Today in Focus

Today in Focus

By The Guardian

Hosted by Michael Safi and Helen Pidd, Today in Focus brings you closer to Guardian journalism. Combining personal storytelling with insightful analysis, this podcast takes you behind the headlines for a deeper understanding of the news, every weekday. Today in Focus features journalists such as: Aditya Chakrabortty, Alex Hern, Alexis Petridis, Andrew Roth, Emma Graham-Harrison, George Monbiot, Jim Waterson, John Crace, John Harris, Jonathan Freedland, Kiran Stacey, Larry Elliott, Luke Harding, Marina Hyde, Nesrine Malik, Owen Jones, Peter Walker, Pippa Crerar, Polly Toynbee, Shaun Walker, Simon Hattenstone and Zoe Williams. The podcast is a topical, deep dive, explainer on a topic or story in the news, covering: current affairs, politics, investigations, leaks, scandals and interviews. It might cover topics such as: GB, Scotland, England and Ireland news, the environment, green issues, climate change, the climate emergency and global warming; American politics including: US presidential election 2024, Biden, Trump, the White House, the GOP, the Republicans and the Republican Party, the Democrats and the Democratic Party; UK politics including: UK election 24, Parliament, Labour, the Conservative Party, the Liberal Democrats, Reform UK, Rishi Sunak, Keir Starmer; culture; the royals and the royal family, including King Charles III and Prince Harry; HS2; the police and current affairs including: Ukraine, Russia, Bangladesh, Israel, Palestine, Gaza and AI.

Episodes

President Biden steps aside

President Joe Biden upended the 2024 US election race by withdrawing as his party’s canidate to face Donald Trump and instead threw his support behind his vice president Kamala Harris. Jonathan Freedland spoke to Nikki McCann Ramirez for a special episode of Politics Weekly America. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/07/2428m 29s

The ‘brat’ summer takeover

The Guardian music editor Ben Beaumont-Thomas, books editor Lucy Knight and film and TV critic Leila Latif look at what’s dominating culture this summer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/07/2430m 52s

Dodging the draft: one Ukrainian man’s story

As the war grinds on and the death toll mounts, fewer Ukrainians are volunteering to fight. And some are going to desperate lengths to avoid it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/07/2429m 18s

The king’s speech: how radical will Labour be?

The new Labour government gets its first chance to set a legislative agenda with the king’s speech at the state opening of parliament. Jessica Elgot examines how radical it will be. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/07/2420m 15s

Has the attempt to kill Trump handed him the election?

As Republicans meet at their national convention this week, has the shooting of the former president altered the course of US politics? David Smith reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/07/2427m 37s

Inside the biggest art fraud in US history

Orlando Whitfield, the author of All That Glitters, on his years of friendship with the art fraudster Inigo Philbrick. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/07/2435m 20s

The attempted assassination of Donald Trump – Politics Weekly America

On Saturday night in London, word came through that Donald Trump had been injured during one of his rallies in Pennsylvania. A shooter, who killed another person and seriously injured others, was killed by Secret Service agents. As the US comes to grips with what just happened, Jonathan Freedland presents as special edition of Politics Weekly America. He hears from former Bill Clinton advisor, Sidney Blumenthal on what this tragedy means for Donald Trump with less than five months until the election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/07/2422m 36s

Euro 2024: is it coming home?

How did Gareth Southgate get the England team to the Euro 2024 final? Barney Ronay reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/07/2425m 31s

The Conservative party: rows, resignations … and a tilt right?

After a brutal defeat, the starting gun has been fired on the Tory leadership battle – but which faction will triumph? Kiran Stacey and Peter Walker report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/07/2433m 23s

Joe Biden and the Democrats’ dilemma

Since Biden’s poor performance in first TV debate against Donald Trump, his place on the ballot has been under threat. Joan E Greve reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/07/2427m 33s

France’s leftwing alliance beat the far right, but what now?

A leftwing alliance snatched victory from the far right in the final round of the French parliamentary elections. But will France now fall into political deadlock? Angelique Chrisafis reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/07/2426m 17s

Keir Starmer’s first weekend in power

Keir Starmer vowed to put the country before his party as he appointed his cabinet and toured the four countries of the UK. Jonathan Freedland reports on what we have learned from the new prime minister’s first days in office. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/07/2427m 42s

Politics Weekly UK – Labour wins a landslide: Is this a new dawn?

Labour has won a landslide victory with Keir Starmer saying “change begins now”. Is this a new era for the country? The Guardian’s John Harris is joined by political editor Pippa Crerar and political correspondent Kiran Stacey. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/07/2435m 10s

Labour’s landslide victory

Labour have won a resounding victory making Keir Starmer prime minister with a thumping majority. Helen Pidd tells the story of the night with the help of Guardian reporters from around the country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/07/2430m 30s

Election Extra: a guide to the night

When to set your alarm for the potential Portillo-moments and how to make it through to dawn. With Archie Bland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/07/249m 14s

Will France fall to the far right?

Marine Le Pen’s party won a significant victory in the first round of the French parliamentary elections. Can they be stopped? Angelique Chrisafis reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/07/2437m 38s

Election Extra: is it over?

Conservatives appear to be close to conceding defeat the day before the election. And Archie Bland hands out his campaign awards. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/07/2410m 20s

Marina Hyde and John Crace on the 2024 election campaign

Guardian columnist Marina Hyde and parliamentary sketch writer John Crace reflect on the highs and lows of the general election campaign. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/07/2426m 32s

Election Extra: desperate times

As the campaign enters its final hours, party leaders are trying to reach as many constituencies as they can and throwing out last desperate attack lines. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/07/2410m 12s

The enigma of Keir Starmer

By the end of the week, Keir Starmer could be the UK’s next prime minister. Why do voters feel they don’t know him?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/07/2446m 31s

Election Extra: Is the race to replace Sunak already under way?

The general election may be three days away, but for some Tory candidates it is merely the staging post for the competition they are really focused on: their party leadership contest. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/249m 55s

The 14 years that broke Britain, part 2

In part two of our miniseries on how 14 years of Tory rule have impacted the UK, Jonathan Freedland explores how chaos from Brexit to Partygate destroyed trust in politics Listen to part 1: austerity. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/2445m 2s

Election Extra: Reform UK activist’s racist ‘pub talk’

Nigel Farage has vowed to banish those accused of extremist comments from campaigning for his Reform party after an undercover report from Clacton by Channel 4 News. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/06/2410m 53s

The 14 years that broke Britain, part 1

If the polls are correct, an era is about to come to an end. What have 14 years of Conservative government done to the country? Jonathan Freedland reports Listen to part 2 here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/06/2439m 36s

Election Extra: will undecided voters be decisive?

Apathy and antipathy towards all parties is a growing trend in UK elections. But with a week to go, undecided voters could prove critical to the result. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/06/2410m 12s

Returning to Leigh: can Labour rebuild the red wall?

The Greater Manchester town was a Labour stronghold before 2019. Will it be once again? Helen Pidd reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/06/2436m 47s

Election Extra: Pippa Crerar on breaking the betting scandal

When she broke the first story over a week ago, the Guardian’s political editor, Pippa Crerar, could hardly have known how deep the betting scandal would go. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/06/2411m 51s

A win for Julian Assange and a loss for press freedom?

After years in ferocious pursuit, the US has finally agreed to a plea deal with the WikiLeaks founder. But there are fears it may set a dangerous precedent. Julian Borger reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/06/2423m 37s

Election Extra: Where are voters getting their news?

The election has just over a week to go and traditionally it is around now that voters start to really engage with the campaign. But this year feels different, says Jim Waterson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/06/2410m 5s

McSweeney and Gray: the powers behind Keir Starmer

After Labour’s 2019 election defeat, Keir Starmer vowed to transform the party. Who are the advisers who have helped him shape it? Jessica Elgot reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/06/2428m 38s

Election Extra: Farage doubles down

Rishi Sunak has heavily criticised comments from Nigel Farage that the west provoked Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/249m 37s

New towns and old ideas: Labour’s housing plan

What are Labour’s proposals for fixing the housing crisis? Robert Booth reports from Hitchin, North Hertfordshire. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/2433m 33s

Election Extra: hope (within reason)

Labour has begun to hint that its ambitions in government will go beyond what it has promised in its manifesto, and sources have told the Guardian of plans to look at redrawing wealth taxes. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/06/2410m 19s

Has Clacton fallen for Nigel Farage?

