The TED Interview

The TED Interview

By TED

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity

Sit down with Head of TED Chris Anderson as he interviews leading thinkers and creators from around the world. The TED Interview is a space for guests to further delve into their groundbreaking work, give us a peek into how they discover and explore fascinating ideas, and, in some cases, even defend their thinking. This season, we’re looking at Infectious Generosity.

Generosity is at the heart of being human. It's how we've co-operated, innovated and grown as a civilization. Following Chris’s book of the same name, this podcast will dive into the idea that through the power of the internet, small acts of thoughtfulness spread to change lives at a scale never experienced before. Welcome to your front-row seat to great conversations with the world’s brightest minds.

And in the spirit of the Infectious Generosity, listeners can receive a free copy of Chris’s book in e-book or audio format. Just visit ted.com/generosity and fill out the short form to receive yours.

Episodes

How much happiness can 2 million USD buy? with Elizabeth Dunn

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity   How much happiness could be gained if more people had access to wealth? Does the relationship between spending money and happiness change when people are in different economic classes? And if chosen randomly, what would YOU do with $10,000? These are questions that Elizabeth Dunn, a social psychologist and professor, posed in a recent study. She researches how people can optimize time, money and technology to maximize their own happiness. In December 2020, TED teamped up with Elizabeth’s researchers to distribute $10,000 to each of 200 random recipients in seven countries to understand how the use of this cash would contribute to their happiness. The end result was fascinating — and at this live event at the TED2024 conference in Vancouver, Elizabeth and Chris dive into the findings.Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at: go.ted.com/TTIscripts
16/05/2451m 52s

Exercising your generosity like a muscle with John M. Sweeney

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity   When John M. Sweeney first read about the old Italian tradition of “café sospeso”, he didn’t know he’d create a viral movement. The simple and powerful idea originates in the working-class cafés of Naples, where generous Neapolitans who could afford to do so would buy two coffees — but consume only one, leaving the other for a less fortunate person to claim. Chris chats with John about why he took this concept from an exploratory Facebook page to the Suspended Coffees movement that now has more than 2,000 participating cafes worldwide. They talk about the profound power of random acts of kindness, the beauty of gifting economies and how the philosophy of generosity can change an entire community – and the world at large.Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at: go.ted.com/TTIscripts
09/05/2430m 21s

Why true success goes beyond profit with Chobani founder Hamdi Ulukaya

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity Hamdi Ulukaya, the founder of Chobani (a company with expected valuation in the billions of USD) claims to be an “anti-CEO” of sorts. That’s because he cares about one thing more than profit — people. Chris asks Hamdi about how he uses his business to make the world better for both employees and customers, the difference between profit and true wealth, and what we can do, in and outside of business, to combat global inequality. Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at: go.ted.com/TTIscripts
02/05/2438m 8s

How to use your time and money for good — as effectively as possible — with Will MacAskill

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity William MacAskill is a moral philosopher and the cofounder of the Effective Altruism Movement, a school of thought that tries to answer the question: How can we do as much good as possible? Chris and Will talk about how to use evidence to figure out how to help solve the world’s most pressing problems efficiently. Then, they discuss why focusing our efforts on some issues over others is both a compelling philosophical question — and a complex project to scale up.Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at: go.ted.com/TTIscripts
25/04/2446m 24s

The healing power of art with Lily Yeh

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity. From Taiwan to Rwanda, artist Lily Yeh has traveled all over the world in pursuit of more than just aesthetic pleasure — and she’s activating local communities on this journey. Chris and Lily chat about Lily’s artistic evolution, discuss how art encourages growth and healing, and examine the positive effect that art can have on individuals long, even long after a work has been completed. Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at: go.ted.com/TTIscripts.
18/04/2447m 0s

How to fight hatred with curiosity with Daryl Davis

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity. Daryl Davis is a Black musician and actor who regularly enters white nationalist spaces. That’s because Daryl is determined to understand the source of bigotry – by actually talking to the humans he disagrees with. Chris interviews Daryl about his unique approach, from attending KKK rallies to joining all-white country bands. Then, Daryl shares why he chooses curiosity over fear and why he still believes, despite our current divisions, humanity is in a bright spot. Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at: go.ted.com/TTIscripts.
11/04/2437m 26s

How empathy gets in the way of a better world with Paul Bloom

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity. It may feel like the world is running low on a seemingly crucial human trait: empathy. But Paul Bloom, a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, thinks that empathy is not the best measure of goodness. Paul’s work focuses on exploring some of the most puzzling aspects of human nature, including pleasure, religion and morality. He argues that empathy can actually lead to inequality because it muddles our judgment and narrows our prejudices. Chris and Paul talk about the biological evolution that led to our modern human psyche, discuss the perils of acting emotionally and break down the relationship between empathy, generosity and what Paul calls "rational compassion." Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at: go.ted.com/TTIscripts.
04/04/2437m 45s

How kindness went viral with Catherine Barrett

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, when misinformation and fear was spreading rampantly, one optimistic community was forming... on Facebook. Catherine Barrett started "The Kindness Pandemic" Facebook group as a way to combat the negativity and aggression she was seeing online. Members participated in campaigns where they engaged in kind acts — and then they posted about it. The group went from dozens of members in its first day to more than 50,000 members joining every day. In this episode, Chris and Catherine chat about bringing humanity back into our digital worlds, discuss what it takes to make kindness go viral, and make a case for being loud about generosity. Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at go.ted.com/TTIscripts
28/03/2439m 8s

How Bill Gates spends $9 billion a year

To get a free copy of the Infectious Generosity book, visit ted.com/generosity. Bill Gates, the founder of Microsoft and the co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is one of the top 10 richest people in the world. But since 2008, he has traded his day-to-day role with Microsoft to focus full-time on his foundation's work to expand opportunity around the world. Chris interviews Bill about his philanthropy philosophy and digs into the opportunities and challenges that face one of the largest private charitable foundations in the world. The two also discuss The Giving Pledge, the movement Bill co-founded with Warren Buffet, which encourages wealthy individuals to commit the majority of their wealth to charitable causes within their lifetimes. Chris and Bill examine the importance of solving the world’s most pressing problems efficiently, talk about why meaningful change requires scale and compare notes on how to best encourage collective excitement about giving back. Transcripts for The TED Interview are available at: go.ted.com/TTIscripts.
21/03/2450m 16s

