Today in Focus

Today in Focus

By The Guardian

Hosted by Nosheen Iqbal and Michael Safi, Today in Focus brings you closer to Guardian journalism. Combining personal storytelling with insightful analysis, this podcast takes you behind the headlines for a deeper understanding of the news, every weekday

Episodes

What’s gone wrong with England’s water?

More untreated sewage is being pumped into England’s seas and rivers than ever before. Sandra Laville follows the money to find out who is responsible. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/22·26m 5s

The far-right radical in Israel’s new government

Itamar Ben-Gvir has spent a lifetime on the fringes of Israeli politics. He was once considered so extreme that he wasn’t allowed to serve in the Israeli army. Now he is the country’s security minister. Bethan McKernan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/12/22·30m 48s

Michelle Mone lobbied for PPE Medpro. But was she enriched by its profits?

During the early weeks of the pandemic, the government was scrambling to find protective clothing for health workers. The Tory peer recommended one supplier to the government – but how far did her links with it go?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/12/22·29m 6s

The young people speaking out against the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God

Rachael Reign was an active member of an evangelical Christian church with branches worldwide. It was only after leaving that she came to believe it had exposed her to a ‘horrendous’ ordeal. Maeve McClenaghan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/12/22·43m 33s

Imprisoned for being HIV positive

In more than 80 countries, people living with HIV still face criminalisation. We hear from two people who faced criminal charges in the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/12/22·31m 52s

How far could China’s ‘zero Covid’ protests go?

China has been rocked by an outpouring of communal anger at the government’s restrictive ‘zero Covid’ lockdown policies. Could the protests develop into something more substantial? Tania Branigan reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/11/22·28m 42s

The crypto-collapse: inside the crazy world of FTX

The cryptocurrency exchange FTX collapsed earlier this month, leaving billions of dollars unaccounted for. Alex Hern explores what happened and where the money went. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/11/22·31m 57s

How dangerous is it to live in a damp, mouldy home?

The death of two-year-old Awaab Ishak from exposure to mould has shown the consequences of uninhabitable homes. But how many people are living in similarly unhealthy conditions and what can be done to protect their health?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/11/22·31m 41s

Inside Qatar 2022: the World Cup of politics and protest

Football’s governing body Fifa has tried to keep politics out of the World Cup – but there has never been a more political tournament, reports Michael Safi in Doha. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/11/22·33m 50s

Is a second referendum on Scotland’s independence further away than ever?

The supreme court has ruled that the Scottish parliament cannot hold a second referendum without Westminster’s approval. Where does that leave the independence movement?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/11/22·24m 13s

Trump v DeSantis: how ex-president’s fan could be his biggest rival

Florida governor Ron DeSantis passionately praised the former president – now he is being talked about as a possible presidential candidate himself.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/11/22·33m 15s

Cop27: another blow to 1.5C?

At Cop27 in Egypt, negotiations ran 40 hours past the Friday night deadline. Country delegates were able to agree a historic deal on loss and damage, but less progress was made on global fossil fuel emission targets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/11/22·26m 16s

Beyond 8 billion: why the world’s population matters

The world now contains 8bn people, according to the UN. Hannah Ellis-Peterson reports from India, which is on course to overtake China as the most populous nation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/11/22·28m 24s

Excitement, boycotts and rainbow protest: Qatar’s World Cup kicks off

The 2022 tournament is finally here. But for more than a decade, disquiet over the Gulf state hosting football’s biggest event has been growing. Four people – with very different perspectives – explain their views. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/11/22·34m 33s

Autumn statement 2022: it’s going to hurt but will it work?

The Guardian’s economics editor, Larry Elliott, looks ahead to Jeremy Hunt’s crucial autumn statement, which is set to usher in a new era of austerity, and explains why is likely to fail just like George Osborne’s before it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/11/22·28m 44s

Reclaiming Kherson: what Russia’s retreat means for the fight for Ukraine

Ukrainians have reacted with jubilation after retaking Kherson city and the region around it. But what did living under Russian occupation do to the area and its people – and is this really the beginning of the end of the war?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/11/22·31m 15s

Is the UK housing market heading for a crash?

A steady stream of bad economic news has filtered into Britain’s property market, prompting fears that prices could tumble. But how worried should people be? Rupert Jones reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/11/22·33m 7s

The mystery of Teesside’s dead crabs

When thousands of crabs started washing up on the beaches of Teesside in north-east England, authorities blamed algae in the water. But the fishers watching their livelihoods disappear weren’t buying it. Joshua Kelly reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/11/22·53m 33s

Cop27: the future is solar, but it won’t be simple

As Joe Biden arrives at Cop27 in Egypt, he comes with a good story to tell on America’s transition to renewable energy. But on the ground in rural Indiana where the country’s biggest solar plant is being built, things are getting nasty. Oliver Milman reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/11/22·33m 36s

Iran’s protest generation on why they won’t be silenced

There have been arrests, violence and a rising death toll during more than seven weeks of protests in Iran. Demonstrators across the country – many of whom are students or even schoolchildren – are refusing to back down. What do they want and why are they willing to risk everything to get it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/11/22·29m 32s

What the scandal at Manston asylum centre says about our migration system

For the last six weeks conditions at a centre housing people who made perilous journeys across the Channel on small boats have been making the headlines. The home secretary, Suella Braverman, has pointed the finger at a ‘broken’ system. But why is the Home Office so often at the centre of a crisis?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/11/22·35m 52s

US midterms: is it still the economy, stupid?

The Democrats have learned hard lessons over the years about what happens when election campaigns neglect the economy, so has the party been strong enough in its messaging for today’s midterm elections? Lauren Gambino reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/11/22·30m 2s

Who is robbing Lebanon’s banks?

A spate of bank robberies has hit Beirut in recent weeks but they are heists with a twist: people are demanding – at gunpoint – that staff hand them their own money. Michael Safi reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/11/22·44m 35s

Cop27: was this the year climate progress unravelled?

The war in Ukraine has led to soaring energy prices, political enmity and instability. Can the meeting of global leaders re-focus the world’s attention on the climate catastrophe?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/11/22·27m 48s

Can Twitter survive Elon Musk? (And can Musk survive Twitter?)

Elon Musk marched into Twitter as its new owner last week and immediately started making changes. Alex Hern reports on what lies ahead for the social media company. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/11/22·32m 44s

Just Stop Oil and the threat of the public order bill

As the UN’s environment agency reports there is “no credible pathway to 1.5C in place”, climate activists resort to extreme actions to draw attention to the climate crisis. Damien Gayle reports on the Just Stop Oil group and the government bill designed to crack down on ‘disruptive’ protest. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/11/22·30m 23s

Culture wars, abortion and conspiracy theories: what the midterms tell us about the US

Florida used to be seen as a swing state but in recent years it has lurched further and further to the right. Now there are worries democracy itself is under threat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/11/22·34m 8s

What does it take to be an undercover police officer?– podcast

David Taylor began his undercover career targeting small-time drug dealers before going deeper into the world of organised crime. But it ended when he was suddenly pulled from a major investigation and he wants to know why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/10/22·31m 53s

Ben Roberts-Smith v the media, part one: reputation

Ben Doherty hosts a special series on the Ben Roberts-Smith defamation trial. Australia’s most-decorated living soldier is seeking to defend his reputation against reports in three newspapers that he says falsely accuse him of being a war criminal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/10/22·46m 38s

War hero or war criminal? Australia’s defamation trial of the century

Ben Roberts-Smith, Australia’s most decorated living soldier, is seeking to defend his reputation against reports in three newspapers that he says falsely accuse him of being a war criminal. Ben Doherty reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/10/22·26m 14s

Can Rishi Sunak pull the Conservative party back together? – podcast

After the chaos of Liz Truss’s short-lived stint as PM, there were claims the Conservative party was ungovernable. Can Rishi Sunak unify it once more?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/10/22·28m 9s

The rise of Europe’s far-right parties – podcast

Why are far-right parties becoming more influential in European politics? Jon Henley reports on the rise of the Brothers of Italy and the Sweden Democrats. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/10/22·30m 5s

Is the UK ready for Rishi Sunak?

Nosheen Iqbal heads to Westminster, where the latest Tory leadership contest has resulted in the UK’s third prime minister this year. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/10/22·27m 25s

Operation Soteria: a new approach to investigating rape

What can be done to improve rape conviction rates in Britain? Alexandra Topping reports on the police forces trialling a way of investigating rape and sexual assault cases. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/10/22·28m 15s

The end of Liz Truss

Liz Truss has resigned after a disastrous premiership marked by U-turns and a self-inflicted economic crisis. Sonia Sodha reports on a day of turmoil in Westminster. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/10/22·28m 42s

The all-powerful Xi Jinping

Xi Jinping is cementing his grip on power and is expected to be handed a third term. Rana Mitter and Emma Graham-Harrison examine what he will he do with it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/10/22·30m 11s

Liz Truss’s attack on nature

Amid the chaos engulfing Liz Truss’s government, one part of her growth agenda still in place is the junking of environmental protections. Sandra Laville reports on why green groups are so furious. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/10/22·30m 25s

Who’s running Britain?

Jeremy Hunt has only been Chancellor for a few days. But on Monday he set about reversing almost everything that was in the prime minister’s policy platform. Is Liz Truss really still in charge of the country?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/10/22·25m 45s

Is it time to rethink the laws on assisted dying?

Laws around assisted dying have long been contentious and euthanasia remains illegal in the UK. But campaigners such as David Minns are continuing to push for change. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/10/22·32m 56s

Inside Frieze: what can it tell us about art, money and power in 2022?

It showcases the art world’s most cutting-edge work. But the Frieze art fair is also a marketplace where the eye-watering prices are defying the looming global recession. Jonathan Jones explains why this is happening – and if the bubble is about to burst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/10/22·30m 47s

Putin’s revenge for the Crimea bridge attack

A series of missile attacks killed civilians across Ukraine this week as Russia responded to the bombing of a key bridge in Crimea. Luke Harding reports on what the escalation from Putin means for the war. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/10/22·24m 46s

The meteoric rise of Suella Braverman

She has been an MP for only seven years but has been catapulted into one of the biggest jobs in politics. And, just over a month in, she is already making waves. But what do we know about the former lawyer – and what does she want to do as home secretary?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/10/22·32m 23s

Molly Russell: how a teenager’s death put social media on trial

Last month a coroner said Molly ‘died from an act of self-harm whilst suffering from depression and the negative effects of online content’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/10/22·29m 27s

The crisis in Britain’s nurseries: are we failing our youngest children?

Staff are leaving for better paid work in supermarkets, and parents say fees are expensive. How did the early years sector end up on the brink and how is it affecting our children?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/10/22·29m 30s

The cheating scandal rocking the chess world

The usually sedate world of chess has been pitched into turmoil with allegations an American grandmaster has cheated more than 100 times. Bryan Graham reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/10/22·33m 36s

Is Liz Truss already fighting to save her premiership?

It’s been four weeks since Liz Truss became prime minister and her policies are already facing criticism from senior Conservative MPs. Rafael Behr reports on whether she’ll be able to hold the party together. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/10/22·27m 3s

Is Vladimir Putin really prepared to use nuclear weapons? – podcast

Putin has been hinting he could use nuclear weapons since the beginning of his war in Ukraine. But in recent days the Russian president’s rhetoric has ramped up alarmingly. How seriously should we take his threats? Andrew Roth reports from Moscow. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/10/22·28m 25s

Truss and Kwarteng: counting the cost of chaos

After delivering a mini-budget that caused financial mayhem, the chancellor backtracked on his headline tax cut – but has the political and economic damage already been done? Heather Stewart reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/10/22·29m 48s

How the assassination of Shinzo Abe became a political scandal in Japan

The killing of the former prime minister shocked Japan, and the ensuing scandal has shaken the government, says Justin McCurry in Tokyo. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/10/22·30m 4s

Brazil’s election: a last chance to save the Amazon?

Brazilians will go to the polls on Sunday with a stark choice to make about the future of their country. And it is one that will have far-reaching implications for the future of the planet, too, says Tom Phillips. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/09/22·31m 31s

Mahsa Amini: how one women’s death ignited protests in Iran

Mahsa Amini died in custody after being detained by Iran’s ‘morality police’. In the 13 days since her death, thousands have taken to the streets to protest against the country’s hijab laws. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/09/22·30m 16s

Does Labour have a route out of Britain’s rolling crises?

