Today in Focus

Today in Focus

By The Guardian

Hosted by Rachel Humphreys, Nosheen Iqbal and Michael Safi, Today in Focus brings you closer to Guardian journalism. Combining personal storytelling with insightful analysis, this podcast takes you behind the headlines for a deeper understanding of the news, every weekday

Episodes

Why a Belarusian Olympic sprinter refused to fly home

The Belarusian Olympic sprinter Krystsina Tsimanouskaya flew out of Tokyo on Wednesday to begin a life in exile after refusing to return home. Andrew Roth describes a growing threat to internal critics of the regime. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/08/2127m 5s

How Simone Biles changed gymnastics – on and off the mat

US gymnastics superstar Simone Biles changed what fans of the sport thought was physically possible. Now she is at the forefront of a new conversation about athletes and mental health. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/08/2126m 32s

Are plans to change the Official Secrets Act a threat to journalism?

Plans to update and expand the Official Secrets Act have been attacked as a ‘licence for cover-ups’ that could be used to thwart legitimate investigative journalism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/08/2127m 24s

Why did Unesco drop Liverpool from its heritage list?

The city has become one of the few places to have been dropped from the UN body’s global list of sites. What went wrong?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/08/2124m 7s

How we all got hooked on caffeine

It’s the world’s most widely used psychoactive drug, it disrupts our sleep, it makes us grumpy when we miss it – and we give it to our children. What keeps us coming back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/07/2126m 28s

The lobbying push that killed off a fight to save the Great Barrier Reef

The successful campaign to keep the Great Barrier Reef off Unesco’s ‘in danger’ list has been greeted with dismay – and gloom about the reef’s chance of recovery. Graham Readfearn explains the fierce global effort to deny the impact of the climate crisis on a prized natural asset. This episode includes explicit language. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/07/2124m 59s

The Republican backlash in Joe Biden’s America

It might seem like a post-Trump world, but in red states across the US his most hardline supporters are setting the political agenda. How much power do they have to shape the country’s future, even with a Democrat in the White House?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/07/2129m 51s

The pandemic enters a new phase

Freedom day, vaccine passports, a row over the ‘pingdemic’, and then a welcome drop in cases: it’s been a rollercoaster week in the coronavirus crisis. Science editor Ian Sample speaks to new Today in Focus host Nosheen Iqbal about whether have we turned a corner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/07/2124m 6s

The authority gap: why women still aren’t taken seriously

When journalist Mary Ann Sieghart set out to document the ways that women are held back by a cultural presumption of their inferiority, she found reams of data to support her case – and heard stories of how it affects even the most successful women in the world. She explains why the authority gap persists, and asks what we can do about it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/07/2128m 57s

The Pegasus project part 5: the fightback against private spyware begins

After a week of stories about the abuse of private spyware by governments around the world, Michael Safi rounds off our mini-series by looking at the global impact of the Pegasus project and what could change as a result. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/07/2130m 2s

The Pegasus Project part 4: runaway princesses and the UK connection

In today’s episode, two princesses from the United Arab Emirates show up in our leaked records – and we look at whether powerful spyware is being used against UK citizens. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/07/2124m 35s

The Pegasus Project part 3: cartels, corruption and cyber-weapons

In the latest part of our mini-series, Michael Safi hears from Nina Lakhani on how 15,000 Mexicans including journalists and politicians appeared on a list of possible targets for surveillance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/07/2124m 52s

The Pegasus project part 2: cat and mouse

For 10 years the Israeli surveillance company NSO has been helping governments steal secrets. Today we look at how a small team of cyber-detectives helped expose them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/07/2126m 3s

The Pegasus project part 1: an invitation to Paris

What happened when a powerful phone hacking tool was sold to governments around the world? Part 1 of a major international investigation introduces our new Today in Focus host, Michael Safi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/07/2121m 50s

Marina Hyde on five years of watching the political circus

For Anushka Asthana’s last episode, the beloved columnist makes a rare appearance to survey an era of tumult and twerps – and explain how she took it all very seriously … through jokes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/07/2137m 10s

Inside the mind of an Olympic athlete one week before the games

Tom Bosworth was ready for Tokyo 2020. Then the pandemic struck and he caught coronavirus. This is how he got himself to the starting line. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/07/2131m 4s

The heatwave forcing America to confront climate reality

An extraordinary heatwave has swept the west coast of the US and Canada, leading to record temperatures, water shortages, and hundreds of deaths – and bringing home the catastrophic consequences of global heating. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/07/2126m 20s

Is it possible to make the internet safe for children? – podcast

A new design code for websites, aimed at children, will soon come into force. How much difference will it make – and is a child-safe internet possible?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/07/2130m 3s

The people searching for missing family members during the pandemic – podcast

Hannah’s brother Paul dropped out of contact almost a decade ago. She never stopped thinking about him – and, as it did for many others, the pandemic led her to try to find him again. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/07/2125m 47s

The Indigenous children who died at Canada’s residential schools

Half a century ago, Barry Kennedy was taken from his family and forced into an abusive system that sought to obliterate his Indigenous heritage. Now, after the discovery of more than 1,000 bodies in unmarked graves at schools including his own, he reflects on the traditions that were erased, the friends he lost – and Canada’s new reckoning with that history. Listeners may find parts of this episode, which deals with physical and sexual abuse, distressing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/07/2137m 24s

The government’s rape review: an apology, but will anything change?

The government has said sorry to thousands of rape victims who have been failed by the criminal justice system. But survivors want cases reopened and justice finally done. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/07/2134m 18s

Euro 2020: what would it mean if England could actually … win?

After decades of disappointment, Gareth Southgate’s England team stand on the brink of making their first major final since 1966 – and from taking the knee to helping hungry children, they’ve got much more than football on their plate. Max Rushden explores what it would mean if the nice guys could finish first at last. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/07/2128m 7s

After Grenfell: the unsolved cladding crisis

The Grenfell Tower tragedy forced a reassessment of fire safety for buildings across the country, but no consensus on who should pay for it. Robert Booth describes how for many residents the issue has become a living nightmare. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/07/2133m 57s

Why do powerful men have affairs?

After Matt Hancock was forced to resign when a secret relationship was exposed, the couples therapist Orna Guralnik explores the cocktail of ego and vulnerability that leads some senior figures to risk it all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/07/2125m 13s

Britney Spears’ battle to take back control of her life and fortune

A legal arrangement set up in the wake of a mental health crisis has left Britney Spears with little control of her personal or professional affairs. Laura Snapes and Sam Levin describe how she’s challenging the situation in court. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/07/2132m 34s

How a pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong died

Apple Daily was a beacon of free speech. Now it has been forced to close by China’s sweeping national security law. Does its demise signal a new chapter in Hong Kong?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/2129m 15s

How the Batley and Spen byelection turned toxic

Maya Wolfe-Robinson visits the Labour-held West Yorkshire seat of Batley and Spen, which votes in an increasingly heated byelection tomorrow. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/06/2135m 4s

Matt Hancock’s downfall

Boris Johnson has a new health secretary this week after the resignation of the man tasked with leading the government’s Covid response. But there are plenty of unanswered questions, says Jonathan Freedland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/06/2132m 27s

Young, hot and bothered: going through menopause in my 30s

Harriet Gibsone tells the scary, sad, and surprisingly funny story of going through early menopause – and hoping for a baby. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/06/2129m 48s

The new Brexit crisis for Northern Ireland’s unionists

From a leadership fiasco to the ‘sausage wars’, the Democratic Unionist party’s stance on Brexit has forced it to contend with a new – perhaps even existential – set of problems. What will they mean for the region’s future?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/06/2130m 54s

How meme stars of the early internet are striking it rich with NFTs - podcast

The growth of non-fungible tokens has given rise to massive windfalls for those behind early virals. Sirin Kale and Alex Hern explain all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/2126m 17s

Police corruption and the unsolved murder of Daniel Morgan

The brutal murder of a private investigator in 1987 has become the UK’s most investigated killing – but 34 years later it remains unsolved and mired in new official findings of police corruption. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/06/2133m 27s

Do we have to learn to live with Covid-19?

The Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, weighs up the race between vaccines and variants and explains why the end of the pandemic does not mean the end of Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/06/2128m 16s

Karim’s story: Egypt’s crackdown on human rights workers

Ten years since the Arab spring rocked Egypt and removed its president, the country is still detaining human rights workers and locking up political prisoners. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/06/2133m 55s

Why England’s footballers are so determined to keep taking the knee

England’s footballers will take the knee before their match against Scotland at Wembley tonight in an anti-racism protest that has divided supporters. Liam Rosenior and Paul MacInnes reflect on how football became enmeshed in the culture wars. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/06/2136m 49s

Is the truth out there? The US government prepares its landmark report on UFOs

A hotly anticipated US government report on decades of mysterious sightings of UFOs is due for release this month. The Guardian’s Adam Gabbatt and former Ministry of Defence employee Nick Pope investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/2134m 45s

Israel’s unlikely coalition: is this the end for Netanyahu?

Israel has a new coalition government made up of eight very different parties. But having ousted Benjamin Netanyahu, can it hold together?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/06/2124m 35s

What’s behind the mass protests in Colombia?

A demonstration against tax rises has morphed into a mass movement against the government, says Joe Parkin Daniels in Bogotá. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/06/2128m 43s

What went wrong with the Covid-19 response in the US?

Author and journalist Lawrence Wright has been writing about pandemics for decades. So when Covid-19 struck the US, he was ideally placed to report on the political response. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/06/2128m 12s

GB News enters the culture war

To its critics, it is a British Fox News; to its creators, it is a vital correction to a liberal London-centric media. Can Andrew Neil’s upstart news channel change the face of British broadcasting?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/06/2127m 55s

The G7 and a crucial moment for the climate

The world’s richest democracies will come together in Britain this week with global heating high on the agenda. Can they match big promises with concrete action?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/2127m 17s

The interrogation of Matt Hancock

Two weeks after Dominic Cummings told MPs that the health secretary was a serial liar who lost the trust of No 10, Matt Hancock will face the same committee to defend himself. Heather Stewart explains what is at stake, and what it could mean for the next stage of the pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/06/2127m 43s

The danger – and beauty – of ultrarunning

After 21 competitors died during a 100km mountain race in Gansu province, the Chinese government last week suspended all extreme sports. But those who love ultrarunning insist it can be safe – and has changed how they see the world. What keeps them coming back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/06/2130m 16s

Why every statue should come down

Gary Younge was glad to see the figure of Edward Colston removed in Bristol a year ago – but, he argues, even monuments to civil rights leaders are a distortion of how history really works How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/06/2131m 44s

Australia’s mouse plague

Families and farmers in New South Wales are doing everything they can to fend off a biblical incursion of rodents. Guardian Australia’s Matilda Boseley has spent months reporting on the story – and hearing the experiences of those who have been affected. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/06/2126m 28s

The Wuhan lab leak theory

Joe Biden has asked US intelligence services to urgently investigate the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic, including the possibility that it began with an accident in a laboratory. The Guardian’s Peter Beaumont looks at the available evidence. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/06/2127m 2s

Bashar al-Assad’s decade of destruction in Syria

Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad, has presided over a devastating civil war that has caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people. Martin Chulov describes a man who came back from the brink of defeat to strengthen his grip on a country deeply scarred by war. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/06/2126m 39s

Will Tokyo really host a pandemic Olympics?

The Games were meant to be a moment of national celebration but – with coronavirus cases rising in Japan – this summer’s postponed Olympics are the subject of recrimination and protest. Can widespread public opposition overcome huge commercial pressure to go ahead?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/06/2129m 58s

Can the US avoid another Trump?

Former Obama adviser Ben Rhodes has travelled the world looking for clues to how the US came to elect Donald Trump and he found parallels everywhere. But is there a way of stopping it from happening again?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/05/2126m 53s

A state-sponsored ‘hijacking’ – the arrest of Belarus blogger Raman Pratasevich

Belarusian journalist Hanna Liubakova examines why Alexander Lukashenko, the president of Belarus, apparently diverted a Ryanair flight in order to arrest 26-year-old blogger Raman Pratasevich. Guardian Moscow correspondent, Andrew Roth, discusses the fallout from the action. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/05/2128m 11s

‘The government failed’: Dominic Cummings takes aim at No 10’s Covid response

Former aide lashed out at every aspect of the government’s approach and Boris Johnson and Matt Hancock in particular. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/05/2130m 35s

Is Britain becoming a hostile environment for EU citizens? | Podcast

As Covid travel restrictions begin to be lifted, a new, far less welcoming post-Brexit attitude is greeting EU citizens at the UK border. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/05/2127m 10s

Two lives changed by the death of George Floyd

A year ago, the murder of George Floyd caused outrage in Minneapolis – and kicked off a protest movement that spread across the world. How do the young Black people at the heart of the story live with his legacy?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/05/2130m 10s

The pandemic scam artists making millions during lockdown – podcast

When Rose got an email about a missed parcel, she thought nothing of arranging a new delivery – a mistake that would ultimately cost her thousands. The Guardian’s money editor, Hilary Osborne, reveals the scale of a lucrative new scam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/05/2124m 9s

Life inside Gaza during 11 days of bombardment

Guardian journalist Hazem Balousha describes living in, and reporting from, Gaza, under heavy bombardment until a ceasefire began on Friday, while historian Rashid Khalidi discusses the history of the Palestinian struggle for statehood. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/05/2136m 25s

Rio de Janeiro’s deadliest police raid

Guardian Latin American correspondent Tom Phillips visits Jacarezinho, one of Rio’s biggest favelas, the day after police carried out the deadliest raid in the city’s history. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/2128m 11s

Apple versus Epic: how the Fortnite app led to a legal showdown

As Apple takes on games developer and Fortnite creator Epic, UK technology editor Alex Hern describes a battle of the tech titans that could reshape the app industry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/05/2127m 46s

How worrying is the India coronavirus variant for UK plans to unlock this summer?