New season coming March 21: Infectious Generosity

The TED Interview is back for a special season. Chris Anderson, Head of TED, returns as host to investigate the ultimate idea worth spreading: Infectious Generosity. Inspired by Chris’s book of the same name, this season will explore how even small acts of kindness have the potential to spread and impact millions – and ultimately build a more hopeful future for all. Listen in as amazing people and great thinkers share how they aim to change lives at a scale never experienced before. And in the spirit of infectious generosity, listeners can receive a free copy of Chris’s book in e-book or audio format. Just visit ted.com/generosity and fill out the short form to receive yours. Tune in next week for the first episode of this new season.
14/03/245m 38s

Frances Frei's three pillars of leadership

A professor at Harvard Business School and expert in work culture, Frei goes into companies like WeWork and Uber with the goal of turning toxic environments into healthy, inclusive spaces. She shares why authenticity, logic, and empathy are the most vital skills an employee can have — and how the measure of a true leader can be seen not just in their presence, but in their absence, too. Find Frances's new show Fixable, wherever you get your podcasts!
08/06/231h

Introducing Good Sport

This week on The TED Interview we’re excited to introduce TED’s newest podcast, Good Sport, hosted by veteran sports producer Jody Avirgan. What can sports teach us about life – and each other? Good Sport brings you invigorating stories from on and off the field to argue that sports are as powerful and compelling a lens as any to understand the world – from what happens when you age out of a sport, to how we do or don't nurture talent, to analyzing how sports arguments have become the mode for all arguments. Good Sport launched on February 8th and you can find it anywhere you’re listening to this. TED Audio Collective+ subscribers on Apple Podcasts can hear the whole season early and ad-free.
08/02/233m 34s

Our Predictions for 2023 | After Hours

Curious about 2023? Youngme, Mihir and Felix from the podcast After Hours are back with their celebrated predictions episode. Who will acquire Spotify? Will Twitter implode? What’s the trend in inflation and energy prices? Who will top the music charts? Space travel for all? Listen in as the hosts outguess each other what the new year will bring. After Hours is another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. If you'd like to hear more, follow the show now wherever you're listening to this.
04/01/2345m 44s

The music of David Byrne’s mind

David Byrne views life through many lenses. He’s a musician, author, filmmaker, curator, conservationist, digital music theorist, bicycle advocate, visual artist... the list goes on. But through his many trajectories – from co-founding the acclaimed band Talking Heads to his later solo career, moving into theater and beyond, David is always trying to capture the indescribable. In this episode, he shares how he meshes art, technology, and point of view to tell one-of-a-kind stories, move audiences, and invoke all of us to create masterpieces of our own. David’s latest experiential theater project “Theater of the Mind” is running now through December 18 at York Street Yards in Denver, Colorado.
17/11/2239m 21s

The hidden gifts of visual thinking with Temple Grandin

When she was just 18, scientist, industrial designer, animal behaviorist, and autism activist Temple Grandin created one of her most well-known inventions: the hug machine. Inspired by the squeeze chute–a device that holds and soothes cattle before they’re handled–Temple designed a device for her and other hypersensitive people who want to experience being held without overstimulation. In this episode, Temple talks about her long, multifaceted career, and how her neurodivergent mind and its gift for identifying patterns and thinking visually has helped her pioneer groundbreaking research. She also explains how all kinds of brains can contribute to creating knowledge, and shares how neurodiversity is a strength across many disciplines. Temple’s latest book, “Visual Thinking: The Hidden Gifts of People Who Think in Pictures, Patterns, and Abstractions,” is out now.
10/11/2231m 37s

Inciting joy with Ross Gay

Nearly every day for a year, American poet Ross Gay sat down and wrote about something that delighted him–from carrying a small tomato plant through an airport to playing a pickup basketball game.The result was his first nonfiction book, “The Book of Delights”, a collection of essays beloved by both critics and fans. These days, Ross is in pursuit of understanding another transcendent human emotion: joy. The author shares what his practice of seeking delight has taught him about life, writing and language, and why he thinks poetry is the best coach for philosophy, mindfulness and gratitude.
03/11/2232m 56s

Randall Munroe answers your wildest questions

How many soulmates do you think people have? What if you tried to funnel all the water from Niagara falls through a straw? Do you think it’s possible? if you sold the whole planet for scrap–what parts would be most valuable? You might think these absurd questions are unanswerable, or even pointless, but these are the kind of questions Randall Munroe can’t stop thinking about. Randall is the bestselling author of the books “What If” and “What If 2” which provide serious, scientific answers to absurd questions. He’s also the Hugo-award winning cartoonist behind the popular xkcd webcomics. In this episode, Randall talks through the most intriguing scenarios from his new volume, and shares why absurdist thought experiments actually help us understand the world–and each other–a bit better.
27/10/2233m 34s

A future without pandemics? with Mark Smolinski

In 2011, when medical doctor and epidemiologist Mark Smolinski was working as a science advisor for the blockbuster film “Contagion,” the film ran a campaign that asked communities: “What are you gonna do to prepare for the next pandemic?” A decade later, as the president of Ending Pandemics–a social venture that aims to predict, detect, and prevent disease outbreaks on our planet– Mark is still thinking about how we can rid the world of pandemic disease. In this episode, Mark shares why we use big data to track disease, explains how our interconnected ecosystems shape public health, talks about why ending pandemics is an achievable goal, and argues that local communities are the ones who can lead the way in understanding–and preventing–the spread of illness.
20/10/2233m 20s

Atul Gawande on why American healthcare desperately needs innovation

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, life expectancy in the United States was 79. Today it’s 76. When compared to other countries like the UK and Japan, where life expectancy is above 80, it’s clear that the U.S. has a lot of work to do. Today on The TED Interview, surgeon, writer, and the Assistant Administrator for Global Health as USAID. Atul Gawande talks about the obstacles the U.S. is facing and how investment in key areas like healthcare innovation, geriatric medicine, and accessible health education, could help Americans live longer, healthier, and more fulfilling lives.
13/10/2246m 5s

Linda Villarosa on the hidden toll of racism on health

When Linda Villarosa was the health editor of Essence Magazine, she says she had a one-track mind. A former college athlete, Linda grew up, like many of us, thinking about health on an individual level. But after reporting on environmental justice, the AIDS crisis, and black mother and infant mortality rates, Linda has uncovered just how much culture and public health infrastructure impact life expectancy – specifically for black Americans. Her 2018 cover story on “Why America's Black Mothers and Babies Are in a Life-or-Death Crisis" was a finalist for a National Magazine Award. In today’s episode, she highlights how structural racism impacts community health and talks about why she’s still optimistic about combating health disparities in the country and across the globe.
06/10/2239m 55s

