Today in Focus

Today in Focus

By The Guardian

Hosted by Anushka Asthana, Today in Focus brings you closer to Guardian journalism. Combining personal storytelling with insightful analysis, this podcast takes you behind the headlines for a deeper understanding of the news, every weekday

Episodes

Facebook, white nationalists and becoming the target of a hate campaign

In November, Julia Carrie Wong reported on the continued presence of white nationalist organisations on Facebook – and a weeks-long campaign of racist and sexist harassment followed. She discusses the impact it had on her and why she believes Facebook has played a role in creating the conditions that enable that kind of harassment to happen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/07/2027m 8s

What would annexation of parts of the West Bank mean for Palestinians?

The Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, has proposed permanently seizing Palestinian territory by annexing swathes of the West Bank - a violation of international law. Journalist Mariam Barghouti and PIPD executive director Salem Barahmeh describe how this would formalise a system that millions of Palestinians are already enduring, while Jerusalem correspondent Oliver Holmes examines what is driving Netanyahu’s latest plans. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/07/2031m 43s

The Leicester garment factories exposed by Covid-19

A spike in cases of Covid-19 in Leicester has led Guardian reporter Archie Bland to its garment factories. He discusses a story that goes beyond the pandemic and into workers’ rights, appalling factory conditions and the ethics of fast fashion. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/07/2025m 6s

Are the police failing BAME communities?

Bas Javid joined the Avon and Somerset police in 1993. Last year he became a commander at the Met. He reflects on his experiences as a BAME officer and discusses the use of stop and search, which has been cited as a continued source of tension between the force and communities. Ben Bowling, a professor of criminology and criminal justice, examines the history of police race relations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/07/2033m 6s

Taking on Sir Humphrey: can the civil service be reformed?

Michael Gove has set out his plans for a revolution of Britain’s permanent bureaucracy, the civil service. But as former Downing Street chief of staff Jonathan Powell argues, it is easier said than done. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/07/2024m 30s

Maria Ressa and an attack on the free press in the Philippines

One of the most prominent journalists in the Philippines has been convicted of ‘cyberlibel’ in a court process condemned by human rights groups. Journalist Carmela Fonbuena in Manila describes the chilling effect the verdict has had on free expression. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/07/2024m 33s

How one neighbourhood in London lost 36 residents to Covid-19

Guardian reporter Aamna Modhin meets residents from Church End, a small, deprived neighbourhood in Brent, north London. She examines how housing pressures, in-work poverty and racial inequalities contributed to the deaths of 36 residents from Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/07/2023m 3s

The scandal of millions of Americans being deprived of running water – podcast

Guardian US environmental justice reporter Nina Lakhani reports on her landmark investigation into America’s water crisis, revealing that millions of Americans are facing unaffordable bills for running water and risk being disconnected or losing their homes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/07/2028m 40s

Why hasn't Boris Johnson released the Russia report?

Parliament’s intelligence and security committee produced a report into alleged Russian interference in UK politics. It was supposed to be published before December’s election, but the UK prime minister withheld its release. Now, six months later it still hasn’t seen the light of day. The Guardian’s Luke Harding investigates what could be in it and says witness testimony from an ex-MI6 officer makes uncomfortable reading for the government. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/2028m 37s

Lockdown easing: why the UK is better prepared for a second wave

This Saturday, lockdown measures in England will ease further, with people able to get a pint in a pub, have a haircut and see another household indoors. The Guardian’s heath editor, Sarah Boseley, looks at whether another lifting of restrictions might result in a second wave, and if it does, why we are better prepared this time round. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/06/2022m 38s

Understanding white privilege with Reni Eddo-Lodge

Reni Eddo-Lodge has become the first black British author to top the UK bestseller list with her 2017 book Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race. In an exclusive interview with the Observer’s Nosheen Iqbal she talks about global discussions on racism following the death of George Floyd. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/06/2023m 47s

After a decade of austerity: what now?

Columnist John Harris has spent the past decade touring the country and reporting on what devastating budget cuts have meant to communities. Looking back, he sees some signs of hope amid the devastation. But will the government change its approach for the impending Covid-19 economic crash?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/06/2027m 14s

How damaging is John Bolton's scathing account of Donald Trump's presidency?

The publication of John Bolton’s White House memoir has caused a sensation. Jonathan Freedland assesses the lurid claims of cosying up to authoritarian leaders as well as descriptions of ‘stunning’ ignorance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/06/2026m 53s

How did Jordan end up with the highest smoking rate in the world?

When international correspondent Michael Safi began looking into why Jordan had become the country with the highest smoking rates in the world, he began to uncover what public health advocates have described as widespread interference in policymaking by multinational tobacco companies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/2030m 35s

Rethinking the police: what can the US learn from Newark?

The New Jersey city had one of the worst reputations for police violence in the US, but as the Guardian’s Ankita Rao discovers, it is leading the charge for reform under a new mayor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/06/2024m 7s

Is spyware technology helping governments hack phones?

WhatsApp has accused an Israeli spyware company of hacking 1,400 of its users, including journalists, human rights activists and diplomatic officials. As new allegations emerge, Guardian US investigations correspondent Stephanie Kirchgaessner discusses how she first discovered the story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/06/2030m 38s

Why is Trump's comeback rally in Tulsa: the site of a massacre?

The president’s decision to hold his first rally since the coronavirus lockdown in Tulsa, Oklahoma, has ignited fresh controversy. The city was home to one of America’s worst ever acts of racial violence in 1921, a moment marked in recent Black Lives Matter protests, and Oklahoma is now seeing a new wave of coronavirus infections. So why has Trump chosen Tulsa?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/06/2030m 58s

Stranded at sea: the crew members trapped on cruise ships

Guardian US reporter Erin McCormick describes why thousands of crew are still stranded on cruise ships after coronavirus bought the industry to a standstill in March. Will Lees describes how it took him 82 days to get back to Canada while Perry, who hasn’t had a salary since March, is still stuck and doesn’t know when he will get home to his family in Mauritius. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/06/2023m 18s

How is Keir Starmer changing the Labour party?

When Keir Starmer was elected as Labour’s new leader in March he was pitched straight into the coronavirus crisis and denied even the chance to hold a victory party. But with public disquiet setting in over the government’s response, Starmer’s own ratings are surging. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/2027m 9s

Facebook v Twitter: how to handle Donald Trump

As protests erupted throughout the US, Donald Trump posted incendiary comments to social media. While Twitter hid the president’s post, Facebook took no action. The Guardian’s Alex Hern looks at what happened next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/06/2023m 2s

A journey to Greece for solo IVF during the pandemic – podcast

Laura Barton has always known that she wanted to have children. After years of miscarriages, and a breakup from her partner last year, she decided to embark on solo IVF. In early March, as the world shut down, she found herself flying to Crete to undergo treatment. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/06/2023m 20s

How the disappearance of Madeleine McCann became a national obsession

The disappearance of a three -year-old British girl at a Portuguese holiday resort in 2007 quickly became a global news story as the hunt for her grew ever more extensive. Thirteen years later, with the mystery still unsolved, German police revealed they had a new prime suspect. Is there now a conclusion in sight?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/06/2033m 50s

Britain's reckoning with its racist past

UK Black Lives Matter protests have been taking place across the country. They have not just been about solidarity with the US or racism in Britain today, but also about the need to address Britain’s past and the impact of that legacy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/06/2031m 10s

The Rees-Mogg conga: how has the pandemic changed parliament?

MPs have been on a crash course in video conferencing in recent months as the pandemic meant access to parliament was severely restricted and remote voting was permitted for the first time. But with Jacob Rees-Mogg leading attempts to revert to in-person voting has the chance to permanently modernise been squandered?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/2025m 56s

Is British theatre about to go out of business?

Every year, 34 million people go to the theatre, double the number that attend Premier League football. But lockdown and physical distancing rules mean the industry is on the edge of collapse. The artistic director of the Pitlochry theatre, Elizabeth Newman, describes the impact. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/06/2024m 7s

The sounds of melting icebergs and whale songs: a journey into Antarctica

The effects of global heating are in evidence everywhere across the islands of Antarctica – from penguin colonies to melting glaciers. The Guardian’s global environment editor Jonathan Watts witnessed how conditions are changing quickly. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/06/2027m 45s

Looking back on the protests that have shaken America

Guardian US reporter Kenya Evelyn looks back at the 11 days of protest that started in Minneapolis over the killing of George Floyd, but quickly spread across the rest of America and then the world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/06/2026m 50s

From Anfield to Cheltenham: did major events cost lives?

A series of high-profile sporting events went ahead as scheduled in mid-March even as Covid-19 was being declared a pandemic. The Guardian’s David Conn investigates the scientific reasoning behind the decision, while Liverpool fan Simon Renoldi reflects on the loss of his father. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/06/2030m 43s

The death of George Floyd: will anything change?

Protests have exploded across the US after a video showed Derek Chauvin, a white Minneapolis police officer, kneeling on the neck of George Floyd, an African American man, despite his pleas that he could not breathe. Floyd lost consciousness and died. Paul Butler discusses the history of police killings of black Americans and whether Floyd’s death could be a turning point. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/06/2038m 7s

England is easing out of lockdown – is it safe?

Health officials and even government scientists have warned against the easing of the coronavirus lockdown in England, saying it could lead to a surge in infections. David Hunter, professor of epidemiology and medicine at the University of Oxford, looks at the risks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/06/2022m 28s

The coronavirus crisis in Britain's prisons

As Britain faced an unprecedented lockdown, the situation for the 80,000 people in prison was even more stringent. David Adams was recently released from jail and describes how prisoners were confined to their tiny cells for more than 23 hours a day. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/06/2025m 6s

Hong Kong: the end of one country, two systems?

Protesters have take to the streets again, this time over a national security law that is set to be imposed by Beijing. Verna Yu and Lily Kuo look at how the standoff compares with those of Hong Kong’s recent history. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/05/2024m 59s

The scandal of Covid-19 in care homes

Why did so many people die in care homes? That may be the most urgent question of the likely public inquiry into the UK’s Covid-19 response. Rob Booth, the Guardian’s social affairs correspondent, on the government failures that led to thousands of care home deaths. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/05/2027m 29s

Brexit: Is the UK headed for a no deal?

For the past few months UK and EU negotiators have been locked in talks trying to thrash out a trade deal before 1 January. But after the chief negotiators, Michel Barnier and David Frost, exchanged testy letters last week, the talks risk reaching a stalemate. Is the UK headed for a no-deal Brexit?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/05/2024m 9s

Why Dominic Cummings won't resign

The prime minister’s senior adviser has provoked national outrage by admitting travelling hundreds of miles to stay with family at the height of coronavirus lockdown. The Guardian’s Matthew Weaver reveals how he helped break the story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/05/2033m 50s

The killing of Ahmaud Arbery

On 23 February Ahmaud Arbery, a young black man, was shot dead by two white men in Brunswick, Georgia. But it was only when a 36-second video of the killing was leaked on 5 May, generating nationwide outcry, that three men were charged with his murder. Why did it take so long?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/05/2032m 22s

Otters, badgers and orcas: can the pandemic help rewild Britain?

Sound recordist Chris Watson shares the birdsong from his English garden, while environmentalist George Monbiot looks at how the pandemic might be an opportunity for rewilding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/05/2027m 32s

Will millions of children really be returning to school in June?

Oli de Botton is a headteacher of a large state school in Newham, east London. Like many teachers across the country, he is tackling the daunting task of getting ready for the return of some of his students in early June. Sally Weale, the Guardian education correspondent, looks at the backlash against this drive to return some year groups to school. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/2026m 40s

The scientific race to understand Covid-19

In the five months since the world learned about Covid-19, it has killed hundreds of thousands of people. In that time, what have scientists found out – and what do they still not know? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/2025m 19s

How coronavirus led to rough sleepers being housed in hotels

Amelia Gentleman reports on life inside the hotels that are now housing some of the more than 5,400 homeless people across England and Wales. It is part of an unprecedented emergency operation to get all rough sleepers off the streets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/05/2022m 24s

Farce and tragedy: how an audacious coup attempt in Venezuela backfired

An attempt earlier this month to remove Nicolás Maduro from power ended in farcical failure as a seaborne invading force was captured easily following a series of mishaps. World affairs editor Julian Borger tells the bizarre story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/05/2029m 25s

Blind Date takeover: looking for love in lockdown part 2

In the concluding part of our Blind Date takeover, two more couples meet remotely for a socially distanced evening of drinks and dinner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/05/2022m 50s

Trump versus Biden: the 2020 pandemic election

The US election campaign is usually in full swing by this stage of the political cycle, but the coronavirus pandemic has put a halt to rallies and fundraising events. David Smith in Washington looks at how the race between Donald Trump and Joe Biden is playing out. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/05/2027m 13s

What does the biggest economic slump in 300 years mean for Britain?

As the chancellor announces plans to extend the unprecedented scheme to pay the wages of millions of workers, whole sectors of the economy remain shut because of Covid-19, causing a recession unseen in Britain for centuries. Larry Elliott explains what it will mean for the country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/05/2023m 59s

Track and trace: will the government's new app work?

Tracking and tracing the movements of people with symptoms of Covid-19 is key to the next phase of ending the lockdown. But as the government trials a contact-tracing app on the Isle of Wight, Alex Hern reports on concerns about privacy, effectiveness and trust. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/05/2024m 31s

Is coronavirus being used to turn India into a surveillance state?

South Asia correspondent Hannah Ellis-Petersen reports on the implications of people downloading an app designed to help control the spread of Covid-19 in a country where civil liberties were already being eroded. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/05/2026m 21s

Blind Date takeover: looking for love in lockdown part 1

Lockdown has changed the way we date. Is it possible to form the same kind of connection through a screen? To find out, we set up six strangers on three virtual blind dates .... Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/05/2027m 33s

Reopening Mississippi: America's poorest state begins lifting lockdown

Despite rising coronavirus case numbers, the US state of Mississippi is moving out of lockdown and reopening parks, restaurants and other non-essential shops. Oliver Laughland went to the resort of Biloxi to see how residents were responding Coronavirus – latest US updates C oronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/05/2030m 7s

Protecting domestic violence victims in lockdown

Kate, a call handler for a domestic violence charity, discusses the challenges of trying to deal with the rising number of calls during lockdown. Guardian reporter Helen Pidd has been reporting on the domestic violence cases being heard at Manchester magistrates court over the past few weeks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/05/2021m 4s

The NHS official privately selling protective kit

Guardian reporters Harry Davies and Simon Goodley tell Rachel Humphreys how they tracked down and confronted a senior NHS procurement official who had set up a company offering PPE for private sale Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/05/2017m 52s

The global race for face masks

The world economy may have dramatically dipped and the price of oil crashed, but one commodity is seeing an unprecedented boom: the face mask. Samanth Subramanian explores the newly distorted marketplace for masks and the lengths some will go to get them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/05/2027m 7s

Who is Covid-19 killing?

More than 26,000 people in the UK have officially been recorded as having died from the coronavirus. In this episode we look beyond the headline figure at who is dying – and hear from friends and family about the lives cut short. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/05/2045m 36s

Should the UK bail out Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic?

Guardian wealth correspondent Rupert Neate looks at why billionaire Sir Richard Branson is asking the UK government to give his Virgin Atlantic airline a £500m bailout to help it survive the economic fallout of the lockdown. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/04/2025m 55s

Where is the kit to protect NHS workers?

