The New Statesman Podcast

The New Statesman Podcast

By The New Statesman

Politics and ideas from Britain's leading progressive political magazine.


Mondays: leading thinkers illuminate the ideas shaping the world, from politics to culture.


Thursdays: host Anoosh Chakelian is joined by the New Statesman politics team to help you understand the week in politics, in Westminster and beyond. Featuring Andrew Marr, Rachel Cunliffe, Freddie Hayward and more.


Saturdays: the New Statesman team answer your questions in "You Ask Us".


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Send us a question: www.newstatesman.com/youaskus


Become a New Statesman subscriber: https://www.newstatesman.com/subscribe


Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


Episodes

Are there any Tory MPs Labour wouldn't welcome?

It's a defection listener questions special.We’ve had lots of questions come in this week about defection, prompted by the surprise and somewhat contentious defection of the once Conservative MP for Dover and Deal, Natalie Elphicke, to Labour last week.To help guide us through Hannah Barnes, associate editor, is joined in the studio by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor at the New Statesman, and down the line by David Gauke, former Conservative MP for South West Hertfordshire and New Statesman columnist.Read: Do Tory defections to Labour herald a realignment? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/05/2430m 56s

Will Starmer stick to his pledges?

This morning Keir Starmer has laid out six key pledges for a Labour government, should they win power this election year.So what is the Labour leader promising, and will those promises be kept?Hannah Barnes, associate editor, is joined on the New Statesman podcast by Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, and George Eaton, senior editor. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/05/2421m 16s

Hilary Cass: "Do I regret doing it? Absolutely not"

Just over a month ago Dr Hilary Cass published her landmark review of gender identity services for children and young people.In her last UK media interview before her team wrap up, she spoke to the New Statesman about the four years it took to compile and complete the review, as well as the reflections she’s had since it was published and criticisms that have been leveled against both her findings and her own professionalism.You can read the accompanying article to this interview here: Hilary Cass: “Do I regret doing it? Absolutely not” Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/05/241h 1m

Who would want Rishi Sunak's job now?

Are any Tories desperate enough to take over as Prime Minister?In our listener questions episode, You Ask Us, Rachel Cunliffe, George Eaton and Freddie Hayward answer your questions on whether any Conservative MPs would really want to take over as PM before the next election, and how on earth they will explain Britain's failing economy during the election campaign.To submit a question, visit www.newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribe to the New Statesman at www.newstatesman.com/subscribeSign up to receive Freddie's daily politics email, Morning Call: morningcall.substack.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/05/2411m 34s

Defeat and defection: Tories are down bad

The longer the Conservatives hang on, the worse it gets. Last week Rishi Sunak lost 474 councillors, the constituency of Blackpool south, and Andy Street’s West Midlands mayoral. And yesterday things went from bad to worse for Sunak with a surprise defection to Labour from Natalie Elphicke MP for Dover and Deal.The Conservatives can’t seem to escape this endless decline in support and popularity. So when did it all start to go wrong, and can they stop the train before it completely derails?Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, is joined in the studio by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and George Eaton, senior editor.Read: The Tory doomscroll Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/05/2420m 17s

How can life sciences investment make the UK healthier? | Sponsored

The UK is on course for a huge rise in preventable illness. The Health Foundation charity predicts that by 2040, one in five adults will be living with a serious condition, such as cancer, dementia or heart disease. Meanwhile, economic activity is stagnating, with roughly 2.8 million people currently out of work due to ill health, according to the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics.Our world-leading life sciences sector has the capacity to help reverse this trend. In 2021 alone, it contributed £43.3bn to the UK economy, and supported 646,000 jobs. With the right investment, it could add an additional £68bn to GDP over the next 30 years, create 85,000 more jobs and result in a 40 per cent decrease in disease burden across the UK.This episode, in partnership with professional services firm PwC, explores how greater investment into vital disease areas such as cancer, obesity and immunology could make British society physically and financially healthier.Emma Haslett is joined by Chi Onwurah, the shadow minister for science, research and innovation; Dr Dan Mahony, chair of the UK BioIndustry Association (BIA) and the government’s life sciences investment envoy; and Stephen Aherne, pharmaceutical and life sciences leader at PwC UK.If you enjoyed this podcast you can find more of Spotlight's policy reporting in our standalone Spotlight podcast feed, or at newstatesman.com/spotlight   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/05/2432m 39s

What do we really know about ‘Starmerism’?

Keir Starmer is the man poised to be the next leader of the UK. But he is also a man of whom many - including those in his own party - have asked: what does he stand for? Four years after Starmer became leader of the Labour party we know a little more about him. We’ve heard about his childhood, the pebble-dashed semi and his time at the Crown Prosecution Service.But what are the principles behind the man and his project ? What do we really know about ‘Starmerism’? Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, is joined by George Eaton, senior editor, who has written this week's cover story.Read: What is Starmerism? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/05/2428m 28s

Election Special: "by and large, the country has moved against the government"

It has been a terrible night for the Conservatives who have lost councillors, constituencies, and new Mayoral positions to Labour. Keir Starmer has called this result a sign to move on and for Rishi Sunak to call a general election.So far the Tories have held onto the Tees Valley mayoral position but Labour have won in Rishi Sunak's backyard. So as the rest of the results continue to trickle in, Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Ben Walker, senior data journalist, as they analyse what yesterday's elections, and today’s results, tell us about the UK wants from its leadership. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/05/2427m 8s

John Swinney - the next leader of Scotland?

One week ago, Humza Yousaf, first minister of Scotland and leader of the Scottish National Party, terminated the power-sharing deal with the Scottish Greens. There had been mounting pressure on both Yousaf’s leadership and ending the coalition, but the eventual timing of the termination caused the now former leader to appear panicked and triggered a Scottish government crisis.On Monday, just after 13 months in office, Yousaf resigned, ahead of two no confidence votes. This morning John Swinney announced his leadership to be Scotland’s next first minister, meanwhile this afternoon Kate Forbes has announced that she will not be entering the leadership race.But the SNP was deeply fractured when Yousaf inherited it, would a successor be able to unite it?Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, is joined by Chris Deerin, Scotland editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/05/2422m 24s

The Rwanda bill will create a legacy of suffering - an interview with a former asylum seeker

In 2022, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees announced that for the first time since records had begun, 100 million people were displaced by war, violence, persecution and human rights abuses.No one wants to leave their home, but for many, the threat of death, danger and destruction leaves them with very little choice. But where can they go? And where will they be met with humanity?Sarah Dawood, senior associate editor at the New Statesman, is joined by former asylum seeker Arman Azadi, who arrived in the UK at 14 years old. After completing school and university in the UK he has worked with charities, governments, and the United Nations to advise on policies concerning displaced children whose lives have been torn apart by war and conflict. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/04/2421m 39s

What are the chances of a Conservative-Reform UK coalition?

A listener writes in to ask, "Is there any risk of a Conservative - Reform coalition?""Why do journalists not ask “how are you going to pay for it” when it comes to defence spending? Why is Keir Starmer's defence spending target covered so differently to planned green spending?" - another listener asks.Hannah Barnes, associate editor, is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, to answer listener questions.Would you like to ask the team a question? You can do so here! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/04/2416m 54s

Can Labour get Britain's trains back on track?

Train travel in the UK has become an increasingly painful experience in the past few years. Prices continue to rise at an astonishing rate, meanwhile delays, cancellations and strikes have become the norm. Many have simply given up on this mode of transport.Last night, Labour announced their plan to get Britain’s railways back on track. But what does this mean? And could bringing trains back into public ownership really fix the dire state of rail travel in the UK?Hannah Barnes, associate editor, is joined in the studio by George Eaton, senior editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent. Read: Louise Haigh: Labour manifesto will pledge rail renationalisation Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25/04/2420m 33s

Can Britain quit smoking for good? | Sponsored

MPs have voted to back Rishi Sunak's progressive smoking ban. Can it work?The Tobacco & Vapes Bill includes new legislation to increase the smoking age by one year, every year, banning the sale of cigarettes to anyone born after 1st January 2009. MPs have voted the bill through its second reading and it is now in the committee stage.The tobacco firm Philip Morris International have pledged to move away from selling cigarettes, and instead focus on heated tobacco products. In this episode, Becky Slack is joined by Dr. Moira Gilchrist of Philip Morris International, to discuss the company's plans for a "smoke-free future" and whether Britain - and tobacco firms - really can kick cigarettes for good.This episode was paid for by Philip Morris International. The New Statesman retains full editorial control. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/04/2427m 8s

Boarding school boys rule Britain, at what cost?

In March, Charles Spencer, the 9th Earl Spencer, published his memoir - A Very Private School. This recounted, in devastating detail, the abuse, both mental and physical, that he had been subjected to at his elite prep boarding school. The brutality is laid bare. For centuries in the UK, a private education has been the pathway to opportunity. Today those who attended private schools are five times more likely to hold top jobs in politics, the judiciary, media, and business. Boarding school boys in particular, who represent less than 1% of the population, have been in charge of the country for most of the past 14 years. But at what cost? For both the survivors of these institutions and for the whole country.Read: A boyhood built on fear, The price of private education Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/04/2438m 59s

How Iran and Israel are dividing British politics

This episode was recorded on the 18th of April, prior to Israel's missile strikes on Iran.Tensions in the Middle East have heightened further after Iran launched a missile attack on Israel last week. This was in response to Israel’s strike on the Iranian embassy in Damascus, Syria - which killed 16 people. Western leaders came to Israel’s defence and condemned Iran’s attack, but prior to this David Cameron - the UK foreign secretary - had warned that the UK’s support for Israel was ‘not unconditional’. So how have these latest developments divided the government’s stance on Israel’s conflict? And how are Labour planning to act should they come into government amid this war?Anoosh Chakelian, Britian editor at the New Statesman, is joined by Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, and George Eaton, senior editor.Read: The new Tory divide on IsraelSign up to the New Statesman's daily politics email Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/04/2417m 52s

Does Liz Truss believe what she's saying?

This week Liz Truss has embarked on the press tour of a lifetime with her new book, Ten Years to Save the West: Lessons from the only conservative in the room. She's been casting blame from the UN to the Bank of England for the failure of her time in office, but does she really believe what she's saying? And how might this affect her standing in the next general election?Anoosh and Rachel also ask Freddie about his recent trip to the National Conservatism conference in Brussels with the likes of Nigel Farage, Suella Braverman, Éric Zemmour, Viktor Orbán, and the Belgian police. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/04/2422m 49s

Decaying Britain: how severe is the NHS dental crisis?

People up and down the country have been struggling to get NHS dental appointments for the past few years, forcing some to pay inflated prices for private treatment, or ignore their oral health until it’s reached an unbearable point. This crisis is also greatly impacting children across the nation, and today the number one reason children are admitted to hospital is due to severe dental issues.So how did we get here? Why is the UK faced with Dickensian rot in 2024?Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor, is joined by policy correspondent Harry Clarke-Ezzidio, and senior associate editor, Sarah Dawood. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/04/2429m 25s

The Angela Rayner investigation: scandal or smear campaign?

Angela Rayner, the Labour deputy leader, is being accused of being a ‘tax avoider’. While these attacks are coming predominantly from the right, they’ve been mounting in recent weeks and now Labour is having to confront the allegations.So what could this mean for the deputy leader? Is Labour in trouble? Or is this a Tory smear campaign?Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, is joined in the studio by political correspondent Freddie Hayward; this episode was recorded on Thursday 11th April.Read the pieces mentioned in this podcast: Is Angela Rayner in danger?; What Dominic Raab missed about Angela Rayner at Glyndebourne; I looked into Angela Rayner’s tax affairs – here’s what I found Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/04/2414m 14s

How will the gender care report affect politics?

We’ve been digging around in our virtual mailbag and have brought a couple of your questions  to discuss. One listener asks: What are the political implications of the Cass report and will it affect how British politicians approach the transgender conversation?And another listener writes in to ask: Could a Starmer win in the UK and a Trump win in the US spell the end for the ‘special relationship’?Ask a question for a future podcast: www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/2022/10/you-ask-usRead Andrew Marr's piece: Inside Labour’s foreign policy factory Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/04/2425m 33s

Is Britain addicted to monarchy?

The British royal family was in crisis even before Queen Elizabeth II died, and the new King and princess of wales both became ill with cancer.In this modern age where access increasingly equates to relevance, and truth and conspiracy so often intertwine, how is Britain’s relationship with monarchy changing? Chris Stone is joined on the New Statesman podcast by author Tanya Gold who has written this week's cover story: The Fragile Crown. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/04/2425m 37s

Why do politicians push culture wars? And should landlord MPs vote on renting laws?

It's listener questions time! Anoosh Chakelian and Rachel Cunliffe answer a listener who asks why senior politicians flock to address culture wars issues "which are frankly below their station", and another who wants to know if MPs who are also landlords should recuse themselves from voting on laws affecting renters.Submit a question for us to answer on a future episode: www.newstatesman.com/youaskusListen to our previous episode on leasehold reform with Barry Gardiner MP: https://pod.fo/e/22360dSign up to receive Morning Call, our daily politics newsletter: https://substack.com/morningcall Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/04/2414m 56s

Sh*tstorm: who's to blame for England's water crisis?

England’s waterways are overflowing with sewage. In a recent report it has been found that a record amount of sewage is being discharged into rivers and seas around England. Data revealed that last year raw sewage was discharged, by private water companies, for more than 3.6 million hours, a 105% increase on the previous 12 months. And in addition to all of this Thames Water, Britain’s biggest water company, is at risk of insolvency.Who’s responsible for this shitstorm? And in how many ways is this damaging for the country?Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, is joined in the studio by Will Dunn, business editor, and Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor.Read Will's piece: Who killed Thames Water? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/04/2423m 17s

Reshaping the gig economy: union representation and worker protections | Sponsored

Flexible work has existed for decades. Think about local hairdressers, personal trainers, or tutors working for themselves – or even the jazz musicians in the early 1900s who coined the term ‘gig economy’. But the past ten years of technology have made it more accessible – and visible – to both the people who use it and those who work in it.But what is the right balance between job autonomy, economic security and worker’s rights? Is there a world where an evolving labour market provides proper workers’ protections and union representation while maintaining real autonomy and flexibility?This New Statesman podcast, sponsored by Uber ahead of the three year anniversary of their groundbreaking recognition agreement with GMB – the first of its kind in the gig economy – breaks down all of this and more, to discuss the future of work in 21st-century Britain.Journalist Suze Cooper was joined by a panel of guests including Sir Stephen Timms, MP for East Ham since 1994 and Chair of Parliament’s Work and Pensions Select Committee; the GMB trade union’s National Secretary, Andy Prendergast and Uber’s UK General Manager, Andrew Brem.Through the episode, they discussed how changes in ways of working have come to the fore in our everyday lives, with technological advances seeing less of a focus on traditional industries and more on the dynamic, flexible labour market of the 21st century. Alongside these transformations we’ve seen the world of work change in other ways with the rise of hybrid working environments, the gig and sharing economy, work-from-anywhere culture and digital nomads. The pandemic has sped up and baked in these developments across the UK, as people’s approach to work-life balance adjusted, with workers seemingly coming to value their autonomy in much more profound ways than previous generations.Options for flexible work across various apps and platforms have enabled more choice for millions of people around their working patterns, choosing when and where they earn. More and more, it appears British workers are putting greater value on autonomy and flexibility in their lives and careers than their parents and grandparents did, balancing work around other responsibilities like caring or studying. But the question for the UK – and considered by the panel throughout this episode – is how best to deliver this flexibility and autonomy whilst not compromising on the protections and benefits workers need. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/04/2429m 10s

Alison McGovern: "people want respect and dignity"

Today on the podcast we're bringing you a conversation from the New Statesman's Path to Power conference which looked inside the Labour Party machine as it gears up for the next election.In this session Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor at the New Statesman, was joined by Alison McGovern, MP for Wirral South and Shadow Minister for Work and Pensions, to discuss Labour's plans for labour. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/04/2426m 0s

How would a general election shift if all UK residents, not just citizens, could vote?

This is an episode we like to call “You Ask Us”. Our first question from James who says: "How would the results of a general election change if all British residents were allowed to vote, not just British Citizens? In other words what happens if we let immigrants without British passports vote?" Ryan also writes in to say: "Will Labour be forced into a strict immigration policy come the general election in order to stop it being the dominant issue?" Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor of the New Statesman, is joined in the studio by political correspondent, Freddie Hayward, and down the line by senior data journalist Ben Walker. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/03/2418m 38s

"Turning up to a gun fight with a wooden spoon": should the UK be tougher on China?

Earlier this week the UK government accused China of stealing 40 million UK registered voters’ names and addresses. The breach occurred in 2021 and 2022, in which time GCHQ has ascertained that China state-affiliated actors also targeted several parliamentarians’ emails - including former Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith. So what could the Chinese government do with this data? How real is the threat of China to Western democracy? And what is our government doing to mitigate this risk?Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor of the New Statesman, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, discuss the UK's China strategy in the run up to the election.Read: China’s global coal machine won’t be stopped so easily Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/03/2417m 15s

The UK's social care system is failing all of us

Each one of us in the UK is likely to be or become a carer at some point in our lives. Women have a 50:50 chance of caring by the time they are 46 and men by the time they reach the age of 57.But the UK’s social care system is failing all of us. This includes those that require care (whether this is older or disabled adults), and both formal employed carers and informal carers who tend to be parents, children, siblings, or spouses.Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor of The New Statesman, is joined by Jess Prestidge from the Centre for Social Justice, and former BBC correspondent and family carer Humphrey Hawksley. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25/03/2429m 54s

Is Vaughan Gething’s victory politically significant?

This is an episode we like to call “You Ask Us”.Our first question from Adam in Cardiff who says: "Does it matter who was elected in the Welsh Labour leadership election? It seems that both candidates had a very similar platform. Does the selection of Vaughan Gething have political implications in Westminster?"Rory also writes in to say: "With the Mayoral elections coming up, what would the significance of a Labour clean sweep be? A lot has been said about the different experiences of Labour and Tory Mayors under the previous government… might a Labour government try to depoliticise devolution?"Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor of the New Statesman, is joined in the studio by political correspondent, Freddie Hayward. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/03/2413m 11s

Labour's economic plans: 'Bidenomics' without the money?

Stability, investment, and reform - these are the three pillars for growth set out by Shadow Chancellor Rachel Reeves in her Mais Lecture to business and finance leaders earlier this week.“In a changing world, Britain has been behind the curve,” she said, but a Labour government, she stated, would seek to bring a “new chapter in Britain's economic history”. Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, is joined by George Eaton, senior editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, who both attended Reeves' lecture on Tuesday evening at Bayes Business School in City University. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/03/2416m 9s

Why are female politicians still taken less seriously?

Why are women still taken less seriously than men? Alona Ferber, senior editor at the New Statesman, is joined by Mary Ann Seighart, journalist, former assistant editor of The Times, visiting professor at Kings College London and author of The Authority Gap: Why women are still taken less seriously than men, and what we can do about it.One of the things that shocked Mary Ann Seighart most from writing this book was that even the most senior, successful, authoritative women are taken less seriously. Even being president of a country doesn't insulate women from the authority gap. Why is this? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/03/2438m 1s

How does the whip system work? + Are Tory voters dying out?

Ben Walker shares exclusive analysis on the impact of a dying electorate.In our weekly listener questions episode, Rachel Cunliffe is joined by Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker to answer two questions from New Statesman listeners:Nick asks: "what is the whip system and how (the hell) can it be democratic?" Freddie explains how it works, and Ben shares his experiences being 'whipped' in his role as a borough councillor.And an anonymous listener asks for analysis on the proportion of voters who have died since the 2019 election - Ben responds with some exclusive analysis, hot off the press.Want to ask a question for a future episode? Go to www.newstatesman.com/YouAsk UsJoin our community of free thinkers by becoming a New Statesman subscriber, and get your first month free: https://www.newstatesman.com/subscribeGet a free daily dose of politics from Freddie Hayward by signing up for the Morning Call newsletter: https://substack.com/morningcall Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/03/2414m 24s

Rishi Sunak has lost control

The Tory racism row exposed the Prime Minister's weakness.It's been another "torrid" week for the Conservatives, with a row over alleged racist comments made by their largest donor overshadowing the announcement of new extremism rules.Rachel Cunliffe is joined by George Eaton and Freddie Hayward to discuss how Rishi Sunak's response to Frank Hester's alleged comments exposes his weakness as leader - and the impact this might have on the next election.Submit a question for "You Ask Us": https://www.newstatesman.com/youaskusJoin our community of free thinkers by becoming a New Statesman subscriber, and get your first month free: https://www.newstatesman.com/subscribeGet a free daily dose of politics from Freddie Hayward by signing up for the Morning Call newsletter: https://substack.com/morningcall Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
14/03/2419m 42s

Andy Burnham and Steve Rotheram's "rallying cry for a more equal Britain"

At the beginning of February Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, travelled to Liverpool to interview two regional mayors: Andy Burnham the Mayor of Greater Manchester and Steve Rotheram, Metro Mayor of the Liverpool City Region.Their new co-authored book, Head North: A Rallying Cry for a More Equal Britain, chronicles their intersecting journeys in politics, the careers paths which brought them to Westminster, and ultimately their joint decision to leave Westminster in order to affect greater change for the regions they represent. This episode was recorded on the 5th of February, 3 days before Labour rowed back on their pledge to invest an annual £28 billion on kickstarting a green industrial revolution. We discuss the proposed £28 billion investment during this conversation, the contents of which are now out of date. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/03/2442m 0s

Is Starmer showing his "true colours"?

It's listener question time!Neil from Cambridge asks: "Rishi Sunak and other Conservatives keep telling us that Labour will take us 'back to square one' either through their policies or lack of a plan. What point in time does he want us to think of as being 'square one'? And why does he think that voters would believe that it is necessarily worse than where we are headed now?"Jon says: "Why do you guys propose on your podcasts that Starmer is currently lying, intending on being radical and inspiring once in office? Don’t you think with a 30 point lead he can afford to show his true colours?"Harry Clarke-Ezzidio, policy correspondent at the New Statesman, steps in for Anoosh this week, and he is joined. by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/03/2415m 57s

Spring Statement: let's talk about growth!

Yesterday, Jeremy Hunt delivered the spring statement, the last before the next general election and his fourth budget since becoming Chancellor in October 2022, after replacing Kwasi Kwarteng.Non-doms have been abolished, national insurance has been cut by 2p, a vaping tax has been introduced, and the NHS has been promised 3.4 billion towards a digital transformation. But while inflation remains high and most of the nation is feeling the prolonged squeeze of the cost of living crisis - will these proposals make any real difference?Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor at the New Statesman, is joined in the studio by Will Dunn, business editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
07/03/2422m 42s

Leaseholds are a big feudal con

Over 5 million people in the UK live in a leasehold; a property ownership agreement which entitles people to the space inside the property but not necessarily the building it’s in nor the land it is built on. England and Wales are the last countries in the world where leaseholds are still widely used. So why is this, how does it affect the 5 million people living in these properties, and is it all a big feudal con?Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Barry Gardiner, Labour MP for Brent North.Watch Barry Gardiner's documentary: LeaseholdListen to our podcast on the collapse of rentier capitalism: The housing crash is just beginning Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/03/2435m 45s

George Galloway's back, back again

After a dramatic and chaotic campaigning period for the Rochdale by-election, the controversial politician George Galloway will be returning to Westminster - yet again. He currently represents the Workers Party of Britain, but this is the fourth city he’s been elected to represent and the third party in four decades.Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, is joined by the New Statesman's Britain editor Anoosh Chakelian, and senior data journalist, Ben Walker.Read Anoosh's report here: Rochdale’s by-election brings the Gaza war to Britain Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/03/2422m 55s

Tory islamophobia: “Reform UK is driving them demented” – with Andrew Marr

From Lee Anderson’s rant against Sadiq Khan on GB News, to Liz Truss’s appearance with Steve Bannon, this week has been nothing short of a conspiratorial catastrophe for the Conservative Party.Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Andrew Marr and Rachel Cunliffe to discuss why Rishi Sunak and senior Conservatives are “too scared” to call out islamophobia – while Reform and GB News are “driving them a bit demented”.Become a New Statesman subscriberhttps://www.newstatesman.com/subscribeDownload the app (subscribers can listen ad-free):iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=US Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/02/2417m 16s

Where do we get the money to fix the world's biggest problems? | Sponsored

The world is currently facing multiple crises, from geopolitical conflicts to pandemics and climate change. But amidst this turbulence, international aid budgets are being stretched as domestic issues take precedence. The UK has cut its overseas aid budget significantly, from 0.7 to 0.5 per cent of gross national income. Meanwhile, low-income countries need more support than ever, as they deal with the fall out of wars, extreme poverty, natural disasters and humanitarian issues. The costs involved are huge, and while aid still has a role to play, we need to look beyond grants to unlock funding on a bigger scale to fix these problems.In this sponsored podcast, host and freelance journalist Emma Haslett is joined by Sarah Champion, Labour MP for Rotherham and chair of the cross-party international development parliamentary committee; James Mwangi, founder of Climate Action Platform for Africa, an organisation working to unlock Africa's potential as a global hub for climate action; and Hannah Ryder, CEO at Development Reimagined, an Africa-led and women-led international development consultancy.Focusing on the African continent, they explore the need to reform global financial institutions, and how the UK can develop new models of financial support that rely less on aid and more on partnership and collaboration with low-income countries.This podcast is sponsored by ONE, a not-for-profit international development organisation which campaigns to end extreme poverty and preventable disease by 2030.Join the fight for a more equal future: visit one.org. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/02/2439m 8s

Chumocracy is tearing Britain apart

From opaque contract awards, to cosy relationships between politicians and business elites, the idea of a ‘chumocracy’ has long been making headlines and raising eyebrows. But just how endemic is the issue? And how does it affect the functioning of the state?Harry Clarke-Ezzidio, policy correspondent at the New Statesman, is joined by business editor, Will Dunn, to explore the links between peers and politicians, and the awarding of government money. Read Will's cover story: The rotten state Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/02/2428m 49s

Have the Tories given up on the culture wars?

