuffers, Chinese food remains a popular dinnertime choice in the U.S. and around the world. According to a 2023 Pew Research study, Chinese restaurants were found in every U.S. state and in 70 percent of all U.S. counties. We discuss how Chinese food become so popular outside of China, and why the cuisine is so beloved and misunderstood.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/12/2330m 25s

How To Deal With The Holiday Spending Rush

It's the holiday season which means bright lights and parties. It can also mean an unusually high credit card bill.From gift giving, to travel, to that item you just had to buy for yourself, end-of-year spending is up. Black Friday shoppers spent a record $9.8 billion dollars online this year. Shoppers spent a record $12.4 billion on Cyber Monday. But not everyone is putting cash upfront. Buy Now/Pay Later usage hit an all-time high in November, with an increase of over 42 percent from last year, according to Adobe Analytics. And half of Americans expect to take on debt to pay for the holidays, according to the personal finance company Achieve. We discuss the best way to deal with the rush of holiday expenditures. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/12/2340m 41s

Heading Back To The American Mall

Retail experts have long said that U.S. malls are dying out. But a recent market analysis paints a different picture.According to a report from Coresight Research published in June, foot-traffic in top-tier malls was up 12 percent in 2022 compared to before the pandemic. Last year, these same malls had more than 95 percent occupancy rates. Younger shoppers are in part driving this resurgence. Approximately 73 percent of Gen-Z shoppers said they visited a mall in the past month. We discuss why malls are making a comeback and how they're keeping up with online shopping. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/12/2334m 23s

Comedian Dara Ó Briain On The Irish Experience

For Irish comedian Dara Ó Briain life right now is just grand.He's been involved in the comedy world since the late 90's.His long list of TV shows and stand-up tours includes the BBC's "Mock the Week," which was on air for 17 years. But Ó Briain has been known to talk about a range of topics from science and history to the Irish experience.His "So...Where Were We" tour, comes to the U.S. early next year. In this latest show, he talks about searching for his birth mother and more.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/12/2332m 25s

The News Roundup For December 15, 2023

Special counsel Jack Smith went to the Supreme Court on Monday asking the justices to quickly rule on whether or not former President Donald Trump can be prosecuted for his alleged efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election. The Biden administration has signaled it may be willing to cave to House GOP demands on immigration restrictions. In return, the White House is hoping to secure funding for Ukraine's fight against the Russian invasion. Meanwhile in Dubai, this year's UN climate conference COP28 came to a close with the participating nations agreeing on a historic first calling for a global transition away from fossil fuels. The United States has once again vetoed a resolution calling for a ceasefire in Gaza at the UN Security Council.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/12/231h 26m

More People Are Putting Their Hopes Of Parenthood On Ice

Egg freezing, or oocyte preservation, was once considered an experimental procedure. But since the American Society for Reproductive Medicine dropped that designation in 2012, more people than ever are putting their hopes of parenthood on ice. There was a 400 percent increase in the number of people freezing their eggs between 2012 and 2020 according to the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technology.Employers like Starbucks and Walmart are offering fertility benefits to attract and retain workers. And fertility industry startups are also capitalizing on demand for services that either help delay parenthood or make parenthood a possibility. We discuss the physical, emotional, and financial realities of egg freezing and its accessibility. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/12/2333m 27s

Mercury Stardust Helps Renters Feel At Home

More than a third of Americans rent instead of own their home, according to the 2022 Census. That number is likely to increase. More than half of Gen Z say renting is a better option than buying a house, and a report from the Wall Street Journal found that more high-income earners are choosing to rent over making the big purchase. As more Americans rent, they face some unique challenges: absent landlords, bait-and-switch apartments, and figuring out whether hanging that heavy mirror on the wall is worth the headache later.Mercury Stardust is a professional home maintenance technician and is known widely as the Trans Handy Ma'am on social media. On TikTok, she helps her 2.5 million followers through all the DIY tasks of rental repairs and to make apartments feel more like homes.If you're not on TikTok, you're in luck. Mercury is out with the new book, "Safe and Sound: A Renter-Friendly Guide to Home Repair." Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/12/2334m 25s

The Evolving Nature Of Cyber Warfare

Hacking and cyber attacks aren't just about flashing pop-ups and phishing emails anymore.Groups of online criminals have become bolder and more sophisticated these last few years. Attacks happen on a much larger scale these days, targeting small towns, hospitals, and even K-12 schools. The hacking groups use complicated malware to get in and lock up those systems.Ransomware groups like Lockbit have made several attacks and threats this year. And cyber has proven an increasingly crucial aspect of the war in Ukraine.We discuss the latest on the cyber attacks of 2023 and what we might expect in 2024.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/12/2328m 21s

America's Love Of Drive-thrus

Drive-thrus are a quintessentially American phenomenon. The first was in the U.S. and they spread quickly nationwide in the mid-20th century due to the rise of car culture and the highway system.Now, estimates suggest there are around 200,000 drive-thrus across the country. They grew in popularity during the pandemic. Drive-thrus have a history of innovation. Fast food companies are experimenting with new technology at their fast food windows, like AI chatbots or elevator food delivery systems that cut out human-to-human interaction.Drive-thrus also offer more than just fast food. Drive-thru funeral homes, banks, and convenience stores save people the step of getting out of their cars.We discuss the history and future of America's drive-thrus.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/12/2332m 54s

The News Roundup For December 8, 2023

House Speaker Mike Johnson is playing hardball with the Senate. He told Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer this week that he can't pass any funding for Ukraine's fight against the Russian invasions through the House unless it was paired with immigration reforms.Meanwhile, leaked audio of Israeli hostages previously held by Hamas details their anger with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Audio of a meeting between them and the prime minister reveals their disapproval of the government's conduct while handling their situation.A former U.S. diplomat was charged this week with espionage. Ex-ambassador Victor Manuel Rocha is accused of spying for Cuba.And Former U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson was heckled as he attempted to apologize for the deaths of British citizens during the pandemic. We cover the biggest headlines during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/12/231h 26m

SOS: Preserving Biodiversity Around The World

Plants and animals across the world are struggling for many reasons. Most of those reasons are caused by human activities. But within the last 50 years, we've taken some steps to try and ease that. Some places like Gorongosa National Park have the world's most hopeful stories of wildlife recovery. And that recovery is just as important to wildlife as it is to the community.There are a few international bodies dedicated to biodiversity conservation: IPBES, the United Nations Biodiversity Conference (COP 15), CITES. Those organizations don't include each country's own plan for conservation.For this episode of our series, "SOS: Save Our Species." We take a closer look at how these organizations work together. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/12/2333m 54s

SOS: Reintroducing Endangered Species

A million species are under the threat of extinction, scientists say.Since the passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973, 11 species on that list have been declared extinct in the United States. One tool being used to combat the extinction crisis is species reintroduction — the process of re-establishing a species population in an area they've been driven out of. Reintroduction has been successful in the U.S. before, with a variety of species, including black-footed ferrets, which were once among the rarest mammals in the world.We discuss how decisions over reintroductions are made and check in on the battle over a gray wolf release program in Colorado.This episode is part of our series, "SOS: Save Our Species," which takes a closer look at the Endangered Species Act and its impact 50 years later. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/12/2333m 38s

SOS: Saving Keystone Species

What do bison, beaver, wolves and sea otters all have in common?They're keystone species. That means they have an outsized impact on their ecosystem. It took humans driving some of these to near extinction to realize just how important they are.Now animals like the American Bison and North American Beaver are some of the Endangered Species Act's most notable success stories. As part of our series marking the 50th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, we're taking a closer look at the efforts to save keystone species.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/12/2338m 14s

SOS: 50 Years After The Endangered Species Act

Scientists predict that more than 1 million species could go extinct in the coming decades. It's been 50 years since Congress passed the Endangered Species Act in 1973 to protect plants and animals in the U.S. from extinction. Over 99 percent of the more than 1,600 species listed as endangered or threatened have survived.But the work to protect our nation's biodiversity is far from over. Just last month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that it was delisting 21 species from the act due to extinction. It included one species of bat and 10 kinds of birds. We discuss what the Endangered Species Act has accomplished in 50 years and how we should think about the next 50 years of conservation.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/12/2335m 47s

The News Roundup For December 1, 2023

New York Rep. George Santos' time in Congress could come to an end this week. A vote to expel him is expected on Friday. He had already previously refused to resign.Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger died this week at the age of 100. He played a part in some of the darkest moments of the Cold War.Meanwhile, the war resumed between Israel and Hamas on Friday, after the last truce extension expired. And in the West Bank four people, including an 8-year-old boy, were killed as the Israeli Defense Force raided the Jenin refugee camp this week.The Department of Justice charged a man accused of taking payment from the Indian government for the assassination of a Sikh leader and U.S. citizen in New York.We cover all these headlines and more during this week's News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/12/231h 24m

Best Of: 'The Golden Bachelor' And Finding Love After 60

For the first time in the franchise's 21-year history, ABC's "The Bachelor" is surprising viewers with "The Golden Bachelor", where all the contestants are over 60. And the bachelor himself is 72. Whether you're a fan of the show or not, the series is airing at a time when many older Americans are finding themselves single. According to a new analysis by Bowling Green State University's National Center for Family and Marriage Research, divorce rates among people 65 and older tripled between 1990 and 2021. And roughly half of women over 65 are un-partnered. That's according to a Pew Research survey from 2020. We discuss what it's like to try and find love in your later years.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/11/2330m 10s

WeWork's Bankruptcy And The Future Of Coworking Spaces

WeWork – the shared office space company – was once hailed as a revolutionary way to work, with a $47 billion valuation to match.But earlier this month, the company filed for bankruptcy. WeWork reported more than $18 billion in debt and around $100 million in unpaid rent.And while the bankruptcy may be the final nail in WeWork's proverbial coffin, many other coworking spaces have cropped up all around the country.We discuss what the future of remote work will look like and how coworking spaces fit into that future.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/11/2336m 38s

Best Of: What We Get Wrong About Forgiveness

In June 2015, nine people died at Charleston's Emanuel A.M.E. Church, victims of a racist shooter's rampage.Some of the victims' relatives publicly forgave the murderer, including Chris Singleton, whose mother, Sharonda Coleman Singleton, was killed. Philosopher Myisha Cherry was struck by the story and its response. Some, she says, paid more attention to the inspirational story of forgiveness than the racial hatred behind the shooting.In her new book, Professor Cherry seeks to understand what forgiveness means and why we venerate it. Sometimes, she argues, forgiveness can do more harm than good, especially if it lets the perpetrator of wrongdoing off the hook – whether that be a person, system or anything else.We discuss forgiveness – what it means and its effect. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/11/2331m 3s

