Today in Focus

Today in Focus

By The Guardian

Hosted by Nosheen Iqbal and Michael Safi, Today in Focus brings you closer to Guardian journalism. Combining personal storytelling with insightful analysis, this podcast takes you behind the headlines for a deeper understanding of the news, every weekday

Episodes

Rapper Nipsey Hussle and the problem of predictive policing

He was one of LA’s most-loved rappers, and a pillar of his community. But records disclosed after his death revealed that he was also the target of an extensive Los Angeles policing operation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/01/2236m 15s

The fight for the future of the BBC

The latest skirmish between the BBC and the government is part of a running debate over who the BBC serves, which dates back to the organisation’s earliest days. But this time, the stakes are higher. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/01/2231m 40s

How MI5 uncovered a Chinese ‘agent’ in parliament

Britain’s security services have named Christine Lee as an ‘agent’ of the Chinese state attempting to run influence operations in parliament. Dan Sabbagh explains what is behind the extraordinary statement and what it means for British politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/01/2226m 44s

On the frontline of the cost of living crisis

Households across the UK will see rising prices and stalling wages strain their budgets in the year ahead, money and consumer editor Hilary Osborne reports. Some families are already feeling the pinch. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/01/2230m 48s

The rise and rise of Liz Truss

As Boris Johnson faces questions over his future, Conservative members and MPs are looking at their options for who might replace him and one name keeps coming up. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/01/2226m 26s

Afghan female MPs fight for their country in exile

After a harrowing escape from the Taliban, Afghanistan’s female politicians are regrouping in Greece to fight for their country. Amie Ferris-Rotman reports on the work of the Afghan women’s parliament in exile. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/01/2233m 32s

A royal mess: Prince Andrew faces a US trial

The Duke of York’s attempts to get a civil case over allegations of sexual assault thrown out have failed. Ed Helmore in New York examines the case against the prince and his narrowing options to salvage his reputation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/01/2219m 38s

Will Boris Johnson’s apology be enough to save him?

Boris Johnson faced anger and derision as he admitted attending a drinks party during the first lockdown but claimed that he believed it to be a work event that did not break the rules. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/01/2226m 26s

What does the Omicron winter crisis mean for the NHS?

Hospital trusts across England have declared ‘critical incidents’ in record numbers as the Omicron wave brings rising admissions and staff sickness. But the strains on NHS capacity long predate Covid, says Denis Campbell Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/01/2227m 32s

Guantánamo Bay at 20: why have attempts to close the prison failed?

The US prison in Cuba has been beset by allegations of torture since it was set up 20 years ago. But despite all the promises to close it down, it remains operational with no end in sight, says Julian Borger. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/01/2231m 38s

A moral victory: what the acquittal of the Colston Four means for future protests

Last week a court acquitted four protesters who helped tear down a statue of the notorious slave trader Edward Colston. Damien Gayle describes what the case means for future protests and one of the defendants, Sage Willoughby, describes the jubilant moment the verdict arrived. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/01/2228m 24s

Culture 2022: what to watch, read and listen to this year

Guardian critics Charlotte Northedge, Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Simran Hans look ahead to the best of the year in culture. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/01/2225m 22s

How the Capitol attack still divides the United States

A year ago today, rioters stormed the Capitol building in Washington DC after Donald Trump encouraged his supporters to march on Congress to protest against the election result. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/01/2230m 14s

Can the UK cope with the Omicron surge?

The year has begun with warnings of critical incidents in UK hospitals and fears over school re-openings but there are reasons to be optimistic, says science correspondent Nicola Davis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/01/2224m 12s

The joy of missing out: how to manage your time in 2022

We only have about 4,000 weeks of life on average, says the writer Oliver Burkeman, so make sure you are prioritising what really matters. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/01/2225m 6s

Revisited: how a Disney movie helped solve a decades-old adventure mystery

In 1959, nine experienced hikers were mysteriously killed in Russia’s Ural mountains. Conspiracy theories circled for years, but an unlikely pairing of science and the movie Frozen may have helped solve the cold case. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/01/2230m 57s

Revisited: the secret deportations of Chinese merchant sailors

During the second world war, Chinese sailors served alongside their British allies in the merchant navy, heroically keeping supply lines open to the UK. But after the war hundreds of them who had settled in Liverpool suddenly disappeared. Now their children are piecing together the truth. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/12/2130m 54s

Revisited: Josh Cavallo, the only openly gay top-tier men’s footballer

Adelaide United’s Josh Cavallo says the response to his recent coming out as gay has been overwhelming. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/12/2126m 30s