"I've heard speculation that the Tories' election strategy is not really about "culture war and wedge issues" or evoking fear of Labour spending plans. It's about showing Starmer as indecisive and untrustworthy, and the Labour Party as divided." - one listener writes in to ask if the Conservatives election tactics have changed in recent months.Another listener writes in to ask if Labour "have got away with the 28 billion thing"; this being the u-turn the previous promise to spend £28 billion a year on kickstarting a green industrial revolution if they win the electionAnoosh Chakelian, Britain editor, is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, to answer these questions. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/02/2415m 6s

Out of Order! Chaos in parliament over ceasefire vote

Almost five months on from the beginning of the conflict, Labour appears to have shifted its position - calling for an “immediate humanitarian ceasefire” in Gaza. This culminated in a chaotic debate in parliament last night with SNP and Tory MPs walking out and this morning Lindsay Hoyle, speaker of the house, is facing calls to resign.Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, to discuss how this breakdown in order reflects the current state of British politics. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/02/2420m 42s

How to tackle the UK's plastic pollution problem | Sponsored

The UK is one of the biggest plastic polluters in the world. According to Greenpeace we produce more plastic waste per person than almost any other country, with our supermarkets creating roughly 800,000 tonnes every year.We need to find ways to minimise waste through keeping products and packaging in circulation for as long as possible. This is where the circular economy comes in - a more sustainable model of production that reduces, reuses, repairs and recycles. With a general election coming up, creating a circular economy will be a crucial component of the next government’s net zero agenda, and businesses will need to play their part.In this sponsored podcast, host and freelance journalist Emma Haslett is joined by Julian Hunt, vice president of public affairs, communication and sustainability of GB and Northern Europe at Coca-Cola Europacific Partners; Ruth Jones, Labour MP for Newport West and shadow minister for environmental protection and animal welfare; and Dr Costas Velis, a lecturer in resource efficiency systems in the School of Civil Engineering (SoCE), at the University of Leeds. They explore how the UK can move towards a circular economy, and the role businesses play in enabling that shift.This podcast is sponsored by Coca-Cola Europacific Partners.To learn more about Coca-Cola Europacific Partners' work in making its packaging more sustainable, you can check out its This is Forward packaging commitments or for further information about the company head here.Listen to the podcast in full here or on the Spotlight on Policy podcast channel. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/02/2425m 32s

Why do local councils keep collapsing?

More councils have gone bust in 2023 than in the 30 years before 2018, with eight effectively declaring bankruptcy since that year: Northamptonshire, Croydon, Slough, Northumberland, Thurrock, Woking, Birmingham and Nottingham. But why are councils going bust? Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor, is joined by policy correspondent Megan Kenyon and Jonny Ball, associate editor of the New Statesman’s policy section, Spotlight, to delve into what’s happening in townhalls across the country.Read Anoosh's report on Thurrock: The town that was gambled awayFollow the council bankruptcy tracker Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/02/2433m 4s

Swing Time: Wellingborough and Kingswood turn red

The results of yesterday’s by-elections are in, Kingswood and Wellingborough - both previously Conservative seats - have turned red in a historic loss for the Tories.Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor, is joined by the New Statesman's associate political editor Rachel Cunliffe, and senior data journalist Ben Walker to discuss what these results mean for Labour, the Conservatives, and Reform UK.Join like minded readers that support our journalism. Enjoy unlimited access to our writing and subscriber-only benefits from just £2 for 2 months. Visit www.newstatesman.com/subscribe-2-for-2 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/02/2430m 49s

Labour’s Rochdale unravelling, with Andrew Marr

This week Labour has suspended not one, but two parliamentary candidates for reported comments made over Israel. The party has been on a mission to purge anti-semitism from its ranks over the past few years, so just how catastrophic has this week been for them?Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor, is joined in the studio by the New Statesman's political editor Andrew Marr, and political correspondent Freddie Hayward.Join like minded readers that support our journalism. Enjoy unlimited access to our writing and subscriber-only benefits from just £2 for 2 months. Visit www.newstatesman.com/subscribe-2-for-2 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/02/2415m 38s

Fake romance: the UK’s leading "catfishing" fraud specialist

How did one detective take on an international network of romance fraudsters? This episode was written Stuart McGurk and read by Will Dunn. The commissioning editor was Melissa Denes. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/02/2446m 13s

Your polling questions answered, with Ben Walker

Our polling expert answers listener questions.Many of you have written in with questions for Ben Walker, the New Statesman's polling data analyst. In this episode Anoosh asks Ben your questions:What impact will tactical voting have on the next election?How will constituency boundary changes impact the main parties?Why are voters less "brand loyal" than in the past?Will 2024 see more green MPs elected?Submit a question for the New Statesman team to answer at www.newstatesman.com/youaskusBecome a New Statesman subscriberhttps://www.newstatesman.com/subscribeDownload the app (subscribers can listen ad-free):iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/02/2419m 24s

Liz Truss is back – and this time she’s “popular”

Will Liz Truss’s “PopCon” undermine Rishi Sunak?On Tuesday Tory right-wingers gathered in Westminster for the launch of “Popular Conservatism”, a new political group spearheaded by Liz Truss, who was joined by the likes of Jacob Rees-Mogg, Lee Anderson and Mark Littlewood, formerly of the IEA.Rachel Cunliffe and Freddie Hayward attended the launch and join Anoosh Chakelian on the podcast to discuss what the new group hopes to achieve and whether they pose a threat to Rishi Sunak’s beleaguered – and increasingly gaffe-ridden – premiership.Submit a question:https://www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/2022/10/you-ask-usBecome a New Statesman subscriberhttps://www.newstatesman.com/subscribeDownload the app (subscribers can listen ad-free):iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/02/2422m 35s

Left Behind: the failed revolutions of the 2010s

The 2010s were a decade that many hoped would usher in a new era of leftist revolutions. Yet, as we look back, the question looms large: What went wrong?In this episode of the podcast Alona Ferber, senior editor, is joined by William Davies, writer and Professor in Political Economy at Goldsmiths, University of London, to look back at the 2010s, the figures, events, and politics that defined this decade - and ask why did the left's aspirations for revolution during the 2010s fall short?Read William Davies' essay The 2010s: a decade of revolutionaries without a revolutionAudio featured from: BBC, Channel 4, Sky News, Garlic Toothpaste, The Telegraph, CNN, The Hill Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/02/2436m 2s

Vape ban, smoking ban: Rishi Sunak's "nanny state"

This week's disposable vape ban follows a generational ban on smoking and an XL Bully ban. Is this Rishi Sunak's legacy? The Conservatives are typically against a "nanny state" but low-cost, high-impact interferences into personal choice seem to be Rishi Sunak's bread and butter. Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Cunliffe discuss the decision-making behind the bans and impact on the nation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/02/2416m 33s

How would a Labour government handle Northern Ireland?

As the UK government and the DUP appear likely to break their Brexit impasse with a new deal, a listener asks what Labour would do differently in Northern Ireland.For two years, the DUP has been boycotting power sharing in Stormont in opposition to post-Brexit trade rules. Now the UK government has published a deal which would reduce checks and paperwork on goods travelling between Great Britain and Northern Ireland, which could lead to the return of devolution within days. Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe and Freddie Hayward answer a listener question about how Labour would approach Northern Ireland and what that would mean for the future of the Union.The also discuss the most influential Labour backbenchers as a listener asks who could rise to replace Keir Starmer as leader in the future.Submit a question:https://www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/2022/10/you-ask-usDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/02/2419m 5s

Is the NHS ready for developments in cancer care? | Sponsored

New technology means cancer diagnosis is better than ever.Advances in genomic testing and other new technologies mean we are spotting cancer earlier, and getting better at identifying the best treatment for patients.But a greater understanding of the disease – or group of diseases – means a requirement for more tailored treatment plans to improve patient outcomes. This involves challenges for the health service when it comes to capacity, cost, personnel, infrastructure, and expertise. Is the NHS ready?In this special podcast, sponsored by Daiichi Sankyo, Becky Slack meets Karin Smyth, Labour’s Shadow Health Minister, Professor Clare Turnbull of the Institute for Cancer Research, and Dr. Marc Moodley, Medical Director of Oncology for Daiichi Sankyo. They explore what the new developments in cancer diagnostics and treatment mean for patients and the NHS, and discuss Labour’s plans for the health service.This New Stateman podcast has been funded by and developed in partnership with Daiichi-Sankyo, a pharmaceutical company specialising in oncology and speciality medicines. For more information visit www.daiichi-sankyo.co.uk--To hear all our Spotlight on Policy podcast episodes, visit the standalone feed here: https://podfollow.com/spotlight-on-policy-from-the-new-statesmanRead more from the New Statesman's Spotlight on Policy team here: https://www.newstatesman.com/spotlight Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
31/01/2423m 32s

Parliament’s sleaze epidemic, with Chris Bryant

We’ve seen the fastest turnover of prime ministers in our history, and more MPs have been suspended from the house or stood down from their seats than ever before in recent years. Politicians breaking the rules and expecting to get away with it is one of the biggest issues in our parliament today - which seems to be unable to escape the mire of sleaze, cronyism and dishonesty.This conversation was recorded at the winter Cambridge Literary festival in December when Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, spoke to Chris Bryant, Labour MP for the Rhondda and Shadow Minister for Creative Industries and Digital about how politicians can reform parliament and win back public confidence.Tickets for the 2024 five day Spring festival are available from the 1st of February, please visit cambridgeliteraryfestival.com to find out more. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/01/2452m 39s

Are the Conservatives laying a trap for Labour?

Earlier this week former minister Simon Clarke wrote in the Telegraph, the Conservative party faces an electoral "massacre" under Rishi Sunak's leadership and warned “extinction is a very real possibility for our party”. “He does not get what Britain needs. And he is not listening to what the British people want.” and “Instead of conviction, we have convention.”A listener writes in to ask: with all the disarray and rebellion in the Tory party, what's the likelihood of a confidence vote anytime soon?Anoosh and Freddie also review whether the are Conservatives 'salting the earth' or 'laying traps for Labour' .Switch on with 50% offRefresh your perspective in 2024 with free-thinking journalism and 50% off our annual subscriptions. Simple use the code JAN50 at the checkout.*Offer ends 31st January and applies to the first year only.www.newstatesman/subscribe  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/01/2415m 47s

Is Labour's green agenda under threat?

Anoosh reports on the Port Talbot steelworkers job losses, and how they will impact Labour's green agenda.2,800 industrial jobs will be lost in Port Talbot steelworks if planned "green" updates go ahead. Anoosh Chakelian visited the Tata Steel plant to meet the workers who will lose their jobs, and joins Freddie Hayward to report what she found. They discuss the impact of the green transition on industrial communities, and whether Labour's planned investment is enough to deliver on environmental goals while protecting the economy.Switch on with 50% offRefresh your perspective in 2024 with free-thinking journalism and 50% off our annual subscriptions. Simple use the code JAN50 at the checkout.*Offer ends 31st January and applies to the first year only.www.newstatesman/subscribe  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25/01/2414m 15s

Susan Neiman: "It's not about being pro-Israel or pro-Palestine, but pro-human rights"

The ongoing war between Israel and Hamas has now passed the 100 day mark. On the 14 January Alona Ferber attended the Jewish Labour Movement conference, which happened to take place on the 100th day of the war. In this podcast she speaks with Susan Neiman, the American moral philosopher, about the splits this war has caused on the left and tensions she sees between tribalist currents on the left and universalist principles, which Neiman believes are the values of a true left. Read Susan Neiman's essay: The universalist tradition has been forgotten, the Enlightenment betrayedSwitch on with 50% offRefresh your perspective in 2024 with free-thinking journalism and 50% off our annual subscriptions. Simple use the code JAN50 at the checkout.*Offer ends 31st January and applies to the first year only.www.newstatesman/subscribe  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/01/2416m 16s

Will David Cameron be forced to face the Commons?

"How powerful are select committees in holding government and other bodies to account? Highly important topic at the moment, given Lord Cameron cannot be held to account in the House of Commons?" a listener writes in. But while the foreign secretary wouldn't usually be seen in the House of Commons, he may be forced to answer questions there soon using an arcane mechanism that hasn't been used since 1957.Join Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, as they answer listener questions.Switch on with 50% offRefresh your perspective in 2024 with free-thinking journalism and 50% off our annual subscriptions. Simple use the code JAN50 at the checkout.*Offer ends 31st January and applies to the first year only.www.newstatesman/subscribe  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/01/2416m 26s

Rwanda: the Conservatives' bill to die on

We’re discussing the Rwanda bill, yet again. On Tuesday there was a rebellion from the right of the Conservative party who attempted to put down amendments on the bill to try and ensure neither UK nor international law can be used to stop a person being deported to Rwanda, and to make it more difficult for people to appeal against their deportation.The bill still managed to pass through the Commons on Wednesday evening but what do we know about this divide amongst the Conservatives? Is Tory unity a thing of the past? And what does it mean to enter an election with such a fragmented party?Switch on with 50% offRefresh your perspective in 2024 with free-thinking journalism and 50% off our annual subscriptions. Simple use the code JAN50 at the checkout.*Offer ends 31st January and applies to the first year only.www.newstatesman/subscribe  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/01/2421m 14s

Restoring nature: can data halt biodiversity loss? | Sponsored

The UK is one of the world’s most nature-depleted countries. According to a recent study, the annual State of Nature report, nearly one in six of more than ten thousand species assessed – that's 16 per cent – could be lost. Many key habitats for our nature are at risk, and this is a problem both for biodiversity but also for our ability to cope with the climate crisis. How can we protect and restore nature? And what role can technology play? In response to this challenge, the Natural History Museum and Amazon Web Services (AWS) have launched a groundbreaking partnership to develop an innovative new tool which brings together a broad range of UK biodiversity and environmental data types in one place in real time. This will help the Museum’s scientists to build on scientific understanding of the UK’s biodiversity and environment, and drive forward science-led nature recovery in the UK’s urban spaces. In this special episode, The New Statesman’s Chris Stone meets Doug Gurr, director of the Natural History Museum, and Hilary Tam, Principal for Sustainability Transformation at AWS to find out how the Data Ecosystem works and how they hope it might help reverse nature loss in Britain.  This episode is sponsored by Amazon Web Services. To find out more about their partnership with the Natural History Museum, visit https://aws.amazon.com/uki/cloud-services/sustainability-aws-and-nhm/Read more about how AWS can help you Transform your legacy IT infrastructure into a modern, scalable and secure cloud environment: https://www.newstatesman.com/companies/amazon-web-services-aws Get involved with Nature Overheard: https://www.nhm.ac.uk/take-part/monitor-and-encourage-nature/nature-overheard.html Visit the Urban Nature project from Summer 2024: https://www.nhm.ac.uk/about-us/urban-nature-project.html Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/01/2420m 42s

Why Team Starmer refuse to believe the hype around them

The Labour Party has a talent for losing elections. Over the last century, it has held office for just 33 years and has produced just six prime ministers. The Conservatives, by comparison, have held office for 67 years and produced 14 prime ministers. It is the burden of history that explains Labour’s caution at the outset of this election year.Senior editor George Eaton joins associate political editor Rachel Cunliffe in the studio to discuss why Team Starmer are refusing to believe the hype around them.Submit a question:https://www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/2022/10/you-ask-usDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/01/2424m 24s

Have millennials forgiven the Lib Dems?

"I felt sure that millennials would never forgive the Lib Dems, but it seems like young people who are leaving London are voting Lib Dem in Tory strongholds. So have millennials forgiven the Lib Dems?" one listener asks.The team discusses how voter priorities change with age, and how this might be advantageous for the Lib Dems.Another listener writes in to ask whether the actions of the Israeli government that the British state are supporting are really in the British national interest? This episode was recorded on Thursday the 10th of January, prior to the UK-US strikes on Yemen.Submit a question:https://www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/2022/10/you-ask-usDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/01/2414m 54s

The Post Office scandal: Lessons from one of the UK's greatest miscarriages of justice

Between 2009 and 2015 more than 700 people who ran Post Offices, also known as sub-postmasters, were wrongly accused of embezzling money and subsequently prosecuted. The fault was actually that of a dodgy computer accounting system.In addition to having to pay back the money from their own pockets, the strain, stress and stigma of this wrongful conviction destroyed the livelihoods of many of the sub-postmasters who were subject to criminal convictions, imprisonment, and bankruptcy. In some cases this also led to illness, divorce, and suicide.In 2019, the High Court ruled that the Horizon system was faulty and in 2020 the government set up a public inquiry. But this has had renewed national interest thanks to the ITV drama Mr Bates vs the Post Office which aired in the new year week, and has resulted in a major intervention by the government - which will introduce a blanket law to exonerate all those who were convicted.What can we as a nation can learn from one of the country’s greatest miscarriages of justice?Submit a question:https://www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/2022/10/you-ask-usDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/01/2422m 52s

How will elections shape the world in 2024?

In 2024 countries with more than 4 billion people will be sending their citizens to the polls. The US, Russia, and India to name a few; this is set to be the biggest election year in history. In this episode of the podcast Anoosh Chakelian is joined by the New Stateman's foreign correspondent Bruno Maçães and senior data journalist Ben Walker to review some of the major political forces at play around the globe in 2024.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/01/2428m 18s

Could parliament introduce a proportional representation system?

"How likely would it be for parliament to introduce a Proportional Representation system similar to the rest of Europe? Would this even be feasible given both main parties benefit from a First Past The Post system?", one listener asks. And after the team tackles the questions of constitutional reform they answer listener Paul's question about Rishi Sunaks recently revealed consultations with Dominic Cummings.Submit a question:https://www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/2022/10/you-ask-usDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/01/2418m 24s

Six-day walkout: will the government budge on junior doctors' pay?

Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Dr Emma Runswick, junior doctor in the North West and the current Deputy Chair of the BMA Council. They discuss what's driven junior doctors to the current 6 day walk out, on top of an accrued 28 days of stoppages over the past year. Will the BMA settle for anything less than a 35% pay rise? Has the new health secretary Victoria Atkins made any changes? And is this industrial action putting patients in danger?Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/01/2418m 18s

How will elections shape Britain in 2024?

2024 is set to be the biggest election year in history and countries with more than 4 billion people will be sending their citizens to the polls. And whether or not the UK government decides to hold a general election before January 2025, it will still be an incredibly decisive electoral year for the country.Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Ben Walker, senior data journalist, to discuss how elections will shape Britain in 2024.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/12/2348m 27s

Andy Burnham: "2024 could be a bigger moment than 1997 for Labour"

In this conversation our political editor Andrew Marr sits down with Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, to discuss why 2024 could be a bigger moment for Labour than 1997. This recording is from from our Path to Power conference which delved inside the Labour Party machine as it gears up for an election in 2024.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/12/2325m 13s

2023: The good, the bad, and the outright bizarre

In a special festive episode of the podcast, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Andrew Marr and Freddie Hayward to revisit some of the best, the worst, and weirdest moments from UK politics in 2023.You can watch the video from this episode on our YouTube channel.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/12/2329m 15s

Labour's mission to make Britain a clean energy super power | Sponsored

This is a live recording from the New Statesman Media Group's Path to Power conference which delved inside the Labour Party machine as it gears up for an election in 2024. In this session, hosted by Sarah Dawood - senior associate editor at the New Statesman, we look at Labour's mission for the UK to become a clean energy superpower. This panel was supported by Lloyds Banking Group. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/12/2327m 46s

What's gone wrong with political journalism in the UK? With Ash Sarkar, Ian Dunt and Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

Armando and Anoosh delve into the inner workings of British political reporting, exploring the complex world of the Lobby, the blurred relationships that many political journalists and politicians balance - trading access and trust, - and how this landscape has been evolving over the past few years with the rise of digital and alternative media. To do this they are joined by Ash Sarkar, senior editor at Novara Media, and Ian Dunt, columnist at the I and former editor of Politics.co.uk.This us the last episode of this series of Westminster Reimagined.Listen to all previous episodes of Westminster Reimagined here: https://podfollow.com/westminster-reimagined-with-armando-iannucci-the-new-statesmanDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Sign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/12/2350m 26s

What does it mean to be Jewish and on the left today?

Earlier this month we published a magazine with the cover ‘Being Jewish Now’. At this time of crisis in the Middle East, with divisions over the Gaza war and rising anti-Semitism, we asked a group of writers, thinkers, and activists to reflect on the question of what it means to be Jewish and on the left today.     In this episode of the podcast senior editor Alona Ferber speaks to five of the writers who contributed to this essay collection, delving deeper into the themes explored in the magazine. Fania Oz-Salzberger: This generation will never see Gazans and Israelis become fellow citizensSam Adler-Bell: Jews in the diaspora must resist the inhumanity being done by Israel in our nameOmer Bartov: Both Netanyahu’s cabinet and Hamas see this crisis as an opportunityChanda Prescod-Weinstein: Lessons of growing up black and JewishHoward Jacobson: The founding of Israel wasn’t a colonial act – a refugee isn’t a colonistBeing Jewish Now: https://www.newstatesman.com/ideas/2023/11/what-it-means-to-be-jewish-nowDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=US Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/12/2358m 45s

Who are the 'five families' of the Tory right? | You Ask Us

A listener writes in to ask what the real threat is from the right of the Tory party, and our associate political editor, Rachel Cunliffe, breaks this down - starting with identifying who the different factions of the Tory right are, and what they want.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/12/2317m 38s

First minister Mark Drakeford resigns, what's next for Wales?

Yesterday Wales’s first minister Mark Drakeford announced his resignation, after exactly five years in office. He drew tributes for his tenure at PMQs from both leaders, with Keir Starmer describing him as “a true titan of Welsh politics”. Who will be the next Welsh leader? How will this affect Labour's general election campaign in Wales? And what will Mark Drakeford's lasting legacy be?Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Matt Hexter, host of the Welsh politics podcast Hiraeth, political consultant and former adviser to Welsh Labour MPs.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
14/12/2321m 10s

Why don't politicians care about happiness? With Richard Layard and Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

Thurrock is suffering major cuts to all its council services since it went effectively bankrupt last December, after hundreds of millions of pounds were put into risky investments that didn’t pay off. One of the services to be gravely affected by the cuts is a place called “Thameside”, an arts complex, described locally as a “mini Barbican”, which houses a theatre, library, archive and museum.Places like Thameside often serve as the heart and soul of our communities. They bring people together, foster a sense of belonging, and contribute to our overall well-being. But what happens when these vital services face budget cuts?In this episode of Westminster Reimagined we discuss The Good Life - how much value do we put on happiness in Britain? How can government policy boost happiness? And is it possible to quantify personal wellbeing? Listen to all previous episodes of Westminster Reimagined here: https://podfollow.com/westminster-reimagined-with-armando-iannucci-the-new-statesmanDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Sign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/12/2335m 16s

Is the NHS stuck on life support?