Linking Math And Games Across The World

Marcus du Sautoy is a mathematician who loves games, travel, and, unsurprisingly, math. His new book is titled "Around the World in 80 Games: A Mathematician Unlocks the Secrets of the Greatest Games." In it, du Sautoy tours the world's games, exploring how they are built around (and can be won using) mathematics.We discuss how math and games are interwoven worldwide, and learn the history of some of our favorite games. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/11/2334m 13s

'The Big Dig': The Legacy Of The Costliest Highway Project

Whether it's high-speed rail or highway reconstruction, infrastructure projects in the U.S. are often associated with high price tags and lengthy timelines. Perhaps no project captures this better than Boston's Central Artery Tunnel project, more commonly known as the Big Dig. It's the nation's most expensive highway project. And it took more than two decades to plan and build.Ian Coss, host of GBH News' "The Big Dig" joins us to discuss the lessons we can take away from projects like Boston's.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/11/231h 8m

The 1A Record Club Listens To Dolly Parton's 'Rockstar'

Dolly Parton's resume is as big as her hair. And at age 77 she's adding another title to it: "Rockstar."Her new album was released on Nov. 17. It's a mix of covers of classic rock songs, featuring collaborations with a whopping list of who's who in Rock-n-Roll. And there are almost 30 tracks – give or take a few – depending on the version of the album that you buy. With 9 new singles, "Rockstar" is Dolly's most significant foray into Rock and Roll music.While Dolly has fully embraced a new "Rockstar" persona – down to the black studded outfits – glimmers of rockstar have existed in Dolly's previous eras. Over the past fifty years, Dolly has won plenty of awards and accolades for her songwriting, becoming one of music's most prolific songwriters.Sit back and grab yourself a cup of ambition. For this edition of the 1A Record Club – Dolly Parton's new album "Rockstar" and what her latest musical evolution represents.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/11/2343m 49s

Best Of: 'Strange Planet' Satirizes The Absurdities Of Everyday Life

The wildly popular webcomic "Strange Planet" has attracted millions of followers by pointing out absurdities in everyday life.Beings on Strange Planet live in a place very similar to Earth and behave very similarly to humans. They just talk about it differently. On Strange Planet, coffee is "jitter liquid," socks are "foot tubes," alcohol is "mild poison," kissing is "mouth pushing," and raccoons are "greyscale finger bandits."The successful webcomic is expanding to books, merchandise, and now a new show on Apple TV+, co-created by "Strange Planet" creator Nathan W. Pyle and "Rick and Morty" co-creator Dan Harmon.We talk to Pyle about the show and his inspiration. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/11/2330m 14s

Best Of: The 1A Record Club Celebrates 50 Years Of Hip-Hop

Hip-hop is many things – unapologetic, lyrical, rhythmic, and above all, ubiquitous.Since its nebulous "creation" at a party in the Bronx in 1973, hip-hop has become one of the world's most popular genres and cultural expressions.It's also evolved drastically. It's given way to various subgenres – like gangsta rap and drill – and provided the means for talented emcees to be heard around the world.But hip-hop doesn't exist without its controversy. The genre has been seen by many since its inception as a tool to further misogyny, violence and capitalist exploitation.We celebrate Hip-Hop's 50th birthday by discussing the history of the genre and what its future could look like. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/11/2334m 57s

Best Of: How To Add Some More Spice To Your Life And Diet

Chances are you uses spices everyday. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, spice consumption per capita among Americans has more than tripled since 1966. But spices aren't just about taste. They can also be beneficial to our health. One 2019 study from the Journal of A.O.A.C. International found that certain spices can lower the risk of chronic disease and help fight inflammation. We talk about how can you incorporate spices into your dishes at home with a spice shop owner, a professional chef, and a doctor.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/11/2332m 36s

Why Does Flying Have To Suck?

Complaints against U.S. airlines hit a record high in 2022. And it's not getting any better. Consumer complaints nearly doubled in the first three months of this year, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.With only four major airlines in the U.S., there's little choice for consumers in the market. And with air travel expected to reach a record high this holiday season, many will be subjected to the worst of travel: long lines, high prices, and of course, awful airplane food.But why does our time in flight have to be riddled with anguish? And what can be done to make the skies friendly again?For that, we're turning to Ganesh Sitaraman, a professor at Vanderbilt University Law School and director of the Vanderbilt Policy Accelerator. He's also out with the new book, "Why Flying is Miserable: And How to Fix It."Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/11/2328m 9s

The News Roundup For November 17, 2023

It's been a busy week for the GOP in Congress. Lawmakers managed to avoid another government shutdown. House Speaker Mike Johnson's grace period in his new role seems to be over. US President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping met for the first time in a year at a summit in San Francisco. The two leaders spent time together as after many months of tensions between the two nations.New polling indicates that there's a significant gap in politician rhetoric and public sentiment on Israel's war on Gaza, with a growing number of Americans believing the IDF has gone too far in its efforts to fight Hamas.Meanwhile, Israeli military strikes on the Al Shifa hospital in Gaza City continued this week, as they focus in on what the IDF claim are Hamas operation centers in medical facilities. Palestinians working in Gaza's main hospital are burying their dead in a mass grave. We cover the most important stories this week during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/11/231h 24m

A Brief History Of Eyeliner

William Shakespeare once said that the eyes are the window to the soul. We make eye contact with others to show that we're listening, to connect, or simply as a way of saying, "I see you."Cultures around the world have understood the power of eyes for centuries. If you travel to India, Chad, Japan, Iran, or just around the corner from your house, you'll probably see the same thing around the eyes of the people who live there: eyeliner. In her new book, "Eyeliner: A Cultural History," Lebanese-British journalist Zahra Hankir explores beauty, power, identity, and resistance through the lens of the iconic cosmetic. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/11/2329m 25s

Best Of: Game Mode Gets Cozy

It's been over three years since "Animal Crossing: New Horizons" was released. It became one of the best-selling video games of the year — moving over 42 million copies, almost four times as much as the previous edition of the game.It also renewed interest in a video game trend known for finding magic in mundane tasks: cozy gaming. Games like "Stardew Valley," "Harvest Moon," and "Unpacking," where the objective is less about shooting, fighting, or space colonization and more about gentle verbs — tending, farming, and homemaking.And the video game industry is taking notice. We discuss the impact and popularity of cozy gaming. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/11/2331m 25s

What United States Vs. Rahimi Could Mean For Gun Rights Of Domestic Abusers

Guns, and who gets to have access to them, is one of the most hotly debated issues in our country. The Supreme Court will weigh in on gun rights once more in the coming months in the case of a 23-year-old Texas man named Zackey Rahimi.His case challenges a federal law that's been around for nearly two decades that strips gun ownership rights from people under domestic violence protection orders.How should the high court regulate who gets access to guns? And how might the outcome of the case shape gun rights as we know them?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/11/2330m 54s

Ask A War Photojournalist

The first photographs of a major military conflict were taken during the Crimean War of the 1850s. Nearly 175 years later, photojournalists are on the ground, on the frontlines of conflicts around the world, documenting history.They do so at great risk to themselves. So far, at least five photojournalists have died during the Israel-Hamas War, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists."You see the spirit of human beings when everything else is stripped away," says photojournalist Lynsey Addario. "That's what drives me to keep going back. At the end of the day, people can be horrible, but they can also be extraordinary and wonderful."We discuss how photojournalists in conflict zones do their work and the impact of witnessing the atrocities of war first-hand.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/11/2331m 13s

The News Roundup For November 10, 2023

This was an off-year election week to remember. In Kentucky, Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear retained control of his office after making abortion a central issue of his campaign.Five GOP candidates took the debate stage in Miami this week, all doing their best to grab the attention of Republican primary voters. WeWork, the office-sharing giant, filed for bankruptcy this week. In 2019, the company was valued at $47 billion.We cover the most important stories from around the country in the domestic hour of the News Roundup.Meanwhile, the U.S. is signaling its desire for more Palestinian governance over Gaza and the West Bank once the war ends. And worldwide, October is being recorded as the hottest-ever month, meaning 2023 is on track to be the hottest-ever year.We cover all these stories and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/11/231h 24m

The GOP Hopefuls Take The Debate Stage For The Third Time

Five Republican presidential hopefuls faced off in Miami on Wednesday night for the third GOP debate, the last one of 2023.Former President Donald Trump will, once again, not be on the stage. Instead, he'll be at a rally in a suburb of Miami nearby.The debate comes as many states went to the polls – Kentucky re-elected their Democratic governor, Democrats flipped Virginia's state house and Ohio voted to enshrine the right to abortion in its Constitution. Foreign policy is expected to dominate the debate as Israel's war on Gaza enters the fourth week. We recap the night and discuss what the candidates said about issues like abortion, the economy and foreign policy.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/11/2343m 9s

Confronting The Nation's Crisis Of Care

By 2030, the Census Bureau estimates that the nation's population will consist of more adults over 65 than children.As the youngest of the baby boomers enter their sixties, and younger adults are having children later in life, many Americans – from Gen Z to Gen X – are finding themselves sandwiched between taking care of elderly parents and young kids at the same time.Today's 65-year-olds have a 70 percent likelihood of needing long-term care in the future, all while the supply of home health aides is dwindling. Nursing homes are also increasingly costly and inaccessible for families of low and moderate incomes.We discuss what it's like to balance caring for young kids and aging adults simultaneously and managing your money or time as a family caregiver.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/11/2331m 58s

What Happens When Private Security Patrols Public Streets?

