Today in Focus

Today in Focus

By The Guardian

Hosted by Nosheen Iqbal and Michael Safi, Today in Focus brings you closer to Guardian journalism. Combining personal storytelling with insightful analysis, this podcast takes you behind the headlines for a deeper understanding of the news, every weekday. Today in Focus features journalists such as: Kiran Stacey, Pippa Crerar, Alex Hern, Helen Pidd, Peter Walker, Luke Harding, Andrew Roth, Shaun Walker and Jim Waterson. The podcast is a topical, deep dive, explainer on a story in the news, covering: current affairs, politics, investigations, leaks, and scandals. It might cover, for example, topics such as: the environment, green issues, climate change, the climate emergency and global warming; American politics including: Biden, Trump, the White House, the GOP, the Republicans and the Republican Party, the Democrats and the Democratic Party; UK politics including: parliament, Labour, the Conservative party, the Liberal Democrats, Rishi Sunak, and Keir Starmer; culture; the royals and the royal family, including King Charles III; HS2; the police; Ukraine; Russia; and Bangladesh

Episodes

Black Box: the collision

The beginning of a new series that explores seven stories and the thread that ties them together: artificial intelligence. In this prologue, Hannah (not her real name) has met Noah and he has changed her life for the better. So why does she have concerns about him?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/24·14m 28s

How the cost of living changed the way we eat out

Restaurants across the UK are struggling with rising rents, food prices and customers tight on cash. How can they attract loyal diners? Grace Dent and Tony Naylor report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/24·24m 29s

The Conservative party’s problem with Islamophobia

Tory deputy chair Lee Anderson was suspended from the party after suggesting London’s mayor Sadiq Khan was being controlled by Islamists. But why can’t the party call his comments Islamophobic? Archie Bland reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/02/24·30m 22s

Saldo: Ukraine’s gangster governor – part 3

The liberation of Kherson city ended months of brutal Russian rule. But across the Dnipro River, occupation governor Volodymyr Saldo finds there is are still money-spinning opportunities to be found. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/02/24·31m 30s

Saldo: Ukraine’s gangster governor – part 2

Russia’s invasion changed everything for Ukrainians – and for one man it presented an opportunity to reboot his political career and reclaim lost power. Tom Burgis reports from Kherson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/02/24·30m 33s

Saldo: Ukraine’s gangster governor – part 1

Vladimir Saldo was swept from Ukraine’s parliament after the Maidan revolution appeared to end his political career. By 2022, police were preparing a case against him as a suspect in a contract killing. Then Russia invaded and everything changed. Tom Burgis reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/02/24·26m 52s

How a ceasefire vote led to two days of chaos in the Commons – podcast

All parties were calling for a pause in the conflict. So why did MPs storm out and why is the speaker facing calls to quit? Kiran Stacey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/02/24·30m 5s

Is an uprising by Europe’s farmers sowing the seeds for the far right?

Furious farmers across Europe have blocked roads and railways as part of protests against new regulations and cheap imports. Jon Henley reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/02/24·20m 50s

Why the NHS needs Martha’s rule

Following a campaign by her family in memory of Martha Mills, the NHS is introducing Martha’s rule giving hospital patients in England access to a rapid review from a separate medical team if they are concerned with the care they are receiving. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/24·36m 59s

The shocking death and extraordinary life of Alexei Navalny

The opposition leader and anti-corruption campaigner was Putin’s fiercest critic. What does his death in a Siberian prison tell us about Russia today? Andrew Roth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/02/24·28m 24s

Deported and disgraced: the students wrongly accused of cheating

In 2014, the Home Office revoked the visas of 35,000 students accused of cheating in an English language exam. The consequences for those wrongly accused was devastating. Amelia Gentleman reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/02/24·40m 56s

Why is it becoming so hard to retire in the UK?

Everyone agrees the state pension system needs reforming – so why is changing it so hard?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/02/24·28m 30s

Israel’s threat to Gaza’s last refuge

What does the Israeli ground invasion threat mean for the million refugees sheltering in the city of Rafah? Ruth Michaelson reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/02/24·27m 17s

What on earth is going on in the Rochdale byelection?

An antisemitism row has led to Labour withdrawing its support for its candidate; a disgraced former Labour MP is running for Reform – and a political troublemaker is back. Helen Pidd reports on the chaos. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/02/24·24m 11s

Is Biden too old to be president?

Joe Biden’s age is increasingly becoming a political liability – even though Trump is just four years younger. David Smith reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/02/24·24m 8s

Why does the UK lag behind on cancer care?

Britain’s cancer survival rates are improving but the UK still lags behind comparable countries. The Guardian’s health editor, Andrew Gregory, reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/02/24·26m 42s

Labour’s £28bn green policy U-turn

Keir Starmer has abandoned his totemic pledge on green investment amid fears it opens the party to attacks on its economic credibility. Is he being too timid? Kiran Stacey and Fiona Harvey report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/02/24·28m 22s

Why the military are the real winners of Pakistan’s election

After loudly criticising the army, Imran Khan, reported to be Pakistan’s most popular politician, has been hit with several jail sentences. Mehreen Zahra-Malik reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/02/24·29m 40s

Why is generation Z so divided on gender?

Studies on the attitudes of young people between the age of 16 and 29 show a serious split towards both feminism and influencers such as Andrew Tate. What’s behind it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/02/24·28m 7s

The murder of Brianna Ghey

A year on from the murder of Brianna Ghey, her killers have been sentenced, and her mother is leading an extraordinary campaign of compassion. Helen Pidd reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/02/24·30m 17s

The disposable vape ban

Vapes are often used by smokers to help them quit cigarettes, but in recent years more British children have taken up the habit. So is a ban the right course of action? Sarah Boseley reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/02/24·23m 20s

The deal that could transform politics in Northern Ireland

A deal agreed with the DUP will allow power sharing to resume in Northern Ireland, with Sinn Féin as the largest party. Rory Carroll reports from Belfast. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/02/24·30m 18s

Is Britain fit to fight a war?

The British army has been struggling to attract applicants for years. Why don’t young people want to sign up? Dan Sabbagh reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/02/24·22m 53s

What’s gone wrong at Boeing?

A terrifying mid-air blowout of a door plug at 16,000 feet (4,900 metres) left passengers fearing for their lives on an Alaska Airlines flight earlier this month. It’s just the latest crisis for Boeing so what has gone wrong? Jeff Wise and Gwyn Topham report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/01/24·32m 31s

Will the ICJ ruling change anything in Gaza?

The ICJ’s interim ruling – which said aid must be allowed into Gaza – was quickly followed by shocking allegations from Israel that employees of one of the biggest aid agencies in the territory were involved in the 7 October attacks. What does this mean for people in Gaza? Patrick Wintour reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/01/24·21m 39s

The mothers and wives of Russian soldiers daring to defy Putin

Partners and parents of conscripted fighters are demanding that their loved ones come home. What does it say about Russian support for the war? With Pjotr Sauer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/01/24·24m 50s

Michelle Mone and the PPE Medpro investigation

After the peer admitted to lying about her involvement in lucrative government PPE deals during the Covid crisis, the fate of her high-profile lingerie company raises further questions. David Conn reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/01/24·32m 48s

Why the UK needs to eliminate measles … again

In 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the UK had successfully eliminated measles from its shores. But the country has since lost that status and cases of the infectious disease are rising rapidly in some areas. Nicola Davis reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/01/24·21m 30s

The terrifying, far-right ‘masterplan’ sparking protests across Germany

The far-right party AfD has met neo-Nazi activists to discuss mass deportations. Why is the party still so popular? Kate Connolly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/01/24·28m 59s

New Hampshire primary: the last chance to stop Trump?

Following the withdrawal of Ron DeSantis from the race, only Nikki Haley now stands between Donald Trump and the Republican nomination for the presidency. David Smith reports from Manchester, New Hampshire. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/01/24·21m 18s

The Freedom theatre – and the fight for Palestinian culture

What does the raiding of a theatre in the West Bank tell us about the dangers Palestinian artists are facing? Emma Graham-Harrison reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/01/24·32m 23s

The race for the moon

The space race of the 20th century put the first person on the moon. Now a new race to the lunar surface – with new global players – is just getting going. Robin McKie reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/01/24·23m 58s

Cocaine, gangs and murder: Ecuador’s 10 days of terror

Just a few years ago it was one of the most peaceful countries in Latin America. But last week drug gangs stormed a live TV broadcast and unleashed a wave of terror. Tom Phillips reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/01/24·27m 14s

The Houthis and the Red Sea crisis

Attacks on commercial ships in the Red Sea by the Houthi rebel group in Yemen have been met with airstrikes from the UK and US. Patrick Wintour reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/01/24·23m 44s

Will South Africa’s genocide case against Israel succeed?