Can AI make healthcare human again? with Eric Topol

Eric Topol is a leading health expert whose writing and explainers about Covid-19 have helped people better understand the complexities of the global pandemic. As a doctor, author, and one of the most cited researchers in medicine, Eric has dedicated his time to thinking about the human genome and how digital tools like artificial intelligence can help us individualize and improve medicine. In this episode, he shares his thoughts why he believes healthcare and the doctor-patient relationship feel broken, and how AI can revolutionize–and save–the future of medicine.
29/09/2245m 56s

Ed Yong on how animal senses reveal the world around us

Like any animal, humans understand the world through our senses. But unlike other creatures, we can't detect magnetic fields with our bodies, or the flow of water from a fish swimming hundreds of feet in the distance. But Ed Yong wants us to really imagine what it would be like to perceive the world in these ways. In this episode, the Pulitzer winning science writer shares the unique ways that other living species get information about the world–from the melodic data-loaded songs of treehoppers and cicadas, to the olfactory brilliance of an average dog. Listen in for a glimpse at the beautiful animal narratives that lie beyond our restrained worldview that Ed writes about in his new book "An Immense World: How Animal Senses Reveal The Hidden Realms Around Us", which is out now.
22/09/2243m 27s

Mark Cuban doesn’t believe in following your passions | ReThinking w/ Adam Grant

Mark Cuban has gone from selling garbage bags door-to-door to selling internet companies for billions, acquiring an NBA team, and becoming a beloved “Shark” on Shark Tank. Mark reveals to Adam how he turns problems into opportunities in entrepreneurship, basketball, and investing. They discuss his latest venture–disrupting the healthcare industry with an online pharmacy and a price-slashing philosophy that makes hundreds of drugs affordable–and why following your passion is not the best way to maintain your motivation. This is an episode of ReThinking with Adam Grant, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For episodes on the psychology of the world's most interesting minds, follow ReThinking wherever you're listening to this. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/RTWAG1
15/09/2244m 52s

Pete Souza, Reagan and Obama’s White House Photographer | Design Matters

Pete Souza has taken some iconic photographs. A former Chief Official White House Photographer for both U.S. Presidents Ronald Reagan AND Barack Obama, Pete’s career has taken him from teaching basic photography in Kansas to taking pictures for National Geographic, Life Magazine, and other dream outlets. In this episode, he talks about carrying out a vision for a project, how he built his unique path in the field, and why he sticks to the old adage that a picture is worth a thousand words. This is an episode of Design Matters with Debbie Millman, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. For more conversations on how incredibly creative people design their careers and lives, follow Design Matters wherever you’re listening to this.
08/09/2238m 29s

A brain implant that turns your thoughts into text | Tom Oxley | TED Tech

"What if you could control digital devices using just the power of thought? That's the incredible promise behind the Stentrode -- an implantable brain-computer interface that collects and wirelessly transmits information directly from the brain, without the need for open surgery. Neurotech entrepreneur Tom Oxley describes the intricacies of this breakthrough technology, which is currently enrolling participants in human trials, as well as how it could help restore dignity to those with disabilities -- and transform the future of communication. This is an episode of TED Tech. Stay tuned after the talk to hear host Sherrell Dorsey talk about the promise and potential of technology when it comes to serving one of humanity's greatest needs: connection. For more ideas on the intersection of tech and humanity, follow TED Tech wherever you're listening to this. "
01/09/2217m 48s

How do we fix the restaurant tipping system? with Saru Jayaraman

How often do you go back and forth over how much to tip at the end of a meal? Depending on the state, in the U.S. that choice could be the difference between a livable income or financial mayhem for the workers who served and prepared your meal. But why do consumers have such power–and why are labor wages so tied to tips? Saru Jayaraman is a lawyer, activist and President of One Fair Wage. She is organizing a national movement of restaurant workers, employers and consumers in one of the most important labor battles in the country–one that aims to end subminimum wage and tip-based labor. Listen as she talks about the stakes of minimum wage legislation, the surprising history of this unfair practice, and how the pandemic has changed the labor landscape–for better and worse.
25/08/2242m 24s

Michael Schur on every moral question ever

Michael Scott, Leslie Knope, Detective Jake Peralta–television producer and writer Michael Schur has created some of TV’s most beloved sitcom characters on shows like The Office, Parks and Recreation, and The Good Place. Still, his shows and his philosophy are not just about laughs. Today on The TED Interview, Michael Schur talks about the craft of writing the TV comedy, why he is obsessed with philosophy and ethics, and what he’s learned from both the fictional and the real workplace about how humans behave, grow, and love. Michael’s New York Times-bestselling book “How to Be Perfect: The Correct Answer to Every Moral Question” is out now.
18/08/2249m 17s

Aaron Bastani is thinking about automated luxury…communism?

With such rampant inequality across the globe, it’s difficult to imagine that in the near future, society could be a place of abundance where everyone has education, healthcare, or housing. But for journalist Aaron Bastani, this improved state of affairs is not off limits; in fact, he believes that, with technology, a better world could be closer than we think. In this episode, Aaron speaks to how and why we should leverage the technological revolution to confront the global challenges of the 21st century. You can read more of his ideas in his much-discussed book Fully Automated Luxury Communism.
11/08/2244m 28s

Juliet Schor wants a four-day work week

Before labor unions fought for them, society didn’t have weekends as we know them. In the 13th century, the average male peasants in the UK only worked 135 days a year. In a post-pandemic and increasingly virtual world, what is the future of labor? Juliet Schor is an economist and sociologist whose research focuses on work and consumer society. In this episode, she shares her thoughts on modern working practices and how her current research on the four-day work week could help address society’s major problems–from burnout at work, to the effects of work on the climate crisis. Juliet also highlights the fascinating ways we have and might continue to reconfigure business in the 21st century, especially as it pertains to the dynamic–and at times predatory–sharing economy.
04/08/2237m 25s

DeepMind's Demis Hassabis on the future of AI

Demis Hassabis is one of tech's most brilliant minds. A chess-playing child prodigy turned researcher and founder of headline-making AI company DeepMind, Demis is thinking through some of the most revolutionary—and in some cases controversial—uses of artificial intelligence. From ​​the development of computer program AlphaGo, which beat out world champions in the board game Go, to making leaps in the research of how proteins fold, Demis is at the helm of the next generation of groundbreaking technology. In this episode, he gives a peek into some of the questions that his top-level projects are asking, talks about how gaming, creativity, and intelligence inform his approach to tech, and muses on where AI is headed next.
28/07/2248m 48s