If you live near a bustling downtown or shopping center, you may have noticed an increase in private security during the last couple of years. Even places like hospitals, jails, or the occasional Walgreens and gas station have turned to hiring their own security. According to The New York Times, most major cities now have at least three times as many security guards as police officers on their streets. In the past couple of weeks, private security guards began patrolling areas in Austin, Texas, and Raleigh, North Carolina. This uptick comes as police departments across the country are struggling to find recruits. As private security replaces its public counterpart, questions about training, regulation, and accountability echo through American communities. Especially considering it's easier for some communities to afford it than it is for others.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/11/2333m 0s

The Challenges Of Reporting The War In Gaza

War is inherently difficult to cover in real-time. The war between Israel and Hamas is no different. The Committee to Protect Journalists has called the death toll among journalists in the conflict unprecedented with at least 36 journalists killed since the war began last month. What kind of challenges are reporters met with? How do those challenges affect the coverage you're getting as a consumer of news?We discuss what it looks like to cover one of the most complicated conflicts. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/11/2331m 7s

The News Roundup For November 3, 2023

House Republicans are set to put forward a bill to send aid to Israel to the tune of $14.3 billion. Idaho made its first "abortion trafficking" arrest this week. A mother and son were arrested and charged with kidnapping for taking an underage girl across state lines for an abortion without her parents' knowledge. Meanwhile, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency is losing its aid workers as Israel continues to bomb Gaza. At least 70 of those workers have died in the attacks. International leaders are looking to begin a peace process as the violence and humanitarian situation in Gaza worsens. The Panama Canal is cutting down on the number of ships allowed to pass through. The El Niño weather pattern is contributing to a drought in the country.We cover the most important stories during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/11/231h 26m

'Pharmageddon' And The Future Of Retail Pharmacies

Pharmacists say they're overworked and understaffed and have been for years. So they planned a "Pharmageddon" – three days of nationwide walkouts at CVS and Walgreens. The walkouts come after protests from pharmacy workers at Walgreens last month, and multiple walkouts at CVS stores in Kansas City. Although complaints have been ongoing, the scale of the walkouts was difficult to confirm. And change has been hard to come by. Pharmacy worker complaints come as big box retailers face other struggles. Last month, Rite Aid filed for bankruptcy. CVS, RiteAid, and Walgreens locations have been closing stores across the country.We discuss the state of retail pharmacies today, and what these shakeups mean for the communities relying on them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/11/2332m 58s

The Evolution Of Día De Los Muertos

It's easy to mistake Día de los Muertos for Halloween. Skeletons and marigolds, like the vivid orange macabre of jack-o-lanterns, are synonymous with the tradition. So are the food and treats prepared for loved ones who have passed away. While both traditions evolved from a complicated intertwining of pagan and Christian beliefs and traditions, the push to keep Día de los Muertos a separate tradition from Halloween and faithful to its indigenous roots is as complex as the history of the holiday itself. Introduced in the U.S. as part of the Chicano Movement in the 1960s and '70s, Día de los Muertos celebrations have become a part of fall festivities in towns and cities around the country. We take a closer look at the history and evolution of Día de los Muertos stateside.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/11/2329m 1s

How Horror Creates Meaning

Different kinds of horror stories can be scary, dreadful, terrifying, and even gross. But they can also be rich with meaning. There's no lack of horror subjects and subgenres to venture into, whether it's slashers, zombies, monsters, ghosts, or vampires. And more niches like highway horror or found footage.The number of jump scares per horror movie is the lowest it's ever been since 2014, according to The Washington Post.We discuss the meaning behind different types of horror stories and different tropes.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/10/2333m 36s

What's Next For Mike Johnson And Donald Trump?

All 220 House Republicans present voted for Louisiana Republican Mike Johnson as the body's next speaker. He was the fourth candidate put forward by the GOP in the three weeks since they ousted former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy.Meanwhile, former President Donald Trump's legal issues continue to mount. His daughter, Ivanka, as well as his sons, Eric and Donald Jr., will soon have to testify in a New York civil case concerning financial fraud.This is one of several cases Trump is facing, including allegations that he sought to interfere with the 2020 election results in Georgia and that he mishandled classified documents at his club in Florida.We discuss all the latest and take a closer look at what's on the new speaker's agenda in terms of legislation. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/10/2332m 24s

The News Roundup For October 27

After three weeks of a vacancy, and multiple failed candidates, House Republicans finally named their speaker: Louisiana Rep. Mike Johnson.Also this week, Ford and the United Auto Workers Union have reached a tentative deal that would see an end to the strike end and a pay raise for the union members.Meanwhile, Israel prepares for a ground war as the humanitarian situation in Gaza grows worse by the day. Palestinians in Gaza are quickly running out of food and water, and the healthcare system has collapsed.And Chinese Defense Minister Li Shangfu was removed from his position two months after he was last seen in public.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/10/231h 23m

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Killers Of The Flower Moon'

For this month's Movie Club, we're discussing "Killers of the Flower Moon," a new film by director Martin Scorsese that some say could be his last. The film is based on a book by the same name by journalist David Grann. Set in the 1920s, it tells the story of the mysterious murders of more than 60 wealthy Osage Native Americans. The murders were brutal and went largely unchecked by local and state police in Oklahoma. The movie stars Lily Gladstone, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Robert De Niro. We discuss the movie, what it gets right about Native American culture, and what it means for the future of films featuring Indigenous characters.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/10/2334m 27s

The State Of Israeli Politics

Benjamin Netanyahu campaigned to be Israel's prime minister on the promise that he'd keep Israel safe.Now, as the leader of one of the most right-wing governments in the country's history, he's tasked with shepherding Israel through a crisis after the Oct. 7 attack by Hamas — the militant and political group that rules Gaza — killed more than 1,400 people.A poll in the Ma'ariv newspaper suggests up to 80% of Israelis believe Netanyahu must take responsibility for the security failures that led to the October 7th attack.The country was already facing internal upheaval as Netanyahu's government pushed to overhaul the judiciary system.We discuss the latest updates on Israeli domestic politics.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/10/2342m 50s

Who Represents The Palestinian People?

Since Hamas's deadly attack on Israel on Oct. 7, a lot has been said about the militant and political group and whether or not they represent the Palestinian people.Hamas has been declared a terrorist group by dozens of countries, including the United States. And many Palestinians in Gaza think the political party is corrupt. The Palestinian Liberation Organization, which controls the West Bank and is led by Mahmoud Abbas, has condemned Hamas's violence.It's been over 15 years since the last parliamentary election that brought Hamas to power, one that many Palestinians weren't old enough to vote in. We discuss how Palestinian leadership and how war and displacement has shaped the lives of Palestinians. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/10/2344m 20s

Best Of: What Is Cultivated Meat?

Cultivated meat is green-lit in the U.S. That's meat grown in a lab.Two food technology companies — UPSIDE Foods and GOOD Meat — are letting people try their cultivated meat. But you can't grab any off grocery shelves quite yet. For now, it's available to the public at Bar Crenn in San Francisco and China Chilcano in Washington D.C. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service approved their labels and the Food and Drug Administration left with no questions after they did a pre-market consultation with the companies on their product.We discuss how this meat is grown and its potential impact on the meat industry.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/10/2334m 1s

The News Roundup For October 20, 2023

President Joe Biden flew to Israel this week for a brief visit amid the country's preparation for a ground invasion of Gaza. During his brief, 7-hour stay, he managed to help push through a deal for humanitarian aid trucks to travel through Egypt to Gaza.Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Defense has ordered some 2,000 troops to prepare to deploy to the Middle East to support the Israeli military in its siege of Gaza. India's Supreme Court refused to legalize same-sex marriage this week, disappointing millions of LGBTQ+ couples, activists, and allies.And Poland's election finished with major losses for the country's nationalist right. We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/10/231h 22m

Diversity, Craft Beer, And The Future Of The Brewing Industry

Whether it's an ale, lager, stout, or sour, people all over the U.S. are trying their own craft beer recipes at home. Some turn them into businesses.The number of craft breweries in the U.S. is at an all-time high according to the Brewers Association, with more than 9,500 across the country. But the industry is changing. Organizations like Beer Kulture and The Michael James Jackson Foundation for Brewing and Distilling are funding technical scholarships for people of color interested in the business. Films like "One Pint at a Time" highlight the lack of diversity in the industry.We discuss what it takes to be in the brewing business these days and how people in the industry are trying to diversify it. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/10/2331m 46s

An Airstrike At Gaza Hospital Kills Hundreds

An air strike has hit the al-Ahli hospital in Gaza City where thousands were seeking safety and treatment.Hamas has blamed an Israeli airstrike, while the Israeli military said the hospital was hit by a rocket fired by Palestinian militants. The health ministry said at least 500 people had been killed.Hundreds of Palestinians had taken refuge in al-Ahli, other hospitals, and United Nations buildings in Gaza City, hoping they would be spared bombardment after Israel ordered all residents of the city and surrounding areas to evacuate to the southern Gaza Strip.The attack spurred protests in Ramallah in the Occupied West Bank and condemnation. Egypt's foreign minister said that Cairo considers this "deliberate bombing of civilians to be a serious violation of international, humanitarian law and of the most basic values of humanity."We discuss the latest humanitarian situation in Gaza and ask whether the rules of war were breached.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our websiteLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/10/2329m 30s

Why How We Talk About Gender Matters

Back in 2015, Schuyler Bailar made headlines for being the first openly transgender athlete to compete on a Division 1 NCAA sports team.Now, he's an advocate for transgender inclusion. His new book is called "He/She/They: How We Talk About Gender and Why It Matters."In the years since Schuyler raced as a member of the Harvard men's swim team, the battle over transgender inclusion in sports has become more contentious.Since 2020, 18 states have passed laws restricting participation in sports for trans women and girls and five other states passed laws applying to all trans athletes, according to an ESPN analysis.We discuss why the way we talk about gender matters. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/10/2333m 56s

The Humanitarian Crisis In Gaza

As Israel's military prepares for a ground war, the humanitarian crisis in Gaza has become increasingly dire with water, food, and fuel in dangerously low supply.Hundreds of thousands of Gazans are fleeing south after the Israeli Government told residents to evacuate.Israel cut off fuel, electricity, and water in retaliation for Hamas' surprise attack last Saturday. Israel says more than 1,400 Israelis have been killed and at least 199 taken hostage. Over the weekend, the Palestinian death toll from Israeli airstrikes surpassed 2,750 according to the Gaza Health Ministry.But the enclave is one of the most densely populated places in the world. About half of Gazans are children under 18. And most have nowhere to go.We discuss the mounting humanitarian crisis and what comes next for Gazans and the world as an Israeli ground invasion approaches.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/10/2334m 43s