As medics and carers report widespread shortages of protective equipment, the government is facing pressure to explain why it appears the UK went into a pandemic under-resourced. Daniel Boffey and Rob Davies unpick the strategy and its failures. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/04/2024m 8s

The secretive scientific committee guiding Britain’s coronavirus response

Following the revelation that Boris Johnson’s chief adviser, Dominic Cummings, took part in the key scientific committee meetings tasked with providing independent advice, Anushka Asthana hears from the Observer’s Sonia Sodha and the former chief scientist Sir David King. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/04/2024m 20s

Covid-19's continued spread into South America

From his temporary home in Rio de Janeiro, the Guardian’s Latin America correspondent, Tom Phillips, can hear the nightly protests against Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, where cases are steadily rising. He discusses how Brazil and other South American countries are trying to deal with the pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/04/2022m 35s

What is the Covid-19 crisis doing to our mental health?

The biggest health crisis in a generation and the enforced isolation of lockdowns is taking not just a physical toll on people but also affecting mental health. The Guardian’s John Crace discusses his mental health challenges and public health specialist Dr Antonis Kousoulis tells Anushka Asthana what may help. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/04/2025m 27s

Surviving ICU: a story of recovery – podcast

Dave Lewins is a healthy, 60-year old helicopter pilot, who in March found himself in intensive care with Covid-19. He describes the experience and how it has changed his life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/04/2021m 13s

How the 5G conspiracy theories took hold

The Guardian’s media editor Jim Waterson looks at why conspiracy theories linking 5G technology to coronavirus have taken hold in the UK, with dozens of phone masts vandalised across the country over the past few weeks. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/04/2019m 24s

Under attack: WHO and the coronavirus pandemic

The World Health Organization has been at the forefront of the global response to new diseases and with differing outcomes. It was hailed for the way it dealt with Sars but pilloried for its handling of Ebola. Now, with its biggest challenge yet, it is in the crosshairs again as Donald Trump threatens to withdraw funding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/04/2026m 41s

Culture under the extended coronavirus lockdown

Three Guardian critics – Ammar Kalia, Laura Snapes and Sian Cain – join Rachel Humphreys with a guide to the best of television, music and books under lockdown. And what the future holds for the arts when conditions are lifted. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/04/2025m 2s

The story of one care home hit by coronavirus

Julie Roche is a manager of a Buckinghamshire care home that usually has 45 residents. In the past few weeks she has lost 13 patients to Covid-19. She discusses the devastating impact this has had on families, staff and her remaining residents. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/04/2023m 7s

The story behind Trump's 'miracle' drug hydroxychloroquine

The drug has been used to treat a number of diseases in the past half-century but after a French study claimed it was effective against coronavirus it has been hailed by the US president as a cure. But there is scant evidence it is effective – and it could actually be harmful. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/04/2024m 39s

From Liberia to Spain: working in disaster zones

Luis Encinas is a nurse and Médecins Sans Frontières coordinator. He has treated patients in Taliban-ruled Afghanistan, in Sierra Leone as Ebola took hold, and now in Spain, battling Covid-19. He and the Guardian’s Madrid correspondent, Sam Jones, describe how the virus has transformed Spain. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/04/2021m 27s

Why have the UK and Germany taken different approaches to Covid-19 testing?

In February, the UK and Germany were taking a similar approach to testing for coronavirus. But over the subsequent weeks, the two countries began to go in very different directions. Guardian health editor Sarah Boseley and Berlin bureau chief Philip Oltermann look at what happened next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/04/2022m 2s

How Covid-19 brought Britain back together

After a divisive period dominated by Brexit, the pandemic has brought about a newly fostered spirit of community engagement and everyday heroism Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/04/2024m 43s

Coronavirus: 100 days that changed the world (part 2) – podcast

After spreading from China into parts of east Asia, the coronavirus hit Europe with a major cluster in northern Italy. But while much of the continent scrambled to shut down cities, Britain left it late to go into lockdown. Michael Safi and Patrick Wintour continue the story of the outbreak’s first 100 days Listen to part 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/04/2040m 1s

Coronavirus: 100 days that changed the world (part 1)

What began as a mystery virus at a Chinese market in December swiftly became a global crisis. The Guardian’s Michael Safi and Patrick Wintour recount the first 100 days as coronavirus took hold, upending the lives of billions of citizens. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/04/2042m 2s

Boris Johnson's personal coronavirus battle

The PM’s admission to an intensive care ward in London has shocked the nation and left a gap at the heart of power during the UK’s biggest crisis in a generation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/04/2028m 15s

Zaandam: onboard the coronavirus-hit cruise ship

The Guardian US reporter Erin McCormick charts the journey of the Zaandam cruise ship, which has docked in Florida after being stranded at sea with a Covid-19 outbreak. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/04/2025m 11s

The hunt for a coronavirus vaccine

Scientists in more than 40 labs around the world are working round the clock to develop a Covid-19 vaccine. Despite early success in sequencing the virus’s genome, however, Samanth Subramanian tells Rachel Humphreys we are still some months away from knowing if one can be put into mass production Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/04/2026m 24s

The devastating impact of Covid-19 in New York – podcast

The Guardian US health reporter Jessica Glenza reports from New York, where medical facilities and staff are being overwhelmed by the Covid-19 outbreak. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/04/2023m 29s

On the NHS frontline – podcast

Laura McClelland is a consultant anaesthetist in an intensive care unit at a busy south Wales hospital. She describes being on the frontline of the fight against Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/04/2024m 11s

From Houseparty to Zoom: our digital lives in lockdown

The lockdown across the world has led people to desperately seek out new tools for maintaining their work and social lives online. But UK technology editor Alex Hern argues he’s been living this way for years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/04/2024m 52s

Lessons from the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic

Science writer and journalist Laura Spinney discusses the outbreak of Spanish flu, one of the worst virus outbreak of modern times, which is believed to have killed up to 100 million people. She believes there are lessons to be learned from that pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/03/2021m 20s

Labour leadership interviews: Sir Keir Starmer

Sir Keir Starmer began his career as a barrister before rising to become the director of public prosecutions. But since his entry into parliament in 2015, he has risen quickly up the ranks to the shadow cabinet’s frontbench. This week he could become Labour’s next leader. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/03/2032m 38s

What can we learn from China’s handling of coronavirus?

After weeks of lockdown China is starting to lift restrictions in an attempt to return the country to normal. The Guardian’s Beijing bureau chief, Lily Kuo, discusses how China coped with coronavirus and what life is like there now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/03/2023m 12s

Coronavirus: the race to rescue the UK’s self employed

Today the chancellor, Rishi Sunak, is expected to announce that the taxpayer will pay self-employed workers up to 80% of their recent earnings to help contain the economic impact of coronavirus. Mark Cairns, an Uber driver, and Rob Booth, the Guardian’s social affairs editor, discuss the impact of Covid-19 on gig economy workers and the self-employed. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/03/2024m 23s

Coronavirus: why are your parents sending you so much fake news?

An avalanche of misinformation, fake news and hoaxes are being shared widely online as people seek reliable information on the coronavirus crisis. The Guardian’s media editor, Jim Waterson, examines where the falsehoods are coming from. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/03/2025m 31s

How far do the government's new emergency powers go?

A new government bill that brings sweeping new powers to shut down mass gatherings, potentially detain people with coronavirus symptoms and weaken the social care safety net is being rushed through parliament. The Guardian’s Peter Walker explains what is at stake. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/03/2020m 12s

The Labour leadership interviews: Rebecca Long-Bailey

Long-Bailey only became an MP in 2015, but now she is running to lead her party. Despite loyally serving in Labour’s shadow cabinet and playing a leading role in drawing up the party’s recent manifesto, she is determined not to be portrayed as the continuity Corbyn candidate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/03/2029m 8s

Social distancing: learning to cope with a new normal

Columnist Zoe Williams has spent the week researching tips for life under a new regime of social distancing and self-isolation. She tells Anushka Asthana it is important to give yourself a break amid the hardships Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/03/2024m 8s

How Donald Trump changed course on coronavirus

Donald Trump has moved from dismissing coronavirus as similar to the winter flu that would disappear in the spring to declaring a national emergency. But did his administration’s initial response waste valuable time? World affairs editor Julian Borger reports from Washington DC. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/03/2024m 53s

How coronavirus infected the global economy

The Guardian’s economics editor, Larry Elliott, says the global economy was already in poor shape when the coronavirus crisis struck. Now governments have stepped in with stimulus packages designed to bail out individuals and small businesses – but will that be enough to stave off a recession?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/03/2028m 26s

Is the government moving fast enough on coronavirus?

Britain has not joined its European neighbours by shutting schools, closing borders or rolling out mass testing. So why not? Health editor Sarah Boseley looks at the arguments the government is making for its approach. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/03/2020m 4s

A cure for insomnia?

Like a growing number of people, Simon Parkin suffered from insomnia for years. After dozens of failed techniques, he finally found one that worked. Also today: Sally Hayden on a locust swarm in east Africa. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/03/2023m 34s

Can the NHS cope with coronavirus?

NHS staff are bracing for a surge in hospital admissions as the number of people in the UK with coronavirus continues to rise. The Guardian’s health policy editor, Denis Campbell, looks at how well equipped the health service is for the crisis. Plus: Charlotte Graham-McLay on the Christchurch massacre, one year on. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/03/2027m 5s

The never-ending prison sentences – podcast

A spate of deaths of people serving indeterminate prison sentences has led to calls for such sentences to be revoked. The Guardian’s Jamie Grierson investigates. Plus: Larry Elliott on Rishi Sunak’s coronavirus budget. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/03/2028m 40s

How coronavirus closed down Italy

With Italy in lockdown, Peter Beaumont charts the spread of Covid-19 in the country while Lorenzo Tondo describes its impact. And: Christina Figueres on tackling the climate crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/03/2028m 15s

The Labour leadership interviews: Lisa Nandy

The Labour leadership candidate Lisa Nandy speaks to Anushka Asthana. Also today: Nils Pratley on a plunge in the financial markets as coronavirus spooks traders. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/03/2032m 53s

Hadley Freeman's 18-year search to uncover her family's secrets

When Hadley Freeman found an old shoebox full of pictures and documents in the back of a wardrobe, it began a quest to find the real story of her family’s history and her grandmother’s escape to America from the Nazis. Plus: Annette McGivney on the problem with almond milk. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/03/2029m 49s

Grounded: why Heathrow's third runway may never happen – podcast

Last week the Court of Appeal ruled the decision to allow the Heathrow expansion was unlawful because it did not take climate commitments into account. Is this the end of the third runway? And: how our quest for a good night’s sleep is leading to a landfill crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/03/2029m 21s

Macron, Merkel and the battle for the future of Europe

The French president, Emmanuel Macron, has staked out his vision for the future of Europe, but with Germany reluctant to sign up, will it fall flat? Plus: Jonathan Freedland on Joe Biden’s spectacular comeback in the Democratic primaries on Super Tuesday. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/03/2027m 8s

Is Britain prepared for a mass outbreak of the coronavirus? – podcast

As Britain faces rising cases of Covid-19, the prime minister has laid out a ‘battle plan’ for how his government will face the growing crisis. Also today: Sarah Todd on learning to read as an adult. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/03/2029m 30s

Super Tuesday and the arrival of the billionaire Mike Bloomberg

The Guardian US political correspondent Lauren Gambino looks at which Democratic candidates are likely to dominate on Super Tuesday today – the biggest moment in the US election calendar after polling day itself. And: Polly Toynbee on the shock resignation of the Home Office permanent secretary Sir Philip Rutnam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/03/2028m 57s

What's behind the rise of Germany's far right? – podcast

A terrorist attack in Hanau was the latest incident of far-right violence in Germany. It’s a growing problem, says the Guardian’s Philip Oltermann. Also today: Amy Hodge on her series of films on Europe after Brexit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/03/2033m 20s

Who should lead Labour?

Ballots went out to Labour members this week as the race to succeed Jeremy Corbyn as leader intensifies. The remaining candidates, Keir Starmer, Rebecca Long-Bailey and Lisa Nandy, all made their pitches to a live audience at this week’s Guardian hustings in Manchester. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/02/2031m 56s

How the Harvey Weinstein trial ended in a guilty verdict

On Monday the jury returned a guilty verdict on two of the five charges against the movie producer, who is now awaiting sentencing. The Guardian US reporter Lauren Aratani discusses covering the trial and what the verdict means for the #MeToo movement. And: the latest in the coronavirus outbreak. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/02/2027m 35s

India, Modi and the rise of Hindu nationalism

With Delhi rocked by deadly protests as Muslim and Hindu groups clash violently, Guardian writer Samanth Subramanian looks at the rise of Hindu nationalism within India. And: Daniel Boffey on the EU’s negotiating position with the UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/02/2029m 7s

Coronavirus: could this be China's Chernobyl moment?

The coronavirus crisis engulfing China is the biggest political test yet for Xi Jinping. The Guardian’s Lily Kuo looks at how it may become an economic crisis. Plus Michael Safi on a humanitarian breakthrough in the Yemen conflict. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/02/2030m 27s

Manchester City: following the money

Manchester City’s fortunes changed dramatically with the takeover by Sheikh Mansour of Abu Dhabi. But after years of success, Europe’s governing body has banned the club from its most prestigious tournament, the Champions League. David Conn explains why. Plus: Alok Jha on the ethics of gene editing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/02/2030m 2s

Syria: the fight for Idlib – podcast

A humanitarian crisis is unfolding in northern Syria after the government’s attempt to take back the opposition-held city of Idlib. Bethan McKernan describes how the fighting and freezing conditions have caused hundreds of thousands of displaced people to flee for their lives. Also today: Justin McCurry on the evacuation of the coronavirus-hit Diamond Princess cruise ship. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/2034m 5s

Flooded Britain: a new normal?

A series of storms have lashed Britain in the past two weeks resulting in widespread floods that have left residents and businesses devastated. But as the climate heats up and towns expand into floodplains, is this the new normal? Also today: Richard Partington on the government’s plans for Britain’s new immigration rules. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/02/2030m 12s

Inside Trump's Facebook campaign – podcast

Guardian US tech reporter Julia Carrie Wong spent a year analysing Trump’s Facebook campaign. She discusses how the sophisticated social media machine is targeting voters. And Leah Green reflects on the death of former Love Island presenter Caroline Flack. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/02/2029m 41s

Can the fashion industry ever be sustainable?

Environmental journalist Lucy Siegle has been writing about the fashion industry for 15 years. As London fashion week draws to a close, she discusses ways the industry could become more environmentally friendly. And: Laura Snapes on the Brit awards and its lack of female nominees. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/02/2027m 3s

Venezuela: a year on from the failed uprising

Tom Phillips, the Guardian’s Latin America correspondent, is back in Venezuela a year after the start of a dramatic, but so far unsuccessful, attempt to topple Nicolás Maduro. While conditions in Caracas appear slightly improved, outside the capital conditions in schools and hospitals are appalling – and getting worse. Also today: Jess Cartner-Morley on pockets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/02/2028m 35s

Who killed Swedish prime minister Olof Palme?

After a night at the cinema in 1986, Olof Palme was assassinated on Stockholm’s busiest street. The killer has never been found. Jan Stocklassa discusses whether novelist Stieg Larsson’s theory can provide any answers. And: the first same-sex couple to get married in Northern Ireland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/02/2029m 21s

What is it like to come out late in life?

Nicholas McInerny, a writer, came out as gay aged 45 and after nearly 20 years of marriage. It took a huge toll on his family and it all came flooding back last week when the TV presenter Phillip Schofield went public with his story. Also today: Alex Hern on the government’s plans to regulate the internet. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/02/2027m 40s

Back from the brink of death: reversing a heroin overdose

Anti-overdose drug naloxone has been in clinical use since the 1970s but not always where it’s needed most. The Guardian’s Jamie Grierson visited Redcar in North Yorkshire where a group of former drug users provide at-risk people with kits that could save their lives. Plus George Monbiot on Storm Ciara and the flooding that has once again devastated parts of England. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/02/2030m 20s

Life on Lesbos: what's happening to the refugees there?