Monday’s change in the rules was supposed to be a moment of celebration – but the new variant spreading in the UK meant it came with a cautionary note. Can the next stage of the government’s ‘irreversible’ plan go ahead?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/05/2123m 18s

Big Short author Michael Lewis on the inside story of America’s failed Covid response

The author and journalist Michael Lewis discusses reporting on a group of individuals who tried to alert the US government to the dangers of its inaction as coronavirus cases began to rise at an alarming rate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/05/2128m 10s

Are Israel and Palestine on the brink of another war?

Oliver Holmes, the Guardian’s Jerusalem correspondent, discusses what has prompted the worst unrest in Israel and Palestine since 2014. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/05/2126m 36s

Why is the UK slashing its international aid budget?

Boris Johnson’s government has blamed the Covid crisis for its decision to cut its international aid budget, but is there more to it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/05/2128m 16s

Can Labour survive Britain’s political realignment?

After another set of disappointing election results, columnist John Harris asks if Labour can ever reconnect with voters in its former heartlands, where support is increasingly swinging to the Conservatives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/05/2128m 13s

The Post Office scandal – part 2

Janet Skinner was jailed for false accounting after being wrongfully accused by her employer, the Post Office, of responsibility for the loss of more than £59,000. Now, with her conviction quashed, she and others are demanding answers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/05/2138m 6s

The Post Office scandal – part 1

When a computer system installed by the Post Office went haywire, it led to the convictions of scores of subpostmasters for theft and false accounting. Lives were wrecked. But after a devastating ruling by the court of appeal, the full truth can now be finally told about the extent of the great Post Office scandal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/05/2132m 42s

Noel Clarke and the allegations that have shaken the film and television industry

Journalists Lucy Osborne and Sirin Kale discuss the allegations of verbal abuse, bullying and sexual harassment by 20 women against Clarke. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/05/2130m 9s

How Jewish parents used Guardian ads to save their children’s lives

This month is 200 years since the Guardian was first established in Manchester. For the Guardian’s world affairs editor, Julian Borger, a part of that history is deeply personal. In 1938, there was a surge of classified ads in the Guardian as parents – including his grandparents – scrambled to get their children out of the Reich. What became of the families?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/05/2138m 31s

The fight for Hartlepool

Hartlepool has sent a Labour MP to parliament in every election since 1964. But as old allegiances fray, Anushka Asthana looks back at how this previously thriving shipbuilding town has lost out over successive governments and wonders if the ‘red wall’ seat could be about to go blue at tomorrow’s byelection. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/05/2140m 54s

America’s gun debate – why we’re getting it so wrong

Abené Clayton, a reporter on the Guardian’s Guns and Lies in America project, examines why the debate on guns in the US does not treat shooting victims and their families equitably, and the impact that can have on communities. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/05/2129m 8s

Why have sperm counts more than halved in the past 40 years?

Dr Shanna Swan has spent more than 20 years examining how chemicals in plastics are causing our fertility to decline – and what we can do about it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/05/2124m 27s

Scotland’s election: a stepping stone to independence?

Constitutional questions have dominated the Scottish election campaign. As voters go to the polls next week, Libby Brooks assesses whether they will give the SNP a majority and a mandate for a new independence referendum. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/04/2125m 28s

Cash for curtains: how damaging are the allegations involving Boris Johnson? –podcast

For months, information has been leaked to the press from inside Downing Street, including allegations Boris Johnson was given the cash – which has not yet been published in any declarations – to do up his official residence. The Guardian columnist Rafael Behr discusses how damaging this could be for the prime minister. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/04/2127m 23s

Inside Afghanistan as troops prepare to leave after the US’s longest war

Fawzia Koofi is an Afghan politician who for the past few years has been one of the few women in peace talks with the Taliban. Last August she was wounded in an assassination attempt. She discusses the attack and the threat the Taliban pose to women’s rights, while the Guardian’s world affairs editor, Julian Borger, discusses the legacy of the US ‘forever’ war. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/04/2123m 19s

India’s Covid disaster: a crisis for the world

A catastrophe is unfolding in India as hospitals run out of oxygen, the Guardian’s south Asia correspondent, Hannah Ellis-Petersen, reports from Delhi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/04/2130m 12s

The Seaspiracy controversy: should we stop eating fish?

The Netflix documentary on the impact of commercial fishing has received celebrity endorsements and a huge audience around the world, but it has also attracted criticism from experts who accuse it of making misleading claims. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/04/2131m 26s

Chaos and collapse: European football’s not-so-super league

Plans for a breakaway super league rocked European football this week as fans, politicians and the game’s governing bodies united in fury. After two chaotic days, the whole scheme had collapsed. David Conn looks back on a week of humiliation for football’s richest clubs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/04/2124m 0s

George Floyd: will Derek Chauvin’s guilty verdict change US policing?

Oliver Laughland, the Guardian’s US southern bureau chief, covered the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, who was found guilty of the murder of George Floyd on Tuesday – a landmark moment in US criminal justice history. Oliver looks at what the verdict means for America. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/04/2128m 50s

Is sitting still slowly killing us?

Modern lifestyles are increasingly sedentary and inactive, and the public health effects of this are only just starting to show up, says author and Guardian reporter Peter Walker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/04/2124m 9s

How UK scientists are tracking down new Covid variants

Since the pandemic began, a crack team of scientists have been working to track Covid variants as they appear, to try to stop them from spreading. The Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, has been speaking to some of them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/04/2125m 15s

Did ‘eat out to help out’ cost lives?

Last August, Bob Pape and his family went on a city break to Birmingham, making the most of the chancellor Rishi Sunak’s ‘eat out to help out’ scheme. The day after he arrived home, his Covid symptoms began. Guardian writer Sirin Kale looks at the links between the scheme and the rise in Covid numbers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/04/2128m 22s

Becoming Prince Philip: an interview with The Crown’s Tobias Menzies

Tobias Menzies played Prince Philip in Netflix hit The Crown. On the eve of the royal’s funeral, Menzies discusses the unique challenge of trying to get inside the mind of a person seen by so many but known by so few. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/04/2128m 54s

David Cameron’s lobbying scandal

The Guardian’s banking correspondent, Kalyeena Makortoff, and political correspondent Rajeev Syal discuss the unprecedented formal inquiry into lobbying by the former prime minister David Cameron on behalf of the collapsed finance company Greensill Capital. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/04/2127m 21s

Will we need a Covid pass to get into the pub?

The UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, has announced plans for a domestic Covid-status certificate. We look to Israel, where a similar scheme has been introduced, and discuss how it might work here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/04/2128m 20s

What is really behind the riots in Northern Ireland?

The Guardian’s Ireland correspondent, Rory Carroll, looks at what is fuelling loyalist anger in Northern Ireland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/04/2130m 22s

Remembering the Brixton riots 40 years on

In April 1981, a simmering tension between the police and Brixton’s black community erupted in violence. Forty years, on Aamna Modhin revisits that weekend with those who witnessed the events unfolding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/04/2126m 23s

Risk, reward and the AstraZeneca vaccine

People in the UK under 30 will be offered an alternative to the AstraZeneca vaccine because of a possible link to rare blood clots. Could the move dent confidence in the widely used jab?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/04/2120m 0s

The death of George Floyd and the case against Derek Chauvin – podcast

The death of George Floyd after being restrained by Minneapolis police last year sparked a wave of outrage that swept across the US and then the world. Now the police officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes is on trial for his murder. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/04/2128m 57s

How can the UK stop harassment and sexual abuse in schools? – podcast

The Everyone’s Invited website has collected 14,000 testimonies so far, painting a picture of widespread sexual harassment and violence in our schools. Everyone’s Invited founder Soma Sara and the Guardian’s senior news reporter Alexandra Topping discuss the outcry, the impact and whose responsibility it is to do something about it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/04/2128m 49s

Why the government's race report sparked a furious backlash

A new report into racial inequality in the UK has been condemned by campaigners and was called a ‘green light for racists’ by Doreen Lawrence. Aamna Mohdin examines what it says and why the response has been so damning. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/04/2131m 12s

A year of Keir: has the Covid pandemic sidelined Labour's leader?

Keir Starmer is marking a year as leader of the Labour party in which one issue has dominated above all else. The Guardian’s political editor, Heather Stewart, examines where the party is heading under his leadership. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/04/2128m 58s

Why are gay conversion practices still legal in the UK?

The UK government has pledged to ban gay conversion practices – which involve trying to change a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity. But they are still legally taking place across the country. George and Joe describe the impact of going through it and the MP Alicia Kearns talks about the fight to have it banned. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/04/2126m 17s

What is the police and crime bill and why are people protesting against it?

Thousands of people have been protesting against the government’s police, crime, sentencing and courts bill, which would allow police to take a more proactive approach in managing protests, but many worry is an attempt to restrict the right to protest. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/04/2121m 46s

Unblocking the Suez canal

The gigantic cargo ship the Ever Given blocked the world’s busiest shipping lane for a week. Michael Safi reports on what the costly nautical traffic jam can tell us about global trade. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/03/2127m 57s

Joe Biden's border challenge: reversing Trumpism

The 46th US president took office promising a more welcoming immigration policy. But Republicans are calling a new wave of migrants at the southern border a ‘crisis’ and demanding he addresses it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/03/2130m 40s

Freshwater part 6: the decision

The court of appeal heard the appeal of the Freshwater Five last week. In the final part of our miniseries, we hear how the judges reached their decision and what it means. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/03/2155m 24s

The aftermath of a rape

While working in Abu Dhabi launching a literary festival, Caitlin McNamara alleges she was raped by a member of the Emirati royal family. A year on, she describes her struggle to hold her attacker to account, and to come to terms with what happened to her. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/03/2125m 46s

Europe's third Covid wave

As a deadly third wave of Covid infections sweeps across the continent, Jon Henley reports on how EU leaders are considering restricting exports of vaccines in a move that could inflame tensions with the UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/03/2127m 23s

Men! What can you do to help fight misogyny?

Educator and author Dr Jackson Katz discusses why all men need to be part of ending violence against women, and what they can do to help. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/03/2129m 4s

A year inside: what shielding has meant for the most vulnerable

The first national lockdown began in Britain a year ago today, but for those identified as clinically vulnerable, the restrictions often mean total isolation. Frances Ryan reports on what it has meant for those who have been shielding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/03/2132m 0s

Professor Neil Ferguson on the Covid year that shattered our way of life

Prof Neil Ferguson was one of the first scientists to raise the alarm in Britain that unless the government radically changed policy, it was heading for a disaster that the NHS could not cope with. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/03/2127m 59s

Is it time to abolish the monarchy?

Jonathan Freedland looks at whether the fallout from last week’s Oprah Winfrey interview with Harry and Meghan has moved the monarchy closer to collapse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/03/2125m 15s

What do progressives make of Joe Biden's presidency so far

Lauren Gambino, political correspondent for Guardian US, discusses the $1.9tn Covid relief package, which was passed by Congress last week. It was seen as a major legislative victory for Joe Biden. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/03/2129m 5s

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow’s story and the campaign to end femicide

Police response to death of Sarah Everard reminds reporter Yvonne Roberts of the Yorkshire Ripper killings; Helen Pidd reports on the murder of an Afghanistan veteran that has also put the spotlight on cycle of women being killed by men. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/03/2129m 48s

Why are women so angry after the killing of Sarah Everard?

The death of Sarah Everard has shocked the UK and ignited a furious debate around the issue of male violence. Guardian senior reporter Alexandra Topping discusses why Everard’s case has prompted so many women to speak out. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/03/2125m 43s

Scandal, riots and the Dutch election

The Dutch cabinet resigned in disgrace earlier this year after admitting it falsely accused thousands of citizens of cheating the benefits system. Then a strict second lockdown sparked riots. Now Dutch voters go to the polls, but are they in the mood for a change of government?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/03/2124m 43s

Hostage diplomacy: when will Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe be free?

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe has endured a five-year nightmare after being arrested and jailed in Iran while on holiday. But now as her husband, Richard Ratcliffe, and the Guardian’s Patrick Wintour explain, having served her sentence she is being threatened with further charges. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/03/2134m 2s

Is the government ready to lead the fight against the climate crisis?

Later this year, the government will host COP26 in Glasgow – possibly one of the last opportunities for the world to avert global climate catastrophe. Guardian environment journalist Fiona Harvey examines whether the UK government is equipped to lead the world in the crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/03/2126m 5s

The great global vaccine divide

The speed at which the world’s scientists have managed to create several effective Covid vaccines has been close to miraculous. But as Michael Safi says, the richest countries have taken the lion’s share. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/03/2126m 57s

Meghan and Harry's brutal takedown of the royal family

Reporters Archie Bland and Aamna Mohdin discuss the impact of Oprah Winfrey’s interview with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, which contained shocking revelations, including allegations of racism at the heart of the royal family. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/03/2129m 24s

Why has there been a rise in anti-Asian hate crime in the US?