South Africa has accused Israel of committing genocide in Gaza at hearings in the international court of justice. Chris McGreal reports on what happens next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/01/24·32m 23s

Reform UK: the party frightening the Tories from the fringes

The rightwing populist party and successor to Ukip has Conservative voters in its sights. Ben Quinn reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/01/24·22m 13s

The Chinese shadow over Taiwan’s election

How are presidential candidates in Taiwan responding to the ongoing threat of invasion from China? Amy Hawkins reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/01/24·29m 56s

A new law to exonerate Post Office victims

After a primetime TV drama moved the Post Office Horizon scandal up the political agenda, Rishi Sunak has acted to push through a law that would quash the convictions of hundreds of wrongly accused employees. Pippa Crerar reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/01/24·26m 20s

The UK government v junior doctors

After the longest continuous strike in NHS history, the latest industrial action in England is finally over. What next? Denis Campbell reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/01/24·26m 40s

The release of Oscar Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius, the former South African Paralympic and Olympic athlete, was released from prison on Friday. Journalists Tim Rohan and Margie Orford report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/01/24·37m 23s

Revisited: The Post Office scandal, part 2

Janet Skinner was jailed for false accounting after being wrongfully accused by her employer, the Post Office, of responsibility for the loss of more than £59,000. With her conviction quashed, she and others are demanding answers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/24·38m 25s

Revisited: the Post Office scandal – part 1

When a computer system installed by the Post Office malfunctioned, it led to the convictions of scores of subpostmasters for theft and false accounting. Lives were wrecked. After an ITV dramatisation brought new attention to the case, the Metropolitan police said they had commenced a criminal fraud investigation in relation to the Post Office. Today we re-run our episodes from 2021 on the scandal in full. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/24·32m 59s

Culture 2024: what to watch and listen to this year

Culture critics Peter Bradshaw, Tshepo Mokoena and Gwilym Mumford look ahead to the best of the year in film, TV and music. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/24·34m 27s

Bombs, boat sinkings and assassinations: is the Middle East descending into war?

Beyond the conflict in Gaza it has been a violent few weeks in the wider Middle East, from attacks on shipping in the Red Sea to bomb blasts in Iran and a killing by drone in Beirut. Julian Borger explains what may happen next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/01/24·28m 17s

Why are there so few Black sperm donors in the US?

A lack of donors is creating problems for prospective parents. What is behind the shortage? Lisa Armstrong reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/01/24·24m 57s

2024: what happens when US and UK elections collide?

UK and US elections don’t usually happen in the same year. So what happens when they do? Jonathan Freedland delves into history books and what lessons they have for 2024. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/01/24·31m 41s

How to reboot your memory for 2024

Cognitive neuroscientist Charan Ranganath, author of Why We Remember, explains how memory shapes our daily existence – and how to get the most out of it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/01/24·31m 10s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 6 – how King Charles profits from the assets of dead citizens

An archaic custom allows the king’s estate to absorb the assets of people in the north of England who die without a will or a known next of kin. Maeve McClenaghan investigates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/01/24·29m 44s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 5 – the coronation of Charles III

Jonathan Freedland examines what the coronation means to the modern-day UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/12/23·35m 7s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 4 – calculating the king’s wealth

Maeve McClenaghan and the reporting team reach the end of their investigation and make the calculations that reveal the vast personal fortune of King Charles III. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/12/23·37m 30s

Revisited: Cost of the crown, part 3 – the hidden history of the monarchy and slavery

Documents recently unearthed by historians have shown how the British royal family had ties to transatlantic slavery. Maeve McClenaghan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/12/23·27m 27s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 2 – duchies, diamonds and Dalís

Any attempt to understand the extent of royal wealth will need to account for the value of their land and their most valuable treasures. Maeve McClenaghan sets off to uncover what is held by the crown and what belongs to the family privately. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/12/23·37m 23s

Revisited: Cost of the crown part 1 – valuing the royal family

In the first part of an investigative miniseries on royal wealth, Maeve McClenaghan sets off on the trail to uncover how much public money is spent on the Windsors – and what they do in return. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/12/23·32m 13s

Revisited: From Blair to Starmer: Labour’s path to power, part 2 – podcast

Labour went into the 1997 general election full of confidence. Now, 26 years on from that famous victory, Kiran Stacey hears as those who helped craft it look ahead and ask if it is time to be more radical. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/12/23·23m 42s

Revisited: From Blair to Starmer: Labour’s path to power, part 1

In 1996 Labour was a year out from an election after more than a decade out of power. Its leader, Tony Blair, was surrounded by advisers and strategists plotting their way to victory. Kiran Stacey hears how they did it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/12/23·26m 37s

How the Guardian covered 2023

The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, talks about how the newspaper covered a year that witnessed the Israel-Gaza war, the coronation of King Charles, the rise of AI and record high temperatures. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/12/23·36m 52s

The ‘cruel’ new visa rules set to break up families

Government attempts to bear down on record migration figures will target family visas for those earning lower incomes. Robert Booth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/12/23·27m 28s

John Crace’s political year

The Guardian’s parliamentary sketch writer, John Crace, reflects on the year’s events in Westminster. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/12/23·27m 49s

Ukraine’s fight for funds to keep Russia at bay

As the Ukraine war heads into a new calendar year, the country is battling not just the Russian army but also on the diplomatic front, to secure further aid from its allies. Luke Harding and Dan Sabbagh report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/12/23·24m 17s

The Barclays and the battle for the Telegraph

The Barclay family may still legally own the newspaper titles, but politicians alongside some of the world’s richest men are contesting who will control them in the future. Jane Martinson, author of You May Never See Us Again: The Barclay Dynasty, reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/12/23·28m 12s

How Madonna changed pop culture for ever

It’s 40 years since Madonna began scandalising and delighting fans and critics around the world. But is she still misunderstood? With Mary Gabriel. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/12/23·31m 17s

Is Israel deliberately trying to make Gaza uninhabitable? – Podcast

With 40% of homes destroyed in the strip, legal experts are raising the question of ‘domicide’ – but what it is it, and is it taking place in Gaza?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/12/23·29m 13s

Rishi Sunak, Rwanda and the rebels

The prime minister faced down rebels within his party to win a vote on his controversial bill to send asylum seekers to Rwanda. But more trouble awaits him in the new year. Kiran Stacey reports from Westminster. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/12/23·24m 0s

Why Argentinians are gambling everything on ‘anarcho-capitalist’ Javier Milei

The libertarian economist won the election with his radical ideas. Can he deliver? Tom Phillips reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/12/23·28m 47s

The stories behind Europe’s unmarked migrant graves – podcast

What happens to the people who risk everything to get to Europe – and don’t survive the journey? Ashifa Kassam reports from Lanzarote. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/12/23·34m 34s

Sellafield: Europe’s most toxic nuclear site

The Guardian’s investigation into safety concerns at Europe’s most hazardous nuclear plant. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/12/23·36m 8s

Revisited: a conversation with Benjamin Zephaniah

The British poet Benjamin Zephaniah died this week after a short illness. Here we revisit a conversation between Zephaniah and George the Poet from 2020. They discussed why, having been born a generation apart, their work was exposing racial injustice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/23·33m 14s

The lives and lies of George Santos

The US politician was accused of telling extraordinary lies about everything from his previous jobs to his religion. Why did it take so long to boot him out of Congress? Adam Gabbatt explains. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/23·23m 37s

Boris Johnson v the Covid inquiry

After accusations of erratic decision-making during the pandemic, the former prime minister will finally face the inquiry. Aletha Adu reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/12/23·25m 4s

Why are so many councils going ‘bankrupt’?

Nottingham council is the latest to in effect declare itself bankrupt, and one in 10 county councils in England are at risk of following suit. What does it mean for the services that so many people rely on? Jessica Murray reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/12/23·27m 6s

Why is the Israel-Hamas conflict so deadly for journalists?