He claims he could be prime minister in 2029 but first he has to become an MP. Will it be eighth time lucky for Reform’s leader? Esther Addley reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/06/2434m 18s

Election Extra: All bets are off

The Conservatives have been hit with further irregular gambling allegations and the party’s campaigns director has taken a leave of absence. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/06/2410m 11s

The Lib Dems’ surprising strategy to breach the blue wall

The Liberal Democrats began their campaign with eye-catching stunts, but it’s tactical voting that may help them breach the blue wall. Peter Walker reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/06/2426m 28s

Election Extra: inflation on target and the SNP manifesto

The SNP launched its manifesto today amid polling that shows the once dominant Scottish party facing steep losses. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/06/248m 52s

Germans are divided. Can Euro 2024 unite them?

Thanks to a troubled economy and gains by the far right in the European elections, Germany’s sense of identity is in the balance. Could footballing success bring the country back together? Philip Oltermann reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/06/2421m 47s

Election Extra: Labour heading for a landslide

A new poll for Ipsos shows Labour heading for an unprecedented majority and spells disaster for Rishi Sunak. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/06/249m 49s

The British judges ruling on the law in authoritarian Hong Kong

Since 1997 Hong Kong’s highest court has included British judges. But with China changing the laws in the city, they are being urged to resign. Amy Hawkins reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/06/2423m 33s

Election Extra: Farage’s five-year plan

Nigel Farage has launched Reform UK’s ‘contract’ with voters, which he insists is not a manifesto. Archie Bland reports on its content and whether it adds up. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/2410m 13s

The economy and Labour’s post-election dilemma

Heather Stewart explains how the party’s central economic message could help it win power but then constrain it in office. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/2421m 59s

Election Extra: Starmer and the Corbyn question

Reform have surged ahead of the Tories in the latest YouGov poll and as Keir Starmer prepares for a BBC grilling, will he have a better answer to questions about his past support for Jeremy Corbyn? Zoe Williams reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/06/2410m 5s

The phone-free, 12-hour school-day experiment

A school in west London is trying to give children their childhood back – by extending its hours from 7am to 7pm. Will it work? Helen Pidd reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/06/2435m 3s

Election Extra: Labour’s plan

Labour published its manifesto today with no surprise announcements. But is it the whole story of the party’s plan for government? Heather Stewart reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/06/249m 25s

Labour takes on the SNP in Scotland

In the 2019 general election, Labour won just one of Scotland’s 59 parliamentary seats. Can it turn around its Scottish fortunes? Libby Brooks reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/06/2432m 4s

Election Extra: damage limitation

Have the Conservatives switched their election strategy to simply limiting losses? Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/06/249m 46s

Election 2024’s battleground: your family WhatsApp group

How are Labour and the Conservatives approaching their online campaign strategies? Jim Waterson reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/06/2430m 11s

Election Extra: the Tory manifesto

As Rishi Sunak searches for a gamechanging campaign moment, Heather Stewart combs through the Conservative party’s election manifesto. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/06/249m 48s

How a far-right push in Europe triggered a shock election in France

The far right has made significant gains in the European parliament elections. The French president, Emmanuel Macron, has responded with a high-stakes gamble. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/06/2422m 23s

Election Extra: Farage rules out pact with Tories

The Conservative party needs to ‘embrace’ Nigel Farage, according to Suella Braverman. But Farage says a pact between his party and the Tories ‘ain’t gonna happen’. Zoe Williams reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/249m 53s

Magic Dave: David Copperfield’s alleged victims speak out – part 2

Sixteen women have accused the magician of sexual misconduct and inappropriate behaviour spanning decades. Copperfield’s lawyers say the allegations are ‘not only completely false but also entirely implausible’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/2433m 5s

Magic Dave: David Copperfield’s alleged victims speak out – part 1

Sixteen women have accused the magician of sexual misconduct and inappropriate behaviour spanning decades. Copperfield’s lawyers say the allegations are ‘not only completely false but also entirely implausible’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/2445m 2s

Election Extra: Sunak’s D-day disaster

The Guardian’s political sketch writer John Crace discusses Sunak’s extraordinary decision to fly home early from Normandy on Thursday and skip the international D-day commemorations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/06/2410m 21s

The Israeli protesters trying to stop food aid getting to Gaza

International aid organisations are warning Gaza is on the brink of famine. But since the start of the year groups of protesters have been trying to prevent food and supplies from getting in. Emma Graham-Harrison reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/06/2433m 28s

Election Extra: New Frank Hester allegations

Former employees of Tory donor Frank Hester have made a series of fresh allegations that Hester repeatedly made comments about race or religion in the workplace, including in recent years. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/06/2410m 11s

From child refugee to Guardian reporter: one journalist’s extraordinary story – podcast

How does it feel to report on the refugee crisis when it’s also the story of your own family? Aamna Mohdin explains. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/06/2434m 29s

Election Extra: Sunak’s £2,000 ‘lie’

Rishi Sunak’s assertion that people would pay £2,000 more in tax under Labour was called a lie by the shadow chancellor today. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/06/248m 45s

Donald Trump is now a convicted criminal. Do voters care?

The hush-money trial ended with a historic verdict against a former president. Can Joe Biden capitalise on it? David Smith and Alice Herman report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/06/2426m 5s

Election Extra: Sunak and Starmer debate preview

Rishi Sunak will go head-to-head with Keir Starmer tonight in their first televised leaders’ debate of the campaign. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/06/249m 16s

Has there been a purge of the left wing of the Labour party?

Keir Starmer once promised to lead a ‘broad church’ Labour party. After a week in which Diane Abbott and Faiza Shaheen have complained about their treatment, does that still hold true? Aletha Adu and Aditya Chakrabortty report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/06/2427m 38s

Election Extra: Nigel Farage is back

Nigel Farage has announced he will stand as a candidate in the 2024 election. Archie Bland explains why it’s terrible news for the Tories Sign up for Election Edition with Archie Bland – our UK general election 2024 newsletter. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/06/249m 12s

How to live to 100

We know more about extending our lifespans than ever before. Afterdecades spent drinking, eating and laughing at people with exercise regimes, what will it take for Phil Daoust to join the ranks of centenarians?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/06/2424m 29s

Trump is guilty on all counts. So what happens next?

Revisited: Guardian journalist Jonathan Freedland speaks to Sam Levine about how Donald Trump became the first US president, sitting or former, to become a convicted criminal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/05/2421m 17s

Exposing Israel’s secret ‘war’ on the ICC

Harry Davies and Yuval Abraham report on how Israeli intelligence agencies tried to derail an ICC war crimes investigation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/05/2436m 20s

How an Indian state became a testing ground for Hindu nationalism

Hannah Ellis-Petersen reports from Uttarakhand, which offers a glimpse into what the future might look like if the BJP retains its power in national elections. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/05/2430m 4s

Why is Sunak’s election campaign so chaotic?

Big beasts have stepped down, a sitting MP has endorsed a Reform UK candidate and the prime minister has already had to have a campaign reset. Peter Walker reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/05/2424m 2s

A journey on weight-loss drug Ozempic

The company behind the weight-loss drug has made millions, but without health insurance it is unaffordable for many. George Chidi reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/05/2427m 38s

Damien Hirst and the dates that don’t add up

Guardian investigations correspondent Maeve McClenaghan discusses her investigation into some of the work of the artist Damien Hirst that has been dated to the 1990s, years before it was actually made. Art critic Jonathan Jones discusses the impact Hirst’s work has had on him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/05/2429m 24s

What should kids be taught about sex and relationships?

The sex and relationships educator Jo Morgan discusses what she believes a sex education curriculum should look like. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/05/2427m 23s

Rishi Sunak’s big election gamble

The prime minister has ended months of speculation by calling an election for 4 July. But why so soon? Jonathan Freedland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/05/2425m 31s

Inside Kharkiv as Russia advances

Shaun Walker reports on Russia’s recent offensive in the Kharkiv region of Ukraine. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/05/2424m 2s

Could Netanyahu really be arrested for war crimes?