The News Roundup For October 13, 2023

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken traveled to Israel this week to reaffirm U.S. support for the country's war against Hamas. He told Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that America would 'always be there' for Israel at a joint press conference.House Republicans are beginning to coalesce around Majority Leader Steve Scalise as their pick to succeed Rep. Kevin McCarthy has the chamber's speaker. However, Scalise faces an uphill battle to obtain the 217 votes he'll need to be confirmed in the role.The Gaza Strip is in the midst of a humanitarian crisis after the Israeli government ordered a complete siege of the territory. Israeli authorities are cutting off access to food, power, and water.Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi and Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohamed bin-Salman discussed the "need to end war crimes in Palestine" in one of their first calls since restoring diplomatic relations between their two countries.Afghanistan was hit by a large earthquake in its western region mere days after two other quakes killed more than 1,000 people. So far, authorities have announced that 100 are injured and at least one person was killed.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/10/231h 25m

How Our Relationships With Our Phones Affect Us

A report from Common Sense Media found that teens get over 230 of these distracting notifications each day. Some get over four thousand. But teens aren't the only ones inundated.According to market research company Insider Intelligence, American adults spend four and a half hours a day on their phones. Smartphones and social media apps are lauded by their industries for their addictive design.Now, lawmakers in Utah, New Jersey, and North Carolina are taking action to protect kids from the reach of social media. We discuss how our phones' constant presence affects us and what we can do to claim back our focus.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/10/2334m 0s

Ask A Playwright

While Shakespeare is long gone, but theater – and thus playwriting – is very much alive.Theater, in contrast to television or film, offers a unique chance for audiences to come together and experience a one-of-a-kind production. Playwrights, in collaboration with actors, directors, and stage crew work, are chiefly responsible for bringing that magic to life.For this installment of our "Ask A" series – where we talk to interesting people about what they do and why it matters – we speak to a group of playwrights about the power of storytelling on stage. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/10/2333m 23s

Game Mode Gets Cozy

It's been over three years since "Animal Crossing: New Horizons" was released. It became one of the best-selling video games of the year — moving over 42 million copies, almost four times as much as the previous edition of the game.It also renewed interest in a video game trend known for finding magic in mundane tasks: cozy gaming. Games like "Stardew Valley," "Harvest Moon," and "Unpacking," where the objective is less about shooting, fighting, or space colonization and more about gentle verbs — tending, farming, and homemaking.And the video game industry is taking notice. We discuss the impact and popularity of cozy gaming. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/10/2331m 25s

Israel Declared War On Hamas After Hundreds Were Killed In Surprise Attacks

Israel has not suffered a blow like this in 50 years. Death tolls are hard to verify. But Israeli officials say more than 600 Israelis have been killed in attacks from Gaza since Saturday. As many as 100 Israeli soldiers and civilians were kidnapped when Palestinian militants crossed the border and raided communities. Retaliatory Israeli air strikes have killed more than 400 people in the Gaza Strip, with 2,300 wounded, Palestinian officials say.We get the latest and hear how the U.S. and the world are responding. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/10/2331m 36s

The News Roundup For October 6, 2023

Former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy lost his position this week as eight Republicans joined House Democrats in stripping him of his title. The House will now have to vote for a new Speaker. Migrant deaths have more than doubled at the border in El Paso, Texas, this year as scorching heat has made conditions for crossings incredibly dangerous. The toll of 148 deaths is a record high.Meanwhile, the war in Ukraine continues as some analysts suggest global support for Volodymyr Zelenskyy's forces is waning. And U.K. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is calling for continental solutions as migrants continue to make their way to the borders of the European Union.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/10/231h 25m

From Solar Panels To National Policies, What Climate Solutions Actually Help?

Climate records have been broken non-stop this year.2023 saw the earth's hottest summer on record. The record-breaking heat continued into September. The year also saw extreme weather including the Canadian wildfires that scorched 37 million acres of land, roughly the size of the state of New York.News like this can be disheartening. But we've heard from many of you about springing into action to fight climate change, even if it's cautiously optimistic.We discuss what can be done at home, in your community, and on a larger scale through policy and industry action to fight climate change.This conversation is part of NPR's Climate Week which puts a spotlight on solutions.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/10/2334m 28s

'The Golden Bachelor' And Finding Love After 60

For the first time in the franchise's 21-year history, ABC's "The Bachelor" is surprising viewers with "The Golden Bachelor", where all the contestants are over 60. And the bachelor himself is 72. Whether you're a fan of the show or not, the series is airing at a time when many older Americans are finding themselves single. According to a new analysis by Bowling Green State University's National Center for Family and Marriage Research, divorce rates among people 65 and older tripled between 1990 and 2021. And roughly half of women over 65 are un-partnered. That's according to a Pew Research survey from 2020. We discuss what it's like to try and find love in your later years.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/10/2329m 25s

Carl Hiaasen, Banned Books, And Censorship In Schools

The American Library Association found that the number of books facing challenges for censorship is up 20 percent for the first eight months of this year compared to 2022. That includes more than 800 books in school districts across 37 states. More than 300 books were removed from Florida schools last year, according to a list released by the Florida Department of Education. Some of those books, written by author Carl Hiaasen, who knows this landscape too well. The longtime Miami Herald national columnist and author has witnessed several of his books be removed from schools, prisons, and libraries. He's already had several events canceled on the nationwide tour of his latest young adult book, "Wrecker."We discuss the banned book environment, and the impact these bans have on students and libraries nationwide. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/10/2331m 42s

The Science Of Synesthesia And Super Sensors

Joy Milne met her husband Les in high school. Nearly 15 years after they met, Joy smelled something different about Les. The scent wouldn't go away, and a decade later, Les was diagnosed with Parkinson's. It turned out, Joy's nose was detecting the disease, long before doctors could.Joy's hyperosmia, or super-smelling ability, helped develop a non-invasive swab test for Parkinson's. Hers is one of many stories in the new book "Fearfully and Wonderfully Made: The Astonishing New Science of the Senses." Author Maureen Seaberg is a super sensor too. She joins us to discuss why some of us have superior senses, and how we can all harness that power. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/10/2330m 21s

The News Roundup For September 29, 2023

A New York Judge has determined that former President Donald Trump and his adult sons committed fraud and canceled the Trump Organization's business certification.Congress is running out of time to pass a funding bill that would avoid a partial government shutdown before Oct. 1. And tributes are being paid to Senator Dianne Feinstein. Her death was announced Friday morning. She was 90.Meanwhile, support for Ukraine is beginning to waiver in the United States as Republican congresspeople squabble over aid for President Volodymyr Zelenskyy's forces. In Canada, protesters are demonstrating outside the Indian consulate, calling for the expulsion of India's top diplomat. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau accused the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government of having a Sikh leader in Canada killed.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/09/231h 24m

A Closer Look At The Second 2024 GOP Primary Debate

Seven Republicans qualified for last night's presidential primary debate: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, former Vice President Mike Pence, businessman Vivek Ramaswamy, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, and South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott.At the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California, the candidates gathered on stage without the current front-runner: former President Donald Trump, who was, at the same time, meeting with auto workers in Michigan.Where are the candidates finding space for alignment and disagreement with both Trump and each other?We discuss the event and the significance of Trump's absence. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/09/2331m 36s

Dessa On 'Bury the Lede' And Making Pop Music Through Pain

What music have you turned to during hard times? That's the question Dessa's latest album hopes to answer.The award-winning rapper, singer, writer, and podcast (and sometimes 1A) host has been in the game for a while. She came up as part of the Minneapolis rap collective, Doomtree. She was featured in 2016's chart-topping "Hamilton Mixtape," and she's collaborated with the Minnesota Orchestra on a number of performances and even a live album. She's also the author of "My Own Devices: True Stories from the Road on Music, Science, and Senseless Love."But like many of us, her last few years weren't easy. And her new music, including "Hurricane Party" and pop-forward "Chopper," is her way of reckoning with — and dancing away — those feelings.We discuss Dessa's new album with her and the influence of pop music. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/09/2332m 17s

How To Add Some More Spice To Your Life And Diet

Chances are you uses spices everyday. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, spice consumption per capita among Americans has more than tripled since 1966. But spices aren't just about taste. They can also be beneficial to our health. One 2019 study from the Journal of A.O.A.C. International found that certain spices can lower the risk of chronic disease and help fight inflammation. We talk about how can you incorporate spices into your dishes at home with a spice shop owner, a professional chef, and a doctor.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/09/2332m 36s

Who Do We Think Gets To Think About The Roman Empire?

How much do you think about the Roman Empire?It's a question that men the world over were asked by friends and loved ones who use the video-sharing app TikTok in recent days.A recent viral trend asserts that dudes spend a surprising amount of time ruminating on barbarian invasions, Hadrian's Wall, fights in the Coliseum, and much more.It's a fun silly trend. But it illustrates a broader point about how we think about who thinks about history. (We think about this a lot.)We discuss what how we think about the Roman Empire says about us.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/09/2329m 13s

The News Roundup For September 22, 2023

House Republicans are struggling to agree on a temporary spending bill which would prevent a government shutdown at the end of the month. Democrats have made no offers to help House Speaker Kevin McCarthy.The Biden administration announced the creation of the American Climate Corps this week. The organization will train and support young people working to fight climate change, preserve environments, and promote clean energy.Meanwhile in the U.K. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is catching flak this week for scaling back his country's climate goals in a press conference this Wednesday.And Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich appeared in a Moscow court this week to appeal his imprisonment on espionage charges. The appeal was returned to a lower court to deal with procedural violations.1A Guest Host Todd Zwillich guides us through the biggest headlines of the week for this edition of the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/09/231h 23m

Rory Stewart On 'How Not To Be A Politician'

The United Kingdom has had five prime ministers since it voted to leave the European Union in 2016. Rory Stewart once came close to being one of them. But he decided to quit party politics in 2019.He now enjoys a degree of popularity in the U.K. His high profile has raised talk that 10 Downing Street could still be a future address for this nomadic rising star.Stewart has walked across Asia, taught at Harvard, served as a diplomat in Iraq, and served as a Conservative MP. He is also a Global Ambassador for the charity Give Directly and a co-host of the podcast "The Rest is Politics."His background and trajectory put him on a path to reach high office. But then came Brexit, Boris Johnson, and a level of carelessness that he writes about in his new memoir, called "How Not to Be A Politician."We sit down with Stewart and discuss his memoir and podcast. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/09/2332m 26s