More reporters are said to have been killed in this conflict than any in decades. Jonathan Dagher, from Reporters Without Borders, discusses what it means for public understanding of the region. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/12/23·32m 4s

Israel-Gaza: a week of tearful reunions and an uneasy truce

As Israeli hostages were exchanged for Palestinian prisoners, the intense fighting was paused this week. Jason Burke reports on an emotional few days and what happens next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/12/23·26m 57s

The secret plan to ‘hook’ the developing world on oil

As the Cop28 climate summit begins in Dubai today, a secret Saudi Arabian plan to get poorer countries ‘hooked on its harmful products’ has emerged. Damian Carrington reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/11/23·25m 20s

Geert Wilders and Europe’s lurch to the far right

How did far-right politician Geert Wilders win so many seats in the Dutch election? Jon Henley and Senay Boztas report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/11/23·32m 27s

How King Charles profits from the assets of dead citizens

An archaic custom allows the king’s estate to absorb the assets of people in the north of England who die without a will or a known next of kin. Maeve McClenaghan investigates King’s estate to transfer £100m into ethical funds after bona vacantia revelations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/11/23·29m 26s

The spy tech firm managing NHS data

Palantir, the US spy-tech firm co-founded by the billionaire Peter Thiel, has won a contract to handle NHS data. It’s a deal that has left privacy advocates such as Cori Crider with serious questions. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/11/23·30m 34s

He’s back: Sam Altman and the chaos at the heart of the AI industry

The CEO of OpenAI was sacked and then rehired days later, after staff threatened to follow him. But what does this corporate drama tell us about the future of AI? Blake Montgomery explains. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/11/23·30m 42s

Can tax cuts save the Tories?

Jeremy Hunt has offered up sweeping tax cuts in an attempt to jolt the UK economy back to life and salvage his party’s hopes of staying in power beyond the next election. Heather Stewart reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/11/23·22m 18s

A truce agreement in Gaza

On late Tuesday night, Israel’s cabinet met to vote on a temporary ceasefire in Gaza and a hostage and prisoner exchange. Julian Borger reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/11/23·18m 33s

How much legal trouble is Donald Trump in?

Various polls have the ex-president as favourite to retake the White House in the US election next year, but he faces growing legal jeopardy. Hugo Lowell reports on the many charges Trump is facing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/11/23·25m 54s

The families stuck living in Britain’s unlicensed bedsits

Why do so many people end up in unlicensed houses of multiple occupation? And what are the conditions like? Robert Booth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/11/23·26m 13s

Israel’s raid on al-Shifa hospital

Gaza’s biggest hospital was filled with doctors, patients and people seeking safety when Israel laid siege to it. Ruth Michaelson reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/11/23·27m 55s

How the UK government’s Rwanda asylum plan came unstuck

The supreme court has ruled that the government’s plan to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda is unlawful. Peter Walker explains what happens next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/11/23·23m 34s

Has Putin got the upper hand in Ukraine?

With the world’s attention on the Middle East, Ukraine seems to be at a stalemate – which may sound like good news for Russia, but is not so straightforward, Luke Harding reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/11/23·22m 2s

The return of David Cameron

Former prime minister David Cameron has been installed as foreign secretary in Rishi Sunak’s reshuffle, in which Suella Braverman was also sacked from the cabinet. Pippa Crerar reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/11/23·24m 58s

Rebuilding Paradise: five years on from California’s deadliest fire

Five years after a wildfire killed 85 people in the Californian town of Paradise, the area has been rebuilt from the ashes. Dani Anguiano and Alastair Gee report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/11/23·31m 13s

Suella Braverman, the police and the protests

Senior members of the government have spent the week calling for Saturday’s pro-Palestinian march to be banned but the Metropolitan police have resisted the pressure. Daniel Boffey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/11/23·21m 33s

What will it take to free the hostages taken by Hamas?

On 7 October, 240 people in Israel were kidnapped and taken into Gaza. A month on, only a handful have been released. Bethan McKernan reports The mothers whose children are held hostage by Hamas: ‘All we want is them home’ Israel-Hamas war – live updates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/11/23·30m 38s

Fear and fury in the West Bank

Palestinians in the West Bank say that while all the attention is on Gaza, Israeli settlers overseen by the military are killing people and forcing them from the land. Julian Borger reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/11/23·25m 54s

Crypto on trial: the downfall of Sam Bankman-Fried

Sam Bankman-Fried, founder of cryptocurrency exchange FTX, is facing up to 110 years in jail after being found guilty of fraud on a massive scale, exposed when his company collapsed last year. Blake Montgomery reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/11/23·27m 40s

Why are Britain’s new homes so rubbish?

Oliver Wainwright reports on the increasingly poor standards of newly built homes in the UK and what consumers can do to protect themselves. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/11/23·24m 51s

How oligarchs use English courts to silence their critics

Use of Slapps by the super-rich against journalists is increasingly common, and campaigners say new legislation to deter such actions does not go far enough. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/11/23·30m 48s

How the Israel-Gaza conflict is dividing Labour

Since a show of unity at Labour conference, anger and upset have been growing over the leader’s stance. Can Keir Starmer heal the rift? Aletha Adu reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/11/23·27m 15s

Is the AI safety summit already too late?

Rishi Sunak has convened a global summit of world leaders and tech executives to discuss how the power of artificial intelligence can be safely harnessed. Dan Milmo reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/11/23·27m 30s

‘We’re totally isolated’: inside Gaza as Israel’s war intensifies

As Israel steps up its military campaign in Gaza, residents trapped in the territory are facing a humanitarian crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/10/23·22m 58s

What we’ve learned so far from the Covid inquiry

Hearings for the government Covid inquiry resume today in Westminster with former Downing Street adviser Dominic Cummings slated to appear this week. Peter Walker reports on the story so far. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/10/23·27m 27s

The last whale hunter in Iceland

Kristján Loftsson has stubbornly refused to bow to public opinion or an overwhelming international consensus against whaling. But with a full ban coming in Iceland, has he killed his last whale?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/10/23·28m 18s

The rise of antisemitism in the UK

There has been a 1,350% increase in hate crimes against Jewish people in London, according to the Metropolitan police. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/10/23·23m 47s

In the wake of Storm Babet

Thousands of homes across Scotland and the Midlands have been flooded in recent days. Jessica Murray reports from Chesterfield. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/10/23·26m 46s

Could the conflict in Israel tip into regional war?

Presidents, prime ministers and diplomats are trying to stop the conflict from spinning further out of control. Is it working?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/10/23·24m 52s

How a contested history feeds the Israel-Palestine conflict

Certain dates are seared into the minds of those who have tried to untangle the decades-long Israel-Palestine conflict, be it 1917, 1947, 1967, 1973 – and now 2023. Chris McGreal reports on an escalating war that is only understandable by looking to the past. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/10/23·37m 40s

How Taylor Swift built her music empire

After its opening last weekend, Taylor Swift: the Eras Tour is on track to be the biggest concert film of all time. How did Swift create this level of success? Laura Snapes reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/10/23·32m 8s

Kicking out the populists: how young voters helped swing Poland’s election

Poland’s far-right Law and Justice party was a disaster for many of the country’s democratic institutions and the LGBT community. Now it appears voters have got rid of it. Shaun Walker reports from Warsaw. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/10/23·25m 26s

The deadly stakes of a ground invasion of Gaza

With more than 2 million people trapped in Gaza, what are the consequences of an Israeli invasion?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/10/23·31m 49s

Is the SNP’s independence dream fading?

The Scottish National party has agreed a new strategy for pursuing independence at its annual conference. But is declining support for the party placing the issue out of reach? Libby Brooks reports from Aberdeen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/10/23·23m 52s

The hidden cost of cancer

Getting ill shouldn’t be expensive. But for many patients, being diagnosed with cancer can be a financial catastrophe. Hilary Osborne looks at why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/10/23·22m 7s

The fight to give Indigenous Australians a voice

As Australians prepare to vote in a referendum to give Indigenous people a voice in parliament, Prof Marcia Langton explores the long struggle for equal rights. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/10/23·41m 25s

Human catastrophe unfolds in Israel and Gaza

Deadly assault by Hamas militants across southern Israel has been followed by devastating airstrikes on Gaza and threats of full-scale invasion by Israeli military. Bethan McKernan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/10/23·35m 39s

Keir Starmer’s plan to rebuild Britain

Keir Starmer promises to bring in a new era of ‘rebuilding’, ‘renewal’ and even ‘healing’ after 13 years of Conservative rule. Kiran Stacey reports on the Labour leader’s keynote conference speech. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/10/23·24m 38s

From Blair to Starmer: Labour’s path to power – part 2

Labour went into the 1997 general election full of confidence. Now, 26 years on from that famous victory, Kiran Stacey hears as those who helped craft it look ahead and ask if it is time to be more radical. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/10/23·23m 32s

How the Israel-Gaza conflict erupted

A bloody attack by Hamas has shocked the world – and left Israel reeling. As the country responds with devastating airstrikes, Peter Beaumont explains how the surprise attack unfolded and what could happen next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/10/23·21m 4s

From Blair to Starmer: Labour’s path to power, part 1

In 1996 Labour was a year out from an election after more than a decade out of power. Its leader, Tony Blair, was surrounded by advisers and strategists plotting their way to victory. Kiran Stacey hears how they did it and what lessons there are for Keir Starmer’s party as it gathers for its annual conference. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/10/23·26m 52s

Why Britain is mourning the Sycamore Gap tree

The felling of a Northumberland tree has made headlines around the world – and led to a criminal investigation. Why did it mean so much to people?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/10/23·26m 46s

Do Rishi Sunak's new policies add up?