As a currency crisis joins the cost of living crisis in the UK, Labour has taken a 17-point poll lead. Peter Walker reports from the party’s conference in Liverpool. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/09/22·24m 45s

Lyrics on trial: how US rappers have their music used against them in court

Rappers are increasingly finding their music used against them in criminal trials. But as Sam Levin reports, California is taking steps to limit the practice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/09/22·36m 49s

The secrets of Lake Mead and the drought exposing them

Drought and overuse have seen water levels drop more than 170ft since 1983, exposing the secrets lying below. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/09/22·22m 7s

Can I Tell You a Secret, episode 1: the beginning

In the first part of a new series, the Guardian journalist Sirin Kale takes us to a small town in the north of England to uncover how one man began a decade of cyberstalking Subscribe to Can I Tell You a Secret? on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/09/22·34m 39s

How the Champions League final nearly ended in disaster

Liverpool fans attending this year’s Champions League final faced a crush outside the stadium that held stark echoes of the worst day in the club’s history. David Conn has spent months investigating what happened. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/09/22·48m 34s

The police killing of Chris Kaba

The killing of a 24-year-old black man by firearms officers in south London comes at a time of plummeting faith in the police and serious questions about accountability for the new Met chief. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/09/22·29m 53s

The Russian soldier exposing what life is really like in Putin’s invading army

The Guardian’s Moscow correspondent, Andrew Roth, on his extraordinary meeting with ex-paratrooper Pavel Filatyev, the highest-ranking officer to speak about fighting in Ukraine. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/09/22·32m 10s

The Queen’s funeral: power, projection and personal reflection

The state funeral of Britain’s longest reigning monarch will be a profound national moment, and one that may never be seen again, says Sam Knight. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/09/22·30m 18s

Can the commonwealth survive the death of the queen?

The Queen’s death has been marked throughout the Commonwealth with a period of official mourning. But not far below the surface lies a simmering anger among those grappling with the legacy of colonialism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/09/22·37m 43s

Is Russia on the retreat in Ukraine?

Ukrainian forces have launched a devastating counteroffensive in the past week, retaking Russian-held territory. Dan Sabbagh and Shaun Walker explain what it means for the war as the countries head into winter. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/09/22·28m 27s

Will Liz Truss’s energy plan keep Britain warm this winter?

The prime minister’s energy plan may have been overshadowed by the death of the Queen, but its implications for households and businesses – as well as the national debt – will be huge. John Collingridge explains what it all means. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/09/22·27m 3s

Can King Charles reinvent himself and the monarchy?

King Charles III comes to the throne with a nation in political flux and economic turmoil. Robert Booth looks at the challenges the new monarch faces. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/09/22·31m 24s

What does the Queen’s death mean for the United Kingdom?

The Guardian columnist Jonathan Freedland looks at why the death of Queen Elizabeth II will have a seismic impact on the country, and what the era of King Charles III might bring. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/09/22·28m 37s

The life and death of Queen Elizabeth II

The Queen has died aged 96 at her Scottish home of Balmoral. Polly Toynbee looks back on her life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/09/22·31m 12s

Liz Truss: the first 48 hours

Liz Truss has had a frantic first 48 hours as prime minister, says political correspondent Aubrey Allegretti, including a brutal cabinet reshuffle and a first battle with Keir Starmer at PMQs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/09/22·25m 58s

The human cost of Pakistan’s devastating floods

More than 1,200 people have died in the floods in Pakistan. The disaster has left around a third of the country under water. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/09/22·24m 25s

What can Britain expect from Liz Truss as prime minister?

Liz Truss succeeds Boris Johnson as prime minister in the midst of a cost of living crisis on top of a bulging in-tray of difficult issues. Pippa Crerar explains how she will approach the job and how she may differ from her predecessor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/09/22·27m 20s

Should we delete our period tracking apps?

Since Roe v Wade was overturned in the US in June, there are concerns that law enforcement could request the intimate data users share with period tracking apps. Johana Bhuiyan reports on the privacy concerns. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/09/22·27m 44s

Will Chileans vote for one of the world’s most progressive constitutions?

Chileans go to the polls on Sunday in a referendum that could lead to the country adopting a constitution enshrining gender equality, action on climate change and Indigenous rights, says reporter John Bartlett in Santiago. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/09/22·28m 38s

Culture this autumn: what to watch, read and listen to

Guardian critics Laura Snapes, Lucy Knight and Kate Abbott on their recommendations from the worlds of music, books and TV. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/09/22·31m 42s

How to cope with rising energy bills

Rupert Jones reports on the energy price cap and what options we have as energy bills go up. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/08/22·27m 8s

The Benin bronzes and why their return to Nigeria matters

Artist Victor Ehikhamenor and Prof Dan Hicks, a professor of contemporary archaeology, look at the significance of a collection of Benin bronzes that the Horniman museum in London is returning to Nigeria. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/08/22·24m 26s

Revisited: searching for the shadow man (part 2)

A genocide researcher investigating a 2013 atrocity committed in Syria creates an alternative online identity – the character of ‘Anna S’ – to entice a military commander to confess to war crimes. But how far can she push? And how long can Anna go on?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/08/22·46m 44s

Revisited: Searching for the shadow man (Part 1)

Leaked footage documenting the 2013 execution of dozens of Syrian civilians led two genocide researchers on a painstaking search over three years to find the man responsible. The first of a two-part special. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/08/22·37m 20s

Revisited: The Division: New Orleans – part four

The division begins to reinvestigate Kuantay Reeder’s case, discovering new evidence that could hold the key to his freedom. The Guardian’s US southern bureau chief, Oliver Laughland, interviews Harry Connick, the district attorney from 1973 to 2003, to ask how he felt about presiding over an administration accused of rights violations and disproportionately punishing the city’s poorest Black residents. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/08/22·56m 0s

Revisited: The Division: New Orleans – part three

In 2020 a change comes to New Orleans. The city elects Jason Williams, a progressive Black prosecutor who promises to reckon with the past. One of the first things he does is set up a civil rights division, led by Emily Maw. The division takes on the case of Kuantay Reeder, and assistant district attorney Bidish Sarma is able to view Reeder’s case file. Will there be evidence inside to support his claim of innocence?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/08/22·38m 15s

Revisited: The Division: New Orleans – part two

In 1995, Kuantay Reeder is sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison for a crime he says he didn’t commit. He spends years doing hard labour in the fields of the prison, and trying to have his conviction overturned. By 2020, he has exhausted almost every legal avenue available to him. But 2020 is also the year that Jason Williams is elected to be the new district attorney of New Orleans. Will the creation of a new civil rights division in his office offer hope to Reeder?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/08/22·35m 8s

Revisited: The Division: New Orleans – part one

The Guardian’s US southern bureau chief, Oliver Laughland, spent six months following what happened when a progressive Black district attorney was elected in Louisiana, the heart of the deep south. He had promised sweeping reforms across New Orleans, including opening up a civil rights division to look over old cases. Kuantay Reeder has been in Louisiana’s ‘Angola’ prison since 1995 for a murder he says he didn’t commit. Would the division be able to help him?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/08/22·41m 46s

Why comedian Grace Campbell refuses to be silenced about sex

Comedian Grace Campbell on why after being raped last year, she worried that her openness about her sex life would be used against her. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/08/22·24m 31s

The boy lost in a Syrian “black hole” prison

There’s a Syrian prison, holding hundreds of children who have never been convicted of any crime. Michael Safi tells the story of one of them.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/08/22·42m 26s

The violent attack on Salman Rushdie

Columnist Nesrine Malik on the history of the fatwa against the author Salman Rushdie and power of his work. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/08/22·26m 16s

Why is England so vulnerable to droughts?

Half of England is in a drought but the culprit is not just climate change. Helena Horton reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/08/22·23m 30s

One year into Taliban rule: the girls defying bans to go to school

On the anniversary of the fall of Kabul, the Guardian’s senior international correspondent, Emma Graham-Harrison, reports from the secret schools set up in Afghanistan to continue girls’ education. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/08/22·27m 53s

Tinder turns 10: what have we learned from a decade of dating apps?

Dating apps have opened up opportunities to meet more people, but what have they done to our psyche? Emily Witt looks at how they have shifted the way we understand modern love, sex and relationships. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/08/22·26m 26s

The FBI raid of Donald Trump’s home

Congressional reporter Hugo Lowell explains why the FBI raided Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort on Monday morning, and how it may even benefit the former president in the long run. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/08/22·23m 52s

The UK’s energy bill crisis

Big oil companies are making record profits while consumer energy bills soar. We spoke to finance reporter Jasper Jolly to find out why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/08/22·29m 27s

What next for al-Qaida after the killing of al-Zawahiri?

Senior international affairs correspondent Emma Graham-Harrison and Africa correspondent Jason Burke explore what the killing of al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri will mean for the terrorist group and its future in Afghanistan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/08/22·26m 6s

The Tory leadership race and the ghost of Margaret Thatcher

Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee identifies how Tory leadership candidates Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak have channelled the former prime minister, and what it says about the Conservative party in 2022. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/08/22·21m 23s

The deadly consequences of Britain’s lockdown drinking

What will the cost be of our lockdown drinking habits? A University of Sheffield study has estimated England could have up to 25,000 excess deaths over the next 20 years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/08/22·28m 25s

The rehabilitation of Mohammed bin Salman

Middle East correspondent Martin Chulov discusses how the Saudi crown prince has been re-embraced on the world stage, four years after the killing of Jamal Khashoggi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/08/22·25m 0s

Monkeypox: are we reacting fast enough to the crisis?

There are around 2,600 confirmed cases of monkeypox in the UK, with gay and bisexual men most at risk of becoming infected. Dr Will Nutland on the response so far. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/08/22·26m 33s

Will Ghana introduce some of the harshest anti-gay laws in the world?

West Africa correspondent Emmanuel Akinwotu describes how a backlash against the opening of an LGBTQ+ safe space in Ghana has fuelled homophobic legislation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/08/22·27m 20s

What really happened on board the Nave Andromeda?

Journalist Samira Shackle on the curious case of an oil tanker and stowaways in the Channel and what it revealed about UK immigration laws. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/08/22·28m 59s

Euro 2022 and the future of women’s football

England will play Germany in the Euro final at Wembley on Sunday. Suzy Wrack reports on the team’s success and what is needed to help the sport continue to grow. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/07/22·32m 48s

Is Italy heading for its first far-right leader since Mussolini? – podcast

The sudden downfall of Mario Draghi’s government could clear the way for Italy’s first far-right government since the second world war, says Rome correspondent Angela Giuffrida. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/07/22·23m 16s

What happens if Russia turns off Europe’s gas?

Russia is threatening to cut off its gas supply to Europe, which would force up prices and choke the continent’s economy. But could it backfire on Vladimir Putin? Dan Boffey and Alex Lawson report. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/07/22·26m 57s

Do the Democrats have a Biden problem?

The approval ratings of the US president are at a record low. Washington DC bureau chief David Smith considers whether Joe Biden will stand for re-election in 2024. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/07/22·24m 35s

Homeless in California: the Americans forced to camp in the desert

In the richest state of the richest country in the world, unhoused people are camping in the Mojave desert. Sam Levin reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/07/22·27m 59s

Liz Truss v Rishi Sunak

The race to become next UK prime minister has come down to an increasingly bitter battle between Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak. Heather Stewart weighs up the decision being faced by Tory members, but denied to any other voters. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/07/22·30m 59s

How Covid keeps surprising us and confounding the experts

More than two years into the pandemic, the virus continues to evolve in unpredictable and surprising ways, says science correspondent Hannah Devlin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/07/22·27m 40s

Sri Lankans forced their president to flee the country: now what?

President Rajapaksa fled Sri Lanka last week after witnessing the storming of his official residence. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/07/22·22m 33s

What will it take for the UK adapt to extreme heat?