Harriet Grant travelled to the Greek island of Lesbos to report on the crisis playing out in its refugee camps. Plus: Lisa O’Carroll on Sinn Féin’s election success. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/02/2027m 28s

Friends across the divide: does Labour have room for Blairism and Corbynism?

Peter Mandelson and Steve Howell represent the two opposite poles of the Labour party: one was a key architect of Blairism, the other of Corbynism. But they started out as inseparable friends at the same school in north London. Now their focus is on what comes next for the party. Plus: Matthew Taylor on the growing prevalence of climate anxiety. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/02/2041m 40s

Why are the Oscars still so white?

Following a strikingly white and male list of Bafta nominees, this year’s Academy Awards shortlists are barely more diverse. It’s a chronic problem in an industry running out of excuses for its slow pace of change. Lanre Bakare examines why the Oscars are still so white. Plus: Joan E Greve on a hectic week of US politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/02/2030m 27s

Will HS2 really benefit the north?

As the government prepares to give the green light to a new high-speed rail line between London, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds, Helen Pidd looks at the dire state of transport links in the north of England. Plus: Annabel Dixon argues that Britain should follow the lead of other European countries on assisted dying legislation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/02/2037m 17s

Will Ireland’s election see the end of Leo Varadkar? – podcast

Varadkar rose to the top of Irish politics without winning an election as leader of Fine Gael. Now he faces voters at a time when many appear to be in the mood for change. Rory Carroll joins the taoiseach on the campaign trail and looks at what the election means for Ireland. Plus: Gaby Hinsliff on the war between Downing Street and the political journalists who cover it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/02/2032m 25s

The rise of facial recognition technology

Facial recognition technology is getting more sophisticated each year and is now being used commercially as identification instead of passwords as well as being adopted by the Metropolitan police in London. Our UK technology editor, Alex Hern, explores the questions it raises about privacy. Also today: Jamie Grierson on the security response to Sunday’s terror attack in south London. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/02/2030m 14s

US election: The importance of Iowa

Chris McGreal visits the first US state to vote in this year’s race for the Democratic party’s presidential nomination. Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren are vying for crucial early momentum in the race to take on Trump. Plus: Iman Amrani on modern masculinity. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/02/2032m 25s

The Brexit gamble – podcast

Anushka Asthana looks back on an extraordinary period of chaos in politics since David Cameron called the EU referendum. Plus: on the day the UK leaves, Faiza Shaheen argues that remainers must now put their energy into ideas to take Britain forward. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/01/2033m 31s

The race to contain coronavirus

Health editor Sarah Boseley tells Rachel Humphreys that the coronavirus outbreak that began in the Chinese city of Wuhan is serious but not yet a global crisis. Plus Louisa Egbunike looks back at the legacy of the Biafran war in west Africa, 50 years on. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/01/2027m 11s

The end of the affair: how Britain walked away from the EU

John Palmer was the Guardian’s correspondent in Brussels in 1973 when the UK entered the European Economic Community. Now, 46 years later, Jennifer Rankin is in Brussels for the Guardian as British MEPs are packing up and leaving. They tell Anushka Asthana how membership has changed Britain. Plus: Dan Sabbagh on Huawei’s role in British infrastructure. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/01/2032m 56s

Armando Iannucci on politics and satire - podcast

The creator of The Thick of It and Veep discusses why modern politics has moved beyond satire. And: Bryan Graham on Kobe Bryant. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/01/2022m 40s

Life after Auschwitz

Ivor Perl and Susan Pollack were 12 and 13 when they were transported to Auschwitz. On the 75th anniversary of the concentration camp’s liberation, they tell their stories. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/01/2036m 52s

How did Isabel dos Santos become Africa's richest woman?

Dos Santos, the billionaire daughter of the former president of Angola, claims to be a self-made businesswoman, but the Luanda Leaks, a cache of 715,000 emails, charts, contracts, audits and accounts, help explain how she actually built her business empire. Plus, why are California’s oldest trees dying?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/01/2030m 0s

Peak meat: is veganism the future?

Marco Springmann, a public health expert, tells Anushka Asthana why cutting out animal products is the best route to a healthy diet – and why veganism is good for the planet. Plus: Alex Hern on the Guardian’s exclusive story of how the Amazon chief, Jeff Bezos, allegedly had his phone hacked after receiving a WhatsApp message apparently sent from the crown prince of Saudi Arabia.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/01/2027m 45s

Zoe Brock: my case against Harvey Weinstein

Like dozens of women in the entertainment industry, the actor, model and writer Zoë Brock has claimed she had a traumatic encounter with the film producer Harvey Weinstein. Now she is faced with a settlement offer that she believes would allow him to escape blame for the alleged assaults. Also today: Lily Kuo on the spread of the deadly coronavirus in China. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/01/2028m 33s

The trial of Harvey Weinstein – podcast

Ed Pilkington looks ahead to Weinstein’s court battle where he faces charges of rape and sexual assault, which he denies. And Jamie Grierson on why counter-terror police have listed Extinction Rebellion as a ‘key threat’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/01/2031m 0s

Can the BBC win its battle with the government? – podcast

The Guardian’s media editor, Jim Waterson, takes stock of a bruising general election campaign for the BBC and subsequent threats to the licence fee from the prime minister. Plus: the BBC’s editorial director, Kamal Ahmed, denies the broadcaster is worried that senior ministers appear to be boycotting flagship shows. Also today: Gabrielle Jackson on endometriosis and the need for modern medicine to catch up with the reality of chronic pain in women. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/01/2034m 11s

The fallout in Iran

International correspondent Michael Safi discusses the mistakes and dangerous miscalculations that have been made by Iran in the wake of Qassem Suleimani’s death. And parliament’s youngest MP, Nadia Whittome, talks about her new role. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/01/2025m 28s

Who can lead Labour back to government?

The race to succeed Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour party has been narrowed to five candidates this week. Political editor Heather Stewart looks at the challenge ahead for the party as it faces five more years of opposition. Plus: John Abraham on the historic warming of the oceans. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/01/2029m 15s

Where did it all go wrong for Harry and Meghan?

Hadley Freeman looks at why, 20 months after the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, the couple no longer want to be full-time working members of the royal family. And: Dan Sabbagh on an unprecedented US intervention in the debate over Huawei. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/01/2029m 9s

Why did former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn choose a life on the run?

The former CEO of Nissan, Carlos Ghosn, was once one of Japan’s most respected business people. Now, as the Guardian’s Justin McCurry reports, he’s on the run in Lebanon after fleeing the country to escape financial misconduct charges. Also today: Gary Younge looks back on the opportunities he had as he bows out after 26 years at the Guardian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/01/2027m 55s

Why did Paul Blackburn spend 25 years in jail for a crime he didn't commit?

Paul Blackburn spent a quarter of a century in prison after being found guilty of a terrible crime. But after his conviction was quashed, he has tried in vain to get an apology for what he went through. Plus: Zoe Williams on an extraordinary year for Greggs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/01/2029m 56s

Ayia Napa: Why was an alleged rape victim convicted for lying?

On 17 July 2019, an 18-year old British woman claimed she had been gang-raped by a group of Israeli tourists. But 10 days later she was being charged with lying by the Cypriot police. Michael Polak, her lawyer, discusses the case, while Israeli journalist Noa Shpigel describes covering the story. And: Caroline Davies discusses the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s decision to step back. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/01/2030m 13s

'It's unimaginable': the Australian bushfires

Bushfires have swept large parts of Australia since October, leaving more than 23 people dead, destroying thousands of homes and devastating wildlife – 1 billion animals have been killed. Guardian Australia editor Lenore Taylor describes reporting on the crisis. And: Julian Borger on the US response to Iranian missiles in Iraq. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/01/2026m 40s

Owen Jones on toxic politics and becoming a target of abuse

Guardian columnist Owen Jones describes the way political debate in Britain has become increasingly divisive and how abuse is now a daily occurrence for most people involved in it. Plus: Helen Pidd on the sentencing of Britain’s most prolific rapist. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/2025m 47s

The assassination of Qassem Suleimani – podcast

The US drone strike on Iran’s most influential general could transform the Middle East. Middle east correspondent Martin Chulov looks at what comes next. Plus: Catherine Shoard on the Golden Globes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/01/2030m 26s

Trump and the media: will 2020 be different?

Ed Pilkington hears from some of the most influential journalists in the US on how hard lessons were learned after their coverage of the 2016 election. But will 2020 really be any different? Plus: Carol Anderson on voter suppression and the US election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/01/2034m 0s

The man who gave birth: a look back

Freddy McConnell is a Guardian journalist and trans man who in 2016 decided to begin the process of conceiving and giving birth to his own child. The film he made about the experience is in cinemas now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/01/2025m 47s

Pharmaceuticals: who decides the price of life?

This week we are looking back at some of our favourite episodes from 2019. The cystic fibrosis drug Orkambi could extend the lives of thousands of children – but it comes with a price tag of £105,000 per patient per year. In this episode from February, the health editor Sarah Boseley explored how the cost of a life-extending drug could be weighed next to a person’s life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/01/2024m 23s

How Greta Thunberg's school strike went global: a look back – podcast

Today in Focus talked to the climate change activist Greta Thunberg in March about the campaign of school strikes she started. As part of a series looking back at some of our favourite episodes of 2019, she told our environment editor Jonathan Watts how it all began. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/12/1924m 42s

The strange world of TikTok: a look back – podcast

This week we are returning to some of our favourite episodes from 2019. In October, the UK technology editor Alex Hern joined Anushka Asthana to discuss the social network that is growing its user base with shareable short videos set to catchy soundtracks. Is it being used as a tool of Chinese foreign policy?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/12/1924m 31s

Abandoned at sea, the cargo crew adrift without wages, fuel or supplies: a look back – podcast

This week we are returning to some of our favourite episodes from 2019. When companies run into trouble they can leave ships’ crews drifting at sea with no visas, wages or supplies. In May, Karen McVeigh and Andy Bowerman told the story of one vessel adrift off the coast of the United Arab Emirates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/12/1924m 45s

Growing up with gangs, poverty and knife crime: a look back – podcast

This week we are returning to some of our favourite episodes from 2019. The Bollo youth club in Acton is barely a mile from wealthy Chiswick but to the teenagers who use it as a second home, it can feel like a world away. In March, its members told Robert Booth how they navigated a life of poverty, gangs and knife crime. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/12/1929m 57s

Hong Kong: the story of one protester

A Hong Kong protester describes why he returns to the streets, week after week, in the face of an increasingly brutal crackdown by the authorities This episode was first broadcast in October 2019. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/12/1928m 10s

It's in the stars: charting the return of astrology

Astrology is back! The Guardian’s Aamna Modhin looks at why millennial women are taking life advice from the stars. And: spoken word artist Sophia Thakur on why we should be a bit kinder at Christmas. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/12/1921m 25s

Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner on an extraordinary year – podcast

Viner reflects on a turbulent year in politics. 2019 started with Theresa May as prime minister and is ending with Boris Johnson, who now has a huge Conservative majority in parliament. And: Miranda Sawyer on interviewing the grime star Stormzy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/12/1928m 0s

Inside the mind of scientist James Lovelock – podcast

James Lovelock, who turned 100 this year, discusses his life’s work, including his latest theory that AI might be the key to saving the planet. And: former US ambassador Samantha Power on finding ways to make a difference in the face of daunting challenges. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/12/1926m 12s

The ups and downs of Jamie Oliver – podcast

Fifteen Cornwall, one of Jamie Oliver’s last UK restaurants, shut last week with 100 job losses. Anna Berrill and Sarah Butler look at what went wrong for the celebrity chef. Also: Annie Kelly on a landmark legal case in the US against the world’s largest tech companies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/12/1925m 32s

The election fallout: what happens next? – podcast

The Guardian and Observer’s Sonia Sodha, looks at what happens next for the Conservatives and Labour. Plus, Samanth Subramanian on the hidden cost of the home delivery revolution. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/12/1931m 27s

Election 2019: what just happened?

Anushka Asthana is joined by Guardian reporters and columnists to tell the story of election night. A massive swing to the Conservative party means Boris Johnson will continue as prime minister and now has a majority for his Brexit deal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/12/1925m 34s

Election 2019: John Crace on the lowlights and the gaffes – podcast

The Guardian’s political sketch writer, John Crace, runs through the highs and the many, many lows of the 2019 general election campaign. And: Patrick Butler on the Guardian and Observer Christmas appeal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/12/1929m 39s

The empty doorway: the people behind Britain's homeless statistics

A record number of homeless people died in 2018 and charities are warning this year could be worse. Simon Hattenstone and Daniel Lavelle have been delving behind the statistics into the lives of those sleeping rough. Also today: Haroon Siddique on how British Hindus are being targeted in this election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/12/1931m 37s

Election 2019: on the campaign trail with Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn

Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn are criss-crossing the country in a final dash to the campaign finish line. Rowena Mason and Heather Stewart have been following the leaders’ campaigns up close for weeks. Plus: Gabrielle Jackson on the deadly bushfires sweeping Australia. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/12/1933m 25s

Election 2019: Gary Younge returns to his childhood town of Stevenage – podcast

The Guardian columnist returns to his home town to see how the bellwether constituency views the election. And: Micha Frazer-Carroll asks whether there will be a ‘youthquake’ in Thursday’s vote. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/12/1926m 39s

Election 2019: inside Momentum

Anushka Asthana reports from inside Momentum, the grassroots movement hoping to propel Jeremy Corbyn into Downing Street. And: Rana Foroohar on why we need to regulate big tech. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/12/1935m 17s

Iran's deadly protests

When Iran’s government announced it was raising the price of fuel by up to three times, thousands of Iranians took to the streets to protest. Michael Safi reports on what happened next. And: Jim Waterson on how social media has changed the way we consume news. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/12/1926m 57s

Election 2019: could Tory remainers deny Boris Johnson a majority?

Conservatives who voted remain in the EU referendum are facing a dilemma at this election: a vote for their usual party will mean putting pro-Brexit Boris Johnson back in Downing Street. Anushka Asthana visits Winchester to find out which way Tory remainers are planning to vote next Thursday. Plus: Nina Lakhani on seven men sentenced for the murder of Berta Cáceres. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/12/1925m 38s

When should terrorists be released from prison?

After the terrorist attack in London last week, political parties are blaming each other. Jamie Grierson reviews the evidence on sentencing and rehabilitation. Plus: Patrick Wintour on the arrival of Donald Trump for a Nato summit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/12/1928m 19s

Hillsborough: the 30-year fight for justice

David Conn has spent years reporting on the pursuit of justice by families of the 96 Liverpool fans who died at a football match in Sheffield in 1989. Plus, Deborah Mattinson on the importance of older voters in the 2019 election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/12/1932m 31s

The alarming rise of the rough sex defence

Too many women’s lives are ending after what those accused of their deaths say were ‘sex games gone wrong’. Anna Moore looks at why strangling has become so normalised. And: Helen Pidd looks back on the general election week. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/11/1922m 57s

Election 2019: shifting identities in Peterborough

Robert Booth on the battle for Peterborough, one of the key swing seats set to determine the election. Plus: Can Dündar on press freedoms under threat in Turkey. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/11/1932m 7s

Election 2019: the battle to unseat Boris Johnson in Uxbridge – podcast

Rachel Humphreys heads to Uxbridge, where the 25-year old Labour candidate Ali Milani is campaigning to unseat Boris Johnson. And: Jonathan Freedland on antisemitism in the Labour party. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/11/1926m 57s

Election 2019: Can we trust opinion polls?