A rise in anti-Asian hate crime during the pandemic is forcing the US to reckon with a racism that’s been overlooked for decades. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/03/2130m 5s

The lawyer who fought to free Guantánamo's highest-value detainee

Nancy Hollander has taken on many difficult cases in her career, but none quite like that of the Guantánamo detainee Mohamedou Ould Salahi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/03/2128m 4s

Guantánamo’s highest-value detainee and the guard who befriended him

Mohamedou Ould Salahi was once Guantánamo’s highest-value detainee, but during the 14 years he spent behind bars he was never charged with a crime. Salahi and his former guard Steve Wood reflect on their time at the prison. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/03/2141m 12s

Alex Salmond, Nicola Sturgeon and the turmoil inside Scottish politics

With Scotland’s first minister Nicola Sturgeon giving evidence today, the Guardian’s Scotland correspondent, Libby Brooks, charts the unravelling of the alliance between first minister Nicola Sturgeon and her predecessor Alex Salmond – once seen as Scotland’s greatest political partnership. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/03/2130m 39s

Why has the Brazilian butt lift become so popular? – podcast

The Brazilian butt lift (BBL) has become the world’s fastest growing cosmetic surgery, despite mounting concerns over the growing number of deaths from the procedure. What is driving its popularity?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/03/2130m 30s

The life and death of Robert Maxwell

In 1991, the tycoon Robert Maxwell died in circumstances that have yet to be fully explained. Thirty years on, his legacy is still being felt, says the author John Preston. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/2131m 17s

Is this the worst year ever for the UK music industry?

Guardian music writer Laura Snapes, singer-songwriter Arlo Parks and musician Nitin Sawhney discuss the impact that Covid, Brexit and the ‘streaming economy’ are having on the sector. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/02/2128m 47s

No sex please, we're British. Dating in a pandemic

Lockdown rules have left little opportunity for people who aren’t already living with a partner to pursue romantic relationships, explains Zoe Williams. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/02/2128m 51s

The science behind England’s Covid exit plan – podcast

Nicola Davis runs through the science behind the government’s decision to begin lifting lockdown restrictions, a four-stage plan that starts with the reopening of schools and could see the return of nightclubs on 21 June. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/02/2122m 26s

Freshwater part 5: the appeal

Today, the Freshwater Five case is in front of the court of appeal after the disclosure of new evidence that the defence says points to the men’s conviction being unsafe. Why has it taken a decade to get to this point? Listen to episode 1 Listen to episode 2 Listen to episode 3 Listen to episode 4. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/02/2143m 47s

Freshwater part 4: radar

When the Freshwater Five’s lawyer, Emily Bolton, found new evidence not disclosed at the men’s trial, it set her on a path to the court of appeal and another version of events that adds weight to their claims Listen to episode 1 Listen to episode 2 Listen to episode 3. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/02/2146m 34s

Freshwater part 3: the clifftop evidence

A major part of the evidence against the Freshwater Five came from the clifftop above Freshwater Bay. It was there that police saw bags being thrown from the men’s boat. But the defence still have questions about what the police actually saw Listen to episode 1 Listen to episode 2. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/2136m 9s

Freshwater part 2: the circumstantial evidence

In the second part of Freshwater, Anushka Asthana examines the circumstantial evidence presented at trial against the Freshwater Five including a series of phone calls from sea and why a man with no prior fishing experience was onboard the boat that night Listen to episode 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/02/2149m 31s

Freshwater part 1: are the wrong men in jail?

In 2011, five men were sentenced to a total of 104 years for conspiracy to import £53m worth of cocaine. They have always said they are innocent. Now, as new evidence is due to be put before the court of appeal, we investigate the case of the Freshwater Five Listen to part 2 Listen to part 3 Listen to part 4 Listen to part 5. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/02/2143m 38s

Catherine Flowers and her fight for environmental justice in Alabama

In parts of the American south, many homes don’t have access to working waste treatment – something activist Catherine Flowers is fighting to change. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/02/2122m 2s

Inside Napier: the former army barracks housing asylum seekers

The Guardian’s home affairs correspondent, Jamie Grierson, discusses the government’s decision to use two former army barracks, Napier and Penally, to house up to 600 vulnerable asylum seekers. Amid allegations of cover-ups, poor access to healthcare and legal advice, and crowded conditions, one former resident describes the impact Napier had on him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/02/2128m 42s

Why are farmers protesting against the Indian government?

The Guardian’s south Asia correspondent and the founder of a sustainable farming movement explain why farmers are so angry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/02/2125m 31s

It's a Sin: a nurse reflects on the Aids crisis of the 80s

Channel 4/HBO Max’s new drama It’s a Sin, written by Russell T Davies, follows a group of friends living through the 1980s Aids crisis. Leigh Chislett worked as a HIV nurse at St Mary’s hospital in London during that period. Watching the show, he saw himself not just in the nurses caring for patients but also in the young gay men navigating their lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/02/2130m 20s

Covid-19 variants and what they mean for vaccines

The Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, looks at why variants of the Covid-19 virus are alarming scientists. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/02/2122m 37s

The coup in Myanmar and a fight for democracy

A military coup in Myanmar has removed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and sent tens of thousands of protesters onto the streets. Rebecca Ratcliffe describes how the country risks turning back the clock to the decades of military dictatorship and economic isolation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/02/2129m 51s

How the Queen lobbied for changes in the law to hide her wealth

Government memos discovered in the National Archives reveal that the Queen lobbied ministers to alter proposed legislation. The Guardian’s David Pegg follows the trail and explains its implications for a monarchy which is supposed to stay out of politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/02/2129m 55s

Alexei Navalny’s imprisonment: how Putin put his opponent behind bars

The sentencing of opposition leader Alexei Navalny marks a dramatic turning point in Russian politics, says Andrew Roth. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/02/2126m 30s

Inside the trial against the 'Ndrangheta, Italy's biggest mafia syndicate

Guardian journalists Lorenzo Tondo and Clare Longrigg discuss the trial against the ‘Ndrangheta, the largest mafia trial in three decades. At the centre is Emanuele Mancuso, son of boss Luni Mancuso, who has been revealing the clan’s secrets after accepting police protection. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/02/2126m 30s

Donald Trump's second impeachment: will the Senate convict him?

Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial begins in the Senate next week. Lawrence Douglas explains the process and politics of the spectacle ahead. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/02/2134m 6s

Wall Street versus the Redditors: the GameStop goldrush

When a group of amateur investors on a Reddit messageboard began buying up stock in a video games retailer it forced huge losses on major Wall Street hedge funds that had bet against it. But following a trading frenzy the stock began to fall, almost as quickly as it had risen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/02/2126m 52s

How the EU’s vaccine effort turned into a crisis

Daniel Boffey, the Guardian’s Brussels bureau chief, looks at why the EU’s vaccination programme has become so chaotic. Last Friday the commission attempted an ill-fated plan to seek to erect a vaccine border on the island of Ireland by triggering a clause in the Brexit withdrawal agreement. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/02/2129m 22s

Inside LA’s Covid crisis – podcast

Guardian US correspondent Sam Levine visits Martin Luther King Jr community hospital in Los Angeles county, an area battling one of the worst Covid outbreaks in the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/02/2129m 1s

Conversations with kids about coronavirus

Children across the UK talk about how the pandemic has affected their lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/02/2134m 38s

What's up with WhatsApp?

A routine update to WhatsApp’s privacy policy resulted in a public relations fiasco earlier this month, when viral posts questioning the changes prompted users to try out alternative apps. Kate O’Flaherty breaks down what’s next for WhatsApp. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/01/2120m 42s

Why Brazilians are having to take the Covid crisis into their own hands

Tom Phillips, the Guardian’s Latin America correspondent, looks at the surge of infections in the Brazilian state of Amazonas that has left many hospitals without the most basic supplies and has prompted yet more protests against Bolsonaro. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/01/2126m 4s

Behind closed doors: Filipina workers trapped by the pandemic

Journalist Corinne Redfern discusses the impact the pandemic has had on the Filipino women trapped overseas, including Mimi (not her real name) who works for a wealthy family in London for just £5 an hour. Mimi was asked to keep working through the first lockdown with the family coaching her on what to say if the police stopped her. In her spare time, Mimi helps other overseas workers escape situations where they are being abused. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/01/2128m 55s

Vaccine hesitancy: what is behind the fears circulating in BAME communities?

Several national surveys suggest people from black, Asian and minority backgrounds are far more likely to reject having the Covid-19 vaccine than their white counterparts. Nazia Parveen and Annabel Sowemimo explain the root causes of this hesitancy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/01/2128m 35s

The fight for recovery from a lifelong eating disorder

The Guardian’s Jenny Stevens struggled with an eating disorder throughout her 20s. When she was able to finally access the treatment she needed, she began a slow recovery – which she is still coming to terms with. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/01/2126m 21s

Surviving cardiac arrest: what it's like to come back to life

Last year the Guardian’s Jonathan Watts underwent a lifesaving operation following a cardiac arrest. He tells Anushka Asthana what it taught him about life and death. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/01/2133m 22s

Why is Sex and the City coming back to our screens?

Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman discusses why Sex and the City was such a successful TV series, while the Guardian’s deputy television editor, Hannah J Davies, looks at what the reboot tells us about TV commissioning today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/01/2128m 7s

The end of Trump: where will the Biden era take America?

Guardian US columnist Robert Reich reflects on the unfinished business of the Trump presidency, and what Biden’s administration should aim to accomplish. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/01/2124m 22s

Is bitcoin a scam?

In 2013 James Howells threw out a computer hard drive containing bitcoin. Last week he again asked his local council for permission to dig for it at his local dump as he believes it is now worth about £200m. The Guardian’s UK technology editor, Alex Hern, looks at the rise of bitcoin and whether it should be banned. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/01/2126m 16s

Inside an NHS hospital at the peak of the coronavirus crisis

As the latest wave of Covid infections hits hospitals, wards are nearing capacity and oxygen supplies are straining at the volume of new patients. The Guardian’s Helen Pidd spent a day at Milton Keynes University hospital to witness the crisis up close. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/01/2128m 50s

Trump, the death penalty and its links with America’s racist history

This week, Donald Trump sanctioned the execution of the only woman on federal death row: Lisa Montgomery. She was the 11th prisoner to be killed since the president restarted federal executions in July last year. The Guardian US’s Ed Pilkington looks at why Trump has carried out more federal executions than any other president in almost 200 years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/01/2132m 51s

Bobi Wine: the reggae singer vying to be Uganda’s next president

Ugandans go to the polls today to elect a new president. Can a charismatic young musician end three and a half decades of rule by a strongman? Freelance reporter Samuel Okiror has been following Bobi Wine’s campaign to defeat Yoweri Museveni. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/01/2124m 28s

Covid: vaccinating our way out of a crisis

Government aims to vaccinate 12 million people by middle of February. With the NHS struggling, Robin McKie asks whether it is fast enough. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/01/2126m 40s

Inside the investigation into how Covid-19 began

This week a team of international experts from the WHO will arrive in China to investigate the origins of Covid-19. A year into the pandemic, Guardian health editor Sarah Boseley looks at what questions still need to be answered. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/01/2123m 17s

From Yemen to the UK: Noor's story

A women’s rights activist tells the extraordinary story of how she fled Yemen after her life was threatened, and her devastation at having to leave her four children behind. She describes her terrifying journey to the UK, where she faces an uncertain future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/01/2125m 9s

The storming of the Capitol and the end of the Trump era

When rioters stormed into the Capitol building in Washington DC this week, it marked a new low for the Trump presidency. David Smith and Lauren Gambino describe a week in US politics like no other. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/2129m 46s

How the Covid surge has left the NHS on the brink

Boris Johnson has announced a new national lockdown amid fears the NHS could be overwhelmed within weeks with Covid patients. Denis Campbell and Dr Samantha Batt-Rawden describe a service already at breaking point. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/01/2129m 55s

Is your boss spying on you?

With home working now well established, many companies are finding new ways to monitor the productivity of their employees often with intrusive spyware, says technology editor Alex Hern. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/01/2127m 44s

A new national lockdown

2021 has begun in crisis mode for Boris Johnson’s government as it scrambles to control new Covid infections by closing schools and implementing a new national lockdown. Peter Walker reports on the new measures Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/01/2122m 9s

Why do some people find it harder than others to lose weight?

After treating thousands of obese people, bariatric surgeon Andrew Jenkinson was left wondering why, when most people eat too many calories, only some become overweight. After years of research, he believes he has the answer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/01/2128m 42s

Revisited: the clitoris coverup – why do we know so little?

Medical textbooks are full of anatomical pictures of the penis, but the clitoris barely rates a mention and many medical professionals are uncomfortable even talking about it. Reporter Calla Wahlquist and associate news editor Gabrielle Jackson explain the history and science of the clitoris, and speak to the scientists and artists dedicated to demystifying it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/01/2127m 4s

Revisited: a cure for insomnia?