Revisited: Emily Ratajkowski’s body – and what she wants to make of it

The model, actor and writer views her body as a ‘tool’ to make a living – but ever since 2013’s Blurred Lines video, it has also been treated as public property. In this interview, Ratajkowski explains why she has written a book about her experiences, from an allegation of assault by Robin Thicke to how motherhood has changed her. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/12/2124m 3s

Revisited: An Al-Qaida recruit-turned-spy and the road to 9/11 podcast

Few terrorist organisations survive for more than a few years. Al-Qaida was different. Jason Burke, who has spent much of his career reporting on the group, and former member Aimen Dean reflect on how it was able to carry out the September 11 attacks barely a decade after it was formed – and its struggle to survive the fallout from its ‘catastrophic success’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/12/2137m 29s

Revisited: Britain’s rich history of black literature

In Black History Month we brought together star authors Ben Okri, Candice Carty-Williams and Caleb Azumah Nelson to discuss the past, present and future of black writing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/12/2132m 31s

Looking back on the Guardian’s 200th year

Editor-in-chief Katharine Viner reflects on how a newspaper founded two centuries ago chronicled the particular ups and downs of 2021. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/12/2129m 44s

How did things get so bad between France and Britain? podcast

Diplomatic editor Patrick Wintour and Paris correspondent Angelique Chrisafis consider how Brexit, Aukus, and the refugee crisis have strained UK-France relations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/12/2127m 24s

2021: a year in wine, cheese and sleaze

From the ‘pingdemic’ to Peppa Pig, the government’s blunders have kept political sketch writer John Crace particularly busy this year. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/12/2125m 24s

Is it going to be another Covid Christmas?

The government hasn’t cancelled Christmas – yet – but the rate of the Omicron variant’s spread should make us all reconsider our plans, science correspondent Nicola Davis reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/12/2122m 49s

Countdown to attack: inside a simulation that mimics nuclear conflict

World affairs editor Julian Borger tries out a VR simulation designed to model a real-life nuclear exchange, and reports on the terrifying outcome. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/12/2126m 45s

Can theatres survive another Christmas of covid cancellations?

Theatres are battling to stay open as they contend with staff shortages and slumping tickets sales in what is usually their busiest time of year. For the cast of a pantomime in Corby, Northamptonshire, the show goes on – for now. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/12/2121m 2s

Is Vladimir Putin preparing to invade Ukraine?

As Russian soldiers continue to amass near the Ukrainian border shots are already being fired and there are fears that President Putin is planning an invasion, says Luke Harding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/12/2127m 53s

Do Covid vaccine mandates work?

In Australia, where employment-related mandates on the coronavirus vaccine were introduced months ago, the stories of two women demonstrate how such measures can work – and how they can backfire. Nicola Davis reports on the considerations governments must make when introducing vaccine mandates. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/12/2128m 51s

The Tories are in turmoil: can Labour capitalise?

The opposition party is performing well in the polls, but still doesn’t have an easy pathway to power, says Observer leader writer Sonia Sodha. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/12/2125m 35s

How Magnus Carlsen won chess back from the machines

Breakthroughs in computing have changed how high-level chess is played, making draws all too common. But the Norwegian champion’s stunning performance in Dubai wrests the game back from the grip of the supercomputers, Guardian US deputy sport editor Bryan Graham reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/12/2125m 24s

Christmas parties, sleaze and plan B: how Boris Johnson is running out of allies

Fury over the release of a video showing Downing Street staffers joking about alleged lockdown breaches are only the latest scandal to rock Johnson’s premiership, reports political correspondent Peter Walker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/12/2127m 30s

Failure, fear and the threat of famine in Afghanistan

A whistleblower has accused the British government of abject failures in its efforts to manage the evacuation of people from Afghanistan as the Taliban took control in August. Emma Graham-Harrison returns to the country to find it facing a humanitarian crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/12/2132m 28s

The death of Arthur Labinjo-Hughes and the crisis in social work

The tragic case of an abused six-year-old in the West Midlands has put a renewed focus on the challenges facing social workers, social policy editor Patrick Butler reports. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/12/2121m 58s

Is MI6 fit for the future?

Britain’s overseas spy agency MI6 needs to become ‘more open, in order to stay secret’ according to its new head, Richard Moore. Dan Sabbagh looks at what that might mean. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/2123m 37s

How Pablo Escobar’s ‘cocaine hippos’ became a biodiversity nightmare

Animals brought illegally to Colombia by the drug kingpin have been allowed to roam free and are now disrupting the fragile ecosystem. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/12/2125m 53s

How designer Virgil Abloh transformed fashion

The visionary black designer revolutionised the way we dress. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/12/2119m 52s

Will the Omicron Covid variant cancel Christmas?