Opinion polls are showing a lead for the Conservatives but as the Prospect editor, Tom Clark, says, pundits and journalists should resist over-interpreting the data. Plus: Emma Graham-Harrison on the victory of pro-democracy candidates in Hong Kong’s local elections. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/11/1930m 16s

The rise of Netflix: an empire built on debt

Mark Lawson and Dan Milmo discuss the sustainability of the streaming service. Plus: Lara Spirit on why you should register to vote before Tuesday’s deadline. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/11/1927m 41s

Windrush: the scandal isn't over

Hubert Howard, a prominent Windrush victim, died recently without receiving compensation or a personal apology. Amelia Gentleman discusses his case. Plus: Polly Toynbee on the boldest Labour manifesto for a generation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/11/1927m 3s

Election 2019: Labour's plan to nationalise 'rip-off' companies

On the day of Labour’s manifesto launch, economics editor Larry Elliott and financial editor Nils Pratley discuss the party’s radical plans to nationalise key British industries. Plus Max Rushden on the return of Jose Mourinho to the Premier League. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/11/1931m 16s

Election 2019: The Welsh village on the frontline of the climate crisis – podcast

Rachel Humphreys reports on her time in Fairbourne, which will be dismantled by 2045 due to rising sea levels, while Sandra Laville looks at why flooding and the climate crisis should be a key issue in the general election. And Lily Kuo on the Hong Kong protesters still inside the Polytechnic University. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/11/1928m 19s

Election 2019: is Brexit reshaping politics in east Belfast?

The Guardian’s Ireland correspondent, Rory Carroll, visits east Belfast, where a majority of the protestant and unionist population backed Brexit. Is there an opening for a new kind of centrist politics? Plus: Suzanne Moore on the questions that remain for Prince Andrew. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/11/1928m 30s

The Marseille mothers taking on the mafia

Angelique Chrisafis discusses meeting a group of mothers who are fighting to plough money confiscated from organised crime into small associations on impoverished housing estates. Plus: Jamie Grierson on factchecking the Conservatives’ immigration claims. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/11/1924m 19s

Election 2019: why is Hartlepool the Brexit party's top target?

Anushka Asthana visits the historically Labour-held seat of Hartlepool in north-east England that is the Brexit party’s top target in the general election. Plus: Sonia Sodha on how flooding in the north of England has affected the campaign. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/11/1932m 44s

Election 2019: is Scotland moving towards independence?

Scotland correspondent Libby Brooks tells Rachel Humphreys how the chaos of Brexit has put independence back centre stage at this election. Plus: Sayeeda Warsi on the Conservative party’s enduring problem of Islamophobia. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/11/1928m 56s

Trump's impeachment hits primetime TV

Julian Borger in Washington DC on how the US is preparing for wall-to-wall coverage of the impeachment of Donald Trump, which moves to public hearings today. Plus Peter Walker on Jo Swinson and the Liberal Democrats: is their campaign yet to take off?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/11/1928m 17s

Election 2019: Is the NHS up for sale?

The NHS is one of the major battleground issues of the general election as parties debate the future of healthcare in the UK. Sarah Boseley and Denis Campbell discuss the extent of private company involvement in the NHS. Plus: Dan Collyns on the downfall of Evo Morales in Bolivia. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/11/1930m 0s

Meeting George Soros

Shaun Walker has spent years covering Russia and eastern Europe and watched how the billionaire philanthropist George Soros has become a figure of hate among populists and the far right. Plus: Lea Ypi on the millions of people who do not have a vote in the UK election Read Shaun Walker’s interview from Guardian Weekend. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/11/1927m 10s

A day inside the hidden world of youth courts

The Guardian’s north of England team has spent a month investigating the youth justice system in England and Wales, in which children as young as 10 are put on trial. Today in Focus joined the editor Helen Pidd in a youth court on the final day. And: Jonathan Freedland on the shambolic start to the general election campaign. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/11/1934m 0s

Election 2019: Dark arts and dirty tricks online

Media editor Jim Waterson tells Anushka Asthana how political parties are pushing the limits of what is allowed in the unregulated space of social media. Plus: Sabine Rennefanz on the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/11/1929m 58s

Mexico's war with the drug cartels

Tom Phillips joins the search for some of the thousands of people who have gone missing or been murdered in the country’s bloody drug wars. Plus Luke Harding on the government’s delay in releasing a report on Russian meddling in UK politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/11/1930m 55s

How a Guardian story led to a landmark case against big tobacco

In June 2018 Sarah Boseley wrote about child labour in the tobacco fields of Malawi. Human rights lawyer Martyn Day read her story and decided to sue British American Tobacco. They recently returned to Malawi to check on the progress of the case. And: Susie Cagle on the Californian wildfires. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/11/1925m 26s

David Attenborough: the making of a British icon

Patrick Barkham joins Anushka Asthana to chart the rise of one of Britain’s best-loved personalities: the natural history broadcaster David Attenborough. Plus: Gaby Hinsliff on women and the myth of ‘likability’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/11/1929m 51s

Cannabis farms and nail bars: the hidden world of human trafficking

Last week 39 people were found dead in a refrigerated lorry trailer in Essex. Annie Kelly discusses the case of Minh, a Vietnamese teenager who was trafficked into the UK in 2013 and found himself enslaved on a cannabis farm. Plus: Robert Kitson on England making it to the Rugby World Cup final. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/11/1928m 56s

Boris Johnson's general election gamble

The Guardian’s political editor, Heather Stewart, tells Anushka Asthana that the general election on 12 December will be highly unpredictable as Brexit preferences, unpopular leaders and tactical voting intersect. Plus: Guy Standing on the plunder of natural resources by private interests. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/10/1927m 34s

How the US caught up with Isis leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi

The Guardian’s Martin Chulov describes how US special forces finally tracked down Baghdadi, who was killed in a raid at the weekend. Plus: Robert Booth on the criticism of the London fire brigade’s response to the Grenfell Tower disaster. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/10/1929m 12s

The women who broke the Harvey Weinstein story

When Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey began investigating Harvey Weinstein, they had no idea it would ignite a global reckoning on sexual harassment resulting in #MeToo. And: Rafael Behr on the likelihood of a winter election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/10/1926m 6s

How the Bristol bus boycott changed UK civil rights

Marvin Rees, the mayor of Bristol, discusses the 1963 Bristol bus boycott – a protest few may have heard of, but which proved to be a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. And: Waad al-Kateab, the director of the documentary For Sama, on life in Aleppo. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/10/1927m 8s

The five brothers forced apart by the war in Syria – podcast

International correspondent Michael Safi tells Anushka Asthana how he tracked down five brothers separated by the war in Syria. Plus: Labour’s Lisa Nandy on why MPs should compromise on Brexit for the good of democracy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/10/1933m 50s

Naomi Klein on how politics can solve the climate crisis

Activist and author Naomi Klein tells Anushka Asthana that combating the climate crisis must be at the heart of an urgent restructuring of politics and the economy. Plus: Daniel Trilling on the shocking discovery of 39 bodies inside a lorry in Essex. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/10/1926m 14s

Are Fox News and Donald Trump falling out of love? – podcast

Luke O’Neil on the powerful relationship between Trump and his favourite TV network. But are things starting to sour? Plus: Jonathan Franklin on the protests in Chile that have turned deadly. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/10/1927m 27s

Is this the end of the road for remainers?

Jonathan Freedland joins Anushka Asthana to discuss how the pro-EU movement has grown in numbers and developed its own political identity based around opposing Brexit. Also today: Denise Phelan on the decriminalisation of abortion in Northern Ireland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/10/1926m 40s

How did a town in West Virginia become the opioid capital of the US?

Chris McGreal reports on the web of doctors, pharmacists and drug companies that made rural Mingo county, West Virginia, the opioid capital of America. And: Emma Barnett on why we need to be better at talking about periods. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/10/1925m 52s

Naming and shaming the polluters

Global environment editor Jonathan Watts discusses the Guardian’s investigation into the fossil fuel industry, and the structures that need to change to halt the climate emergency. And: Gary Younge on Donald Trump’s mental health. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/10/1932m 42s

Will parliament vote for a Brexit deal?

Jennifer Rankin and Polly Toynbee discuss the dilemma facing MPs as the government edges towards a Brexit deal. Plus, Cara Reedy on what it means to be a person with dwarfism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/10/1925m 29s

On the frontline as US troops leave northern Syria

Martin Chulov, who covers the Middle East for the Guardian, has spent the past week on the frontline of north-east Syria. He describes the fallout from Trump’s shock decision to withdraw US troops. And: Amelia Gentleman on the EU citizens struggling for the right to remain in the UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/10/1927m 54s

Hong Kong: the story of one protester

A Hong Kong protester describes why he has returned to the streets, week in week out, in the face of an increasingly brutal crackdown by the authorities. And: Polly Toynbee on the Queen’s speech. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/10/1929m 27s

What is the truth about vaping?

Jamie Doward and Max Sanderson join Anushka Asthana to navigate a way through the haze of the debate around vaping. Is it really safe? Plus: Frances Perraudin on the anniversary of #metoo – what has really changed after two years of the campaign against sexual harassment and sexual assault. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/10/1924m 27s

A fatal crash and the problem of diplomatic immunity

Harry Dunn died in a collision in August with a car allegedly being driven by the wife of a US diplomat, who left the UK soon after under the rules of diplomatic immunity. Patrick Wintour looks at what might happen next. And: author Jonathan Safran Foer on changing the way we eat to avoid climate catastrophe. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/10/1924m 42s

Brexit and the Irish border: is there a solution?

Lisa O’Carroll and Rory Carroll tell Anushka Asthana that solving the Irish border problem is still key to a Brexit deal. Plus: Wendy Laura Belcher on African literature. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/10/1926m 31s

Shell, Nigeria and a 24-year fight for justice

In 1995, the Nigerian government executed the Ogoni Nine – environmental activists who were trying to fight Shell’s exploitation of their homeland. Now, four widows are taking the oil company to court. And: Dan Sabbagh on the ramifications of Trump’s shock decision to withdraw from the Turkish-Syrian border. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/10/1926m 59s

Thirteen children have been shot dead in St Louis, Missouri. Why?

The Guardian US correspondent Amanda Holpuch discusses her recent trip to St Louis, where 13 black children have been fatally shot since April. And: Polly Toynbee attends the first day of the Extinction Rebellion protests. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/10/1927m 33s

The strange world of TikTok: viral videos and Chinese censorship

UK technology editor Alex Hern joins Anushka Asthana to discuss the Chinese-owned social network that is growing its user base with shareable short videos set to catchy soundtracks. But is it also being used as a tool of Chinese foreign policy? Plus: Marie Le Conte on the role of political gossip. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/10/1926m 19s

In conversation with Jia Tolentino

Jia Tolentino, described as one of the world’s greatest young essayists, discusses how the age of the internet has fundamentally changed who we are. Plus: Lisa O’Carroll on the Irish border. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/10/1925m 15s

Boris Johnson’s Brexit speech: preparing for an election

Boris Johnson used his first leader’s speech at the Conservative party conference to set up a new phase of negotiations with the EU and an election confrontation with Jeremy Corbyn. Plus: Jim Waterson on Prince Harry, privacy and the media. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/10/1925m 48s

Boris Johnson and the Jennifer Arcuri allegations

Boris Johnson says he behaved with ‘full propriety’ regarding his links to the US businesswoman Jennifer Arcuri while he was London mayor. Matthew Weaver has been following the story for the Guardian. Plus: Wadah Khanfar remembers his friend Jamal Khashoggi on the anniversary of his murder. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/10/1927m 20s

Could this impeachment inquiry end Trump’s presidency?

In a July phone call between Donald Trump and Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskiy, Trump asked Zelenskiy to investigate former vice-president Joe Biden. An intelligence official decided to blow the whistle on the call. Lauren Gambino discusses how this has led to an impeachment inquiry. And: Joseph Harker on the start of Black History Month. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/10/1923m 46s

Is it over for Justin Trudeau? – podcast

The Canadian prime minister achieved a historic victory in 2015 but as he nears the end of his first term a series of scandals are making his political future less certain. With elections next month, journalist Leyland Cecco discusses how likely it is Trudeau will repeat his initial success. And: Kaitlyn Regehr on why new sex education lessons in schools are already outdated. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/09/1929m 11s

Prince Andrew's damaged reputation

Last week Jeffrey Epstein accuser Virginia Roberts did her first television interview, and in it restated claims that she had been made to have sex with Prince Andrew when she was 17. ITV royal editor Chris Ship discusses the Duke of York’s friendship with deceased child abuser Jeffrey Epstein. And: Labour MP Paula Sherriff on standing up to Boris Johnson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/09/1929m 47s

Can Labour unite and plot a path to power?

Sonia Sodha joins Anushka Asthana to discuss Labour’s options now that parliament has resumed and the party has backed Jeremy Corbyn’s Brexit strategy. Also today: Tom McCarthy on the moves to impeach Donald Trump. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/09/1929m 47s

Unlawful: the supreme court stuns Boris Johnson

Philippe Sands QC on the decision by the supreme court to rule against the government on the suspension of parliament. Plus: Shoshana Zuboff on how to fight back against surveillance capitalism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/09/1923m 40s

The US college admissions scandal

Journalist Evgenia Peretz discusses how US college tutor Rick Singer persuaded so many parents to take part in one of the biggest university scandals the Department of Justice has ever prosecuted. And: Rob Davies on the collapse of Thomas Cook. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/09/1927m 10s

The British spy who tried to stop the Iraq war

In the weeks leading up to the war in Iraq, Katharine Gun exposed a US plot to spy on the UN in leaks published in the Observer. She joins former Observer journalist Martin Bright to tell their story ahead of a forthcoming Hollywood adaptation. Plus the BBC’s Carrie Gracie on how she fought for equal pay. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/09/1931m 13s

Where did it all go wrong for David Cameron?

As the former PM publishes his memoirs, Patrick Wintour tells Anushka Asthana that Cameron’s pursuit of austerity and decision to call an EU referendum sowed the seeds of his demise. Plus, in opinion, George Monbiot on the global climate strike. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/09/1931m 10s

County lines: how drugs gangs are recruiting children

Aamna Mohdin tells Rachel Humphreys how county lines gangs are stepping up their operations by using short-term holiday flats and recruiting local teens to sell drugs in small towns around Britain. Plus Owen Jones on Jeremy Corbyn’s ‘neutral’ stance on Brexit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/09/1925m 22s

Revoke and remain: inside the Lib Dem party conference – podcast

With a new leader in Jo Swinson and the defection of six MPs to the party, Lib Dems are hoping for a resurgence. Rachel Humphreys reports from party conference. Plus Vince Beiser on the black market in sand. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/09/1927m 12s

How dangerous is chlorinated chicken?

Chlorine-washed chicken from the US has become a totemic issue in the post-Brexit trade deals Britain could look to secure. But is it unsafe? And what does it say about the different attitudes to food production on either side of the Atlantic? Also today: Israelis go to the polls for their second election of the year. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/09/1926m 0s

Edward Snowden: life after leaking

Former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden’s life was upended by his decision to expose his government’s programme of mass surveillance. Ewen MacAskill helped break the story for the Guardian back in 2013 and now visits him in his adopted home of Moscow. Plus Caelainn Barr on why rape prosecutions are at a 10-year low Watch the Guardian’s exclusive interview with Edward Snowden. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/09/1930m 46s

A 2,000km journey through the Amazon rainforest

Tom Phillips describes his recent Amazon trip and examines the impact of the new era of wrecking ushered in by Brazil’s president, Jair Bolsonaro. Also, Rhik Samadder on coping with depression when your job involves trying to amuse people. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/09/1925m 25s

'It's all gone': how Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas

Oliver Laughland tells Rachel Humphrys about the destruction he witnessed in the Bahamas in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian. Also today: Chris Hanretty on the Scottish court’s ruling that the British government’s suspension of parliament was unlawful. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/09/1922m 0s

Could Boris Johnson's explosive election strategy work?