International criminal court prosecutors have requested arrest warrants for the leaders of Israel and Gaza. Julian Borger reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/05/2422m 31s

The rightwing Christian group and the battle over end-of-life care

The Christian Legal Centre is behind a number of end-of-life court cases that could be ‘prolonging suffering’, according to doctors. Josh Halliday reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/2433m 12s

The children of the contaminated blood scandal

It is the NHS’s worst treatment disaster – with 30,000 patients infected. Two survivors, Ade Goodyear and Andy Evans, explain why it took so long for it to be brought to light. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/05/2437m 14s

What keeps the world’s top climate scientists up at night?

Hundreds of climate experts expect global temperatures to rise to at least 2.5C (4.5F) above preindustrial levels by 2100. Damian Carrington reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/05/2430m 48s

The 'foreign agents' law that has set off mass protests in Georgia

The bill requires any civil society organisation that receives more than 20% of its funds from abroad to register as being under foreign influence. Daniel Boffey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/05/2420m 14s

The growing tensions over immigration in Ireland

Rory Carroll, the Guardian’s Ireland correspondent, looks at what is fuelling anti-immigrant anger in the Republic of Ireland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/05/2426m 50s

Put it down! Should children be allowed smartphones?

Almost all children have them by the time they are 11 years old – and some get them at four. But are they ruining childhoods? Blake Montgomery reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/05/2429m 19s

Rishi Sunak staggers on – but for how long?

The prime minister is another MP down after Natalie Elphicke crossed the floor to join Labour. With the Conservatives trailing by 30 points after heavy local election losses, what options does Rishi Sunak now have? Guardian political correspondent Kiran Stacey tells Helen Pidd what these losses mean for the PM, and looks at what calculation Keir Starmer made in taking in a rightwing Tory. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/05/2424m 2s

Escaping Rafah: on the ground in Gaza’s last refuge

We hear from two Palestinians living in tents in the city of Rafah. As the threat of an Israeli invasion hangs over them, they decide whether to stay or leave. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/05/2424m 6s

The London Bridge ‘hero’ who could go to prison for 99 years

In 2019, ex-offender Marc Conway helped hold down a knifeman who killed two people in a terror attack. But by doing so he risked being recalled to prison. Simon Hattenstone reports Marc Conway risked his life to stop the London Bridge terror attack. Why did he fear being sent to prison for it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/05/2429m 6s

Non-doms are threatening to leave. Should they be convinced to stay?

Multi-millionaire Bassim Haidar says ending the non-dom tax status is a mistake. He plans to leave the UK and says other non-doms will do the same. Should the government change their mind?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/05/2420m 57s

How do we protect teenagers from sextortion scams?

Murray Dowey, a 16-year-old from Dunblane, was targeted by a sextortion scammer in the hours before he took his own life. Now his parents are raising awareness of this increasingly prevalent crime. Libby Brooks reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/05/2428m 50s

Politics Weekly Westminster: local elections special

In the first of our Politics Weekly Westminster episodes, the Guardian’s political editor Pippa Crerar and political correspondent Kiran Stacey go over the big wins and losses from the local and mayoral elections. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/05/2430m 19s

Are we on the brink of a ceasefire deal for Gaza?

With the threat of famine and the invasion of Rafah looming over Gaza, the leaders of Israel and Hamas are discussing a ceasefire deal. Julian Borger reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/05/2430m 2s

Has Elon Musk driven Tesla off track?

The electric carmaker’s Cybertruck was recalled last month after safety concerns emerged over the accelerator pedal. Kari Paul reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/05/2424m 8s

Is Labour about to win a local election landslide?

Councillors, mayors and police commissioners across England and Wales are facing voters this week. What’s at stake?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/05/2427m 55s

Scotland’s first minister Humza Yousaf resigns

On Monday, Scotland’s first minister Humza Yousaf announced his resignation. What does this mean for the Scottish National party? Severin Carrell and Libby Brooks report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/04/2427m 28s

Have open marriages gone mainstream?

From therapy sessions to bookshelves, interest in non-monogamous relationships seem to be soaring. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/04/2426m 20s

The US college protests and the crackdown on campuses

Police have arrested dozens of students across US universities this week after a crackdown on pro-Palestine protests on campuses. Erum Salam and Margaret Sullivan report from New York. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/04/2428m 44s

What Ukraine needs to change the course of the war

Ukraine has been granted a multibillion-dollar lifeline in military aid. But it will need more than that to prevail in the conflict with Russia. Dan Sabbagh in Kyiv and Shaun Walker report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/04/2427m 21s

Could a row over a council house bring down Angela Rayner?

Keir Starmer’s deputy is facing questions over the sale of her former home. But do voters care? Gaby Hinsliff reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/04/2427m 32s

Sudan’s forgotten war

While conflicts in Gaza and Ukraine have captured global attention, the civil war in Sudan has been largely ignored. That can’t be allowed to continue, says the Guardian’s Nesrine Malik. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/04/2427m 51s

Where does the Cass report leave trans teenagers?

Dr Hilary Cass’s review of NHS gender identity services has been published. Amelia Gentleman reports on what it means for children at the centre of it all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/04/2436m 39s

The chilling policy to cut Greenland’s high birth rate

In the 1960s the birthrate in Greenland was one of the highest in the world. Then it plunged. Decades later, women have finally begun speaking out about what happened. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/04/2431m 21s

Can Rishi Sunak create a smoke-free generation?

MPs voted this week to ban anyone aged 15 or younger in 2024 from ever buying cigarettes. If the legislation passes and is enacted, it would be a world first. Ben Quinn reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/04/2424m 10s

Liz Truss and her plan to ‘save the west’

Liz Truss is back – kind of. The former PM of just 49 days has published a book, Ten Years to Save the West. The Guardian’s political correspondent Eleni Courea and breaking news correspondent Martin Pengelly discuss her seeming lack of regret. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/04/2427m 2s

Is the Middle East on the brink?

After Iran launched an attack on Israel, is the region heading for all-out war? Emma Graham-Harrison reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/04/2424m 48s

How Swiss women won a landmark climate case for Europe

Last week a group of older women successfully challenged the Swiss government’s climate policies at the European court of human rights. Isabella Kaminski reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/04/2425m 51s

Carers scandal: why are so many being prosecuted by the UK government?

George Henderson was convicted of fraud and had to repay £19,500 in carer’s allowance years after ticking the wrong box on the form. He is not alone. The Guardian’s social policy editor, Patrick Butler, looks at why thousands are facing prosecution over innocent mistakes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/04/2427m 32s

Stormy Daniels, Donald Trump, and the start of the hush money trial

Hugo Lowell talks through the law and the politics of a case starting this Monday against Donald Trump – the first ever criminal trial of a former or sitting US president. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/04/2427m 0s

Profits over pipes: who should own our water?

Thames Water owes hundreds of millions of pounds in debt, and the UK government is concerned about its potential collapse. Helena Horton reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/04/2425m 32s

The devil walking on Earth part 2

Annie Kelly reports on the story of Sosa Henkoma, who was exploited by drug gangs as a child and now mentors young people at risk of gang violence. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/04/2422m 50s

The devil walking on Earth: part 1

Annie Kelly reports on the story of Sosa Henkoma, who was exploited by drug gangs as a child and now mentors young people at risk of gang violence. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/04/2430m 17s

Should the UK stop arming Israel?

The killing of six international aid workers and their Palestinian driver this week has brought new scrutiny of Israel’s conduct in its war in Gaza. Peter Beaumont and Patrick Wintour examine the growing backlash. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/04/2428m 33s

Scotland’s new hate crime law

The Scottish government has introduced a hate crime law that broadens protections for marginalised groups but critics say it limits freedom of speech. Libby Brooks reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/04/2428m 14s

Israel divided: Netanyahu’s coalition crisis

A cabinet split over military service for ultra-Orthodox Jews and large street protests demanding the release of hostages are threatening the prime minister’s grip on power. Bethan McKernan reports from Jerusalem. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/04/2425m 29s

What is Reddit really worth?

The popular social media site has never made a profit and relies on an army of unpaid moderators to keep order. So what difference will a stock market listing make? Alex Hern reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/04/2428m 44s

The birdwatcher fighting racism in public spaces – podcast

A Central Park birdwatching incident went viral after Christian Cooper filmed a white woman threatening him. Now he is using his platform to share his passion for nature. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/04/2427m 50s

Who screwed millennials: a generation left behind – Full Story podcast

Guardian Australia’s Full Story co-host Jane Lee and reporter Matilda Boseley investigate the mystery of who screwed young people out of affordable housing, education and secure work. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/03/2421m 34s

Ten years of equal marriage – what has it changed?