This discussion was recorded at the Cambridge Literary Festival in November 2023. Anoosh Chakelian was joined by Isabel Hardman, assistant editor at the Spectator and author of Fighting for Life, and Phil Whitaker, GP and medical editor at the New Statesman. They came together to ask, can we fix the NHS?Watch and listen more from the Cambridge Literary Festival:https://www.cambridgeliteraryfestival.com/clf-player-watch-listen/Subscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/12/2341m 15s

A week inside frantic Tory migration plans

This week it seems that the government have been doing anything and everything to tackle the high migration numbers, that means cracking down on both illegal and legal routes to entering the UK. First new visa requirements were announced, stating that applicants would need to earn £38,700 to be eligible (higher than the average UK salary) and that this would also apply to UK citizens who intended to bring a foreign partner to the country on a spousal visa.Not long after this Home Secretary James Cleverly announced those changes, he signed a treaty with Rwanda and the government published its emergency legislation to try and see off legal challenges to its deportation scheme.Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/12/2325m 32s

"B*llocks": Boris Johnson at the Covid inquiry

Boris Johnson appeared "diminished" at the Covid inquiry - and still couldn't quite apologise properly.Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor for the New Statesman, was in the room as the former prime minister gave evidence. She joins Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward to analyse two "blockbuster" days, figure out if we've learned anything new, and look ahead to next week when Rishi Sunak will appear to account for his actions during the pandemic.Read Rachel's report from the inquiry: "The Tories are lucky to be rid of Boris Johnson"https://www.newstatesman.com/quickfire/2023/12/the-tories-are-lucky-to-be-rid-of-boris-johnsonDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
07/12/2320m 29s

Is British democracy under threat? With Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

Is democracy slipping away from us? How protected are we by our constitution? And do governments have the power to swiftly change this? In June, in front of a live audience, Armando and Anoosh were joined by Simon Woolley, founder and director of Operation Black Vote and Principal of Homerton College, Cambridge, and Graham Smith, CEO of the anti-monarchy campaign group Republic. This episode was recorded shortly after the first data regarding voter ID impact in elections, and also after the arrest of Graham Smith at a pre-arranged Coronation protest. Listen to all previous episodes of Westminster Reimagined here: https://podfollow.com/westminster-reimagined-with-armando-iannucci-the-new-statesman Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=US Subscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/12/2344m 41s

The housing crash is just beginning

Housing in the UK has become increasingly unaffordable during the last two decades, buying a home is an unattainable prospect for many in the country, and the challenges facing renters are now reaching a tipping point. And the rentier economy is not only freezing out housing tenants. Small, and sometimes large, businesses are also being priced out of these spaces, which is having a significant effect on the UK's cultural landscape.Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, is joined by Will Dunn, business editor, and Ellen Peirson-Hagger, assistant culture editor, to discuss the economics of the current housing market as well as the cultural and societal effects which are being felt up and down the country.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/12/2336m 54s

The most misleading phrases in political journalism | You Ask Us

Andrew Marr joins the team in the studio this week to answer listener questions. John writes in to ask which often used misleading expressions in political journalism might warrant the use of a 'broadcaster swear jar'. Meanwhile, Xia asks the podcast team which policies they're most optimistic about that might be put in place by a Starmer government.In this episode we also hear from Freddie Hayward, politics correspondent, and Zoë Grunëwald, politics and policy correspondent.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/12/2317m 10s

Tories shaken by record high migration

Andrew Marr, political editor at the New Statesman, speaks to Freddie Hayward, political correspondent, about why the newly published figures on net migration for 2022 have sent shockwaves through the Conservative party. The focus, he says, has shifted from illegal migration - 'stop the boats' - to legal migration, because of these figures.Last week the Office for National Statistics revealed that net migration to the UK reached a record high of 745,000 in 2022. This figure relates to people given permission to enter the country, mainly to work or study. Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Give something priceless:Give the New Statesman and get 20% off our gift subscriptions using code XMAS20 at the checkout.newstatesman.com/gift-subscribe Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
30/11/2317m 16s

Can older workers fix the economy? | Sponsored

 Since the start of the pandemic in 2020, nearly a million people aged 50-64 have left the workforce. Other major economies have seen their employment rates bounce back after the pandemic, and the Financial Times have reported that the UK is the only developed economywhere inactivity kept rising after the initial pandemic shock.   In this episode, sponsored by Phoenix Insights, Becky Slack from the New Statesman Spotlight team is joined by Alison McGovern, shadow minister for employment, Neil Carberry of the Recruitment and Employment Confederation, and Claire Hawkins, director of corporate affairs and investor relations at the Phoenix Group. They discuss why so many older people are leaving the workforce, what government and employers can do to support older workers better, and the economic impact of doing so.Find out more about Phoenix Insightshttps://www.thephoenixgroup.com/phoenix-insights/Hear more of our Spotlight podcasts on their own feedhttps://podfollow.com/spotlight-on-policy-from-the-new-statesman Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/11/2327m 10s

How do Gen Z want to vote? With Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

The writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our fourth series of Westminster Reimagined.In this episode, which was recorded in the summer of 2023, Armando and Anoosh visit a group of sixth form students who will be voting for the first time in the upcoming general election. They want to know what how politics is taught in schools, how the students view the UK political party system, and whether the issues that matter to the students are represented by politicians today.Listen to all previous episodes of Westminster Reimagined here: https://podfollow.com/westminster-reimagined-with-armando-iannucci-the-new-statesmanDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Sign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/11/2342m 36s

100 years of British political nightmares

How did the Great Depression’s spectres of fascism, bombing and mass unemployment force politicians to think the unthinkable, and pave the way to post-war Britain? How was Thatcher’s road to victory made possible by a decade of nightmares: of hyperinflation, military coups and communist dictatorship? And why, since the Crash in 2008, have new political threats and divisions forced us to change course once again?Freddie Hayward, political correspondent at the New Statesman, is joined in the studio by author and documentary maker Phil Tinline to discuss his book The Death of Consensus: 100 Years of British Political Nightmares.Read this week's cover story:https://www.newstatesman.com/ideas/2023/11/jfk-assassination-60-years-myth-martyr-saviourDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Sign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25/11/2330m 15s

Are we poorer than we were in 2010? | You Ask Us

"The economy will play a central part of next year's election. Do you know if people are better off than in 2010?" - one listener writes in to ask. The podcast team discuss how this can be measured, and how parties might frame this in the run up to the election.Another listener writes in to ask about the constant churn in the ministerial system.Anoosh Chakelian is joined in the studio by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Sign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/11/2314m 32s

Autumn Statement: "A whacking great return to austerity"

Jeremy Hunt would like this Autumn Statement to be seen as what the government is branding “the biggest tax cut in British history”, but what are the actual costs and implications of the yesterday's budget?Anoosh Chakelian is joined in the studio by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman WhatsApp channel:https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02c Sign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/11/2326m 9s

Is Britain really great? With Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

The writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our fourth series of Westminster Reimagined. Across this season he is joined by co-host Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor at the New Statesman, to explores parts of British public life he believes to be broken, and is joined by guests from inside and outside Westminster to work out how to fix them.In this first episode of the season our hosts are joined by Alex von Tunzelmann, historian, screenwriter and author, and Ivan Rogers, former permanent representative of the UK to the European Union. In their careers they've both reflected on how Britain is seen on the international stage and the way its role in the world has been changing, and Armando and Anoosh want to know - is Britain really great, anymore?Listen to all previous episodes of Westminster Reimagined here: https://podfollow.com/westminster-reimagined-with-armando-iannucci-the-new-statesman Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/11/2350m 30s

Iran's interest in Israel, with former ambassador John Jenkins

Iran, Hamas and Hezbollah – all of whom operate out of Beirut’s southern suburbs – have coordinated their positions in various ways for years in pursuit of what they see as the greater good. John Jenkins, former British ambassador to Saudi Arabia, Libya, Iraq, Syria and Burma, speaks to senior editor Katie Stallard about Iran's interest in the Israel-Hamas conflict and how this will play out across the region.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/11/2328m 5s

You Ask Us: How is a foreign secretary's success judged? Will Labour reform the Lords?

"At the Home Office you have immigration figures, as health secretary there are NHS waiting lists. Is David Cameron likely to improve his reputation because it’s harder to fail as foreign secretary?" - one listener asks.Anoosh Chakelian is joined in the studio by associate political editor Rachel Cunliffe and political correspondent Freddie Hayward to answer listeners questions surrounding David Cameron's appointment as foreign secretary.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/11/2314m 3s

Rwanda, resignations, and a rancorous letter

The government's Rwanda plan has been put on hold, yet again, after being ruled illegal earlier this week by the Supreme Court. And someone who would have a lot to say about this is the former Home Secretary Suella Braverman who was fired on Monday. Braverman has since published a blistering letter to the Prime Minister attacking his failure to deliver on any of his key promises.Meanwhile, Labour is seeing losses and resignations after 56 MPs defied Keir Starmer to vote for ceasefire in Gaza.Anoosh Chakelian is joined by associate political editor, Rachel Cunliffe, and political correspondent, Freddie Hayward, to discuss this very busy week in politics.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/11/2330m 39s

Reshuffle special: (Lord) Cameron returns

Suella Braverman is out of government... and a shock appointment rocks Westminster.Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward record an emergency episode of the New Statesman podcast to discuss the breaking news of Rishi Sunak's dramatic reshuffle following a weekend of protests which the now former Home Secretary had previously branded "hate marches". This episode was recorded at 10.30am on 13 November 2023, while news of the reshuffle continued to break. For the latest updates and analysis visit https://www.newstatesman.com, or follow our new WhatsApp channel here: https://whatsapp.com/channel/0029Va9latS0wajogms2z02cSubscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/11/2320m 25s

The great private school con | Audio Long Reads

They no longer have a stranglehold on Oxbridge and would lose tax breaks under Labour. So what is elite education really selling?At the Labour Party conference in Liverpool in October, the Independent Schools Council hosted a forlorn drinks reception: not one of the more than 40 MPs showed up. ‘We are not the enemy,’ one private school headmaster complained to a sympathetic Daily Mail. But if Labour does win the next general election, it has committed to removing tax breaks on business rates and 20% VAT on private school fees – raising £1.6bn to be invested in state schools. On top of this, Starmer’s cabinet (as it stands) would be the most state-educated in history – with only 13% having attended private school (against Rishi Sunak’s 63%). Can elite education survive – and cling on to its charitable status?In this week’s audio long read – the last in this series – the New Statesman’s features editor Melissa Denes attends three school open days to understand how these winds of change might affect them. She also follows the money, calculating that – allowing for tax breaks - the average taxpayer subsidises an Eton schoolboy at a far higher rate than a state school one. As the gaps in spending between the two sectors grow, and society strives to become more fair, will an expensive education evolve into a luxury service rather than a charitable concern?Written and read by Melissa Denes.This article originally appeared in the 10-16 November edition of the New Statesman; you can read the text version here.If you enjoyed listening to this article, you might also enjoy The decline of the British university by Adrian Pabst. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/11/2329m 37s

You Ask Us: why can't Tory MPs behave themselves?

In the week the Tory peer Michelle Mone has finally admitted involvement in a PPE firm awarded £200m in "VIP" Covid contracts, we discuss the numerous allegations against politicians and ask why Parliament is beset with bad behaviour - and how it's affecting the Tories' reputation.And then we let you in behind the scenes of the New Statesman newsroom, to talk about how journalists source, fact check and verify their reporting - with a debut from our features editor Melissa Denes.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/11/2321m 39s

Rishi Sunak's "watered down" Kings Speech pledges

Amid much pomp and circumstance, this week King Charles III delivered the first King's Speech in over 70 years. In this episode of the podcast Anoosh Chakelian is joined by deputy political editor Rachel Wearmouth, and political correspondent Freddie Hayward, to discuss what Charles announced in his speech, and perhaps more notably - what went unmentioned.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/11/2316m 55s

How Rishi Sunak became the first Silicon Valley prime minister | Audio Long Read

On 2 November 2023, Rishi Sunak closed his global AI Safety Summit at Bletchley Park by interviewing the richest man on Earth, Elon Musk. The mood was deferential (the PM towards the tech billionaire). Was Sunak eyeing up a post-politics job in San Francisco, some wondered, or calculating that Musk’s Twitter might be an effective campaigning tool come 2024?In this week’s audio long read, the New Statesman contributing writer Quinn Slobodian examines the origins of Sunak’s “fanboy-ish enthusiasm” for the billionaire tech disruptors. These lie in the publication of a 1997 business book, he writes: The Sovereign Individual: How to Survive and Thrive During the Collapse of the Welfare State, by the American venture capitalist James Dale Davidson and William Rees-Mogg, father of Jacob. The book has become cult reading among tech leaders, and influential on the alt-right: its world view of a libertarian internet and the rise of economic freeports and tax havens chimed with a wealthy elite who saw a chance to get much, much richer. In Sunak, Slobodian argues, we see the arrival of the sovereign individual in Downing Street: “a ‘two-fer’, as they say in America: both its first Silicon Valley prime minister and its first hedge fund prime minister”.Written by Quinn Slobodian and read by Will Lloyd.This article originally appeared in the 2 November 2022 issue of the New Statesman; you can read the text version here.If you enjoyed this episode, you might also enjoy Sam Bankman-Fried and the effective altruism delusion by Sophie McBain. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/11/2322m 27s

You Ask Us: Why won't the government call for a ceasefire?

"Looking at the polling for a ceasefire in Gaza, it seems like foreign policy is the area where Westminster is most out of touch with public opinion. Why is this?" - one listener asks. Anoosh Chakelian is joined by business editor Will Dunn and politics correspondant Freddie Hayward to discuss the government's position on a ceasefire, Labour's plans, and also the UK's AI safety summit which took place this week.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/11/2316m 16s

The Covid Inquiry: Inside a toxic government

Module two of the Covid inquiry - decision-making and political governance - was set to be the most controversial section, looking into the workings of central government. And from the use of the term “f***pigs” to Boris Johnson’s query about blowing a hair dryer up his nose, this has rung true.On this episode of the podcast Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Emma Norris, deputy director at the Institute for Government, and the New Statesman's associate political editor, Rachel Cunliffe, to analyse what the public has learned over the past week about the handling of the pandemic.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/11/2323m 4s

Solving lung cancer inequality | Sponsored

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide – but it doesn't affect everyone equally.  Data shows wide regional variation of lung cancer diagnoses, as well as huge differentials linked to socio-economic factors and class. In this episode Becky Slack is joined by a panel including a leading clinical expert, Professor David Baldwin, Lorraine Dallas from the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation, as well as David Long from the leading pharmaceuticals company and our sponsor for this episode, MSD. They discuss the root of lung cancer inequalities and how they can be mitigated. This episode has been fully funded by MSD, one of the world's leading pharmaceutical companies active in several key areas of global health, including immunisation and oncology. Learn more about the work they do following the science to tackle some of the world's greatest health threats at www.msd.com Listen to all our Spotlight on Policy episodes here: https://podfollow.com/spotlight-on-policy-from-the-new-statesman Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/11/2331m 35s

Andrew Marr: War, conspiracies and the "cloud of unknowing"

We’re bringing you something new on the podcast today – a pilot of a new show we’re working on from our political editor, Andrew Marr. Before we make this a regular feature on the New Statesman podcast, we’d really value some feedback from you, our listeners.If you enjoy this episode or have any thoughts you’d like to share, please get in touch at podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk - or if you’re listening on Spotify you can type a reply below the episode.Excerpts featured from: TRT World, Mediatime Network, GB News, Malcolm Roberts, Washington Post, UK Parliament, BBC News, Sky News, Channel 4 News, Marvel Entertainment Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
31/10/2312m 15s

Israel, Hamas and the unravelling of the West | Audio Long Read

What might be the long term impact of the Israel-Hamas war on global alliances? In this week’s audio long read, the New Statesman’s contributing writer John Gray reflects on three weeks of bloodshed, beginning with the massacres of 7 October, and their wider consequences. An escalating conflict will empower Iran and Russia, he writes, as well as strengthen swing states such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar. The United States might abandon Ukraine, or dilute its commitment to defending Taiwan from China. And with a presidential election on the horizon, does the White House have the stamina for a protracted foreign war? Already support for both Israel and Palestine has become sorely contested across the West, as Keir Starmer faces pressure from Muslim (and non-Muslim) MPs in the UK, while Emmanuel Macron has banned pro-Palestinian protest. Egypt and Lebanon have said they will not accept Palestinian refugees. For Gray, the events of 7 October mark the point at which the post-Cold War order finally ­fractured. “We have entered a world of imperial rivalries like that before 1914, which ended in Europe’s suicide in the trenches,” he writes. If America rose to become the global superpower after the second world war, that influence is now coming to an end.Written by John Gray and read by Melissa Denes.This article originally appeared in the 27 October-2 November edition of the New Statesman; you can read the text version here. If you enjoyed this episode, you might also enjoy listening to The Dawn of the Saudi Century, by Quinn Slobodian. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/10/2316m 11s

One year of Rishi Sunak: what has he achieved?

This Wednesday marked one year of Rishi Sunak as Prime Minister. Following Liz Truss's short, yet chaotic, premiership - has Rishi Sunak managed to stabilise the economy and the Conservative Party? Where does he stand on his 5 pledges? And is he still being haunted by 'Tory sleaze'?Joining Anoosh Chakelian to analyse the first year of Sunak's premiership is Rachel Wearmouth, deputy political editor, and Zoë Grunëwald, politics and policy correspondent.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/10/2320m 5s

Will Labour unity break over Israel-Hamas?

Nine days after saying on LBC that “Israel has that right” to cut of water and power off to Gaza, Keir Starmer explained that this wasn't what he meant. This has caused quite a lot of damage, with 23 Labour councillors resigning and over 150 Muslim Labour Councillors now petitioning Labour’s leadership to support an immediate ceasefire in Gaza.Could Israel and Palestine prove just as much a problem for Keir Starmer as it did for Jeremy Corbyn?Joining Anoosh Chakelian in the studio is deputy politics editor, Rachel Wearmouth, and politics and policy correspondent, Zoë Grunëwald.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/10/2314m 29s

The Israel war is a "global terror risk"

"We're in a very dangerous and unstable situation"Bruce Hoffman has been observing and studying global terrorism for over 50 years. In this episode he speaks to the New Statesman's Katie Stallard about how the war between Israel and Hamas places the world in danger. They discuss the threat from Hezbollah in Lebanon and the risk of escalation within the Middle East, as well as why terror organisations like ISIS and Islamic Jihad could be motivated to launch attacks on the United States, Europe and the United Kingdom.Read on the New Statesman: Warnings that the escalating Israel-Hamas conflict could become a genocide should be heeded https://www.newstatesman.com/world/middle-east/2023/10/deadly-logic-existential-war-israel-hamasSubscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/10/2327m 30s

Two for two: Labour's by-election clean sweep

Earlier today, Labour won by-elections in Mid-Bedfordshire and Tamworth - two seats which were previously safe Tory heartlands. Labour leader Keir Starmer has described this result as a "game changer".So how did this pan out, and what does it mean looking ahead to the general election? Are Conservative voters turning to Labour, or are they being apathetic?To answer all of this Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, and Ben Walker, senior data journalist.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/10/2324m 49s

Humza Yousaf is preparing the SNP for heavy losses

Chris Deerin reports from the SNP conference, where even "statesmanlike" Humza Yousaf couldn't outshine a guest appearance from his predecessor Nicola Sturgeon.Chris joins Anoosh Chakelian and Rachel Wearmouth to discuss the mood of the conference, which was heavy on expectation management.Read Chris Deerin's interview with Humza Yousaf:https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/politics-interview/2023/10/humza-yousaf-last-snp-leader-interviewDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/10/2318m 23s

Why web browsers are key to cyber security | Sponsored

Cyber-crime is predicted to cost the global economy $8tn this year, in part due to increased remote working - borne out by a spike in malware attacks at the start of the pandemic.But should responsibility for security lie solely with individual employees?“We really think it should be the responsibility of the browser vendor, the web developer, and the IT admin to make sure that the user doesn't have to think about security as much as possible,” says Emily Stark, a software engineer at Google, who joins host Becky Slack on this episode.Also on the panel is cyber security expert Matt Hasker, global web director of Get Safe Online.Together they explore the role browsers can play in securing users' and companies' data online.This episode is sponsored by Chrome Enterprise. Learn more about how your enterprise browser can protect your company data and improve cybersecurity on the Chrome Enterprise website. Listen to all our Spotlight on Policy episodes here: https://podfollow.com/spotlight-on-policy-from-the-new-statesman Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/10/2317m 44s

War in Israel and Palestine: could it spread?

As Israel prepares a ground attack on Gaza, Katie Stallard is joined by Alona Ferber and Professor Lina Khatib to explore the wider geo-political situation in the Middle East - including mounting violence on Israel's west bank and the looming shadow of Hezbollah in Iran.Follow the New Statesman's reporting and analysis of the crisis in Israel and Gaza at www.NewStatesman.com.Subscribers get ad-free access to all our podcasts via the New Statesman app. Download it in the iOS app store or the Google Play store.Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/10/2326m 55s

Has your AI therapist got your back? | Audio Long Read

In May this year, an American woman sought the help of a chatbot on an eating disorders website. The bot, named Tessa and running on an evolving, generative AI, advised her to start counting calories. Perhaps she should get some calipers, it suggested, to measure her body fat. When it emerged that Tessa had given similarly dangerous advice to others, the bot was taken down. As countries around the world face a mental health crisis, exacerbated by the pandemic and a lack of human therapists, a new tech goldrush has begun. Can the latest self-help chatbots help meet a desperate need, delivering “microtherapy” sessions on demand? Do they have a place in disaster zones - or do people in crisis deserve human attention and support? In this week’s audio long read, freelance reporter and author of Sex Robots and Vegan Meat Jenny Kleeman talks to the people behind the latest incarnations of AI therapy in the UK and the US, as well as the technology’s critics. Written by Jenny Kleeman and read by Zoe Grunewald. This article originally appeared in the 13-19 October edition of the New Statesman. You can read the text version here. If you enjoyed this episode, you might also enjoy The psychiatrists who don’t believe in mental illness by Sophie McBain--Want more Audio Long Reads? Follow our standalone feed here: https://podfollow.com/audio-long-reads-new-statesman Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
14/10/2322m 5s

You Ask Us: Is Sunak a tech bro? Is Paddington a centrist?

On this week's You Ask Us we're getting to the heart of British politics and asking, is Paddington a centrist? But before we get there the team answers a listener's question on Rishi Sunak's ambitions for the UK and AI.The host of this podcast is Britain editor Anoosh Chakelian, and joining her is policy and politics correspondent Zoë Grünewald, and business editor Will Dunn.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/10/2330m 4s

Tackling the digital divide through partnership | Sponsored

20 million people in the UK lack the basic digital skills required to download apps, apply for jobs online, or use the internet with confidence. This results in a £5.5bn loss of earnings to UK employees, and is a serious problem for UK productivity and individual quality of life. In this special episode, Jon Bernstein from the New Statesman’s Spotlight on Policy team meets Martin McFadyen from Virgin Media O2 Business and three charity and environmental partners - Emma Stone (Good Things Foundation), Emma Weston (Digital Unite) and Holly Smith (Hubbub) – to find out how they are helping local communities by providing opportunities for people to get connected and develop their digital skills. This episode is sponsored by Virgin Media O2 Business. Not sure where to start with ESG? Visit: https://www.virginmediao2business.co.uk/sustainability/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/10/2323m 35s

Keir Starmer: "half fabulous, half ready to fight"

Arriving on stage to an attack of glitter from a protester, Labour leader Keir Starmer quickly recovered to deliver his speech. Amongst many mentions of fighting, he promised that as Prime Minister, he will fight "for you".Anoosh Chakelian is joined by deputy political editor Rachel Wearmouth and political correspondent Freddie Hayward to discuss Starmer's vision of the decade ahead under a Labour government.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/10/2319m 48s

Rachel Reeves: 7 standing ovations but no big new policies

Darren Jones, Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury, joins the podcast to take us behind the scenes of the Shadow Cabinet's announcements at this year's Labour Party conference, including Shadow Chancellor Rachel Reeves ' speech which received 7 standing ovations and an endorsement from Mark Carney - the former Bank of England Governor.Joining our host Anoosh Chakelian from the conference in Liverpool we hear from Rachel Wearmouth, deputy political editor, and Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/10/2329m 0s

How Britain became a dangerous place to have a baby

What are the roots of today’s maternity crisis? Recent research by the Care Quality Commission has found a “concerning decline” in England, with over half of maternity wards rated substandard. Donna Ockenden’s review of Shrewsbury and Telford maternity trust found that, between 2001 and 2019, 201 babies and nine mothers had died avoidable deaths. In this week’s audio long read, the editor of the New Statesman’s Spotlight magazine Alona Ferber traces the origins of this decline – from the advent of woman-centred care in the 1980s to today’s more frayed and divided landscape. Are austerity and political indifference the key factors, and does an ideological split over ‘natural’ and ‘medical’ birth play a part? “Thirty years ago,” Ferber writes, “when power moved from the institution to the individual, that shift was radical, progressive and revolutionary. It was about women’s rights and politics, as much as it was about health. But today the system is so stretched that the nexus of power is nowhere. It is not with clinical staff, nor with families. Instead, we muddle through.” Drawing on interviews with practitioners and her own birth experiences, she pieces together the elements of an ongoing crisis. Written and read by Alona Ferber. This article was originally published on 30 September 2023 and you can read the text version here. If you enjoyed this episode, you might also like Sophie McBain on The ADHD decade: what’s behind the boom in adult diagnoses Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
07/10/2323m 54s

Labour takes Rutherglen: the end of SNP domination?