A new Covid variant first identified in South Africa is spreading around the world, with leaders rushing to respond. Our science correspondent Nicola Davis outlines what we know so far about the Omicron variant. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/12/2124m 32s

The Mississippi and Texas laws threatening US abortion rights

As the supreme court hears new challenges to Roe v Wade, American abortion rights hang in the balance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/12/2129m 40s

Barbados becomes a republic – and Britain faces a reckoning

On Tuesday, Barbados replaces Queen Elizabeth II with president Sandra Mason – and while some are celebrating the change, others ask if a symbolic shift is really enough to reckon with the legacy of colonialism. Michael Safi visits Bridgetown to ask if the country can free itself from the history that got it here – and what Britain owes to the people of its former colonies whose ancestors were enslaved. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/11/2138m 27s

Inflation’s back – but is it here to stay?

The inflation rate keeps going up – and some economists are warning that it’s time to take urgent action. So what is causing the change, what does it mean for ordinary people, and what’s the best way to deal with it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/11/2118m 28s

A tragedy in the Channel

At least 27 people died when their boat sank in the Channel attempting to reach the UK. Diane Taylor reports on a tragedy that was long in the making – and avoidable. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/11/2125m 35s

The disappearance of Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai

The Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai vanished after making an allegation of sexual assault against a senior political figure. Her subsequent reappearance has raised more questions than answers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/11/2131m 4s

The autistic women denied a diagnosis for decades

When the television presenter Melanie Sykes and the model Christine McGuinness revealed they had been diagnosed with autism as adults, it brought new attention to the challenges for others like them whose symptoms have been missed. This is the story of one autistic woman - and how diagnosis in her thirties changed her life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/11/2128m 32s

The human cost of Qatar’s 2022 World Cup dream

Qatar says it has reformed conditions for workers building its World Cup facilities, but change is hard to see on the ground, reports Pete Pattisson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/11/2130m 14s

After a lifetime in the background, Huma Abedin steps forward | Podcast

As Hillary Clinton’s most trusted aide, it was her job to stay out of view. Even when her husband Anthony Weiner’s scandalous behaviour dragged her into the spotlight, she mostly stayed silent. In this interview, Huma Abedin explains why she is ready to tell her own story, in a new memoir that sheds remarkable light on what it cost her to become a public figure against her will. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/11/2128m 17s

Covid is surging in Europe. What does it mean for the UK?

As the days get shorter and we huddle indoors, memories of 2020’s catastrophic winter are close at hand. Now a new surge of coronavirus cases is spreading across Europe. But as well as notes of caution, there are good reasons to hope that the UK will avoid the lows of last year – from lower hospitalisation rates to exciting treatments on the verge of approval. How optimistic should we be – and can we still go to Christmas parties?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/11/2125m 4s

The EU border where refugees are treated as human weapons

How the humanitarian crisis playing out on the border of Poland and Belarus became the latest front in the battle between President Lukashenko and the European Union. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/11/2129m 36s

Is Donald Trump plotting to steal the 2024 election?

Trump’s attempt to overturn the result of the 2020 US election was ultimately thwarted, but through efforts at state level to elect loyalists to key positions, the stage is set for a repeat showing in 2024. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/11/2129m 33s

Azeem Rafiq’s long battle to expose racism at Yorkshire cricket club

When Azeem Rafiq went public with the claim that he had faced a series of racist incidents throughout his time at Yorkshire cricket club, the incidents he described were written off as ‘banter’. But that defence has crumbled – and now he is ready to give evidence to MPs. What will he reveal about his experiences of bigotry in cricket?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/11/2131m 53s

Cop26: where does the world go from here?

Environment correspondent Fiona Harvey describes a global climate deal that makes some progress but goes nowhere near far enough to avert devastating global heating. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/11/2126m 56s

A day with the paramedics on the frontline of the UK’s ambulance crisis

If you dial 999, you might expect an ambulance to come in minutes – but in reality, the pandemic has pushed an already creaking service to its limits. This is the story of one shift, and how the people charged with saving our lives are navigating a system on the brink of collapse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/11/2127m 54s

A British betrayal: the secret deportations of Chinese merchant sailors

During the second world war, Chinese sailors served alongside their British allies in the merchant navy, heroically keeping supply lines open to the UK. But after the war hundreds of them who had settled in Liverpool suddenly disappeared. Now their children are piecing together the truth. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/11/2130m 52s

Emily Ratajkowski’s body – and what she wants to make of it

The model views her body as a ‘tool’ to make a living – but ever since 2013’s Blurred Lines video, it has also been treated as public property. In this interview, she explains why she has written a book about her experiences, from an allegation of assault by Robin Thicke to how motherhood has changed her. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/11/2124m 12s

‘Politically corrupt’: the sleaze allegations engulfing the Tories

Following the resignation of the former Conservative minister Owen Paterson, MPs have been debating changes to their disciplinary procedures and the government has been forced to defend itself against a number of allegations of ‘sleaze’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/11/2130m 31s

Josh Cavallo: the world’s only openly gay top-tier men’s footballer

Adelaide United’s Josh Cavallo says the response to his recent coming out as gay has been overwhelming. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/11/2126m 51s

Cop26: what are the chances of keeping the 1.5C target alive?