Like a growing number of people, Simon Parkin suffered from insomnia for years. After dozens of failed techniques, he finally found one that worked. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/12/2019m 38s

Revisited: Leonardo da Vinci and the mystery of the world's most expensive painting

Salvator Mundi was sold for a record $450m at auction in 2017 to an anonymous bidder. But the painting’s provenance as the work of Leonardo has been called into question. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/12/2024m 50s

Revisited: Otters, badgers and orcas – can the pandemic help rewild Britain?

Sound recordist Chris Watson shares the birdsong from his English garden, while environmentalist George Monbiot looks at how the pandemic might be an opportunity for rewilding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/12/2026m 44s

Revisited: is veganism the future?

Marco Springmann, a public health expert, tells Anushka Asthana why cutting out animal products is the best route to a healthy diet – and why veganism is good for the planet. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/12/2022m 28s

Culture 2020: a look back at the best TV, music and books

The Guardian’s deputy music editor, Laura Snapes, the assistant TV editor, Ammar Kalia, and books site editor, Sian Cain, discuss their favourite music, TV and books from the past six months and what they’re looking forward to hearing, watching and reading in 2021. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/12/2031m 37s

How Lewis Hamilton became one of the UK’s top sports stars and activists

Writers Michael Eboda and Oliver Owen look at how a 12-year-old go karting champion went on to become Formula One’s most successful driver. This year, more than ever, Hamilton has also been leading the fight against racism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/12/2028m 0s

The new strain of coronavirus that has cancelled Christmas

Guardian health editor Sarah Boseley looks at the fast-spreading Covid variant that has prompted the prime minister to put London, the south east and the east of England into tier 4 and more than 40 countries to ban UK arrivals because of concerns about the spread. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/12/2022m 38s

From Wuhan to an ICU in Wales: the people who helped us report the pandemic

Throughout 2020 we have reported on the shocking developments as Covid-19 swept through Britain, changing our way of life in a flash. In this episode we revisit people who helped us tell the story, from Wuhan, ICU wards, care homes and unemployment claims to a blind date that led to romance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/12/2037m 30s

The Georgia runoff: an historic battle for control of the US Senate

Reporter Khushbu Shah discusses the runoff in Georgia. Republicans have 50 seats in the Senate and the Democrats 48, so much hangs on the outcome of the 5 January election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/12/2027m 8s

Returning to Tunisia on the tenth anniversary of the Arab Spring – podcast

The Guardian’s international correspondent Michael Safi returns to Tunisia where, 10 years ago, fruit seller Mohamed Bouazizi set fire to himself. It triggered a wave of protests across North Africa and the Middle East which have had profound ramifications. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/12/2027m 46s

Rugby's dementia crisis – podcast

In 2003 Steve Thompson helped England win the World Cup, playing a part in one of the most memorable endings to a match. Now aged 43, he finds he has no memory of the match at all – and has been diagnosed with early onset dementia. Andy Bull describes how a group of former stars are launching a legal case against the sport’s governing bodies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/12/2030m 27s

Deal or no deal: where is Brexit heading?

With talks ongoing between the EU and UK over the final Brexit trade deal, the clock is running down and the January deadline is looming. Daniel Boffey explains what is at stake. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/12/2023m 23s

Has Labour lost its 'red wall' forever?

Labour’s historical general election victories were built on a bedrock of safe seats in the north of England. But a year ago it lost some of its most prized seats to the Conservatives – and so far voters appear to have few regrets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/12/2029m 36s

Looking back at 2020: a year like no other

A look back at how the Guardian covered a year that began with the outbreak of a pandemic, witnessed global anti-racism protests after the killing of George Floyd, and ended with the voting out of President Donald Trump. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/12/2033m 56s

The mystery of the Gatwick drone

In December 2018 a series of drone sightings forced the closure of Gatwick airport, causing chaos for Christmas travellers. Two years on and with the mystery still unsolved, Samira Shackle investigates what really happened. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/12/2027m 23s

The spy cops scandal: part 2

The Guardian’s Paul Lewis and Rob Evans on investigating one of British police’s most covert units and learning that they were using the identities of dead children. Frank Bennett reflects on the impact of discovering that a police spy had stolen his dead brother’s identity to infiltrate two leftwing organisations, and to deceive a woman into a sexual relationship. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/12/2034m 24s

The spy cops scandal: part 1

Guardian investigative editor Paul Lewis and investigative reporter Rob Evans detail their decade-long investigation into undercover policing. At least 139 officers were given fake identities to monitor the inner workings of more than 1,000 political groups. Jessica, a former member of one of those groups, describes the impact of discovering that a man with whom she began a relationship in 1992 was actually an undercover cop. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/12/2045m 27s

The rise of the 'chumocracy'

Investigations into how lucrative Covid-related government contracts were awarded have raised serious questions about cronyism. The Guardian’s Felicity Lawrence and David Pegg investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/2031m 44s

How to have a Covid-safe Christmas

Families across the UK are being allowed to gather over Christmas, even as tens of thousands of new coronavirus cases are recorded each day. Is it possible to have a safe holiday? The Guardian’s science correspondent Nicola Davis offers some guidance Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/12/2024m 43s

Three women on their fight for abortion rights in Poland

Academic Agnieszka Graff, lawyer Karolina Więckiewicz and gynaecologist Anna Parzyńska discuss their fight for abortion rights. An attempt by authorities to impose a near-total ban on terminations has sparked mass demonstrations across the country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/12/2023m 35s

The Crown – fact or fiction?

Royal correspondent Jennie Bond, who has covered some of the most dramatic years of the monarchy, discusses whether The Crown is an accurate depiction of palace life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/12/2026m 27s

The Nobel peace prize winner fighting a war in Ethiopia

Ethiopia’s prime minister was feted by the international community as a reformer and a peacemaker. Now, as the Guardian’s Jason Burke explains, he has launched a major military campaign in the north of his country that threatens the stability of the region. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/12/2032m 14s

He risked his life fighting the Californian wildfires, now he faces deportation

For weeks, the Guardian US reporter Sam Levin has been speaking to Bounchan Keola, who is being detained by Ice and facing deportation to Laos, a country he left when he was four, despite having risked his life to fight wildfires in California this year. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/11/2026m 27s

Is former Elite boss Gerald Marie the Harvey Weinstein of the fashion industry?

Wendy Walsh was 17 when she moved to Paris to be a model. Within weeks of arriving, Walsh alleges, she was raped by Gérald Marie. She is one of 16 women who have spoken to the investigative reporter Lucy Osborne, who has spent the past year looking into whether Marie was a sexual predator. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/11/2028m 42s

How the Covid-19 pandemic has increased Amazon's dominance

As high street rivals were forced to close this year, Amazon has gone from strength to strength. But reports of conditions in some of its huge warehouses have brought a new level of scrutiny, as John Harris explains. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/11/2024m 35s

A vaccine revolution

Results from clinical trials have shown that the world has three apparently highly effective vaccines for Covid-19. With the race now on for regulatory approval, production and distribution, is the end of the pandemic within reach?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/11/2027m 41s

Racism within the Windrush compensation scheme

The Guardian’s Amelia Gentleman wrote her first story on the Windrush scandal almost three years ago – yet she is still hearing from people facing injustice. Alexandra Ankrah, the most senior black Home Office employee in the team responsible for the Windrush compensation scheme, discusses why she resigned this year, describing the scheme as systemically racist and unfit for purpose while Samantha Cooper describes her frustrations with trying to access financial help. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/11/2028m 46s

Gary Younge on minority voters and the future of the Republican party

A look at the history of US voting rights and what the changing demographics of the country mean for Republicans. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/11/2031m 42s

How Samuel Paty's murder reignited France's free speech debate

The murder of a schoolteacher who had shown his class cartoons of the prophet Muhammad during a lesson on free speech has rekindled a debate in France over secularism and the state’s role in regulating free expression. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/11/2034m 43s

How will Joe Biden reset US relations with the world?

Joe Biden will enter the White House in 2021 facing numerous domestic crises. But as Patrick Wintour explains, he cannot ignore the rest of the world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/11/2026m 1s

What does the turmoil in Downing Street mean for Britain?

Boris Johnson has gotten rid of his chief adviser, Dominic Cummings, and his director of communications, Lee Cain. Katy Balls explains what it means for Brexit and the government’s handling of the Covid crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/11/2029m 46s

What will it take for Donald Trump to concede defeat?

Donald Trump is continuing to dispute the result of the US election and, far from offering his concession, is instead claiming victory. Lawrence Douglas describes what Trump’s behaviour means for the country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/11/2029m 40s

Why a plan to cut pollution is making people across England so angry

A slew of initiatives from local councils have meant drivers being moved off residential streets and on to busier main roads. But while many residents support the schemes, the measures have provoked protests. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/11/2020m 14s

Adrian Chiles on being diagnosed with ADD as an adult

A year ago, the broadcaster Adrian Chiles opened a book on attention deficit disorder (ADD). Suddenly the good, the bad and the mad bits of his life started to make sense. He describes the impact the diagnosis has had on his life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/11/2027m 36s

The Karens: can friendship trump politics?

Karen Ward and Karen Cotter live in the town of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. There is one thing on which they really don’t agree: politics, and in particular, Donald Trump. Yet despite everything that sets them apart, these two women have become close friends and believe there is a way to heal the political rift that has torn apart so many communities in the past four years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/11/2033m 32s

The life and death of White Helmets' founder James Le Mesurier

James Le Mesurier died a year ago today. The Guardian’s Martin Chulov describes the immense pressure the co-founder of the White Helmets was under, as he saw the organisation he built appear to be slipping away from him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/11/2032m 54s

Labour's battle to root out antisemitism

Following the publication of the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in the Labour party its leader Keir Starmer called it a ‘day of shame’. Jessica Elgot reports on how the party is moving forward. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/11/2028m 33s

US election 2020: can Joe Biden unite America?

After days of tense counting in key states, Joe Biden was confirmed as the winner of the US election, beating the incumbent Donald Trump. But as David Smith explains, his job of uniting the country begins now – and it won’t be easy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/11/2024m 55s

US election 2020: will Donald Trump accept the result?

Joe Biden was still leading Donald Trump in the tense race to the critical 270 electoral votes as counting continued in key states. Jonathan Freedland describes an election that has provided one clear message: the US remains divided. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/11/2029m 51s

Light at the end of the lockdown tunnel

It’s day one of the lockdown in England, and it’s been a turbulent week in US politics. Thankfully Robin McKie, the Observer’s science editor, has some good news on the race to find a vaccine. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/11/2025m 23s

US election 2020: how the night unfolded

It’s been a night of increasingly tense election results. Pollsters had projected a big win for the Democratic candidate, Joe Biden, but with the major swing states too close to call at the time of recording, his route to the White House appeared to be narrowing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/11/2025m 55s

US election 2020: what kind of president would Joe Biden be?

If Joe Biden is elected president this week, it will be the culmination of a career in politics that has seen successes as well as controversies. Journalist and biographer Evan Osnos examines what his past can tell us about the kind of president he could become. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/11/2041m 50s

US election 2020: who are the voters sticking with Trump?

Donald Trump faces a major challenge to repeat the swing states victory he achieved in 2016. The Guardian’s Chris McGreal takes a US election road trip and meets voters who explain why they are standing by the White House incumbent. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/11/2030m 19s

US election 2020: Donald Trump and the rise of white supremacist extremism

White supremacist extremism is the most lethal terrorism threat to the United States. It’s a hateful ideology that the Guardian’s Lois Beckett says has infected many parts of American society. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/10/2038m 59s

Marcus Rashford, free school meals and Boris Johnson's political own goal

Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff looks at why the government has refused to extend the free school meals scheme and how the decision has backfired while Guardian journalist Aamna Mohdin reports from a food bank in Hillingdon. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/10/2027m 0s

The fight to 'EndSars' in Nigeria

The Guardian’s West Africa correspondent Emmanuel Akinwotu reports from the protests against the special anti-robbery squad (Sars), which have swept Nigeria and gained international support. For years, the police unit has been plagued with allegations of extrajudicial killings and abuse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/10/2022m 19s

US election 2020: are Democrats taking black voters for granted in Wisconsin?

The Guardian US reporter Kenya Evelyn grew up in Milwaukee, in the swing state of Wisconsin. She recently returned to see how this year’s pandemic, recession and Black Lives Matter protests are shifting the city’s politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/10/2022m 25s

10 years of Instagram: how it has transformed our lives

This October marks 10 years since the launch of Instagram. Tech journalist Sarah Frier looks at how it went from a tiny startup to a multibillion-dollar business, and the impact the social media company has had on our lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/10/2031m 50s

US election 2020: Can the Democrats win back trust in Ohio?

The race in Ohio has long been a reliable guide to the US election: the state’s winner usually goes on to win the presidency. In 2016, it broke decisively for Trump, but this year there are signs that its voters are turning away from the president. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/10/2029m 35s

US election 2020: can we trust the polls?

The Guardian US data editor, Mona Chalabi, casts a sceptical eye over the US polling industry that is once again predicting defeat for Donald Trump. Has it learned lessons from 2016?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/10/2029m 42s

Inside Australia’s asylum system: a possible model for the UK

Guardian Australia reporter Ben Doherty looks at the history behind Australia’s asylum seeker policies, including the controversial practice of offshore processing and resettlement. It’s one of the options the British government is allegedly considering to deter asylum seekers from attempting to cross the Channel to the UK. Journalist Behrouz Boochani, who spent seven years in detention in Papua New Guinea, discusses the impact the policy has had. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/10/2031m 49s

US elections 2020: Joe Biden and Donald Trump's possible paths to power

Lauren Gambino, political correspondent for Guardian US, discusses which states Biden will need to win to take the White House, and what Trump will need to do to retain the presidency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/10/2029m 35s

Leaded petrol, acid rain, CFCs: why the green movement can overcome the climate crisis

Guardian environment correspondent Fiona Harvey discusses why the last 50 years of environmental action have shown how civil society can force governments and business to change and why that should give campaigners optimism for the future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/10/2027m 55s

Covid in the UK: a new north-south divide?