Anushka Asthana hears from the Guardian’s John Harris on how the chaos in Westminster looks to people in towns around the UK. Also today: Gaby Hinsliff on accusations of cronyism in Theresa May’s honours list Watch the latest episode of Anywhere But Westminster. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/09/1930m 54s

Siri, sex and Apple's privacy problem

As Apple prepares to launch a new iPhone, Alex Hern explores the privacy scandal around its automated personal assistant, Siri. Plus, Polly Toynbee on why Jeremy Corbyn is preventing Boris Johnson from calling an election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/09/1923m 12s

Why do Dubai's princesses keep trying to run away?

Ola Salem discusses the divorce case of Princess Haya, who fled to London. Why do royal women keep trying to escape the emirate? Plus John Marsden on the growing trend of toxic parenting. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/09/1923m 20s

Malcolm Gladwell on the consequences of misreading a stranger

The writer Malcolm Gladwell examines our interactions with strangers and what can happen when they go wrong, and Daniel Boffey on the view from Brussels of a chaotic week in British politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/09/1927m 30s

Reporting from the eye of a political storm

Anushka Asthana follows the Guardian’s political correspondents in Westminster as they attempt to make sense of another seismic week in British politics, with Boris Johnson losing his fragile majority and calling for MPs to allow him an election. Plus Lily Kuo on a huge moment in Hong Kong as protesters forced the withdrawal of the extradition bill. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/09/1932m 59s

Back to school after a decade of austerity

As the chancellor, Sajid Javid, gears up for what could be a pre-election spending review, education correspondent Sally Weale tells Anushka Asthana how nearly 10 years of government cutbacks in school funding have fed through to the classroom. Plus Dr David Nicholl, a consultant neurologist, on why he chastised Jacob Rees-Mogg over his support for a possible no-deal Brexit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/09/1929m 16s

Boris Johnson's ultimatum: back me or it's a general election

Jonathan Freedland joins Anushka Asthana to discuss a pivotal week ahead in British politics. Plus Prof Liz Bentley of the Royal Meteorological Society on the destructive force of Hurricane Dorian, which has been battering the Bahamas and is heading for the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/09/1928m 33s

The man who gave birth

Freddy McConnell is a Guardian journalist and trans man who in 2016 decided to begin the process of conceiving and delivering his own child. The film he made about the experience is in cinemas now. And: Andrew Rawnsley on the anniversary of the second world war. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/09/1927m 57s

Antique firearms: gangs, guns and untraceable ‘ghost bullets’

Kenneth R Rosen on how British gangs are using a loophole in the law to get hold of antique firearms and untraceable bullets. Plus: Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner on the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo massacre. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/08/1926m 0s

Phillip Hammond, the Treasury and the risk of a no-deal Brexit

Poppy Trowbridge on her work as a special adviser in Hammond’s Treasury as it tried to plan for Brexit and avoid crashing out with no deal. Plus, Carey Gillam on how the biotech company Monsanto tried to destroy her reputation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/08/1931m 23s

Helping a nine-year-old recover from an eating disorder

We hear about the importance of early intervention in rare cases of pre-teen eating disorders. Plus, calls to ban hands-free phone use while driving. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/08/1927m 4s

The crisis in Kashmir

Azhar Farooq and Vidhi Doshi report on the crisis over Kashmir, triggered by the Indian government’s decision to impose direct rule from Delhi. Plus Jason Burke on life in post-Mugabe Zimbabwe. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/08/1929m 33s

Meghan: why all the hate against the Duchess of Sussex?

Victoria Murphy on why Meghan has been subjected to a sustained campaign of criticism from sections of the media and the British public. Plus: Malachi O’Doherty on 50 years since the start of the Troubles. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/08/1927m 10s

In black and white: why Newcastle United fans want Mike Ashley out

As the Premier League season kicks off this weekend, David Conn examines the fraught relationship between Newcastle United fans and the club’s owner, Mike Ashley. Plus, Ammar Kalia on the Miss England beauty contest. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/08/1931m 15s

The mother who hunts paedophiles in her spare time

Libby Brooks investigates Scotland’s self-styled ‘paedophile hunters’ who use Facebook to track down adults intent on grooming children for abuse. Plus: Labour’s Diane Abbott on the legacy of the late Toni Morrison. Warning: this episode contains strong language and references to abuse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/08/1924m 55s

Cancer town: life in the shadow of a chemical plant

In Reserve, Louisiana, Oliver Laughland hears how a community is fighting for the right to a safe environment for their children, who face a risk of cancer 50 times higher than the national average. Plus Helen Pidd on the battle to save the dam at Whaley Bridge in Derbyshire. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/08/1926m 39s

How much does Google know about you? – podcast

Alex Hern on how Google’s use of personal data has potentially helped create a new age of mass surveillance. Plus Lois Beckett on the response to two mass shootings in the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/08/1928m 0s

The women fighting back in Kenya's biggest slum

Edita Ochieng and like-minded women are taking a stand against endemic sexual violence and police corruption in Kibera. Plus: Angelique Chrisafis on why climate protesters in France are stealing portraits of Emmanuel Macron. Warning: this podcast contains references to sexual abuse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/08/1927m 50s

Running dry: the water crisis driving migration to the US

Nina Lakhani explores how drought and famine are fuelling the wave of migration from Central America to the US. Plus: Emma Graham-Harrison on China and the Hong Kong protests. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/08/1926m 34s

Understanding Dominic Cummings, Boris Johnson's chief strategist

James Graham, screenwriter of the TV drama Brexit: The Uncivil War, talks about Dominic Cummings, the former Vote Leave director now at the heart of Boris Johnson’s strategy team. And: Daniel Trilling on how the media covers refugees. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/08/1927m 30s

Obscene texts and corruption: the downfall of Puerto Rico's governor

Mass protests triggered by leaked text messages have led to the resignation of Ricardo Rosselló. Oliver Laughland discusses his time on the island. And: Larry Elliott on why sterling is at a 28-month low. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/07/1927m 9s

A web of lies: Carl Beech and the VIP paedophile ring

In 2014 Carl Beech claimed he had been a victim of child sexual abuse by high-profile politicians. His allegations snowballed into a multimillion-pound police investigation, but rather than exposing a paedophile ring, Beech ended up on trial. Simon Murphy discusses the story. And: Shaun Walker on the possible poisoning of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/07/1932m 16s

Jeff Bezos and the United States of Amazon

In 1994, Jeff Bezos founded Amazon, the company that has since made him the richest man in the world. Julia Carrie Wong charts the company’s success and controversies. Plus: Jim Waterson on why young people aren’t watching the news anymore. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/07/1928m 31s

Boris Johnson's Brexit cabinet

Jonathan Freedland talks about Boris Johnson’s brutal cabinet reshuffle which brings the members of the victorious Brexit campaign into the heart of government. And: Laura Snapes on the nominations for the Mercury music prize. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/07/1928m 55s

Can Labour reunite to take on Boris Johnson? – podcast

Heather Stewart on Labour’s attempts to reunite around its Brexit policy, plus Sonia Sodha on Boris Johnson’s first speech as prime minister. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/07/1928m 5s

Is prime minister Boris Johnson leading us to a no-deal Brexit?

Boris Johnson will enter Downing Street this afternoon as Britain’s new prime minister. But Britain is still hurtling to the Brexit deadline of 31 October – with parliament rising this week for its summer recess. Rowena Mason and Daniel Boffey map out the coming months as Johnson’s plan comes into contact with the harsh realities in Brussels. Plus: Rebecca Nicholson on comedy and canned laughter. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/07/1929m 2s

Could Trump’s racist rhetoric win him re-election in 2020?

On 14 July, Donald Trump used Twitter to tell four unnamed Democratic congresswomen to ‘go back and help fix the totally broken and crime-infested places from which they came’. His racist language shocked many around the world, but he has refused to back down. The Guardian’s Jamiles Lartey looks at Trump’s history of racism while David Smith discusses how it may affect the 2020 presidential race. And: Julian Borger on the Iran crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/07/1927m 11s

Stranded in Pakistan: why did the Home Office deny a baby a visa?

Nina Saleh, a British resident for 20 years, travelled to Pakistan to adopt a baby and was then repeatedly denied a visa, leaving her trapped abroad for months on end. Plus: Zoe Williams on what her time as a waitress taught her about being a good diner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/07/1924m 42s

The Jeffrey Epstein scandal

The financier Jeffrey Epstein is back in court on charges of the sex trafficking of minors. Vicky Ward and Ed Pilkington discuss his case. Plus: Aditya Chakrabortty wonders why the French super-rich who promised to donate to Notre Dame haven’t paid up yet. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/07/1930m 27s

Has Brexit saved the Lib Dems?

The Lib Dems have made an extraordinary comeback in 2019 because of their anti-Brexit stance. The Observer political editor, Toby Helm, discusses whether the party is here to stay. And: Oliver Wainwright on the inclusion of social housing in this year’s Stirling architecture prize. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/07/1923m 38s

Why do so many people still believe the moon landings were a hoax?

On the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission that first put humans on the moon, Richard Godwin explores why conspiracy theories about the landings still endure. Plus Geoff Andrews on his part in the Guardian’s lunar front page from 1969 – and how he missed the famous quote. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/07/1925m 41s

The real Boris Johnson: politician or journalist?

The Tory leadership hopeful has long attempted to hold down careers in both politics and journalism. As he hopes to take over as prime minister, his biographers Sonia Purnell and Andrew Gimson look at what his career in newspapers says about his character and abilities for the top job in UK politics. Plus: Sabrina Siddiqui on the widespread condemnation of Donald Trump’s racist remarks about four congresswomen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/07/1927m 22s

Police chases: are they worth it?

The public expect police to pursue bad guys, but a shocking tally of recent deaths has exposed the risks involved. Tom Lamont discusses how the death of Matthew Seddon could change how we think about police chases. And: Sirin Kale on sexist dress codes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/07/1929m 1s

Stop and search is discriminatory, so why is it on the rise?

The first stop and search Jamal ever experienced was when he was 11 years old. Now, at 24, he has been stopped numerous times. Most recently, a stop became aggressive and he was hit in the face with handcuffs, but was charged and convicted with assaulting an officer. There is little evidence stop and search works in combating violent crime, but critics say it disproportionately targets young black men. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/07/1929m 8s

What is happening to migrant children at US border facilities?

Elora Mukherjee is a prominent US immigration lawyer. Several weeks ago she visited the Clint border facility in Texas, which was holding hundreds of children who had tried to cross the border. What she saw was so shocking she has decided to speak out. And: Jennifer Silvers on how our experiences when we are young can affect the rest of our lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/07/1927m 42s

Jeremy Hunt and the NHS: master negotiator or out of his depth?

Denis Campbell assesses whether Hunt’s experience as health secretary warrants him becoming the next prime minister. Plus: Dan Milmo on the Deutsche Bank job cuts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/07/1926m 28s

The sea captain facing jail after saving the lives of refugees

Carola Rackete defied Italy’s ban on migrant rescue ships by forcing her way into the port of Lampedusa last week. She tells the Guardian’s Lorenzo Tondo she would do it all again, even though she faces a lengthy trial and a possible jail sentence. Plus: Simon Jenkins on the leaked diplomatic cables of the UK’s Washington ambassador, which were highly critical of Donald Trump. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/07/1927m 6s

What really happens to the waste in your recycling bin?

Recycling is often cited as one of the easiest ways to make a difference to the environment. But does old plastic really get reprocessed into new? Guardian reporters around the world have been investigating what really happens to our waste. Also today: Bryan Mealer on a shocking spate of murders of black trans women in Texas. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/07/1923m 43s

Who owns England?

It is a simple question with an incredibly complex answer – not even the Land Registry knows the exact ownership of all parts of the country. Guy Shrubsole set out to solve the mystery. Plus Alex Hern on the police’s use of facial recognition technology. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/07/1928m 5s

Is a new generation taking over the Democratic party?

Kamala Harris was the big winner of the first round of Democratic party debates in the US. This week, her poll numbers surged and so did donations to her campaign. But as Lauren Gambino in Washington notes, it was bad news for the frontrunners as Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders faltered. Also today: Daniel Boffey on the new cast of characters taking over the EU’s top jobs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/07/1927m 31s

Should doctors face jail when treatment goes wrong?

The death of a patient at a private London hospital after a delay in his treatment led to the imprisonment of David Sellu. After 15 months behind bars, his name was finally cleared. He tells his harrowing story as a new report reveals that doctors from ethnic minorities are twice as likely to face disciplinary action as white doctors. Plus: Gaby Hinsliff on Jeremy Corbyn and the civil service. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/07/1927m 36s

Life in the fastest warming place on earth

In the world’s northernmost town, temperatures have risen by 4C since 1971, devastating homes, wildlife and even the cemetery. India Rakusen and Jon Watts travel to Svalbard to find out how the island is coping with the effects of global heating. And: Gary Younge on Ivanka Trump’s presence at the G20. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/07/1923m 49s

Why is cocaine washing up on the beaches of Fiji?

A multibillion-dollar operation involving cocaine and methamphetamines is having a major impact on islands in the Pacific. Kate Lyons travelled to Fiji to investigate. Plus: John Harris on Facebook’s cryptocurrency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/1923m 4s

Has Saudi Arabia got away with the murder of Jamal Khashoggi?

A UN report on the murder of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi has said there is credible evidence linking the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, to the crime. Nick Hopkins and Stephanie Kirchgaessner discuss the killing and the fallout in Saudi Arabia and among its allies. Plus: Patrick Timmons on the political reaction to the deaths of a father and daughter in the Rio Grande this week. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/06/1928m 34s

Why aren't Hong Kong's protesters backing down?

Millions of people have taken to the streets over the past three weeks in opposition to an extradition law. The Guardian correspondent Emma Graham-Harrison discusses covering the demonstrations and what could happen next. Plus: Angie Zelter on why she doesn’t regret being arrested at an Extinction Rebellion protest. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/06/1923m 46s

Ebola is back – can it be contained?

The current outbreak of the deadly virus in the DRC has been called the most complex public health emergency in history. Peter Beaumont describes his recent visit to the DRC and Sarah Boseley discusses how the 2014 outbreak was eventually contained. Plus: Helen Pidd on what has been achieved with the ‘northern powerhouse’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/06/1925m 9s

Can anything stop Boris Johnson?

The Tory leadership hopeful has spent the past three days avoiding questions on why the police were called to his home after an altercation with his partner. But will questions about Johnson’s previous behaviour and character damage his chances of becoming prime minister?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/06/1928m 40s

What has changed since the Stonewall rebellion?

The Stonewall rebellion in 1969 started a revolution in LGBT rights in the US. Ed Pilkington revisits the story 50 years on with those who were there. Plus: Lucy Siegle on the rise of fast fashion. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/1932m 23s

On the frontline: why has environmental journalism become so dangerous?

The field of environmental journalism is now one of the most dangerous after war reporting. The investigative reporter Juliette Garside and the global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, discuss why journalists are facing rising levels of violence. And: Polly Toynbee on Jeremy Hunt and Boris Johnson making it to the final in the Tory leadership race. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/06/1926m 12s

Why are the best footballers in the world suing their bosses?

The Women’s World Cup is nearing the knockout stages, with the tournament favourites, the US, in blistering form. But back home, the players are taking on their governing body in a gender equality lawsuit that could have huge implications for women’s sport. Plus: Jonathan Freedland on Donald Trump’s economic record. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/06/1924m 55s

What oil companies knew: the great climate cover-up

Oil firms are said to have known for decades of the link between burning fossil fuels and climate breakdown. Author Bill McKibben describes how industry lobbying created a 30-year barrier to tackling the crisis. Plus: John Stewart on his campaign to stop the third runway at Heathrow. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/06/1929m 51s

The rehabilitation of Tony Blair?