What We Get Wrong About Forgiveness

In June 2015, nine people died at Charleston's Emanuel A.M.E. Church, victims of a racist shooter's rampage.Some of the victims' relatives publicly forgave the murderer, including Chris Singleton, whose mother, Sharonda Coleman Singleton, was killed. Philosopher Myisha Cherry was struck by the story and its response. Some, she says, paid more attention to the inspirational story of forgiveness than the racial hatred behind the shooting.In her new book, Professor Cherry seeks to understand what forgiveness means and why we venerate it. Sometimes, she argues, forgiveness can do more harm than good, especially if it lets the perpetrator of wrongdoing off the hook – whether that be a person, system or anything else.We discuss forgiveness – what it means and its effect. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/09/2331m 3s

In Good Health: When A Popular Decongestant Doesn't Work

Last week, an FDA advisory panel unanimously agreed that Phenylephrine, a common ingredient in many over-the-counter decongestant medications, is ineffective. The decision could affect hundreds of products including Sudafed PE, NyQuil Severe Cold and Flu, and Benadryl Allergy Plus Congestion. This comes as COVID cases continue to rise and as we head into fall allergy season. Studies also show that human-caused climate change is making allergies more intense and last longer. For this edition of In Good Health, our panel of experts discusses the best alternatives for relief and how you should prepare for the colder months as sicknesses surge.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/09/2333m 5s

Google's Power And The Biggest Tech Monopoly Trial In 25 Years

It's hard to deny Google's power when it comes to the internet. In the Merriam-Webster dictionary, "google" is even a verb. The U.S. Department of Justice wants to do something about that. It's taking on Google in the biggest tech monopoly trial in 25 years. The DOJ is accusing the company of abusing its power to become the dominant search engine. Google controls around 90 percent of the U.S. search engine market and is worth 1.7 trillion dollars. We discuss the trial, how the U.S. is regulating tech, and what implications this case has for tech business around the world.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/09/2329m 32s

The News Roundup For September 15, 2023

Speaker Kevin McCarthy directed the House of Representatives to open an impeachment inquiry over the business dealings of President Joe Biden's family this week. And on Thursday Biden's son Hunter was indicted on three gun charges.American auto workers are on strike. Thousands of UAW members followed through on their promise to walk off the job if companies don't reach an agreement by 11:59 p.m. Thursday evening.Meanwhile, in Libya, the death toll is expected to climb as high as 20,000 after floods ripped through the eastern part of the country this week after Tropical Storm Daniel. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un expressed his full support for Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine when the two met this week.We cover these headlines and more with 1A Guest Host Todd Zwillich during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/09/231h 23m

1A Movie Club: The Best Of The Bad

The 1995 film "Showgirls" starring Elizabeth Berkley was one of the largest commercial failures of its time. With a budget of $45 million, (nearly $90 million in 2023 dollars), the film ended up losing more than $8 million and was widely panned by critics. Berkeley said the movie was so bad she became a "pariah" in Hollywood.But nearly 30 years after its release, "Showgirls" maintains a cult following with midnight showings at independent theaters and deep-dive essays exploring its themes by culture critics.Americans love their share of bad movies. From "The Room" to "Troll 2," you can find entire online communities and podcasts dedicated to unpacking these works of... art.We discuss what it is we love the most about bad movies. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/09/2329m 48s

Why Panic Attacks Happen And How To Prevent Them

Matt Gutman has spent decades in front of cameras and microphones as a newscaster, reporting on current events across the globe. His calm, cool demeanor belied his internal struggle with a lifetime of panic.Matt is one of many Americans who suffer from panic attacks. He tried pharmaceuticals, psychedelics and therapy. His journey is documented in the new book "No Time To Panic: How I Curbed My Anxiety and Conquered a Lifetime of Panic Attacks." We talk to Matt and psychiatrist Dr. Ellen Vora about why panic attacks happen and how to prevent them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/09/2336m 51s

The Diversity Problem With Corporate America

This summer, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down affirmative action in higher education. That means colleges and universities can no longer consider a student applicant's race when building their student bodies.The decision was a victory for Edward Blum, the legal activist who founded Students for Fair Admissions. The organization won the landmark case it brought against Harvard University and the University of North Carolina.Now, Blum and other conservative legal firms, have set their sights on diversity efforts in corporate America.We discuss the legal challenges against venture capital funds, law firm fellowships, and federal contracting programs that all aim to uplift Black professionals and businesses.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/09/2330m 19s

How Hawaii Is Keeping History And Culture In Mind As It Rebuilds

Recovery and rebuilding efforts are underway in Hawaii a month after the deadly fires that swept through Maui. Some 115 people were killed and thousands were displaced by the fires which began in the town of Lahaina.Along with the homes and businesses lost to the fires in Maui, cultural institutions are also struggling to rebuild. The land around Lahaina is significant to Hawaii's history and heritage. A network of community leaders has kept Lahaina's cultural history intact. But with the fires came the destruction of that sacred land. We discuss the impact of the cultural loss due to the Maui wildfires, and what rebuilding and recovery mean for Native Hawaiians. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/09/2335m 39s

The News Roundup For September 9, 2023

Another government shutdown is looming as the calendar shifts to the month of September. Congress has until the 30th to settle up on a short-term funding bill that would keep the lights on in Washington. Special Counsel Jack Smith is not making Donald Trump's life any easier. Smith has charged the former president with four counts over his attempt to overthrow the results of the 2020 election. Meanwhile, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken met with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to reassure Ukrainian leaders that they could continue to count on American support in their fight against the Russian invasion. And North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is expected to travel to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin to discuss their respective conflicts with the U.S. And abortion restrictions grow in the United States, Mexico is moving in the opposite direction. The country's supreme court did away with all federal penalties and decriminalized abortion this week. We cover these headlines and a whole lot more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/09/231h 28m

The Benefits Of Birdnesting After Divorce

Some parents who are no longer married are trying a strategy called birdnesting. It's an arrangement where children remain in their family home while the parents cycle in and out of the house. The hope for this approach is that it offers stability to young people during a time of major change. According to the University of Illinois at Chicago's Psychiatry College of Medicine, children of divorce have a greater risk of developing mental health disorders like anxiety and depression. We discuss how much co-parenting arrangements like nesting offset the negative effects of divorce on kids and what you need to know before you try nesting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/09/2330m 21s

The Passion And Politics Of Pickleball

Over the past three years, the number of Americans who reported playing pickleball went from 5 million to 36.5 million according to the Association of Pickleball Professionals.As the sport builds in popularity among amateur players, professional pickleball is also getting an influx of cash from sporting celebrities like Lebron James and Kevin Love.We host a panel conversation about the passion and politics of pickleball.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/09/2332m 28s

What Is Cultivated Meat?

Cultivated meat is green-lit in the U.S. That's meat grown in a lab.Two food technology companies — UPSIDE Foods and GOOD Meat — are letting people try their cultivated meat. But you can't grab any off grocery shelves quite yet. For now, it's available to the public at Bar Crenn in San Francisco and China Chilcano in Washington D.C. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service approved their labels and the Food and Drug Administration left with no questions after they did a pre-market consultation with the companies on their product.We discuss how this meat is grown and its potential impact on the meat industry.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/09/2334m 7s

Best Of: Spending Time In 'Your Mama's Kitchen'

Whether your mom was a natural cook or a reluctant one. Or if your other parent was the one throwing down in the kitchen, food and the place where it's made live inside of us long after we've eaten. What we inherit from our parents' kitchen and pass along as adults is at the center of a new podcast by award-winning journalist Michele Norris.It's called "Your Mama's Kitchen." Former first lady Michelle Obama joins Michele for the first episode. We speak to Michele about how our experiences in the kitchen shape us outside of it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/09/2331m 19s

The News Roundup For September 1, 2023

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell froze when answering questions asked by reporters about whether he would run for re-election. It's the second such incident involving the Kentucky senator. It has sparked discussions about the age at which politicians should step aside.A white shooter in Jacksonville, Florida, killed three Black people this week. The gunman shot at shoppers and employees at a Dollar General store in a predominantly Black area of the city. The incident is being investigated as a hate crime.Meanwhile, the U.S. Embassy in Haiti is urging Americans in the country to leave amid political unrest and rising gang violence. If they are to stay, authorities warn against traveling within the country and engaging with large groups of people.Former Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan's conviction and prison sentence were suspended by a court in Islamabad. He was released on bail.We cover all the biggest news from around the world during this week's News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/09/231h 28m

The 'New' Homeschoolers

The pandemic forced many families into homeschooling — and a surprising number of them are sticking with it.In the 2021 and 2022 school year, homeschool enrollment rose by 30 percent. That's according to research from Stanford University and the Urban Institute.The most dramatic shift in homeschool enrollment was among Black families. According to a 2020 Census Household Survey, homeschooling among Black families in the fall of 2020 was five times higher than it was in the spring of 2020.We discuss why more parents are opting to homeschool their kids for good and the kind of regulation that comes with homeschooling. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/08/2334m 34s

What's Happening In Afghanistan Two Years After The U.S. Left?

On Aug. 30, 2021, the U.S. completed its full withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, bringing the 20-year-long war to an end.Two weeks earlier, on Aug. 15, with fewer troops to block their path, the Taliban took over Kabul.Since then, the Taliban has controlled Afghanistan. Girls are now banned from attending school past sixth grade. Independent media, including newspapers and radio stations, have been shut down. Protestors, journalists, and activists are being arrested.We look back on the U.S. war in Afghanistan and what's happening in the country now.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/08/2331m 1s

Is Rent Control The Answer To Rising Evictions?