At the UN climate summit in Glasgow, global environment editor Jonathan Watts examines the emissions-cutting pledges from world leaders as time runs out to prevent catastrophic global heating. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/11/2133m 21s

Enter the metaverse!

Mark Zuckerberg changed Facebook’s name to Meta last week – and launched a vision for his company that he claims will transform the way we interact with the internet and each other. So what exactly is the metaverse? And will it ever leave the realm of science fiction?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/11/2125m 36s

Could China ever invade Taiwan – and what would happen next?

With a record number of Chinese fighters flying sorties in Taiwan’s air defence zone in October, and rhetoric on all sides becoming more heated, many observers say the past few weeks have been the most tense in the region for decades. How serious is the prospect of an attempt by Beijing to take back the island that it has claimed since 1949 – and would an attack draw the US into a major international conflict?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/11/2127m 57s

Cop26: how three young activists are trying to change the world

Ridhima Pandey in India, Iris Duquesne in Canada and Raina Ivanova in Germany tell Michael Safi about their attempts to force their political leaders to change course on tackling the climate crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/11/2128m 1s

The regrets of the unvaccinated: why Covid-bereaved families are speaking out

As unvaccinated people in the UK and US continue to die from Covid-19, bereaved relatives are telling their stories to try to convince others to get their jabs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/11/2129m 22s

Cop26: what would success look like for a country vanishing under water?

On the eve of Cop26, Mohamed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, argues that if countries do not get serious about reducing emissions, it will not be just the Maldives that faces a perilous future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/10/2128m 51s

The scourge of spiking: the students fighting for a safe night out

A flurry of reports of students who fear they have been targeted in nightclubs has prompted social media outrage. Now the young women behind the Girls Night In campaign want to turn that anger into lasting change. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/10/2127m 8s

The day that could define Rishi Sunak

He has risen smoothly from private schooling to Oxford, the City, and then parliament – and now he is a youthful and popular chancellor who many believe will be the next prime minister. How has Rishi Sunak managed it – and does the budget that will set the terms of the UK’s exit from the pandemic pose the biggest threat yet to his Teflon reputation?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/10/2130m 2s

How British police tried to recruit an informant in Black Lives Matter

When anti-racism activist Lowri Davies got a call from a covert officer in Swansea, she played along. But she was recording the conversation – and what she learned sheds new light on how progressive movements are monitored by the state. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/10/2130m 16s

What a net zero world will look like – and how to get there

It’s the phrase that will be on every world leader’s lips at the Cop26 summit – and it summarises the ambitious plan that will be central to efforts to limit the ravages of the climate crisis. So what is net zero? What kind of world could it create? And what needs to happen to to make it a reality?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/10/2124m 27s

The Korean debt crisis that inspired Squid Game’s dark dystopia

The Netflix hit is as fantastical as it is violent – but underpinning its macabre story of impoverished contestants risking their lives for money is a real crisis of personal debt in Korea. Why has it resonated all over the world?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/10/2130m 16s

Face off: the government versus GPs

The government is demanding that GPs see more patients face-to-face in return for an injection of extra funding, but many in the profession say the pandemic has left them close to breaking point. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/10/2128m 5s

Cop 26: a question of degrees – what a hotter planet means for all of us

The world is heating up at an alarming rate and world leaders are running out of chances to keep temperature rises below 1.5C, says Jonathan Watts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/10/2130m 42s

The killing of MP David Amess

The shocking killing of the Conservative MP David Amess has been described as an attack on British democracy. Gaby Hinsliff looks at how politicians are responding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/10/2125m 53s

Britain’s rich history of black literature

For Black History Month we’ve brought together star authors Ben Okri, Candice Carty-Williams and Caleb Azumah Nelson to discuss the past, present and future of black writing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/10/2131m 53s

Newcastle fans think they’ve got their club back. But at what cost?

After Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund bought Newcastle United, there was jubilation on Tyneside but revulsion among critics who view the deal as an egregious example of sportswashing. What does the deal tell us about the soul of the beautiful game – and what football clubs mean to their fans?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/10/2130m 22s

Has England gone back to the office?

Ever since the order to work from home was lifted, workers in England have been heading back to the office – but mostly only a few days a week. Joanna Partridge looks at whether work will ever be the same again. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/10/2125m 21s

What went wrong with the UK’s handling of the Covid pandemic?