It’s a decade since the first same-sex marriages were performed in England and Wales. What have they meant for LGBTQ+ people?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/03/2435m 9s

How gangs took control of Haiti

Haiti has erupted into violence after gangs laid waste to the capital and forced the prime minister to resign. But Haitians are wary from bitter experience of outside forces intervening to find a solution to the crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/03/2431m 6s

The assisted dying debate: Paola’s story – podcast

Paola Marra ended her life last week in Switzerland after being told by doctors she could not be guaranteed a pain-free death from bowel cancer in the coming months. Robert Booth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/03/2430m 48s

Terrorism and the battle for the truth in Moscow

Footage of four gunmen appears to support Islamic State’s claim that it masterminded the worst terrorist attack in Russia in two decades. But the Kremlin has put Ukraine in the frame. Andrew Roth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/03/2425m 5s

The rise and fall of Vice Media

Vice Media is laying off hundreds of workers and no longer publishing journalism on its website. Sirin Kale and Sam Wolfson discuss their time at the company. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/03/2427m 21s

Shining a light on London’s men-only Garrick Club

The Garrick Club is one of London’s original gentlemen’s clubs. Among its members are the most powerful people in the country. Yet in 2024 women are not welcome to apply for membership. Amelia Gentleman reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/03/2424m 49s

The silencing of climate protesters in English and Welsh courts

The court of appeal ruled on Monday that the ‘consent’ defence could not be used in the cases of climate activists. Sandra Laville reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/03/2424m 12s

How serious are the plots against Rishi Sunak?

Recent missteps from the prime minister have added to Tory MPs’ concerns about their disastrous poll ratings. But are they ready to act against Rishi Sunak? Pippa Crerar reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/03/2428m 57s

Why are Indian and Nepali men ending up on the frontline in Ukraine?

Hundreds of young Indian and Nepali men are ending up on the frontlines of the war in Ukraine. Their families want answers. Hannah Ellis-Petersen reports from Delhi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/03/2424m 18s

What happens when you put a nursery in a care home?

At Belong Chester, residents spend their days with nursery-age children. What effect does it have on the wellbeing of both groups? Helen Pidd reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/03/2432m 56s

What do the Tories consider extreme?

Michael Gove is rewriting the government’s definition of ‘extremism’ but his actions have drawn criticism from across the political spectrum. Columnist Rafael Behr reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/03/2426m 14s

The princess and the pictures

An edited family photo of the Princess of Wales with her children on Mother’s Day has fuelled an intensifying swirl of conspiracy theories around the royal couple. Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/03/2429m 20s

How an infamous ransomware gang found itself hacked

LockBit was a sophisticated criminal operation, offering the tools needed to steal a company’s data and hold it to ransom. Then it was itself hacked. Alex Hern reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/03/2433m 4s

The Ministry of Defence’s multimillion pound Saudi defence deal

Documents released in a Serious Fraud Office court case showed suspicious payments on Saudi Arabian defence deals going back decades. David Pegg reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/03/2426m 11s

Black Box: the hunt for ClothOff – the deepfake porn app

For the past six months, the Guardian journalist Michael Safi has been trying to find out who is behind an AI company that creates deepfakes. Deepfakes that are causing havoc around the world, with police and lawmakers baffled about how to deal with them. And in trying to answer one question, he has been left with a bigger one: is AI going to make it impossible to sort fact from fiction? Subscribe to Black Box, a new Guardian audio series on artificial intelligence, for all the remaining episodes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/03/2446m 44s

Black Box: The connectionists

Scientist Geoffrey Hinton set out to understand the brain and ended up working with a group of researchers who invented a technology so powerful that even they don’t truly understand how it works. This is about a collision between two mysterious intelligences – two black boxes – human and artificial. Subscribe to Black Box, a new series on artificial intelligence, for more episodes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/03/2440m 3s

Jeremy Hunt’s election year budget – podcast

What does the spring budget mean for the public’s finances and the general election to come? Heather Stewart reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/03/2420m 34s

Gaza’s hunger crisis

Children are reported to be starving in Gaza as insufficient aid supplies crawl into the territory. Meanwhile, as Ramadan approaches, peace talks are faltering. Patrick Wintour reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/03/2425m 42s

Why IVF is under attack in Alabama

After an Alabama supreme court judgment, the biggest IVF clinics in the state closed, leaving prospective parents desperate. Jessica Glenza reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/03/2428m 32s

Is ill-health holding back the UK economy?

Growing numbers of people are leaving the jobs market because of long-term illnesses. It’s coming at a huge personal and national cost, says economics editor Larry Elliott. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/03/2427m 20s

Black Box: the collision

The beginning of a new series that explores seven stories and the thread that ties them together: artificial intelligence. In this prologue, Hannah (not her real name) has met Noah and he has changed her life for the better. So why does she have concerns about him?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/2414m 28s

How the cost of living changed the way we eat out

Restaurants across the UK are struggling with rising rents, food prices and customers tight on cash. How can they attract loyal diners? Grace Dent and Tony Naylor report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/2424m 29s

The Conservative party’s problem with Islamophobia

Tory deputy chair Lee Anderson was suspended from the party after suggesting London’s mayor Sadiq Khan was being controlled by Islamists. But why can’t the party call his comments Islamophobic? Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/02/2430m 22s

Saldo: Ukraine’s gangster governor – part 3

The liberation of Kherson city ended months of brutal Russian rule. But across the Dnipro River, occupation governor Volodymyr Saldo finds there is are still money-spinning opportunities to be found. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/02/2431m 30s

Saldo: Ukraine’s gangster governor – part 2

Russia’s invasion changed everything for Ukrainians – and for one man it presented an opportunity to reboot his political career and reclaim lost power. Tom Burgis reports from Kherson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/02/2430m 33s

Saldo: Ukraine’s gangster governor – part 1

Vladimir Saldo was swept from Ukraine’s parliament after the Maidan revolution appeared to end his political career. By 2022, police were preparing a case against him as a suspect in a contract killing. Then Russia invaded and everything changed. Tom Burgis reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/02/2426m 52s

How a ceasefire vote led to two days of chaos in the Commons – podcast

All parties were calling for a pause in the conflict. So why did MPs storm out and why is the speaker facing calls to quit? Kiran Stacey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/02/2430m 5s

Is an uprising by Europe’s farmers sowing the seeds for the far right?

Furious farmers across Europe have blocked roads and railways as part of protests against new regulations and cheap imports. Jon Henley reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/02/2420m 50s

Why the NHS needs Martha’s rule

Following a campaign by her family in memory of Martha Mills, the NHS is introducing Martha’s rule giving hospital patients in England access to a rapid review from a separate medical team if they are concerned with the care they are receiving. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/2436m 59s

The shocking death and extraordinary life of Alexei Navalny

The opposition leader and anti-corruption campaigner was Putin’s fiercest critic. What does his death in a Siberian prison tell us about Russia today? Andrew Roth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/02/2428m 24s

Deported and disgraced: the students wrongly accused of cheating

In 2014, the Home Office revoked the visas of 35,000 students accused of cheating in an English language exam. The consequences for those wrongly accused was devastating. Amelia Gentleman reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/02/2440m 56s

Why is it becoming so hard to retire in the UK?

Everyone agrees the state pension system needs reforming – so why is changing it so hard?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/02/2428m 30s

Israel’s threat to Gaza’s last refuge

What does the Israeli ground invasion threat mean for the million refugees sheltering in the city of Rafah? Ruth Michaelson reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/02/2427m 17s

What on earth is going on in the Rochdale byelection?

An antisemitism row has led to Labour withdrawing its support for its candidate; a disgraced former Labour MP is running for Reform – and a political troublemaker is back. Helen Pidd reports on the chaos. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/02/2424m 11s

Is Biden too old to be president?

Joe Biden’s age is increasingly becoming a political liability – even though Trump is just four years younger. David Smith reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/02/2424m 8s

Why does the UK lag behind on cancer care?