The pandemic made monthly rent payments soar, rising 15 percent between 2020 and 2022.Evictions are also on the rise since the pandemic, with some cities seeing filings increases by as much as 50 percent, according to Princeton University's Eviction Lab. This has led some cities and states to consider rent regulations. This month, a group of economists sent a letter to the Biden Administration in support of national rent regulation. It's a sign of a possible shift in what historically has been one of the most agreed-upon topics among economists – probably ever. We discuss rent control and which regulations actually work. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/08/2330m 51s

Best Of: Seeking Thrills And Staying Safe On Roller Coasters

While you may not be a fan of the heart pumping, adrenaline boosting feeling of a roller coaster's twists and turns, for others, it's the best part of the warmer months or even a core memory of their childhood. But recently, two roller coasters hit the headlines for less than awesome reasons. Riders at a Wisconsin festival were stuck upside down for around three hours after a mechanical failure. And a North Carolina man spotted a massive crack in a coaster support beam after his family had been on the ride.We discuss the safety of roller coasters and what's next for coaster engineering.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/08/2332m 20s

The News Roundup For August 25, 2023

The racketeering case against Donald Trump and his co-conspirators in Fulton County, Georgia, progressed this week. Former New York City Mayor and Trump ally Rudy Giuliani surrendered to authorities this week at the Atlanta jail where the defendants in the case are being booked.Overseas, the head of the Wagner military group Yevgeny Prigozhin reportedly died in a plane crash in Russia this week. In June, Prigozhin ordered his troops to march on Moscow in defiance of Russian President Vladimir Putin and his military leaders.In a big moment for Prime Minister Narendra Modi's country, India landed a rover on the south pole of the moon.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/08/231h 22m

How Cable News Changes American Politics And Culture

For more than 80 years, cable television has been at the center of American politics and culture. While streaming platforms have driven many families to cut the cord, there are still more than 72 million active cable subscribers according to the National Cable and Telecommunications Association.News remains a huge part of Americans' cable television diet. But the industry is at a crossroads, with cable subscriptions down 30 percent over the past decade. Giants of the industry like CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC have cut their staffs.We discuss how cable news has shaped our politics and culture and its role in the 2024 Presidential election.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/08/2332m 6s

Best Of: The Human Labor Powering AI Engines

As anxieties over automation mount, AI is already responsible for the employment of millions of workers globally.From chatbots to text-to-image generators, AI relies on human workers labeling and annotating the millions of images and words it references. But the work of feeding information to AI can be tedious, with unreliable pay and few opportunities for growth.We discuss the workforce powering AI and Congress' plans to regulate the industry. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/08/2328m 9s

'Strange Planet' Satirizes The Absurdities Of Everyday Life

The wildly popular webcomic "Strange Planet" has attracted millions of followers by pointing out absurdities in everyday life.Beings on Strange Planet live in a place very similar to Earth and behave very similarly to humans. They just talk about it differently. On Strange Planet, coffee is "jitter liquid," socks are "foot tubes," alcohol is "mild poison," kissing is "mouth pushing," and raccoons are "greyscale finger bandits."The successful webcomic is expanding to books, merchandise, and now a new show on Apple TV+, co-created by "Strange Planet" creator Nathan W. Pyle and "Rick and Morty" co-creator Dan Harmon.We talk to Pyle about the show and his inspiration. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/08/2330m 16s

What We Know About Trump's Latest Criminal Indictment

Former President Donald Trump is facing his fourth criminal indictment — this time for attempting to overturn election results in Georgia.Trump has denied the charges, but the alleged crimes facing the presidential candidate are piling up. We talk about where the latest indictment fits in with the others and what happens next with our panel of guests.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/08/2334m 27s

The News Roundup For August 18, 2023

Former President Donald Trump was indicted again this week. He's been charged alongside 18 other co-defendants by a grand jury in Georgia for conspiring to unlawfully keep himself in office in the wake of the 2020 election under the state's racketeering law.Wildfires continue to ravage Maui. The death toll in the wildfires has reached 110, but is sure to climb in the coming days.Meanwhile, the United Nations issued a warning over the situation in Sudan this week. More than 1 million people have fled the country since fighting broke out in April. North Korea has officially confirmed U.S. soldier Travis King is in the country. North Korean officials are claiming King came to their country to escape unequal and inhumane treatment in the U.S. military.We cover all this and more during this edition of the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/08/231h 21m

Plugged In: Local Governments And The IRA

The Inflation Reduction Act is one year old this week, but what has it actually accomplished? That depends on where you are. While the law provides billions of dollars for the U.S. to transition away from fossil fuels, it's up to local governments to allow the big renewable energy development needed to meet the country's net-zero emissions goal. We discuss the biggests challenges for local governments when it comes to using IRA funding. Later we talk to Bureau of Land Management Director Tracy Stone-Manning. We discuss the funding the Bureau received from the IRA and what it's covering. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/08/2333m 11s

Spending Time In 'Your Mama's Kitchen'

Whether your mom was a natural cook or a reluctant one. Or if your other parent was the one throwing down in the kitchen, food and the place where it's made live inside of us long after we've eaten. What we inherit from our parents' kitchen and pass along as adults is at the center of a new podcast by award-winning journalist Michele Norris.It's called "Your Mama's Kitchen." Former first lady Michelle Obama joins Michele for the first episode. We speak to Michele about how our experiences in the kitchen shape us outside of it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/08/2331m 24s

Plugged In: How The IRA Is Changing Housing In America

The average American home generates roughly 10 thousand kilowatt hours of electricity every year according to the Energy Information Administration. Millions of Americans are transitioning to solar energy. A Pew Research poll last year found 8 percent of households have solar installed already and 39 percent said they're considering making the switch.But the expensive upfront cost of installing solar (on average $16,000 to $23,000) has kept a lot of people from making the switch.We discuss available options for homeowners and renters.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/08/2335m 43s

Plugged In: How The IRA Is Changing America

It's been nearly a year since the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 narrowly passed.President Joe Biden's sweeping climate bill has high hopes for fighting climate change, including a pledge to cut U.S. emissions in half by 2030. Some initiatives are working.We discuss the IRA and what other laws need to be passed to progress the fight against climate change.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/08/2340m 43s

The News Roundup For August 11, 2023

President Joe Biden is keeping his monument streak going, this time selecting more than 404,000 hectares of land near the Grand Canyon for protection. The move is welcome news for activists and members of Indigenous nations in the area.It was a busy week for the U.S. overseas, as well. U.S. officials were in Niger this week to attempt facilitating talks between supporters of the captive president and leaders of coup. They were not been allowed to see or speak with President Mohamed Bazoum.And the Biden administration has crafted new regulations on how American businesses can invest in Chinese enterprises. We cover these stories and so much more during this week's News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/08/231h 26m

The 1A Record Club Celebrates 50 Years Of Hip-Hop

Hip-hop is many things – unapologetic, lyrical, rhythmic, and above all, ubiquitous.Since its nebulous "creation" at a party in the Bronx in 1973, hip-hop has become one of the world's most popular genres and cultural expressions.It's also evolved drastically. It's given way to various subgenres – like gangsta rap and drill – and provided the means for talented emcees to be heard around the world.But hip-hop doesn't exist without its controversy. The genre has been seen by many since its inception as a tool to further misogyny, violence and capitalist exploitation.We celebrate Hip-Hop's 50th birthday by discussing the history of the genre and what its future could look like. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/08/2334m 57s

In Good Health: COVID's Summer Surge

COVID is surging across the globe for the fourth consecutive summer. In the United States, the latest tracking data from the CDC shows a 12 percent rise in hospitalizations due to the virus.Dr. Paul Offit is the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He's also on the FDA Vaccine Advisory Panel.He says the rise in COVID cases due to summer travel is expected. The severity of illness for most people is very low relative to previous summers.In the latest installment of In Good Health, we learn about the slate of new vaccines coming out in this fall for the flu, COVID, and RSV and explore how prepared the United States is for future pandemics.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/08/2330m 21s

The Debate Over Deep-Sea Mining

If you sank deep into the ocean, where the light no longer reaches, you would see, sitting on the seabed floor, nodules that look just like unassuming rocks.Those grayish clusters are actually filled with vital metals like cobalt, nickel, and copper, which are materials used in the construction of electric cars.Companies and governments are eager to begin deep sea mining for the metals, claiming it would aid in the shift to a greener economy. Others argue this mining could wreak havoc on the marine life we still know so little about. Two weeks ago, international talks about deep-sea mining regulations ended without any rules being set in place. We discuss how harmful the extraction of these metals can be and the future of deep-sea mining. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/08/2333m 30s

The Issue Of Religious Public Charter Schools

In June, a state board voted 3-to-2 to approve plans for St. Isidore of Seville Virtual Catholic School. It's named after the seventh-century patron saint of the internet. And it would be the first publicly-funded religious charter school in the country. The school is slated to go online in the fall of 2024 but is already facing legal challenges. On July 31, the Oklahoma Parent Legislative Action Committee filed a lawsuit to block the school from receiving taxpayer funds.We discuss the separation of church and state in public education, and what St. Isidore's approval could mean for other schools around the country.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/08/2335m 22s

The News Roundup For August 4, 2023

Former President Donald Trump was indicted again this week, this time on four charges related to his efforts to overturn the results of the 220 election.Moscow's business district was hit by a drone strike this week, the second attack of its kind on the city since May. And in Ukraine, Russian shelling damaged a landmark church in Kherson and wounded several people.Several countries are evacuating their citizens and personnel from Niger following the military coup that ousted President Mohamed Bazoum last Wednesday.And the United States Women's National Team has qualified for the Round of 16 at the 2023 Women's World Cup. The team failed to win at least two of its group-stage games for the first time in its history.We cover all this and more during this edition of the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/08/231h 25m

1A Remaking America: Guiding Growth In Up-And-Coming Cities

The U.S. population has grown by more than 20 million people since 2010. But where those new Americans end up is not even across the board.The populations of half of all counties in the U.S. shrank from 2010 to 2020, while those of most metropolitan areas continued to grow.People flock to booming cities for good reasons: jobs, educational opportunities, cultural and recreational activities. But traffic can be a nightmare and housing costs are off the charts.We discuss why and how cities grow, and what impacts growth has on residents and take a look at Utah, the fastest-growing state in the U.S.This show is part of 1A's "Remaking America" project looking at how our government is – and is not – working for everyone. It's a partnership with six public radio stations, including KUT in Austin, Texas.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/08/2333m 42s

How US Abortion Politics Jeopardize A Global AIDS Relief Program

About 20 years ago, Congress pretty much agreed on one thing: PEPFAR.President George W. Bush introduced the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in his 2003 State of the Union address. Since then, it's been renewed with little fuss every five years. But abortion politics are changing that, Politicians are reacting to allegations that PEPFAR funds are being used to "promote abortion on demand." Congress needs to decide if it will renew the program by the end of September.We discuss PEPFAR and how the politics around the program became so fraught. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/08/2332m 43s