A parliamentary report says the initial handling of the coronavirus outbreak was one of the worst public health failures in UK history. Could tens of thousands of deaths have been avoided – and what are the lessons for the future?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/10/2128m 0s

Dubai’s ruler and the Pegasus phone hacking exposed in a UK court

A high court judge has ruled that Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum hacked the phone of his ex-wife Princess Haya using Pegasus spyware. In this episode we look at the implications of the affair. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/10/2129m 42s

The countdown to Cop26: can world leaders save the planet?

Three weeks from today leaders will gather in Glasgow for the Cop26 climate summit. But will their individual pledges to reduce emissions carry enough weight to avert the growing threat of catastrophic global heating?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/10/2132m 51s

The whistleblower who plunged Facebook into crisis

After a set of leaks last month that represented the most damaging insight into Facebook’s inner workings in the company’s history, the former employee behind them has come forward. Now Frances Haugen has given evidence to the US Congress – and been praised by senators as a ‘21st century American hero’. Will her testimony accelerate efforts to bring the social media giant to heel?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/10/2127m 40s

Can women trust the police?

In the aftermath of the sentencing of Sarah Everard’s killer, women’s trust in the police has collapsed. Can anything be done to restore it? Is misogyny endemic in British policing? And is there a risk that such an appalling crime could happen again?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/10/2125m 41s

Why everything you’ve heard about panic buying might be wrong

With queues outside petrol stations and claims that selfish punters are using jerry cans to stockpile fuel, one word has become synonymous with the supply chain crisis that has hit the UK in recent weeks: panic. But the social psychologist Clifford Stott says something different is going on. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/10/2125m 40s

The Pandora papers: who’s giving money to the Conservatives?

Fresh questions for the Conservative party today after it emerged one of its major donors was involved in structuring of a telecoms deal later alleged to be corrupt Pandora papers news and reaction – live updates See all of our Pandora papers coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/10/2123m 25s

Inside the Pandora papers – financial secrets of the rich and powerful

A massive trove of leaked offshore data reveals the financial dealings of current and former world leaders. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/10/2124m 59s

Boris Johnson wants a conference reset. Will reality ruin it?

The prime minister was hoping to use his party’s major gathering to seize the agenda and set out his plans for the rest of the parliamentary term. Instead, he may be forced to deal with evolving supply chain and fuel crises – and bat off claims that Brexit is to blame. The Guardian’s political editor, Heather Stewart, explains the task he has ahead of him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/10/2126m 28s

The conviction of R Kelly

More than 20 years after the first allegations of sexual violence and abuse against R Kelly, he has been convicted on racketeering and sex trafficking charges. But as the women of colour who gave evidence celebrate the verdicts, there are renewed questions in the US about how the music industry, the media and the criminal justice system failed to hold him accountable for decades. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/09/2132m 16s

Can China help end the world’s addiction to coal?

Beijing has won international praise for announcing that it will stop funding coal projects in the developing world – but it is still heavily reliant on the fossil fuel for rapid economic growth at home. The Guardian’s global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, explains why China took such a significant step before Cop26 – and how much there still is to do. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/09/2127m 44s

Bond is back. Where’s he going next?

He’s a lucrative cultural export – and as unreconstructed as secret agents come. Now, as Daniel Craig’s final instalment finally hits the cinemas, many are calling for a new kind of 007 – but is the franchise too conservative to make the leap? Guardian film editor Catherine Shoard surveys the history of an $8.5bn cultural institution. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/09/2133m 46s

The Pegasus project: hacked in London

The tragic story of Alaa Al-Siddiq has further exposed the extent of how powerful Pegasus spyware has been used against human rights activists even once they have fled their home country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/09/2130m 47s

Keir Starmer’s make-or-break conference week

The Labour party meets this weekend in Brighton for its first in-person annual conference since Keir Starmer won the leadership. Jessica Elgot explains why it could define his future prospects. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/09/2128m 14s

The energy crisis no one saw coming

A cold winter, a windless summer, and boom in business have combined to create an energy crisis that is hitting particularly hard in the UK. The Guardian’s energy correspondent Jillian Ambrose explains how it happened – and what it will mean for people. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/09/2127m 48s

Germany decides: who will follow Angela Merkel?