Britain’s cancer survival rates are improving but the UK still lags behind comparable countries. The Guardian’s health editor, Andrew Gregory, reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/02/2426m 42s

Labour’s £28bn green policy U-turn

Keir Starmer has abandoned his totemic pledge on green investment amid fears it opens the party to attacks on its economic credibility. Is he being too timid? Kiran Stacey and Fiona Harvey report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/02/2428m 22s

Why the military are the real winners of Pakistan’s election

After loudly criticising the army, Imran Khan, reported to be Pakistan’s most popular politician, has been hit with several jail sentences. Mehreen Zahra-Malik reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/02/2429m 40s

Why is generation Z so divided on gender?

Studies on the attitudes of young people between the age of 16 and 29 show a serious split towards both feminism and influencers such as Andrew Tate. What’s behind it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/02/2428m 7s

The murder of Brianna Ghey

A year on from the murder of Brianna Ghey, her killers have been sentenced, and her mother is leading an extraordinary campaign of compassion. Helen Pidd reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/02/2430m 17s

The disposable vape ban

Vapes are often used by smokers to help them quit cigarettes, but in recent years more British children have taken up the habit. So is a ban the right course of action? Sarah Boseley reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/02/2423m 20s

The deal that could transform politics in Northern Ireland

A deal agreed with the DUP will allow power sharing to resume in Northern Ireland, with Sinn Féin as the largest party. Rory Carroll reports from Belfast. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/02/2430m 18s

Is Britain fit to fight a war?

The British army has been struggling to attract applicants for years. Why don’t young people want to sign up? Dan Sabbagh reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/02/2422m 53s

What’s gone wrong at Boeing?

A terrifying mid-air blowout of a door plug at 16,000 feet (4,900 metres) left passengers fearing for their lives on an Alaska Airlines flight earlier this month. It’s just the latest crisis for Boeing so what has gone wrong? Jeff Wise and Gwyn Topham report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/01/2432m 31s

Will the ICJ ruling change anything in Gaza?

The ICJ’s interim ruling – which said aid must be allowed into Gaza – was quickly followed by shocking allegations from Israel that employees of one of the biggest aid agencies in the territory were involved in the 7 October attacks. What does this mean for people in Gaza? Patrick Wintour reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/01/2421m 39s

The mothers and wives of Russian soldiers daring to defy Putin

Partners and parents of conscripted fighters are demanding that their loved ones come home. What does it say about Russian support for the war? With Pjotr Sauer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/01/2424m 50s

Michelle Mone and the PPE Medpro investigation

After the peer admitted to lying about her involvement in lucrative government PPE deals during the Covid crisis, the fate of her high-profile lingerie company raises further questions. David Conn reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/01/2432m 48s

Why the UK needs to eliminate measles … again

In 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the UK had successfully eliminated measles from its shores. But the country has since lost that status and cases of the infectious disease are rising rapidly in some areas. Nicola Davis reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/01/2421m 30s

The terrifying, far-right ‘masterplan’ sparking protests across Germany

The far-right party AfD has met neo-Nazi activists to discuss mass deportations. Why is the party still so popular? Kate Connolly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/01/2428m 59s

New Hampshire primary: the last chance to stop Trump?

Following the withdrawal of Ron DeSantis from the race, only Nikki Haley now stands between Donald Trump and the Republican nomination for the presidency. David Smith reports from Manchester, New Hampshire. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/01/2421m 18s

The Freedom theatre – and the fight for Palestinian culture

What does the raiding of a theatre in the West Bank tell us about the dangers Palestinian artists are facing? Emma Graham-Harrison reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/01/2432m 23s

The race for the moon

The space race of the 20th century put the first person on the moon. Now a new race to the lunar surface – with new global players – is just getting going. Robin McKie reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/01/2423m 58s

Cocaine, gangs and murder: Ecuador’s 10 days of terror

Just a few years ago it was one of the most peaceful countries in Latin America. But last week drug gangs stormed a live TV broadcast and unleashed a wave of terror. Tom Phillips reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/01/2427m 14s

The Houthis and the Red Sea crisis

Attacks on commercial ships in the Red Sea by the Houthi rebel group in Yemen have been met with airstrikes from the UK and US. Patrick Wintour reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/01/2423m 44s

Will South Africa’s genocide case against Israel succeed?

South Africa has accused Israel of committing genocide in Gaza at hearings in the international court of justice. Chris McGreal reports on what happens next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/01/2432m 23s

Reform UK: the party frightening the Tories from the fringes

The rightwing populist party and successor to Ukip has Conservative voters in its sights. Ben Quinn reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/01/2422m 13s

The Chinese shadow over Taiwan’s election

How are presidential candidates in Taiwan responding to the ongoing threat of invasion from China? Amy Hawkins reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/01/2429m 56s

A new law to exonerate Post Office victims

After a primetime TV drama moved the Post Office Horizon scandal up the political agenda, Rishi Sunak has acted to push through a law that would quash the convictions of hundreds of wrongly accused employees. Pippa Crerar reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/01/2426m 20s

The UK government v junior doctors

After the longest continuous strike in NHS history, the latest industrial action in England is finally over. What next? Denis Campbell reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/01/2426m 40s

The release of Oscar Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius, the former South African Paralympic and Olympic athlete, was released from prison on Friday. Journalists Tim Rohan and Margie Orford report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/01/2437m 23s

Revisited: The Post Office scandal, part 2

Janet Skinner was jailed for false accounting after being wrongfully accused by her employer, the Post Office, of responsibility for the loss of more than £59,000. With her conviction quashed, she and others are demanding answers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/2438m 25s

Revisited: the Post Office scandal – part 1

When a computer system installed by the Post Office malfunctioned, it led to the convictions of scores of subpostmasters for theft and false accounting. Lives were wrecked. After an ITV dramatisation brought new attention to the case, the Metropolitan police said they had commenced a criminal fraud investigation in relation to the Post Office. Today we re-run our episodes from 2021 on the scandal in full. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/2432m 59s

Culture 2024: what to watch and listen to this year

Culture critics Peter Bradshaw, Tshepo Mokoena and Gwilym Mumford look ahead to the best of the year in film, TV and music. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/2434m 27s

Bombs, boat sinkings and assassinations: is the Middle East descending into war?

Beyond the conflict in Gaza it has been a violent few weeks in the wider Middle East, from attacks on shipping in the Red Sea to bomb blasts in Iran and a killing by drone in Beirut. Julian Borger explains what may happen next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/01/2428m 17s

Why are there so few Black sperm donors in the US?

A lack of donors is creating problems for prospective parents. What is behind the shortage? Lisa Armstrong reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/01/2424m 57s

2024: what happens when US and UK elections collide?

UK and US elections don’t usually happen in the same year. So what happens when they do? Jonathan Freedland delves into history books and what lessons they have for 2024. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/01/2431m 41s

How to reboot your memory for 2024

Cognitive neuroscientist Charan Ranganath, author of Why We Remember, explains how memory shapes our daily existence – and how to get the most out of it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/01/2431m 10s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 6 – how King Charles profits from the assets of dead citizens

An archaic custom allows the king’s estate to absorb the assets of people in the north of England who die without a will or a known next of kin. Maeve McClenaghan investigates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/01/2429m 44s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 5 – the coronation of Charles III

Jonathan Freedland examines what the coronation means to the modern-day UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/12/2335m 7s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 4 – calculating the king’s wealth

Maeve McClenaghan and the reporting team reach the end of their investigation and make the calculations that reveal the vast personal fortune of King Charles III. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/12/2337m 30s

Revisited: Cost of the crown, part 3 – the hidden history of the monarchy and slavery

Documents recently unearthed by historians have shown how the British royal family had ties to transatlantic slavery. Maeve McClenaghan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/12/2327m 27s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 2 – duchies, diamonds and Dalís

Any attempt to understand the extent of royal wealth will need to account for the value of their land and their most valuable treasures. Maeve McClenaghan sets off to uncover what is held by the crown and what belongs to the family privately. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/12/2337m 23s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 1 – valuing the royal family

In the first part of an investigative miniseries on royal wealth, Maeve McClenaghan sets off on the trail to uncover how much public money is spent on the Windsors – and what they do in return. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/12/2332m 13s

Revisited: From Blair to Starmer: Labour’s path to power, part 2 – podcast

Labour went into the 1997 general election full of confidence. Now, 26 years on from that famous victory, Kiran Stacey hears as those who helped craft it look ahead and ask if it is time to be more radical. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/12/2323m 42s

Revisited: From Blair to Starmer: Labour’s path to power, part 1

In 1996 Labour was a year out from an election after more than a decade out of power. Its leader, Tony Blair, was surrounded by advisers and strategists plotting their way to victory. Kiran Stacey hears how they did it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/12/2326m 37s