Best Of: In Search Of The Elusive Lesbian Bar

In the 1980s there were roughly 200 lesbian bars across the country. Today, there are less than 30, according to The Lesbian Bar Project.While many gay bars cater to men, spaces for queer women have dwindled.Two years ago, Krista Burton began her journey to find out why. In her book, "Moby Dyke: An Obsessive Quest To Track Down The Last Remaining Bars In America," Krista traveled to 20 self-proclaimed lesbian bars to speak to patrons and owners.We talk to Krista about her book and discuss why these spaces are disappearing.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/08/2339m 24s

How Extreme Heat Affects Our Mental Health

Extreme temperatures remind us just how much heat can affect our physical health in dangerous and sometimes deadly ways. More than 600 people die each year in the U.S. from heat-related illnesses. But emerging research shows that hot days can affect our mental health, too. Emergency room visits for mental health issues across age groups rise along with the temperature. And the heat can affect everything from our sleep and mood to our susceptibility to anxiety and depression. We discuss how we can prepare for the effects of heat waves on our brains and bodies.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/07/2335m 28s

The News Roundup For July 28, 2023

A Congressional hearing on UAPs yielded some surprising information this week. Three military veterans appeared before lawmakers on Wednesday, one of whom alleged that the U.S. had recovered "non-human biologics" from supposed UAP crash sights.Overseas, the situation surrounding the military takeover in Niger continues to develop. Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum was taken into custody this week by a group of soldiers. The U.S. and UN have raised concerns about regional stability.And heat waves and natural disasters fueled by climate change in Europe and America are making life for citizens unbearable. This includes thousands fleeing their homes in Greece as wildfires rage across the country.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/07/231h 28m

Microsoft, Activision Blizzard, And The Future Of Gaming

Microsoft's intention to purchase video game developer Activision Blizzard was first announced in January 2022.The Federal Trade Commission issued a complaint against the deal, saying it would harm competition in the gaming market. That case went to trial — and Microsoft came out on top,And the deal still faces roadblocks in the United Kingdom, where the Competition and Markets Authority initially blocked the deal and is now holding a hearing to review it next month.But despite those roadblocks, the deal is set to close. And it may change the business of video games for the foreseeable future. We discuss the buyout and how this acquisition could affect the future of gaming. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/07/2333m 6s

The Fraught Future Of Volunteer Firefighting

Firefighters and fire departments perform a critical service in our communities, including responding to medical emergencies and helping mitigate the effects of natural disasters.But more than 70 percent of fire departments are staffed by volunteers, according to the U.S. Fire Administration.Volunteer fire departments are having to contend with dips in volunteerism and heightened standards for fire and emergency response teams.All the while, climate emergencies are becoming more frequent and dangerous.We discuss volunteer fire departments, and the demands and future of volunteer firefighting. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/07/2335m 3s

What Nutrition Labels Really Tell Us About Our Food

Many of us have likely felt confused by food labels before. But nutrition facts can offer important information about what we're consuming. There are several efforts underway to make the labels on our food more clear for consumers. Earlier this year, a bill was introduced in California that would change the language around expiration dates from "sell by" or "enjoy by" to "use by" or "best if used by" to minimize confusion. And last month, the FDA said it would test out putting nutrition labels on the front of packages in hopes of making them more accessible. We discuss food labels; what you like and hate about them, how to read them, and what they may look like in the future. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/07/2333m 58s

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Barbie'

For this month's edition of the 1A Movie Club, we're seeing "Barbie." The film's star-studded cast includes Margot Robbie, Ryan Gosling, Issa Rae, Kate McKinnon, and Will Ferrell — just to name a few. There's even a Barbie album with original songs from Lizzo, Charli XCX, Billie Eilish, and Gosling.The highly anticipated movie arrives in theaters this weekend. It has promised to deliver for Barbie lovers and haters alike.So how did the iconic doll translate to the big screen?We discuss with our Movie Club Panel and Guest Host Celeste Headlee. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/07/2332m 53s

The News Roundup For July 21, 2023

New temperature records were set in the southwest U.S. as climate change continues to push global temperatures to their extremes.Meanwhile, U.S. Special Climate Envoy John Kerry spent time in China this week discussing climate change and carbon with officials in President Xi Jinping's government. Little progress seems to have been made. And President Joe Biden invited Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to visit him at the White House before the end of the year. Biden, however, is also urging Netanyahu to not push proposed judicial reforms in his home country.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/07/231h 27m

Composer Ludwig Göransson On 'Oppenheimer'

Ludwig Göransson isn't a stranger to the power music can play in film.He's the composer behind the blockbuster "Black Panther" series, which earned him an Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2019. Now, he's back with "Oppenheimer." It's a historical epic that tells the life story of the father of the atomic bomb.He joins us to talk about his many collaborations and the music that shapes his life and work.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/07/2332m 11s

Strikes Are On The Rise; Are Labor Unions Missing Their Moment?

Strikes. Picketing. Protests. One thing has become clear across dozens of industries in recent years. Workers are dissatisfied.To resolve some of their workplace qualms, many workers have taken to organizing. But unions, and the collective bargaining agreements they try to secure, are often stalled by employers.Enter, strikes.A study from Cornell found that strikes were up by 52 percent in 2o22 and involved more than 224,000 workers. And while more than 16 million workers in the United States (about 1 in 10) were represented by a union in 2022, the share of workers represented by a union is declining.That's because union jobs are growing at a slower rate than non-union jobs.It's all happening at a time when most Americans are expressing support for unions. The tight labor market is also in the worker's favor. So, why aren't unions booming?We discuss unions, strikes, and the future of the labor movement. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/07/2335m 18s

In Good Health: The Complexities Of Autoimmune Disease

About one in ten people have an autoimmune disease, according to a population study of more than 2.2 million people. Autoimmune disease varies widely, and falls into subspecialties across the medical world: dermatology, gastroenterology, neurology , and more — and getting a diagnosis for an autoimmune disease can be long and difficult.Autoimmune diseases affect women and women of color on a far more frequent basis. Lupus is one of these diseases, affecting African American women three times more than white women. We discuss why the diagnostic process for an autoimmune disease is so complicated and why rates of disease are higher for women and women of color.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/07/2333m 36s

How To Get The Backyard Garden Of Your Dreams

It's about that time of year when your garden may be looking lush or... a little sad. And with this weekend's heatwave hitting a large swath of the U.S., it's getting harder to keep plants alive. Research from the University of Colorado Boulder found that people who started gardening not only experienced decreased levels of stress and anxiety but also reduced risk of chronic diseases. Gardening may be good for the body and soul, but it can also be frustrating. We assemble a group of expert gardeners to answer all your planting questions and make your backyard garden dreams come true – or at least try.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/07/2333m 51s

The News Roundup For July 14, 2023

Vermont and New York are bracing for more rain and flooding. The capital of the Green Mountain state, Montpelier, was swamped this week after storms dumped two months' worth of water on the city in two days. President Joe Biden declared an emergency in the state and authorized the Federal Emergency Management Agency to begin distributing aid.Meanwhile, overseas, President Biden met with NATO leaders in Lithuania this week and promised heads of state that the U.S. would remain committed to its allies despite "extreme elements" of the GOP signalling otherwise.The Brazilian government announced that deforestation in the Amazon rainforest is down by more than a third this year, so far.The longest-serving prime minister of the Netherlands announced he would step down this week, paving the way for a general election.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/07/231h 25m

1A Remaking America: The First Amendment And LGBTQ Rights

More than 20 states across the country have public accommodation laws to prevent businesses from discriminating against customers based on things like race, gender, religion, or sexual orientation.But a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision could put these protections at risk. Last month, in a 6-to-3 decision, the court ruled in it would be unconstitutional under the First Amendment for Lorie Smith, the plaintiff in 303 Creative v. Elenis, to have to create a message she opposes – in this case, a wedding website for a same-sex couple. The case raises big questions about what counts as creative speech under the First Amendment and also about questions about the fate of anti-discrimination protections across the country.We unpack the implications of the Supreme Court decision with legal and First Amendment scholars. This show is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/07/2337m 20s

Local Spotlight: The Black Opry Residency's Impact On Americana Music

Americana music encompasses country, bluegrass, folk, and blues and has deep roots in Black musical traditions.Long before Lil Nas X pushed the boundaries of what constitutes country music, Black musicians across Americana were reclaiming space in the genre.Many of those musicians found celebration and support in the Black Opry, a collective of Black artists that perform Americana music, founded online by Holly G in Nashville.This year, the Black Opry partnered up with WXPN to launch the Black Opry Residency, a weeklong program that provides resources and support for unsigned Black Americana musicians.We explore how and why the residency program came to be and what it means for the future of Black Americana musicians.This is a part of our series called "Local Spotlight," where we'll cover local stories that deserve national attention. Have a suggestion about what we should feature? You know where to find us.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/07/2331m 30s

Seeking Thrills And Staying Safe On Roller Coasters

While you may not be a fan of the heart pumping, adrenaline boosting feeling of a roller coaster's twists and turns, for others, it's the best part of the warmer months or even a core memory of their childhood. But recently, two roller coasters hit the headlines for less than awesome reasons. Riders at a Wisconsin festival were stuck upside down for around three hours after a mechanical failure. And a North Carolina man spotted a massive crack in a coaster support beam after his family had been on the ride.We discuss the safety of roller coasters and what's next for coaster engineering.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/07/2332m 20s

In Good Health: How Chronic Noise Exposure Affects The Human Body

Noise is unavoidable. Whether it's the rumbling of a freight train as it moves along the tracks in your backyard or the constant drip of your leaky faucet – we're surrounded by it.Qualities of sound, like frequency and loudness, impact how your body responds to a particular source of noise.A growing body of research says that chronic noise exposure is putting nearly a third of Americans at heightened risk of hypertension, stroke, and heart attacks.In this installment of our series, "In Good Health," we explore noise and its impact on our lives. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/07/2332m 26s

The News Roundup For July 7, 2023

A federal judge told the Biden administration officials and several federal agencies this week to stop communicating with social media platforms. The decision is in response to a lawsuit brought by several states against the administration concerning efforts to combat misinformation.More than 20 mass shootings occurred across the country this holiday week. At least 20 people were killed and more than 120 were injured in shootings in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, and Fort Worth.Meanwhile, an Israeli Defense Force operation in the occupied West Bank city of Jenin left at least twelve Palestinians dead and more than one hundred and twenty injured. Tuesday was the hottest day ever recorded on Earth. The record for global temperature is one that scientists are predicting will be shattered many times in the coming years.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/07/231h 25m