Rishi Sunak has declared himself an enemy of the ‘30-year status quo’. In doing so, he scrapped much of the HS2 rail link and said A-levels would be replaced. Kiran Stacey reports on whether it all adds up. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/10/23·24m 54s

HS2: how the costly rail project ran out of track

It started out with high hopes and a higher budget. Helen Pidd explains why the government has lost faith in the ambitious – and controversial – rail project. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/10/23·27m 8s

Out in the cold: the spy scandal gripping Denmark

Claus Hjort Frederiksen, Denmark’s former defence minister and Lars Findsen former head of Denmark’s foreign intelligence agency, have been charged with divulging state secrets and face lengthy prison sentences. Harry Davies investigates why the scandal will reverberate well beyond Scandinavia. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/10/23·34m 3s

Gangs of Stockholm: the rise of gun crime in Sweden

September has become the worst month for shooting deaths in Sweden since records began in 2016. Miranda Bryant and Sebastian Stakset, a former gang member, talk about what’s behind the shocking rise in violence. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/10/23·26m 30s

Culture 2023: the films, music and TV shows not to miss this autumn

Guardian music critic Alexis Petridis, film editor Catherine Shoard and TV critic Leila Latif guide you through what’s on offer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/09/23·30m 18s

Nagorno Karabakh: Why a frozen conflict suddenly exploded

Tens of thousands of refugees have already fled their homes in the disputed region, and more are set to follow. Andrew Roth explains why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/09/23·24m 36s

Overcrowded and understaffed: life in England’s crumbling prisons

Rats, broken windows and overfilled cells are a daily reality for prisoners in England’s crumbling jails. Helen Pidd reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/09/23·34m 3s

Why are London firearms officers laying down their guns?

Metropolitan police firearms officers have downed their weapons in protest at the charging of a colleague with murder. Vikram Dodd reports on what happens now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/09/23·22m 3s

The Blind Side and Hollywood’s blind spot

Why is the retired NFL player Michael Oher bringing a lawsuit against the family who took him in as a teenager? Andrew Lawrence reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/09/23·26m 58s

Looking for alternatives: a tale of two German towns

As Germany heads into a recession, tensions over its migration policy and its national identity are throwing up unusual results in local elections. Michael Safi reports View the front page of the Guardian’s newly launched Europe edition. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/09/23·45m 11s

Rishi Sunak’s net zero U-turn

The PM has torn up his ambitious plans for Britain to achieve its commitments on net zero emissions, saying they were ‘unrealistic and punitive’. Kiran Stacey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/09/23·22m 35s

The destruction of Derna

What left the city of Derna vulnerable to such a devastating flood? The Libyan freelance journalist Johr Ali reports on the city in which he grew up. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/09/23·27m 40s

The horrifying allegations against Russell Brand

The comedian, presenter and actor has been accused of sexual assault, emotional abuse and rape between 2006 and 2013 – allegations Brand denies. Alexandra Topping explains why such stories can be particularly difficult to investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/09/23·30m 3s

Naomi Klein’s doppelganger

When the author Naomi Klein began being mistaken for Naomi Wolf it set her off on a quest to examine the slippery nature of truth in the post-pandemic world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/09/23·29m 35s

What have a year of protests really changed in Iran?

Twelve months after 22-year-old Mahsa Amini died in the custody of the regime’s ‘morality police’, we look at her legacy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/09/23·30m 17s

Ukraine’s counteroffensive: breaking the Russian lines

Ukraine’s much-anticipated summer offensive has been slow to the point of stalling. But a recent breakthrough of the Russian lines has provided new hope for the country’s leaders – and its partners. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/09/23·23m 55s

A day in the ruins of Morocco’s earthquake

Peter Beaumont reports from the High Atlas mountains in Morocco, where residents deal with the huge loss of life and destruction of their villages. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/09/23·26m 12s

The concrete crisis: is Britain falling apart?

Last-minute safety worries about the structural soundness of school buildings threw the new term into chaos for many children and their parents. Could the episode spell disaster for Rishi Sunak’s government?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/09/23·27m 47s

Has the plant-based food revolution lost its sizzle?

There has been a boom in the market for plant-based foods and products that mimic meat in recent years. But that boom has hit a blip amid a cost of living crisis and increasing consumer worries about ultra-processed food, says Bee Wilson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/09/23·29m 51s

The mystery of Bangladesh’s missing children – part three

What would you do if everything you believed about your childhood was wrong? Rosie Swash and Thaslima Begum investigate an international adoption scandal that is still shattering lives today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/09/23·35m 44s

The scandal of Bangladesh’s missing children – part two

What would you do if everything you believed about your childhood was wrong? Rosie Swash and Thaslima Begum investigate an international adoption scandal that is still shattering lives today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/09/23·40m 1s

The mystery of Bangladesh’s missing children – part one

What would you do if everything you believed about your childhood was wrong? Rosie Swash and Thaslima Begum investigate an international adoption scandal that is still shattering lives today • Listen to episodes two and three of this series. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/09/23·33m 30s

How safe are the priceless treasures in our museums?

As many as 2,000 historic items are thought to have gone missing from the British Museum’s collections in the past decade. How could it have happened, and how easily can museums get stolen artefacts back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/09/23·27m 24s

The chilling rise of AI scams

Criminals are cloning voices and making calls to trick victims into sending them money. How can they be stopped?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/09/23·23m 33s

The curious world of the Guardian’s Experience column

Rebecca Liu discusses her role as a commissioning editor at the Guardian’s Experience column and we hear three stories from those who have been featured in the column. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/09/23·34m 21s

Why wasn’t Lucy Letby stopped sooner?

The nurse is the most prolific child serial killer in modern British history. Could the NHS have prevented her committing so many crimes?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/08/23·35m 14s

Rats, fires and floods: why Parliament is falling down

It is the symbol of Britain’s democracy and it is falling into decay. The Palace of Westminster needs extensive – and expensive – repairs. But are MPs ready to do what it takes to save it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/08/23·34m 32s

The final weeks of Yevgeny Prigozhin

The Wagner leader seemed to have achieved the unthinkable: humiliating Putin and getting away with it. But had he really been forgiven – or was the Kremlin playing for time?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/08/23·25m 22s

Revisited: Trafficked: Marta – part four – podcast

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/08/23·33m 44s

Revisited: Trafficked: the operation – part three – podcast

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/08/23·42m 18s

Revisited: Trafficked: the closed door – part two

Julia, a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK, tells the journalist Annie Kelly about the years she was shipped between brothels. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/08/23·34m 24s

Revisited: Trafficked: the trap – part one

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/08/23·30m 14s

Cotton Capital: Reparations – episode 6

Revisited: In the final episode of the series, Cotton Capital editor and Guardian journalist Maya Wolfe-Robinson looks at the subject of reparations. What do they mean for communities and descendants of transatlantic enslavement – and what is the Guardian planning to do in its own programme of measures?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/08/23·49m 33s

Cotton Capital: Resistance – episode 5

Revisited: In the fifth episode in the series, Guardian journalist and Cotton Capital special correspondent Lanre Bakare examines Black Mancunian history, beginning with the 1945 Pan-African Congress that took place in the city and shaped independence movements across Africa. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/08/23·41m 6s

Cotton Capital: The Brazilian connection – episode 4

Revisited: The fourth episode in the Cotton Capital series explores how during the transatlantic slave trade, more enslaved African people were taken to Brazil than any other country. Today, more than half of Brazil’s population identify as Black and there are more Black people in Brazil than any other country except Nigeria. But the country is still grappling with deep structural racism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/08/23·37m 30s

Cotton Capital: The Sea Islands – episode 3

Revisited: In the third episode in the series, journalist DeNeen L Brown travels to the Sea Islands in the US and meets the Gullah Geechee people – direct descendants of enslaved Africans who picked the distinctive Sea Island cotton prized by traders in Manchester. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/08/23·48m 21s

Cotton Capital: The meaning of Success – episode 2

Revisited: The second episode in the series follows journalist Maya Wolfe-Robinson as she travels to Jamaica in search of the site of the former sugar plantation Success, once co-owned by the Guardian funder Sir George Philips. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/08/23·50m 58s

Cotton Capital: The bee and the ship – episode 1

Revisited: The first episode in the Cotton Capital series explores the revelations that the Guardian’s founding editor, John Edward Taylor, and at least nine of his 11 backers had links to slavery, principally through the textile industry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/08/23·46m 41s

The wellness-to-conspiracy pipeline

For many people, alternative therapies and wellness routines provide comfort and pleasure. For others, they can be a pathway to far-right conspiracies, says author and journalist James Ball. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/08/23·33m 15s

Why were the wildfires in Hawaii so deadly?