In what has been described by Keir Starmer as a 'seismic result', Labour has taken the Rutherglen and Hamilton West seat with more than twice the votes received by the SNP candidate. Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Ben Walker, the New Statesman's senior data journalist, and Chris Deerin, Scotland editor, to discuss what this result means for the future of Labour, for Scottish politics, and the question of Scottish independence. Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/10/2326m 22s

Is Suella Braverman the future of the Conservative Party?

Rishi Sunak wrapped up this year's Conservative Party conference with an hour long speech in which he finally announced the long-rumoured cancellation of HS2 Manchester. He also proposed a life-ban on smoking and a replacement for A-levels, as well as waging into the culture wars asserting that 'a man is a man and a woman is a woman'.Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Wearmouth and Zoë Grünewald, who have both been in Manchester this week. They discuss the impact of the Prime Minister's speech as well as the future trajectory of Home Secretary Suella Braverman, whose hard-hitting address was well-received by fellow conservatives in the room.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/10/2322m 15s

How thriving cities can unlock productivity | Sponsored

Economic growth in the UK is stagnating. Can a radical reshaping of private and public sector roles in core cities help unlock productivity and prosperity in Britain?  The latest in our Spotlight on Policy series welcomes the Mayor of Bristol, Marvin Rees, the CEO of Leeds City Council, Tom Riordan, and PwC’s Public Sector expert Katie Johnston, to explore the role cities can play in boosting Britain’s productivity. This episode is sponsored by PwC.Download the Good Growth for Cities report here: https://www.pwc.co.uk/industries/government-public-sector/good-growth.htmlView the PWC productivity tracker: https://www.pwc.co.uk/industries/insights/productivity-tracker/regional.htmlFind out more about the UK Urban Futures Commission: https://www.thersa.org/projects/uk-urban-futures-commission   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/10/2324m 47s

Soft-launching the end of HS2

We're bringing you this episode from Manchester where this year's Conservative Party conference is taking place. Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor, is joined by political correspondent Freddie Hayward, and deputy political editor Rachel Wearmouth to discuss the speculation around the scrapping of HS2 Manchester, as well as Liz Truss's popularity at the conference a year on from her chaotic leadership.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/10/2317m 6s

A year inside GB News: "what the hell have we done?"

For today’s Audio Long Read we’re bringing you one from our archives, which is suddenly extremely prescient. This week GB News is in the spotlight once again, this time for broadcasting misogynist comments made by Laurence Fox about a female journalist, Ava Evans. The channel has suspended Fox, along with host Dan Wootton, and has apologised for broadcasting the comments. But this is the latest in a long line of incidents in which GB News has pushed the boundaries of what is acceptable in broadcast journalism. In 2022 we published Stuart McGurk’s investigation into the origins of the right-wing news channel, speaking to insiders working in the founding team including senior journalists, editorial and production staff, and the chief executive himself. Stuart’s article, which is both alarming and hilarious, sheds light on the tumultuous origins of GB News and provides context for its current battle to be taken seriously.This article was originally published online on the New Statesman in April 2022; you can read the text version here. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, you might also like Cancel culture comes to GB News, by Clive Martin. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
30/09/2347m 35s

You Ask Us: What was behind Suella Braverman's speech on immigration?

The Home Secretary made a speech this week in Washington to a right-wing US think tank called the American Enterprise Institute. She made a number eye-catching statements, including “a misguided dogma of multiculturalism” has proven “toxic” for Europe, and the pace of migrant arrivals posed an “existential threat” to the West.Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor and host of the New Statesman podcast, is joined in the studio by Zoë Grünewald, policy and politics correspondent, and Freddie Hayward, political correspondent. Together they analyse what was behind Suella Braverman's speech, before discussing what happened at the Lib Dem conference in Bournemouth earlier this week.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/09/2320m 10s

Who really controls Britain's right wing?

The Conservatives have been in power for more than 13 years under five different prime ministers. We have experienced Cameroon austerity, Mayite statism, Johnsonite populism, and Trussite libertarianism. But who now wields the greatest influence among the Tories and on the British right?George Eaton, senior editor, joins the podcast to discuss the publication of the New Statesman's inaugural Right Power List – a guide to the 50 most influential people in conservative politics.This podcast is hosted by Anoosh Chakelilan, Britain editor at the New Statesman.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/09/2321m 55s

IQ fetishism, in Silicon Valley and beyond

Where does the concept of IQ fetishism originate? And why has it resurfaced in contemporary discussions, particularly within the tech-right movement? Join historian Quinn Slobodian as he discusses how IQ-based hierarchies have influenced societal perceptions and policies and the potential societal consequences and divisions resulting from the prevalence of such thinking.The host for this episode is senior editor for China and global affairs, at the New Statesman.You can read Quinn Slobodian's full piece The rise of the new tech right here.Download the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25/09/2328m 42s

The philosopher and the crypto king: Sam Bankman-Fried and the effective altruism delusion | Audio Long Read

At the time of writing, the crypto billionaire Sam Bankman-Fried is due to stand trial on 3 October 2023. He stands accused of fraud and money-laundering on an epic scale through his currency exchange FTX. Did he gamble with other people’s money in a bid to do the maximum good? In this week’s long read, the New Statesman’s associate editor Sophie McBain examines the relationship between Bankman-Fried and the Oxford-based effective altruism (EA) movement. The billionaire was a close associate and supporter of William MacAskill, the Scottish moral philosopher who many consider EA’s leader. It was MacAskill who had persuaded him – and many other young graduates – to earn more, in order to give more. But how much money was enough – and what should they spend it on? Was EA just “a dumb game we woke Westerners play”, as Bankman-Fried told one journalist? In conversations with EA members past and present, McBain hears how the movement was altered by its enormous wealth. As the trial of its biggest sponsor approaches, will effective altruism survive – or be swallowed by its more cynical Silicon Valley devotees? Written and read by Sophie McBain. This article originally appeared in the 22-28 September 2023 edition of the New Statesman; you can read the text version here. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, you might also like Big Tech and the quest for eternal youth, by Jenny Kleeman. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/09/2336m 12s

You Ask Us: How might a Labour government manage a Trump government?

With both the UK and US elections coming into view, the team consider what's happening with Labour's foreign policy agenda and how the relationship between a Labour government and a Trump government could play out. And another question from a listener casts a look back to the appointment of Jeremy Hunt as Chancellor. Had Sunak not been required to keep Hunt in place in the aftermath of Truss, who might he have chosen to be Chancellor? Would Sunak's preferred brand of economics differ from what Hunt is providing?Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth, and Freddie Hayward, answer listener questions.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/09/2317m 49s

Rishi Sunak and his environmental straw men

This Wednesday Rishi Sunak gave a speech rolling back on the government’s Net Zero pledges, pushing back the ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030 to 2035, scrapping plans to force landlords to upgrade the energy efficiency of their homes, watering down the gas boiler phaseout (aiming for 80% rather than 100% by 2035), and ruling out plans for a seemingly unbeknownst meat tax.Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Andrew Marr and Freddie Hayward to discuss where these plans have come from, what they mean for the Conservatives and Labour, and how they will divide public opinion.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/09/2315m 28s

Trussonomics isn't dead

Liz Truss thought she had two years to save the economy, but her mini-budget caused it all to blow up in less than two months. We're now a year on from her chaotic 49 day premiership, but there are groups of economists and politicians who think her free-market growth strategy was right and it's only a matter of time before it makes a comeback.Read The Trussites are plotting their comeback: https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/conservatives/2023/09/the-trussites-are-plotting-their-comebackDownload the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/09/2328m 48s

How Chile (almost) democratised Big Tech | Audio Long Read

Fifty years after Salvador Allende was ousted, might his greatest legacy be his battle with the emerging tech giants?On 1 August 1973, a seemingly mundane diplomatic summit took place in Lima, Peru. But there was nothing mundane about its revolutionary agenda. The attendees – diplomats from Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru – aspired to create a more just technological world order, one that might have prevented the future dominance of Silicon Valley. As the Chilean foreign minister lamented even then: “500 multinational corporations control 90 per cent of the world’s productive technology”. Could a new international institution - a tech equivalent of the IMF - ensure that developing countries had access to all the benefits of technological progress? Six weeks later, Salvador Allende’s government was toppled, paving the way for General Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship of Chile. In this week’s audio long read, the author and podcaster Evgeny Morozov considers Allende’s legacy. Often viewed as a tragic but hapless figure, his government in fact oversaw a number of radical and utopian initiatives - many of them to do with technology. Might Chile under Allende have evolved into the South Korea or Taiwan of South America?Read by Catharine Hughes and written by Evgeny Morozov, who hosts The Santiago Boys: the Tech World that Might Have Been podcast series. This article was originally published on newstateman.com on 9 September 2023; you can read the text version here. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, you might also enjoy Would climate change have been worse without capitalism?Download the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/09/2322m 23s

You Ask Us: Why are so many councils going bust?

Since being recently surpassed by India, Britain has the world's sixth largest economy. But, one listener asks, how do we square this position with the reality of our crumbling services? And on the subject of government funding, another listener asks: will Birmingham City Council's financial crisis will make Labour more weary of devolving power to local authorities?Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth, and Freddie Hayward, answer listener questions.Read more from Anoosh on Thurrock Council's bankruptcy and the West Country's disappearing bus routesSubmit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/09/2316m 30s

Angela Rayner can’t let the unions down now

The deputy labour leader and “trade union favourite” delivered a speech full of promises at the TUC. Now she has to deliver.Reaffirming Labour’s commitment to the New Deal for Working people, Rayner shored up support among the unions as Labour approaches the next election. But, as Rachel Wearmouth tells Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward, Rayner’s “one of us” status could spell problems for a future Labour government if they fall short.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
14/09/2315m 24s

Legacy tech & the move to sustainable computing | Sponsored

The UK is one of the largest producers of household electronic waste in the world. In 2022 we threw away nearly 24 kilos of things like plugs, mobile phones and computer hardware per person.   The volume of e-waste produced world-wide is predicted to increase from more than 61 million metric tons this year to nearly 75 million in 2030 – and the vast majority of this will go into landfill.   In this special episode, Becky Slack from the New Statesman's Spotlight team meets Michael Wyatt, director of Google ChromeOS EMEA, and Justin Sutton-Parker, CEO of research group Px3, to discuss what businesses and other organisations can do to play their part in reducing the scourge of e-waste, and more broadly how IT can drive sustainability.  --This episode is sponsored by Google ChromeOS. Trial ChromeOS Flex for yourself on an old PC or Mac for free. Download ChromeOS Flex onto a USB via the ChromeOS website.--The New Statesman Spotlight team reports on policy for those who shape it and the businesses it affects. Read their policy reporting at https://www.newstatesman.com/spotlight Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/09/2324m 2s

Britain's great tax delusion

Rishi Sunak earned almost £5m in the past three years, yet this was only taxed at a rate of 22%. Britain's tax system is broken, focusing on income rather than wealth, and it seems like no one plans on doing anything about this. Shadow chancellor Rachel Reeves has explicitly stated that should Labour come into power, a wealth tax will not be introduced. In this episode, staff writer Harry Lambert sets out how Labour could raise £28billion by adopting a wealth tax, and how this could help narrow the gap between Asset Britain and Austerity Britain.Read Britain’s great tax con here: https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/economy/2023/08/britains-great-tax-conDownload the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/09/2319m 17s

The prime minister and the AI that solved the climate crisis

After the extreme heat of summer 2024, which saw children stretchered out of their exams, Britain’s prime minister calls a press conference in Westminster Hall. He has one eye on life after office (skiing in Aspen, a big gig in Silicon Valley), but before he leaves, he wants to unveil something truly ground-breaking: a large language model that has been trained by the best minds to solve the climate crisis. In this satirical work of speculative fiction, the New Statesman’s business editor Will Dunn explores the government’s love affair with Big Tech, fast-forwarding to the dying days of a Conservative government. Climate protestors have been cleared from the roads - but the tarmac is melting and people want answers. Could an advanced AI called Tom provide the prime minister’s moonshot moment?Written and read by Will Dunn. You can read the text version at newstatesman.com If you enjoyed this episode, you might also enjoy Edward Docx reading Boris Johnson: the death of a clown. Download the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/09/2322m 49s

Crumbling Britain, with Andrew Marr

We inhabit an economy too small to deliver the social goods British people expect, and now Britain is cracking. From the concrete crises affecting schools across the country, to crumbling policies and leadership on both the right and left, Andrew Marr reflects on the state of the nation and its place in the world.Andrew Marr, political editor of the New Statesman, is joined by Freddie Hayward and Rachel Cunliffe.Crumbling Britain:https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/crumbling-britain Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/09/2314m 42s

You Ask Us: The big Labour reshuffle, promotions and demotions

Angela Rayner up, Lisa Nandy down - what’s motivated the moves in Keir Starmer’s shadow cabinet reshuffle this week and what does this tell us about the direction of the Labour party if they get into power?Freddie Hayward, Zoë Grünewald, and Rachel Cunliffe, answer listener questions.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
07/09/2322m 9s

The trappings of Western hyper-liberalism | Conversation

Can liberalism survive the horrors of our modern world?Will Lloyd is joined by John Gray political philosopher and author of The New Leviathans: Thoughts After Liberalism. They discuss how Thomas Hobbes seminal work Leviathan can be reinterpreted in the 21st century, particularly in the contexts of Russia, China, and the liberal West.Read more of John Gray's work here: https://www.newstatesman.com/author/john-gray Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/09/2329m 5s

Summer of Light: a new short story by Jonathan Coe | Audio Long Read

In the summer of 1924, a highly regarded painter falls – or is he pushed? – into the canal while celebrating his exhibition at the Venice Biennale. Two young women are heard running away into the night.In this dazzling new coming-of-age story first published in the New Statesman’s summer issue, the award-winning novelist Jonathan Coe explores the relationship between artist and muse, female friendship and male cruelty.Written by Jonathan Coe and read by Tom Gatti.If you enjoyed this episode, you may also enjoy Then Later, His Ghost: a short story by Sarah Hall. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/09/2320m 22s

You Ask Us: if you're a centrist politician, how do you choose one party over another?

Rory Stewart, Tony Blair, Alastair Campbell: a listener writes in to ask why centrist politicians align themselves with one party over another?But before the team dissects the evolution of centrist politicians, they turn an imminent matter. Has the recent turmoil and churn, with multiple prime ministers in quick succession, given the UK an appetite for frequent change? And could this truncate a Labour governments time in office?Rachel Cunliffe, Freddie Hayward, and Zoë Grünewald answer listener questions.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/09/2318m 35s

Ben Wallace and Nadine Dorries, the long goodbye

“History will not remember you kindly” Nadine Dorries’ wrote this weekend in her resignation letter to Rishi Sunak. But this is not the only departure which has been looming over the Conservatives for the past few weeks. This morning former defence secretary Ben Wallace handed in his resignation and was swiftly replaced by Grant Shapps, who stepped into his fifth job this year.Rachel Cunliffe, Freddie Hayward, and Zoë Grünewald discuss the implications of the reshuffle for both Labour and the Tories, and whether history will, in fact, remember Rishi Sunak - and Nadine Dorries - kindly.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
31/08/2322m 10s

Escaping Eden: life after the Plymouth Brethren | Audio Long Reads

For those who leave the ultra-conservative Christian sect, separation comes at great personal cost. The New Statesman’s assistant editor Pippa Bailey had always been curious about the Plymouth Brethren, ever since discovering that her maternal grandparents had left the group in the 1960s. What might her life have been like if they stayed? Who were the cousins separated by a doctrine of isolation from non-Brethren ‘worldlies’? In this week’s deeply reported and moving magazine cover story, Pippa tells the story of the breakaway group, from its origins in 1820s Ireland to its modern-day incarnation as a global church and effective lobbyist. She speaks to former members, many of whom mourn the loss of family and friends to an organisation they consider repressive. It’s a fascinating journey, even if, as Pippa writes, her  grandmother has no interest in resurfacing the past: “After all, she says, it’s all part of the Lord’s plan, and He does not test us more than we can bear.” This article originally appeared in the 25-31 August issue of the New Statesman; you can read the text version here. Written and read by Pippa Bailey. If you enjoyed this episode, you might also enjoy How to build a language: inside the Oxford English Dictionary, by Pippa Bailey, or our reported feature by Stuart McGurk, A year inside GB news. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/08/2343m 10s

You Ask Us: will Labour stop the culture wars, and does the government control what journalists report?

The Conservatives seem intent on fighting the next election on "culture wars" issues. A listener asks, would a Labour government put an end to all that?Also, how does the government control its media messaging? Is there a shadowy office pulling the strings and controlling what journalists report? We look at the concept of "the grid".Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe and Freddie Hayward answer listener questions.Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25/08/2320m 33s

Have Conservatives forgotten education?

GCSE and A Level results are out, and the proportion of top grades have dipped since the pandemic years. It's an opportunity for the government and the opposition to talk about their ambitions for education. Are they both failing to do so?Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe and Freddie Hayward discuss the Tory education record, from Michael Gove’s reforming agenda to unprecedented churn at the top of the Department for Education. And, they ask, what would Labour do differently?Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/08/2321m 4s

Russia’s war on the future | Conversation

After spending several days reporting in Pokrovsk, a small city in eastern Ukraine and the recent target of two missile strikes, Katie Stallard describes the devastating impact of Vladimir Putin’s war on Ukraine’s civilians.“The first strike hit just as people were making dinner, coming home from a long day at work. The first strike hit and the emergency services responded. Then, 37 minutes later, the second strike hit. So it seemed to have been deliberately timed to hit the rescue workers.”Our foreign editor, Megan Gibson, is joined by Katie Stallard, speaking from Warsaw, to discuss Russia’s assault on the next generation, what Putin is aiming for, and why Ukrainians will not give up.Read the full article here: https://www.newstatesman.com/world/europe/ukraine/2023/08/russias-war-future-generations-children-ukraineSubmit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/08/2328m 30s

In defence of counterfactual history | Audio Long Read

What if the rush to war in 1914 had been averted? What if the Berlin Crisis of 1961 had led to nuclear war? What if the liberal revolution of 1848 had been successful? A new exhibition in Berlin considers a series of momentous what-ifs, an intriguing addition to the canon of counterfactual history. In this week’s long read, the New Statesman’s contributing writer Jeremy Cliffe assesses the value of such rival realities, as explored in fiction and, increasingly, on social media platforms and alt-fic online communities. In contemporary British politics, the tumult of the past decade has inspired a new cottage industry of counterfactual histories.  Often derided as pure speculation, Cliffe makes the case for their usefulness and, from his home in Berlin, reflects on the city’s many ghosts. “History is about facts,” he writes. “But those facts include intentions, imagined futures and visions that shape actual events even when – much more often than not – they never come to pass.”Written by Jeremy Cliffe and read by Chris Stone.This article originally appeared in the 28 July-17 August summer issue of the New Statesman. You can read the text version here.If you enjoyed listening to this episode, you might also enjoy Thomas Mann, German identity and the romantic allure of Russia, by Jeremy Cliffe.Listen to all our Audio Long Reads herehttps://podfollow.com/audio-long-reads-new-statesmanDownload the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/08/2323m 13s

You Ask Us: Should it be easier to recall MPs, and how do Rishi Sunak and John Major compare?

Various MPs, including Nadine Dorries, have been accused of not doing their jobs. Should there be a standard of work all MPs must meet? Anoosh and Freddie tackle a listener’s question.Also – much has been said about the similarities and differences between Tony Blair and Keir Starmer, but what about John Major and Rishi Sunak?Submit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/08/2322m 4s

Labour’s caution could turn to radicalism in office

Would Labour be radical in office?Freddie Hayward spoke to party insiders to find out – he joins Anoosh Chakelian to talk about how Labour can make meaningful policy changes in an age of cynicism and poor public finances.Read the full article here: https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/uk-politics/2023/08/labours-caution-could-turn-to-radicalism-in-officeSubmit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/08/2315m 53s

Where do Labour and the Tories differ on growth? With Bridget Phillipson and Bim Afolami | Conversation

Two visions for how Britain can increase productivity and boost growth.Freddie Hayward interviews shadow education secretary Bridget Phillipson and Conservative MP Bim Afolami on how Labour and the Conservatives propose to boost growth and prepare Britain for the future.This conversation was recorded live at the New Statesman’s Politics Live conference on June 27 2023. Book your tickets for next year's event: https://nsmg.live/event/ns-politics-live/Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
14/08/2327m 47s

What Simone De Beauvoir knew about loss, by Ali Smith | Audio Long Read

The novelist Ali Smith first came across the work of Simone de Beauvoir in an Inverness bookshop, aged 18 or 19, and was instantly compelled by her “tough, troubling” prose. In this week’s long read, Smith reflects on De Beauvoir’s 1964 memoir A Very Easy Death, a slight, visceral book about her estranged mother’s death. What happens when an existentialist, bound ethically to a thinking life, confronts the end of life and thought? Why does a writer who prides herself on uncompromising truth tell her mother she is not dying of cancer, when she is?Smith blends the personal and the political in an essay that grapples with De Beauvoir’s power to disturb and provoke, sixty years on. Written by Ali Smith and read by Anna Leszkiewicz. This article originally appeared in the 28 July-17 August 2023 New Statesman summer issue. You can read the text version here.If you enjoyed listening to this episode, you might also enjoy Karl Ove Knausgaard: a personal manifesto on the art of fiction.Listen to all our Audio Long Reads herehttps://podfollow.com/audio-long-reads-new-statesmanDownload the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/08/2321m 41s

You Ask Us: Is Starmer haunted by Blair, and how do you raise voter turnout?