Strict new measures have been imposed on cities in the north of England this week in an attempt to control the increasing spread of Covid-19 infections. But the way the new restrictions have been rolled out has angered local leaders and residents alike, says Josh Halliday. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/10/2026m 30s

The story of the Mangrove Nine

Guardian arts and culture correspondent Lanre Bakare discusses the Mangrove Nine, a group of black activists who found themselves on trial at the Old Bailey in 1971 after protesting against police harassment. Their story became a landmark moment in British history, though many have never heard of it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/10/2026m 12s

US election 2020: what if Trump refuses to concede?

Trump has repeatedly stated that he may refuse to accept defeat in the coming election. As Lawrence Douglas explains, things could get very messy if the result is close. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/10/2032m 46s

US election 2020: why are so many Americans being denied a vote?

Millions of American voters will be unable to cast their ballot in this year’s presidential election and those affected will be disproportionately first-time voters and from minority groups, reports Sam Levine. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/10/2029m 32s

US election 2020: who is supreme court nominee Amy Coney Barrett?

Today is the start of the confirmation process for Amy Coney Barrett, a deeply conservative judge who is Donald Trump’s pick for supreme court judge. Guardian US investigative journalist Stephanie Kirchgaessner has been looking at her career and personal life, including membership to the secretive Catholic group People of Praise, and discusses what her appointment would mean for the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/10/2030m 49s

Understanding the fight over trans rights – part 2

Last month the equalities minister, Liz Truss, announced that some reforms to the Gender Recognition Act would go ahead but one key aspect – allowing trans people to self-identify without a medical diagnosis - would not be adopted. The issue has divided ‘gender critical’ feminists from those who are more trans-inclusive. Is there a route to reconciliation? Listen to part 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/10/2048m 54s

Understanding the fight over trans rights — part 1

Stephen Whittle has been at the heart of trans activism for half a century. He discusses the legal and political progress that has been made over the past few decades while the Guardian’s Scotland correspondent Libby Brooks examines why there was a backlash over the 2015 Gender Recognition Act, which proposed a further expansion of trans rights Listen to part 2. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/10/2038m 57s

Does Sweden have the answer to living with Covid-19? – podcast

The Swedish example is regularly raised by libertarian-minded Conservatives when protesting against government restrictions aimed at quelling the spread of the virus in the UK. But what did the Scandinavian country do differently and could it be applied elsewhere?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/10/2030m 4s

US election 2020: how Covid-19 reached the White House

Donald Trump spent the weekend in hospital after developing symptoms following a positive test for coronavirus. But with confusing medical briefings and a controversial drive-by stunt, Americans are still trying to get answers as to how Trump became infected as the election approaches. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/10/2032m 34s

The ugly side of the modelling industry

When the model Emily Ratajkowski recently wrote an essay detailing the ways she has felt exploited by the modelling industry, readers were shocked. But on social media, many models responded with similar allegations. Former model Leanne Maskell and current model Magdalena Kossewska discuss their experiences, while John Horner, managing director of Models 1 looks at whether the industry needs better regulation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/10/2025m 52s

US election 2020: an ugly fight in the critical swing state of Florida

Oliver Laughland, the Guardian’s US southern bureau chief, discusses his recent road trip around Florida, a key state that Trump only narrowly won in 2016. He found two sides bitterly opposed. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/10/2027m 19s

Has Covid-19 turned the clock back on women's equality? – podcast

Women seem to be bearing the brunt of the economic fallout and taking on a greater share of domestic work and childcare. Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff looks at whether the virus has meant a huge step back for women’s rights. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/10/2029m 10s

An inevitable crisis: how Covid-19 hit universities

The academic year has started at universities across the UK but far from the promised freshers’ experience, new students are finding themselves forced to isolate and attend classes online. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/09/2030m 22s

Why has activist Nathan Law been forced to flee Hong Kong?

Nathan Law is one of Hong Kong’s most prominent democracy activists, but his years of campaigning have made him a target for the Chinese government. He discusses the toll it has taken and why he has now had to flee to London. Guardian correspondent Emma Graham-Harrison looks at what the future holds for Hong Kong. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/09/2031m 1s

Did the NHS 111 Covid helpline fail hundreds of families?

Hundreds of people believe the 111 helpline failed their relatives. Now the Guardian’s David Conn reports that they are demanding a full inquiry into the service. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/09/2027m 57s

Should men-only private members' clubs still exist?

The Garrick Club was founded in 1831 – a place where ‘actors and men of refinement and education might meet on equal terms’. Women were not allowed to be members and, almost 200 years on, that is still the case. Emily Bendell on why she is taking legal action against the Garrick and Amy Milne-Smith on the history of London’s clubland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/09/2025m 35s

Is the UK ready for a Covid second wave?

From hospitals to care homes to community testing, the first wave of Covid-19 infections was met with unprecedented national efforts but also with panic, errors and delays. As infections begin to rise again, is the country better prepared? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/09/2032m 13s

How the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg could change America

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a pioneer of women’s rights and a liberal icon of the US supreme court. Her death last week will change the political balance of the court and has rocked the US election campaign with just weeks to go. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/09/2039m 54s

The fight over dyslexia

The question of who gets diagnosed with dyslexia and who then receives support was one of many that Guardian journalist Sirin Kale found herself examining when she began a year-long investigation into the condition. But what surprised her most was how fiery the conversation around this condition had become, with some asking whether the term dyslexia should even exist. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/09/2034m 4s

The growing influence of the QAnon conspiracy theory – podcast

The Guardian US tech reporter Julia Carrie Wong discusses the rise of QAnon, a wide-ranging and baseless internet conspiracy theory that has been festering on the fringes of rightwing internet communities for years. In recent months its visibility has exploded amid the social unrest and uncertainty of the coronavirus pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/09/2032m 53s

Former model Amy Dorris accuses Donald Trump of sexual assault

In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, the former model Amy Dorris talked to Lucy Osborne about allegations that Donald Trump sexually assaulted her at the US Open tennis tournament more than two decades ago, in an alleged incident that left her feeling ‘sick’ and ‘violated’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/09/2037m 50s

Brexit, Covid and u-turns: why Tory backbenchers are getting restless

The PM has been attempting to quell disquiet on several fronts, says the Guardian’s Jessica Elgot, with backbench Conservative MPs rebelling over the government’s latest Brexit plans, Covid-19 restrictions and a series of damaging U-turns. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/09/2027m 47s

The poisoning of Alexei Navalny

Luke Harding says alleged attack on Russian opposition figure has all the hallmarks of a state-sponsored hit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/09/2029m 21s

Why blaming young people for the Covid-19 spike could backfire

Before introducing new rules banning private gatherings of more than six people, the health secretary pointed the finger at young people for increasing rates of coronavirus. But could a blame game be counterproductive?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/09/2021m 37s

How an Austrian ski resort became the centre of Europe’s Covid-19 outbreak

When Nigel Mallender headed to Ischgl in March, he was looking forward to a fun-packed break with friends. Just four days later, he and thousands of other tourists were desperately trying to leave after authorities became aware of coronavirus cases. Mallender and the Guardian’s Philip Oltermann discuss the fallout from that week. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/09/2022m 27s

Alastair Campbell and family on living with his depression

Former Labour communications chief Alastair Campbell has always struggled with depression. He, his partner, Fiona Millar, and their daughter, Grace Campbell, discuss the impact it has had on their lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/09/2034m 11s

The women fighting sexual abuse in the factories where your jeans are made

An investigation into working conditions in garment factories in Lesotho revealed widespread sexual abuse of women. Annie Kelly travelled to southern Africa to investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/09/2027m 37s

Is democracy in America under threat?

As the US election draws closer, the Guardian’s Ed Pilkington hears from civil leaders on their fears for the integrity of the process and the future of their democracy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/09/2033m 46s

Rule, Britannia! and the manufacturing of culture wars

Was Rule, Britannia! going to be dropped from the Last Night of the Proms in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement? Apparently not, and yet Boris Johnson was moved to comment on the story. Guardian columnist Nesrine Malik looks at how culture wars have entered mainstream politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/09/2029m 3s

The life and death of Belly Mujinga

Guardian writer Sirin Kale spoke to friends and family of Belly Mujinga about her life and death. Belly, a transport worker and mother to an 11-year-old girl, developed Covid-19 after being allegedly spat on during her shift at London’s Victoria station. Her death made headlines and raised pressing questions about racial injustice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/09/2031m 57s

Will Trump’s law and order gamble pay off?

The Guardian’s US Washington DC bureau chief, David Smith, discusses Donald Trump’s law and order gamble on the election, and how it is impacting on Democratic candidate Joe Biden’s campaign. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/09/2026m 11s

Coronavirus: is it safe for children to go back to school?

As millions of children in England and Wales return to class, the Observer’s science editor, Robin McKie, weighs up the potential health impact Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/09/2021m 8s

What has four years of Donald Trump meant for the climate crisis?

Guardian US environment reporter Emily Holden looks at the Trump administration’s impact on the environment, and the consequences for the climate crisis if he wins another term. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/09/2028m 23s

Who are Europe's Dreamers?

Across Europe, millions of young people live in undocumented limbo, in fear of deportation from the countries they grew up in because of hostile migration policies. Now, inspired by their US counterparts, they are fighting for recognition and residency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/09/2026m 20s

Leonardo da Vinci and the mystery of the world's most expensive painting

Salvator Mundi was sold for a record $450m at auction in 2017 to an anonymous bidder. But the painting’s provenance as the work of Leonardo has been called into question. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/08/2024m 55s

Revisited: the Windrush scandal isn't over

Hubert Howard, a prominent Windrush victim, died recently without receiving compensation or a personal apology. Amelia Gentleman discusses his case. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/08/2023m 45s

Revisited: Understanding white privilege, with Reni Eddo-Lodge

Reni Eddo-Lodge became the first black British author to top the UK bestseller list with her 2017 book Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race. In an exclusive interview with the Observer’s Nosheen Iqbal, she talks about global discussions on racism after the death of George Floyd. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/08/2023m 42s

Revisited: How the Bristol bus boycott changed UK civil rights

Marvin Rees, the mayor of Bristol, discusses the 1963 Bristol bus boycott – a protest that proved to be a watershed moment in the UK’s civil rights movement. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/08/2022m 11s

Revisited: Britain's reckoning with its racist past

UK Black Lives Matter protests have taken place across the country. They have not just been about solidarity with the US or racism in the UK today, but also about the need to address Britain’s past and the impact of that legacy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/08/2031m 28s

Revisited: The death of George Floyd – will anything change? – podcast

Protests ignited across the world after footage showed George Floyd dying under the knee of white Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Paul Butler discusses the history of police killings of black Americans and whether Floyd’s death could prove a turning point. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/08/2038m 22s

Who are the people risking everything to cross the Channel?

The number of migrants arriving in small boats this year is already double that of 2019. But those who manage to reach the UK find themselves confronted by a government that is increasingly hostile to new arrivals. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/08/2029m 4s

The trouble with England's test and trace system

Josh Halliday on failures in England’s coronavirus contact-tracing system as the government replaces the main public health body in the middle of the pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/08/2027m 54s

The A-levels fiasco

When schools in England closed in March in response to the coronavirus pandemic, it meant students could no longer take their final exams. Instead, computer modelling was used to assign grades. But when results were unveiled, there was shock and anger at what looked like clear injustices. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/08/2031m 5s

Can Kamala Harris help Joe Biden win the US presidency?

Kamala Harris is the first Indian American and the first black woman to run for US vice-president on a major party ticket. Lauren Gambino discusses why as Joe Biden’s running mate, Harris is in prime position to go one step further. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/08/2030m 5s

The return of Extinction Rebellion

When Extinction Rebellion began holding protests two years ago, the movement could not have predicted its rapid growth or the public support it received. But missteps and the Covid-19 shutdown meant the group lost momentum. Now, it is planning a series of new actions in the autumn. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/08/2026m 29s

Could a Belarus protest movement bring down Alexander Lukashenko?

Since Sunday, thousands of protesters have taken to the streets in Belarus to contest the claimed election victory of the president, Alexander Lukashenko, and met a violent police response. Hanna Liubakova, a Belarusian journalist, describes being on the ground, while the Guardian’s Andrew Roth looks at how Lukashenko has remained in power for 26 years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/08/2027m 26s

How Britain’s deepest recession is becoming a jobs crisis

Economics writer Aditya Chakrabortty describes how the coronavirus crisis has sent Britain plunging into a record recession and what it means for the millions of people fearing for their jobs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/08/2027m 6s

How one hotel outbreak of Covid-19 put an Australian state back in lockdown

Melbourne bureau chief, Melissa Davey, discusses life under a second lockdown after a hotel security breach in Victoria caused a resurgence of coronavirus cases. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/08/2022m 12s

After the Beirut explosion: anger, grief and the fall of the government

It is a week since the devastating explosion rocked Beirut, killing more than 200 people. As shock turns to anger and the cabinet resigns, Bethan McKernan and Martin Chulov report on what comes next for the Lebanese people. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/08/2027m 53s

The Covid long haul: why are some patients not getting better?