Last week fires tore through the Hawaiian island of Maui, causing devastating destruction in the ancient capital of Lahaina. What happened?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/08/23·26m 16s

The mystery of the Crooked House fire

When Britain’s wonkiest pub was destroyed in a fire and the ruins demolished, it sparked protests and made headlines around the world – but why?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/08/23·25m 0s

The Bibby Stockholm saga

After removing asylum seekers from the Bibby Stockholm barge on Friday, the government says they will be returned ‘as soon as possible’. Daniel Trilling and Sammy Gecsoyler report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/08/23·31m 10s

Uncovering the truth of the Nazi occupation of the Channel Islands

In 1940 the German army took over the Channel Islands and built concentration camps on Alderney where hundreds, possibly thousands, of people died. Now a UK government review will attempt to get to the truth of what really happened. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/08/23·32m 29s

How the search for UFOs reached the US Congress

The quest to discover whether or not we’re alone in the universe has become an obsession for many Americans. Some of them are elected officials, reports Adam Gabbatt in Washington DC. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/08/23·33m 28s

The Qur’an burnings in Sweden: who is fanning the flames? – podcast

The act of burning a holy book in Sweden is not of itself illegal. But a spate of burnings has resulted in outrage at home and abroad – and potentially far-reaching consequences. Miranda Bryant reports from Stockholm. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/08/23·23m 33s

Why the rest of the world can’t afford to ignore the coup in Niger

The Sahel region, sometimes called Africa’s ‘coup belt’, has just seen another government ousted. Peter Beaumont and Nesrine Malik on what it means for African – and global – security. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/08/23·28m 53s

The legacy of Sinéad O’Connor

Film-maker Kathryn Ferguson and journalist Simon Hattenstone share their memories of Sinéad O’Connor and reflect on her impact on music and society. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/08/23·36m 55s

How can we escape burnout? | Podcast

Burnout is a serious issue in workplaces across the UK. What can we do to change our working culture in order to prevent it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/08/23·25m 51s

Donald Trump’s January 6 indictment

The former US president appeared in court on Wednesday charged on four counts related to his efforts to overturn the result of the 2020 election. Hugo Lowell reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/08/23·35m 3s

Rishi Sunak’s anti-green gamble

The prime minister’s announcement of new oil and gas licences in the North Sea this week is a sign he sees electoral advantage in being anti-green. Kiran Stacey reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/08/23·28m 48s

Life in the UK for one of China’s most wanted

Hong Kong activist Finn Lau has vowed to continue his fight for democracy despite the Chinese bounty on his head. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/08/23·32m 9s

Why is Hollywood on strike? (And why Succession's Brian Cox is joining them)

Production on Hollywood films and hit TV shows has ground to a halt. Apart from the stars on the picket line, how is this strike different from other labour disputes?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/08/23·34m 3s

The novelist who became a war crimes investigator – and uncovered a secret diary - Podcast

Victoria Amelina was an award-winning novelist. But after Russian forces invaded Ukraine, she began investigating war crimes – including the disappearance of a much-loved children’s author. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/07/23·30m 27s

Why Nigel Farage’s bank account matters so much

Since the politician’s account with Coutts was closed, the story has dominated the news agenda. Does it show that something has gone very wrong in our banking system?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/07/23·29m 54s

Climate crisis up close: a week of wildfires in Rhodes

Holidaymakers on the Greek island of Rhodes found themselves evacuated from hotels and sleeping in school halls as wildfires raged nearby. As they make plans to return home, residents and business owners are counting the cost of what will be an expensive recovery. Rachel Hall reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/07/23·27m 5s

The class of 2023: the UK’s unluckiest students

Many of the students who began their studies under Covid restrictions are now leaving university without knowing their grades. Anna Fazackerley reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/07/23·30m 51s

The Great British motorcycle scam – part two

In the concluding part of an investigation into Norton, Simon Goodley reports on a prestigious motorcycle brand that became a vehicle for a multimillion-pound pension fraud. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/07/23·44m 15s

The Great British motorcycle scam – part one

Norton Motorcycles was once one of the most prestigious brands in motorsport. So how did it become the vehicle for a multimillion pound pension fraud that has left investors penniless? Simon Goodley reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/07/23·38m 16s

Why we are all living in a Barbie world – podcast

She may have towered over the toy market for 60 years, but Barbie has never been short of critics. So why is a film about a plastic doll creating such fevered excitement?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/07/23·30m 18s

Extreme heat: a warning shot from nature

Over the last two weeks, many countries have experienced record-breaking temperatures. Guardian reporters based in the UK, US, Italy and Taiwan discuss the fallout. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/07/23·27m 51s

The World Cup and the future of women’s football

The Women’s World Cup kicks off on Thursday. The former England star Karen Carney discusses why this is an opportunity for investment that the sport cannot afford to miss. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/07/23·26m 9s

Could your clothes be making you sick? | Podcast

Stain-resistant, wrinkle-proof, hard-wearing – modern clothing can cope with anything. But we know little about the chemicals that go into making it so impressive – or what they could be doing to our health. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/07/23·32m 55s

Has Britain become a country of shoplifters?

Shopkeepers complain the number of thefts from stores is soaring. Is the cost of living crisis to blame or organised gangs?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/07/23·26m 56s

The Sun, the BBC and Huw Edwards: the story of a scandal

After a week of frenzied reporting about allegations against the BBC presenter, there are uncomfortable questions for the paper that ran the scoop, reports Jim Waterson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/07/23·25m 43s

Will Mark Zuckerberg’s Threads unravel Twitter?

Meta has launched what it promises will be a kinder alternative to Twitter. Can it deliver? Dan Milmo reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/07/23·28m 42s

Putin v Prigozhin: is Wagner too valuable to crush?

When Wagner forces turned their guns against Russian forces it led to panic in Moscow. But after the coup was aborted and its leader accused of treachery, it was business as usual for the group’s lucrative Africa operations. Pjotr Sauer and Jason Burke report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/07/23·30m 47s

Cure or fad? The truth about weight loss drugs | Podcast

A new generation of weight loss drugs has caused a stir – offering impressive results. But are they really a silver bullet for the obesity epidemic?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/07/23·31m 38s

Payback or play? The orcas sinking yachts

Since May 2020, there have been hundreds of reports of orcas interacting with boats in the strait of Gibraltar. Philip Hoare reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/07/23·24m 29s

What the raid on Jenin says about the future of Israel and Palestine

The biggest assault on the West Bank in 20 years could herald a new phase of this old conflict, reports Bethan McKernan from Jenin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/07/23·29m 11s

Can Biden solve his supreme court problem?

Last week, the US supreme court ruled in favour of a web designer who does not want to serve gay clients, ended affirmative action and blocked Joe Biden’s student debt forgiveness plan. Sam Levine reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/07/23·31m 46s

Why are so many children refusing to go to school? | Podcast

One in 10 GCSE-year pupils are absent from England’s schools each day, up 70% since before the Covid pandemic. What is going on?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/07/23·26m 44s

The killing of Nahel – and a week of grief and fury in France

Since a 17-year-old boy was shot during a traffic stop, protests have set France ablaze, and exposed deep divisions. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/07/23·28m 9s

Tuvalu – how do you save a disappearing country?