The UK is experiencing its hottest recorded temperatures this week with much of the country’s infrastructure struggling to cope. What will it take to adapt to far more regular heatwaves?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/07/22·29m 1s

How right to buy fuelled the UK housing crisis

Why did the government decide to sell off millions of council houses four decades ago? Lynsey Hanley and Vicky Spratt on how right to buy, high rents, and a housing shortage have left the dream of buying out of reach for millions. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/07/22·33m 2s

Is Britain’s Homes for Ukraine scheme working?

The Russian invasion of Ukraine caused a massive humanitarian crisis and led to millions of people fleeing their country. Some have made their way to the UK as part of the government’s Homes for Ukraine scheme. But is it working as intended?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/07/22·33m 33s

The race for Tory leadership

After Boris Johnson resigned last week, 11 candidates came forward to replace him. Today, with six candidates remaining, Conservative MPs will vote in the second round of the contest. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/07/22·29m 40s

The Uber Files: the drivers (part 3)

Uber launched itself into cities across the world, selling a dream in which drivers could earn more than elsewhere – and customers could pay much less. But it wasn’t a model that was built to last, as one London driver, Abdurzak Hadi, tells us. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/07/22·36m 57s

The Uber files: the whistleblower (part 2)

In the second part of our miniseries on Uber, former executive Mark MacGann explains his decision to speak out Listen to part 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/07/22·38m 15s

The Uber files: the unicorn (part 1)

A leak of internal documents from inside Uber reveals evidence that the company broke laws, duped police, exploited violence against drivers and secretly lobbied prime ministers and presidents in an effort to break into markets long held by taxi companies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/07/22·41m 35s

The lies and fall of Boris Johnson

Boris Johnson announced his resignation after he accepted that he no longer had the support of his party. Jonathan Freedland describes a man brought down by his own failings. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/07/22·33m 7s

Boris Johnson clings on against the odds

Boris Johnson’s premiership is hanging by a thread as his ministerial colleagues resign and call for him to go. Gaby Hinsliff explains how it came to this. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/07/22·24m 16s

Bangladesh’s catastrophic flooding: the climate crisis frontline

At least 100 people have died in extreme flooding in Bangladesh. Thaslima Begum speaks to the people trying to save lives and fight for climate justice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/07/22·22m 17s

Understanding the cryptocurrency crash

This year has been a disaster for many investors in cryptocurrencies. Alex Hern draws the parallels of the spreading panic in the new digital economy with the 2008 financial crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/07/22·31m 12s

Surviving Britain’s homelessness crisis

Journalist Daniel Lavelle on his experience of homelessness and what it taught him about the impact of government cuts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/07/22·33m 13s

50 years of Pride and why we still need it

In 1972, members of the LGBTQ+ community marched through London demanding equality and celebrating their identities. Five decades on, Ted Brown from the Gay Liberation Front recounts his memories of that time. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/22·37m 32s

The case against Donald Trump

The US congressional hearings on the Capitol Hill attack have been prime time viewing. And the case against Donald Trump has been building for all to see, says Lawrence Douglas. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/06/22·30m 52s

Ukraine: counting the cost of a long war

President Zelenskiy has urged G7 leaders to urgently send more heavy weapons to Ukraine to bring the war to an end before winter. But, as Dan Sabbagh reports, there is no clear resolution in sight. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/06/22·29m 30s

The women’s lives in danger in a post-Roe America

Jessica Glenza reports on the supreme court ruling and the profound consequences it will have for women facing unwanted pregnancies across the United States. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/06/22·28m 28s

Can Colombia’s first leftwing president deliver change?

Gustavo Petro has been elected as the Latin American country’s first leftist leader. But he faces a huge challenge if he is to deliver on his promises, says Joe Parkin Daniels. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/06/22·26m 13s

Artificial intelligence: conscious or just very convincing?

Alex Hern reports on recent developments in artificial intelligence and how a Google employee became convinced an AI chatbot was sentient. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/22·33m 49s

Is Britain facing a summer of strikes?

Transport correspondent Gwyn Topham reports on the rail strike negotiations, and economics columnist Aditya Chakrabortty analyses the political response from the Conservatives and Labour. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/06/22·25m 36s

A tale of two byelections

After the resignations in disgrace of two Tory MPs, the Lib Dems and Labour are hoping to snatch victories in Thursday’s byelections. Are Boris Johnson’s voters ready to desert him?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/06/22·28m 18s

What’s at stake in the extradition of Julian Assange?

After the UK home secretary decided to extradite Julian Assange to face trial and a possible life sentence in the US, Ben Quinn reports on what the ruling means for the WikiLeaks founder – and for press freedom. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/06/22·28m 27s

Walking through a warzone: Igor and Zhu-Zhu’s incredible journey

When the bombardment of Mariupol became unbearable, Igor Pedin set off with his dog Zhu-Zhu to find safety. Daniel Boffey tells his incredible story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/06/22·34m 48s

Abba avatars: will technology change the way we see gigs? | Podcast

More than 40 years since they were last on tour, Abba have returned as digital avatars. Is Abba Voyage, which debuted in London last month, the future of concerts?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/22·30m 57s

The disappearance of Dom Phillips and Bruno Pereira

Brazilian police have arrested two men in connection with the alleged murder of British journalist Dom Phillips and Indigenous expert Bruno Pereira. The pair went missing on an expedition in the Javari region. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/06/22·34m 35s

Living with long Covid

With no restrictions in place and a successful vaccine rollout in the UK, it is tempting to think that the threat to health from coronavirus is passing. But millions are struggling with long Covid, says Linda Geddes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/06/22·27m 11s

Remembering Grenfell

Five years on from the the Grenfell Tower tragedy, the community is grappling with what should happen to the ruined building and the need for a fitting memorial. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/06/22·30m 16s

Life in the firing zone: the occupation of Masafer Yatta

After decades trying to resist eviction, the Palestinians living in Masafer Yatta have lost their case in the Israeli supreme court. Bethan McKernan on the controversial decision and the people determined to stay in their homes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/06/22·34m 27s

Cameras in the courtroom: the spectacle of the Depp-Heard trial | Podcast

The defamation trial was livestreamed and clipped into short videos for millions on social media. Columnist Moira Donegan on cameras in court and the impact of the case on those wanting to report domestic abuse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/06/22·36m 44s

Sudden infant death syndrome: will parents finally get answers?

Sudden infant death syndrome (Sids), also known as cot death, affects 200 families a year in the UK. Hannah Devlin reports on a new study that has raised hopes of an explanation for parents. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/22·34m 7s

Life in the firing zone: the occupation of Masafer Yatta

After decades trying to resist eviction, the Palestinians living in Masafer Yatta have lost their case in the Israeli supreme court. Bethan McKernan on the controversial decision and the people determined to stay in their homes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/06/22·34m 51s

England’s new strangulation law – and why it’s needed

A new law specifically targeting non-fatal strangulation comes into effect this week in England and Wales. Yvonne Roberts explains why it is necessary. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/06/22·29m 46s

Boris Johnson’s narrow vote of confidence

Boris Johnson won a vote of confidence yesterday – but he suffered a massive rebellion from parliamentary colleagues. Political correspondent Peter Walker explains what happens now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/06/22·21m 34s

100 days of war in Ukraine

On 24 February Russia began its assault on Ukraine. The explosions that day marked the end of an era in Europe and changed the lives of millions for ever. Michael Safi talks to Volodymyr Ksienich and Kyrylo Demchenko, two of thousands of young Ukrainians who answered a call to protect their country, as well as hearing from Guardian correspondents Emma Graham-Harrison and Shaun Walker, who have been reporting on the ground. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/06/22·44m 32s

How to feed the world without destroying it

George Monbiot on the growing global food crisis and the degradation of our soils. Can the solution be found in the lab?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/06/22·31m 5s

The Queen’s platinum jubilee and the future of the monarchy

Tina Brown, author of The Palace Papers, on the importance of this jubilee to the royal family and how the Queen has maintained public support through her 70 years on the throne despite many crises. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/06/22·29m 4s

Is the UK heading for a recession?

Last Friday, Boris Johnson was asked if the UK was heading for recession. He replied “not necessarily at all”. Richard Partington explains why we are facing such economic uncertainty. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/06/22·22m 6s

Abuse in the modelling industry

Six former models have alleged sexual abuse against the fashion agent Jean-Luc Brunel. Lucy Osborne investigates how the industry failed victims of abuse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/05/22·38m 24s

Inside the US gun industry

There are more guns than people in the United States, and the industry is still able to sell almost 2m a month. Ryan Busse, a former gun company executive, explains how we got here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/05/22·36m 10s

How the climate crisis upturned Australian politics

The rightwing coalition that has run Australia for most of the past decade has been ejected from power by voters sick of its inaction on the climate crisis, says Lenore Taylor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/05/22·27m 9s

Sue Gray day: the Partygate finale

The Partygate saga culminated with a report on Wednesday on the extent of rule-breaking in Downing Street during lockdown. Peter Walker and Jonathan Freedland analyse what it means for the PM. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/05/22·28m 36s

How worried should we be about monkeypox?

An outbreak of monkeypox in the UK is ‘significant and concerning’, but for now it poses a low risk to the public, says science editor Ian Sample. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/05/22·24m 43s

Toothaches and waiting lists: where did the NHS dentists go?

Millions of people in the UK are struggling to gain access to affordable dental care. Denis Campbell explores the crisis in NHS dentistry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/05/22·28m 55s

A travesty in Turkey: the Gezi Park trials

Eight human rights activists have been given long prison sentences for anti-government protests in Turkey. Sami Kent reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/05/22·37m 0s

The nurses getting huge bills for quitting the NHS

International nurses working for NHS trusts are being trapped in their jobs by clauses in their contracts that require them to pay thousands of pounds if they try to leave. Shanti Das reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/22·26m 50s

How Vladimir Putin rejuvenated Nato

Finland and Sweden this week formally applied to join Nato after years of non-alignment. Jon Henley reports on how the Ukraine war has given the alliance a new lease of life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/05/22·30m 17s

The ‘carbon bombs’ set to blow up the world’s climate pledges

A Guardian investigation has revealed 195 oil and gas projects known as ‘carbon bombs’ that could trigger catastrophic climate breakdown if allowed to continue. Damian Carrington reports Revealed: the ‘carbon bombs’ set to trigger catastrophic climate breakdown. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/05/22·27m 16s

Florida’s ‘don’t say gay’ bill

Florida’s legislature has introduced a bill that would allow parents to sue school districts if they consider lessons to not be ‘age-appropriate’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/05/22·30m 24s

Marcos’ myths: the dictator’s son rewriting history in the Philippines

Ferdinand ‘Bongbong’ Marcos is on course for a landslide victory in the Philippines presidential election. For those who grew up under the martial law of his father, the result brings up the horrors of the past. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/05/22·35m 1s

The fight for the right to roam in the English countryside

A campaign to widen access to the English countryside is gathering momentum. However, as Helena Horton reports from a mass trespass event in Devon, there is little sign the government is willing to budge. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/05/22·29m 0s

Why are so many journalists being killed in Mexico?

The death of Mexican crime reporter Margarito Martinez shocked his friends and colleagues in Tijuana. Tom Phillips reports on how the Mexican president’s verbal attacks on the press are putting its country’s journalists at risk. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/05/22·30m 10s

Putin’s dilemma: what is his next move in Ukraine?

Vladimir Putin’s Victory Day speech revealed a man facing one of the biggest decisions of his presidency: to escalate or de-escalate the war in Ukraine. Andrew Roth reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/05/22·27m 27s

What does Sinn Féin’s win mean for Northern Ireland?