German voters will elect a new chancellor for the first time in 16 years on Sunday, as the Angela Merkel era ends. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/09/2132m 49s

Going nuclear: the secret submarine deal to challenge China

It came out of the blue – but the new military pact between Australia, the UK and the US could transform international relations for a generation. The Guardian’s defence and security editor, Dan Sabbagh, explains the Aukus deal that has enraged Beijing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/09/2123m 35s

Finally! Get ready for a new season of culture

New albums, new TV series, and actual live shows – the culture taps might have run dry during the pandemic, but this autumn they are switching on again at last. Our critics give their pick of the new crop. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/09/2129m 53s

The murder of Fikile: the woman who took on a coal mine

Fikile Ntshangase was involved in a legal dispute over the extension of an opencast mine when she was shot dead in her home. Her daughter Malungelo Xhakaza tells her story to Rachel Humphreys. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/09/2129m 29s

The problem with OnlyFans’ mainstream dream

When the ‘subscription social network’ OnlyFans announced it would be banning the sexually explicit content that made it a billion-dollar business, sex workers were up in arms – and many observers wondered how the move could make financial sense. Then it had second thoughts. So what does this tech saga tell us about where pornography fits into the future of the internet – and is it just another example of the sex industry treating women as disposable?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/09/2131m 49s

Who’s paying for the government’s plan to fix social care?

The government’s plan to fix the ailing social care system passed into law this week. But who will benefit most and who will pick up the bill?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/09/2129m 2s

Is Brexit the reason McDonald's is running out of milkshakes?

As gaps continue to appear on supermarkets shelves and restaurants take unavailable items off menus, Britain’s supply chains appear to be at the centre of a perfect storm of pandemic disruption coupled with post-Brexit labour shortages. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/09/2126m 6s

Ecstasy, LSD and magic mushrooms: are these drugs the future of therapy?

Scientists treating depression and a range of other mental illnesses have been running controlled trials using MDMA and psychedelic drugs such as LSD and the results have been encouraging. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/09/2126m 44s

A conversation about Islamophobia in the UK since 9/11

Poet Suhaiymah Manzoor-Khan and standup comedian Nabil Abdul Rashid both came of age in the early 2000s, as Britain’s Muslim communities were feeling the backlash from 9/11. In conversation with Nosheen Iqbal, they look back at the past two decades and ahead to what the future holds for Britain’s Muslims. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/09/2138m 18s

Inside Al-Qaida: a recruit-turned-spy, a journalist and the road to 9/11

Few terrorist organisations survive for more than a few years. Al-Qaida was different. Jason Burke, who has spent much of his career reporting on the group, and former member Aimen Dean reflect on how it was able to carry out the September 11 attacks more than a decade after it was formed – and its struggle to survive the fallout from its ‘catastrophic success’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/09/2137m 10s

The children of 9/11

There were 3,051 children who lost a parent on September 11 2001. In the first of three episodes examining the reverberations of the attacks 20 years on, three of that group reflect on the weight of that private grief – and what it meant to grow up with it in the media spotlight. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/09/2137m 25s

Burnout in the US battle against wildfires

More than 40,000 wildfires have burned in the US so far this year – and the firefighters who battle them have been pushed to their limit. Llew, who did the job for 20 years, explains the impact it had on his life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/09/2125m 52s

One hour to escape: the race to get out of a Gaza tower before an Israeli airstrike

A warning call told residents of al-Jalaa apartment block that their homes were about to be destroyed. This is the story of the frantic evacuation that followed – told through recordings made by the people who lived there. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/09/2138m 4s

One man’s epic electric test drive – from Land’s End to John o’Groats

With new petrol and diesel vehicles to be banned in the UK from 2030, what can a road trip the length of the UK teach us about the future of cars?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/09/2136m 27s

The big coronavirus questions as a new school term begins

With ministers promising a return to normal in classrooms, it’s a tough time to be a teacher – but with new information constantly emerging on vaccines for children, and the pandemic not yet over, it’s a tough time for parents and pupils too. Jules White and Nicola Davis have done their homework. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/09/2122m 36s

The British citizens stranded in Kabul

Day after day, Ahmad risked his life to come to the airport with his family, British passport in hand – only to be left behind when the last evacuation flight departed. Now he and many others who hoped to be rescued face an uncertain future in the new Afghanistan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/09/2128m 13s

The knock: the families torn apart by an arrest over child abuse images

When the police came to Emma’s door on a Sunday evening, she could never have imagined that her ex-husband would be arrested for downloading indecent images of children. What happens to the families whose lives ‘the knock’ turns upside down?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/08/2131m 38s

Revisited: how meme stars of the early internet struck it rich with NFTs

The growth of non-fungible tokens has given rise to huge windfalls for those behind early virals. Sirin Kale and Alex Hern explain all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/08/2126m 4s

Revisited: Why is Sex and the City coming back to our screens?

Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman discusses why Sex and the City was such a successful TV series, while the Guardian’s deputy television editor, Hannah J Davies, looks at what the reboot tells us about TV commissioning today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/08/2128m 19s

Revisited: the danger – and beauty – of ultrarunning

After 21 competitors died during a 100km mountain race in Gansu province earlier this year, the Chinese government suspended all extreme sports. But those who love ultrarunning insist it can be safe – and has changed how they see the world. What keeps them coming back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/08/2130m 0s

Revisited: Inside the ’Ndrangheta trial

Guardian journalists Lorenzo Tondo and Clare Longrigg discuss the largest mafia trial in three decades. At the centre is Emanuele Mancuso, son of boss Luni Mancuso, who has been revealing the clan’s secrets after accepting police protection. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/08/2126m 30s

Revisited: The pandemic scam artists making millions during lockdown

When Rose got an email about a missed parcel, she thought nothing of arranging a new delivery – a mistake that would ultimately cost her thousands. The Guardian’s money editor, Hilary Osborne, reveals the scale of a lucrative new scam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/08/2124m 17s

Revisited: why has the Brazilian butt lift become so popular?

The Brazilian butt lift has become the world’s fastest growing cosmetic surgery, despite mounting concerns over the number of deaths from the procedure. What is driving its popularity?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/08/2130m 51s

A Paralympian’s long journey to Tokyo

In 2012, Sophie Carrigill was a complete beginner at wheelchair basketball. Now she’s going to Japan with real hopes of a gold medal – and inspiring a new generation of athletes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/08/2122m 58s

The Plymouth attack and misogynist ‘incel’ culture

The man who killed five people in south-west England last week was part of a hateful online community of men who blame women for their status as ‘involuntary celibates’. Did that contribute to his violence – and does the incel movement radicalise some of the young men who are part of it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/08/2125m 25s

How the pandemic exposed the crisis in children’s social care

Children’s services have reached breaking point in some areas as family breakdown and a lack of funding have resulted in a perfect storm. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/08/2127m 56s

How the Taliban took Afghanistan

The departure of US forces was followed by a rout of Afghan government forces. Now, after 20 years of western intervention, Afghanistan is back under the control of the Taliban. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/08/2131m 22s

After ICU: a Covid patient meets one of the doctors who saved his life

Karl Gray, a 60-year-old Salvation Army minister from north London is reunited with Dr Susan Jain, an intensive care consultant who helped save his life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/08/2128m 30s

The fall of Andrew Cuomo

The New York governor Andrew Cuomo resigned this week after 11 women came forward with sexual harassment claims, ending the career of one of the most prominent politicians in the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/08/2133m 43s

Has the Delta variant derailed Australia’s zero-Covid strategy?

Australia appeared to be a model case for how to control the spread of Covid-19, but the arrival of the Delta variant has changed everything. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/08/2128m 26s

Scientists issue a climate code red

A major UN scientific report has concluded global heating is now irreversible and it is unequivocal that human influence has warmed the atmosphere. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/08/2124m 3s

Israel’s shadow war with Iran

A spate of attacks on one of the world’s busiest shipping trade routes is part of an escalating tit-for-tat conflict playing out between Iran and Israel, says Martin Chulov, the Guardian’s Middle East correspondent. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/08/2123m 15s

In search of answers about miscarriage

When journalist Jennie Agg suffered four miscarriages, she set out to better understand what is known about why women lose pregnancies and why conversations on the subject are still so difficult. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/08/2130m 34s

Racism, policing and austerity: have lessons been learned since England’s 2011 riots?

This week marks a decade since the riots that swept across England in August 2011. But has enough changed to prevent similar unrest happening again?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/08/2136m 37s

Why a Belarusian Olympic sprinter refused to fly home

The Belarusian Olympic sprinter Krystsina Tsimanouskaya flew out of Tokyo on Wednesday to begin a life in exile after refusing to return home. Andrew Roth describes a growing threat to internal critics of the regime. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/08/2127m 5s

How Simone Biles changed gymnastics – on and off the mat

US gymnastics superstar Simone Biles changed what fans of the sport thought was physically possible. Now she is at the forefront of a new conversation about athletes and mental health. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/08/2126m 32s

Are plans to change the Official Secrets Act a threat to journalism?

Plans to update and expand the Official Secrets Act have been attacked as a ‘licence for cover-ups’ that could be used to thwart legitimate investigative journalism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/08/2127m 24s

Why did Unesco drop Liverpool from its heritage list?