The Pacific Islands country could be lost to rising sea levels in just 50 years. Now its citizens have come up with a surprising plan to preserve their nation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/07/23·30m 56s

The Republican race for 2024: can anyone stop Trump?

Despite being embroiled in several legal wrangles that could ultimately land him in jail, Donald Trump has a comfortable lead in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Joan E Greve reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/06/23·27m 16s

Guards at Del Monte pineapple farm in Kenya accused of killings

An investigation by the Guardian and the Bureau of Investigative journalism has uncovered claims from villagers in Kenya of violence and even killings linked to guards on a Del Monte pineapple farm. Emily Dugan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/06/23·30m 6s

The oil company CEO running the next UN climate change summit

The UN’s annual climate conference is being dogged by scandal months before it even begins. Environment editor Damian Carrington reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/06/23·26m 35s

What the Wagner mutiny means for Ukraine, Russia and Putin

When Russia’s mercenary group marched on Moscow, it seemed to take the world – and Vladimir Putin – by surprise . What does it mean for his grip on power – and for his war?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/06/23·28m 58s

A violent homicide – and a pioneering act of forgiveness | Podcast

When Donald Fields Jr killed his father in an argument, he could have been imprisoned for life. Instead, in a case that might be the first of its kind in the US, he completed a restorative justice programme and was released. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/06/23·42m 52s

How the Windrush generation shaped British culture

It is 75 years since HMS Empire Windrush docked at Tilbury in Essex. Authors Colin Grant and Patrice Lawrence and publisher Sharmaine Lovegrove reflect on the cultural legacy of that moment and how it has shaped their work. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/06/23·35m 1s

Britain’s mortgage timebomb

The Bank of England is expected to raise interest rates again today, leaving millions of homeowners facing higher costs. Richard Partington reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/06/23·30m 22s

Held v Montana: the young people fighting for the climate in court

Dharna Noor reports on the 16 young people taking on the state of Montana in a historic climate case. What could it mean if the plaintiffs are successful?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/06/23·30m 18s

Why police are stepping back from mental health callouts

Police spend an estimated 20-40% of their time on mental health calls, according to the College of Policing. Is Humberside police’s ‘Right Care, Right Person’ a better way? Helen Pidd reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/06/23·28m 58s

The death of the Unabomber: will his dangerous influence live on? – podcast

Ted Kaczynski, the Harvard-educated mathematician who ran a 17-year bombing campaign that killed three people, died in prison earlier this month. But his manifesto promoting violent rebellion against the modern world continues to inspire copycat attacks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/06/23·45m 7s

Boris Johnson: the damning verdict

A committee of MPs has found that Boris Johnson deliberately misled parliament and was part of a campaign to abuse and intimidate them. Peter Walker reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/06/23·26m 49s

Is it time to decriminalise abortion in the UK?

After a distressing and controversial case in which a woman was jailed after taking abortion pills after the UK time limit, is it time to change the law?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/06/23·26m 10s

How Saudi Arabia took over professional golf

After months of bitter divisions in the world of professional golf, a major deal has resulted in victory for Saudi Arabia and its bid to influence the future of the sport. Ewan Murray reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/06/23·33m 41s

The long shadows of Boris Johnson and Nicola Sturgeon

The former PM and ex-Scottish first minister were controversial leaders. Now they are both facing disgrace – adding to the turmoil in British politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/06/23·28m 2s

What’s behind the rise in dog attacks?

Seven people have been killed by dogs in the UK so far this year. Simon Usborne reports on the worrying increase in attacks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/06/23·26m 59s

Prince Harry versus the Mirror

Prince Harry became one of the most senior royals ever to give evidence in an English court this week. Jim Waterson reports from the high court in London where tabloid phone hacking was back under the microscope. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/06/23·26m 43s

The destruction of the Kakhovka dam

The UN has blamed the destruction of the Kakhovka dam on Russia. What impact will the flooding have on the war in Ukraine? Dan Sabbagh reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/06/23·27m 31s

How to develop artificial super-intelligence without destroying humanity

Sam Altman, the founder of the revolutionary application Chat-GPT, is touring Europe with a message: AI is changing the world and there are big risks, but also big potential rewards. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/06/23·33m 35s

What is the UK government hiding from the Covid inquiry?

The government has launched legal action to prevent the independent Covid inquiry demanding disclosure of thousands of WhatsApp messages. What does it have to hide, asks Aubrey Allegretti. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/06/23·28m 53s

Our critics’ guide to a summer of music, movies and culture

Guardian culture writers Alex Needham, Ellen E Jones and Michael Cragg make their picks of the best of this summer in arts and culture. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/06/23·32m 26s

Is Manchester City’s dominance of English football fair?

Manchester City have added this season’s Premier League title to their collection of honours and are favourites to win the FA Cup and the Champions League. But are they playing fair? Jonathan Liew reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/06/23·28m 45s

Sofas, smiles – and scandal: what’s going on at ITV’s This Morning?

It’s been a fixture on British TV screens for decades – as has one of its hosts, Phillip Schofield. But now This Morning is in turmoil after he admitted to an ‘unwise, but not illegal’ workplace relationship. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/06/23·25m 29s

Tracking down Ukraine’s abducted children

How did tens of thousands of Ukrainian children end up in Russian re-education camps? Peter Beaumont reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/05/23·26m 56s

Bashar al-Assad’s dark return to the world stage

For almost a decade the murderous actions of the Syrian president meant he was shunned but now he is being embraced by Arab leaders once more. What does this mean for the millions of refugees who fled from his brutal regime?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/05/23·30m 34s

The Murdochs' real-life succession drama | Podcast

Who will take over Rupert Murdoch’s media empire after he dies, and why does it matter? Paddy Manning reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/05/23·30m 33s

A spying scandal and lots of coffee: how Guardian Australia launched 10 years ago

In a special edition of Full Story, Guardian Australia’s daily podcast, Bridie Jabour speaks to the key players of its launch in May 2013. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/05/23·47m 49s

Conspiracy theories and chaos: a week watching GB News

GB News launched in 2021 with a mission to disrupt the relatively safe and sedate world of rolling TV news. Heather Stewart spent a week watching the channel to see what it has become today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/05/23·28m 1s

How a killing on New York subway exposed a broken system – podcast

When Jordan Neely, a homeless Michael Jackson impersonator, died at the hands of a fellow passenger this month, it shocked the world. But what does it reveal about the city?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/05/23·34m 53s

Is Suella Braverman speeding towards a government exit?

Having set herself up as a rival to the prime minister, the home secretary is now facing allegations that she broke the ministerial code. Aubrey Allegretti reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/05/23·22m 58s

From pollution to policing – can Sadiq Khan clean up London?

While training for the marathon, the London mayor developed adult-onset asthma – now he is on a mission to clean up the city’s air. But will his green policies win over voters?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/05/23·28m 41s

Why California is dismantling its death row

After decades locked alone in small cages in California’s San Quentin prison, men sentenced to die are now being moved off death row. Sam Levin investigates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/05/23·30m 51s

National Conservatism: a Tory fringe or the party’s future?

A conference run by a rightwing American thinktank attracted Tory MPs and influencers this week. Is its Trumpish populist philosophy a taste of where the Conservative party is heading?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/05/23·25m 6s

Can Imran Khan really take on the Pakistani army and win?

The former prime minister has blamed the country’s powerful military for his arrest last week, and his supporters have attacked military buildings. With Khan’s home surrounded by police yesterday, has he picked a battle he’s destined to lose?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/05/23·34m 8s

Has Ukraine’s spring offensive begun?

Ukrainian officials claim their forces have retaken land around the eastern city of Bakhmut and shot down Russian missiles targeting Kyiv. Luke Harding reports on the state of the war. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/05/23·26m 0s

Erdoğan survives, but will Turkish democracy?

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the president of Turkey, has moulded the country in his image during his two decades in power. Now he faces a run-off election to stay in power. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/05/23·31m 46s

Is the UK in the grip of ‘greedflation’?

Prices in the UK are continuing to rise on everything from groceries to energy bills and mortgage costs. Meanwhile, some companies are reporting record profits. Richard Partington reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/05/23·26m 53s

Hosting Ukraine’s Eurovision party

Hannah Moore reports from Liverpool’s M&S Bank Arena where Britain is preparing to host the Eurovision song contest on behalf of last year’s winners Ukraine. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/05/23·33m 48s

The killing of Shireen Abu Akleh – and another ordinary day in the West Bank

A year ago the renowned journalist was shot, but it was far from the only news story in Palestine that day. Kaamil Ahmed looks into the stories Abu Akleh never got to report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/05/23·33m 52s

Did distress calls go unanswered in the run-up to a fatal Channel disaster?