The Irish nationalist party Sinn Féin won the most seats in the Northern Ireland assembly last week for the first time. Rory Carroll explains what happens now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/05/22·29m 57s

The Division: New Orleans – part four

The division begins to reinvestigate Kuantay Reeder’s case, discovering new evidence that could hold the key to his freedom. The Guardian’s US southern bureau chief, Oliver Laughland, goes to interview Harry Connick, the district attorney from 1973 to 2003, to ask how he felt about presiding over an administration accused of rights violations and disproportionately punishing the city’s poorest Black residents.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/05/22·49m 7s

The Division: New Orleans – part three

In 2020 a change comes to New Orleans. The city elects Jason Williams, a progressive Black prosecutor who promises to reckon with the past. One of the first things he does is set up a civil rights division, led by Emily Maw. The division takes on the case of Kuantay Reeder, and assistant district attorney Bidish Sarma is able to view Reeder’s case file. Will there be evidence inside to support his claim of innocence?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/05/22·38m 7s

The Division: New Orleans – part two

In 1995, Kuantay Reeder is sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison for a crime he says he didn’t commit. He spends years doing hard labour in the fields of the prison, and trying to have his conviction overturned. By 2020, he has exhausted almost every legal avenue available to him. But 2020 is also the year that Jason Williams is elected to be the new district attorney of New Orleans. Will the creation of a new civil rights division in his office offer hope to Reeder?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/05/22·34m 59s

The Division: New Orleans – part one

The Guardian’s US southern bureau chief, Oliver Laughland, has spent the past six months following what happened when a progressive Black district attorney called Jason Williams was elected in Louisiana, the heart of the deep south. Jason had promised sweeping reforms across New Orleans, and part of that change involved opening up a civil rights division to look over old cases. Kuantay Reeder has been in Louisiana’s ‘Angola’ prison since 1995 for a murder he says he didn’t commit. Will the division be able to help him?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/05/22·41m 25s

The US supreme court is ready to overturn the right to an abortion. What happens next?

A leaked draft opinion lays out the supreme court’s plans to overturn Roe v Wade. It is something abortion activists have long feared – and will have lasting repercussions for all Americans, reports Jessica Glenza. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/05/22·28m 52s

Walls, ‘gates’ and Britain’s local elections

Whether its a focus on the ‘red wall’ or the ‘blue wall’, Partygate or Tractorgate, local elections are an important guide to the prospects of the national government and opposition alike, says Heather Stewart. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/05/22·25m 42s

The Wagatha Christie case (part 2)

As the so-called ‘Wagatha Christie’ trial approaches, neither side is backing down from a case that has legal fees running into the millions, says media editor Jim Waterson Listen to part 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/05/22·26m 10s

The Wagatha Christie case (part 1)

A sensational libel trial is due to begin next week. Jim Waterson dives into the worlds of celebrity, media and the courts to understand how we got here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/05/22·28m 33s

Will Elon Musk regret buying Twitter?

It’s not rocket science – but it might be even harder. Alex Hern explains why Elon Musk may find that running Twitter and making a profit is a greater challenge than he bargained for. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/04/22·30m 59s

Searching for the shadow man (part 2)

A genocide researcher investigating a 2013 atrocity committed in Syria creates an alternate online identity – the character of ‘Anna S’ – to entice a military commander to confess to war crimes. But how far can she push? And how long can Anna go on? Listen to part 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/04/22·43m 13s

Searching for the shadow man (Part 1)

Leaked footage documenting the 2013 execution of dozens of Syrian civilians led two genocide researchers on a painstaking search over three years to find the man responsible. The first of a two-part special. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/04/22·37m 27s

Can Emmanuel Macron reunite France?

The French president has faced down the challenge from the far right to win a second term. But he returns to office as president of a deeply divided country, says Angelique Chrisafis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/04/22·26m 21s

Shein and the rise of ultra-fast fashion

The Chinese fashion brand Shein found rapid success by catering to young shoppers whose tastes are driven by social media. But making fast fashion even faster comes at a cost. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/04/22·31m 28s

The shaming of the Salvation Army

Investigative reporter Simon Goodley talks about the organisation which has been accused of acting as a rogue landlord in a Thames estuary community in Essex. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/04/22·33m 22s

Can Russia succeed as a new chapter of war begins in Ukraine?

Ukraine’s army held off Putin’s forces and stopped a Russian takeover of Kyiv in the first phase of the war. But, as Luke Harding reports, Russia’s approach in this next stage looks very different. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/04/22·24m 33s

What’s behind the economic implosion in Sri Lanka?

An economic crisis in Sri Lanka is now threatening starvation for the poorest citizens. Hannah Ellis-Petersen reports on a disaster still unfolding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/04/22·30m 54s

Will the UK really send refugees to Rwanda?  – podcast

Boris Johnson has announced a scheme to send people seeking asylum in Britain to Rwanda for resettlement. Sunder Katwala argues that it will fail as a policy – and it misreads the mood of the country • How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/04/22·30m 29s

The real cost of the chicken in your supermarket trolley

Chicken has become such a staple of the British diet that shoppers have grown used to paying less than a pint of beer for a whole bird in a supermarket. But the supply chain that leads to the shelves is mired in ethical and environmental dilemmas, finds Simon Usborne. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/04/22·26m 3s

Where did it all go wrong for Imran Khan? – podcast

The ousting of Pakistan’s prime minister in a vote of no confidence followed a period of intense political turmoil. Yale political scientist Sarah Khan describes what could come next. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/04/22·27m 45s

Boris Johnson broke the law. Will the Met's Partygate fines be the PM’s undoing?

He says he will pay the penalties issued by the Met police, but he is not resigning – at least, not yet. Are Tory MPs prepared to push the prime minister out of office?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/04/22·26m 18s

How a conspiracy theory about Ukrainian ‘bioweapons labs’ took off

First it was just a tweet – but soon it had turned into a favourite Kremlin talking point. Journalist Justin Ling charts how a false claim about biological warfare spread across the internet and the world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/04/22·30m 53s

Who gets to decide the future of Channel 4?

Critics in the Conservative party say the broadcaster’s best years are behind it and privatisation is the answer. But what would be lost in the process?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/04/22·27m 50s

The insect crisis: where did all the bugs go?

What does the drastic decline in insect populations mean for our lives? The Guardian’s Oliver Milman talks about these miraculous creatures and how they play a vital role in making the Earth habitable. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/04/22·24m 53s

The week the world woke up to Russian war crimes in Ukraine

After the rapid withdrawal of Russian forces from the suburbs around Kyiv, the full scale of the atrocities they had committed were exposed to the world this week. The Guardian’s Daniel Boffey was one of the first reporters to witness the scene of multiple war crimes in Bucha. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/04/22·33m 17s

Can Emmanuel Macron hold off France’s far-right surge?

The first round of the French election takes place this Sunday with Emmanuel Macron staking his claim to a second term. But to do so he must beat a resurgent far right, says our Paris correspondent Angelique Chrisafis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/04/22·29m 8s

How boycotts against Russia work – and how they don’t

From the cancellation of performances of Tchaikovsky to the exit of Ikea and McDonald’s from Moscow, there has been a rush to boycott all things Russian. But what impact do these official and unofficial economic protests have?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/04/22·32m 16s

Babies in bunkers: the surrogate mothers and infants trapped in Ukraine

Sirin Kale reports on the surrogate mothers trapped in Ukraine – and the parents struggling to bring their babies home to safety. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/04/22·27m 44s

How fentanyl flooded the US and sent opioid deaths soaring

Erin McCormick examines what’s driving a surge in drug overdose deaths in America – and why Black Americans, Indigenous Americans and young people have been so hard hit by the crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/04/22·29m 22s

Weekend: episode two of a new podcast

Ease into the weekend with our brand new podcast, showcasing some of the best Guardian and Observer writing from the week, read by talented narrators. In this episode, Marina Hyde looks at the new additions to Downing Street (2m00s), Hadley Freeman interviews Hollywood actor Will Arnett (9m56s), Sirin Kale tries her hand at quiz show Mastermind (26m32s), and David Robson examines why we’re so stressed about stress (41m08s). If you like what you hear, subscribe to Weekend on Apple, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/04/22·49m 39s

Myanmar: the reporters risking everything to cover a forgotten conflict

After a military coup in February 2021, the grinding conflict in Myanmar has entered its second year with no resolution in sight. There is a danger the world has started forgetting, says reporter Emily Fishbein. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/04/22·31m 43s

Is Russia’s military strategy in Ukraine changing?

On Tuesday, Russia announced it would ‘radically reduce’ its military activity in northern Ukraine, but the Ukrainian military warns that Russia’s statement is intended to mislead them. Emma Graham-Harrison reports from Kharkiv. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/03/22·28m 37s

Ramzan Kadyrov: Putin’s ‘attack dog’ and Ukraine

Ramzan Kadyrov, the feared Chechen leader and staunch Putin ally, is reportedly in Ukraine commanding a unit alongside Russian forces. Julius Strauss explains what his arrival into the war means for Russia, Ukraine and Chechnya. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/03/22·26m 13s

Can P&O be forced to reverse its mass sacking of workers?

The company’s sacking of 800 UK employees without notice prompted outrage from politicians and unions alike. But will anything change? Joanna Partridge explores a low point in the recent history of industrial relations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/03/22·30m 5s

The race to mine the deep sea

One of the largest mining operations ever seen on Earth aims to despoil an ocean we are only just beginning to understand, says global environment editor Jonathan Watts• Seabed regulator deciding deep sea’s future ‘behind closed doors’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/03/22·32m 12s

The shameful strip-search of Child Q

After a 15-year-old London girl was strip searched by police at her school, her family and community want accountability. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/03/22·29m 38s

The siege of Mariupol – podcast

For weeks the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol has been under constant bombardment from Russian artillery. With the city in ruins, residents who risked everything to escape can now tell their stories. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/03/22·34m 19s

How pandemics end and what they leave behind

Two years after the first UK coronavirus lockdown, Laura Spinney reflects on what the years after the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic looked like, and what we might expect in a post-Covid era. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/03/22·25m 55s

Can China broker an end to Russia’s war in Ukraine?

They’re longtime strategic partners but Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is testing the strength of Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping’s relationship, Tania Branigan explains. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/03/22·27m 28s

The woman jailed for a voting mistake

Pamela Moses, a Black Lives Matter activist , was sentenced to six years in prison for trying to register to vote. Sam Levine tells the remarkable story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/03/22·39m 9s

How daily life in Ukraine has become an act of defiance

Across the country, journalist Nataliya Gumenyuk has been chronicling how people in Ukraine are just carrying on - and how that in itself is a form of resistance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/03/22·28m 43s

Has the Ukraine crisis transformed Britain’s approach to refugees?

People in Britain have been signing up in their thousands to offer a place in their homes to those seeking refuge from the war. It’s a spirit of generosity that puts it at odds with recent government policy, says Amelia Gentleman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/03/22·38m 1s

How the UK finally turned on Roman Abramovich

When Roman Abramovich bought Chelsea in 2003, he transformed the club’s fortunes and ushered in a new era of billionaire owners in the Premier League. But as David Conn explains, the issues that led to sanctions being imposed on him last week by the government have been in plain view for years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/03/22·33m 48s

The Wagner Group’s shadow mission in Ukraine

Officially, it does not exist. But reporter Pjotr Sauer has traced the notorious Russian mercenary group’s activities in Syria and Africa – and recently spoke to one of its members. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/03/22·30m 40s

How Ketanji Brown Jackson became Biden’s supreme court nominee

If confirmed by the US Senate, Jackson will be the first Black woman to take a seat on the country’s highest court. The New York University law professor Melissa Murray explains the significance of Jackson’s nomination. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/03/22·28m 11s

What’s driving Vladimir Putin and his assault on Ukraine?

The president’s attitude to power – in Russia and beyond – has changed steadily since 1999, says Sam Greene, the co-author of Putin v the People: The Perilous Politics of a Divided Russia. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/03/22·30m 9s

Could Nato do more to stop the war in Ukraine?