Tony Blair’s legacy since leaving office has been the subject of heated debate both within the Labour party and the country at large. As Paul Lewis reports, his re-entry into the national debate on Brexit comes at a time of a crisis of trust in British politics and a rise in populism. Also today: Jim Waterson on the Saudi investment in the Evening Standard. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/06/1930m 15s

From bootcamp to burnout: how to make it as a YouTuber

Young stars on the Google-owned site can become multi-millionaires almost overnight but controversy has stalked every stage of YouTube’s growth. Plus: Amelia Abraham on rising LGBT hate crimes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/1926m 50s

The story of Grenfell United

Natasha Elcock and Ed Daffarn escaped from Grenfell Tower on 14 June 2017. Karim Mussilhy’s uncle died in the fire. Together with other survivors and bereaved people, they formed Grenfell United. They talk about their work over the past two years, while the Guardian’s social affairs correspondent, Rob Booth, discusses government inaction. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/06/1931m 11s

Private armies and secret deals: Russia's drive into Africa

A cache of leaked documents appear to show how a close Putin ally is leading a push to turn Africa into a strategic hub with echoes of Soviet-era zones of influence. Luke Harding reports on the Kremlin’s drive to leave its mark on the continent. Plus comedian Jon Stewart tears into US lawmakers over the treatment of 9/11 first responders and emergency services. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/06/1930m 27s

Change UK: how not to set up a political party

With six of its 11 MPs having quit, Heather Stewart, the Guardian’s political editor, charts what went wrong. Plus Damian Carrington on plant extinctions. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/06/1926m 11s

Cruel state: the impact of austerity on disabled people

Guardian columnist Frances Ryan, who is disabled, has written about inequality and disability rights for decades. She discusses the impact that austerity has had on those most in need. And: Helen Davidson on the Hong Kong protests. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/06/1926m 49s

Are peers asleep on the job? Investigating the House of Lords

Investigative journalist David Pegg and data journalist Pamela Duncan have spent the last four months examining the House of Lords. They discuss why the upper house is under such pressure to reform. Plus: Iman Amrani on her modern masculinity series. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/1926m 8s

Farewell Maybot: John Crace on the changing of the Tory guard

The Guardian’s political sketch writer first coined the term ‘the Maybot’ in 2016, when she robotically repeated the same phrases in a car-crash interview. As she prepares to step down as Conservative leader, Crace discusses who might take over. Plus: Suzanne Wrack on the start of the Fifa Women’s World Cup. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/06/1929m 15s

China's forgotten protesters: the other Tiananmens

Hundreds of Chinese cities were involved in the student-led demos in 1989. The Guardian’s Lily Kuo discusses the uprisings outside of Beijing. Plus: Patrick Wintour on Saudi Arabia’s hand in Sudan’s military crackdown. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/06/1925m 48s

What is the future for Sir Philip Green?

As Sir Philip Green’s retail empire faces the prospect of entering administration, putting 18,000 jobs at risk, the Guardian business reporter Sarah Butler discusses how we got here. Plus: Sadiq Khan responds to being called a loser by Donald Trump. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/06/1927m 41s

Death, carnage and chaos: a climber on his recent ascent of Everest

On 23 May, an image taken by the climber Nirmal Pujra went viral. It showed a long queue of climbers waiting to reach the summit of Everest. Elia Saikaly, a film-maker, was on that climb. He describes the ascent, while the Guardian’s Michael Safi discusses why the number of people seeking to scale Everest has exploded. Plus: Helsinki’s radical solution to homelessness. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/06/1924m 30s

Inside Islamic State: meeting Umm Sayyaf, the most senior female Isis captive

Martin Chulov, the Guardian’s Middle East correspondent, tells Anushka Asthana about meeting Umm Sayyaf, who described her role in helping the CIA hunt for the Isis leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. And: Johny Pitts on how an ice bath with pop duo Jedward prompted a journey around Europe exploring Afropean identity. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/06/1926m 26s

Trump's coming to see the Queen but what actually happens on a state visit?

Ben Rhodes was Barack Obama’s national security adviser and accompanied him on his UK state visit in 2011. He reveals what goes into planning a trip of this scale and what the UK should expect when Trump arrives next week. Plus: Paul Owen on the fallout from Mueller’s first public statement on his investigation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/05/1925m 25s

Historical war crimes: an amnesty for British soldiers?

Defence secretary Penny Mordaunt has promised to introduce a ‘presumption against prosecution’ on historical prosecutions for military veterans. Samira Shackle looks back at the collapse of the investigation into abuse allegations in Iraq, while Conservative MP Johnny Mercer argues that soldiers have been unfairly hounded. Also today: Emma John looks ahead to the Cricket World Cup. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/05/1928m 24s

What happens to a place when its steel industry collapses

The announcement that British Steel was entering insolvency came as a hammer blow to Scunthorpe, where it employs 5,000 people. It has become a familiar story in recent years, and Helen Pidd returns to Redcar, which lost the majority of its steelworks in 2015. Also today: Rory Carroll on the case of Ian Bailey, on trial in France for murder in his absence. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/05/1929m 55s

The Brexit divide: Britain's EU election earthquake

A wave of support for populists and Greens has disrupted centrist parties across the EU. Daniel Boffey considers what it means for the bloc and Brexit. Plus: Julia Kollewe on the world’s first raspberry-picking robot. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/05/1926m 32s

Who is trying to ban abortion in the US?

Alabama is one of 15 states to recently pass an abortion ban. Although none of the bans are currently in effect, the aim is to place pressure on Roe v Wade, the court decision that enshrined a woman’s legal right to an abortion. The Guardian’s US health reporter, Jessica Glenza, discusses her meeting with Janet Porter, the religious extremist who inspired the anti-abortion laws. And: Serena Daniari on trans women finding their voices. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/05/1928m 20s

The end of May: are we headed for Boris Johnson as prime minister?

Theresa May has entered the final phase of her leadership, with rivals waiting to pounce on the chance to succeed her. Patrick Wintour lays out the route ahead but can anyone stop the clear favourite? Also today: Claire Armitstead on the outpouring of love for children’s author Judith Kerr who died on Thursday at the age of 95. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/05/1929m 58s

Inside the neo-Nazi plot to kill a Labour MP

A plot to kill a Labour MP and a police officer was only disrupted after an informant within the neo-Nazi group National Action blew the whistle. Robbie Mullen passed the details on to Hope Not Hate’s Matthew Collins. Here, they tell their extraordinary story. Also today: the columnist Aditya Chakrabortty on his unlikely collaboration with the techno group Underworld. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/05/1928m 26s

Is John Bolton trying to drive Trump to war with Iran?

Donald Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, was a key architect of the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. Now he is stoking tensions with Iran. Julian Borger describes how the standoff could get out of control. Also today: Katharine Viner on how the Guardian is updating its language when reporting on the climate crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/05/1926m 40s

Shaken up: will Nigel Farage's Brexit party change politics?

The Brexit party is expected to top the polls in this week’s European elections in the UK. Farage’s calls to leave the EU immediately without a deal have proved appealing to many voters who feel betrayed that Brexit is yet to be delivered. The Guardian’s Peter Walker describes a reshaping of British politics. Plus: Samuel Gibbs on Google and Huawei. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/05/1926m 43s

Abandoned at sea: the cargo crew adrift without wages, fuel or supplies

When companies run into trouble they can leave ships’ crews drifting at sea with no visas, wages or supplies. Karen McVeigh and Andy Bowerman tell the story of one vessel adrift off the coast of UAE. Plus, Rupert Neate on the tax breaks attracting the super-rich to Italy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/1927m 25s

Mum and me: a story of immigration and integration

Guardian columnist Aditya Chakrabortty, the son of two Indian immigrants, explains why he felt so frustrated with a recent report from Tony Blair’s thinktank. And Katharine Murphy looks ahead to Australia’s imminent election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/05/1930m 35s

Facing up to Europe's far right

The EU elections, beginning on 23 May, are a test for Europe’s mainstream parties as populists appear to be gaining momentum with stark anti-immigration campaigns. Anushka Asthana is joined by Jennifer Rankin, Shaun Walker and Angelique Chrisafis to assess the rising tide of populism across the continent. Plus: Simon Hattenstone on what an accidental voicemail recording revealed about G4S’s private ambulance service. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/05/1929m 40s

India is voting: who is going to win the world's biggest election?

Hundreds of millions of Indians are going to the polls over six weeks to vote for their next government. The Guardian’s south Asia correspondent, Michael Safi, heads out on the trail as the prime minister, Narendra Modi, makes a national security case for re-election amid criticism over his handling of the economy. Plus: John Crace on what he learnt from attending a Nigel Farage rally. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/05/1925m 34s

The Venezuela uprising: the story so far

Nicolás Maduro appeared on the brink of being forced from power in an uprising plotted by the opposition leader, Juan Guaidó. But key figures stayed loyal, allowing the president to begin reprisals. Tom Phillips in Caracas has watched it play out. Plus: Owen Jones on public schools and who gets to go to Britain’s elite universities. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/05/1926m 41s

Smuggled over the border: the school trip, the Stasi and the East German defector

In December 1984, a group of teenagers on a school trip from West Germany crossed the border into East Germany. When they returned, an East German defector was hiding under a seat on their bus. Sophie Hardach speaks to those involved 35 years on and revisits their incredible story. Plus: Jo Holdaway on the GM anti-virus drug that saved her daughter’s life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/05/1930m 0s

Love Corbyn, hate Brexit? Labour's EU elections dilemma

Jeremy Corbyn launched Labour’s European elections manifesto with a renewed promise to back a second Brexit referendum in certain circumstances – but to also respect the result of the first. Yet for ardently pro-Corbyn Europhiles such as Momentum’s Laura Parker, it has been a tough balancing act to support. Also today: Jason Burke on the South African election and the ANC. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/05/1928m 54s

Anna Sorokin: the fake heiress who fooled everyone

For years Sorokin passed herself off as ‘Anna Delvey’, a German heiress worth $60m. Today she will be sentenced in New York and faces up to 15 years in prison. Hadley Freeman discusses how Sorokin was eventually exposed and why her case has attracted so much attention. Plus: Helen Pidd on the inequality between London and the rest of England. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/05/1927m 27s

Fortress Europe: what happens to the refugees sent back to Libya?

The EU’s efforts to stem the flow migration from Africa across the Mediterranean has meant assisting the Libyan coastguard to intercept boats. But what happens when asylum seekers are returned to war-torn Libya? Sally Hayden has spent months investigating conditions in the detention camps. Plus: Jonathan Watts on the UN’s alarming report on the possible extinction of more than a million plant and animal species. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/05/1929m 8s

The new space race

The science writer Philip Ball has always been fascinated by space. He looks at the latest missions to the moon and beyond. And: Carole Cadwalladr on why she used her TED talk to tell tech billionaires they had broken democracy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/05/1927m 50s

Fired by Trump: former US attorney Preet Bharara on American justice – podcast

The ‘sheriff of Wall Street’, who took on mafia bosses and terrorists in court, looks back on his career. Plus: Tim Gordon on the silencing of the oceans. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/05/1929m 20s

Are non-disclosure agreements out of control?

Zelda Perkins worked for Harvey Weinstein in her early 20s. She signed a non-disclosure agreement when she left his company, but 20 years later decided to break it when allegations about the film producer’s behaviour became public. She has subsequently questioned the widespread use of NDAs. Plus: Dan Sabbagh on Gavin Williamson’s short-lived cabinet career. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/05/1926m 0s

Julian Assange and the story of WikiLeaks

Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, has been sentenced to 50 weeks in prison for breaching bail conditions after spending almost seven years inside the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Today, he has an extradition hearing, which could conclude with him being sent to the US. Esther Addley and Julian Borger chart his rise and fall. Plus: Sean Ingle on the Caster Semenya ruling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/05/1934m 21s

Accused of cheating: another immigration scandal?

Amelia Gentleman discusses the immigration scandal in which the Home Office has accused 34,000 international students of cheating in English language tests. And: Magid Magid, the 29-year old lord mayor of Sheffield, who is stepping down to run as a Green MEP. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/05/1926m 0s

How worried should we be about Huawei?

Theresa May has turned to her national security council to help her decide on whether to allow the Chinese firm Huawei to provide parts of Britain’s 5G network. Guardian reporters Rupert Neate, Alex Hern and Tania Branigan discuss the company at the heart of a diplomatic tussle. Plus, in opinion, David Kogan argues Labour needs clarity on Brexit to have a chance of winning power. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/04/1928m 15s

On the frontline in the fight for LGBT rights

Ruth Hunt joined Stonewall 14 years ago, quickly rising to become the charity’s chief executive. In that time she has seen huge strides made towards equality for LGBT people. As she prepares to step down in August, she reflects on how much further there is to go. And: the author Nicci Gerrard on her campaign for the rights of people with dementia in hospitals. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/04/1925m 40s

Are our blueberries radioactive? The fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster 30 years on

On 26 April 1986, the worst nuclear accident in human history occurred in the No 4 reactor of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Soviet Ukraine. Kate Brown has spent years researching the cover-up that took place afterwards. Plus: Rory Carroll reflects on the legacy of the Northern Irish journalist Lyra McKee. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/04/1928m 4s

A week with Extinction Rebellion

Last week, central London was brought to a standstill when thousands of protesters blocked sites including Waterloo Bridge in a ‘climate rebellion’ organised by Extinction Rebellion. The Guardian reporter Damien Gayle has been with the protesters from the start, while Matthew Taylor, the Guardian’s environment correspondent, assesses their demands. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/04/1926m 51s

Terror in Sri Lanka

On Easter Sunday, explosions across Sri Lanka killed hundreds of people and wounded many more. As the country reels in shock, Michael Safi describes reporting in the aftermath. Plus: the Guardian’s chief political correspondent, Jessica Elgot, on what to expect from Brexit now parliament is back. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/04/1926m 4s

How the Green New Deal was hatched in a London bar

In 2007, over a friendly drink, the Guardian’s economics editor, Larry Elliott, came up with a radical plan to address the effects of the financial crisis and climate change. He called it the Green New Deal. Plus: the Guardian’s education correspondent on why schools are going to test four-year-olds • What is the Green New Deal and how would it benefit society?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/04/1927m 29s

Hope for those with Huntington's

Robin McKie, the Observer’s science and environment editor, discusses an innovative drug that may soon offer ways to fight Huntington’s disease, while Mark Newnham describes being diagnosed with the inherited condition. Plus: Peter Beaumont describes his trip to the Costa Rican cloud forest, at threat from climate change. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/04/1926m 18s

Is Ukraine about to elect a comedian as its next president?

Ukrainians look set to elect Volodymyr Zelenskiy, a comedian and actor with no political experience, as their new president on Sunday. Andrew Roth discusses the events that have taken him to the brink of power. Plus: Peter Tatchell on why the British police should not be providing leadership training to officers in Brunei. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/04/1925m 2s

When rape cases don't make it to trial

Recorded rapes have increased by 15%, but recent figures show only one-third of cases referred to the CPS led to charges being brought. ‘Rebecca’ discusses her experience, while the Guardian’s Alexandra Topping looks at why prosecution rates have dropped. Plus: Julia Finch on Mark Carney’s warning that global banks cannot afford to ignore climate change. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/04/1931m 3s

How protesters toppled Sudan's Omar al-Bashir – podcast

The Guardian’s Nesrine Malik grew up in Sudan and witnessed first-hand the brutality of the country’s then president, Omar al-Bashir. Malik reflects on what his ousting, after 30 years, means for Sudan. Plus: Angelique Chrisafis on the Notre Dame Cathedral fire. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/04/1926m 0s

Is English football's racism problem being taken seriously?