When the Guardian’s Luke Harding began suffering symptoms of Covid-19 he assumed he would be laid low for a couple of weeks. Five months later he is still unwell, and he has found hundreds of people like him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/08/2022m 3s

Hadley Freeman on the future of the royals

Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman discusses the fallout from the publication of Finding Freedom, a biography of Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, and the latest allegations surrounding Prince Andrew. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/08/2024m 18s

How did President Trump get his pandemic response so wrong?

While Donald Trump continues to claim the US is ‘doing very well’ in its fight against Covid-19, the figures suggest a different story. The US has the highest death toll in the world, with over 150,000 deaths. Guardian US chief reporter Ed Pilkington examines how Trump got it wrong. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/08/2031m 28s

How the world is coping with coronavirus, six months on

From Portugal to Pakistan, the Guardian’s international correspondent Michael Safi looks at the different ways countries have been affected by the virus and the impact that is having on the lives of people there. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/08/2026m 40s

How cancer care was sidelined in the fight against Covid-19 – podcast

With NHS services consumed by the fight against Covid-19 in recent months, cancer care has been dealt a blow, with diagnoses and treatment delayed. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/08/2026m 5s

Inside Lebanon's economic crisis

Scenes of economic despair are visible across Lebanon – from shops to homes, businesses to hospitals. Guardian journalist Martin Chulov discusses why the country is verging on financial collapse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/08/2025m 53s

Young, British and black: a generation rises

The death of George Floyd in the US provoked massive anti-racism protests in the UK. Guardian reporter Aamna Mohdin discusses what she learned when she interviewed 50 young Britons at the heart of those rallies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/07/2021m 38s

How did Britain get so overweight?

As the government launches a newly interventionist strategy to tackle obesity, the Guardian’s Felicity Lawrence looks at whether it goes far enough to take on the might of the food industry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/07/2028m 57s

Is Donald Trump playing politics with the Portland protests?

The anti-racism protests in Portland appeared to be dwindling in size until Donald Trump sent in federal officers to confront them, reports the Guardian’s Chris McGreal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/07/2027m 16s

Will we ever achieve immunity from Covid-19?

Recent studies suggest that even where immunity is developed to Covid-19, it may be fleeting. Science editor Ian Sample looks at what this means for vaccines, treatments and living long term with the coronavirus. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/07/2027m 11s

Are we creating a generation of problem gamblers?

Children as young as 11 are becoming problem gamblers as apps and websites make betting easier than ever. Journalist Jenny Kleeman investigates how it has been allowed to happen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/07/2025m 31s

Covid-19 and the EU: 'When Italy cried for help there was silence'

When coronavirus swept through the European Union, member states called on Brussels to help. But as Daniel Boffey in partnership with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism discovered, the distress calls too often went unanswered. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/07/2027m 11s

The shocking truth of racism in British schools

When a teenage activist sent a callout on social media for examples of racism within schools, he was deluged with responses. Aditya Chakrabortty began to investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/07/2030m 38s

Sketching a crisis: John Crace on the politics of coronavirus

Sketch writer John Crace reflects on a surreal parliamentary session, including the daily indignities of the coronavirus press conferences, which some cabinet members mastered – and others clearly did not. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/07/2031m 20s

Is Kanye West seriously running for president?

The rapper has entered the race for the White House invoking his religious beliefs. Prof Josef Sorett looks at whether West’s presidential bid is anything more than a stunt. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/07/2026m 15s

Perseverance: the new mission to Mars

Planetary scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson describes how the latest mission to Mars builds on centuries of discoveries about the red planet, our nearest neighbour. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/07/2027m 34s

Poland divided and right-wing populists win again – podcast

A narrow win for the populist incumbent Andrzej Duda in Poland’s presidential election cleared the path for the right-wing Law and Justice party to pursue anti-LGBT policies and further assault the courts and free press. The Guardian’s Christian Davies reports from Warsaw. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/07/2028m 34s

Who is Ghislaine Maxwell and does she hold the key to justice for Epstein’s victims?

Ghislaine Maxwell, a British socialite and daughter of the media baron Robert Maxwell, once attended parties with princes, presidents and celebrities. Now she faces up to 35 years in a US prison for her alleged involvement in Jeffrey Epstein’s sex trafficking of underage girls. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/07/2030m 5s

In conversation with Benjamin Zephaniah and George the Poet

Benjamin Zephaniah and George the Poet are two of Britain’s most successful contemporary poets. They discuss why, despite being born a generation apart, their work is still exposing racial injustice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/07/2032m 39s

Is the UK's ‘golden era’ of relations with China now over?

China and the UK have clashed in recent months over a draconian new security law in Hong Kong and the Chinese tech company Huawei. The Guardian’s Tania Branigan examines whether a much-promoted ‘golden era’ between the two countries is at an end. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/07/2023m 40s

Facebook, white nationalists and becoming the target of a hate campaign

In November, Julia Carrie Wong reported on the continued presence of white nationalist organisations on Facebook – and a weeks-long campaign of racist and sexist harassment followed. She discusses the impact it had on her and why she believes Facebook has played a role in creating the conditions that enable that kind of harassment to happen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/07/2027m 8s

What would annexation of parts of the West Bank mean for Palestinians?

The Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, has proposed permanently seizing Palestinian territory by annexing swathes of the West Bank - a violation of international law. Journalist Mariam Barghouti and PIPD executive director Salem Barahmeh describe how this would formalise a system that millions of Palestinians are already enduring, while Jerusalem correspondent Oliver Holmes examines what is driving Netanyahu’s latest plans. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/07/2031m 43s

The Leicester garment factories exposed by Covid-19

A spike in cases of Covid-19 in Leicester has led Guardian reporter Archie Bland to its garment factories. He discusses a story that goes beyond the pandemic and into workers’ rights, appalling factory conditions and the ethics of fast fashion. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/07/2025m 6s

Are the police failing BAME communities?

Bas Javid joined the Avon and Somerset police in 1993. Last year he became a commander at the Met. He reflects on his experiences as a BAME officer and discusses the use of stop and search, which has been cited as a continued source of tension between the force and communities. Ben Bowling, a professor of criminology and criminal justice, examines the history of police race relations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/07/2033m 6s

Taking on Sir Humphrey: can the civil service be reformed?

Michael Gove has set out his plans for a revolution of Britain’s permanent bureaucracy, the civil service. But as former Downing Street chief of staff Jonathan Powell argues, it is easier said than done. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/07/2024m 30s

Maria Ressa and an attack on the free press in the Philippines

One of the most prominent journalists in the Philippines has been convicted of ‘cyberlibel’ in a court process condemned by human rights groups. Journalist Carmela Fonbuena in Manila describes the chilling effect the verdict has had on free expression. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/07/2024m 33s

How one neighbourhood in London lost 36 residents to Covid-19

Guardian reporter Aamna Modhin meets residents from Church End, a small, deprived neighbourhood in Brent, north London. She examines how housing pressures, in-work poverty and racial inequalities contributed to the deaths of 36 residents from Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/07/2023m 3s

The scandal of millions of Americans being deprived of running water – podcast

Guardian US environmental justice reporter Nina Lakhani reports on her landmark investigation into America’s water crisis, revealing that millions of Americans are facing unaffordable bills for running water and risk being disconnected or losing their homes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/07/2028m 40s

Why hasn't Boris Johnson released the Russia report?

Parliament’s intelligence and security committee produced a report into alleged Russian interference in UK politics. It was supposed to be published before December’s election, but the UK prime minister withheld its release. Now, six months later it still hasn’t seen the light of day. The Guardian’s Luke Harding investigates what could be in it and says witness testimony from an ex-MI6 officer makes uncomfortable reading for the government. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/2028m 37s

Lockdown easing: why the UK is better prepared for a second wave

This Saturday, lockdown measures in England will ease further, with people able to get a pint in a pub, have a haircut and see another household indoors. The Guardian’s heath editor, Sarah Boseley, looks at whether another lifting of restrictions might result in a second wave, and if it does, why we are better prepared this time round. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/06/2022m 38s

Understanding white privilege with Reni Eddo-Lodge

Reni Eddo-Lodge has become the first black British author to top the UK bestseller list with her 2017 book Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race. In an exclusive interview with the Observer’s Nosheen Iqbal she talks about global discussions on racism following the death of George Floyd. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/06/2023m 47s

After a decade of austerity: what now?

Columnist John Harris has spent the past decade touring the country and reporting on what devastating budget cuts have meant to communities. Looking back, he sees some signs of hope amid the devastation. But will the government change its approach for the impending Covid-19 economic crash?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/06/2027m 14s

How damaging is John Bolton's scathing account of Donald Trump's presidency?

The publication of John Bolton’s White House memoir has caused a sensation. Jonathan Freedland assesses the lurid claims of cosying up to authoritarian leaders as well as descriptions of ‘stunning’ ignorance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/06/2026m 53s

How did Jordan end up with the highest smoking rate in the world?

When international correspondent Michael Safi began looking into why Jordan had become the country with the highest smoking rates in the world, he began to uncover what public health advocates have described as widespread interference in policymaking by multinational tobacco companies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/2030m 35s

Rethinking the police: what can the US learn from Newark?

The New Jersey city had one of the worst reputations for police violence in the US, but as the Guardian’s Ankita Rao discovers, it is leading the charge for reform under a new mayor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/06/2024m 7s

Is spyware technology helping governments hack phones?

WhatsApp has accused an Israeli spyware company of hacking 1,400 of its users, including journalists, human rights activists and diplomatic officials. As new allegations emerge, Guardian US investigations correspondent Stephanie Kirchgaessner discusses how she first discovered the story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/06/2030m 38s

Why is Trump's comeback rally in Tulsa: the site of a massacre?

The president’s decision to hold his first rally since the coronavirus lockdown in Tulsa, Oklahoma, has ignited fresh controversy. The city was home to one of America’s worst ever acts of racial violence in 1921, a moment marked in recent Black Lives Matter protests, and Oklahoma is now seeing a new wave of coronavirus infections. So why has Trump chosen Tulsa?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/06/2030m 58s

Stranded at sea: the crew members trapped on cruise ships

Guardian US reporter Erin McCormick describes why thousands of crew are still stranded on cruise ships after coronavirus bought the industry to a standstill in March. Will Lees describes how it took him 82 days to get back to Canada while Perry, who hasn’t had a salary since March, is still stuck and doesn’t know when he will get home to his family in Mauritius. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/06/2023m 18s

How is Keir Starmer changing the Labour party?

When Keir Starmer was elected as Labour’s new leader in March he was pitched straight into the coronavirus crisis and denied even the chance to hold a victory party. But with public disquiet setting in over the government’s response, Starmer’s own ratings are surging. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/2027m 9s

Facebook v Twitter: how to handle Donald Trump

As protests erupted throughout the US, Donald Trump posted incendiary comments to social media. While Twitter hid the president’s post, Facebook took no action. The Guardian’s Alex Hern looks at what happened next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/06/2023m 2s

A journey to Greece for solo IVF during the pandemic – podcast

Laura Barton has always known that she wanted to have children. After years of miscarriages, and a breakup from her partner last year, she decided to embark on solo IVF. In early March, as the world shut down, she found herself flying to Crete to undergo treatment. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/06/2023m 20s

How the disappearance of Madeleine McCann became a national obsession

The disappearance of a three -year-old British girl at a Portuguese holiday resort in 2007 quickly became a global news story as the hunt for her grew ever more extensive. Thirteen years later, with the mystery still unsolved, German police revealed they had a new prime suspect. Is there now a conclusion in sight?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/06/2033m 50s

Britain's reckoning with its racist past

UK Black Lives Matter protests have been taking place across the country. They have not just been about solidarity with the US or racism in Britain today, but also about the need to address Britain’s past and the impact of that legacy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/06/2031m 10s

The Rees-Mogg conga: how has the pandemic changed parliament?

MPs have been on a crash course in video conferencing in recent months as the pandemic meant access to parliament was severely restricted and remote voting was permitted for the first time. But with Jacob Rees-Mogg leading attempts to revert to in-person voting has the chance to permanently modernise been squandered?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/2025m 56s

Is British theatre about to go out of business?

Every year, 34 million people go to the theatre, double the number that attend Premier League football. But lockdown and physical distancing rules mean the industry is on the edge of collapse. The artistic director of the Pitlochry theatre, Elizabeth Newman, describes the impact. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/06/2024m 7s

The sounds of melting icebergs and whale songs: a journey into Antarctica

The effects of global heating are in evidence everywhere across the islands of Antarctica – from penguin colonies to melting glaciers. The Guardian’s global environment editor Jonathan Watts witnessed how conditions are changing quickly. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/06/2027m 45s

Looking back on the protests that have shaken America

Guardian US reporter Kenya Evelyn looks back at the 11 days of protest that started in Minneapolis over the killing of George Floyd, but quickly spread across the rest of America and then the world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/06/2026m 50s

From Anfield to Cheltenham: did major events cost lives?