Nato has refused to intervene militarily in the Ukraine war. Dan Sabbagh explains what more the world’s most powerful military alliance could do – and why full intervention is off the table for now Russia-Ukraine war: latest updates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/03/22·32m 50s

From north to south: how Putin united Ukrainians against Russia

Shaun Walker has spent much of the first fortnight of the war in and around Kyiv. Travelling south to the port city of Odesa, he found even the Russian-speaking population were becoming hardened in disgust at Moscow’s invasion. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/03/22·34m 26s

The Ukrainian refugees pouring into Europe

A million and a half people have been forced to escape their homes in Ukraine. Annie Kelly and Lorenzo Tondo explain what this growing refugee crisis looks like. Plus, a couple who fled for Hungary share their journey. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/03/22·29m 17s

The scandal of Britain’s ‘ghost’ flights

At least 15,000 flights have taken off from UK airports since March 2020 at less than 10% capacity or even with no passengers at all. The Guardian’s environment editor, Damian Carrington, attempts to find out why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/03/22·25m 33s

What Russians are being told about the war in Ukraine

The world has reacted with revulsion to stark images of Russia’s brutal invasion of Ukraine. But televisions in Moscow show a different story entirely, says Andrew Roth. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/03/22·31m 40s

The volunteer fighter: ‘Life will never be the same’

Volodymyr Ksienich, 22, has returned to Ukraine to join the defence of Kyiv. He tells Michael Safi how his life changed forever after last week’s Russian invasion. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/03/22·26m 29s

How to end Britain’s love affair with Russian money

Oliver Bullough has traced how the British financial system has sheltered ill-gotten Russian wealth over many decades. Can the system be cleaned up?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/03/22·29m 57s

Comedian, president, warrior: the transformation of Volodymyr Zelenskiy

When the comic actor Volodymyr Zelenskiy ran for the Ukrainian presidency in 2019 he was treated as a joke. Now, as Luke Harding reports from Lviv, he personifies the defiance and dignity of Ukraine’s embattled population. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/22·31m 22s

A family flees Kyiv

Thousands of Ukrainians are flooding out of the capital. As the Russian attack continues, the residents who remain are taking cover – and taking up arms, Emma Graham-Harrison reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/02/22·29m 28s

The day Putin invaded Ukraine

Russia has launched an invasion of Ukraine on several fronts, raising fears it could escalate into the most serious conflict Europe has seen since the second world war. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/02/22·28m 29s

Freedom or folly? The end of England’s Covid restrictions

Today marks the first day in nearly two years that no laws will be in place in England to deal with the spread of Covid-19. But is the government still following the science?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/02/22·26m 8s

Putin orders troops into Ukraine. Now what?

After weeks of threats, Putin has sent soldiers and tanks into eastern Ukraine. Shaun Walker and Patrick Wintour explain what the new stage of the crisis means for Ukraine and its allies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/02/22·21m 27s

Democrats’ crime conundrum

While US Democrats struggle to follow through on promises of police reform, Republicans are trying to keep voters’ attention on rising crime rates. Lauren Gambino reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/02/22·27m 11s

Credit Suisse: a bank for dictators, drug lords and criminals

A leak of data from Credit Suisse has shown how it provided services to known criminals and fraudsters for decades. It’s the latest huge scandal to hit the Swiss bank, say investigative reporters Kalyeena Makortoff and David Pegg. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/22·33m 2s

The Tories attacking the UK’s net zero plans

The Net Zero Scrutiny Group insists it accepts the facts of the climate emergency. But as the cost of living crisis deepens, they see an opportunity to push back against the government’s climate agenda. Helena Horton reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/02/22·24m 15s

The fall of Prince Andrew

The Duke of York faces a bill of millions of pounds after settling a sexual assault case with his accuser, Virginia Giuffre. This, in effect, ends his career in public life, says royal reporter Caroline Davies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/02/22·22m 8s

The displaced Chagos Islanders yearning for home

Over 50 years after they were forcibly removed from their homes, the former residents of Britain’s last colony in Africa are challenging the UK’s claim to the archipelago. Lawyer Philippe Sands is advising the Mauritian government in the legal battle. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/02/22·26m 56s

How the Ukraine crisis looks from Kyiv

As US intelligence sources warn of an imminent Russian invasion, residents of the Ukrainian capital are refusing to be cowed, reports Shaun Walker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/02/22·26m 42s

The joys (and pressures) of being single

You don’t need a partner to have a happy and fulfilling life - so why does society still apply the pressure to couple up?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/02/22·28m 52s

Scotland reckons with the violent witch hunts of its past

They were accused of sorcery but they were just ordinary women. Libby Brooks reports on a campaign to pardon those persecuted in witch trials 300 years ago. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/02/22·28m 20s

What a leadership crisis looks like from inside Downing Street

Gavin Barwell was in No 10 when Tory MPs were plotting the downfall of his boss Theresa May. Now, as Boris Johnson’s premiership hangs in the balance, he tells Nosheen Iqbal what it’s like on the inside when things start falling apart. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/02/22·30m 3s

Clause 9 and the erosion of citizenship rights

The UK government has long held the right to deprive British people of their citizenship. But in the past 20 years, its use of those powers has dramatically accelerated. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/02/22·30m 43s

Is the cryptocurrency trading boom creating a new generation of addicts?

With endorsements from celebrities and ads on TikTok, cryptocurrency has gone mainstream. But not everyone gets rich. Rob Davies reports on how crypto apps encourage addictive, high-risk trading habits. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/02/22·30m 1s

The scammers getting rich on lockdown loneliness

Dating fraudsters stole nearly £100m from lonely people in Britain last year. Lizzie Cernik reports on how these increasingly sophisticated scams work. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/02/22·31m 14s

Weekend: episode one of a new podcast

Ease into the weekend with our brand new podcast, showcasing some of the best Guardian and Observer writing from the week, read by talented narrators. In our first episode, Marina Hyde reflects on another less than stellar week for Boris Johnson (1m38s), Edward Helmore charts the rise of Joe Rogan (9m46s), Laura Snapes goes deep with singer George Ezra (18m30s), and Alex Moshakis asks, “Are you a jerk at work?” (34m40s). If you like what you hear, subscribe to Weekend on Apple, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/02/22·48m 45s

Can Joe Rogan change?

The freewheeling, inquisitive style that made Rogan so influential turned into a liability during the Covid pandemic. What’s next for the world’s most famous podcaster?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/02/22·31m 12s

Cressida Dick and the crisis of trust in the Metropolitan police

After a year in which the Met lurched from one crisis to another, Danny Shaw looks at the challenges faced by the woman in charge. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/02/22·32m 0s

‘A ticking time bomb’: what a prison break reveals about the threat from Islamic State

IS might have been defeated on the battlefield, but the terror group still has the capacity to shock and its threat is far from over, says Martin Chulov. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/02/22·27m 36s

Sue Gray’s verdict: ‘Failures of leadership’

Sue Gray’s report into Covid lockdown rule-breaking in Downing Street has finally been published. Jessica Elgot analyses what it means for Boris Johnson’s future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/02/22·23m 9s

Grenfell inquiry final phase: will politicians be held accountable?

As the Grenfell inquiry heads towards its concluding stages, politicians will be called to account for their part in the deadly fire. Our social affairs correspondent Robert Booth has been watching on throughout • How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/01/22·27m 35s

Has China fallen into a Covid-zero trap?

From the beginning, China’s response to coronavirus has been to quash outbreaks with ultra-strict lockdowns. But has the Omicron variant left its leaders trapped in the wrong strategy?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/01/22·25m 25s

What happens if Russia invades Ukraine?

With diplomatic talks at an apparent impasse, Vladimir Putin seems prepared to start a war. Andrew Roth reports from Moscow. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/01/22·28m 6s

Will the police have the final word on ‘partygate’?

After weeks of damaging allegations of parties and rule-breaking gatherings in Downing Street the Metropolitan police have now opened an investigation. Could this spell the end for Boris Johnson?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/01/22·21m 36s

Boris Johnson clings on, the scandals keep coming

Boris Johnson has been forced to order a new inquiry into allegations on Islamophobia in the Conservative party as his mutinous MPs await a verdict on Covid rule-breaking in Downing Street. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/01/22·25m 40s

Rapper Nipsey Hussle and the problem of predictive policing

He was one of LA’s most-loved rappers, and a pillar of his community. But records disclosed after his death revealed that he was also the target of an extensive Los Angeles policing operation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/01/22·36m 15s

The fight for the future of the BBC

The latest skirmish between the BBC and the government is part of a running debate over who the BBC serves, which dates back to the organisation’s earliest days. But this time, the stakes are higher. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/01/22·31m 40s

How MI5 uncovered a Chinese ‘agent’ in parliament

Britain’s security services have named Christine Lee as an ‘agent’ of the Chinese state attempting to run influence operations in parliament. Dan Sabbagh explains what is behind the extraordinary statement and what it means for British politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/01/22·26m 44s

On the frontline of the cost of living crisis

Households across the UK will see rising prices and stalling wages strain their budgets in the year ahead, money and consumer editor Hilary Osborne reports. Some families are already feeling the pinch. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/01/22·30m 48s

The rise and rise of Liz Truss

As Boris Johnson faces questions over his future, Conservative members and MPs are looking at their options for who might replace him and one name keeps coming up. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/01/22·26m 26s

Afghan female MPs fight for their country in exile

After a harrowing escape from the Taliban, Afghanistan’s female politicians are regrouping in Greece to fight for their country. Amie Ferris-Rotman reports on the work of the Afghan women’s parliament in exile. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/01/22·33m 32s

A royal mess: Prince Andrew faces a US trial

The Duke of York’s attempts to get a civil case over allegations of sexual assault thrown out have failed. Ed Helmore in New York examines the case against the prince and his narrowing options to salvage his reputation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/01/22·19m 38s

Will Boris Johnson’s apology be enough to save him?

Boris Johnson faced anger and derision as he admitted attending a drinks party during the first lockdown but claimed that he believed it to be a work event that did not break the rules. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/01/22·26m 26s

What does the Omicron winter crisis mean for the NHS?

Hospital trusts across England have declared ‘critical incidents’ in record numbers as the Omicron wave brings rising admissions and staff sickness. But the strains on NHS capacity long predate Covid, says Denis Campbell Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/01/22·27m 32s

Guantánamo Bay at 20: why have attempts to close the prison failed?

The US prison in Cuba has been beset by allegations of torture since it was set up 20 years ago. But despite all the promises to close it down, it remains operational with no end in sight, says Julian Borger. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/01/22·31m 38s

A moral victory: what the acquittal of the Colston Four means for future protests

Last week a court acquitted four protesters who helped tear down a statue of the notorious slave trader Edward Colston. Damien Gayle describes what the case means for future protests and one of the defendants, Sage Willoughby, describes the jubilant moment the verdict arrived. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/01/22·28m 24s

Culture 2022: what to watch, read and listen to this year

Guardian critics Charlotte Northedge, Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Simran Hans look ahead to the best of the year in culture. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/01/22·25m 22s

How the Capitol attack still divides the United States

A year ago today, rioters stormed the Capitol building in Washington DC after Donald Trump encouraged his supporters to march on Congress to protest against the election result. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/01/22·30m 14s

Can the UK cope with the Omicron surge?

The year has begun with warnings of critical incidents in UK hospitals and fears over school re-openings but there are reasons to be optimistic, says science correspondent Nicola Davis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/01/22·24m 12s

The joy of missing out: how to manage your time in 2022

We only have about 4,000 weeks of life on average, says the writer Oliver Burkeman, so make sure you are prioritising what really matters. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/01/22·25m 6s

Revisited: how a Disney movie helped solve a decades-old adventure mystery

In 1959, nine experienced hikers were mysteriously killed in Russia’s Ural mountains. Conspiracy theories circled for years, but an unlikely pairing of science and the movie Frozen may have helped solve the cold case. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/01/22·30m 57s

Revisited: the secret deportations of Chinese merchant sailors

During the second world war, Chinese sailors served alongside their British allies in the merchant navy, heroically keeping supply lines open to the UK. But after the war hundreds of them who had settled in Liverpool suddenly disappeared. Now their children are piecing together the truth. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/12/21·30m 54s

Revisited: Josh Cavallo, the only openly gay top-tier men’s footballer

Adelaide United’s Josh Cavallo says the response to his recent coming out as gay has been overwhelming. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/12/21·26m 30s

Revisited: Emily Ratajkowski’s body – and what she wants to make of it

The model, actor and writer views her body as a ‘tool’ to make a living – but ever since 2013’s Blurred Lines video, it has also been treated as public property. In this interview, Ratajkowski explains why she has written a book about her experiences, from an allegation of assault by Robin Thicke to how motherhood has changed her. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/12/21·24m 3s

Revisited: An Al-Qaida recruit-turned-spy and the road to 9/11 podcast

Few terrorist organisations survive for more than a few years. Al-Qaida was different. Jason Burke, who has spent much of his career reporting on the group, and former member Aimen Dean reflect on how it was able to carry out the September 11 attacks barely a decade after it was formed – and its struggle to survive the fallout from its ‘catastrophic success’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/12/21·37m 29s

Revisited: Britain’s rich history of black literature

In Black History Month we brought together star authors Ben Okri, Candice Carty-Williams and Caleb Azumah Nelson to discuss the past, present and future of black writing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/12/21·32m 31s

Looking back on the Guardian’s 200th year

Editor-in-chief Katharine Viner reflects on how a newspaper founded two centuries ago chronicled the particular ups and downs of 2021. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/12/21·29m 44s

How did things get so bad between France and Britain?