Labour’s dominance in the polls draws obvious comparisons with 1997-era New Labour. But is it fair to compare Keir Starmer with Tony Blair – and what should the current Labour leader learn from his predecessor? Anoosh and Freddie tackle a listener’s question.Also – how do we incentivise voter turn out? One listener has a novel idea. Could it work?Submit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/08/2315m 1s

Rishi Sunak's asylum policy is all at sea

The first residents have boarded the Bibby Stockholm barge moored off the coast of Dorset. Anoosh Chakelian visited Portland to meet locals and asylum seekers, and joins Freddie Hayward in the studio to reveal what she discovered.They also discuss why leaving the European Court of Human Rights is no deterrent for people seeking asylum in the UK, and how Brexit may have actually made it harder for Rishi Sunak's conservatives to "Stop The Boats".Submit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/08/2314m 58s

The Trump trial and the internet conspiracy infecting the world | Conversation

An internet hoax conceived on a fringe message board grew into an online conspiracy theory so far-reaching that it sparked the January 6 attack on the US capitol. Now Qanon has gone global, what are the consequences for politics and society?Rachel Cunliffe is joined by James Ball, journalist and author of The Other Pandemic: How QAnon Contaminated the World. They discuss the most recent indictment against former US president, Donald Trump, and how his actions were informed by the viral internet conspiracy group known as Qanon.They examine how the QAnon movement spread across mainstream social media platforms and mutated into something bigger and more dangerous: encompassing anti-vaxxers, Covid deniers, incels, and those who believe they must save children from LGBT "groomers". How did governments and big tech companies allow a conspiracy theory to get so big it threatened American democracy? And now this "digital virus" is out there, what can be done to combat it?Read more about the chaos and confusion of Donald Trump on trial: https://www.newstatesman.com/world/americas/north-america/us/2023/08/chaos-confusion-donald-trump-on-trialSubmit a question for You Ask Us: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
07/08/2330m 44s

George Monbiot: how I escape climate despair | Audio Long Read

There is one question the environmental journalist and author George Monbiot is asked more than any other: how do you cope? When your job is to report on the climate crisis, where do you find hope? Monbiot’s answer is a very personal one: he goes sea kayaking – alone, often far off the coast, with (if he’s lucky) a pod of dolphins or a flock of shearwaters for company.In this evocative essay from the New Statesman’s summer 2023 issue, Monbiot explores the sea off the island of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, his former home in Cardigan Bay, and his new home in South Devon – a coastline “featuring cliffs and rocky coves, clefts and chasms, reefs and skerries, sandy and shingle beaches and several estuaries”. He relives the dangers and joys of battling the waves in a very small boat, most recently with an underwater camera fixed to the hull. There is no permanent escape from ecological distress, he writes, from the warming seas and the waste pumped into them, “but for hours at a time, I lose myself”.Written by George Monbiot and read by Chris Stone.This article originally appeared in the 28 July-17 August 2023 New Statesman summer issue. You can read the text version here.https://www.newstatesman.com/environment/2023/07/escpaing-climate-sea-kayaking-george-monbiotListen to all our Audio Long Reads herehttps://podfollow.com/audio-long-reads-new-statesmanIf you enjoyed this episode, you might also enjoy Rebecca Solnit on hope, despair and climate action.https://www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/audio-long-reads/2022/10/rebecca-solnit-on-hope-despair-and-climate-actionDownload the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/08/2315m 53s

You Ask Us: Is a new party possible, and has Andy Burnham avoided policing scandal?

Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker answer listener questions.There have been multiple attempts to launch credible new political parties in recent years, but very few have taken hold. Why? A listener, quite possibly the youngest fan of the New Statesman Podcast, asks what it would take for a new party to gain ground in Parliament.And Greater Manchester Police face allegations of sexual assault and cover up. Andy Burnham, as mayor and police commissioner, has ordered a review – but our questioner asks how he has avoided scrutiny for the force's failings.Submit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/08/2325m 22s

Rutherglen by-election: Labour’s key to unlock Scotland?

Yet another by-election could provide a key opportunity for Anas Sarwar’s Scottish Labour to regain lost seats in Scotland.The former SNP MP Margaret Ferrier has been recalled by her Rutherglen and Hamilton West constituents, triggering a by-election. Ben Walker and Freddie Hayward join Anoosh Chakelian on the New Statesman podcast to discuss what the latest polls reveal about voting intention in the seat – formerly a Labour stronghold – and whether this might be the beginning of a Labour resurgence in Scotland.Submit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/08/2313m 20s

All politics is local, with Westminster council leader Adam Hug

When Labour won Westminster Council from the Conservatives in 2022, they made history.Now in power for the first time ever, the Labour council leadership is faced with the challenge and opportunity of running one of the UK’s richest councils – inheriting what council leader Adam Hug calls “mediocre” and “wasteful” Conservative policies.In this revealing interview, Anoosh Chakelian and Harry Lambert go behind the scenes of local government to ask the Westminster Council leader how he hopes to address the housing crisis, what Labour nationally should be doing about planning, development and free school meals, and why Oxford Street still won't be pedestrianised.This interview was recorded on 29th June 2023.Submit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
31/07/2327m 57s

The 1922 committee: inside the Conservatives’ assassination bureau | Audio Long Read

The Conservative Private Members Committee, informally known as the 1922 Committee (or the ’22), is the Tory confessional, its trade union and backbenchers’ common room. If that makes it sound chaotic (and it sometimes is) it is also the assassination bureau that felled Margaret Thatcher, and, more recently, three prime ministers in four years: Theresa May, Boris Johnson and Liz Truss. Will it come for Rishi Sunak before the next election?In this week’s richly detailed and highly entertaining long read, magazine writer Tanya Gold reports on the secretive committee’s inner workings, hearing from decision-makers past and present about what happens when a leader loses the party’s confidence. “The ’22 can be turgid for months, even years,” she writes. “But people talk about Committee Room 14 during a leadership crisis as they might about seeing Bruce Springsteen, or a riot.” And over the next 18 months, they could be busy.Written by Tanya Gold and read by Rachel Cunliffe. This article originally appeared in the 21-27 July 2023 edition of the New Statesman, and you can read the text version here. If you enjoyed this episode, you might also enjoy The making of Prince William by Tanya Gold.Download the New Statesman app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/07/2326m 51s

You Ask Us: How would a Lib Dem return change parliament? And why Liz Truss was worse for Labour.

Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward answer your questions. After a routing in 2015, the Liberal Democrats have languished as a minor player in the Commons while the SNP have enjoyed the advantages of being the third largest party in parliament. Their positions could reverse at the next election. Our listener asks how politics would change if the Lib Dems became the third largest party.  Liz Truss’ premiership proved disastrous for the Conservatives – but did it scar Labour too? Anoosh and Freddie explore the long tail of the Truss debacle and its impact on both sides of the house.Submit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/07/2316m 24s

Are Labour and the Tories u-turning on green policies?

Keir Starmer has faced criticism for appearing to water down some key environmental policies, particularly in light of Labour's narrow defeat in the Uxbridge and South Ruislip by-election. But is that criticism fair?Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward discuss how perceived opposition to the Net Zero agenda and schemes like London's Ulez have impacted the green policies of both Labour and the Conservatives, and how this is being viewed by voters.Submit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/07/2311m 23s

What does a think tank actually do?

Shadowy forces, deep state actors in the pay of nefarious oligarchs... or an important part of the political ecosystem?Rachel Cunliffe meets senior figures from three think tanks from across the political spectrum to find out how think tanks work, how they are funded, and the role they play in creating public policy.Guests:Robert Colvile, director of the Centre for Policy Studies (CPS)Carys Roberts, executive director of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR)Matthew Lawrence, founder and director of Common WealthSubmit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/07/2330m 15s

How Saudi Arabia is buying the world | Audio Long Read

When Saudi cinemas reopened in 2018, for the first time in 35 years, they screened the Marvel movie Black Panther. Many saw parallels between the kingdom and the fictional world of Wakanda, as crown prince Mohammed bin Salman unveiled ambitious plans for modernisation and an economy that would diversify away from oil, investing in futuristic projects such as Neom, a half-trillion-dollar city.Saudi Arabia has since sought to position itself as a global investment powerhouse, focusing on tourism, sports sponsorships, financial services, green hydrogen production, and the electric vehicle industry. Long dependant on oil, can the kingdom transform itself into a major global force in a post-carbon future?In this week’s long read and magazine cover story, New Statesman contributing writer Quinn Slobodian explores the consequences of Saudi dominance on international politics, the climate crisis and our technological future. Written by Quinn Slobodian and read by Chris Stone.Listen to more: The Spanish election reveals the future of Europe, by Jeremy Cliffe: https://pod.fo/e/18c885Download the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our weekly Saturday Read emailhttps://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/07/2336m 29s

By-election special: Tory wipeout, interrupted

In a terrible night of results for Rishi Sunak in rural England, Labour faltered in outer London.Rachel Cunliffe, Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Ben Walker analyse the results of the by-elections in Somerton and Frome, Selby and Ainsty, and Boris Johnson’s old seat of Uxbridge and South Ruislip.Submit a question: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsDownload the app:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week:https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to our daily politics email: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/07/2324m 31s

You Ask Us: Why won't Keir Starmer undo the two-child cap - and can we fix rip-off banks?

Keir Starmer says he’ll keep the two-child cap on benefits. Is this a knee-jerk reaction to public opinion, or an attempt at “fiscal discipline”? The New Statesman Podcast team answer your questions. The Labour leader has risked the anger of his own MPs by apparently reneging on a previous commitment to reverse limits on child benefit introduced by George Osborne under austerity. Angela Rayner has called the cap “barbaric”, and Starmer himself has previously said Labour would reverse it. So what’s prompted this about-turn? Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth, Rachel Cunliffe and Will Dunn answer a listener’s question. They also discuss what the government can – or should – do to force banks to pass rising interest rates onto savers. Should the banks be nationalised?Submit a question to You Ask Us here: https://www.newstatesman.com/YouAskUsSubscribers can listen ad-free via the New Statesman app. Download it now:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week with our special podcast offer: https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to receive our daily politics email, Morning Call: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/07/2326m 22s

Brexit "has broken Britain" - Stephen Flynn interview

Stephen Flynn, Westminster leader of the SNP, speaks to Zoë Grünewald at the New Statesman's Politics Live conference.They discuss the SNP’s ambitions for Scottish independence in the light of Nicola Sturgeon’s resignation, arrest and subsequent release, and how a Labour government under Keir Starmer might relate to the SNP over issues including Brexit in remain-voting Scotland.This episode was recorded in front of a live audience at the New Statesman's Politics Live conference on 27th June 2023. To pre-register for next year’s conference visit nsmg.liveSubscribers can listen ad-free via the New Statesman app. Download it now:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week with our special podcast offer: https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to receive our daily politics email, Morning Call: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/07/2323m 11s

The Spanish election reveals the future of Europe | Audio Long Read

Since 2018, prime minister Pedro Sánchez has led a surprisingly durable and impactful Spanish government, implementing progressive policies such as improved rights for abortion, transgender people and migrants. His coalition government has repositioned Spain as a European “pivot” state, a bridge between north and south, east and west. Its economy is predicted to grow faster than that of Germany, France and Italy.But will any of this be enough to keep Sanchez in power after the 23 July general election? He faces significant challenges from the conservative People's Party, as well as new alliances on the left – an increasingly fragmented political environment that mirrors trends seen across Europe, as identity politics, the climate crisis, and demographic shifts reshape many once stable two-party systems. In this wide-ranging essay, New Statesman contributing writer Jeremy Cliffe reflects on what Spain and its election tells us about the future of Europe. By 2030, he writes, “politics in many states will be defined by the normalised collapse of the cordon sanitaire between mainstream conservatism and the far right. It will be a landscape in which the left can only win by forging broad and canny coalitions.” If Silvio Berlusconi’s divisive authoritarianism presaged our present moment, Sanchez and his battles could point the way to our European future. Written by Jeremy Cliffe and read by Chris Stone. This article originally appeared in the 14-20 July issue of the New Statesman. You can read the text version here.If you enjoyed listening to this episode, you may also like A brief history of “woke”: how one word fuelled the culture wars.Subscribers can listen ad-free via the New Statesman app. Download it now:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week with our special podcast offer: https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to receive The Saturday Read - our weekly email highlighting the best writing from the New Statesman and around the web: https://saturdayread.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/07/2322m 10s

You Ask Us: Who replaces Rishi Sunak – and could Labour MPs defect?

The Conservatives are on track to lose the next election. Who would lead them in opposition?Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Zoë Grünewald answer a listener question on the senior Conservatives who currently look most likely to replace Rishi Sunak as Tory leader.They also address whether Keir Starmer will survive as leader of the Labour party until the next election, if unhappy Labour MPs will stick with him – and what the risks to his leadership might be.Read Zoë’s interview with David Blunkett: “Labour needs to be radical, but not scary” https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/politics-interview/2023/07/david-blunkett-interview-labour-radical-not-scarySubscribers can listen ad-free via the New Statesman app. Download it now:iOS: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/new-statesman-magazine/id610498525Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.progressivemediagroup.newstatesman&hl=en_GB&gl=USSubscribe to the New Statesman from £1 per week with our special podcast offer: https://newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to receive our daily politics email, Morning Call: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
14/07/2319m 27s

Are Labour's missions enough - and is a reshuffle ahead?

Keir Starmer has finished announcing Labour’s five missions. Are they enough to get Labour into government? Vocational education, social mobility, and breaking the “class ceiling” – Labour’s final "mission" was designed to represent the party’s core values. Keir Starmer's mission-based approach is supposed to give us an insight into how a Labour government might lead the country.Anoosh Chakelian, host of the New Statesman podcast, Zoë Grünewald, political reporter for the New Statesman, and Rachel Wearmouth, deputy political editor of the New Statesman, discuss Labour’s five missions and whether they will be enough to win the next election - and chat through reshuffle rumours.These podcast are made possible by New Statesman subscribers. Not a subscriber yet? Get access to all our content online, including ad-free podcast episodes, from just £1 per week. Subscribe here: https://www.newstatesman.com/podcastofferSign up to receive our daily politics email, Morning Call: https://morningcall.substack.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/07/2315m 49s

The Keir Starmer interview: “my mortgage is up – and Sunak doesn’t get it.”

In this wide-ranging interview with Rachel Wearmouth, Keir Starmer discusses the “really damaged economy” Labour will inherit if they win the next election – and attacks Rishi Sunak for being “out of touch” with ordinary people.Speaking in front of a live audience at the New Statesman politics live conference on 27 June 2023, Starmer said a Labour government would have to “go at pace” to rebuild public services, but refused to commit to recommended public sector pay rises.He also addressed claims that he is planning to create hundreds of new Labour peers, acknowledging an “imbalance” in the House of Lords.Pre-register for next year’s Politics Live conference here: https://nsmg.live/event/ns-politics-live/Sign up for the New Statesman’s daily politics email, Morning Call, here: https://morningcall.substack.com/Subscribe to the New Statesman from just £1 a week: www.newstatesman.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/07/2328m 23s

You Ask Us: Will Keir Starmer do electoral reform - and Andy Burnham ever be Prime Minister?

Anoosh, Freddie and Zoë answer your questions in You Ask Us.Keir Starmer has said that voter reform is not a priority for the Labour party. But in the event of a hung parliament at the next election, he may look to the Liberal Democrats – who have long campaigned for proportional representation – for support. Could this sway his hand to change the electoral system?A new survey revealed Andy Burnham is the second most popular politician in the country. The Manchester Mayor has run for the Labour leadership twice. Could he make it third time lucky?To submit a question for You Ask Us visit www.newstatesman.com/youaskusSign up to receive Morning Call, the New Statesman’s daily politics email by Freddie Hayward, here: https://morningcall.substack.com/Subscribe to the New Statesman for £1 per week: www.newstatesman.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
07/07/2315m 58s

Why Britain is broke, with Ed Conway

The UK is experiencing higher inflation than any other G7 country. Ed Conway, Economics editor for Sky News, joins Anoosh, Freddie and Zoë on the New Statesman podcast to explain why Britain appears caught in a "contagious" cycle of economic pain - and why Rishi Sunak and the Bank of England appear unable to break it.Read Ed Conway's cover story for this week's New Statesman magazine, "Broke Britannia", here: https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/economy/2023/07/broke-britannia-uk-inflationSign up to receive the New Statesman's daily politics email, Morning Call, here: https://morningcall.substack.com/Subscribe to the New Statesman from just £1 per week: https://www.newstatesman.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/07/2327m 58s

Russia's new Time of Troubles – with Vladislav Zubok

Following Yevgeny Prigozhin's short-lived mutiny in Russia, the New Statesman's China and Global Affairs Editor Katie Stallard speaks to the historian Vladislav Zubok about what the failed rebellion means for the future of Vladimir Putin's regime. Zubok is professor of international history at the London School of Economics and the author of multiple books including Collapse: The Fall of the Soviet Union. They discuss why Prigozhin decided to act when he did, what the crisis reveals about the stability of Putin's political system, and whether Russia is headed for a new Time of Troubles – the period of conflict and civil upheaval in the early 17th century that brought down the ruling Rurik dynasty.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/07/2326m 30s

Can Wes Streeting save the NHS?

In this bonus episode of the New Statesman Podcast, Wes Streeting, the shadow health secretary, meets Phil Whitaker, the New Statesman’s medical editor and a working GP, at his surgery in Somerset, to have a conversation chaired by Anoosh Chakelian.They clash over Streeting’s plans for GPs and how best to take pressure off hospitals, and discuss what the yardsticks for success will be for a Labour government and the existential threat to the health service posed by the Tories. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/07/2359m 16s

You Ask Us: Will there be another “Portillo moment” – and could rural England vote Labour?

In this week’s You Ask Us, our polling expert Ben Walker joins the podcast to answer some of your queries. With so many senior MPs standing down at the next election, might there still be a “Portillo moment” when a high-profile Conservative loses their seat, and who will it be? The team also answer consider which party is better placed to win over rural voters, Labour or the Lib Dems?Submit your question for You Ask Us at newstatesman.com/youaskus Vote for The New Statesman Podcast in the British Podcast Awards - voting closes 5 September Subscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
30/06/2325m 2s

Nicola Sturgeon’s encore – and Humza Yousaf’s new(-ish) plan for independence

Following Nicola Sturgeon’s evidence session at the Covid inquiry in London, the New Statesman’s Scotland editor, Chris Deerin, joins Anoosh Chakelian and Rachel Wearmouth to discuss what she had to say.They chat about how much the prospect of a no-deal Brexit affected pandemic planning in Scotland, what the relationship between Holyrood and Westminster was like at the time, and how the former first minister tried to land political blows on the UK government during her testimony.Then, the team turn to Sturgeon’s replacement as head of the Scottish government, Humza Yousaf, and his plan to use the next UK general election as a mandate to insist on a new Scottish independence referendum. Submit your question for You Ask Us at newstatesman.com/youaskusVote for The New Statesman Podcast in the British Podcast Awards - voting closes 5 September Subscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/06/2326m 1s

Why do newspaper endorsements still matter?

Have the newspapers decided who they are going to back at the next general election and if they have will it actually have any impact? The New Statesman’s media correspondent, Will Turvill, joins Rachel Cunliffe to discuss his research into the main papers’ editorials to understand what they might say at the next election and why it still matters.They talk about how endorsements can set the broadcast media agenda, if papers follow readers or lead them – and why Murdoch was unhappy about the “Sun Wot Won It” headline in 1992.Subscripe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/06/2316m 46s

You Ask Us: What next for Boris Johnson – and Angela Rayner

In today’s special You Ask Us episode of the New Statesman Podcast, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward to answer listeners’ questions:They discuss what role Angela Rayner might have in a Starmer government and whether she’s being sidelined. Then they tackle a question on whether Boris Johnson could return to politics through the House of Lords.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus.Subscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/06/2313m 53s

Rishi Sunak’s inflation pledge backfires

As the Bank of England raises interest rates again after worse than expected inflation figures, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Andrew Marr, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward to discuss what it all means for voters, the government and the opposition.They discuss why the Conservatives seem unable to come up with a plan to deal with the approaching mortgage crisis, whether Labour’s proposals go far enough and what difference a future Labour government might make to the state of the economy.You Ask Us returns tomorrow.Subscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/06/2318m 8s

How trailblazers are using smart meters to make the switch to net zero | Sponsored

In this special podcast from the Spotlight team in partnership with Smart Energy GB we're looking at how smart meters can help bring down energy bills.From July ofgem, the regulator, will be reducing the price cap on energy. But household bills in Britain are expected to stay high. The government has an aim for all homes to be offered a smart meter by 2025. If you don't have a smart meter installed in your home, it can be harder to understand your energy use and to control spending.Host Becky Slack is joined by Andy Maybury, who retrofitted his home in the Scottish Borders to make it more energy efficient, and Sara Higham director of Corporate Affairs for Smart Energy GBFor more information on Smart Meters search “get a smart meter”**Eligibility may vary Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/06/2321m 9s

Is Keir Starmer a radical or conservative? With his former aide Claire Ainsley

As Labour starts to set out its policy agenda for the next election, Anoosh Chakelian speaks to one of the people who helped shape it.Claire Ainsley worked in Starmer’s policy team from 2020 to 2022 – before that she was at the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, and is now a director at the Progressive Policy Institute. They discuss how radical or conservative Starmer needs to be to win the election, what lessons can be learned from other centre-left successes around the world, and how to build a broad coalition with working-class and middle-class voters.Submit a question to You Ask UsSubscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/06/2323m 13s

You Ask Us: Could Sadiq Khan lose, and is Britain the new Poland?

In our weekly You Ask Us episode, Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward answer your questions. This week, they tackle whether Labour’s comparison of the UK economy with Poland and Romania can be considered xenophobic and if London is as Labour as Sadiq Khan thinks. If you have a question for You Ask Us go to newstatesman.com/youaskus, or leave a comment on YouTube.Subscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/06/2316m 40s

Boris Johnson: the verdict

As a long-awaited investigation finds Boris Johnson knowingly misled parliament – and disrespected its processes – Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward discuss what the report means for Johnson and his party.They go through what the report found, how Boris Johnson reacted and whether this is ultimately good or bad politically for Rishi Sunak.Our new standalone You Ask Us episode will be published on Friday – if you want to submit a question go to newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/06/2317m 2s

SPOTLIGHT: Can redesigning cities boost economic growth and happiness?

A bonus podcast from our Spotlight team:Placemaking – the process of creating quality places that people want to live, work, play and learn in – can contribute significantly to the UK’s productivity. It revitalises public spaces, and can lead to a range of societal and economic benefits, including increased levels of employment, better health and wellbeing, and improved access to culture, skills and education. In this special episode sponsored by PwC, we speak with a panel of expert guests across local government and the private sector about what regeneration projects can do for cities, how their benefits can be spread across the country, and how to tackle challenges such as gentrification. We also look at PwC’s annual Good Growth for Cities Report, a ranking of major UK cities based on 12 measures of economic wellbeing, from health and jobs to transport availability. Sarah Dawood, special projects writer at the New Statesman’s Spotlight policy channel, is joined by Karen Finlayson, partner at PwC and regions leader for UK government and health; Huw Thomas, councillor and leader of Cardiff Council; and Katie Trout, director of policy and partnerships at the West Midlands Growth Company. Read PwC’s Good Growth for Cities Report in full at pwc.co.uk/goodgrowth. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/06/2333m 59s

Boris Johnson resigns and Nicola Sturgeon is arrested

After Nicola Sturgeon's arrest and Boris Johnson flounced out of the Commons over his honours list and the Privileges Committee investigation into whether he misled parliament, the New Statesman Podcast team discuss what all the drama means for the UK. Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Ben Walker consider the difficulties Scottish First Minister Humza Yousaf and the SNP are now facing. They then move on to why Boris Johnson resigned as an MP, along with two allies, what it means for Rishi Sunak, and which parties might win the three by-elections now on the horizon.Submit a question to You Ask UsSuscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/06/2326m 6s

Why is Caroline Lucas standing down?

In this week’s You Ask Us, Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth answer listeners’ questions on Caroline Lucas, the Green MP, standing down and why Jamie Driscoll, mayor of the North of Tyne, was blocked from running for the newly created North East mayoralty.If you have a question for You Ask Us you can submit it on the New Statesman websiteSubscribe to Morning Call   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/06/2310m 19s

The real Rachel Reeves

As Rachel Reeves returns from her visit to the US – where she was accompanied in Washington DC and New York by the NS editor-in-chief, Jason Cowley – we ask what a Labour government will mean for the economy, and what drives the shadow chancellor both personally and politically.Jason joins Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward to discuss his cover story, “The Reeves doctrine: Labour’s plan for power”. They talk about what Reeves believes, why her party is still nervous about scaring voters, and how radical a Labour government might be.You Ask Us will be released as a separate podcast episode tomorrow.Subscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/06/2317m 27s

What’s gone wrong with British policing?

As more allegations of misconduct within the Metropolitan Police reach the courts, Anoosh Chakelian speaks to a former officer about what’s going wrong with British police.Matt Lloyd-Rose speaks to about his new book, an account of his time as a volunteer police officer with the Met. They discuss misogyny and racism, how police officers’ focus on what they say means they fail to actually help solve problems and why it’s as much the instution that’s the problem as individual officers. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/06/2328m 19s

Is greed driving inflation?

Our business editor Will Dunn joins Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward to discuss his New Statesman cover feature on the age of greedflation. Some companies have been accused of taking advantage of rising food prices to increase their profit margins. The panel talk about why they have been able to get away with not reducing mark-ups, and what the political impact could be.  Then in You Ask Us, they answer a listener's question on Keir Starmer will really make housing more affordable. If you have a question for the podcast team, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus.Sign up for Morning Call at morningcall.substack.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/06/2327m 25s

Is there a future for moderates in the Conservative Party?