Jennifer Egan on storytelling in a data-hooked world

Jennifer Egan is a journalist and writer whose novel “A Visit from the Goon Squad” won both the 2011 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction. Using a unique format—including a whole chapter told through Powerpoint—Egan nimbly explores the mystery and complexity of human life in the digital age. Her newest book, “The Candy House,” poses similar questions around technology, memory, and authenticity. In this episode, the author talks candidly about her creative process, considers the role of the novelist in an increasingly tech-driven world, and makes an argument for why the long-lasting art of fiction has the power to shift and even alter our consciousness.
21/07/2245m 11s

Garry Kasparov on chess, technology and democracy

Garry Kasparov is one of the greatest chess players of all time. He was one of the youngest world champions ever, and had a 20-year streak as the world’s top-rated player. But even though he is known as a champion, he is also particularly famous for losing—against Deep Blue. After the IBM computer beat Kasparov, the Azerbaijan native spent much of his career thinking about games, computers, artificial intelligence, and how to beat our fears regarding technology. Now he’s turned his attention to finding a fear-fighting strategy with far higher stakes: the preservation of freedom and democracy. Kasparov has become one of Vladimir Putin’s most vocal critics in recent years. Earlier this year, he opened the TED conference with a stirring call to action in support of Ukraine. In this episode, he looks back on his outstanding career, his advocacy and political activism, and shares his latest thinking on the Ukraine war.
14/07/2241m 31s

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein connects history to the stars

The way Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a theoretical physicist, sees it, Harriet Tubman is the Great American Astronomer. Using the North Star, with no formal training, Harriet Tubman led hundreds of enslaved people to freedom. Chanda is a night sky expert, too. She’s studying the intersections of astrophysics, particle physics, and cosmology, and she’s a leading thinker in understanding dark matter—the invisible particles some postulate could account for most of the matter in the universe. In this episode, Chanda shares how she uses science and the stars not just to uncover how amazing our universe is, but to understand and celebrate humanity’s shared histories—and struggles. Chanda’s latest book, “The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred” is out now.
07/07/2247m 24s

How to predict the future with Jane McGonigal

Future forecaster and game designer Jane McGonigal ran a social simulation game in 2008 that had players dealing with the effects of a respiratory pandemic set to happen in the next decade. She wasn’t literally predicting the 2020 pandemic—but she got eerily close. Her game, set in 2019, featured scenarios we're now familiar with (like masking and social distancing), and participant reactions gave her a sense of what the world could—and eventually, did—look like. How did she do it? And what can we learn from this experiment to predict—and prepare for—the future ourselves? In this episode, Jane teaches us how to be futurists, and talks about the role of imagination—and gaming—in shaping a future that we’re truly excited about. Jane’s new book, Imaginable: How to See the Future Coming and Feel Ready for Anything―Even Things That Seem Impossible Today is available now.
30/06/2242m 43s

Steven Johnson wants to know how enlightenment happens

It’s official, the TED Interview has a new host! In Chris’s last episode as head of the show, he interviews his successor, bestselling science and technology author Steven Johnson. Two self-described intellectual soulmates, Chris and Steven take a deep dive in discussing where ideas come from, how optimism benefits creative ideation, the complex and even controversial process of discovery, and the beauty of what they call the “adjacent possible.”
23/06/2254m 31s

Unlocking the mysteries of our brain | David Eagleman

The way that our brain perceives the world is profoundly informed by our senses–so what would happen if we could heighten them—or even create a whole NEW sense? In one of his last episodes as host of the show, Chris Anderson kicks off our series on the future of intelligence by interviewing neuroscientist and author David Eagleman. They’ll decode the mysteries of the brain, consider consciousness and what it means to be human, and dig deep into David’s ground-breaking research on how wearable technology can bypass sensory impairment, translating sound into patterns of vibration for the deaf and hard of hearing.
16/06/2257m 19s

What’s on Elon Musk’s mind?

What will it take to build a future worth being excited about? Elon Musk believes we already have the tools that will help us create one, but we must take bold action to get there. In conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, Musk details how the radical new innovations he’s working on—Tesla’s intelligent humanoid robot Optimus, SpaceX’s otherworldly Starship and Neuralink’s brain-machine interfaces—could help maximize the lifespan of humanity and create a world where goods and services are abundant and accessible for all. This episode was recorded on April 6, 2022. To talk about recent developments including his bid to buy Twitter, Elon joined Chris on stage at TED 2022 on April 14. You can listen to that interview now by following TED Talks Daily wherever you’re listening to this.
15/04/221h 6m

The limitless potential of human knowledge | David Deutsch

In an ever expanding world, it can be easy to think of our lives as insignificant. But according to David Deutsch, we all possess one skill that gives each of us infinite reach: our ability to attain knowledge. In the final episode of this season dedicated to making a case for optimism, Chris revisits his interview with the father of quantum computing to explore how knowledge first developed, how it sets us apart and how we can use it to shape a more hopeful future.
26/06/211h 3m

The science and ethics of rewriting our DNA | Jennifer Doudna

Biochemist Jennifer Doudna won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for pioneering CRISPR, a revolutionary biotech tool that can edit DNA with unprecedented precision and ease. But how exactly does CRISPR work, and what consequences may arise from altering our internal makeup? She talks to Chris about the remarkable effects CRISPR can have on our lives--from eradicating genetic diseases to slowing the climate crisis--as well as the ethical and moral questions we must grapple with when it comes to changing who we are. Can’t get enough TED? Become a member for access to exclusive events, global conversations, and more. Join now: go.ted.com/podmembers
17/06/2146m 7s

Can planting trees really stop climate change? | Thomas Crowther

From governments to airlines to your favorite eco-friendly clothing brand, tree-planting campaigns are everywhere. Reforesting the planet has become one of the quickest, easiest and most ubiquitous ways to reduce our carbon footprint...but is it actually helping to stop climate change? Ecologist Thomas Crowther speaks with Chris about how planting trees can actually hurt the environment -- unless it's done right. In which case, it can be a pivotal solution in our efforts to end the climate crisis. Can’t get enough TED? Become a member for access to exclusive events, global conversations, and more. Join now: go.ted.com/podmembers
10/06/2147m 38s

Bonus: How to give a killer speech | How To!