The Human Labor Powering AI Engines

As anxieties over automation mount, AI is already responsible for the employment of millions of workers globally.From chatbots to text-to-image generators, AI relies on human workers labeling and annotating the millions of images and words it references. But the work of feeding information to AI can be tedious, with unreliable pay and few opportunities for growth.We discuss the workforce powering AI and Congress' plans to regulate the industry. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/07/2328m 9s

How Youth Sports Affect America's Kids

Kids these days are busy.Even when school is out and it's time to close the books (or maybe, a laptop) time in the summer can fill up quickly. Often, with sports. Whether they're kicking a ball with the neighbors, going to the park for a game of pick-up basketball, traveling in Little League, heading to the Y for a swim, or even hitting a heavy bag, sports are everywhere in our early lives. But getting involved in organized sports as a kid can be expensive. Some communities pull together to offer discounted programs or transportation for kids who don't have access to it.We discuss how youth sports have changed over the years and what factors go into picking the right sport. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/07/2330m 24s

The Savory Story Of Hot Dogs And America

First introduced by immigrants in the 1800s, hot dogs have become synonymous with sports, summer, and the Fourth of July. And no other food starts debates quite like hot dogs – what's the best way to cook them? What's the best brand? What toppings are and aren't allowed? Are they sandwiches? Should we even eat them?We discuss the evolution of one of America's favorite foods and talk about some of your favorite ways to top them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/07/2340m 20s

Best Of: I Love You, Man: The Male Friendship Recession

Friendships are one of the few relationships that we choose. They can last longer than our romantic relationships and be just as intimate. They can take on the role of family if our own falls short. Having friends is an important part of the human experience. But over the past few years, adult friendship has been on the decline. And men are suffering the most from it. According to the Survey Center on American Life, the percentage of men with at least six close friends has fallen by half since 1990. One in five single men says he has zero close friends. We speak to two psychologists who specialize in friendships and men. We also hear from two guys who've been best friends for 30 years on how they keep the love alive.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/07/2333m 17s

The News Roundup For June 30, 2023

In a 6-3 ruling, the court struck down race-conscious admissions at two universities, setting the stage for other college and university admissions policies.Meanwhile, Canadian wildfires are wreaking new havoc in the Upper Midwest of the US, creating dense smog and unsafe air qualities in major American cities.Around the world, the questions of what's next for Russia after a dramatic but short-lived mutiny was cut short by the leader of the Wagner Group – Yevgeny Progozhin?Violent protests in France begin again after a teenager is killed during a police stop.The Swedish government approves a Quran-burning demonstration outside of a mosque, coinciding with the Muslim holiday of Eid-al-Adha.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/06/231h 21m

The History And Potential Of MDMA

MDMA, also known as ecstasy or molly, is illegal. It is listed as a Schedule 1 drug by the U.S. federal government (the same group as marijuana and psilocybin, or magic mushrooms).In recent years, a growing body of academic research has suggested potential benefits of MDMA. One study found that MDMA-enhanced therapy dramatically reduced PTSD symptoms. Another showed that psychedelics like MDMA could reopen so-called critical periods of time when brains are especially impressionable and open to learning.Rachel Nuwer's new book, "I Feel Love: MDMA and the Quest for Connection in a Fractured World," explores the history and potential of the so-called love drug.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/06/2330m 21s

The Opioid Crisis Is Causing Grandparents To Become Caregivers Again

The U.S. is battling a years-long, devastating opioid epidemic. Last year saw 79,770 reported opioid-involved drug overdose deaths, a 1.5 percent decrease from the previous year, according to data from the CDC.Nevertheless, the opioid crisis has upended traditional family structures. Many parents have died from overdosing, become incarcerated, or are otherwise unable to care for their children due to substance abuse.As a result, more and more children are being raised primarily by their grandparents in what are known as grandfamilies.Grandfamilies face unique challenges, as caregivers contend with stigma, dwindling income, deficits in technological savvy, and health issues related to aging.What kind of support do grandfamilies need to raise successful children? We explore how the opioid crisis is affecting grandparent caregivers with a panel of experts.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/06/2335m 5s

The Problem With Solitary Confinement In The U.S.

More than 122,000 people in the U.S. are estimated to be in solitary confinement, according to a report by Solitary Watch and Unlock the Box. That number is far greater than previous estimates.The United Nations says that prolonged solitary confinement can be psychological torture. We talk with our panel about the use of solitary confinement across the U.S. in federal and state prisons as well as local jails.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/06/2335m 59s

370 Years Later, Connecticut Is Exonerating Accused Witches

In May, legislators in Connecticut passed a resolution to exonerate people accused of being witches in the seventeenth century.Dozens of people were killed, mostly women, over accused witchcraft in the U.S. in the 1600s and early 1700s. It's estimated that nearly 50,000 people were killed in Europe based purely on superstition.We talk with our guests about the phenomenon of witch trials, their lasting impact, and what exoneration can mean to us now in 2023.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Find more shows and information online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/06/2335m 52s

The News Roundup For June 23, 2023

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito penned an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal trying to get ahead of a report released by ProPublica detailing unreported trips he took with a billionaire who had business before the court.Meanwhile, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed Congress this week. The search for a submarine carrying tourists to the wreck of the Titanic gripped the attention of people around the world. Hope of finding the five people aboard has now passed. And at least seven Palestinians were killed in an Israeli military raid in the Jenin refugee camp in the occupied West Bank. Hundreds more were injured as soldiers fired live ammunition.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/06/231h 26m

A Year After Roe v. Wade Was Overturned

A year ago, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, upending abortion law across the country. With Roe v. Wade overturned, what could replace it? WNYC's Supreme Court podcast "More Perfect" takes up that question in a two-part series. The two episodes focus on the origins of the viability line—that's the line that determines when a fetus is viable outside the womb.That line was around 24 weeks as defined by Roe v. Wade. Now it's whenever the state decides. We discuss the viability line in post-Roe America. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/06/2331m 23s

A Conversation With Celebrated Carpenter Mark Ellison

For carpenter Mark Ellison, a house, a staircase, a doorway are opportunities for beauty. Ellison has been called many things, including the best carpenter in New York City and the man who builds impossible things. His specialty is lavish and challenging projects, and his clients have included the late David Bowie and the late Robin Williams. But in his new book, "Building: A Carpenter's Notes on Life and the Art of Good Work," Ellison is less interested in these extravagant projects and more interested in what they've taught him: how to build a life worth living. We speak about that life and what he's learned in it.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/06/2332m 25s

How Genealogy Is Used To Track Black Family Histories

Our names are important to us. They tell us who we are and often, who we come from.So imagine suddenly discovering the last name you've always carried... might not actually be the name you should have. For Black Americans, genealogy can fill in the blanks left by the legacy of slavery and racism in the U.S. Services like the Freedmen's Bureau and Slave Voyages provide free access to records and documents to help with that search.We talk about the power of genealogy in fostering knowledge and connection for Black Americans.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/06/2330m 42s

Best Of: 1A Remaking America: The Birmingham Movement, 60 Years Later

On May 2, 1963, hundreds of school-age kids in Birmingham, Alabama, woke up with a plan. Through coded messages broadcast by local radio DJs, they were given the signal to leave the classroom and meet at the park for a peaceful protest against segregation in the city. These actions by students brought national attention—and a new momentum—to the civil rights movement, support for which had been waning as more adults were jailed and reluctant to be arrested.Civil rights leaders, including James Bevel, recruited young people to participate in a peaceful demonstration which became known as the Children's Crusade. Hundreds of kids were arrested by police for parading without a permit. Images of police dogs and firehoses being used on students in the city highlighted the injustices in Birmingham and prompted President John F. Kennedy to express support for federal civil rights legislation. We discuss the Children's Crusade and it's impact 60 years later. This conversation was recorded in April as part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country, including WBHM. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/06/2347m 26s

The News Roundup For June 16, 2023

Former President Donald Trump pleaded not guilty to 37 counts of mishandling classified documents this week. GOP politicians are split on the matter. The Supreme Court upheld the Indian Child Welfare Act on Thursday. The law gives priority to Native tribes when children from the community are up for adoption.Meanwhile, the United Nations is reporting that a record number of people around the world have been displaced by war, climate crises, and human rights abuses. And the European Union is moving to regulate the usage of artificial intelligence. It's the first governing body in the world to tackle the issue in a major way.We cover all this and more during the News Roundup.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/06/231h 26m

Strike A Pose: Ballroom Culture Since The '70s

Forget the waltz and the tango. For this show, we're headed to a different kind of ball. In these spaces, Houses compete in different walking and dancing competitions.It's long influenced important parts of American pop culture. Beyoncé's "Renaissance," Madonna's "Vogue", the award-winning show "Pose,"and HBO Max's reality show "Legendary" all highlight or borrow from ballroom culture. Its history has also been recorded in documentaries like "Paris Is Burning" or the more recent "How Do I Look."We discuss the history of ballroom culture, what it looks like today, and how it can be a place for political organization.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/06/2333m 42s

Best Of: Where Does Nuclear Energy Fit In A Carbon-Free Future?

Experts have repeatedly said that the world has to stop burning fossil fuels if we want to avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis.The latest United Nations climate report reminded us just how soon that needs to happen. The U.S. should cut two-thirds of fossil fuels in the next decade.When it comes to carbon-free energy, many people think of renewables like solar or wind. But there's also the nuclear option. Nuclear currently accounts for 20 percent of our electricity production, according to the Energy Information Administration. We discuss where nuclear energy fits into a carbon-free future and how safe the nuclear power we already have is.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us online.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/06/2332m 19s

1A Remaking America: The Anti-Dollar Store Movement

The most common store in the U.S.? It's not Target, not Walmart, or Walgreens.It's Dollar General.The chain boasts more than 19,000 locations across the country. According to the American Public Health Association, dollar stores are the fastest-growing food retailers in the country, but they don't usually provide the same amount of fresh produce as conventional grocery stores.Now, dozens of cities are moving to limit the number of dollar stores opening in their communities.We discuss the playbook city reps are using to regulate their local market.This show is part of 1A's "Remaking America" project looking at how our government is – and is not – working for everyone.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find out how to connect with us by visiting our website.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/06/2329m 17s
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