With the Conservative Party showing open divisions, its right emboldened to hold separate conferences, and many Tory MPs already announcing their plans to stand down at the next election, Zoë Grünewald takes a look at what’s happening to moderates in the party. She’s joined by the writer and commentator Benedict Spence, and Ryan Shorthouse, the chief executive of the liberal conservative think tank Bright Blue. They discuss why centrist voters are turning away from the Conservatives, whether the party has much to show for the last 13 years in government, and which wing might take control after the next election.Subscribe to Morning Call at morningcall.substack.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/05/2335m 29s

Does unionism have a future in Northern Ireland?

After the local elections in Northern Ireland, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward are joined by the Belfast Telegraph reporter Sam McBride to discuss how the different parties did, and what it might mean for the future of power-sharing and the Union as a whole.Then they look at another difficult week for Rishi Sunak, and why Labour feels like it could have the upper hand on Immigration.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25/05/2325m 57s

Is Westminster broken?

Harry Lambert, New Statesman contributing writer, joins Anoosh Chakelian to discuss what could work better in political journalism, the way Westminster and Whitehall are structured, and local government – inspired by two new books, Ian Dunt’s How Westminster Works...and Why It Doesn’t and Paul Johnson’s Follow the Money, on the subject. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/05/2329m 27s

Who holds the power on the left?

As the New Statesman publishes the Left Power List – the 50 most powerful people on the British left – George Eaton, senior editor, joins Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward to discuss who’s on the list and why. They talk about how power has changed on the left, what the reaction has been.Then in You Ask Us they tackle listeners’ questions on what the National Conservativism conference is all about. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/05/2323m 59s

SPOTLIGHT: How Smart Meters help small businesses

With rising energy prices, Small businesses are keen to take more control over their bills. Smart meters can help companies understand in detail how they are using energy, which can help find ways to make things more efficient. In this special episode of Spotlight, in partnership with Smart Energy GB we speak to Josh Kay, co-founder of a production and art fabrication company the Syrup Room and Victoria Bacon from Smart Energy GB about how Smart Meters can helpTo find out more search "get a smart meter"**Eligibility may vary. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/05/237m 41s

BONUS: Have the Conservatives already lost the next election? With Andrew Marr and David Gauke

In a bonus episode of the New Statesman Podcast, we bring you a discussion between Andrew Marr and David Gauke after the local elections earlier this month, in which the Tories did poorly. They talk about the rise of the “Not the Conservatives” party, the chances of Labour winning the next election, and whether voters are concerned about the chances of a coalition.Subscribe to the new Morning Call, now on Substack. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/05/2315m 43s

The art of the political interview – with Rob Burley

 Why is this lying bastard lying to me? That’s the question Jeremy Paxman famously asked when trying to pin down slippery politicians, and it’s the title of Rob Burley’s new book, published on 11 May. With 25 years of experience working with the great political interviewers of our age – from Andrew Neil to Emily Maitlis, and Andrew Marr to Beth Rigby – he joins Rachel Cunliffe to dissect what makes a great TV political interview, and why scrutiny of our leaders is more important now than ever.   They discuss Brian Walden’s landmark 1989 interview with Margaret Thatcher, the impossible pressure put on the BBC, and the surrealism of the brief Liz Truss era. They also look at how Boris Johnson broke the rules of engagement between journalists and politicians, and revisit why the former PM once had to hide in a fridge.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/05/2332m 16s

Is Labour heading for a majority after all?

Now all the local ballots have been counted, Anoosh is joined by Freddie Hayward, Rachel Wearmouth and Ben Walker to work out who did well, who did badly, and what the results might tell us about the next election.They look at what’s behind Labour wins in places like Medway and Thanet, whether Keir Starmer should be worried about the Greens, and how the Lib Dems are doing.   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/05/2328m 33s

Is it time to abolish the monarchy - Recorded live at the Cambridge literary Festival

In this special edition of the New Statesman Podcast we bring you the New Statesman debate, recorded live at the Cambridge Literary Festival, on the motion: “This house believes it is time for Britain to abolish its monarchy.”  The death of the Queen, followed by Harry and Meghan’s revelations, marked a turning point for the royal family. On the eve of the coronation of King Charles, six speakers tackle the critical question: is the monarchy an essential source of stability in troubled times? Or is it a distraction and a financial burden – an institution long past its sell-by date?  For the motion: Tanya Gold, an award-winning journalist who has written extensively on the royal family; Anna Whitelock, a historian, author and professor of the history of monarchy at City, University of London; and Gary Younge, a journalist, author, broadcaster and academic. Against the motion: Robert Hardman, a journalist and author specialising in the monarchy, his most recentbook is Queen of Our Times: The Life of Elizabeth II;Andrew Marr, a broadcaster, author and the New Statesman’s political editor; and the journalist and film-maker Tanjil Rashid, who has recently produced documentaries on the war in Ukraine and writes for the Financial Times and the Washington Post.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/05/231h 22m

A bad night for the Conservatives at the local elections

As the first results from the English local elections come in, Rachel Wearmouth, Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker look at what they mean for the main parties. They talk about where the Conservatives are losing, and where Labour, the Lib Dems and the Greens are succeeding.Subscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/05/2326m 6s

Are the Tories failing children?

What’s it like to be a child today? Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe and Zoë Grünewald discuss the New Statesman's recent interview with Rachel de Souza, the children’s commissioner for England – who is tasked with protecting and promoting the rights of children – and how government and tech companies are failing young people. We hear about what it’s like to grow up online and the rise in pupil absences since the pandemic, as well as De Souza’s work on fighting online harms and why her biggest challenge remains the tech giants. The team also consider the political response to the mental health crisis in schools, the migrant children who have gone missing from hotels run by the Home Office, and why the Illegal Migration Bill could embolden human traffickers.Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman appPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/05/2330m 13s

The writer at the centre of the Diane Abbott row

Diane Abbott, the former shadow home secretary and ally of Jeremy Corbyn, has been suspended as a Labour MP after she claimed Jewish people cannot be victims of racism, in a letter to the Observerresponding to a column by Tomiwa Owolade, a New Statesman contributing writer. He joins Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward to talk about her suspension, why the anti-Semitism row continues to punctuate Labour Party politics, and whether Abbott should be allowed to stand for Labour at the next election.Then in You Ask Us, they look at whether we should all just accept that we are poorer, as per advice from the Bank of England’s chief economist, Huw Pill. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/04/2320m 36s

Is Rishi Sunak reviving the Tories? Live at the Cambridge Literary Festival

In a special episode of the New Statesman Podcast recorded live at the Cambridge Literary Festival, Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker discuss Dominic Raab’s resignation and what it means for Rishi Sunak's position. They also examine the Prime Minister's improving poll numbers and ask whether the recovery is real – and what Labour under Keir Starmer is doing in response. Then in You Ask Us, they take questions from the audience on whether Labour will benefit from the SNP's problems, the focus on immigration, and the extent of public sympathy for the current wave of strikes. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/04/2353m 53s

From election fever in England to SNP turmoil in Scotland

The local elections in England are on 4 May, with more than 8,000 council seats across the country up for grabs. It is the first major electoral test for Rishi Sunak since becoming Prime Minister and a sign of how things could go in the general election next year. What should we watch out for?  Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward are joined by the New Statesman’s senior data journalist Ben Walker – founder of State of the Nation, a data site for understanding Britain – to discuss the electoral map and how key wards voted last time. The team assess whether Labour can make a definitive recovery in so-called Red Wall England and how the Tories are managing expectations. Then, in You Ask Us, the New Statesman’s Scotland editor, Chris Deerin, joins the podcast to answer a listener’s question: what on Earth’s going on with the SNP? If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app  Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/04/2332m 44s

Can we restore faith in parliament? With Hannah White

With the public's view of government and parliament at new lows after the pandemic, what can be done to increase belief in politics? Dr Hannah White, director of the Institute for Government, speaks to Zoë Grünewald about her new book Held in Contempt, What’s Wrong with the House of Commons. They discuss how trust was damaged so severely under Boris Johnson, and whether Rishi Sunak and Keir Starmer are doing enough to restore faith in institutions.Subscribe to Morning Call at https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/morning-call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/04/2327m 26s

Joe Biden’s visit exposes the UK’s Brexit impasse

The US president, Joe Biden, arrived in Belfast on a week-long visit to the island of Ireland marking the 25th anniversary Good Friday Agreement. Northern Ireland has been in a year of political limbo since it’s devolved government collapsed as a result of divisions over the post-Brexit trade regime.Anoosh Chakelian and Rachel Wearmouth are joined by the New Statesman’s foreign editor, Megan Gibson, to discuss Biden’s deeply personal speech and US-UK relations after claims that his bilateral talks with Rishi Sunak had been stripped back to a coffee – dubbed a “bi-latte”.They also talk about the political implications of the visit for Northern Ireland and mounting tensions as violence broke out at an Easter Monday march in Derry last week and the police raised the terrorism threat level. Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks what’s behind Labour’s attack ads.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/04/2336m 50s

Spotlight: How Smart Meters can help with the energy crisis

The energy market is complicated. Consumers are understandably confused by the range of tariffs and suppliers – and even by where energy comes from. In 2021, 40 percent of our electricity was generated using gas, around half of which was imported by pipeline from Norway or by ship from places such as Qatar, the United States and Russia.Smart meters enable the opposite of this opaque system. They offer visibility and transparency that can help consumers make the best decisions for themselves.In this special episode of Spotlight, in partnership with Smart Energy GB we speak to Anna Moss, senior consultant at Cornwall Insight about how Smart Meters can help with energy security.The New Statesman podcast will return later this week.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/04/2310m 30s

The New Statesman political editors’ reunion: covering Westminster from Thatcher to Sunak

In this special podcast, nine political editors and writers come together to discuss working at the New Statesman, covering everything from the rise and fall of Thatcher and New Labour through to the coalition government and the recent period of Conservative hegemony. We hear from Patrick Wintour, Sarah Baxter, Steve Richards, Jackie Ashley, Rafael Behr, Mehdi Hasan, Helen Lewis, Stephen Bush and their chair, the current political editor Andrew Marr. Together, they discuss what made working at the New Statesman unique and the magazine’s evolution over the years – through the Blair-Brown years, 9/11, Brexit and Corbyn – as well as the key moments in their careers and the influence of social media. This podcast was recorded for a special 110th anniversary edition of the New Statesman, out on 13 April. An abridged version of this conversation will also appear in print and online. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/04/2345m 45s

Is the Good Friday Agreement under threat? With Jonathan Powell

It’s a quarter of a century since a peace deal introduced cross-community power-sharing to Northern Ireland. One of the architects of the deal was Tony Blair’s chief of staff Jonathan Powell. He speaks to the New Statesman's deputy political editor Rachel Wearmouth about how the deal came together, how it has fared since 1998, and the likelihood today of an Irish unification referendum.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
07/04/2320m 40s

Dover delays, the Brexit taboo and Stevenage Woman

The Easter exodus from the UK has begun but holidaymakers hoping for a quick getaway were stranded by lengthy delays at the Port of Dover. Suella Braverman, the Home Secretary, has denied that this was related to Brexit, instead blaming the weather.Anoosh Chakelian, Zoë Grünewald and Ben Walker discuss what’s causing the snarl-up, why evasiveness around the “B” word is not confined to the government alone, and where public opinion lies when there are signs of crisis everywhere.Then in You Ask Us a listener asks: Who is Stevenage Woman?If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/04/2327m 0s

Are social conservatives the future of British politics?

As the Tories increasingly use social issues and culture wars to appeal to voters, we talk about the key MPs behind this trend, analyse how socially conservative the country really is, and debate what this means for the future of the Conservative Party and the UK more broadly. Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Wearmouth, Rachel Cunliffe and our polling expert, Ben Walker, along with special guest Henry Hill, the deputy editor of the ConservativeHome website. They discuss the battles going on in the Conservative Party, what Kate Forbes’s close defeat in the SNP leadership race means, and how liberal the British public really is. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/04/2335m 0s

Tough on crime? Britain’s new political battleground

Petty crime is emerging as a central battleground of the next election. The Prime Minister has announced headline-grabbing plans to ban laughing gas (nitrous oxide), which the Levelling Up Secretary, Michael Gove, has described as an “increasing scourge”. This swiftly followed a big speech on law and order from the Labour leader, Keir Starmer, which unveiled ambitions to reverse rising crime rates.Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Zoë Grünewald discuss Rishi Sunak’s big idea of “immediate justice” and whether this would win immediate votes in the local elections – or is even possible at all.They also analyse Labour’s ambitious “tough on crime” agenda, the damning findings of the Casey report into the Met’s toxic culture, and why tackling crime is easier than tackling austerity.In You Ask Us, they chat about Jeremy Corbyn’s future in answer to a question from a listener: should the Labour Party be a broad church?If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
30/03/2328m 22s

How Brexit remade the Conservative Party, with Tim Bale

Has winning the Brexit vote made the Conservative Party ungovernable? That’s the question political scientist Tim Bale is tackling in his new book The Conservative Party After Brexit. He speaks to Anoosh Chakelian about how the party has changed, why its coalition of right-wing populism and free-market fundamentalism is inherently unstable and why the damage could continue well beyond the next election. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/03/2330m 57s

What Humza Yousaf means for the SNP, Scottish independence and Labour

Humza Yousaf is the new leader of the SNP after beating his closest rival, Kate Forbes, by 52 per cent to 48 per cent in the final round of the party’s leadership election.He’s the continuity candidate, but is continuity enough to keep the SNP in power in Holyrood and dominant in Scottish Westminster seats as it continues to push for independence?Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Chris Deerin, Scotland editor, to discuss the result, the bruising campaign and why Labour might be the happiest party north of the border right now.If you have a question for You Ask Us go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/03/2321m 4s

Is the era of Boris and Brexit over?

During a grumpy four-hour hearing with the Commons Privileges Committee, Boris Johnson appeared to lack the deft political touches that got him into No 10. The team discuss how his performance didn’t help him, why he was unable to lead a dramatic revolt against Rishi Sunak’s Brexit deal, and if this is good or bad for the current prime minister. Then in You Ask Us, they answer a listener’s question on whether the UK could ever have a more humane immigration policy.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to Newstatesman.com/youaskus Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/03/2330m 48s

Childcare gets top billing in the Budget, but will it work?

After Jeremy Hunt announced an extension of free childcare provision to children older than nine months in the Budget this week, some parents groups are celebrating – but is this really a victory?Rachel Cunliffe is joined by Zoë Grünewald and Alona Ferber to discuss what was announced, whether it leaves Labour in a difficult position, and if the new policy will actually deliver what it promises.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app Podcast listeners can subscribe to the NewStatesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our specialoffer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/03/2320m 2s

What’s behind the Budget? With Andrew Marr

Jeremy Hunt presented his first Budget on Wednesday (15 March) as forecasts said that Britain faces a record fall in living standards over the next two years.Anoosh Chakelian is joined by the New Statesman’s political editor, Andrew Marr, and business editor, Will Dunn, to take us through the key measures. They discuss the huge stealth tax rises the Chancellor snuck into his “boring” Budget and, with half a million workers on strike as he delivered it, the missed opportunities to rescue public services.Then, the New Statesman’s deputy political editor Rachel Wearmouth joins the podcast to discuss Labour’s response: has its emphasis on childcare been overshadowed by the Tories, and are the two main parties moving closer together on policy?If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman appPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/03/2326m 3s

What’s behind the Tories’ new voter ID laws?

The local elections in May will be the first time that voters in England must show a form of photo ID to cast their vote. The government has said we need these tough restrictions to combat election fraud but pilots suggest one million voters could be put off voting, with police told to prepare for polling station chaos.Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe and Ben Walker discuss the reality of voter fraud, why Rishi Sunak is pressing ahead with this policy now and who might be denied their right to vote. Plus, the many ways this law might degrade trust in the electoral process rather than bolster it.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/03/2323m 31s

Why are women voters moving to the left?

Women have turned away from the Conservative Party over the past few decades, who since 2010 have been more likely to vote for Labour. The Conservatives’ failure to support women – who are bearing the brunt of the cost-of-living crisis – has not helped things.Anoosh Chakelian, Zoë Grünewald and Rachel Wearmouth discuss why the Tories have failed to win over female voters, the rise of newly politicised mums, and how gender equality has been weaponised to fuel the culture wars.Then in You Ask Us a listener asks why Labour has never elected a female leader.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusThis week we’ve been celebrating our women writers from around the world. Read more here.Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/03/2322m 2s

BONUS: Britain’s childcare crisis, with Stella Creasy

Childcare in the UK is among the most expensive among the countries of the OECD. The lack of affordable and accessible childcare is costing the nation £27bn a year – equivalent to 1 per cent of GDP – according to report by Centre for Progressive Policy. In this bonus episode of the New Statesman podcast, brought to you by the Spotlight team, Alona Ferber, editor of the Spotlight policy section and supplement, speaks to Stella Creasy. The Labour MP for Walthamstow has long been outspoken on the need to reform Britain’s dysfunctional childcare system, which the party promises to “completely reimagine” if it wins the next election. They discuss why childcare is becoming an increasingly political issue and the hostility Creasy has experienced campaigning around issues related to work and motherhood. She discusses her recent victory on whether childcare should be considered part of economic infrastructure, the crisis in the sector and which voices are sorely missing from the debate.This interview will be appearing in the next edition of the Spotlight supplement.Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman appPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/03/2333m 36s

Could childcare win Labour the next election?

A new report from economics think tank the Centre for Progressive Policy (CPP) reveals the UK is losing 1 per cent of GDP through a lack of suitable childcare. Rachel Cunliffe, Alona Ferber and Zoë Grünewald discuss the cost of Britain’s broken childcare system as the pressure increases for action. We hear from Labour MP Stella Creasy, who with shadow education secretary Bridget Phillipson wants to make childcare a dividing line in the next election. The team discuss what Labour’s childcare policy would look like, the Australian Labor Party’s election success following the promise of a radical childcare policy with subsidies of up to 90 per cent, and Rishi Sunak’s offer – a “letter-writing campaign” to persuade stay-at-home mums to return to work – after scrapping Liz Truss's childcare reforms. They also cover what’s often missing in the debate, including why childcare should be seen as economic infrastructure, the quality of care, and why workers are often underpaid, overworked and undervalued.Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman appIf you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/03/2331m 52s

What the Brexit deal means for Rishi Sunak – and Keir Starmer

Rishi Sunak has agreed a deal with the EU on the Northern Ireland protocol. He has hailed this as a “new chapter” in relations, but will he reap the rewards? Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth discuss the “Windsor framework”, as the deal is known, and what the DUP and hardline Tory Brexiteers will do now. They also debate whether Labour will be forced to drop its “Make Brexit Work” slogan. Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks what is behind Keir Starmer’s missions, which are outlined in his cover essay for this week’s New Statesman magazine.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman appPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/03/2319m 58s

Inside Westminster’s warped workplace

Anoosh Chakelian and Zoë Grünewald are joined by two parliamentary researchers to delve into the working conditions, power imbalances and abuses that take place within Westminster. Jenny Symmons and Holly Brazier Tope are senior researchers for Labour MPs and representatives of parliamentary staff for the GMB union. They open up about the problems at their workplace, ranging from diseased drinking water, fires and asbestos to bullying, outrageous assignments and sexual misconduct.  The team discuss the dangers of being employed by an individual MP, including poor pay and being fired at will, why parliamentary staffers are considering strike action, and whether a more inclusive and less toxic workplace is possible.Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman appPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/02/2333m 44s

Kate Forbes: How faith can make you political "roadkill", with Tim Farron

For a hot moment Kate Forbes was favourite to replace Nicola Sturgeon as SNP leader and Scotland’s first minister. But revealing her socially conservative views in a series of interviews, including being against equal marriage, gender self-identification and sex outside of marriage, has dismayed her supporters and jeopardised her campaign. Anoosh Chakelian and Ben Walker discuss the SNP’s socially liberal base and the parallels between Forbes and Tim Farron, who resigned as Liberal Democrat leader in 2017 after he was repeatedly challenged about his views on gay sex. Anoosh then speaks to Farron himself about how he rates Forbes’ prospects given his own experience, her brutally honest strategy, and whether a leader with her views is compatible with the SNP’s progressive agenda. Then in You Ask US, Ben answers listeners’ polling questions on where Britain stands on strikes, apathy towards Brexit, and the significance of the West Lancashire by-election result, as forecast by Britain Predicts, the New Statesman’s new polling model.Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/02/2334m 6s

SPOTLIGHT: The autonomous future is nearly here - with Wejo

Widespread use of autonomous cars is on the horizon. Self-driving vehicles are already out on our roads. And autonomy will change our relationship with our vehicles. But what will the new immersive world inside a vehicle be like? In the third episode of a three-part special series partnered with Wejo, the smart mobility tech company, a panel of expert guests discuss how legislation and policy are enabling self-driving vehicles – and how AVs will change our lives. Will our children do their homework in the car on their way to school? Will we watch films on long journeys on the motorway?Alona Ferber, editor of the New Statesman’s Spotlight policy channel, is joined by Richard Barlow, founder and chief executive of Wejo, Larry Burns, the former corporate vice president of Research and Development for General Motors who championed self-driving and electric vehicles – and now sits on Wejo’s board – Alex Kendall, CEO of AV2.0 start-up Wayve, and Amanda Stretton, the former racing driver, broadcaster, and automotive expert. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/02/2322m 16s

Will being tough on crime decide the next election?

With the criminal justice system under immense strain, from huge case backlogs to crumbling court buildings and staff shortages, Labour has seized the opportunity to attack the Tories’ record on crime. In a speech on Thursday 16 February the shadow home secretary, Yvette Cooper, declared that “only Labour is the party of law and order”. Rachel Cunliffe, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth discuss Keir Starmer’s strategy, evoking Tony Blair, and whether this could be the deciding issue at the next election.  They also talk about the government’s attempt to cling on to its “tough on crime” credentials, which has been overtaken by Rishi Sunak’s “relentless” commitment to stop migrants in small boats arriving on Britain’s shores.Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/02/2317m 7s

Nicola Sturgeon resigns – what next for Scottish politics?

 After surprising the country by announcing her resignation as First Minister and SNP leader, Nicola Sturgeon leaves a vacuum in UK politics. The New Statesman’s Scotland editor, Chris Deerin, joins the podcast to discuss what's behind her decision and what it means for the Union, independence and the prospects of Scottish opposition parties. Then in You Ask Us, we try to work out who could replace her. Subscribers can get an ad free version of the NS Podcast on the New Statesman app Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/02/2332m 25s

An intensive care doctor’s remedy for the NHS, with Jim Down

Ahead of the publication of his new book, Life in the Balance: A Doctor’s Stories of Intensive Care, Dr Jim Down speaks to Anoosh Chakelian about the struggles the NHS is facing, why privitisation isn’t the answer, and the toll the job is taking on the mental health of many doctors.Jim’s book is published on 23 February.Subscribe to the Morning Call newsletter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
13/02/2322m 23s

Will Rishi Sunak’s reshuffle restore his authority?

Rishi Sunak is struggling to restore order over a divided and unruly Conservative party. His latest attempt, this week, takes the form of a cabinet reshuffle and a restructuring of Whitehall that created four new government departments. Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward break down the main changes and talk about what this disruptive and expensive move tells us about Sunak’s grip on his party. They also discuss the appointment of the controversial “red wall rottweiler” Lee Anderson as deputy Conservative Party chairman and whether the new departments promise a new political direction. Then in You Ask Us a listener asks: what is the cost of strikes compared with the cost of giving workers pay rises?If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/02/2318m 16s

Can we stop the government criminalising protest? With Jodie Beck of Liberty

Last week the government faced multiple defeats in the House of Lords on its wide-ranging Public Order Bill, which have peers warned would have a chilling effect on the right to protest.As the government continues to try to push its legislation through, Jodie Beck, head of policy and campaigns at the human rights organisation Liberty, talks to Rachel Cunliffe about why this bill is so controversial, how it will criminalise perfectly normal acts, and whether anything can be done to stop the assault on civil liberties.Watch our video on the Crime and Policing ActIf you have a question for You Ask Us, go to https://newstatesman.com/youaskus  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/02/2326m 49s

Rishi Sunak’s first 100 days, with Andrew Marr

Rishi Sunak is marking 100 days in office just after Britain was hit by the biggest day of industrial action in a decade and the IMF predicted that the UK will be the only major economy to shrink in 2023. With the Tory party engulfed in sleaze and sackings, Sunak is feeling the pressure. Andrew Marr joins Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward to discuss whether the Prime Minister is simply too inexperienced to weather this perfect storm, the clamour for tax cuts among the Tory ranks, and the key question buzzing around Westminster – is Boris Johnson about to make a comeback? In You Ask Us, a listener wonders if Brexit is behind the UK's gloomy economic outlook.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/02/2321m 5s

Are the Lib Dems winning here?