How the Guardian covered 2023

The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, talks about how the newspaper covered a year that witnessed the Israel-Gaza war, the coronation of King Charles, the rise of AI and record high temperatures. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/12/2336m 52s

The ‘cruel’ new visa rules set to break up families

Government attempts to bear down on record migration figures will target family visas for those earning lower incomes. Robert Booth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/12/2327m 28s

John Crace’s political year

The Guardian’s parliamentary sketch writer, John Crace, reflects on the year’s events in Westminster. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/12/2327m 49s

Ukraine’s fight for funds to keep Russia at bay

As the Ukraine war heads into a new calendar year, the country is battling not just the Russian army but also on the diplomatic front, to secure further aid from its allies. Luke Harding and Dan Sabbagh report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/12/2324m 17s

The Barclays and the battle for the Telegraph

The Barclay family may still legally own the newspaper titles, but politicians alongside some of the world’s richest men are contesting who will control them in the future. Jane Martinson, author of You May Never See Us Again: The Barclay Dynasty, reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/12/2328m 12s

How Madonna changed pop culture for ever

It’s 40 years since Madonna began scandalising and delighting fans and critics around the world. But is she still misunderstood? With Mary Gabriel. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/12/2331m 17s

Is Israel deliberately trying to make Gaza uninhabitable? – Podcast

With 40% of homes destroyed in the strip, legal experts are raising the question of ‘domicide’ – but what it is it, and is it taking place in Gaza?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/12/2329m 13s

Rishi Sunak, Rwanda and the rebels

The prime minister faced down rebels within his party to win a vote on his controversial bill to send asylum seekers to Rwanda. But more trouble awaits him in the new year. Kiran Stacey reports from Westminster. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/12/2324m 0s

Why Argentinians are gambling everything on ‘anarcho-capitalist’ Javier Milei

The libertarian economist won the election with his radical ideas. Can he deliver? Tom Phillips reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/12/2328m 47s

The stories behind Europe’s unmarked migrant graves – podcast

What happens to the people who risk everything to get to Europe – and don’t survive the journey? Ashifa Kassam reports from Lanzarote. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/12/2334m 34s

Sellafield: Europe’s most toxic nuclear site

The Guardian’s investigation into safety concerns at Europe’s most hazardous nuclear plant. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/12/2336m 8s

Revisited: a conversation with Benjamin Zephaniah

The British poet Benjamin Zephaniah died this week after a short illness. Here we revisit a conversation between Zephaniah and George the Poet from 2020. They discussed why, having been born a generation apart, their work was exposing racial injustice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/2333m 14s

The lives and lies of George Santos

The US politician was accused of telling extraordinary lies about everything from his previous jobs to his religion. Why did it take so long to boot him out of Congress? Adam Gabbatt explains. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/2323m 37s

Boris Johnson v the Covid inquiry

After accusations of erratic decision-making during the pandemic, the former prime minister will finally face the inquiry. Aletha Adu reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/12/2325m 4s

Why are so many councils going ‘bankrupt’?

Nottingham council is the latest to in effect declare itself bankrupt, and one in 10 county councils in England are at risk of following suit. What does it mean for the services that so many people rely on? Jessica Murray reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/12/2327m 6s

Why is the Israel-Hamas conflict so deadly for journalists?

More reporters are said to have been killed in this conflict than any in decades. Jonathan Dagher, from Reporters Without Borders, discusses what it means for public understanding of the region. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/12/2332m 4s

Israel-Gaza: a week of tearful reunions and an uneasy truce

As Israeli hostages were exchanged for Palestinian prisoners, the intense fighting was paused this week. Jason Burke reports on an emotional few days and what happens next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/12/2326m 57s

The secret plan to ‘hook’ the developing world on oil

As the Cop28 climate summit begins in Dubai today, a secret Saudi Arabian plan to get poorer countries ‘hooked on its harmful products’ has emerged. Damian Carrington reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/11/2325m 20s

Geert Wilders and Europe’s lurch to the far right

How did far-right politician Geert Wilders win so many seats in the Dutch election? Jon Henley and Senay Boztas report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/11/2332m 27s

How King Charles profits from the assets of dead citizens

An archaic custom allows the king’s estate to absorb the assets of people in the north of England who die without a will or a known next of kin. Maeve McClenaghan investigates King’s estate to transfer £100m into ethical funds after bona vacantia revelations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/11/2329m 26s

The spy tech firm managing NHS data

Palantir, the US spy-tech firm co-founded by the billionaire Peter Thiel, has won a contract to handle NHS data. It’s a deal that has left privacy advocates such as Cori Crider with serious questions. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/11/2330m 34s

He’s back: Sam Altman and the chaos at the heart of the AI industry

The CEO of OpenAI was sacked and then rehired days later, after staff threatened to follow him. But what does this corporate drama tell us about the future of AI? Blake Montgomery explains. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/11/2330m 42s

Can tax cuts save the Tories?

Jeremy Hunt has offered up sweeping tax cuts in an attempt to jolt the UK economy back to life and salvage his party’s hopes of staying in power beyond the next election. Heather Stewart reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/11/2322m 18s

A truce agreement in Gaza

On late Tuesday night, Israel’s cabinet met to vote on a temporary ceasefire in Gaza and a hostage and prisoner exchange. Julian Borger reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/11/2318m 33s

How much legal trouble is Donald Trump in?

Various polls have the ex-president as favourite to retake the White House in the US election next year, but he faces growing legal jeopardy. Hugo Lowell reports on the many charges Trump is facing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/11/2325m 54s

The families stuck living in Britain’s unlicensed bedsits

Why do so many people end up in unlicensed houses of multiple occupation? And what are the conditions like? Robert Booth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/11/2326m 13s

Israel’s raid on al-Shifa hospital

Gaza’s biggest hospital was filled with doctors, patients and people seeking safety when Israel laid siege to it. Ruth Michaelson reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/11/2327m 55s

How the UK government’s Rwanda asylum plan came unstuck

The supreme court has ruled that the government’s plan to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda is unlawful. Peter Walker explains what happens next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/11/2323m 34s

Has Putin got the upper hand in Ukraine?

With the world’s attention on the Middle East, Ukraine seems to be at a stalemate – which may sound like good news for Russia, but is not so straightforward, Luke Harding reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/11/2322m 2s

The return of David Cameron

Former prime minister David Cameron has been installed as foreign secretary in Rishi Sunak’s reshuffle, in which Suella Braverman was also sacked from the cabinet. Pippa Crerar reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/11/2324m 58s

Rebuilding Paradise: five years on from California’s deadliest fire

Five years after a wildfire killed 85 people in the Californian town of Paradise, the area has been rebuilt from the ashes. Dani Anguiano and Alastair Gee report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/11/2331m 13s

Suella Braverman, the police and the protests

Senior members of the government have spent the week calling for Saturday’s pro-Palestinian march to be banned but the Metropolitan police have resisted the pressure. Daniel Boffey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/11/2321m 33s

What will it take to free the hostages taken by Hamas?

On 7 October, 240 people in Israel were kidnapped and taken into Gaza. A month on, only a handful have been released. Bethan McKernan reports The mothers whose children are held hostage by Hamas: ‘All we want is them home’ Israel-Hamas war – live updates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/11/2330m 38s

Fear and fury in the West Bank

Palestinians in the West Bank say that while all the attention is on Gaza, Israeli settlers overseen by the military are killing people and forcing them from the land. Julian Borger reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/11/2325m 54s

Crypto on trial: the downfall of Sam Bankman-Fried

Sam Bankman-Fried, founder of cryptocurrency exchange FTX, is facing up to 110 years in jail after being found guilty of fraud on a massive scale, exposed when his company collapsed last year. Blake Montgomery reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/11/2327m 40s

Why are Britain’s new homes so rubbish?

Oliver Wainwright reports on the increasingly poor standards of newly built homes in the UK and what consumers can do to protect themselves. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/11/2324m 51s

How oligarchs use English courts to silence their critics

Use of Slapps by the super-rich against journalists is increasingly common, and campaigners say new legislation to deter such actions does not go far enough. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/11/2330m 48s

How the Israel-Gaza conflict is dividing Labour

Since a show of unity at Labour conference, anger and upset have been growing over the leader’s stance. Can Keir Starmer heal the rift? Aletha Adu reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/11/2327m 15s

Is the AI safety summit already too late?