Diplomatic editor Patrick Wintour and Paris correspondent Angelique Chrisafis consider how Brexit, Aukus, and the refugee crisis have strained UK-France relations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/12/21·27m 24s

2021: a year in wine, cheese and sleaze

From the ‘pingdemic’ to Peppa Pig, the government’s blunders have kept political sketch writer John Crace particularly busy this year. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/12/21·25m 24s

Is it going to be another Covid Christmas?

The government hasn’t cancelled Christmas – yet – but the rate of the Omicron variant’s spread should make us all reconsider our plans, science correspondent Nicola Davis reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/12/21·22m 49s

Countdown to attack: inside a simulation that mimics nuclear conflict

World affairs editor Julian Borger tries out a VR simulation designed to model a real-life nuclear exchange, and reports on the terrifying outcome. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/12/21·26m 45s

Can theatres survive another Christmas of covid cancellations?

Theatres are battling to stay open as they contend with staff shortages and slumping tickets sales in what is usually their busiest time of year. For the cast of a pantomime in Corby, Northamptonshire, the show goes on – for now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/12/21·21m 2s

Is Vladimir Putin preparing to invade Ukraine?

As Russian soldiers continue to amass near the Ukrainian border shots are already being fired and there are fears that President Putin is planning an invasion, says Luke Harding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/12/21·27m 53s

Do Covid vaccine mandates work?

In Australia, where employment-related mandates on the coronavirus vaccine were introduced months ago, the stories of two women demonstrate how such measures can work – and how they can backfire. Nicola Davis reports on the considerations governments must make when introducing vaccine mandates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/12/21·28m 51s

The Tories are in turmoil: can Labour capitalise?

The opposition party is performing well in the polls, but still doesn’t have an easy pathway to power, says Observer leader writer Sonia Sodha. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/12/21·25m 35s

How Magnus Carlsen won chess back from the machines

Breakthroughs in computing have changed how high-level chess is played, making draws all too common. But the Norwegian champion’s stunning performance in Dubai wrests the game back from the grip of the supercomputers, Guardian US deputy sport editor Bryan Graham reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/12/21·25m 24s

Christmas parties, sleaze and plan B: how Boris Johnson is running out of allies

Fury over the release of a video showing Downing Street staffers joking about alleged lockdown breaches are only the latest scandal to rock Johnson’s premiership, reports political correspondent Peter Walker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/12/21·27m 30s

Failure, fear and the threat of famine in Afghanistan

A whistleblower has accused the British government of abject failures in its efforts to manage the evacuation of people from Afghanistan as the Taliban took control in August. Emma Graham-Harrison returns to the country to find it facing a humanitarian crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/12/21·32m 28s

The death of Arthur Labinjo-Hughes and the crisis in social work

The tragic case of an abused six-year-old in the West Midlands has put a renewed focus on the challenges facing social workers, social policy editor Patrick Butler reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/12/21·21m 58s

Is MI6 fit for the future?

Britain’s overseas spy agency MI6 needs to become ‘more open, in order to stay secret’ according to its new head, Richard Moore. Dan Sabbagh looks at what that might mean. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/21·23m 37s

How Pablo Escobar’s ‘cocaine hippos’ became a biodiversity nightmare

Animals brought illegally to Colombia by the drug kingpin have been allowed to roam free and are now disrupting the fragile ecosystem. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/12/21·25m 53s

How designer Virgil Abloh transformed fashion

The visionary black designer revolutionised the way we dress. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/12/21·19m 52s

Will the Omicron Covid variant cancel Christmas?

A new Covid variant first identified in South Africa is spreading around the world, with leaders rushing to respond. Our science correspondent Nicola Davis outlines what we know so far about the Omicron variant. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/12/21·24m 32s

The Mississippi and Texas laws threatening US abortion rights

As the supreme court hears new challenges to Roe v Wade, American abortion rights hang in the balance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/12/21·29m 40s

Barbados becomes a republic – and Britain faces a reckoning

On Tuesday, Barbados replaces Queen Elizabeth II with president Sandra Mason – and while some are celebrating the change, others ask if a symbolic shift is really enough to reckon with the legacy of colonialism. Michael Safi visits Bridgetown to ask if the country can free itself from the history that got it here – and what Britain owes to the people of its former colonies whose ancestors were enslaved. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/11/21·38m 27s

Inflation’s back – but is it here to stay?

The inflation rate keeps going up – and some economists are warning that it’s time to take urgent action. So what is causing the change, what does it mean for ordinary people, and what’s the best way to deal with it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/11/21·18m 28s

A tragedy in the Channel

At least 27 people died when their boat sank in the Channel attempting to reach the UK. Diane Taylor reports on a tragedy that was long in the making – and avoidable. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/11/21·25m 35s

The disappearance of Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai

The Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai vanished after making an allegation of sexual assault against a senior political figure. Her subsequent reappearance has raised more questions than answers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/11/21·31m 4s

The autistic women denied a diagnosis for decades

When the television presenter Melanie Sykes and the model Christine McGuinness revealed they had been diagnosed with autism as adults, it brought new attention to the challenges for others like them whose symptoms have been missed. This is the story of one autistic woman - and how diagnosis in her thirties changed her life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/11/21·28m 32s

The human cost of Qatar’s 2022 World Cup dream

Qatar says it has reformed conditions for workers building its World Cup facilities, but change is hard to see on the ground, reports Pete Pattisson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/11/21·30m 14s

After a lifetime in the background, Huma Abedin steps forward | Podcast

As Hillary Clinton’s most trusted aide, it was her job to stay out of view. Even when her husband Anthony Weiner’s scandalous behaviour dragged her into the spotlight, she mostly stayed silent. In this interview, Huma Abedin explains why she is ready to tell her own story, in a new memoir that sheds remarkable light on what it cost her to become a public figure against her will. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/11/21·28m 17s

Covid is surging in Europe. What does it mean for the UK?

As the days get shorter and we huddle indoors, memories of 2020’s catastrophic winter are close at hand. Now a new surge of coronavirus cases is spreading across Europe. But as well as notes of caution, there are good reasons to hope that the UK will avoid the lows of last year – from lower hospitalisation rates to exciting treatments on the verge of approval. How optimistic should we be – and can we still go to Christmas parties?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/11/21·25m 4s

The EU border where refugees are treated as human weapons

How the humanitarian crisis playing out on the border of Poland and Belarus became the latest front in the battle between President Lukashenko and the European Union. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/11/21·29m 36s

Is Donald Trump plotting to steal the 2024 election?

Trump’s attempt to overturn the result of the 2020 US election was ultimately thwarted, but through efforts at state level to elect loyalists to key positions, the stage is set for a repeat showing in 2024. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/11/21·29m 33s

Azeem Rafiq’s long battle to expose racism at Yorkshire cricket club

When Azeem Rafiq went public with the claim that he had faced a series of racist incidents throughout his time at Yorkshire cricket club, the incidents he described were written off as ‘banter’. But that defence has crumbled – and now he is ready to give evidence to MPs. What will he reveal about his experiences of bigotry in cricket?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/11/21·31m 53s

Cop26: where does the world go from here?

Environment correspondent Fiona Harvey describes a global climate deal that makes some progress but goes nowhere near far enough to avert devastating global heating. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/11/21·26m 56s

A day with the paramedics on the frontline of the UK’s ambulance crisis

If you dial 999, you might expect an ambulance to come in minutes – but in reality, the pandemic has pushed an already creaking service to its limits. This is the story of one shift, and how the people charged with saving our lives are navigating a system on the brink of collapse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/11/21·27m 54s

A British betrayal: the secret deportations of Chinese merchant sailors

During the second world war, Chinese sailors served alongside their British allies in the merchant navy, heroically keeping supply lines open to the UK. But after the war hundreds of them who had settled in Liverpool suddenly disappeared. Now their children are piecing together the truth. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/11/21·30m 52s

Emily Ratajkowski’s body – and what she wants to make of it

The model views her body as a ‘tool’ to make a living – but ever since 2013’s Blurred Lines video, it has also been treated as public property. In this interview, she explains why she has written a book about her experiences, from an allegation of assault by Robin Thicke to how motherhood has changed her. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/11/21·24m 12s

‘Politically corrupt’: the sleaze allegations engulfing the Tories

Following the resignation of the former Conservative minister Owen Paterson, MPs have been debating changes to their disciplinary procedures and the government has been forced to defend itself against a number of allegations of ‘sleaze’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/11/21·30m 31s

Josh Cavallo: the world’s only openly gay top-tier men’s footballer

Adelaide United’s Josh Cavallo says the response to his recent coming out as gay has been overwhelming. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/11/21·26m 51s

Cop26: what are the chances of keeping the 1.5C target alive?

At the UN climate summit in Glasgow, global environment editor Jonathan Watts examines the emissions-cutting pledges from world leaders as time runs out to prevent catastrophic global heating. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/11/21·33m 21s

Enter the metaverse!

Mark Zuckerberg changed Facebook’s name to Meta last week – and launched a vision for his company that he claims will transform the way we interact with the internet and each other. So what exactly is the metaverse? And will it ever leave the realm of science fiction?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/11/21·25m 36s

Could China ever invade Taiwan – and what would happen next?

With a record number of Chinese fighters flying sorties in Taiwan’s air defence zone in October, and rhetoric on all sides becoming more heated, many observers say the past few weeks have been the most tense in the region for decades. How serious is the prospect of an attempt by Beijing to take back the island that it has claimed since 1949 – and would an attack draw the US into a major international conflict?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/11/21·27m 57s

Cop26: how three young activists are trying to change the world

Ridhima Pandey in India, Iris Duquesne in Canada and Raina Ivanova in Germany tell Michael Safi about their attempts to force their political leaders to change course on tackling the climate crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/11/21·28m 1s

The regrets of the unvaccinated: why Covid-bereaved families are speaking out

As unvaccinated people in the UK and US continue to die from Covid-19, bereaved relatives are telling their stories to try to convince others to get their jabs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/11/21·29m 22s

Cop26: what would success look like for a country vanishing under water?

On the eve of Cop26, Mohamed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, argues that if countries do not get serious about reducing emissions, it will not be just the Maldives that faces a perilous future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/10/21·28m 51s

The scourge of spiking: the students fighting for a safe night out

A flurry of reports of students who fear they have been targeted in nightclubs has prompted social media outrage. Now the young women behind the Girls Night In campaign want to turn that anger into lasting change. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/10/21·27m 8s

The day that could define Rishi Sunak

He has risen smoothly from private schooling to Oxford, the City, and then parliament – and now he is a youthful and popular chancellor who many believe will be the next prime minister. How has Rishi Sunak managed it – and does the budget that will set the terms of the UK’s exit from the pandemic pose the biggest threat yet to his Teflon reputation?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/10/21·30m 2s

How British police tried to recruit an informant in Black Lives Matter

When anti-racism activist Lowri Davies got a call from a covert officer in Swansea, she played along. But she was recording the conversation – and what she learned sheds new light on how progressive movements are monitored by the state. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/10/21·30m 16s

What a net zero world will look like – and how to get there

It’s the phrase that will be on every world leader’s lips at the Cop26 summit – and it summarises the ambitious plan that will be central to efforts to limit the ravages of the climate crisis. So what is net zero? What kind of world could it create? And what needs to happen to to make it a reality?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/10/21·24m 27s

The Korean debt crisis that inspired Squid Game’s dark dystopia

The Netflix hit is as fantastical as it is violent – but underpinning its macabre story of impoverished contestants risking their lives for money is a real crisis of personal debt in Korea. Why has it resonated all over the world?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/10/21·30m 16s

Face off: the government versus GPs

The government is demanding that GPs see more patients face-to-face in return for an injection of extra funding, but many in the profession say the pandemic has left them close to breaking point. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/10/21·28m 5s

Cop 26: a question of degrees – what a hotter planet means for all of us

The world is heating up at an alarming rate and world leaders are running out of chances to keep temperature rises below 1.5C, says Jonathan Watts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/10/21·30m 42s

The killing of MP David Amess

The shocking killing of the Conservative MP David Amess has been described as an attack on British democracy. Gaby Hinsliff looks at how politicians are responding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/10/21·25m 53s

Britain’s rich history of black literature

For Black History Month we’ve brought together star authors Ben Okri, Candice Carty-Williams and Caleb Azumah Nelson to discuss the past, present and future of black writing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/10/21·31m 53s

Newcastle fans think they’ve got their club back. But at what cost?

After Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund bought Newcastle United, there was jubilation on Tyneside but revulsion among critics who view the deal as an egregious example of sportswashing. What does the deal tell us about the soul of the beautiful game – and what football clubs mean to their fans?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/10/21·30m 22s

Has England gone back to the office?

Ever since the order to work from home was lifted, workers in England have been heading back to the office – but mostly only a few days a week. Joanna Partridge looks at whether work will ever be the same again. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/10/21·25m 21s

What went wrong with the UK’s handling of the Covid pandemic?

A parliamentary report says the initial handling of the coronavirus outbreak was one of the worst public health failures in UK history. Could tens of thousands of deaths have been avoided – and what are the lessons for the future?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/10/21·28m 0s

Dubai’s ruler and the Pegasus phone hacking exposed in a UK court

A high court judge has ruled that Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum hacked the phone of his ex-wife Princess Haya using Pegasus spyware. In this episode we look at the implications of the affair. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/10/21·29m 42s

The countdown to Cop26: can world leaders save the planet?

Three weeks from today leaders will gather in Glasgow for the Cop26 climate summit. But will their individual pledges to reduce emissions carry enough weight to avert the growing threat of catastrophic global heating?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/10/21·32m 51s

The whistleblower who plunged Facebook into crisis

After a set of leaks last month that represented the most damaging insight into Facebook’s inner workings in the company’s history, the former employee behind them has come forward. Now Frances Haugen has given evidence to the US Congress – and been praised by senators as a ‘21st century American hero’. Will her testimony accelerate efforts to bring the social media giant to heel?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/10/21·27m 40s

Can women trust the police?

In the aftermath of the sentencing of Sarah Everard’s killer, women’s trust in the police has collapsed. Can anything be done to restore it? Is misogyny endemic in British policing? And is there a risk that such an appalling crime could happen again?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/10/21·25m 41s

Why everything you’ve heard about panic buying might be wrong

With queues outside petrol stations and claims that selfish punters are using jerry cans to stockpile fuel, one word has become synonymous with the supply chain crisis that has hit the UK in recent weeks: panic. But the social psychologist Clifford Stott says something different is going on. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/10/21·25m 40s

The Pandora papers: who’s giving money to the Conservatives?

Fresh questions for the Conservative party today after it emerged one of its major donors was involved in structuring of a telecoms deal later alleged to be corrupt Pandora papers news and reaction – live updates See all of our Pandora papers coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/10/21·23m 25s

Inside the Pandora papers – financial secrets of the rich and powerful

A massive trove of leaked offshore data reveals the financial dealings of current and former world leaders. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/10/21·24m 59s

Boris Johnson wants a conference reset. Will reality ruin it?

The prime minister was hoping to use his party’s major gathering to seize the agenda and set out his plans for the rest of the parliamentary term. Instead, he may be forced to deal with evolving supply chain and fuel crises – and bat off claims that Brexit is to blame. The Guardian’s political editor, Heather Stewart, explains the task he has ahead of him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/10/21·26m 28s

The conviction of R Kelly

More than 20 years after the first allegations of sexual violence and abuse against R Kelly, he has been convicted on racketeering and sex trafficking charges. But as the women of colour who gave evidence celebrate the verdicts, there are renewed questions in the US about how the music industry, the media and the criminal justice system failed to hold him accountable for decades. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/09/21·32m 16s

Can China help end the world’s addiction to coal?

Beijing has won international praise for announcing that it will stop funding coal projects in the developing world – but it is still heavily reliant on the fossil fuel for rapid economic growth at home. The Guardian’s global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, explains why China took such a significant step before Cop26 – and how much there still is to do. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/09/21·27m 44s

Bond is back. Where’s he going next?

He’s a lucrative cultural export – and as unreconstructed as secret agents come. Now, as Daniel Craig’s final instalment finally hits the cinemas, many are calling for a new kind of 007 – but is the franchise too conservative to make the leap? Guardian film editor Catherine Shoard surveys the history of an $8.5bn cultural institution. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/09/21·33m 46s

The Pegasus project: hacked in London

The tragic story of Alaa Al-Siddiq has further exposed the extent of how powerful Pegasus spyware has been used against human rights activists even once they have fled their home country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/09/21·30m 47s

Keir Starmer’s make-or-break conference week

The Labour party meets this weekend in Brighton for its first in-person annual conference since Keir Starmer won the leadership. Jessica Elgot explains why it could define his future prospects. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/09/21·28m 14s

The energy crisis no one saw coming

A cold winter, a windless summer, and boom in business have combined to create an energy crisis that is hitting particularly hard in the UK. The Guardian’s energy correspondent Jillian Ambrose explains how it happened – and what it will mean for people. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/09/21·27m 48s

Germany decides: who will follow Angela Merkel?

German voters will elect a new chancellor for the first time in 16 years on Sunday, as the Angela Merkel era ends. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/09/21·32m 49s

Going nuclear: the secret submarine deal to challenge China

It came out of the blue – but the new military pact between Australia, the UK and the US could transform international relations for a generation. The Guardian’s defence and security editor, Dan Sabbagh, explains the Aukus deal that has enraged Beijing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/09/21·23m 35s

Finally! Get ready for a new season of culture

New albums, new TV series, and actual live shows – the culture taps might have run dry during the pandemic, but this autumn they are switching on again at last. Our critics give their pick of the new crop. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/09/21·29m 53s

The murder of Fikile: the woman who took on a coal mine

Fikile Ntshangase was involved in a legal dispute over the extension of an opencast mine when she was shot dead in her home. Her daughter Malungelo Xhakaza tells her story to Rachel Humphreys. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/09/21·29m 29s

The problem with OnlyFans’ mainstream dream

When the ‘subscription social network’ OnlyFans announced it would be banning the sexually explicit content that made it a billion-dollar business, sex workers were up in arms – and many observers wondered how the move could make financial sense. Then it had second thoughts. So what does this tech saga tell us about where pornography fits into the future of the internet – and is it just another example of the sex industry treating women as disposable?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/09/21·31m 49s

Who’s paying for the government’s plan to fix social care?

The government’s plan to fix the ailing social care system passed into law this week. But who will benefit most and who will pick up the bill?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/09/21·29m 2s

Is Brexit the reason McDonald's is running out of milkshakes?

As gaps continue to appear on supermarkets shelves and restaurants take unavailable items off menus, Britain’s supply chains appear to be at the centre of a perfect storm of pandemic disruption coupled with post-Brexit labour shortages. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/09/21·26m 6s

Ecstasy, LSD and magic mushrooms: are these drugs the future of therapy?

Scientists treating depression and a range of other mental illnesses have been running controlled trials using MDMA and psychedelic drugs such as LSD and the results have been encouraging. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/09/21·26m 44s

A conversation about Islamophobia in the UK since 9/11

Poet Suhaiymah Manzoor-Khan and standup comedian Nabil Abdul Rashid both came of age in the early 2000s, as Britain’s Muslim communities were feeling the backlash from 9/11. In conversation with Nosheen Iqbal, they look back at the past two decades and ahead to what the future holds for Britain’s Muslims. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/09/21·38m 18s

Inside Al-Qaida: a recruit-turned-spy, a journalist and the road to 9/11

Few terrorist organisations survive for more than a few years. Al-Qaida was different. Jason Burke, who has spent much of his career reporting on the group, and former member Aimen Dean reflect on how it was able to carry out the September 11 attacks more than a decade after it was formed – and its struggle to survive the fallout from its ‘catastrophic success’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/09/21·37m 10s

The children of 9/11

There were 3,051 children who lost a parent on September 11 2001. In the first of three episodes examining the reverberations of the attacks 20 years on, three of that group reflect on the weight of that private grief – and what it meant to grow up with it in the media spotlight. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/09/21·37m 25s

Burnout in the US battle against wildfires

More than 40,000 wildfires have burned in the US so far this year – and the firefighters who battle them have been pushed to their limit. Llew, who did the job for 20 years, explains the impact it had on his life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/09/21·25m 52s

One hour to escape: the race to get out of a Gaza tower before an Israeli airstrike

A warning call told residents of al-Jalaa apartment block that their homes were about to be destroyed. This is the story of the frantic evacuation that followed – told through recordings made by the people who lived there. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/09/21·38m 4s

One man’s epic electric test drive – from Land’s End to John o’Groats

With new petrol and diesel vehicles to be banned in the UK from 2030, what can a road trip the length of the UK teach us about the future of cars?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/09/21·36m 27s

The big coronavirus questions as a new school term begins

With ministers promising a return to normal in classrooms, it’s a tough time to be a teacher – but with new information constantly emerging on vaccines for children, and the pandemic not yet over, it’s a tough time for parents and pupils too. Jules White and Nicola Davis have done their homework. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/09/21·22m 36s

The British citizens stranded in Kabul

Day after day, Ahmad risked his life to come to the airport with his family, British passport in hand – only to be left behind when the last evacuation flight departed. Now he and many others who hoped to be rescued face an uncertain future in the new Afghanistan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/09/21·28m 13s

The knock: the families torn apart by an arrest over child abuse images

When the police came to Emma’s door on a Sunday evening, she could never have imagined that her ex-husband would be arrested for downloading indecent images of children. What happens to the families whose lives ‘the knock’ turns upside down?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/08/21·31m 38s

Revisited: how meme stars of the early internet struck it rich with NFTs

The growth of non-fungible tokens has given rise to huge windfalls for those behind early virals. Sirin Kale and Alex Hern explain all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/08/21·26m 4s

Revisited: Why is Sex and the City coming back to our screens?

Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman discusses why Sex and the City was such a successful TV series, while the Guardian’s deputy television editor, Hannah J Davies, looks at what the reboot tells us about TV commissioning today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/08/21·28m 19s

Revisited: the danger – and beauty – of ultrarunning

After 21 competitors died during a 100km mountain race in Gansu province earlier this year, the Chinese government suspended all extreme sports. But those who love ultrarunning insist it can be safe – and has changed how they see the world. What keeps them coming back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/08/21·30m 0s

Revisited: Inside the ’Ndrangheta trial

Guardian journalists Lorenzo Tondo and Clare Longrigg discuss the largest mafia trial in three decades. At the centre is Emanuele Mancuso, son of boss Luni Mancuso, who has been revealing the clan’s secrets after accepting police protection. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/08/21·26m 30s

Revisited: The pandemic scam artists making millions during lockdown

When Rose got an email about a missed parcel, she thought nothing of arranging a new delivery – a mistake that would ultimately cost her thousands. The Guardian’s money editor, Hilary Osborne, reveals the scale of a lucrative new scam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/08/21·24m 17s

Revisited: why has the Brazilian butt lift become so popular?

The Brazilian butt lift has become the world’s fastest growing cosmetic surgery, despite mounting concerns over the number of deaths from the procedure. What is driving its popularity?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/08/21·30m 51s

A Paralympian’s long journey to Tokyo

In 2012, Sophie Carrigill was a complete beginner at wheelchair basketball. Now she’s going to Japan with real hopes of a gold medal – and inspiring a new generation of athletes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/08/21·22m 58s

The Plymouth attack and misogynist ‘incel’ culture

The man who killed five people in south-west England last week was part of a hateful online community of men who blame women for their status as ‘involuntary celibates’. Did that contribute to his violence – and does the incel movement radicalise some of the young men who are part of it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/08/21·25m 25s

How the pandemic exposed the crisis in children’s social care

Children’s services have reached breaking point in some areas as family breakdown and a lack of funding have resulted in a perfect storm. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/08/21·27m 56s

How the Taliban took Afghanistan

The departure of US forces was followed by a rout of Afghan government forces. Now, after 20 years of western intervention, Afghanistan is back under the control of the Taliban. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/08/21·31m 22s

After ICU: a Covid patient meets one of the doctors who saved his life

Karl Gray, a 60-year-old Salvation Army minister from north London is reunited with Dr Susan Jain, an intensive care consultant who helped save his life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/08/21·28m 30s

The fall of Andrew Cuomo

The New York governor Andrew Cuomo resigned this week after 11 women came forward with sexual harassment claims, ending the career of one of the most prominent politicians in the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/08/21·33m 43s

Has the Delta variant derailed Australia’s zero-Covid strategy?