After a series of by-election victories, could the Lib Dem election machine be powering the party back to its late 90s levels of popularity? Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker look at the party’s recent performance, how it is preparing to fight an upcoming election and why Brexit has changed the kinds of seats it is fighting for. Listen to our special on the Green Party. If you have a question for the podcast team go to Newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
30/01/2319m 44s

The return of Tory sleaze

Rishi Sunak promised to draw a line under the scandalous Boris Johnson era when he became Prime Minister, but Tory sleaze seems here to stay. He is facing serious questions over the integrity of his party after a succession of allegations against senior figures. Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Will Dunn, the New Statesman’s business editor, try to figure out what's going – from Boris Johnson’s loan allegedly facilitated by the BBC chairman Richard Sharp and his million-pound donation from the businessman Christopher Harborne, to the investigation into Nadhim Zahawi’s tax affairs. The team discuss Sunak’s political naivety and ask whether the stories are bad only for the government or, in fact, tarnish all politicians and parties. Then in You Ask Us a listener asks why campaigners keep calling for all sorts of new protected characteristics under the Equality Act. If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/01/2329m 44s

How to fix the NHS, with Phil Whitaker

With the crisis in the health service growing, the New Statesman’s medical editor Phil Whitaker speaks to Rachel Cunliffe about his prescription for fixing it. They discuss how the system is currently broken, why the Health Secretary Steve Barclay and the shadow health secretary Wes Streeting could benefit from spending time on the front line with GPs, and how to get back to a system in which the private insurance sector panics about not being needed. Subscribe to Morning Call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/01/2327m 16s

SPOTLIGHT: Are we there yet?: The EV story - with Wejo

A special podcast from Spotlight, the New Statesman’s policy supplement - The New Statesman podcast will return tomorrow.  In 2020, the UK announced the end of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030. At the time, Boris Johnson’s government pledged £1.8bn to support greater uptake of zero emission vehicles, including £1.3bn to rollout more chargepoints for electric vehicles nationwide. Since then, the country has seen the biggest year-on-year growth in electric car registration for years. But there are millions of registered cars on the road in the UK – so how far have we come on the EV journey? In the second episode of a three-part special partnered series with Wejo, the smart mobility tech company, a panel of expert guests discuss what’s standing in the way of greater uptake of EVs, in the UK and elsewhere.  Alona Ferber, editor of the New Statesman’s Spotlight policy channel, is joined by Richard Barlow, founder and chief executive of Wejo, Melanie Shufflebotham, founder and COO of the EV charging app, Zap_Map, Dale Vince, CEO of Ecotricity, and Philipe Vangeel, Secretary General of AVERE, the European Association for Electromobility.  The next episode of this special series explores the autonomous vehicles future that is nearly here. Click here for the first episode.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/01/2322m 7s

From Scotland to Stormont, is Rishi Sunak losing the Union?

Rishi Sunak’s government has decided to block legislation to simplify gender recognition passed by the Scottish Parliament using a mechanism that’s being described as the “nuclear option”. The decision has precipitated a constitutional crisis, with Nicola Sturgeon calling the decision a “full-frontal attack” on devolution.Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth discuss how a debate over policy has turned into one over Scotland’s power to govern itself. The team also covers claims that the government is trying to inflame tensions as part of a culture war and exploit divisions within the Labour Party over the bill.Then in You Ask Us a listener asks how the stalemate at Stormont, the Northern Irish Assembly, which has been without a government since February 2022, will end.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/01/2321m 5s

Why Britain’s economy has never been worse, with Duncan Weldon

Will Dunn, the New Statesman’s business editor, is joined by the journalist and former political adviser Duncan Weldon to discuss how Britain is facing a decline like never before. They talk about the country’s long history of economic woe and what we can learn from it, why we are feeling the current crisis more acutely than our neighbours, and if this calls for big ideas or – as Liz Truss and Kwasi Kwarteng attempted in their disastrous mini-Budget – suffers from them.If you’ve got a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/01/2322m 41s

Is Rishi Sunak's anti-strike law a trap for Labour?

After the Prime Minister and the leader of the opposition met across the despatch box for the first time in 2023, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by the New Statesman's Political Editor Andrew Marr and Freddie Hayward to analyse whether Rishi Sunak can start turning his polling figures around.They discuss Sunak’s answers about his use of private healthcare and Labour’s potentially costly plans for the NHS.Then in You Ask Us, they answer a listener’s question on how Labour is responding to the government’s anti-strike legislation.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusSubscribe to the Morning Call newsletter at https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/morning-call CORRECTION: On an earlier version of this episode of the New Statesman podcast, during a discussion about anti-strike legislation, there was a suggestion that individual workers may be arrested – this was incorrect. As we made clear in our intro to the topic, the law would be enforceable in two ways: allowing employers to fire workers who strike, and to sue unions that don’t ensure a minimum level of service. We have removed this from the podcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/01/2317m 42s

How do the SNP and Welsh Labour compare with the Tories in England?

In a devolution special for the New Statesman Podcast, we take a look at how the NHS crisis - and other political problems - are playing out in Scotland and Wales. Our Scotland editor, Chris Deerin, returns to the podcast to speak to Anoosh Chakelian about his own experience in a Scottish hospital, and how problems with the service are affecting the SNP. Then Anoosh is joined by the co-host of the Hireath Welsh politics podcast Matthew Hexter to analyse the impact on Wales, and how its Labour-run government is responding.Sign up for the Morning Call newsletter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/01/2339m 13s

Sunak vs Starmer: The battle of the New Year’s speeches

Rishi Sunak and Keir Starmer welcomed in 2023 with speeches setting out their priorities for the year and beyond. Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Cunliffe discuss Sunak’s five pledges and why he appears more Blue Peter presenter than prime minister. They also analyse Starmer’s embrace of a Brexit slogan with his promise to help voters “take back control” of their communities, why he is pitching to a new squeezed middle, and his reluctance to talk about big spending.Then in You Ask Us a listener asks whether the Conservatives are running the NHS down on purpose so they can sell it off.If you’ve got a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus  Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Read more:Freddie Hayward writes Keir Starmer takes the fight to the Tories by stealing their slogans.Zoë Grünewald writes Rishi Sunak's New Year speech showed how out of depth he is.Anoosh Chakelian asks are the Conservatives "defunding" the NHS in order to privatise it? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/01/2330m 9s

Will Labour change the voting system?

Half of Britain (51 per cent) wants the voting system to change, according to the British Social Attitudes survey, while only 44 per cent want to retain the current system. Most Labour supporters are in favour and this year the Labour Party conference voted for a manifesto commitment to proportional representation for general elections. Anoosh Chakelian is joined by special guest Jess Garland, director of policy and research at the Electoral Reform Society, to talk all things voter reform. They discuss the significance of proportional representation and the recent rise in public support, where the various political parties stand on the issue, and how a change to the system could be brought about.You can submit a question for You Ask Us at newstatesman.com/youaskus, and sign up for the Morning Call politics newsletter at newstatesman.com/politics/morning-call. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/01/2316m 26s

From partygate to Trussonomics, 2022 in review

 In a special episode of the New Statesman Podcast, Harry Lambert joins Anoosh Chakelian to look back at the year in politics.They cast their minds back to the three prime ministers, two monarchs, one controversial beer and korma, and the collapse of more “walls” than you can shake a comedy Lib Dem prop at.You can submit a question for You Ask Us at newstatesman.com/youaskus, and sign up for the Morning Call politics newsletter at newstatesman.com/politics/morning-call. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/12/2254m 42s

SPOTLIGHT: How connected vehicle data is going to change the world - with Wejo

In the very near future, your car will use data from your mobile device to help you navigate and stay safe. But vehicles already generate useful data. In the first episode of a three-part special partnered series with Wejo, the smart mobility tech company, a panel of expert guests discuss how connected vehicle data is already changing the world.Real-time data, information generated by vehicles driving around towns and cities as we speak, is already being used to help ease traffic congestion, help prevent accidents, and support the move to a net zero economy.Read more and watch the video on the New Statesman website: https://www.newstatesman.com/spotlight/2022/12/how-connected-vehicle-data-is-going-to-change-the-world-with-wejoIn the first episode of this special series, the panel traces the origins of connected vehicle data and looks at potential problems around data privacy. The discussion also explores the potential of data for local authority service delivery, and highlights examples of where vehicle data is already being put to use for wider social benefits.Alona Ferber, editor of the New Statesman’s Spotlight policy channel, is joined by Richard Barlow, founder and chief executive of Wejo, John Stenlake, director of Vehicle Innovation & Mobility at Microsoft, and Peter Van Manen, the former managing director of McLaren Electronic Systems, the company that supplies control and data systems to all competitors in the Formula One, NASCAR and indyCar racing series.One application of vehicle data has been to reduce insurance premiums, Barlow, who started Wejo ten years ago, explains on the episode: “In the first year I worked with an insurance provider, and my thought process with insurance providers was that if they had access to data, then they would be able to provide better policies, more cost effective policies for all drivers.”“It became very apparent that the insurers were very much ingrained with the idea that they could produce their premium costs for high risk drivers, but not for all drivers, just a very small percentage,” he says. “And then at the same point, it became clear that motor manufacturers were also making more of their vehicles be available in terms of the data they make available."And it was a massive disconnect. I realised there was an opportunity there to work with the motor manufacturers and to actually go beyond insurance, but actually use data to provide better mobility services. And now today we see data from 90 million journeys every day. We have over 20 million vehicles on [Wejo’s] platform.”The next episodes of this special series will look at obstacles to mass electric vehicle adoption and the autonomous vehicles future that is nearly here.   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/12/2219m 46s

The best of culture in 2022

A special Boxing Day episode hosted by Rachel Cunliffe, looking back at the best (and worst) of the year in culture. She is joined by Tom Gatti, the New Statesman’s executive editor for culture, Kate Mossman, senior writer, and Rachel Cooke, our regular TV critic, to talk about their picks across TV, music, books, and film. In music, they discuss the high-art cabaret of Christine and the Queens’ Redcar and Kate’s nerve-wracking interview with Nick Cave about his deepening faith and grieving for two sons. In film, the stand-out was The Quiet Girl, based on Claire Keegan’s story of early-1980s rural Ireland which left Rachel Cooke and Tom weeping. In TV, they move from the indulgent theatre of the Harry and Meghan documentary to the exquisite observations made in the BBC series Marriage, and explain why people can’t stop the watching the second season of The White Lotus. And in books, highlights include the nasty but brilliant novel Vladimir by Julia May Jonas and Katherine Rundell’s The Golden Mole, while the unanimous lowlight is Matt Hancock’s retrospectively constructed and entirely delusional Pandemic Diaries.Subscribe to the Morning Call newsletter at https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/morning-call Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/12/2246m 9s

Rishi Sunak could face more NHS strikes next year

It’s been an unprecedented week of strike action involving both nurses and ambulance workers – and the government still refuses to negotiate with NHS unions over pay. Anoosh Chakelian and Zoë Grünewald, the New Statesman’s political reporter, are joined by Dr Emma Runswick, a mental health doctor and deputy chair of council for the British Medical Association (BMA), a doctors’ trade union.They discuss the poor pay and conditions that have led to strike action and why junior doctors might be next, plus the government’s refusal to consider pay negotiations, and the shadow health secretary Wes Streeting’s recent critique of the BMA. The team also covers the wider problems in the NHS after years of poor planning and underfunding – such as ambulance delays, staff shortages and long waiting lists – and whether these issues are changing patient attitudes towards the healthcare system. Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks: with the NHS in such a state after the Conservatives have slowed its funding, is there a reason Labour or the Lib Dems don’t attack the government harder on the NHS? Is it because there is a fear of sounding critical of the NHS itself.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer: visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer to learn more  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/12/2235m 49s

Why Love Actually has ruined politics, with Jonn Elledge

In a special festive edition of the New Statesman Podcast, NS columnist Jonn Elledge speaks to Rachel Cunliffe about the highs and lows of the year, how Love Actually messed up our politicians, and why residents of a town in Sweden spend every Christmas trying to burn a wooden goat. If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus You can find Jonn Elledge’s books Conspiracy and The Compendium of (Not Quite) Everything at all good bookshops, and hear him talk about Conspiracy on the NS podcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/12/2230m 29s

Are strike politics trickier for Rishi Sunak or Keir Starmer?

Nurses in England, Wales and Northern Ireland went on strike today for the first time in their history. With the UK facing “winter lockdown” following the latest wave of strikes and with inflation still high, Rishi Sunak’s government is under pressure. Labour leader Keir Starmer has described the nurses' strike as a “badge of shame for this government”, while the Prime Minister has unveiled his plan to crack down on migrants claiming asylum in Britain.Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward discuss public support for the strikes, which remains relatively high, and how long the momentum behind them can last, as well as Labour's position and why shadow health secretary Wes Streeting is challenging the British Medical Association. Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks: is Nigel Farage making a comeback?You can read all our Spotlight Cybersecurity coverage here.If you’ve got a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
15/12/2236m 11s

What politicians get wrong about immigration, with Sunder Katwala

After figures showed record net migration to the UK in 2022, is immigration still a toxic political issue? Freddie Hayward talks to Sunder Katwala, director of the think tank British Future, about how public attitudes to immigration have changed, the impact of Brexit, and why the Conservatives may not get much electoral benefit from discussing the topic. If you’ve got a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/12/2221m 30s

Are British prime ministers too powerful? With Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

The writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our third series of Westminster Reimagined. In six special episodes Iannucci explores parts of British public life he believes to be broken, and is joined by guests from inside and outside Westminster to work out how to fix them. In this final episode of the season Iannucci and Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman’s Britain editor, examine whether Britain’s leaders want to be too powerful. Boris Johnson spoke often of a personal mandate, and Tony Blair enforced more control from the centre. Have our leaders got too strong – and can anything be done about it?  Our guests for the episode are Alastair Campbell, Tony Blair’s director of communications and now a diarist and podcaster, and Catherine Haddon, resident historian of the Institute for Government. The panel discusses whether prime ministers have always wanted more power, how much Johnson tried to change the rules of the game and why prime ministers should make the most of their cabinets. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/12/2232m 35s

Is Rishi Sunak’s authority starting to crumble? With Andrew Marr

Keir Starmer dubbed Rishi Sunak the “blancmange prime minister” – comparing him to a particularly weak and wobbly dessert – after he U-turned on new onshore wind farms and mandatory housing targets this week under pressure from Tory MPs. Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward are joined by Andrew Marr, the New Statesman’s political editor, to discuss Sunak’s struggle to control a divided Tory party as the prospect of electoral defeat looms. They also cover Rachel’s exclusive interview with Keir Starmer as he plots Labour’s route back to power and the launch of a major report authored by Gordon Brown that recommends a radical overhaul of the constitution. Then in You Ask Us, a listener wonders: should we abolish the House of Lords?If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/12/2221m 6s

Can Labour end “trickle-down” education?

Keir Starmer has used Winchester, the elite independent school Rishi Sunak attended, to attack the Tory party over tax benefits for private schools, saying it amounted to “trickle-down education”. Meanwhile, the Prime Minister defended private schools as a personal choice, accusing Starmer of “attacking the hard-working aspirations of millions of people in this country”. Rachel Cunliffe is joined by Sam Freedman, a former senior adviser on schools at the Department of Education, to discuss Labour’s policy to remove the charitable status of private schools and VAT exemption on school feels, the rage Starmer’s comments have sparked, and the quality of state education. In You Ask Us, they answer a listener’s question: how much do private schools give out in bursaries to poorer children, and is that more or less than the cost of Labour’s private-school policy proposals?If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer: visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer to learn more  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/12/2220m 24s

Can Britain make Brexit work? With Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

The writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our third series of Westminster Reimagined. In six special episodes, Iannucci explores the parts of British public life he believes are broken and works out how to fix them with guests from inside and outside Westminster.  In this episode, Iannucci and Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman’s Britain editor, discuss the B-word. Six years after Britain voted to leave the EU, Boris Johnson’s promise to Get Brexit Done rings hollow. The Northern Ireland protocol is an ever-present sore spot, the Office for Budget Responsibility believes bluntly that Brexit has delivered a “significant adverse impact” on trade and, according to a YouGov poll, the number of Britons who believe it was a mistake now stands at 56 per cent. Our special guests this week are two brothers divided by Brexit, each with businesses that deal with Europe. Ian Baxter, founder and chair of Baxter Freight, voted Remain in the 2016 referendum, while his brother, Nigel Baxter, managing director of RH Commercial Vehicles, voted Leave. Can they come together and unite after years of division? The panel discusses why the brothers found themselves on opposing sides of the Brexit debate, and how their decisions have impacted their relationship, businesses and world-view. Plus, if they have any regrets, and how we as a society can begin to move on.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer: visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer to learn more  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/12/2239m 59s

Redrawing the UK’s electoral map: who’s set to win and lose?

For the first time since 2010, constituency boundaries are set to be redrawn. The Boundary Commission for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland has published its final proposals, to be followed by final recommendations in 2023 that are likely to be adopted in time for the next election.Anoosh Chakelian and Rachel Wearmouth are joined by Ben Walker, who has made a detailed map of the changes for England and Wales for the New Stateman’s State of the Nation. The team discuss which MPs stand to lose and gain, why the shake-up is controversial, and the emerging political consequences.Then in You Ask Us a listener asks how Labour would solve the wage crisis.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer: visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer to learn more  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/12/2224m 56s

Why are so many Conservative MPs standing down? With Charlotte Ivers

As the Conservative Party deadline approaches for MPs to say whether they want to run in the next election, many young Tory MPs have already announced that they’ve had enough, including the Bishop Auckland MP Dehanna Davison. Charlotte Ivers, the Times Radio presenter and columnist for the New Statesman and Sunday Times, joins Rachel Cunliffe to talk about why this is, and how Rishi Sunak’s first month in office has gone. They also talk about whether Matt Hancock’s third place in I’m a Celebrity has done him more good than harm. If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus.Sign up for our Morning Call newsletter. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/11/2222m 34s

Can politics survive a post-truth world? with Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

The writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our third series of Westminster Reimagined. In six special episodes Iannucci explores parts of British public life he believes to be broken, and is joined by guests from inside and outside Westminster to work out how to fix things.In this episode, Iannucci and Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman’s Britain editor, look at how politics can operate in a post-truth world. Is there any way to counter misinformation and disinformation? And what effect are they having on our politicians and elections?Our special guests are James Ball, journalist and author of Post-Truth: How Bullshit Conquered the World, and Mae Dobbs, a digital campaigner who worked on the presidential campaigns of Barack Obama and Joe Biden. Plus, we hear from former BBC executive Pat Younge on how the broadcaster could do much more to tackle a culture of outright lying among politicians.The panel discusses whether objective news really is now harder to find or whether it’s always been difficult, the extent to which social media is making things worse, and what can be done to tackle the problem. Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer: visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer to learn more  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25/11/2237m 37s

Why is Brexit back to haunt the Tory party?

Rishi Sunak has denied reports that the government is preparing to seek a “Swiss-style” deal with the EU over the next decade to rebuild economic ties with the trading bloc.Rachel Cunliffe, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward discuss why the Prime Minister is incurring the wrath of hardline Tory Brexiteers, the signs of rising public discontent with Brexit, and whether this is a window of opportunity for Labour.Meanwhile Suella Braverman, the Home Secretary, has once again come under fire as she struggled to explain to the MPs on the Home Affairs Select Committee how someone fleeing persecution would legally seek asylum in the UK. The team discuss how long Braverman can hold on as Home Secretary and why she is a symptom of a government in disarray.Then in You Ask Us a listener asks: should England have boycotted the Qatar World Cup?If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer: visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer to learn more  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/11/2225m 23s

Bonus: Anti-microbial resistance: the crisis that could spell the end of medicine - with Pfizer

In 2014, the then prime minister David Cameron commissioned a review into a worrying global phenomenon: an increase in drug-resistant infections. “If we fail to act,” he warned, “we are looking at an almost unthinkable scenario where antibiotics no longer work and we are cast back into the dark ages of medicine.”  The economist Jim O’Neill, who chaired the review, predicted that by 2050 “ten million lives a year” and a “cumulative cost of $100trn of economic output” would be at risk from bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites increasingly resisting treatment. Six years on, however, anti-microbial resistance (AMR) continues to endanger humanity.  Alona Ferber, editor of the New Statesman's Spotlight policy channel, is joined by three expert guests to discuss why AMR is so complex, how far we have come in tackling it since the 2016 review, and what our best hopes are for getting this dangerous trend under control: Pfizer UK's managing director and country president Susan Rienow, the UK government's AMR envoy Sally Davies, and the microbiologist Laura Piddock, scientific director of the Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership in Geneva.  This special episodes has been funded by Pfizer Limited. Non Pfizer panelist's views are independent, but content has been reviewed by Pfizer Limited for A B P I code compliance.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/11/2230m 19s

Rishi Sunak four weeks on

In a special episode of the New Statesman podcast, recorded live at the Cambridge Literary Festival, Rachel Wearmouth, Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker look back at the last few weeks in politics, including the fall out from the Autumn Statement, how Rishi Sunak is going down with voters and whether Labour is finding its voice.Then they take questions from the audience on everything from Brexit, to Jeremy Corbyn running as independent parliamentary candidate, to whether it matters if Twitter collapses under Elon Musk's leadership.If you have a question for You Ask Us go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/11/2258m 46s

Is Britain falling apart? With Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

The writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our third series of Westminster Reimagined. In six special episodes Iannucci explores parts of British public life he believes to be broken, and is joined by guests from inside and outside Westminster to work out how to fix things.  In this episode, Iannucci and Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman’s Britain editor, examine whether the UK is falling apart at the seams. In 2010 the Conservative Party came to power promising to fix “Broken Britain”. Today, with unions around the country striking, the NHS buckling, and communities increasingly stepping in to provide vital services following a 37 per cent cut in local council funding, we ask: how can Britain carry on like this? Our special guests are Michelle Dornelly, founder of Children with Voices, which runs Hackney Community Food Hub, and Emilie De Bruijn, who set up Hartlepool Baby Bank. The panel discusses why these two women founded front-line services for their local communities, the lack of resources, the dangers of burning out, and why the state is sitting back and relying on their goodwill, as well as what can be done to remedy the problem. Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer: visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer to learn more  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/11/2243m 41s

Jeremy Hunt’s doom-filled Autumn Statement

Rachel Cunliffe, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth dissect the Autumn Statement, which will leave Britain with highest tax burden since the Second World War. They discuss what to make of the Office for Budget Responsibility’s bleak forecast that living standards are set to collapse by the largest amount on record, and recap how we got to this point just 55 days after Kwasi Kwarteng’s ill-fated tax-cutting “mini-Budget”.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/11/2220m 25s

Is the Conservative Party doomed? With John Oxley

As Rishi Sunak and Jeremy Hunt prepare for a Budget that will likely mean years of austerity, Rachel Cunliffe talks to the Conservative commentator John Oxley about the mess the party finds itself in. They discuss whether the damage done by Liz Truss and Kwasi Kwarteng is reversible, or if the party was in terminal decline anyway. Plus, what hopes Tories have at the next election and the impact of euroscepticism on the party. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
14/11/2229m 30s

Jon Stewart & Armando Iannucci: has the special relationship become a kiss of death? | Westminster Reimagined

The legendary writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our third series of Westminster Reimagined. Across six special episodes, Iannucci explores parts of British public life he believes to be broken, and is joined by guests from both inside and outside the Westminster world to work out how to fix things.  In this episode, the American satirist and broadcaster Jon Stewart and British radio presenter turned Arizona podcaster Sam Walker join Iannucci and Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman’s Britain editor, to compare US and UK politics. They discuss whether the chaos and division of US political life is a warning for the UK, and whether discourse in Britain is heading in a similar direction.   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/11/2244m 27s

The Gavs and Gav-nots: how the Tories are still divided

Gavin Williamson has resigned from the cabinet as minister without portfolio after a string of bullying allegations, including expletive-laden texts to a female colleague. It’s not the first time he has lost a government job: he was sacked twice before, under Theresa May and Boris Johnson.Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth, Freddie Hayward and Emma Haslett discuss the scandal and controversies that pepper Williamson’s career, and what his resignation tells us about the Rishi Sunak leadership and the way Westminster works. Plus, the moves Keir Starmer had made to put Labour on an election footing.Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks to what extent George Osborne’s post-2010 period of austerity has led UK politics to where it is now.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/11/2223m 5s

Why Rishi Sunak flip-flopped on Cop

As Cop27, the UN climate conference, starts in Egypt, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by India Bourke, our environment correspondent, to discuss why Rishi Sunak U-turned and is now attending, what might be announced and why it’s disappointing that the leaders of so many other countries are not going.Read more:Carbon emissions tracker 2022: How do countries compare? Greta Thunberg on why Cop27 is a “scam”“I haven’t met a politician ready to do what it takes”: Greta Thunberg and Björk in conversationMapped: Fracking sites could impact one in four Tory constituencies Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
07/11/2226m 30s

“It’s inequality, stupid.” With Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

The writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci, returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our third series of Westminster Reimagined. In six special episodes Iannucci explores parts of British public life he believes to be broken, and is joined by guests from inside and outside Westminster to work out how to fix things.   In this episode, Iannucci and Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman’s Britain editor, examine why in Britain the rich are richer and the poor are poorer than in other European countries. The income gap is the largest it has been in ten years, food-bank use has doubled since 2014 and nearly a third of low-income families are unable to heat their homes; meanwhile the richest 1 per cent of households in the UK are worth £3.6 million each.   Special guests for the episode Dominic Watters, a social worker living on the breadline who campaigns against food insecurity and wrote Social Distance in Social Work: Covid Capsule One, and Adrienne Buller, director of research at the Common Wealth think tank and author of The Value of a Whale.   The panel discusses living in fuel and food deserts, how hostility toward the “undeserving poor” is baked into the welfare system, and whether a minister for income inequality might be one potential solution. Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/11/2238m 4s

Rishi Sunak’s first ten days – with Andrew Marr

Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman’s Britain editor, is joined by Andrew Marr, political editor, and Rachel Wearmouth, deputy political editor, to assess Rishi Sunak’s first ten days in Downing Street, from the damaging re-appointment of Suella Braverman as Home Secretary to mixed messages on his government’s commitment to the climate.They discuss his tricky mandate, the prospect of tax rises and spending cuts, and how Keir Starmer is facing up to him.Then in You Ask Us: is it ever OK to comment on a politician’s appearance or presentational style?If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.Read more:Andrew Marr on whether Rishi Sunak and Keir Starmer’s “centrist” styles can speak to the anger of the dayRachel Wearmouth on how the Prime Minister and Labour leader compareAnoosh Chakelian on the appetite for an election around an exasperated country Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/11/2227m 38s

How to get better leaders – with Brian Klaas

With the Conservatives on to their fifth prime minister in just six years, we talk to the political scientist and author Brian Klaas about the leadership problem in politics: why the top jobs attract the worst people; why it was a good thing that Truss was able to fail so quickly; and what we need to do to defend democracy. If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Read more:Brian Klaas on why we choose the wrong leaders Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
31/10/2232m 50s

Which version of Rishi Sunak will Britain get?