We all have to give a presentation at some point in our lives—on a stage, in a conference room, and, these days, on Zoom. So what makes a good speech? In this episode from How To! science writer David Epstein turns the microphone on Chris to find the answer. Chris breaks down some of the most famous talks of all time and solves an unusual challenge from a 6th-grader named Lucy: can he help her prepare for the biggest speech of her young life? This is an episode of How To!, a podcast from Slate. For more episodes, find it wherever you're listening to this.
08/06/2129m 44s

The end of our 50-year stagnation | Tyler Cowen

Some believe our world has changed at a rapid pace in recent decades. From the rise of the internet to the proliferation of startups spinning out inventions, it can certainly seem that way. In this episode, though, economist Tyler Cowen argues that none of this has really transformed the ways we live over the last 50 years. But he contends that now that's changing, as new breakthroughs in science and medicine push us out of the so-called "Great Stagnation" into a new era of meaningful innovation. Can’t get enough TED? Become a member for access to exclusive events, global conversations, and more. Join now: go.ted.com/podmembers
03/06/2158m 19s

How to turn grit into a lifelong habit | Angela Duckworth

What does it take to persevere and succeed, not just in our careers but in all aspects of our lives? For psychologist Angela Duckworth, the answer can be summed up in one concept: grit. She explains the ingredients in grit and the experiences that make one person persist where another gives up — and offers concrete steps to instill grit early in life and sustain it. Can’t get enough TED? Become a member for access to exclusive events, global conversations, and more. Join now: go.ted.com/podmembers
27/05/211h

What it really takes to make change | Jacqueline Novogratz

From the strikes that transformed the world's view on climate change to the marches that demanded equity and justice for Black lives, there has been a new awakening of people passionate about creating change. As founder and CEO of Acumen, Jacqueline Novogratz decided early on to dedicate her life's work to doing just that. In this episode, Chris talks to Jacqueline (who he also happens to be married to) about the wisdom she gained from abandoning a lucrative career as a banker to start a nonprofit dedicated to eradicating global poverty, and the moral imagination -- and difficult tradeoffs -- she believes are necessary to make a transformative impact on the world. Can’t get enough TED? Become a member for access to exclusive events, global conversations and more. Join now: go.ted.com/podmembers
20/05/211h

How youth gave climate the urgency it needed | Xiye Bastida

Before the pandemic struck, young people everywhere abandoned their classrooms and took to the streets. Xiye Bastida was a driving force among these youth climate activists in the U.S. Xiye grew up in Mexico, moved to New York at 13 and started organizing school walk-outs to demand a future unruined by climate change. That movement led to one of the biggest global marches the world has ever seen. In this conversation, Chris and Xiye explore how a group of young people shifted the cultural zeitgeist for a problem that is often seen as too vast, and too entrenched, to overcome. Can’t get enough TED? Become a member for access to exclusive events, global conversations and more. Join now: go.ted.com/podmembers.
13/05/2144m 44s

Work is never going back to normal | Simon Sinek

Work as we knew it is undergoing seismic shifts as the pandemic in the U.S. wanes. As some businesses reopen, even people lucky enough to work from home face big questions. What lessons do we take from this past year? How should we lead? How should we talk to each other? How should we even relate to work? Chris turns to Simon Sinek, a thinker and writer on leadership, for some candid guidance in this moment of reinvention. This conversation was recorded in front of a live virtual audience of TED Members. To join us for future recordings, access to exclusive events, global conversations, and more, visit go.ted.com/podmembers
06/05/2146m 26s

How COVID vaccines are revolutionizing medicine | Adrian Hill

This past year, scientists racing to stop the novel coronavirus delivered vaccines at a pace and scale the world has never seen before. Adrian Hill, director of Oxford University's vaccine research institute, recounts how he and his team developed the AstraZeneca vaccine. He explains why the challenges were as much about logistics as science, and predicts how the rapid creation of all COVID vaccines could change the pace of medical progress—even in realms beyond vaccines. This episode was recorded on March 8, 2021. Can’t get enough TED? Become a member for access to exclusive events, global conversations, and more. Join now: go.ted.com/podmembers
22/04/211h 6m

The race to build AI that benefits humanity | Sam Altman

In this new season of the TED Interview, conversations with people who make a case for...optimism. Not some blind, hopeful feeling but the conviction that somewhere out there are solutions that, given the right attention and resources, can guide us out of the dark place we’re in. We share those ideas—and the people propelling them—to light a possible path forward. For the first episode: AI. Will innovation in artificial intelligence drastically improve our lives, or destroy humanity as we know it? From the unintended consequences we've suffered from platforms like Facebook and YouTube to the danger of creating technology we can't control, it's easy to see why people are afraid of a world powered by AI. But in this interview, OpenAI CEO Sam Altman makes a case for AI's potential to make the future better for all of us—and explains how his company is leading that charge with an unusual new business model. Can’t get enough TED? Become a member for access to exclusive events, global conversations, and more. Join now: go.ted.com/podmembers
15/04/211h 9m

A special announcement from TED on climate

Today, we're re-sharing a conversation with Christiana Figueres, because we've got a special update for you from TED. On Saturday, October 10, we'll launch Countdown: an exciting new global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis, turning ideas into action. To get involved, tune in to the global launch which will be live-streamed at youtube.com/ted on October 10 at 11am ET. In 2015, Christiana Figueres brokered the historic Paris Agreement to combat climate change. She gives an inside look at the negotiations that led to a commitment from 195 countries to work toward a low carbon future and discusses her current work on COUNTDOWN, an ambitious new initiative from TED aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero.
08/10/201h 7m

Malala Yousafzai on why educating girls changes everything

The youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, Malala Yousafzai has been an international advocate for girls' education since she was 15 years old and was shot by the Taliban for speaking out about girls' education. Now, as a fresh graduate of Oxford University (and job seeking!), she urges us not to forget about the girls who still lack access to a classroom. She describes why learning was crucial to her as a young girl in Pakistan and how the fight for girls' education is inextricably linked with the coronavirus pandemic and recent calls for racial justice. This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by TED's current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded July 8, 2020.
16/07/2034m 35s

The role of the wealthy in achieving equality with Darren Walker

Born in a charity hospital and now president of the Ford Foundation, Darren Walker has been on both sides of the “inequality equation." He explains the need for the wealthy to acknowledge their complicity in a system that sustains racism and injustice, the importance of nuance in addressing complex systemic issues in the U.S., and the role philanthropy can play in rectifying the social and economic imbalances that disproportionately hurt Black Americans. This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson. It was recorded July 1, 2020.
09/07/2046m 2s

Al Gore on the new urgency of the climate crisis

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore has been a leader in climate advocacy for over 40 years. He argues that amid the global pandemic and worldwide calls for racial justice, climate action can help create a “clean, prosperous, just future” for all. He also highlights youth’s vital role in pressuring governments and businesses on environmental issues, and the effect of strategies like carbon pricing and nuclear energy on reducing emissions. This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson. It was recorded June 23, 2020.
02/07/2048m 15s