Rishi Sunak has convened a global summit of world leaders and tech executives to discuss how the power of artificial intelligence can be safely harnessed. Dan Milmo reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/11/2327m 30s

‘We’re totally isolated’: inside Gaza as Israel’s war intensifies

As Israel steps up its military campaign in Gaza, residents trapped in the territory are facing a humanitarian crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/10/2322m 58s

What we’ve learned so far from the Covid inquiry

Hearings for the government Covid inquiry resume today in Westminster with former Downing Street adviser Dominic Cummings slated to appear this week. Peter Walker reports on the story so far. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/10/2327m 27s

The last whale hunter in Iceland

Kristján Loftsson has stubbornly refused to bow to public opinion or an overwhelming international consensus against whaling. But with a full ban coming in Iceland, has he killed his last whale?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/10/2328m 18s

The rise of antisemitism in the UK

There has been a 1,350% increase in hate crimes against Jewish people in London, according to the Metropolitan police. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/10/2323m 47s

In the wake of Storm Babet

Thousands of homes across Scotland and the Midlands have been flooded in recent days. Jessica Murray reports from Chesterfield. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/10/2326m 46s

Could the conflict in Israel tip into regional war?

Presidents, prime ministers and diplomats are trying to stop the conflict from spinning further out of control. Is it working?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/10/2324m 52s

How a contested history feeds the Israel-Palestine conflict

Certain dates are seared into the minds of those who have tried to untangle the decades-long Israel-Palestine conflict, be it 1917, 1947, 1967, 1973 – and now 2023. Chris McGreal reports on an escalating war that is only understandable by looking to the past. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/10/2337m 40s

How Taylor Swift built her music empire

After its opening last weekend, Taylor Swift: the Eras Tour is on track to be the biggest concert film of all time. How did Swift create this level of success? Laura Snapes reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/10/2332m 8s

Kicking out the populists: how young voters helped swing Poland’s election

Poland’s far-right Law and Justice party was a disaster for many of the country’s democratic institutions and the LGBT community. Now it appears voters have got rid of it. Shaun Walker reports from Warsaw. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/10/2325m 26s

The deadly stakes of a ground invasion of Gaza

With more than 2 million people trapped in Gaza, what are the consequences of an Israeli invasion?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/10/2331m 49s

Is the SNP’s independence dream fading?

The Scottish National party has agreed a new strategy for pursuing independence at its annual conference. But is declining support for the party placing the issue out of reach? Libby Brooks reports from Aberdeen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/10/2323m 52s

The hidden cost of cancer

Getting ill shouldn’t be expensive. But for many patients, being diagnosed with cancer can be a financial catastrophe. Hilary Osborne looks at why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/10/2322m 7s

The fight to give Indigenous Australians a voice

As Australians prepare to vote in a referendum to give Indigenous people a voice in parliament, Prof Marcia Langton explores the long struggle for equal rights. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/10/2341m 25s

Human catastrophe unfolds in Israel and Gaza

Deadly assault by Hamas militants across southern Israel has been followed by devastating airstrikes on Gaza and threats of full-scale invasion by Israeli military. Bethan McKernan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/10/2335m 39s

Keir Starmer’s plan to rebuild Britain

Keir Starmer promises to bring in a new era of ‘rebuilding’, ‘renewal’ and even ‘healing’ after 13 years of Conservative rule. Kiran Stacey reports on the Labour leader’s keynote conference speech. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/10/2324m 38s

From Blair to Starmer: Labour’s path to power – part 2

Labour went into the 1997 general election full of confidence. Now, 26 years on from that famous victory, Kiran Stacey hears as those who helped craft it look ahead and ask if it is time to be more radical. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/10/2323m 32s

How the Israel-Gaza conflict erupted

A bloody attack by Hamas has shocked the world – and left Israel reeling. As the country responds with devastating airstrikes, Peter Beaumont explains how the surprise attack unfolded and what could happen next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/10/2321m 4s

From Blair to Starmer: Labour’s path to power, part 1

In 1996 Labour was a year out from an election after more than a decade out of power. Its leader, Tony Blair, was surrounded by advisers and strategists plotting their way to victory. Kiran Stacey hears how they did it and what lessons there are for Keir Starmer’s party as it gathers for its annual conference. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/10/2326m 52s

Why Britain is mourning the Sycamore Gap tree

The felling of a Northumberland tree has made headlines around the world – and led to a criminal investigation. Why did it mean so much to people?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/10/2326m 46s

Do Rishi Sunak's new policies add up?

Rishi Sunak has declared himself an enemy of the ‘30-year status quo’. In doing so, he scrapped much of the HS2 rail link and said A-levels would be replaced. Kiran Stacey reports on whether it all adds up. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/10/2324m 54s

HS2: how the costly rail project ran out of track

It started out with high hopes and a higher budget. Helen Pidd explains why the government has lost faith in the ambitious – and controversial – rail project. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/10/2327m 8s

Out in the cold: the spy scandal gripping Denmark

Claus Hjort Frederiksen, Denmark’s former defence minister and Lars Findsen former head of Denmark’s foreign intelligence agency, have been charged with divulging state secrets and face lengthy prison sentences. Harry Davies investigates why the scandal will reverberate well beyond Scandinavia. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/10/2334m 3s

Gangs of Stockholm: the rise of gun crime in Sweden

September has become the worst month for shooting deaths in Sweden since records began in 2016. Miranda Bryant and Sebastian Stakset, a former gang member, talk about what’s behind the shocking rise in violence. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/10/2326m 30s

Culture 2023: the films, music and TV shows not to miss this autumn

Guardian music critic Alexis Petridis, film editor Catherine Shoard and TV critic Leila Latif guide you through what’s on offer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/09/2330m 18s

Nagorno Karabakh: Why a frozen conflict suddenly exploded

Tens of thousands of refugees have already fled their homes in the disputed region, and more are set to follow. Andrew Roth explains why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/09/2324m 36s

Overcrowded and understaffed: life in England’s crumbling prisons

Rats, broken windows and overfilled cells are a daily reality for prisoners in England’s crumbling jails. Helen Pidd reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/09/2334m 3s

Why are London firearms officers laying down their guns?

Metropolitan police firearms officers have downed their weapons in protest at the charging of a colleague with murder. Vikram Dodd reports on what happens now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/09/2322m 3s

The Blind Side and Hollywood’s blind spot

Why is the retired NFL player Michael Oher bringing a lawsuit against the family who took him in as a teenager? Andrew Lawrence reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/09/2326m 58s

Looking for alternatives: a tale of two German towns

As Germany heads into a recession, tensions over its migration policy and its national identity are throwing up unusual results in local elections. Michael Safi reports View the front page of the Guardian’s newly launched Europe edition. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/09/2345m 11s

Rishi Sunak’s net zero U-turn

The PM has torn up his ambitious plans for Britain to achieve its commitments on net zero emissions, saying they were ‘unrealistic and punitive’. Kiran Stacey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/09/2322m 35s

The destruction of Derna

What left the city of Derna vulnerable to such a devastating flood? The Libyan freelance journalist Johr Ali reports on the city in which he grew up. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/09/2327m 40s

The horrifying allegations against Russell Brand

The comedian, presenter and actor has been accused of sexual assault, emotional abuse and rape between 2006 and 2013 – allegations Brand denies. Alexandra Topping explains why such stories can be particularly difficult to investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/09/2330m 3s

Naomi Klein’s doppelganger

When the author Naomi Klein began being mistaken for Naomi Wolf it set her off on a quest to examine the slippery nature of truth in the post-pandemic world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/09/2329m 35s

What have a year of protests really changed in Iran?

Twelve months after 22-year-old Mahsa Amini died in the custody of the regime’s ‘morality police’, we look at her legacy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/09/2330m 17s

Ukraine’s counteroffensive: breaking the Russian lines

Ukraine’s much-anticipated summer offensive has been slow to the point of stalling. But a recent breakthrough of the Russian lines has provided new hope for the country’s leaders – and its partners. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/09/2323m 55s

A day in the ruins of Morocco’s earthquake

Peter Beaumont reports from the High Atlas mountains in Morocco, where residents deal with the huge loss of life and destruction of their villages. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/09/2326m 12s

The concrete crisis: is Britain falling apart?