A series of high-profile sporting events went ahead as scheduled in mid-March even as Covid-19 was being declared a pandemic. The Guardian’s David Conn investigates the scientific reasoning behind the decision, while Liverpool fan Simon Renoldi reflects on the loss of his father. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/06/2030m 43s

The death of George Floyd: will anything change?

Protests have exploded across the US after a video showed Derek Chauvin, a white Minneapolis police officer, kneeling on the neck of George Floyd, an African American man, despite his pleas that he could not breathe. Floyd lost consciousness and died. Paul Butler discusses the history of police killings of black Americans and whether Floyd’s death could be a turning point. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/06/2038m 7s

England is easing out of lockdown – is it safe?

Health officials and even government scientists have warned against the easing of the coronavirus lockdown in England, saying it could lead to a surge in infections. David Hunter, professor of epidemiology and medicine at the University of Oxford, looks at the risks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/06/2022m 28s

The coronavirus crisis in Britain's prisons

As Britain faced an unprecedented lockdown, the situation for the 80,000 people in prison was even more stringent. David Adams was recently released from jail and describes how prisoners were confined to their tiny cells for more than 23 hours a day. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/06/2025m 6s

Hong Kong: the end of one country, two systems?

Protesters have take to the streets again, this time over a national security law that is set to be imposed by Beijing. Verna Yu and Lily Kuo look at how the standoff compares with those of Hong Kong’s recent history. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/05/2024m 59s

The scandal of Covid-19 in care homes

Why did so many people die in care homes? That may be the most urgent question of the likely public inquiry into the UK’s Covid-19 response. Rob Booth, the Guardian’s social affairs correspondent, on the government failures that led to thousands of care home deaths. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/05/2027m 29s

Brexit: Is the UK headed for a no deal?

For the past few months UK and EU negotiators have been locked in talks trying to thrash out a trade deal before 1 January. But after the chief negotiators, Michel Barnier and David Frost, exchanged testy letters last week, the talks risk reaching a stalemate. Is the UK headed for a no-deal Brexit?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/05/2024m 9s

Why Dominic Cummings won't resign

The prime minister’s senior adviser has provoked national outrage by admitting travelling hundreds of miles to stay with family at the height of coronavirus lockdown. The Guardian’s Matthew Weaver reveals how he helped break the story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/05/2033m 50s

The killing of Ahmaud Arbery

On 23 February Ahmaud Arbery, a young black man, was shot dead by two white men in Brunswick, Georgia. But it was only when a 36-second video of the killing was leaked on 5 May, generating nationwide outcry, that three men were charged with his murder. Why did it take so long?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/05/2032m 22s

Otters, badgers and orcas: can the pandemic help rewild Britain?

Sound recordist Chris Watson shares the birdsong from his English garden, while environmentalist George Monbiot looks at how the pandemic might be an opportunity for rewilding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/05/2027m 32s

Will millions of children really be returning to school in June?

Oli de Botton is a headteacher of a large state school in Newham, east London. Like many teachers across the country, he is tackling the daunting task of getting ready for the return of some of his students in early June. Sally Weale, the Guardian education correspondent, looks at the backlash against this drive to return some year groups to school. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/2026m 40s

The scientific race to understand Covid-19

In the five months since the world learned about Covid-19, it has killed hundreds of thousands of people. In that time, what have scientists found out – and what do they still not know? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/2025m 19s

How coronavirus led to rough sleepers being housed in hotels

Amelia Gentleman reports on life inside the hotels that are now housing some of the more than 5,400 homeless people across England and Wales. It is part of an unprecedented emergency operation to get all rough sleepers off the streets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/05/2022m 24s

Farce and tragedy: how an audacious coup attempt in Venezuela backfired

An attempt earlier this month to remove Nicolás Maduro from power ended in farcical failure as a seaborne invading force was captured easily following a series of mishaps. World affairs editor Julian Borger tells the bizarre story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/05/2029m 25s

Blind Date takeover: looking for love in lockdown part 2

In the concluding part of our Blind Date takeover, two more couples meet remotely for a socially distanced evening of drinks and dinner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/05/2022m 50s

Trump versus Biden: the 2020 pandemic election

The US election campaign is usually in full swing by this stage of the political cycle, but the coronavirus pandemic has put a halt to rallies and fundraising events. David Smith in Washington looks at how the race between Donald Trump and Joe Biden is playing out. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/05/2027m 13s

What does the biggest economic slump in 300 years mean for Britain?

As the chancellor announces plans to extend the unprecedented scheme to pay the wages of millions of workers, whole sectors of the economy remain shut because of Covid-19, causing a recession unseen in Britain for centuries. Larry Elliott explains what it will mean for the country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/05/2023m 59s

Track and trace: will the government's new app work?

Tracking and tracing the movements of people with symptoms of Covid-19 is key to the next phase of ending the lockdown. But as the government trials a contact-tracing app on the Isle of Wight, Alex Hern reports on concerns about privacy, effectiveness and trust. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/05/2024m 31s

Is coronavirus being used to turn India into a surveillance state?

South Asia correspondent Hannah Ellis-Petersen reports on the implications of people downloading an app designed to help control the spread of Covid-19 in a country where civil liberties were already being eroded. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/05/2026m 21s

Blind Date takeover: looking for love in lockdown part 1

Lockdown has changed the way we date. Is it possible to form the same kind of connection through a screen? To find out, we set up six strangers on three virtual blind dates .... Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/05/2027m 33s

Reopening Mississippi: America's poorest state begins lifting lockdown

Despite rising coronavirus case numbers, the US state of Mississippi is moving out of lockdown and reopening parks, restaurants and other non-essential shops. Oliver Laughland went to the resort of Biloxi to see how residents were responding Coronavirus – latest US updates C oronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/05/2030m 7s

Protecting domestic violence victims in lockdown

Kate, a call handler for a domestic violence charity, discusses the challenges of trying to deal with the rising number of calls during lockdown. Guardian reporter Helen Pidd has been reporting on the domestic violence cases being heard at Manchester magistrates court over the past few weeks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/05/2021m 4s

The NHS official privately selling protective kit

Guardian reporters Harry Davies and Simon Goodley tell Rachel Humphreys how they tracked down and confronted a senior NHS procurement official who had set up a company offering PPE for private sale Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/05/2017m 52s

The global race for face masks

The world economy may have dramatically dipped and the price of oil crashed, but one commodity is seeing an unprecedented boom: the face mask. Samanth Subramanian explores the newly distorted marketplace for masks and the lengths some will go to get them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/05/2027m 7s

Who is Covid-19 killing?

More than 26,000 people in the UK have officially been recorded as having died from the coronavirus. In this episode we look beyond the headline figure at who is dying – and hear from friends and family about the lives cut short. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/05/2045m 36s

Should the UK bail out Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic?

Guardian wealth correspondent Rupert Neate looks at why billionaire Sir Richard Branson is asking the UK government to give his Virgin Atlantic airline a £500m bailout to help it survive the economic fallout of the lockdown. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/04/2025m 55s

Where is the kit to protect NHS workers?

As medics and carers report widespread shortages of protective equipment, the government is facing pressure to explain why it appears the UK went into a pandemic under-resourced. Daniel Boffey and Rob Davies unpick the strategy and its failures. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/04/2024m 8s

The secretive scientific committee guiding Britain’s coronavirus response

Following the revelation that Boris Johnson’s chief adviser, Dominic Cummings, took part in the key scientific committee meetings tasked with providing independent advice, Anushka Asthana hears from the Observer’s Sonia Sodha and the former chief scientist Sir David King. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/04/2024m 20s

Covid-19's continued spread into South America

From his temporary home in Rio de Janeiro, the Guardian’s Latin America correspondent, Tom Phillips, can hear the nightly protests against Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, where cases are steadily rising. He discusses how Brazil and other South American countries are trying to deal with the pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/04/2022m 35s

What is the Covid-19 crisis doing to our mental health?

The biggest health crisis in a generation and the enforced isolation of lockdowns is taking not just a physical toll on people but also affecting mental health. The Guardian’s John Crace discusses his mental health challenges and public health specialist Dr Antonis Kousoulis tells Anushka Asthana what may help. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/04/2025m 27s

Surviving ICU: a story of recovery – podcast

Dave Lewins is a healthy, 60-year old helicopter pilot, who in March found himself in intensive care with Covid-19. He describes the experience and how it has changed his life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/04/2021m 13s

How the 5G conspiracy theories took hold

The Guardian’s media editor Jim Waterson looks at why conspiracy theories linking 5G technology to coronavirus have taken hold in the UK, with dozens of phone masts vandalised across the country over the past few weeks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/04/2019m 24s

Under attack: WHO and the coronavirus pandemic

The World Health Organization has been at the forefront of the global response to new diseases and with differing outcomes. It was hailed for the way it dealt with Sars but pilloried for its handling of Ebola. Now, with its biggest challenge yet, it is in the crosshairs again as Donald Trump threatens to withdraw funding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/04/2026m 41s

Culture under the extended coronavirus lockdown

Three Guardian critics – Ammar Kalia, Laura Snapes and Sian Cain – join Rachel Humphreys with a guide to the best of television, music and books under lockdown. And what the future holds for the arts when conditions are lifted. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/04/2025m 2s

The story of one care home hit by coronavirus

Julie Roche is a manager of a Buckinghamshire care home that usually has 45 residents. In the past few weeks she has lost 13 patients to Covid-19. She discusses the devastating impact this has had on families, staff and her remaining residents. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/04/2023m 7s

The story behind Trump's 'miracle' drug hydroxychloroquine

The drug has been used to treat a number of diseases in the past half-century but after a French study claimed it was effective against coronavirus it has been hailed by the US president as a cure. But there is scant evidence it is effective – and it could actually be harmful. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/04/2024m 39s

From Liberia to Spain: working in disaster zones

Luis Encinas is a nurse and Médecins Sans Frontières coordinator. He has treated patients in Taliban-ruled Afghanistan, in Sierra Leone as Ebola took hold, and now in Spain, battling Covid-19. He and the Guardian’s Madrid correspondent, Sam Jones, describe how the virus has transformed Spain. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/04/2021m 27s

Why have the UK and Germany taken different approaches to Covid-19 testing?

In February, the UK and Germany were taking a similar approach to testing for coronavirus. But over the subsequent weeks, the two countries began to go in very different directions. Guardian health editor Sarah Boseley and Berlin bureau chief Philip Oltermann look at what happened next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/04/2022m 2s

How Covid-19 brought Britain back together

After a divisive period dominated by Brexit, the pandemic has brought about a newly fostered spirit of community engagement and everyday heroism Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/04/2024m 43s

Coronavirus: 100 days that changed the world (part 2) – podcast

After spreading from China into parts of east Asia, the coronavirus hit Europe with a major cluster in northern Italy. But while much of the continent scrambled to shut down cities, Britain left it late to go into lockdown. Michael Safi and Patrick Wintour continue the story of the outbreak’s first 100 days Listen to part 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/04/2040m 1s

Coronavirus: 100 days that changed the world (part 1)

What began as a mystery virus at a Chinese market in December swiftly became a global crisis. The Guardian’s Michael Safi and Patrick Wintour recount the first 100 days as coronavirus took hold, upending the lives of billions of citizens. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/04/2042m 2s

Boris Johnson's personal coronavirus battle

The PM’s admission to an intensive care ward in London has shocked the nation and left a gap at the heart of power during the UK’s biggest crisis in a generation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/04/2028m 15s

Zaandam: onboard the coronavirus-hit cruise ship

The Guardian US reporter Erin McCormick charts the journey of the Zaandam cruise ship, which has docked in Florida after being stranded at sea with a Covid-19 outbreak. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/04/2025m 11s

The hunt for a coronavirus vaccine

Scientists in more than 40 labs around the world are working round the clock to develop a Covid-19 vaccine. Despite early success in sequencing the virus’s genome, however, Samanth Subramanian tells Rachel Humphreys we are still some months away from knowing if one can be put into mass production Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/04/2026m 24s

The devastating impact of Covid-19 in New York – podcast

The Guardian US health reporter Jessica Glenza reports from New York, where medical facilities and staff are being overwhelmed by the Covid-19 outbreak. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/04/2023m 29s

On the NHS frontline – podcast

Laura McClelland is a consultant anaesthetist in an intensive care unit at a busy south Wales hospital. She describes being on the frontline of the fight against Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/04/2024m 11s

From Houseparty to Zoom: our digital lives in lockdown

The lockdown across the world has led people to desperately seek out new tools for maintaining their work and social lives online. But UK technology editor Alex Hern argues he’s been living this way for years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/04/2024m 52s

Lessons from the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic

Science writer and journalist Laura Spinney discusses the outbreak of Spanish flu, one of the worst virus outbreak of modern times, which is believed to have killed up to 100 million people. She believes there are lessons to be learned from that pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/03/2021m 20s

Labour leadership interviews: Sir Keir Starmer

Sir Keir Starmer began his career as a barrister before rising to become the director of public prosecutions. But since his entry into parliament in 2015, he has risen quickly up the ranks to the shadow cabinet’s frontbench. This week he could become Labour’s next leader. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/03/2032m 38s

What can we learn from China’s handling of coronavirus?