A path to peace in Afghanistan with President Ashraf Ghani

The war in Afghanistan has wrought turmoil and loss of life for nearly two decades. But that is just one side of the story. President of Afghanistan Ashraf Ghani digs into what's needed to bring peace and positive change to his country -- including the importance of sharing common ground with its neighbors, allies and adversaries; elevating the voices of women; and pushing forward a strategy for the pandemic that doesn't abandon its people in poverty. This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson. It was recorded June 16, 2020.
25/06/2039m 18s

Why a company’s future depends on putting its employees first with Dan Schulman

How can businesses recover from the pandemic's unprecedented economic destruction? PayPal CEO Dan Schulman argues that it's by improving the financial health of their employees. His company has pioneered research into Net Disposable Income, and he contends that ensuring every worker has enough is vital to the long-term success of any business. This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by TED’s business curator Corey Hajim and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded May 19, 2020.
18/06/2040m 43s

How Taiwan used digital tools to solve the pandemic with Audrey Tang

Taiwan has succeeded in avoiding a pandemic lockdown, in part through an innovative digital strategy. Audrey Tang, Taiwan's Digital Minister, shares how tools and techniques like crowdsourcing, a transparent supplies system and the use of humor have resulted in less than 500 confirmed cases to date. This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by TED's science curator David Biello and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded June 1, 2020.
11/06/2042m 49s

Reckoning with racial injustice in the U.S. -- and where we go from here

Featuring Dr. Bernice King, CEO of the King Center and daughter of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; Rashad Robinson, President of Color of Change; Anthony Romero, Executive Director of the ACLU; and Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff, CEO of the Center for Policing Equity. The killing of George Floyd and other recent police violence against black people in the U.S. has sparked outrage and action the world over. Why is this moment so important, and how can we learn from it to end systemic racism? This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded June 3, 2020.
05/06/201h 2m

What we learn from the crisis can make our economy stronger with Kristalina Georgieva

What will it take to put the pieces of the global economy back together? Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Kristalina Georgieva takes us inside the massive economic stimulus efforts leading the world toward recovery and renewal. She argues that we must channel money to the countries that need it most and fortify our financial systems to ensure we emerge from this "great transformation" even stronger than before. This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded May 18, 2020.
28/05/2040m 9s

What we get wrong about global growth with Dambisa Moyo

Global economist Dambisa Moyo was raised in Zambia and educated in England and the United States. Tune into her unique worldview and how it’s shaped her thinking on issues like overseas aid, climate, democracy and the rise of the coronavirus pandemic. This episode was recorded on March 5, 2020.
24/04/201h 5m

Design your life for happiness with Elizabeth Dunn

Psychologist Elizabeth Dunn argues that happiness is made not found and explains how our everyday choices—in matters from time to money to technology—help create it. This episode was recorded on February 5, 2020.
17/04/201h 2m

The world after the coronavirus pandemic with Fareed Zakaria

The coronavirus pandemic is more global, dramatic and unusual than any crisis we've seen in a long time, says journalist Fareed Zakaria. Listen as he shares his perspective on how we can recover from the economic fallout, why certain countries were able to avoid major outbreaks and what this might mean for the balance of global power. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded April 9, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
10/04/2035m 0s

What coronavirus means for the global economy with Ray Dalio

"I'm a capitalist. I believe in the system. I believe you can increase the size of the pie and you could divide it well," says Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates. He offers wide-ranging insight and advice on how we might recover from the global economic fallout of the coronavirus crisis -- and use it as an opportunity to reform the systems that help grow our economy. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and business curator Corey Hajim. It was recorded on April 8, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
09/04/2052m 25s

The tech we need to end the pandemic and restart the economy with Danielle Allen

As COVID-19 continues to spread, the world is facing two existential threats at once: a public health emergency and an economic crisis. Political theorist Danielle Allen describes how we can ethically and democratically address both problems by scaling up "smart testing," which would track positive cases with peer-to-peer software on people's cell phones -- so we can end the pandemic and get back to work. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and business curator Corey Hajim. It was recorded April 6, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
07/04/2045m 34s

How to create meaningful connections while apart with Priya Parker

Author Priya Parker shares tools for creating meaningful connections with friends, family and coworkers during the coronavirus pandemic -- and shows how we can take advantage of gatherings that are unique to this moment of social distancing. “We don’t necessarily need to gather more,” she says. “We need to gather better.” This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by Chris and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded on March 27, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
05/04/2046m 44s

Emotional resilience right now with Susan David

"Life's beauty is inseparable from its fragility," says psychologist Susan David. In a special virtual conversation, she shares wisdom on how to build resilience, courage and joy in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. Responding to listeners' questions from across the globe, she offers ways to talk to your children about their emotions, keep focus during the crisis and help those working on the front lines. This conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by Chris and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded on March 23, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
04/04/2051m 33s

Elizabeth Gilbert says it's OK to feel overwhelmed. Here's what to do next

If you're feeling anxious or fearful during the coronavirus pandemic, you're not alone. Offering hope and understanding, author Elizabeth Gilbert reflects on how to stay present, accept grief when it comes and trust in the strength of the human spirit. "Resilience is our shared genetic inheritance," she says. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and head of curation Helen Walters. It was recorded on April 2, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
03/04/2059m 40s

How to sleep during a pandemic with Matt Walker

A good night's sleep has perhaps never been more important. Sharing wisdom and debunking myths, sleep scientist Matt Walker discusses the impact of sleep on mind and body -- from unleashing your creative powers to boosting your memory and immune health -- and details practices you can start (and stop) doing tonight to get some rest. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by Chris and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded on April 1, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
02/04/2058m 32s

Why pandemics are not inevitable with Sonia Shah

What can past pandemics teach us how to tackle the current one? Tracing the history of contagions from cholera to Ebola and beyond, science journalist Sonia Shah explains why we’re more vulnerable to outbreaks now than ever before, what we can do to minimize the spread of coronavirus and how to prevent future pandemics. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by science curator David Biello and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded on March 31, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
02/04/2043m 48s

Lessons from China's response to COVID-19 with Gary Liu

From Hong Kong, South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu tracks China's response to the coronavirus pandemic -- from the initial outbreak in Wuhan to the shutdown of Hubei province and the containment measures taken across its major cities. Sharing insights into how the culture in places like Hong Kong and South Korea contributed to fast action against the virus, Liu identifies lessons people across the world can use to stop its spread. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by Chris and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded on March 25, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
01/04/2058m 16s