Last-minute safety worries about the structural soundness of school buildings threw the new term into chaos for many children and their parents. Could the episode spell disaster for Rishi Sunak’s government?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/09/2327m 47s

Has the plant-based food revolution lost its sizzle?

There has been a boom in the market for plant-based foods and products that mimic meat in recent years. But that boom has hit a blip amid a cost of living crisis and increasing consumer worries about ultra-processed food, says Bee Wilson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/09/2329m 51s

The mystery of Bangladesh’s missing children – part three

What would you do if everything you believed about your childhood was wrong? Rosie Swash and Thaslima Begum investigate an international adoption scandal that is still shattering lives today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/09/2335m 44s

The scandal of Bangladesh’s missing children – part two

What would you do if everything you believed about your childhood was wrong? Rosie Swash and Thaslima Begum investigate an international adoption scandal that is still shattering lives today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/09/2340m 1s

The mystery of Bangladesh’s missing children – part one

What would you do if everything you believed about your childhood was wrong? Rosie Swash and Thaslima Begum investigate an international adoption scandal that is still shattering lives today • Listen to episodes two and three of this series. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/09/2333m 30s

How safe are the priceless treasures in our museums?

As many as 2,000 historic items are thought to have gone missing from the British Museum’s collections in the past decade. How could it have happened, and how easily can museums get stolen artefacts back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/09/2327m 24s

The chilling rise of AI scams

Criminals are cloning voices and making calls to trick victims into sending them money. How can they be stopped?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/09/2323m 33s

The curious world of the Guardian’s Experience column

Rebecca Liu discusses her role as a commissioning editor at the Guardian’s Experience column and we hear three stories from those who have been featured in the column. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/09/2334m 21s

Why wasn’t Lucy Letby stopped sooner?

The nurse is the most prolific child serial killer in modern British history. Could the NHS have prevented her committing so many crimes?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/08/2335m 14s

Rats, fires and floods: why Parliament is falling down

It is the symbol of Britain’s democracy and it is falling into decay. The Palace of Westminster needs extensive – and expensive – repairs. But are MPs ready to do what it takes to save it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/08/2334m 32s

The final weeks of Yevgeny Prigozhin

The Wagner leader seemed to have achieved the unthinkable: humiliating Putin and getting away with it. But had he really been forgiven – or was the Kremlin playing for time?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/08/2325m 22s

Revisited: Trafficked: Marta – part four – podcast

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/08/2333m 44s

Revisited: Trafficked: the operation – part three – podcast

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/08/2342m 18s

Revisited: Trafficked: the closed door – part two

Julia, a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK, tells the journalist Annie Kelly about the years she was shipped between brothels. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/08/2334m 24s

Revisited: Trafficked: the trap – part one

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/08/2330m 14s

Cotton Capital: Reparations – episode 6

Revisited: In the final episode of the series, Cotton Capital editor and Guardian journalist Maya Wolfe-Robinson looks at the subject of reparations. What do they mean for communities and descendants of transatlantic enslavement – and what is the Guardian planning to do in its own programme of measures?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/08/2349m 33s

Cotton Capital: Resistance – episode 5

Revisited: In the fifth episode in the series, Guardian journalist and Cotton Capital special correspondent Lanre Bakare examines Black Mancunian history, beginning with the 1945 Pan-African Congress that took place in the city and shaped independence movements across Africa. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/08/2341m 6s

Cotton Capital: The Brazilian connection – episode 4

Revisited: The fourth episode in the Cotton Capital series explores how during the transatlantic slave trade, more enslaved African people were taken to Brazil than any other country. Today, more than half of Brazil’s population identify as Black and there are more Black people in Brazil than any other country except Nigeria. But the country is still grappling with deep structural racism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/08/2337m 30s

Cotton Capital: The Sea Islands – episode 3

Revisited: In the third episode in the series, journalist DeNeen L Brown travels to the Sea Islands in the US and meets the Gullah Geechee people – direct descendants of enslaved Africans who picked the distinctive Sea Island cotton prized by traders in Manchester. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/08/2348m 21s

Cotton Capital: The meaning of Success – episode 2

Revisited: The second episode in the series follows journalist Maya Wolfe-Robinson as she travels to Jamaica in search of the site of the former sugar plantation Success, once co-owned by the Guardian funder Sir George Philips. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/08/2350m 58s

Cotton Capital: The bee and the ship – episode 1

Revisited: The first episode in the Cotton Capital series explores the revelations that the Guardian’s founding editor, John Edward Taylor, and at least nine of his 11 backers had links to slavery, principally through the textile industry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/08/2346m 41s

The wellness-to-conspiracy pipeline

For many people, alternative therapies and wellness routines provide comfort and pleasure. For others, they can be a pathway to far-right conspiracies, says author and journalist James Ball. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/08/2333m 15s

Why were the wildfires in Hawaii so deadly?

Last week fires tore through the Hawaiian island of Maui, causing devastating destruction in the ancient capital of Lahaina. What happened?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/08/2326m 16s

The mystery of the Crooked House fire

When Britain’s wonkiest pub was destroyed in a fire and the ruins demolished, it sparked protests and made headlines around the world – but why?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/08/2325m 0s

The Bibby Stockholm saga

After removing asylum seekers from the Bibby Stockholm barge on Friday, the government says they will be returned ‘as soon as possible’. Daniel Trilling and Sammy Gecsoyler report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/08/2331m 10s

Uncovering the truth of the Nazi occupation of the Channel Islands

In 1940 the German army took over the Channel Islands and built concentration camps on Alderney where hundreds, possibly thousands, of people died. Now a UK government review will attempt to get to the truth of what really happened. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/08/2332m 29s

How the search for UFOs reached the US Congress

The quest to discover whether or not we’re alone in the universe has become an obsession for many Americans. Some of them are elected officials, reports Adam Gabbatt in Washington DC. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/08/2333m 28s

The Qur’an burnings in Sweden: who is fanning the flames? – podcast

The act of burning a holy book in Sweden is not of itself illegal. But a spate of burnings has resulted in outrage at home and abroad – and potentially far-reaching consequences. Miranda Bryant reports from Stockholm. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/08/2323m 33s

Why the rest of the world can’t afford to ignore the coup in Niger

The Sahel region, sometimes called Africa’s ‘coup belt’, has just seen another government ousted. Peter Beaumont and Nesrine Malik on what it means for African – and global – security. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/08/2328m 53s

The legacy of Sinéad O’Connor

Film-maker Kathryn Ferguson and journalist Simon Hattenstone share their memories of Sinéad O’Connor and reflect on her impact on music and society. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/08/2336m 55s

How can we escape burnout? | Podcast

Burnout is a serious issue in workplaces across the UK. What can we do to change our working culture in order to prevent it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/08/2325m 51s

Donald Trump’s January 6 indictment

The former US president appeared in court on Wednesday charged on four counts related to his efforts to overturn the result of the 2020 election. Hugo Lowell reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/08/2335m 3s

Rishi Sunak’s anti-green gamble

The prime minister’s announcement of new oil and gas licences in the North Sea this week is a sign he sees electoral advantage in being anti-green. Kiran Stacey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/08/2328m 48s

Life in the UK for one of China’s most wanted

Hong Kong activist Finn Lau has vowed to continue his fight for democracy despite the Chinese bounty on his head. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/08/2332m 9s

Why is Hollywood on strike? (And why Succession's Brian Cox is joining them)

Production on Hollywood films and hit TV shows has ground to a halt. Apart from the stars on the picket line, how is this strike different from other labour disputes?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/08/2334m 3s

The novelist who became a war crimes investigator – and uncovered a secret diary - Podcast

Victoria Amelina was an award-winning novelist. But after Russian forces invaded Ukraine, she began investigating war crimes – including the disappearance of a much-loved children’s author. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/07/2330m 27s

Why Nigel Farage’s bank account matters so much

Since the politician’s account with Coutts was closed, the story has dominated the news agenda. Does it show that something has gone very wrong in our banking system?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/07/2329m 54s

Climate crisis up close: a week of wildfires in Rhodes

Holidaymakers on the Greek island of Rhodes found themselves evacuated from hotels and sleeping in school halls as wildfires raged nearby. As they make plans to return home, residents and business owners are counting the cost of what will be an expensive recovery. Rachel Hall reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/07/2327m 5s
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