A series of recent incidents in Premier League stadiums and at non-league level has highlighted football’s enduring problem with racism. The Guardian’s Jacob Steinberg investigates whether the authorities are taking it seriously enough. Plus: we hear from protesters at the Extinction Rebellion climate change demonstration in London. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/04/1930m 29s

Going viral: Fox News, Davos and radical economics

Rutger Bregman became a social media sensation after his onstage tirade at the gathered elite in Davos this year. His call for higher taxes, open borders and a shorter working week captured the imaginations of millions who viewed the speech online. But can his utopian ideas be translated into realistic policy changes? Plus: J Oliver Conroy on David Buckel, a year on from the climate protester’s death in New York. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/04/1926m 47s

Brexit means breakfast: behind the scenes at a Brussels all-nighter

After a marathon debate in Brussels, Theresa May emerged with a new October Brexit deadline. Jennifer Rankin and Daniel Boffey, in Brussels, saw it through to the bitter end and explain what happens now. Plus: Richard Sprenger on funeral poverty. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/04/1925m 53s

The parent protests that stopped LGBT equality lessons

A bitter row between a Birmingham primary school and its mostly Muslim parents over the teaching of LGBT equality has led to street protests and the suspension of the lessons. The Guardian’s Nazia Parveen traces the origins of the dispute and where it has led. Plus: Hannah Devlin on the first ever image of the silhouette of a black hole. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/04/1928m 3s

Can the Conservative party survive Brexit?

As Theresa May heads to Brussels to plead for more time to scrape together a Brexit deal, she leaves a party fracturing and shedding members. Nick Boles dramatically resigned from the party last week and now feels emboldened to speak out. Also today: Dream McClinton on the discrimination based on skin complexion that exists within the black community. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/04/1927m 38s

King Bibi: can anyone beat Benjamin Netanyahu?

After a series of damaging corruption allegations against the PM, could Israelis decide it’s time for a change? Plus: Sherrie Smith on the discrimination faced by Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/04/1927m 11s

Is Facebook spying on you?

It is one of the most widely held conspiracy theories in tech: could Facebook be listening to its users in order to target ads at them? It isn’t, says the Guardian’s UK tech editor, Alex Hern, but the company has plenty of other ways to monitor you. Plus: George Monbiot on ‘rewilding’ the planet to combat climate catastrophe. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/04/1928m 46s

The Tories and their Islamophobia problem

The Conservative peer and former party chair Sayeeda Warsi discusses the Tories’ Islamophobia problem, and why they need to be doing so much more to tackle it. Plus Jim Waterson on the Facebook Brexit ads that are secretly overseen by staff of a Lynton Crosby firm. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/04/1926m 10s

Blowing the whistle on Brexit

A year after revealing that the official leave campaign broke electoral law, whistleblower Shahmir Sanni and Guardian and Observer journalist Carole Cadwalladr assess the impact of the story. Plus Dawn Foster on the Newport West byelection. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/04/1925m 42s

Back-stabbing and Brexit: the Tory leadership race

With Britain’s political system heading for crisis and a possible disorderly Brexit, Conservative MPs are plotting their routes to Downing Street to replace Theresa May. The Guardian’s Rowena Mason discusses the candidates not letting a crisis go to waste. Plus, David Smith on US presidential hopeful Joe Biden’s very bad week. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/04/1922m 53s

Heroin and me: our political sketch writer on giving up drugs

The best decision the Guardian’s parliamentary sketch writer, John Crace, ever made was to give up heroin. Having lost his 20s to addiction, Crace swore he would not touch the drug again. After 32 clean years, he explains how quitting is a lifelong process. Also today: Alex Hern on Mark Zuckerberg and internet regulation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/04/1932m 0s

Faking your own hate crime? The strange case of Jussie Smollett

Now all charges have been dropped against the actor Jussie Smollett, who was accused of staging a racist and homophobic attack, we examine the issues surrounding the case. Plus: Lucy Knight on being gay and a Christian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/04/1926m 34s

Mozambique: reporting from a disaster zone

Cyclone Idai is one of the worst weather-related disasters ever to hit the southern hemisphere. Peter Beaumont discusses his recent trip to Mozambique, where he reported on the devastation the cyclone has caused. Plus: Sonia Sodha on understanding what is actually happening in parliament. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/03/1923m 54s

Cherry-picking, cake and fudge: how the EU set the terms of Brexit

As May announced her intention to quit after phase one of Brexit, MPs attempted to take control of the debate with a series of indicative votes. The former UK ambassador to the EU Sir Ivan Rogers reflects on how the negotiation process favoured the bloc once the timetable was agreed. Plus: Caroline Criado Perez on what a lack of spacesuits for women tells us about entrenched sexism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/03/1926m 15s

Mueller report: why Donald Trump is not yet in the clear

The US president has gleefully welcomed the special counsel’s finding of no evidence of collusion with Russia in the 2016 election. However, as the Guardian’s Jon Swaine explains, there are several other ongoing investigations that could yet damage his presidency. Plus, Harriet Grant on the London playground segregating rich children from poor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/03/1921m 5s

The reality of reality TV

Following the death of Love Island’s Mike Thalassitis, Jonny Mitchell, a friend and former contestant, and Sarah Gertrude Shapiro, a former producer of US show The Bachelor, discuss their experiences of reality television. Plus Gaby Hinsliff on the stubborn obduracy of Theresa May. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/03/1928m 52s

Outsourced schools: the Essex mums fighting back

When Waltham Holy Cross primary school was given a failing report it was immediately under threat of a private takeover in the government’s academisation drive. But parents have fought back – and may yet prevail. The Guardian’s Aditya Chakrabortty explains how. Plus: Mark Rice-Oxley on why we should embrace the four-day working week. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/03/1927m 15s

Investigating the Loughinisland murders

When two journalists began investigating the unsolved murders at Loughinisland in Northern Ireland in 1994, they had hoped to get justice for the families of the six men who died. Instead, Barry McCaffrey and Trevor Birney found themselves under arrest. Plus: Jay Rayner on his 20 years as a restaurant critic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/03/1927m 23s

Brexit showdown: Theresa May v Brussels

As the PM heads to Brussels to face another battle of wills with the EU commission president, the Guardian’s Patrick Wintour describes the bitter history between Jean-Claude Juncker and the UK – and the latest chapter of the fraught Brexit talks as May pushes for a postponement. Plus: Daniel Lavelle on the growth of accent-softening classes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/03/1923m 12s

Gaza: generation blockade

Oliver Holmes describes his recent visit to Gaza, where a generation of Palestinians have spent their entire lives fenced in. Plus: Rafael Behr on why an article 50 extension is not a victory for remainers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/03/1925m 35s

The Christchurch massacre and the rise of far-right extremism

The atrocity in Christchurch has focused the world’s attention on the rise of far-right extremism and has piled pressure on tech companies to do more to stop its spread. Eleanor Ainge Roy is in Christchurch for the Guardian and foreign correspondent Jason Burke discusses how new technology is facilitating some age-old methods of terrorism. Plus: Nesrine Malik on the normalisation of Islamophobia in some parts of the media. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/03/1926m 45s

Growing up with gangs, poverty and knife crime

The Bollo youth club in Acton is barely a mile from wealthy Chiswick but to the teenagers who use it as a second home, it can feel like a world away. Its members tell Robert Booth how they navigate a life through poverty, gangs and knife crime. Plus: Helen Pidd on the crisis in school funding that is forcing schools to close early Warning: contains strong language. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/03/1931m 57s

A week of Brexit mayhem

Anushka Asthana spends a pivotal week in parliament, during which the government lost a series of votes on the Brexit process. MPs Jacob Rees-Mogg, Emily Thornberry, Jess Phillips and Sam Gyimah discuss their part in the chaotic proceedings. Plus: the Guardian’s Rowena Mason on what it all means. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/03/1928m 41s

Greta Thunberg: how her school strike went global

Greta Thunberg’s school strike against climate change has spread to 71 countries, and this Friday’s action could be one of the largest global climate change protests ever. Now nominated for the Nobel peace prize, she tells our environment editor Jonathan Watts how it all began. Plus: Gary Younge on how Brexit overwhelmed British politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/03/1925m 55s

Syria, Skripal and MH17: how Bellingcat broke the news

In 2012, Eliot Higgins began blogging about the news from his front room in Leicester. Seven years later, his investigative website Bellingcat has been responsible for revealing key aspects of some of the world’s biggest stories. And: Jonathan Freedland on the result of Theresa May’s meaningful vote. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/03/1927m 58s

Will Brexit be decided today?

Theresa May returns to parliament today after a last ditch dash to Strasbourg to win fresh concessions on her deal. So will the deadlock finally be broken this week? Daniel Boffey in Brussels and Sonia Sodha in London explain how the process could now pan out. Plus: environment editor Matthew Taylor on how to reduce your exposure to air pollution. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/03/1925m 44s

Trump, Brexit and the rise of populism

It has become the political buzzword of the decade: populism is said to explain political movements from Brexit to the rise of Donald Trump. But how has it taken hold – and can it be quantified? The Guardian’s Paul Lewis investigates. Plus: Sam Delaney on the problem with men and mental health. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/03/1923m 28s

Let's talk about Michael Jackson

Michael Jackson was once the biggest music star in the world. According to a new documentary, Leaving Neverland, he was also a predatory paedophile. Hadley Freeman, who interviewed James Safechuck and Wade Robson, looks at how Jackson’s celebrity protected him. And on International Women’s Day, the writer Jeanette Winterson asks who will benefit from a revolution in AI. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/03/1930m 7s

Chris Grayling's failings: ferry fiascos and no-deal Brexit planning

The transport secretary, Chris Grayling, has fought off calls for him to resign over a series of costly controversies. But was the man at the centre of them all really to blame? The Guardian’s Peter Walker looks back at a catalogue of crises that have a habit of engulfing the cabinet minister now known as ‘Failing Grayling’. Plus: Rob Evans on the blacklisting of trade unionists and the role of undercover police. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/03/1926m 10s

Superyachts and private schools: Britain's dirty money problem

Russian money – some legitimate, some the proceeds of fraud – was channeled through a Lithuanian bank into the UK, according to a major leak of banking documents. The Guardian’s Juliette Garside has been investigating for months and describes how Prince Charles and some of England’s most exclusive schools have benefited. Plus: Ben Beaumont-Thomas on the legacy of the Prodigy’s Keith Flint. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/03/1931m 20s

Talking to the Taliban: peace at what price?

Donald Trump is becoming increasingly impatient about removing all US troops from Afghanistan, 18 years after the invasion that followed September 11. As peace talks continue, Fawzia Koofi, a female Afghan MP, describes being in the room with the Taliban, while the Guardian’s Emma Graham-Harrison examines the slow progress for women’s rights that could be at risk when international forces leave. Plus: Gary Younge on knife crime. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/03/1924m 10s

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: can the new star of the US left help beat Trump?

All eyes are on Ocasio-Cortez, but what does her brand of politics actually mean for the Democrats as they head into the presidential elections next year? The Guardian’s Lauren Gambino reports from Washington. And Rupert Jones discusses the dangers of the rising number of windowless microflats. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/03/1924m 10s

Labour's antisemitism crisis

The party’s handling of cases came under scrutiny again this week as it suspended MP Chris Williamson. The move came after the resignation of Luciana Berger, who claims she was bullied out of the party for being Jewish. The Guardian’s Jessica Elgot looks back at two years of controversy, plus Jon Swaine on Michael Cohen’s explosive testimony against his former boss Donald Trump. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/1928m 13s

The fall of Cardinal George Pell

One of Pope Francis’s trusted advisers is now the most senior member of the Catholic church to be convicted of child abuse. The Guardian’s Melissa Davey was in court every day and describes the trial that brought about Pell’s downfall. Plus: Alex Hern on Facebook’s decision to permanently ban the far-right activist Tommy Robinson Warning: this episode contains descriptions of rape and abuse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/02/1927m 40s

Hard Brexit Tories: a party within a party?

The Guardian’s Dan Sabbagh and Conservative MEP Daniel Hannan explore whether the European Research Group is as influential as ever - or has it overplayed its hand on Brexit? Plus: Joanna Walters on the Sackler family and the US opioid crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/02/1927m 37s

The fit-for-work scandal

After a picture of 64-year-old Stephen Smith’s emaciated frame went viral, the Department for Work and Pensions apologised for passing him fit to work. It was the latest example of how reforms to disability benefits are hitting some of Britain’s most disadvantaged people. The Guardian’s Patrick Butler explains how we got here. Plus: Polly Toynbee welcomes Jeremy Corbyn’s move towards backing a new Brexit referendum. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/02/1924m 41s

Searching for my sister: America's missing indigenous women

Every year, thousands of Native American women are reported missing across the US. Many are never found and the murder rate of indigenous women is higher than for any other race in the country. Reporter Kate Hodal investigates. Plus: author Mike Carter on retracing his father’s steps on a walk from Liverpool to London. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/02/1926m 44s

Racism in Britain: what has changed since the Stephen Lawrence inquiry?

The 1999 Macpherson report into the investigation of the murder of Stephen Lawrence found the Met police to be ‘institutionally racist’. Now, 20 years on, David Lammy reflects on what has changed – and what hasn’t. Plus: Cornelius Walker looks ahead to his night at the Oscars. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/02/1926m 50s

Has Brexit broken British politics?

Eleven MPs have now left their political parties to join the Independent Group. The Guardian’s political editor, Heather Stewart, asks whether Brexit is pushing British party politics to breaking point. And: Nosheen Iqbal on Sajid Javid revoking Shamima Begum’s citizenship. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/1925m 39s

David's mother killed his father, but he wants her freed

In 2010 Sally Challen hit her husband Richard more than 20 times with a hammer, killing him. Her son David Challen explains why she did it. And: Lauren Gambino on why 16 states are suing Trump’s administration. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/02/1923m 8s

Send me home: what should happen to the Isis wives?

Hoda Muthana, an American who joined Isis four years ago, now wants to return home. The Guardian’s Martin Chulov describes his time at al-Hawl refugee camp, where an estimated 1,500 foreign women and children are seeking safety. And: Polly Toynbee on the split within the Labour party. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
19/02/1924m 8s

What a European education project can tell us about Brexit

When the writer Peter Pomerantsev was a teenager, he was sent to a school that was part of the European Schools network, which counts Boris Johnson among its alumni. He discusses what the project can tell us about the EU. Plus: the Guardian’s UK technology editor, Alex Hern, on AI advancements. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
18/02/1925m 55s

Did air pollution kill nine-year-old Ella?

This Friday marks six years since Ella Kissi-Debrah’s death, which her mother believes was partly caused by air pollution. Plus: 15-year-old George Bond explains why he is going on today’s school climate strike. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
15/02/1922m 32s

Selling a kidney to reach Europe

Desperate to reach Europe, people from Africa are travelling to Egypt and selling body parts to pay for their onward passage. Seán Columb has spent more than five years researching this subject. Plus: Ruth Maclean on Nigeria’s upcoming elections. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
14/02/1925m 15s

What does Jeremy Corbyn really think about Brexit?

Brexit has become a divisive issue for the Labour leader and his party. Heather Stewart charts Corbyn’s changing relationship with the EU. Plus: Lois Beckett looks at the March for our Lives movement, a year after the Parkland shootings. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
13/02/1923m 43s

9/11 and the terrorists on trial

The Guardian’s Julian Borger recently spent a week at the Guantánamo Bay detention facility, attending the 33rd pre-trial hearing of five 9/11 suspects. He discusses why arguably the most important criminal trial in American history has still not begun. And: Damian Carrington on the catastrophic decline of insects. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
12/02/1928m 55s

Why are homeless people still dying in the UK?