Building unity during a pandemic with Rabbi Jonathan Sacks

Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks offers thoughts on how we can navigate the coronavirus pandemic with courage, hope and empathy. With wisdom and clarity, he speaks on leadership, fear, death, hope and how we could use this moment to build a more just world. Watch for a special, impromptu prayer about halfway through the conversation. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and head of curation Helen Walters. This was recorded on March 30, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
31/03/2059m 33s

The quest for the coronavirus vaccine with Seth Berkley

When will the coronavirus vaccine be ready? Epidemiologist Seth Berkley (head of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance) takes us inside the effort to create a vaccine for COVID-19. With clarity and urgency, he explains what makes it so challenging to develop, when we can expect it to be rolled out at scale and why we'll need global collaboration to get it done. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded on March 26, 2020. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
31/03/2058m 53s

Bill Gates on how we must respond to the COVID-19 pandemic

Philanthropist and Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates offers insights into the COVID-19 pandemic, discussing why testing and self-isolation are essential, which medical advancements show promise and what it will take for the world to endure this crisis. This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by Chris and TED's current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. To learn more, visit go.ted.com/tedconnects
30/03/2051m 55s

Bonus: Adam Kucharski on what should -- and shouldn't -- worry us about the coronavirus

Infectious disease expert Adam Kucharski uses mathematical models to help the world understand how diseases like Ebola and Zika spread, and how they can be controlled. Now, as the threat of COVID-19 continues to rise, he gives us a necessary perspective on its transmission, how governments have responded and what needs to change in order to end the pandemic.
12/03/201h 8m

Bonus: Tom Rivett-Carnac is optimistic about the fate of our planet

In this bonus episode, Chris talks with climate policy expert Tom Rivett-Carnac, who worked with Christiana Figueres—guest from our last episode!—to negotiate the landmark Paris Agreement. They discuss why we need optimism to solve the climate crisis, and why TED’s new COUNTDOWN initiative can serve as a key catalyst of this optimism for countries, cities and citizens everywhere. This conversation was originally shared on the podcast Outrage and Optimism—check it out wherever you get your podcasts. For more go to: countdown.ted.com
23/12/1949m 42s

Christiana Figueres on how we can solve the climate crisis

In 2015, Christiana Figueres brokered the historic Paris Agreement to combat climate change. She gives an inside look at the negotiations that led to a commitment from 195 countries to work toward a low carbon future and discusses her current work on COUNTDOWN, an ambitious new initiative from TED aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero. We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
11/12/191h 6m

Frances Frei's three pillars of leadership

A professor at Harvard Business School and expert in work culture, Frei goes into companies like WeWork and Uber with the goal of turning toxic environments into healthy, inclusive spaces. She shares why authenticity, logic and empathy are the most vital skills an employee can have — and how the measure of a true leader can be seen not just in their presence, but in their absence, too. We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
20/11/1959m 37s

Donald Hoffman has a radical new theory on how we experience reality

According to cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman, our brains are showing us a "hacked" version of reality. His revolutionary new way of thinking about consciousness combines the study of evolution with insights into brain activity in an attempt to solve the mysteries behind how we perceive the world. We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
13/11/1954m 50s

Kate Raworth argues that rethinking economics can save our planet

Endless growth may actually be hurting our economy—and our planet. Economist Kate Raworth makes a case for “doughnut economics”: an alternative way to look at the economic systems ruling our societies and imagine a sustainable future for all. We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
06/11/1953m 51s

Michael Tubbs on politics as a force for good

At 26, Michael Tubbs ran for Mayor of Stockton, California, hoping to transform a city in crisis into a community of opportunity. He won. Mayor Tubbs breaks down how initiatives like universal basic income can free people from poverty, what being a good neighbor means in a democratic society, and why eradicating cycles of crime requires helping victims AND perpetrators. We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
30/10/1950m 50s

Elif Shafak on the urgent power of storytelling

Best-selling author Elif Shafak proves that storytelling can be profoundly political—and makes the case for embracing uncertainty in turbulent times. We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
23/10/191h 1m

Anil Seth explores the mystery of consciousness

Is the dress blue or gold? Do you hear "laurel" or "yanny"? Neuroscientist Anil Seth digs into why we all perceive the world so differently, and tries to explain the biggest mystery of all: consciousness. We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
16/10/1951m 6s

Dan Gilbert on the surprising science of happiness

Psychologist Daniel Gilbert delves deep into the weird, counterintuitive science of happiness and explains why our minds worry about things we needn’t worry about (and fail to worry about things we really should worry about). We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
09/10/191h 1m

Bonus: Parag Khanna on global connectivity

Best-selling author Parag Khanna unpacks global connectivity—the threats, the benefits, and how it is destined to redefine our identities. We're doing a TED Interview survey! If you have a few minutes, we'd love to know your thoughts on the show. Find it at: surveynerds.com/tedinterview
25/09/1938m 8s

Johann Hari challenges the way we think about depression

Author Johann Hari offers a deeply personal and surprisingly uplifting perspective on how to tackle depression.
24/07/191h 15m

Yuval Noah Harari reveals the real dangers ahead

Historian and futurist Yuval Harari has a story about the future that’s profound, exciting, and unsettling.
17/07/191h 9m

Tim Ferriss on life-hacks and psychedelics

Life-hack master Tim Ferriss gives an intimate look into the darker moments in his life, his Stoic philosophy and his new passion for psychedelics.
10/07/1951m 5s

Monica Lewinsky argues for a bully-free world

Monica Lewinsky reveals the very personal price to public humiliation and explores how we can all do better.
03/07/1940m 41s

Sylvia Earle makes a passionate case for our oceans

Dive deep into the fascinating, horrifying, hopeful story of the ocean with world-renowned marine biologist Sylvia Earle.
26/06/1955m 40s

Andrew McAfee on the future of our economy

Is the future of our economy scary? Exciting? MIT research scientist Andrew McAfee argues that it's both.
19/06/191h 21m

Susan Cain takes us into the mind of an introvert

Self-confessed introvert Susan Cain delves deep into this complex personality trait, offering ideas for better offices, better schools and better relationships.
12/06/1948m 7s

Kai-Fu Lee on the future of AI

Technologist Kai-Fu Lee describes the high-stakes battle between the West and China in artificial intelligence and what it means for the future of work.
05/06/191h 5m

David Brooks on political healing

NYT pundit David Brooks describes a plan to rebuild broken communities and offers actionable steps to live a more meaningful life.
29/05/191h 8m

Amanda Palmer on radical truth telling

An intimate conversation with one of the most unique voices in music today. Amanda Palmer shows us how the future of creative work means asking for what you want.
22/05/191h 7m

Bill Gates looks to the future

Microsoft founder Bill Gates takes us deep into his remarkable history and propels us into the future of technology and philanthropy.
15/05/1944m 27s