In November 2021 a dinghy crossing from France to the UK overturned, and at least 27 people drowned. Questions are being asked over whether distress calls were effectively ignored in run-up to worst Channel disaster in 30 years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/05/23·26m 40s

Why ‘godfather of AI’ Geoffrey Hinton thinks humanity at crossroads

His work is at heart of AI revolution, but in an interview with the Guardian’s Alex Hern, Hinton says he now fears the advances he helped usher in could pose an existential threat to humankind. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/05/23·29m 30s

Cotton Capital: the Guardian and reparations

Cotton Capital editor and Guardian journalist Maya Wolfe-Robinson looks at the subject of reparations. What do reparations mean for the communities and descendants of transatlantic enslavement – and what is the Guardian planning to do in its own programme of measures?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/05/23·50m 8s

Cost of the crown part 5: the coronation of Charles III

Charles III will be crowned in Westminster Abbey on Saturday in a ceremony steeped in centuries of history. Jonathan Freedland examines what the event means to the modern-day UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/05/23·35m 25s

Cost of the crown part 4: calculating the king’s wealth

Maeve McClenaghan and the reporting team reach the end of their investigation and make the calculations that reveal the vast personal fortune of King Charles III. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/05/23·37m 15s

Cost of the crown part 3: the hidden history of the monarchy and slavery

Documents recently unearthed by historians have shown how the British royal family had ties to transatlantic slavery. Maeve McClenaghan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/05/23·27m 59s

Cost of the crown part 2: Duchies, diamonds and Dalis

Any attempt to understand the extent of royal wealth will need to account for the value of their land and their most valuable treasures. Maeve McClenaghan sets off to uncover what is held by the crown and what belongs to the family privately. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/05/23·37m 30s

Cost of the crown part 1: valuing the royal family

In the first part of an investigative miniseries into royal wealth, Maeve McClenaghan sets off on the trail to uncover how much public money is spent on the Windsors – and what they do in return. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/05/23·32m 40s

Prince Harry and the return of the phone hacking scandal

This week, Prince Harry’s case over alleged phone hacking by the publisher of the Sun and News of the World reached the high court. Jim Waterson reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/04/23·30m 52s

Funding, forensics – and a fridge freezer? The investigation into the SNP

Just a few months ago the SNP, with Nicola Sturgeon at the helm, looked almost untouchable. Now a fraud investigation into the party has caused that image to dramatically unravel. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/04/23·31m 41s

Why are London’s schools disappearing?

London schools in areas such as Lambeth and Camden are having to close their doors as pupils leave. Why are numbers dropping so fast – and why does it matter so much?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/04/23·29m 45s

A bullying politician or snowflake civil servants? The downfall of Dominic Raab

The former deputy prime minister may have resigned but he remains defiant after an inquiry into bullying allegations. What does the scandal tell us about the relationship between ministers and Whitehall?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/04/23·27m 50s

Embracing a childfree life

Helen Pidd always thought she would have children, but after three unsuccessful rounds of IVF, she reimagines her life with the help of people who are childfree by choice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/04/23·34m 55s

Are we facing a summer of sporting protests?

High-profile protests at the Grand National and the World Snooker Championships made headlines around the country; the London Marathon could be next. Sean Ingle and Damien Gayle report on what sporting stunts can achieve – and whether the authorities can stop them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/04/23·29m 50s

Sudan’s warring generals

Fighting in Sudan is continuing despite an internationally brokered truce. At the heart of the conflict is a power struggle between two powerful generals in a country permanently in the grip of its military. Nesrine Malik reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/04/23·28m 6s

The court case pushing Indian democracy to the brink – podcast

Critics have long accused Narendra Modi of eroding the world’s biggest democracy. Now, ahead of next year’s general election, his main political rival could be jailed – for defaming the name Modi. What’s going on?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/04/23·32m 10s

The Pentagon leaks: how did US security files end up on Discord? – podcast

Earlier this year, hundreds of top secret Pentagon documents were posted on the social media platform Discord. Manisha Ganguly and Julian Borger report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/04/23·28m 32s

Why are British audiences suddenly so out of control?

From fights at the Bodyguard musical to wild drunken antics at comedy clubs and even heckling at the opera, performers and theatre staff say crowds are getting out of hand. What’s going on?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/04/23·25m 57s

Investigating alleged sexual misconduct at the CBI

Police have launched an investigation into alleged sexual misconduct at the Confederation of British Industry in the wake of a recent Guardian investigation. Anna Isaac reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/04/23·30m 10s

Why has the Labour party turned nasty?

The party’s latest ad campaign launches personal attacks on Rishi Sunak. What’s behind its new ruthless approach?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/04/23·26m 36s

Is artificial intelligence getting out of control?

Hundreds of tech industry leaders have signed a letter proposing a six-month pause on the development of systems more powerful than OpenAI’s GPT-4. Alex Hern reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/04/23·28m 43s

The ‘nice, ordinary’ family suspected of being Russian spies

When a couple and their children moved into a sleepy suburb of Slovenia’s capital, their neighbours thought they seemed very normal. But were they really who they seemed?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/04/23·33m 18s

Xi Jinping and the battle over China’s memory of the Cultural Revolution

Mao’s Cultural Revolution pitted children against their parents and tore at the fabric of China’s society. It’s vital to the understanding of China today, says Red Memory author Tania Branigan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/04/23·31m 10s

‘Peace babies’ and the birth of the Good Friday agreement

The generation born after the Good Friday agreement, which brought peace to Northern Ireland, are continuing to reckon with their inheritance. Mother and daughter Anne and Kerrie Patterson explain what it means to them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/04/23·41m 1s

Inside Tennessee, America’s most stringent anti-abortion state

Tennessee has an abortion ban so strict that even its Republican sponsors are having doubts about it. Stephanie Kirchgaessner reports on the reality of women’s rights in the state nine months after the supreme court struck down Roe v Wade. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/04/23·31m 37s

Why headteachers are fighting back against Ofsted inspections

The death of headteacher Ruth Perry after a devastating report from schools watchdog Ofsted has prompted a growing backlash. Michelle Sheehy, headteacher of Millfield primary school in the West Midlands, explains why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/04/23·27m 52s

The indictment of Donald Trump

The former US president will appear in a criminal court in New York City today to answer charges relating to campaign finance offences. Hugo Lowell reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/04/23·27m 19s

Cotton Capital: the bee and the ship – examining the Guardian’s links to slavery

Episode one of the new Guardian podcast series Cotton Capital explores the revelations that the Guardian’s founding editor, John Edward Taylor, and at least nine of his 11 backers had links to slavery, principally through the textile industry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/04/23·46m 29s

How raising the retirement age set France on fire

An attempt to force through an increase in the state pension age brought thousands of protesters out on to the streets and has left Emmanuel Macron facing his biggest crisis yet. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/03/23·26m 15s

Why are British teenagers being locked up in ‘re-education camps’?

Secretive centres that promise to change the behaviour of wayward western teenagers and young people have been springing up in Somalia. But what really goes on inside?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/03/23·32m 0s

Who is Humza Yousaf and how will he change Scotland?

For eight years Nicola Sturgeon towered over Scottish politics. Now there is a new first minister in charge, how will he make his mark?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/03/23·29m 30s

‘It’s way beyond just science’: untangling the hunt for Covid’s origins

Three years after much of the world was forced into Covid lockdowns, the precise origins of the virus are still hazy, and the hunt is bringing scientists into confrontation with political forces that many are not prepared for Read more: ‘Being truthful is essential’: scientist who stumbled upon Wuhan Covid data speaks out. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/03/23·27m 52s

Exposing the myth of Britain’s ‘perfect’ war against Islamic State

The UK government continues to claim that there were no civilian casualties as a result of its bombing campaign against Islamic State militants in Iraq. Emma Graham-Harrison reports from Mosul on the evidence that cannot any longer be ignored. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/03/23·40m 3s

Trafficked: Marta - part four

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/03/23·33m 32s

Trafficked: the operation – part three

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/03/23·42m 18s

Trafficked: the closed door – part 2

Julia, a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK, tells the journalist Annie Kelly about the years she was shipped between brothels. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/03/23·34m 24s

Trafficked: the trap – part one

The story of a Ukrainian woman who escaped modern slavery in the UK. Annie Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/03/23·30m 3s

Britain’s biggest police force is racist, sexist, and homophobic - can it change? – podcast

A landmark report into the Metropolitan police says discrimination is ‘baked in’ and trust in the force has plummeted. Is it worth trying to fix?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/03/23·31m 46s

Is it time to delete TikTok?