Rishi Sunak attended his first PMQs on Wednesday 26 October, and seemed to buoy up his divided party with Johnsonite attack lines on Labour – but can he hold on to unity and win back the country’s trust? Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, Rachel Wearmouth and our business editor, Will Dunn, to discuss Sunak’s first few days in charge, the fallout from his reappointment of Suella Braverman, and what to expect from the now-delayed Autumn Statement.Then, in You Ask Us, they answer a listener’s question on whether Sunak’s past mistakes show he’s out of touch.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/10/2230m 22s

Rishi Sunak wins – what now?

The UK is to have a new prime minister whose policies are unknown and no one but Tory MPs voted for. Public appetite for a general election is high. What will Rishi Sunak, the former chancellor, do when he officially enters No 10, and why did Boris Johnson drop out of the Conservative leadership race this weekend?Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman’s Britain Editor, is joined by Rachel Wearmouth, Deputy Political Editor, and our polling expert Ben Walker to analyse the challenges ahead, what Sunak’s victory means for the Conservative Party’s dire poll ratings, and how Labour feels about its new opponent.Then, in You Ask Us, we answer a listener’s question: why are there Tory MPs who oppose Rishi Sunak, and will the party remain divided?Read more:Rishi Sunak becomes Prime Minister after Penny Mordaunt fails to make Tory ballotCan anyone save the Tories? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/10/2226m 10s

BONUS: How the lettuce became Liz Truss’s nemesis, with Jon Livesey

In this bonus episode of the New Statesman Podcast, Rachel Cunliffe interviews the Daily Star deputy editor-in-chief Jon Livesey about how a lettuce livestream helped chronicle the downfall of Liz Truss’s calamitous time in office. They talk about why it cut through to the public, what’s happening to the lettuce now, and which vegetable will come next. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21/10/226m 44s

Prime Minister Liz Truss resigns after just 44 days in office

Liz Truss has announced she will stand down as prime minister after her government was plunged into chaos yesterday. The Home Secretary was forced to resign, the chief whip attempted to resign, and Tory MPs were allegedly manhandled and reduced to tears over a fracking vote which was (maybe?) a vote of confidence. Rachel Cunliffe, Ben Walker and Rachel Wearmouth discuss Liz Truss’s resignation and then Freddie Hayward joins the podcast to take us through how the madness unfolded, minute by minute.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/10/2224m 17s

Will Liz Truss last the week?

In a desperate attempt to stabilise the financial markets Jeremy Hunt, the newly appointed Chancellor, has reversed “almost all” of the tax cuts announced in the government’s mini-Budget just three weeks ago.Anoosh Chakelian and Harry Lambert discuss the measures announced in Hunt’s emergency statement this morning, reports that he is now acting effectively as a caretaker PM, and who would succeed Liz Truss should she be ousted.In You Ask Us, a listener asks if the Tories can get away with switching leader again without calling a general election.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
17/10/2219m 1s

Horror in the City at the Tories' mini-Budget, with the economist and former trader Gary Stevenson

Emma Haslett, The New Statesman’s associate business editor, speaks to Gary Stevenson, an economist and former trader for Citibank, a job he initially won in a card game. In 2011 he became the bank’s most profitable trader globally by correctly predicting the economy would not recover from the 2008 financial crash. In 2014 Stevenson quit his job, and he now campaigns against wealth inequality and educates people on economics via his YouTube channel, GarysEconomics. They discuss the fallout from the Tories' disastrous mini-Budget and No 10’s attachment to trickle-down economics, as well as the reaction among Stevenson’s former colleagues in the City. Emma and Gary also offer their predictions for the economy this time next year. Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/10/2225m 5s

Will Liz Truss sack Kwasi Kwarteng to save herself?

What was left of Liz Truss’s authority visibly dissipated in Prime Minister’s Questions this week. As Freddie Hayward reports, the atmosphere was “funereal”, with the Prime Minister repeating “I’m genuinely unclear” and refusing to talk about market turmoil or tax cuts, only the government’s energy package.Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward discuss the criticism of the mini-Budget and what Truss’s options are, whether Kwasi Kwarteng will survive as Chancellor and who would replace him, and Labour’s plans for a future without Truss.Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks what on earth the government’s much-touted “supply-side reform” is.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
14/10/2225m 8s

How Liz Truss is fuelling the energy crisis, with Dale Vince

Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Dale Vince, a green energy industrialist and founder of Ecotricity, a renewable energy company. Vince’s book Manifesto: How a Maverick Entrepreneur Took On British Energy and Won was published in 2020, charting his journey from leaving school aged 15, to becoming a New Age traveller, and finally into the weird world that is Britain’s energy market. They discuss the government’s response to Britain’s energy and cost-of-living crises versus Labour’s pledge to create a publicly owned renewable power company, Great British Energy, the sense of frustration even among energy companies, and some solutions.If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskusPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/10/2221m 16s

Are the Conservatives preparing for opposition? With Andrew Marr

As conference season ends, our Political Editor, Andrew Marr, discusses the Conservative and Labour conferences with Freddie Hayward and Anoosh Chakelian. They reflect on the mood at the Conservative Party conference, whether Liz Truss will get any policy through parliament and if Labour really is more confident that it could return to government. Then in You Ask Us they answer a listener’s question on whether Keir Starmer is trying to be more left-wing. Read Anoosh’s piece on the country bracing for austerity, Andrew’s latest column and our exclusive polling on what Labour voters think of Starmer.  If you have a question for You Ask Us, go to newstatesman.com/youaskus Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/10/2218m 38s

Rebellious Tory MPs look for Liz Truss’s successor

Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Freddie Hayward, Rachel Wearmouth and Harry Lambert, who are reporting from the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham.They describe a sense of discord and dissent, with Liz Truss’s U-turn on abolishing the top rate of income tax damaging her credibility and emboldening Tory rebels. The team discuss the open speculation by Tory MPs about who might succeed the Prime Minister, including Boris Johnson as an “off the shelf” candidate, and the party’s response to a weak speech by Kwasi Kwarteng, the Chancellor.Then in You Ask Us a listener asks, will Liz Truss be able to cut benefits?If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/10/2225m 18s

Labour is in an anti-London "Tory trap": Sadiq Khan vs Andy Burnham

This is a special episode recorded live at the New Statesman’s fringe event at this year’s Labour Party conference in Liverpool. Anoosh Chakelian sits down with Andy Burnham and Sadiq Khan to discuss what levelling up should look like under Labour, where they stand on electoral reform and why they have very different political styles.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
03/10/2253m 51s

Inside Liz Truss and Kwasi Kwarteng’s economic meltdown, with David Gauke and Duncan Weldon

With the cost of debt rising and the pound still falling, just how much damage has the Conservatives’ mini-Budget done to the economy?To unpick what’s going on, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by David Gauke, who was work and pensions secretary and chief secretary to the Treasury under Theresa May, and by the economist and author Duncan Weldon, along with the New Statesman’s business editor, Will Dunn.They discuss why the markets reacted so badly to the Chancellor’s statement on 23 September, what the subsequent Bank of England intervention actually did, and what the impact of all of this might be on ordinary voters as well as the electoral prospects of the Tory party.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
29/09/2231m 24s

Is Keir Starmer’s vision enough? With Ed Miliband

Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward are joined by Ed Miliband, the shadow climate change and net zero secretary and former Labour leader, to discuss Keir Starmer’s speech from the Labour Party conference in Liverpool.They discuss the pledge to create a publicly owned “Great British energy” company to cut bills and the conference slogan “A fairer, greener future”; how the economic turmoil will affect their ability to deliver these promises; and whether Miliband would advise a note of caution to the optimistic party faithful. Then the New Statesman polling expert, Ben Walker, joins the podcast to discuss a recent YouGov poll that shows Labour leading the Tories by 17 points and whether the plunging pound has damaged public confidence in Liz Truss’s government. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27/09/2219m 34s

Is Labour finally a government in waiting?

Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth report from the Labour Party conference in Liverpool.They discuss the remarkably upbeat mood among the party faithful, the headline policy announcements so far, and the alternative vision for the economy set out by the shadow chancellor, Rachel Reeves, as the pound continues to plummet after Liz Truss’s tax-cutting frenzy.Then in You Ask Us, they answer a listener’s question on the prospects of the party abandoning the first-past-the-post electoral system, after polls show a majority of the British public are in favour of change.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/09/2218m 4s

The Tories’ plan to make the rich richer

Kwasi Kwarteng, the Chancellor, presented a mini-Budget today (23 September) whose centrepiece was the biggest tax cuts in decades in an attempt to stimulate the economy. Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth, Rachel Cunliffe and Emma Haslett take us through the announcements that shocked the House of Commons. They discuss how these ideological policies will disproportionately benefit the rich; the UK’s precarious financial position as borrowing costs jump; and whether this is a departure from the last twelve years of Tory rule, as was suggested by Rachel Reeves, the shadow chancellor.In You Ask Us, the team answer Rachel Cunliffe’s question: does this now mean that a post-2009 graduate on £50,000 a year will pay a higher marginal tax rate (including student loan repayments) than someone on £200,000 who went to university for free before tuition fees were introduced?If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/09/2229m 34s

Inside Britain’s housing crisis

The UK has a housing crisis: in the past decade, decent and stable living arrangements have become an impossible dream for many.The New Statesman’s senior associate editor Rachel Cunliffe speaks to Hashi Mohamed, author of A Home of One’s Own, which draws on his own history of housing insecurity and his professional career as a planning barrister, about how we came to this point and what can be done.They discuss the segregating and alienating effects of housing insecurity, why successive governments have failed to act on this crisis, and how they can be persuaded that it’s a priority.Podcast listeners can get a subscription to the New Statesman for just £1 per week, for 12 weeks. Visit www.newstatesman.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
20/09/2230m 19s

Trussonomics: Is Trickling Down the new Levelling Up?

The newly appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer, Kwasi Kwarteng, is facing criticism after he sacked Tom Scholar, permanent secretary at the Treasury since 2016, and following reports that he plans to scrap caps on banker bonuses.  Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Harry Lambert, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth to discuss what’s really behind the sacking of the Treasury's most senior civil servant, and Prime Minister Liz Truss’s plans to encourage economic growth through tax cuts during a cost-of-living crisis. Then, in You Ask Us, Rachel Cunliffe joins the team to answer a listener question on whether the police crackdown on anti-monarchy protestors is the result of the Police, Crime, Courts and Sentencing Act.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/09/2232m 30s

How the death of the Queen affects government

The ceremonies following the death of the Queen continue this week. Freddie Hayward speaks to Anoosh Chakelian about what the mood has been like at the public events, and whether some of the policing has been heavy handed.Then in You Ask Us they answer a listener’s question about whether the events have affected parliament’s ability to scrutinise the new government.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/09/2215m 8s

The Queen dies and an era ends

A special podcast from the New Statesman to reflect on the death of Elizabeth II and the accession of Charles III. Andrew Marr, political editor, Megan Gibson, international editor, and Rachel Cunliffe, senior associate editor, join Anoosh Chakelian, Britain editor, to discuss the impact that the Queen had on the country, the reaction to her death from around the world and what it means for the UK now. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/09/2230m 57s

Liz Truss's first days, with Andrew Marr

The Prime Minister, Liz Truss, has announced her plans to help with the energy crisis. Anoosh Chakelian is joined by the New Statesman’s political editor, Andrew Marr, and deputy political editor, Rachel Wearmouth, to discuss Truss’s first few days in office and how her energy price cap is likely to go down with the public.Then, in You Ask Us, they answer a listener’s question on whether Boris Johnson is planning a political comeback. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
08/09/2220m 44s

Liz Truss wins. But can she deliver, deliver, deliver?

As predicted, Liz Truss has beaten Rishi Sunak in the race to become the next prime minister of the UK. She won the Tory leadership contest by a comfortable majority, securing 81,326 votes (57 per cent) to Sunak’s 60,399 (43 per cent). Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth, Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker discuss her promises to “deliver” in a muted victory speech, why polls predicted a landslide victory that didn't quite emerge, and the series of daunting challenges that lie ahead for her – including economic crisis and an all-round lack of popular support. Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks about Truss’s plan for energy bills.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
05/09/2219m 48s

Will the next PM be another Boris Johnson? In conversation with Adam Fleming

With just days until we find out who Britain’s next prime minister will be, we take a look back at the outgoing Conservative leader: what shaped Boris Johnson? How did he rise to power? What do his three years in office mean for his successor and how the media will cover them?Rachel Cunliffe speaks to Adam Fleming about his BBC podcast series Boris, which examines the life of Johnson from his birth, in 1964 in New York, until the moment he was forced to resign as Tory leader in the wake of the partygate scandal.Radio 4’s Boris is available on BBC Sounds Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/09/2229m 24s

How big is the economic crisis the UK is facing? With Duncan Weldon

As the cost-of-living crisis and rapidly rising energy prices look set to push the UK into recession, how bad is the situation and what could be done about it?The economist and journalist Duncan Weldon speaks to Will Dunn, the New Statesman’s business editor, about just how serious the crisis is, how it compares to the 1970s and why Liz Truss will find that tax cuts just won’t cut it. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
30/08/2230m 12s

Tory cuts catch up with Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak

The Conservative leadership contest limps towards its conclusion with Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak attending the final hustings this week. And as the country heads towards a difficult winter, raw sewage is being pumped into Britain’s waterways and the economy goes from bad to worse. Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Cunliffe discuss the leadership hopefuls’ latest campaign pledges and the distinct lack of enthusiasm for them among Tory members and MPs. They also talk about Truss’s U-turn on her emergency cost-of-living budget and whether her free-market conservatism is out of step with the concerns of the general public. Then in You Ask Us India Bourke, the New Statesman’s environment correspondent, joins to answer a listener’s question on what the sewage crisis means for the Conservative Party.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/08/2231m 57s

What can Keir Starmer learn from Joe Biden? With Matthew McGregor

As the US president Joe Biden starts to turn around his poor polling figures ahead of the midterm elections later this year, are there lessons that the Labour leader Keir Starmer can learn from his Democrat counterpart? The veteran campaigner Matthew McGregor, who worked for Ed Miliband and supported digital campaigns for the Democrats in the US, talks to Rachel Wearmouth about what Labour could learn from American politics, and why the party also needs to look at countries like Australia and Germany.They discuss the impact the Supreme Court overruling of Roe vs Wade, which federally guaranteed access to abortion, is having on US politics. Plus, how to make radical changes from the centre, and how Prime Minister's Questions is surprisingly popular among Washington DC politicos. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23/08/2222m 50s

Are the Tories in trouble over the economy?

UK inflation has risen above 10 per cent for the first time in 40 years, driving the fastest fall in real pay on record. The defining challenge for the next prime minister will be preventing millions from facing destitution this winter.Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward are joined by Emma Haslett, the New Statesman’s associate business editor, to discuss the economic downturn and Britain’s “zombie” government. They also talk about recent polling indicating the Conservatives are no longer seen as more competent with the economy than Labour, and examine public sympathy with striking transport workers.Then, in You Ask Us, a listener asks whether the leaked recording of Liz Truss saying that British workers need “more graft” and lack the “skill and application” of foreign rivals like the Chinese, will damage her chances of becoming the next PM.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19/08/2220m 47s

Is Labour finally on the front foot in the energy crisis?

The Labour leader Keir Starmer has announced that the party wants to tackle the energy bills crisis by freezing the energy price cap, to be chiefly funded by a windfall tax. Has Labour finally shown its economic competence?Rachel Wearmouth is joined by Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker to discuss the plans, whether they’ve come at the right time, and what the Conservative response will likely to be. Then, in You Ask Us, they answer a listener's question on whether Labour should now be repurposing George Osborne’s austerity-era attack line about the governing party not fixing the roof when the sun was shining.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
16/08/2219m 19s

As crisis looms, where are Britain’s leaders?

Against the backdrop of a predicted massive increase in energy bills and the coming recession, the Tory leadership contest grinds grimly on. There is a palpable feeling that the country is adrift, with Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss focused on personal attacks and appealing to the Tory party membership. Rachel Cunliffe, Freddie Hayward and Ben Walker discuss the damage the campaigns are doing to the Conservative brand as the “blue-on-blue” bickering dominates the contest. They also talk about Keir Starmer’s notable absence from the limelight, and whether Truss’s campaign is gaining momentum after a video leaked to the New Statesman showed Rishi Sunak boasting to members of taking money from “deprived urban areas” to help wealthy towns.  Then, in You Ask Us, a listener asks whether the winner of the leadership contest, whether Sunak or Truss, will pivot and come out with some meaningful policies on the cost of living – or are they just running scared and hoping for a miracle?If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/08/2226m 47s

Is Labour too divided to win?

After more factional strife within Labour, the academic and former Downing Street staffer Patrick Diamond speaks to Anoosh Chakelian about his new book: Labour's Civil War: How infighting has kept the left from power (and what can be done about it). They discuss the party’s history of fighting itself, what lessons can be learned from its time in government, and what Keir Starmer needs to do to end the conflict.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email: podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
09/08/2220m 35s

SPONSORED: How can we ensure our pension funds make a difference?

This podcast is sponsored by Rio AI As the world faces a climate emergency, what power do ordinary people have to try and shape the way big companies behave. One of the biggest areas of investment is our pension funds – but do we have the information or ability to shape how companies invest our money?Philippa Nuttall discusses how to make our pension funds work for the environment with David Hayman from Make My Money Matter and Ros Altman, former pensions minister.Rio ESG is an intelligent sustainability software platform that helps equip corporate, public sector, financial services and investment management entities with the knowledge and technology to do better.From data capture to investment consultancy, Rio combines market-leading sustainability knowledge with its intelligent sustainability software platform to deliver award-winning, solution-based data analysis, governance and education tools, to help organisations of all sizes report on, and improve, their ESG metrics.Rio partners with organisations of all sizes to deliver bespoke sustainability solutions that reduce risk, increase investment prospective and deliver lasting impact, for both corporations and the planet.Visit www.rio.ai to begin your sustainable investment journey. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
06/08/2215m 20s

How workers‘ pay tripped up Liz Truss and Keir Starmer

The Bank of England has raised interest rates by 0.5 per cent to 1.75 per cent, the highest increase in 27 years, and predicts that the UK will enter a deep recession within months. As the cost-of-living crisis worsens and with strikes planned throughout the summer, Labour remains split over frontbenchers joining picketing workers. Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Cunliffe discuss Labour leader Keir Starmer’s softening stance on picketing – after shadow levelling up secretary Lisa Nandy joined striking telecoms workers and union leaders claimed that Labour was “irrelevant” to working people – and ask whether the party’s ambiguity can be sustained through a summer of strikes. Then In You Ask Us, a listener enquires about the communication issues and presentation style of Liz Truss’s Conservative leadership campaign.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/08/2230m 42s

Sunak, Truss and Starmer’s visions for the economy

With the Conservative leadership hopefuls offering competing promises of tax cuts, the New Statesman podcast looks at whether either has anything to say about Britain’s cost-of-living crisis.Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Wearmouth, deputy political editor, and Emma Haslett from the New Statesman’s business desk to pick through the promises, and ask whether Rishi Sunak’s campaign is looking more and more desperate.Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks if the shadow chancellor Rachel Reeves’s stance against nationalising utilities could put Labour’s plans for net-zero greenhouse gas emissions at risk.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
01/08/2225m 46s

From the Forde report to strikes, is Labour still divided?

Two years after it was commissioned, the Forde report into infighting in the Labour Party during the years of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership has finally been published. Such tensions have never fully gone away. Keir Starmer sacked Sam Tarry, a shadow transport minister, on July 27 after he joined a rail picket line against the leadership’s instructions.Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth and Freddie Hayward discuss what led to the Forde inquiry, its key findings and why this is unlikely to spell the end of the party's deep factionalism.Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks what the point of the Labour Party is when they don’t support organised labour.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email: podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28/07/2224m 25s

Are conspiracy theories getting worse, with Jonn Elledge

 After Boris Johnson talked of a "deep state" undermining his ability to govern, have we entered an era of conspiracy theories? Jonn Elledge, one of the authors of a new book, Conspiracy: A History of Boll*cks Theories and How Not To Fall For Them, talks to Rachel Cunliffe about how conspiracy theories are nothing new. They discuss QAnon, whether a few hundred years of European history were just made up – and why Britney Spears shows that sometimes obscure internet theories can be true.Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26/07/2230m 19s

Who will be Britain’s next prime minister? With Andrew Marr

With Penny Mordaunt having been eliminated from the contest on Wednesday 20 July, either Rishi Sunak or Liz Truss will become Britain’s next prime minister.  Anoosh Chakelian and Rachel Cunliffe speak to the New Statesman’s political editor, Andrew Marr, about how the Johnson “loyalist” and the “traitor” emerged victorious, whether Boris Johnson will indeed be back as he hinted in his final PMQs, and the climate emergency that overshadows this race.  Then, in You Ask Us, a listener asks: why Liz Truss? What are the qualities that her a backers believe would make her a good PM?If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/07/2223m 39s

Who’s winning the Tory leadership race?

This evening one of the remaining five candidates to be the next prime minister will be eliminated in a vote of MPs. Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Rachel Cunliffe, Ben Walker and Rachel Wearmouth, our new deputy political editor, to discuss who came out of the two debates over the weekend best and why Labour has enjoyed watching the candidates tear strips out of each other on live TV.Then, in You Ask Us, they answer a listener’s question on what Boris Johnson might do next.If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukPodcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
18/07/2230m 53s