Roger McNamee takes on big tech

Recorded live at TED! Roger McNamee—early investor in Facebook turned outspoken critic—sits down for an extended examination of big tech's missteps and where we go from here.
03/05/1959m 36s

Bonus Episode: Chris Anderson on the Ezra Klein Show

Today, something a little different. Ezra Klein, the founder of Vox, recently spoke with Chris on his podcast, The Ezra Klein Show. Editor to editor, aspirational human to aspirational human. We’re sharing it with you now because we think listeners of this show might appreciate Ezra’s thoughtful style. Chris and Ezra discuss religion, the nuanced complexity of human nature, and why Chris believes ideas matter now more than ever. Which ideas, overshadowed by the day’s headlines, are quietly reshaping the world we live in? Perhaps more than any politician? And, in an age of tribalism-fueled skepticism, how can we keep people open to hearing ideas that may nudge them out of their comfort zones? To find out more about TED, please visit TED.com.
20/12/181h 3m

Sir Ken Robinson (still) wants an education revolution

Do schools kill creativity? Back in 2006, Sir Ken Robinson posed this question to the TED audience – and boy, did it touch a nerve. More than fifty million views and a decade later, Chris sits down with Sir Ken to dig into the changes and progress that have been made, and see if the answer now is any different. How are educators thinking about creativity these days? And why should creativity be a focus at all? With his characteristic verve, wit and sparkle, Sir Ken explains all. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewrobinson
18/12/1855m 48s

Daniel Kahneman wants you to doubt yourself. Here’s why

What shapes happiness – the experiences we have, or the stories we tell ourselves about them afterwards? When and how does our intuition reliably fail? And why is overconfidence the fatal flaw we should all watch out for? In this fascinating, far-ranging conversation, Chris digs into the questions that really matter with Danny Kahneman, Nobel laureate, godfather of behavioral economics, and one of the most influential psychologists alive. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewkahneman
11/12/1841m 51s

Ray Kurzweil on what the future holds next

Join Chris for a very special conversation with legendary inventor and computer scientist Ray Kurzweil, recorded live onstage at TED2018. Listen in to hear what the man who makes a living from predicting the future arc of technology thinks is coming our way next – including the specific prediction of when he thinks technology will finally gain human levels of language understanding. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewkurzweil
04/12/1838m 2s

Mellody Hobson challenges us to be color brave

Talking about race can be difficult. But Mellody Hobson argues that we need to do it anyway – boldly and often. Mellody is the president of Ariel Investments, a firm that manages more than 13 billion dollars. And throughout her career and in her personal life, she’s experienced just how corrosive it can be when people choose to be “color blind.” In this candid conversation, she shares her vision of a more harmonious, diverse America — and the difficult truths we need to swallow (and discuss) to get there. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewhobson
27/11/1853m 49s

Robin Steinberg’s passionate quest to reform cash bail

On any given night, 450,000 people in the United States stay in jail without having been convicted of any crime. Most of them are there because they don't have enough money to pay bail. Exasperated at what she saw as a systemic design flaw that primarily affects poor and marginalized people, public defense lawyer Robin Steinberg came up with a plan to fix things. As she explains in this sparky conversation with Chris, that idea is about as bold as they get. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewsteinberg
20/11/1839m 14s

Steven Pinker argues that our pessimism about today's world is profoundly wrong

Was 2017 really the "the worst ever," as some would have us believe? Cognitive psychologist and linguist Steven Pinker shares data that shows: actually, it was one of the best overall. At TED2018, Chris sat down with Steven to take a closer look at the data that suggest the world is improving, and to unpack why so many people find this idea so challenging. To find out more about TED, please visit TED.com. Find the transcript at:  go.ted.com/interviewpinker
13/11/1856m 0s

Dalia Mogahed on Islam in the world today

Just after 9/11, Dalia Mogahed asked: what do 1.8 billion Muslims really think? In a grand research project with Gallup, she interviewed more than 50,000 Muslims about their lives, their dreams, and the state of their religion. Today, she continues her research on Muslims as the director of research at the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding. In this intimate conversation with Chris, she opens up about her own faith and shares what she believes are the most common misconceptions of the world’s second-biggest religion. To find out more about TED, please visit TED.com. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewmogahed
06/11/1852m 23s

Sam Harris on using reason to build our morality

Many philosophers draw a hard line between the worlds of facts and values, but not Sam Harris. In this thought-provoking conversation with Chris, he makes the case that reason can indeed answer moral questions, and then explores the many controversies that emerge from that claim. Moral superiority? Cultural superiority? How about moral progress? Chris and Sam dig in to discuss the right ways to think about defining right from wrong, and reason’s role in it all. To find out more about TED, please visit TED.com. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewharris
30/10/181h 2m

David Deutsch on the infinite reach of knowledge

It can be easy to believe that humans are insignificant. We’re specks of dust on a random planet in a vast universe. Less powerful than elephants. Fewer than ants. But David Deutsch believes that’s all beside the point, because humans possess one unique skill: attaining knowledge. David Deutsch – Oxford professor, father of quantum computing, recluse – convinced Chris years ago to take over leadership of TED with his ideas about knowledge. In this mind-bending conversation, the two dive into his theory that the potential reach of knowledge is infinite. They explore how knowledge first developed, why it sets us apart and what all of these heady concepts really mean for our present and future. To find out more about TED, please visit TED.com. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewdeutsch
23/10/1859m 46s

Elizabeth Gilbert shows up for ... everything

As a writer, Elizabeth Gilbert is notorious for placing her heart squarely on her sleeve. Her best-selling memoir, “Eat, Pray, Love,” was a sensation precisely because of her eloquent, open-hearted descriptions of fear, divorce and wanting everything life had to offer. When she spoke at TED back in 2009, she charmed the audience with her frank descriptions of what happened after the book became a runaway success and her lyrical ideas of the nature of creativity. Nearly ten years later, in this extraordinarily intimate conversation with Chris, she shares why openness, transparency and creativity are still central to her philosophy of life – even when faced with moments of desperation and personal tragedy. To find out more about TED, please visit TED.com. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewgilbert
16/10/1858m 49s

Coming Soon: The TED Interview

Deep dives into great minds. Season one of this interview series hosted by TED's Chris Anderson launches October 16th, featuring conversations with beloved TED speakers such as author Liz Gilbert, philosopher Sam Harris, Islam scholar Dalia Mogahed, educator Sir Ken Robinson and many more. To find out more about TED, please visit TED.com.
25/09/181m 53s
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