After weeks of lockdown China is starting to lift restrictions in an attempt to return the country to normal. The Guardian’s Beijing bureau chief, Lily Kuo, discusses how China coped with coronavirus and what life is like there now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/03/2023m 12s

Coronavirus: the race to rescue the UK’s self employed

Today the chancellor, Rishi Sunak, is expected to announce that the taxpayer will pay self-employed workers up to 80% of their recent earnings to help contain the economic impact of coronavirus. Mark Cairns, an Uber driver, and Rob Booth, the Guardian’s social affairs editor, discuss the impact of Covid-19 on gig economy workers and the self-employed. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/03/2024m 23s

Coronavirus: why are your parents sending you so much fake news?

An avalanche of misinformation, fake news and hoaxes are being shared widely online as people seek reliable information on the coronavirus crisis. The Guardian’s media editor, Jim Waterson, examines where the falsehoods are coming from. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/03/2025m 31s

How far do the government's new emergency powers go?

A new government bill that brings sweeping new powers to shut down mass gatherings, potentially detain people with coronavirus symptoms and weaken the social care safety net is being rushed through parliament. The Guardian’s Peter Walker explains what is at stake. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/03/2020m 12s

The Labour leadership interviews: Rebecca Long-Bailey

Long-Bailey only became an MP in 2015, but now she is running to lead her party. Despite loyally serving in Labour’s shadow cabinet and playing a leading role in drawing up the party’s recent manifesto, she is determined not to be portrayed as the continuity Corbyn candidate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/03/2029m 8s

Social distancing: learning to cope with a new normal

Columnist Zoe Williams has spent the week researching tips for life under a new regime of social distancing and self-isolation. She tells Anushka Asthana it is important to give yourself a break amid the hardships Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/03/2024m 8s

How Donald Trump changed course on coronavirus

Donald Trump has moved from dismissing coronavirus as similar to the winter flu that would disappear in the spring to declaring a national emergency. But did his administration’s initial response waste valuable time? World affairs editor Julian Borger reports from Washington DC. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/03/2024m 53s

How coronavirus infected the global economy

The Guardian’s economics editor, Larry Elliott, says the global economy was already in poor shape when the coronavirus crisis struck. Now governments have stepped in with stimulus packages designed to bail out individuals and small businesses – but will that be enough to stave off a recession?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/03/2028m 26s

Is the government moving fast enough on coronavirus?

Britain has not joined its European neighbours by shutting schools, closing borders or rolling out mass testing. So why not? Health editor Sarah Boseley looks at the arguments the government is making for its approach. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/03/2020m 4s

A cure for insomnia?

Like a growing number of people, Simon Parkin suffered from insomnia for years. After dozens of failed techniques, he finally found one that worked. Also today: Sally Hayden on a locust swarm in east Africa. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/03/2023m 34s

Can the NHS cope with coronavirus?

NHS staff are bracing for a surge in hospital admissions as the number of people in the UK with coronavirus continues to rise. The Guardian’s health policy editor, Denis Campbell, looks at how well equipped the health service is for the crisis. Plus: Charlotte Graham-McLay on the Christchurch massacre, one year on. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/03/2027m 5s

The never-ending prison sentences – podcast

A spate of deaths of people serving indeterminate prison sentences has led to calls for such sentences to be revoked. The Guardian’s Jamie Grierson investigates. Plus: Larry Elliott on Rishi Sunak’s coronavirus budget. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/03/2028m 40s

How coronavirus closed down Italy

With Italy in lockdown, Peter Beaumont charts the spread of Covid-19 in the country while Lorenzo Tondo describes its impact. And: Christina Figueres on tackling the climate crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/03/2028m 15s

The Labour leadership interviews: Lisa Nandy

The Labour leadership candidate Lisa Nandy speaks to Anushka Asthana. Also today: Nils Pratley on a plunge in the financial markets as coronavirus spooks traders. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/03/2032m 53s

Hadley Freeman's 18-year search to uncover her family's secrets

When Hadley Freeman found an old shoebox full of pictures and documents in the back of a wardrobe, it began a quest to find the real story of her family’s history and her grandmother’s escape to America from the Nazis. Plus: Annette McGivney on the problem with almond milk. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/03/2029m 49s

Grounded: why Heathrow's third runway may never happen – podcast

Last week the Court of Appeal ruled the decision to allow the Heathrow expansion was unlawful because it did not take climate commitments into account. Is this the end of the third runway? And: how our quest for a good night’s sleep is leading to a landfill crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/03/2029m 21s

Macron, Merkel and the battle for the future of Europe

The French president, Emmanuel Macron, has staked out his vision for the future of Europe, but with Germany reluctant to sign up, will it fall flat? Plus: Jonathan Freedland on Joe Biden’s spectacular comeback in the Democratic primaries on Super Tuesday. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/03/2027m 8s

Is Britain prepared for a mass outbreak of the coronavirus? – podcast

As Britain faces rising cases of Covid-19, the prime minister has laid out a ‘battle plan’ for how his government will face the growing crisis. Also today: Sarah Todd on learning to read as an adult. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/03/2029m 30s

Super Tuesday and the arrival of the billionaire Mike Bloomberg

The Guardian US political correspondent Lauren Gambino looks at which Democratic candidates are likely to dominate on Super Tuesday today – the biggest moment in the US election calendar after polling day itself. And: Polly Toynbee on the shock resignation of the Home Office permanent secretary Sir Philip Rutnam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/03/2028m 57s

What's behind the rise of Germany's far right? – podcast

A terrorist attack in Hanau was the latest incident of far-right violence in Germany. It’s a growing problem, says the Guardian’s Philip Oltermann. Also today: Amy Hodge on her series of films on Europe after Brexit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/03/2033m 20s

Who should lead Labour?

Ballots went out to Labour members this week as the race to succeed Jeremy Corbyn as leader intensifies. The remaining candidates, Keir Starmer, Rebecca Long-Bailey and Lisa Nandy, all made their pitches to a live audience at this week’s Guardian hustings in Manchester. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/02/2031m 56s

How the Harvey Weinstein trial ended in a guilty verdict

On Monday the jury returned a guilty verdict on two of the five charges against the movie producer, who is now awaiting sentencing. The Guardian US reporter Lauren Aratani discusses covering the trial and what the verdict means for the #MeToo movement. And: the latest in the coronavirus outbreak. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/02/2027m 35s

India, Modi and the rise of Hindu nationalism

With Delhi rocked by deadly protests as Muslim and Hindu groups clash violently, Guardian writer Samanth Subramanian looks at the rise of Hindu nationalism within India. And: Daniel Boffey on the EU’s negotiating position with the UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/02/2029m 7s

Coronavirus: could this be China's Chernobyl moment?

The coronavirus crisis engulfing China is the biggest political test yet for Xi Jinping. The Guardian’s Lily Kuo looks at how it may become an economic crisis. Plus Michael Safi on a humanitarian breakthrough in the Yemen conflict. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/02/2030m 27s

Manchester City: following the money

Manchester City’s fortunes changed dramatically with the takeover by Sheikh Mansour of Abu Dhabi. But after years of success, Europe’s governing body has banned the club from its most prestigious tournament, the Champions League. David Conn explains why. Plus: Alok Jha on the ethics of gene editing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/02/2030m 2s

Syria: the fight for Idlib – podcast

A humanitarian crisis is unfolding in northern Syria after the government’s attempt to take back the opposition-held city of Idlib. Bethan McKernan describes how the fighting and freezing conditions have caused hundreds of thousands of displaced people to flee for their lives. Also today: Justin McCurry on the evacuation of the coronavirus-hit Diamond Princess cruise ship. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/2034m 5s

Flooded Britain: a new normal?

A series of storms have lashed Britain in the past two weeks resulting in widespread floods that have left residents and businesses devastated. But as the climate heats up and towns expand into floodplains, is this the new normal? Also today: Richard Partington on the government’s plans for Britain’s new immigration rules. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/02/2030m 12s

Inside Trump's Facebook campaign – podcast

Guardian US tech reporter Julia Carrie Wong spent a year analysing Trump’s Facebook campaign. She discusses how the sophisticated social media machine is targeting voters. And Leah Green reflects on the death of former Love Island presenter Caroline Flack. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/02/2029m 41s

Can the fashion industry ever be sustainable?

Environmental journalist Lucy Siegle has been writing about the fashion industry for 15 years. As London fashion week draws to a close, she discusses ways the industry could become more environmentally friendly. And: Laura Snapes on the Brit awards and its lack of female nominees. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/02/2027m 3s

Venezuela: a year on from the failed uprising

Tom Phillips, the Guardian’s Latin America correspondent, is back in Venezuela a year after the start of a dramatic, but so far unsuccessful, attempt to topple Nicolás Maduro. While conditions in Caracas appear slightly improved, outside the capital conditions in schools and hospitals are appalling – and getting worse. Also today: Jess Cartner-Morley on pockets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/02/2028m 35s

Who killed Swedish prime minister Olof Palme?

After a night at the cinema in 1986, Olof Palme was assassinated on Stockholm’s busiest street. The killer has never been found. Jan Stocklassa discusses whether novelist Stieg Larsson’s theory can provide any answers. And: the first same-sex couple to get married in Northern Ireland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/02/2029m 21s

What is it like to come out late in life?

Nicholas McInerny, a writer, came out as gay aged 45 and after nearly 20 years of marriage. It took a huge toll on his family and it all came flooding back last week when the TV presenter Phillip Schofield went public with his story. Also today: Alex Hern on the government’s plans to regulate the internet. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/02/2027m 40s

Back from the brink of death: reversing a heroin overdose

Anti-overdose drug naloxone has been in clinical use since the 1970s but not always where it’s needed most. The Guardian’s Jamie Grierson visited Redcar in North Yorkshire where a group of former drug users provide at-risk people with kits that could save their lives. Plus George Monbiot on Storm Ciara and the flooding that has once again devastated parts of England. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/02/2030m 20s

Life on Lesbos: what's happening to the refugees there?

Harriet Grant travelled to the Greek island of Lesbos to report on the crisis playing out in its refugee camps. Plus: Lisa O’Carroll on Sinn Féin’s election success. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/02/2027m 28s

Friends across the divide: does Labour have room for Blairism and Corbynism?

Peter Mandelson and Steve Howell represent the two opposite poles of the Labour party: one was a key architect of Blairism, the other of Corbynism. But they started out as inseparable friends at the same school in north London. Now their focus is on what comes next for the party. Plus: Matthew Taylor on the growing prevalence of climate anxiety. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/02/2041m 40s

Why are the Oscars still so white?

Following a strikingly white and male list of Bafta nominees, this year’s Academy Awards shortlists are barely more diverse. It’s a chronic problem in an industry running out of excuses for its slow pace of change. Lanre Bakare examines why the Oscars are still so white. Plus: Joan E Greve on a hectic week of US politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/02/2030m 27s

Will HS2 really benefit the north?

As the government prepares to give the green light to a new high-speed rail line between London, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds, Helen Pidd looks at the dire state of transport links in the north of England. Plus: Annabel Dixon argues that Britain should follow the lead of other European countries on assisted dying legislation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/02/2037m 17s

Will Ireland’s election see the end of Leo Varadkar? – podcast

Varadkar rose to the top of Irish politics without winning an election as leader of Fine Gael. Now he faces voters at a time when many appear to be in the mood for change. Rory Carroll joins the taoiseach on the campaign trail and looks at what the election means for Ireland. Plus: Gaby Hinsliff on the war between Downing Street and the political journalists who cover it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/02/2032m 25s

The rise of facial recognition technology

Facial recognition technology is getting more sophisticated each year and is now being used commercially as identification instead of passwords as well as being adopted by the Metropolitan police in London. Our UK technology editor, Alex Hern, explores the questions it raises about privacy. Also today: Jamie Grierson on the security response to Sunday’s terror attack in south London. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/02/2030m 14s

US election: The importance of Iowa

Chris McGreal visits the first US state to vote in this year’s race for the Democratic party’s presidential nomination. Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren are vying for crucial early momentum in the race to take on Trump. Plus: Iman Amrani on modern masculinity. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/02/2032m 25s

The Brexit gamble – podcast

Anushka Asthana looks back on an extraordinary period of chaos in politics since David Cameron called the EU referendum. Plus: on the day the UK leaves, Faiza Shaheen argues that remainers must now put their energy into ideas to take Britain forward. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/01/2033m 31s

The race to contain coronavirus

Health editor Sarah Boseley tells Rachel Humphreys that the coronavirus outbreak that began in the Chinese city of Wuhan is serious but not yet a global crisis. Plus Louisa Egbunike looks back at the legacy of the Biafran war in west Africa, 50 years on. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/01/2027m 11s

The end of the affair: how Britain walked away from the EU

John Palmer was the Guardian’s correspondent in Brussels in 1973 when the UK entered the European Economic Community. Now, 46 years later, Jennifer Rankin is in Brussels for the Guardian as British MEPs are packing up and leaving. They tell Anushka Asthana how membership has changed Britain. Plus: Dan Sabbagh on Huawei’s role in British infrastructure. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/01/2032m 56s

Armando Iannucci on politics and satire - podcast

The creator of The Thick of It and Veep discusses why modern politics has moved beyond satire. And: Bryan Graham on Kobe Bryant. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/01/2022m 40s

Life after Auschwitz

Ivor Perl and Susan Pollack were 12 and 13 when they were transported to Auschwitz. On the 75th anniversary of the concentration camp’s liberation, they tell their stories. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/01/2036m 52s
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