After a spike in deaths among homeless people in the affluent city of Oxford, Robert Booth went to investigate. In a growing community of rough sleepers, there is little support for people with mental health problems and addiction. Plus: Nosheen Iqbal on the ‘white fragility’ preventing a frank national discussion about racism. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
11/02/1922m 50s

Will the EU stop a no-deal Brexit?

Unless an agreement can be reached in the coming weeks, Britain will crash out of the European Union without a deal. There have been stark warnings about the effects for the UK, but how badly would it hurt the EU? The Guardian’s Jennifer Rankin, Angelique Chrisafis and Kate Connolly dig into the detail. Plus Amelia Gentleman on the resumption of deportation flights to Jamaica after the Windrush scandal. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
08/02/1926m 33s

Pharmaceuticals: who decides the price of life?

The cystic fibrosis drug Orkambi could extend the lives of thousands of children – but it comes with a price tag of £105,000 per patient per year. The NHS says it cannot afford it. Health editor Sarah Boseley explores how the cost of a life-extending drug can be weighed next to a person’s life. Plus: Natalie Nougayrède on the conspiracy theories threatening European unity. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
07/02/1924m 47s

Escape from Syria: the boys stranded after Isis fall

The young children of an Islamic State fighter were abandoned in Syria after his death. But with the help of human rights lawyer Clive Stafford-Smith and reporter Joshua Surtees, the boys have been reunited with their mother. Also today: columnist Gary Younge on the storm over Liam Neeson’s race comments. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
06/02/1926m 59s

Is climate change way worse than we realise?

David Wallace-Wells, the author of new book The Uninhabitable Earth, depicts a world ravaged by climate chaos. India Rakusen talks to the author about why he thinks we are underestimating the impact climate change will have on the environment. Plus: the Guardian’s Helen Pidd on the consequences that Brexit uncertainty is having on the north of England. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
05/02/1926m 34s

Hungary, populism and my Orbán-voting father

Viktor Orbán, Hungary’s far-right prime minister, is at the forefront of a nationalist surge in Europe, and his anti-migrant rhetoric has brought condemnation from the EU. The Guardian’s John Domokos went to find out the attraction Orbán holds to Hungarian voters, including his own father. Plus: how one woman is campaigning to prevent her frozen eggs being destroyed. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
04/02/1927m 51s

Disaster in the Australian outback

Searing heat, severe drought and official mismanagement have allowed rivers in south-eastern Australia to run dry. The Guardian reporters Anne Davies and Lorena Allam discuss the devastating impact this has had on wildlife and residents. Plus: Zoe Williams on children’s screen time. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
01/02/1926m 55s

Brexit and the Good Friday agreement

The landmark peace deal struck between the British and Irish governments in 1998 paved the way for power-sharing between unionists and nationalists in Northern Ireland and ended a 30-year conflict. Henry McDonald reports on how the Good Friday agreement is once again under scrutiny as Britain approaches Brexit. Plus Jason Burke on the political crisis in Zimbabwe. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
31/01/1926m 56s

Venezuela crisis: can Maduro ride out Guaidó’s challenge?

The opposition leader Juan Guaidó has declared himself Venezuela’s interim president after mass protests against Nicolás Maduro. But the military have so far stayed loyal to Maduro, who has called the attempt to remove him a coup. Virginia Lopez reports from Caracas. Plus: Jessica Elgot on what we learned from another night of Brexit votes in the House of Commons. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
30/01/1927m 21s

Order! Order! Speaker John Bercow and Brexit

Today is the day that backbench MPs in parliament could wrestle control of the Brexit process away from the government. Overseeing proceedings is the Speaker John Bercow, whose recent break with precedent infuriated Brexiters. Plus, in opinion: Jonathan Freedland on the Brexit-backing elite and how they will avoid the worst consequences of leaving the EU. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
29/01/1925m 12s

Going viral: the victims of online conspiracy theories

What is it like to be the focus of an online conspiracy theory that goes viral? Four people whose lives were upended by conspiracists tell the Guardian’s Ed Pilkington how they dealt with it – and why it could happen to anyone. Plus: Jamie Fullerton on the monkey gangs of Kuala Lumpur whose jungle habitat is being swallowed by the city. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
28/01/1929m 20s

The Catholic church faces its past

Last year investigations around the world showed that historical sexual abuse within the Catholic church had been covered up for decades. India Rakusen talks to two survivors and hears from the Guardian’s religion correspondent Harriet Sherwood on how the church plans to move forward. Plus: the Guardian’s Tom Phillips on Juan Guaidó’s attempted take over in Venezuela. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
25/01/1928m 21s

Planning for no deal on the Brexit frontline

With less than 10 weeks to go until Britain leaves the EU and still no withdrawal deal agreed, businesses around the country are scrabbling to prepare for the worst-case scenario of a disorderly Brexit. Our reporters in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland discover that very few contingency plans are in place. Plus: Aditya Chakrabortty on why the Davos elite are running scared. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
24/01/1927m 28s

Deadly air: driving a rickshaw in Delhi

Delhi’s rickshaw drivers are on the frontline of the city’s most notorious problem: horrendous air pollution. The Guardian’s south Asia correspondent, Michael Safi, travels the city with Pandit, a driver whose exposure to the worsening air quality is affecting his health and his livelihood. Plus: Ana Adlerstein looks at the reality of life on the US-Mexico border in Arizona. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
23/01/1925m 9s

How Ukip embraced the far right

With Brexit talks stalled and some of its supporters pushing a betrayal narrative, the Guardian’s Peter Walker charts how Ukip has begun rising in the polls again. But how did the party come to fully embrace the far right in Britain? And do its supporters know how extreme it has become? Plus: Helen Pidd on what young voters in Bolsover make of the Brexit deal paralysis. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
22/01/1927m 11s

What can we do, right now, about climate change?

Calamitous weather events and warnings from scientists that the planet is warming faster than previously believed are causing alarm. Global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, describes the shifts needed to keep global warming to a maximum of 1.5C. Plus: David Conn on how football and gambling have become inseparable. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
21/01/1927m 13s

Is there a Democrat who can oust Donald Trump?

The Democrats are already fighting for the opportunity to take on Donald Trump – but can any of them hope to unseat him? Plus: Nobel peace prize winner Malala Yousafzai on what she would like to tell the US president about building walls. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
18/01/1924m 46s

How Brexit unravelled

In a disastrous week for Theresa May’s Brexit agreement, her former director of strategy, Chris Wilkins, and the Guardian’s Daniel Boffey chart where it all went wrong. Plus: Polly Toynbee on what Labour should do next. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
17/01/1924m 37s

The great Brexit rebellion

On a monumental day in parliament, Anushka Asthana is with the Conservative MP Anna Soubry as she works across traditional party boundaries to defeat Theresa May’s Brexit deal. Political editor Heather Stewart explains what happens now. Plus: the Guardian’s Simon Hattenstone on his time following the Leave Means Leave campaign group. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
16/01/1926m 20s

School segregation: a lesson from Birmingham

A school in Birmingham is attempting to buck the trend of increasing ethnic and religious segregation in the city. The Guardian’s Aamna Mohdin spends a day at the University of Birmingham school that takes its students from across the diverse city. Plus: John Crace on today’s Brexit vote. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
15/01/1924m 21s

China's Muslim detention camps

Up to a million Muslims are being held in detention camps in the Chinese province of Xinjiang. The Guardian’s Lily Kuo visits the region where authorities are expanding the camps and increasing surveillance on ethnic minorities. Plus: in opinion, the writer Bella Mackie on how running helps her cope with anxiety. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
14/01/1923m 10s

Who will pay for Donald Trump's border wall?

With the US government in partial shutdown, the president continues to demand funding for his Mexican border wall. Lauren Gambino, in Washington DC, and Bryan Mealer, in Texas, discuss how Trump’s central campaign promise has led to this point of paralysis. Plus, John Harris looks back to the optimism of 1989. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
11/01/1925m 26s

On trial: El Salvador's abortion ban

The shocking case of Imelda Cortez has put El Salvador’s strict abortion laws in the spotlight. Human rights lawyer Paula Avila-Guillen and reporter Nina Lakhani describe how a surprise verdict has given fresh hope to women in El Salvador. Plus, in opinion, Randeep Ramesh on the Guardian’s call for a citizens’ assembly to break the Brexit deadlock. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
10/01/1924m 14s

Today in Focus | Deal or no deal? The Brexit road ahead

As Theresa May prepares for the showdown Brexit vote on Tuesday, the government is stepping up its contingency planning for crashing out of the EU without a deal. The Guardian’s Patrick Wintour sets out the routes available to the government as the exit date fast approaches. Plus in opinion: Owen Jones on responding to increasing abuse on the streets and online. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
09/01/1924m 45s

What does 2019 hold for Kim Jong-un and North Korea?

Kim Jong-un goes into 2019 with momentum to build on after last year’s historic meeting with President Donald Trump. As Kim attempts to negotiate a fresh summit, the Guardian’s Tania Branigan looks at his leadership so far and Emma Graham-Harrison describes a rare trip to Pyongyan. Plus: Catherine Shoard on the annual film awards season. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
08/01/1921m 40s

Is the anti-vaccine movement putting lives at risk?

The re-emergence of the disgraced doctor Andrew Wakefield has fueled a resurgence of vaccine scepticism among rightwing populists. After a surge in measles outbreaks across the EU in 2018, Sarah Boseley looks back at how confidence in the MMR vaccine was dented after Wakefield’s discredited campaign against it. Plus: Sonia Sodha on how to improve the British honours system. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
07/01/1924m 59s

Would you give your kidney to a stranger?

The UK’s living donor scheme allows six people to enter a chain, and three of them will get a new kidney from a stranger. Rachel Williams speaks to six participants. Plus: the writer Cecilia Knapp reflects on Christmas. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
21/12/1822m 8s

Windrush, Brexit, Trump and Cambridge Analytica: looking back at 2018

The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, revisits the biggest stories of the year from the Windrush scandal, Cambridge Analytica and Facebook, the Brexit saga and the Trump administration to the World Cup and the royal wedding. Plus: Michael Braithwaite on how he got caught up in the Windrush scandal. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
20/12/1830m 20s

Can the NHS be saved?

A long-term plan designed to secure the future of NHS England has been delayed once again by Brexit. But as Britain’s health service heads into its annual winter beds crisis, the Guardian’s Denis Campbell visits King’s College hospital in London to find out what staff and patients need for the future – and how much it will cost. Plus: Hadley Freeman on why Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, was right to distance herself from her father and his media onslaught. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
19/12/1823m 20s

Is this the end for the Sicilian mafia?

The arrest of the man believed to be the head of the Sicilian mafia this month is the latest blow for an organisation struggling to rebuild after the death last year of Salvatore Riina, the ‘boss of the bosses’. Clare Longrigg, the author of several books on the mafia, describes the current state of Cosa Nostra. Plus: Jonathan Watts on what to take from the COP24 climate talks. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
18/12/1823m 47s

2018: a terrible year for Facebook

Facebook has been hit by a series of data, privacy and hate speech scandals this year. Alex Hern, the Guardian’s UK tech editor, discusses how Mark Zuckerberg has responded. Plus the Guardian environment reporter Oliver Milman on returning to Paradise, California, after the deadliest fire in the state’s history. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
17/12/1825m 9s

Is the net closing in on Donald Trump?

The investigation into Donald Trump’s election campaign has resulted in guilty pleas from some of the president’s former inner circle. The Guardian’s Jon Swaine in New York considers what we have learned so far from Robert Mueller’s forensic investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 US election. Plus: Robert Booth on the first phase of the inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
14/12/1823m 43s

Theresa May: a crisis of confidence

After a frenzied day of infighting among Conservative MPs, Theresa May remains prime minister, having survived a vote of confidence in her leadership. But how damaging has the episode been for her party? Anushka Asthana hears from the Guardian’s Jessica Elgot and Conservative MPs Ben Bradley, Nicky Morgan and Sarah Wollaston. Plus: Natalie Nougayrède on a make-or-break week for Emmanuel Macron. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
13/12/1825m 9s

Stansted 15: the conviction of peaceful protesters

The conviction of protesters who locked themselves around a deportation flight at Stansted airport has been called a ‘crushing blow for human rights’. The Guardian’s Damien Gayle has been following the case and hears from demonstrators and deportees. Plus: Soraya Chemaly on the importance of female rage. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
12/12/1822m 47s

Labour's Brexit dilemma

Theresa May has postponed her crucial Brexit vote amid huge divisions in her party. But there is a dilemma, too, for Labour MPs whose constituencies voted overwhelmingly in favour of leaving the EU. How do they square their voters’ wishes with that of their party and their own conscience? Plus: Jonathan Freedland on why Labour should be backing a second referendum. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
11/12/1822m 48s

What is it like to fear your own child?

Child-on-parent violence is a taboo subject and one that is hardly researched in the UK. We speak to Lesley, a mother who lives with daily violence from her eldest son. It has devastated family life and exposed gaps in a system not set up to deal with the problem. Plus: Emma Graham-Harrison on the Nobel peace prize winners Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad, who receive their awards today. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
10/12/1820m 40s

End of an era: Angela Merkel's long goodbye

Angela Merkel steps down as the leader of the CDU party today after 18 years at the helm, although she plans to remain Germany’s chancellor until 2021. Her move comes after the migration crisis left her party languishing in the polls and amid a rising tide of populism in Europe. The Guardian’s Kate Connolly in Berlin takes a look at her legacy. Plus: Rania Ali on debunking stereotypes about refugees. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
07/12/1824m 25s

Why are millions fleeing Venezuela?

Twenty years on from the election of Hugo Chávez, his legacy faces ruin. Millions of Venezuelans are fleeing their country after a political crisis became a humanitarian one. The Guardian’s Tom Phillips witnesses how a once booming economy has turned so sour. Plus: Mona Chalabi on the chronic lack of diversity in Britain’s police. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
06/12/1823m 3s

In the room for the Brexit showdown

In July, Nick de Bois found himself as chief of staff in the Brexit department after the sudden resignation of David Davis and the appointment of Dominic Raab. So what did the fevered EU negotiations look like from the inside? And what happens now? Plus: Poppy Noor argues that the crisis on the high street is hitting women’s jobs hardest. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
05/12/1822m 28s

Bias in Britain: the truth about modern racism

An exclusive Guardian study has shown the extent of racial bias faced by minority ethnic citizens. The Guardian’s Afua Hirsch and Anushka Asthana discuss how growing up in a majority white society felt to them and whether attitudes have significantly changed since. Plus, Kehinde Andrews on rethinking the historical figures we revere in Britain. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
04/12/1823m 32s

Honduras, a dam and the murder of Berta Cáceres

Seven men have been convicted of the murder of an award-winning environmental activist in Honduras. But has justice been done for Berta Cáceres? The Guardian’s Nina Lakhani explores what the case says about the state of modern Honduras. Plus: Mark Townsend on how easy it is to buy converted firearms in the UK. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
03/12/1823m 32s

The G20: Donald Trump and the rise of the strongmen

How did a forum for global cooperation become a stage for authoritarians? The Guardian world affairs editor, Julian Borger, analyses the G20 ahead of the summit in Buenos Aires with the help of the Guardian’s foreign correspondents. Plus William Davies on why we stopped trusting elites. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
30/11/1823m 24s

North Sentinel Island and the strange death of John Allen Chau

The death of an American missionary on a remote Indian island has sparked a backlash in India. The Guardian’s Michael Safi describes how John Allen Chau was killed after trying to preach Christianity to one of the world’s last remaining indigenous societies who live in total isolation. Plus John Harris on the trouble with Airbnb. To support The Guardian’s independent journalism, visit theguardian.com/todayinfocus/support
29/11/1823m 55s
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Heart UK