Australia appeared to be a model case for how to control the spread of Covid-19, but the arrival of the Delta variant has changed everything. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/08/21·28m 26s

Scientists issue a climate code red

A major UN scientific report has concluded global heating is now irreversible and it is unequivocal that human influence has warmed the atmosphere. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/08/21·24m 3s

Israel’s shadow war with Iran

A spate of attacks on one of the world’s busiest shipping trade routes is part of an escalating tit-for-tat conflict playing out between Iran and Israel, says Martin Chulov, the Guardian’s Middle East correspondent. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/08/21·23m 15s

In search of answers about miscarriage

When journalist Jennie Agg suffered four miscarriages, she set out to better understand what is known about why women lose pregnancies and why conversations on the subject are still so difficult. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/08/21·30m 34s

Racism, policing and austerity: have lessons been learned since England’s 2011 riots?

This week marks a decade since the riots that swept across England in August 2011. But has enough changed to prevent similar unrest happening again?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/08/21·36m 37s

Why a Belarusian Olympic sprinter refused to fly home

The Belarusian Olympic sprinter Krystsina Tsimanouskaya flew out of Tokyo on Wednesday to begin a life in exile after refusing to return home. Andrew Roth describes a growing threat to internal critics of the regime. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/08/21·27m 5s

How Simone Biles changed gymnastics – on and off the mat

US gymnastics superstar Simone Biles changed what fans of the sport thought was physically possible. Now she is at the forefront of a new conversation about athletes and mental health. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/08/21·26m 32s

Are plans to change the Official Secrets Act a threat to journalism?

Plans to update and expand the Official Secrets Act have been attacked as a ‘licence for cover-ups’ that could be used to thwart legitimate investigative journalism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/08/21·27m 24s

Why did Unesco drop Liverpool from its heritage list?

The city has become one of the few places to have been dropped from the UN body’s global list of sites. What went wrong?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/08/21·24m 7s

How we all got hooked on caffeine

It’s the world’s most widely used psychoactive drug, it disrupts our sleep, it makes us grumpy when we miss it – and we give it to our children. What keeps us coming back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/07/21·26m 28s

The lobbying push that killed off a fight to save the Great Barrier Reef

The successful campaign to keep the Great Barrier Reef off Unesco’s ‘in danger’ list has been greeted with dismay – and gloom about the reef’s chance of recovery. Graham Readfearn explains the fierce global effort to deny the impact of the climate crisis on a prized natural asset. This episode includes explicit language. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/07/21·24m 59s

The Republican backlash in Joe Biden’s America

It might seem like a post-Trump world, but in red states across the US his most hardline supporters are setting the political agenda. How much power do they have to shape the country’s future, even with a Democrat in the White House?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/07/21·29m 51s

The pandemic enters a new phase

Freedom day, vaccine passports, a row over the ‘pingdemic’, and then a welcome drop in cases: it’s been a rollercoaster week in the coronavirus crisis. Science editor Ian Sample speaks to new Today in Focus host Nosheen Iqbal about whether have we turned a corner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/07/21·24m 6s

The authority gap: why women still aren’t taken seriously

When journalist Mary Ann Sieghart set out to document the ways that women are held back by a cultural presumption of their inferiority, she found reams of data to support her case – and heard stories of how it affects even the most successful women in the world. She explains why the authority gap persists, and asks what we can do about it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/07/21·28m 57s

The Pegasus project part 5: the fightback against private spyware begins

After a week of stories about the abuse of private spyware by governments around the world, Michael Safi rounds off our mini-series by looking at the global impact of the Pegasus project and what could change as a result. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/07/21·30m 2s

The Pegasus Project part 4: runaway princesses and the UK connection

In today’s episode, two princesses from the United Arab Emirates show up in our leaked records – and we look at whether powerful spyware is being used against UK citizens. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/07/21·24m 35s

The Pegasus Project part 3: cartels, corruption and cyber-weapons

In the latest part of our mini-series, Michael Safi hears from Nina Lakhani on how 15,000 Mexicans including journalists and politicians appeared on a list of possible targets for surveillance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/07/21·24m 52s

The Pegasus project part 2: cat and mouse

For 10 years the Israeli surveillance company NSO has been helping governments steal secrets. Today we look at how a small team of cyber-detectives helped expose them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/07/21·26m 3s

The Pegasus project part 1: an invitation to Paris

What happened when a powerful phone hacking tool was sold to governments around the world? Part 1 of a major international investigation introduces our new Today in Focus host, Michael Safi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/07/21·21m 50s

Marina Hyde on five years of watching the political circus

For Anushka Asthana’s last episode, the beloved columnist makes a rare appearance to survey an era of tumult and twerps – and explain how she took it all very seriously … through jokes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/07/21·37m 10s

Inside the mind of an Olympic athlete one week before the games

Tom Bosworth was ready for Tokyo 2020. Then the pandemic struck and he caught coronavirus. This is how he got himself to the starting line. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/07/21·31m 4s

The heatwave forcing America to confront climate reality

An extraordinary heatwave has swept the west coast of the US and Canada, leading to record temperatures, water shortages, and hundreds of deaths – and bringing home the catastrophic consequences of global heating. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/07/21·26m 20s

Is it possible to make the internet safe for children? – podcast

A new design code for websites, aimed at children, will soon come into force. How much difference will it make – and is a child-safe internet possible?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/07/21·30m 3s

The people searching for missing family members during the pandemic – podcast

Hannah’s brother Paul dropped out of contact almost a decade ago. She never stopped thinking about him – and, as it did for many others, the pandemic led her to try to find him again. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/07/21·25m 47s

The Indigenous children who died at Canada’s residential schools

Half a century ago, Barry Kennedy was taken from his family and forced into an abusive system that sought to obliterate his Indigenous heritage. Now, after the discovery of more than 1,000 bodies in unmarked graves at schools including his own, he reflects on the traditions that were erased, the friends he lost – and Canada’s new reckoning with that history. Listeners may find parts of this episode, which deals with physical and sexual abuse, distressing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/07/21·37m 24s

The government’s rape review: an apology, but will anything change?

The government has said sorry to thousands of rape victims who have been failed by the criminal justice system. But survivors want cases reopened and justice finally done. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/07/21·34m 18s

Euro 2020: what would it mean if England could actually … win?

After decades of disappointment, Gareth Southgate’s England team stand on the brink of making their first major final since 1966 – and from taking the knee to helping hungry children, they’ve got much more than football on their plate. Max Rushden explores what it would mean if the nice guys could finish first at last. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/07/21·28m 7s

After Grenfell: the unsolved cladding crisis

The Grenfell Tower tragedy forced a reassessment of fire safety for buildings across the country, but no consensus on who should pay for it. Robert Booth describes how for many residents the issue has become a living nightmare. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/07/21·33m 57s

Why do powerful men have affairs?

After Matt Hancock was forced to resign when a secret relationship was exposed, the couples therapist Orna Guralnik explores the cocktail of ego and vulnerability that leads some senior figures to risk it all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/07/21·25m 13s

Britney Spears’ battle to take back control of her life and fortune

A legal arrangement set up in the wake of a mental health crisis has left Britney Spears with little control of her personal or professional affairs. Laura Snapes and Sam Levin describe how she’s challenging the situation in court. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/07/21·32m 34s

How a pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong died

Apple Daily was a beacon of free speech. Now it has been forced to close by China’s sweeping national security law. Does its demise signal a new chapter in Hong Kong?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/21·29m 15s

How the Batley and Spen byelection turned toxic

Maya Wolfe-Robinson visits the Labour-held West Yorkshire seat of Batley and Spen, which votes in an increasingly heated byelection tomorrow. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/06/21·35m 4s

Matt Hancock’s downfall

Boris Johnson has a new health secretary this week after the resignation of the man tasked with leading the government’s Covid response. But there are plenty of unanswered questions, says Jonathan Freedland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/06/21·32m 27s

Young, hot and bothered: going through menopause in my 30s

Harriet Gibsone tells the scary, sad, and surprisingly funny story of going through early menopause – and hoping for a baby. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/06/21·29m 48s

The new Brexit crisis for Northern Ireland’s unionists

From a leadership fiasco to the ‘sausage wars’, the Democratic Unionist party’s stance on Brexit has forced it to contend with a new – perhaps even existential – set of problems. What will they mean for the region’s future?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/06/21·30m 54s

How meme stars of the early internet are striking it rich with NFTs - podcast

The growth of non-fungible tokens has given rise to massive windfalls for those behind early virals. Sirin Kale and Alex Hern explain all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/21·26m 17s

Police corruption and the unsolved murder of Daniel Morgan

The brutal murder of a private investigator in 1987 has become the UK’s most investigated killing – but 34 years later it remains unsolved and mired in new official findings of police corruption. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/06/21·33m 27s

Do we have to learn to live with Covid-19?

The Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, weighs up the race between vaccines and variants and explains why the end of the pandemic does not mean the end of Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/06/21·28m 16s

Karim’s story: Egypt’s crackdown on human rights workers

Ten years since the Arab spring rocked Egypt and removed its president, the country is still detaining human rights workers and locking up political prisoners. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/06/21·33m 55s

Why England’s footballers are so determined to keep taking the knee

England’s footballers will take the knee before their match against Scotland at Wembley tonight in an anti-racism protest that has divided supporters. Liam Rosenior and Paul MacInnes reflect on how football became enmeshed in the culture wars. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/06/21·36m 49s

Is the truth out there? The US government prepares its landmark report on UFOs

A hotly anticipated US government report on decades of mysterious sightings of UFOs is due for release this month. The Guardian’s Adam Gabbatt and former Ministry of Defence employee Nick Pope investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/21·34m 45s

Israel’s unlikely coalition: is this the end for Netanyahu?

Israel has a new coalition government made up of eight very different parties. But having ousted Benjamin Netanyahu, can it hold together?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/06/21·24m 35s

What’s behind the mass protests in Colombia?

A demonstration against tax rises has morphed into a mass movement against the government, says Joe Parkin Daniels in Bogotá. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/06/21·28m 43s

What went wrong with the Covid-19 response in the US?

Author and journalist Lawrence Wright has been writing about pandemics for decades. So when Covid-19 struck the US, he was ideally placed to report on the political response. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/06/21·28m 12s

GB News enters the culture war

To its critics, it is a British Fox News; to its creators, it is a vital correction to a liberal London-centric media. Can Andrew Neil’s upstart news channel change the face of British broadcasting?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/06/21·27m 55s

The G7 and a crucial moment for the climate

The world’s richest democracies will come together in Britain this week with global heating high on the agenda. Can they match big promises with concrete action?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/21·27m 17s

The interrogation of Matt Hancock

Two weeks after Dominic Cummings told MPs that the health secretary was a serial liar who lost the trust of No 10, Matt Hancock will face the same committee to defend himself. Heather Stewart explains what is at stake, and what it could mean for the next stage of the pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/06/21·27m 43s

The danger – and beauty – of ultrarunning

After 21 competitors died during a 100km mountain race in Gansu province, the Chinese government last week suspended all extreme sports. But those who love ultrarunning insist it can be safe – and has changed how they see the world. What keeps them coming back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/06/21·30m 16s

Why every statue should come down

Gary Younge was glad to see the figure of Edward Colston removed in Bristol a year ago – but, he argues, even monuments to civil rights leaders are a distortion of how history really works How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/06/21·31m 44s

Australia’s mouse plague

Families and farmers in New South Wales are doing everything they can to fend off a biblical incursion of rodents. Guardian Australia’s Matilda Boseley has spent months reporting on the story – and hearing the experiences of those who have been affected. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/06/21·26m 28s
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