Western governments are telling their staff to remove the popular social media app from their work phones amid security fears. Alex Hern reports on why time could be running out for TikTok’s current ownership model. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/03/23·26m 20s

The accidental journalist who covered the war in Iraq

Twenty years on from the invasion of Iraq, Ghaith Abdul-Ahad and James Meek describe their chance first meeting and their time reporting on the war together. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/03/23·41m 34s

How Eleanor Williams’ lies tore a town apart and finally unravelled

Why did Eleanor Williams, a young woman from a remote coastal town in England, pretend she was a victim of a grooming gang?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/03/23·40m 2s

Jeremy Hunt’s ‘back to work’ budget

The chancellor has put getting Britons back into work at the heart of his plan to grow the UK economy. But the danger signs are still flashing, reports Heather Stewart. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/03/23·34m 3s

Who will replace Nicola Sturgeon as Scotland’s next first minister?

The battle to replace Nicola Sturgeon is dividing the SNP and growing increasingly bitter, reports Libby Brooks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/03/23·31m 3s

The BBC’s spectacular own goal

A tweet by Gary Lineker led to his suspension by the BBC and set off a weekend of chaos in its schedules. Now with a truce agreed, Archie Bland reports on whether it can hold. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/03/23·26m 38s

Who blew up the Nord Stream gas pipelines?

Months after the covert sabotage mission that has been likened to a spy thriller, the net could be closing in on the perpetrators at the centre of the mystery. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/03/23·25m 58s

Is ‘Stop the boats’ a slogan without a solution?

Rishi Sunak has promised to stop people crossing the Channel in small boats but his planned law has been called inhumane and unworkable. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/03/23·29m 24s

Avian flu is decimating wild birds, but could it become a global pandemic?

It is threatening rare species, and causing havoc for chicken farmers. Now a strain of bird flu has spread to mammals. Could it be a danger to humans?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/03/23·23m 36s

Rupert Murdoch and the lawsuit blowing open Fox News

Rupert Murdoch has been drawn into a defamation lawsuit brought against Fox News for spreading the conspiracy theory that the 2020 US election was rigged. Ed Pilkington reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/03/23·32m 57s

What have we learned from Matt Hancock’s WhatsApp messages?

More than 100,000 of the former health secretary’s phone messages have been leaked. What do they tell us about the way the government handled the pandemic?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/03/23·28m 16s

The dawn of the four-day week

A growing movement to shorten the working week is gaining supporters, including bosses as well as employees. Heather Stewart reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/03/23·29m 38s

Israel and the West Bank: a week of rage and rampage

Escalating violence by Israeli settlers in the occupied Palestinian territories is happening amid unprecedented anti-government protests. It’s no coincidence, reports Bethan McKernan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/03/23·27m 5s

What’s in the air in East Palestine, Ohio?

When a train derailed in a small town in Ohio last month, it shed its toxic load, spewed smoke and set off a political firestorm that is still raging. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/03/23·33m 46s

What the salad crisis says about Britain

Shoppers have been left staring at empty shelves and advised by their government to eat turnips over tomatoes. But the food shortage might be more serious than it sounds, reports Joanna Partridge. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/23·22m 11s

Is the Northern Ireland protocol deal a much-needed win for Rishi Sunak?

The protocol led to the collapse of power sharing in Northern Ireland’s assembly – and empty supermarket shelves. So will the prime minister’s Windsor framework solve everything?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/02/23·28m 22s

Rewriting Roald Dahl

The latest editions of the author’s books for children have had extensive edits made to update the language for modern sensibilities. Lucy Knight and David Baddiel take a closer look. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/02/23·25m 40s

Searching for the first casualty of the war in Ukraine

Daniel Boffey reports on the life and death of staff sergeant Denys Tkach, the first soldier to have been killed by Russian forces on the day of the invasion. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/02/23·31m 39s

Why did the search for Nicola Bulley turn so toxic?

After the mortgage adviser disappeared TikTok detectives, grief tourists and the media descended. Now her family have hit out at the ‘appalling’ way they have been treated. What went wrong?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/02/23·29m 47s

The secret world of disinformation for hire

How an undercover investigation revealed a team of Israeli contractors who claim to have manipulated more than 30 elections around the world using hacking, sabotage and automated disinformation on social media. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/02/23·43m 26s

The new tactics of Britain’s far right

Far-right groups are mobilising in towns around the UK where asylum seekers are living in hotels. The protests are spreading – and turning increasingly aggressive. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/23·34m 37s

The true cost of wood-burning stoves

Learning the full extent of the environmental damage caused by wood-burning stoves led Guardian columnist George Monbiot to issue a public mea culpa – and help ignite a raging debate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/02/23·26m 4s

Are chatbots coming for your job?

A high-stakes race for supremacy in artificial intelligence is playing out between two of the world’s biggest tech companies. Should we be worried or excited? Chris Stokel-Walker reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/02/23·30m 37s

Nicola Sturgeon's resignation: the end of an era for Scotland

On Wednesday morning, Nicola Sturgeon called a press conference to announce she would be stepping down as the first minister of Scotland. Severin Carrell reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/02/23·26m 43s

Why is the Prevent counter-terrorism programme review so controversial?

The UK scheme has long had its critics, but now even the review looking at how to overhaul it is facing criticism. Why is the debate around Prevent so heated?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/02/23·33m 4s

Why anger is growing in Turkey a week after catastrophic earthquakes

It’s been an agonising time for survivors in Syria and Turkey – especially those whose relatives and friends are still trapped under rubble. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/02/23·27m 53s

How a new treatment for diabetes offers hope for millions

The development of an ‘artificial pancreas’ could revolutionise the daily lives of people living with type 1 diabetes. Now the technology could be made available to more than 100,000 people in the UK on the NHS. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/02/23·33m 27s

Could western tanks be decisive in Ukraine?

After months of debate and diplomacy, western tanks are finally heading to Ukraine for what promises to be a spring escalation in the fighting. But will they be decisive? Dan Sabbagh and Daniel Boffey report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/02/23·30m 25s

Haiti: a country in crisis without an elected government

The last elected Haitian senators left parliament this month. Amid raging gang violence, the country is at breaking point with a health and hunger emergency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/02/23·37m 27s

Why are more people in the UK turning to private healthcare?

The NHS turns 75 this year, but as waiting lists for appointments grow, increasing numbers of patients are looking elsewhere for healthcare. Denis Campbell reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/02/23·30m 34s

A deadly earthquake in Syria and Turkey

A 7.8-magnitude quake has struck Turkey and Syria, killing at least 2,600 people and razing entire neighbourhoods. Experts say it could not have happened at a worse time. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/02/23·31m 50s

After 17 years in prison, will Andrew Malkinson finally clear his name?

Almost two decades ago Andrew Malkinson was accused of a rape where the victim was left for dead. He has always maintained his innocence and his supporters say the case against him was fatally flawed. Now he hopes new evidence will show he was not guilty. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/02/23·28m 44s

The children going missing from Home Office hotels

More than 200 unaccompanied child asylum seekers have gone missing from hotels used by the Home Office. Mark Townsend reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/02/23·21m 36s

Strikes, seatbelts and sleaze: Rishi Sunak’s first 100 days as PM

Rishi Sunak entered Downing Street promising to calm the markets and stop the scandals, but 100 days in it’s proving a bumpy ride, reports Pippa Crerar. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/02/23·30m 41s

The scammers forced to steal people’s life savings

‘Pig butchering’ crypto scams, where victims are wooed for months before being fleeced, are ruining people’s lives. But how are criminal gangs exploiting trafficking victims – and using fake UK firms – to steal millions of pounds?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/02/23·36m 38s

How Putin’s chef became the second-most powerful man in Russia

Yevgeny Prigozhin went from hot dog seller to the commander of a private army fighting intense battles in Ukraine. But his rapid rise has made him a target, reports Pjotr Sauer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/01/23·30m 10s

The code of omertà: how a mafia kingpin evaded police for 30 years

Matteo Messina Denaro was arrested after decades on the run, found hiding in plain sight in Sicily. Lorenzo Tondo and Clare Longrigg report on what it means for the once mighty Cosa Nostra. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/01/23·25m 11s
-
-
Heart UK
Mute/Un-mute