The city has become one of the few places to have been dropped from the UN body’s global list of sites. What went wrong?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/08/2124m 7s

How we all got hooked on caffeine

It’s the world’s most widely used psychoactive drug, it disrupts our sleep, it makes us grumpy when we miss it – and we give it to our children. What keeps us coming back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/07/2126m 28s

The lobbying push that killed off a fight to save the Great Barrier Reef

The successful campaign to keep the Great Barrier Reef off Unesco’s ‘in danger’ list has been greeted with dismay – and gloom about the reef’s chance of recovery. Graham Readfearn explains the fierce global effort to deny the impact of the climate crisis on a prized natural asset. This episode includes explicit language. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/07/2124m 59s

The Republican backlash in Joe Biden’s America

It might seem like a post-Trump world, but in red states across the US his most hardline supporters are setting the political agenda. How much power do they have to shape the country’s future, even with a Democrat in the White House?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/07/2129m 51s

The pandemic enters a new phase

Freedom day, vaccine passports, a row over the ‘pingdemic’, and then a welcome drop in cases: it’s been a rollercoaster week in the coronavirus crisis. Science editor Ian Sample speaks to new Today in Focus host Nosheen Iqbal about whether have we turned a corner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/07/2124m 6s

The authority gap: why women still aren’t taken seriously

When journalist Mary Ann Sieghart set out to document the ways that women are held back by a cultural presumption of their inferiority, she found reams of data to support her case – and heard stories of how it affects even the most successful women in the world. She explains why the authority gap persists, and asks what we can do about it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/07/2128m 57s

The Pegasus project part 5: the fightback against private spyware begins

After a week of stories about the abuse of private spyware by governments around the world, Michael Safi rounds off our mini-series by looking at the global impact of the Pegasus project and what could change as a result. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/07/2130m 2s

The Pegasus Project part 4: runaway princesses and the UK connection

In today’s episode, two princesses from the United Arab Emirates show up in our leaked records – and we look at whether powerful spyware is being used against UK citizens. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/07/2124m 35s

The Pegasus Project part 3: cartels, corruption and cyber-weapons

In the latest part of our mini-series, Michael Safi hears from Nina Lakhani on how 15,000 Mexicans including journalists and politicians appeared on a list of possible targets for surveillance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/07/2124m 52s

The Pegasus project part 2: cat and mouse

For 10 years the Israeli surveillance company NSO has been helping governments steal secrets. Today we look at how a small team of cyber-detectives helped expose them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/07/2126m 3s

The Pegasus project part 1: an invitation to Paris

What happened when a powerful phone hacking tool was sold to governments around the world? Part 1 of a major international investigation introduces our new Today in Focus host, Michael Safi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/07/2121m 50s

Marina Hyde on five years of watching the political circus

For Anushka Asthana’s last episode, the beloved columnist makes a rare appearance to survey an era of tumult and twerps – and explain how she took it all very seriously … through jokes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/07/2137m 10s

Inside the mind of an Olympic athlete one week before the games

Tom Bosworth was ready for Tokyo 2020. Then the pandemic struck and he caught coronavirus. This is how he got himself to the starting line. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/07/2131m 4s

The heatwave forcing America to confront climate reality

An extraordinary heatwave has swept the west coast of the US and Canada, leading to record temperatures, water shortages, and hundreds of deaths – and bringing home the catastrophic consequences of global heating. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/07/2126m 20s

Is it possible to make the internet safe for children? – podcast

A new design code for websites, aimed at children, will soon come into force. How much difference will it make – and is a child-safe internet possible?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/07/2130m 3s

The people searching for missing family members during the pandemic – podcast

Hannah’s brother Paul dropped out of contact almost a decade ago. She never stopped thinking about him – and, as it did for many others, the pandemic led her to try to find him again. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/07/2125m 47s

The Indigenous children who died at Canada’s residential schools

Half a century ago, Barry Kennedy was taken from his family and forced into an abusive system that sought to obliterate his Indigenous heritage. Now, after the discovery of more than 1,000 bodies in unmarked graves at schools including his own, he reflects on the traditions that were erased, the friends he lost – and Canada’s new reckoning with that history. Listeners may find parts of this episode, which deals with physical and sexual abuse, distressing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/07/2137m 24s

The government’s rape review: an apology, but will anything change?

The government has said sorry to thousands of rape victims who have been failed by the criminal justice system. But survivors want cases reopened and justice finally done. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/07/2134m 18s

Euro 2020: what would it mean if England could actually … win?

After decades of disappointment, Gareth Southgate’s England team stand on the brink of making their first major final since 1966 – and from taking the knee to helping hungry children, they’ve got much more than football on their plate. Max Rushden explores what it would mean if the nice guys could finish first at last. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/07/2128m 7s

After Grenfell: the unsolved cladding crisis

The Grenfell Tower tragedy forced a reassessment of fire safety for buildings across the country, but no consensus on who should pay for it. Robert Booth describes how for many residents the issue has become a living nightmare. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/07/2133m 57s

Why do powerful men have affairs?

After Matt Hancock was forced to resign when a secret relationship was exposed, the couples therapist Orna Guralnik explores the cocktail of ego and vulnerability that leads some senior figures to risk it all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/07/2125m 13s

Britney Spears’ battle to take back control of her life and fortune

A legal arrangement set up in the wake of a mental health crisis has left Britney Spears with little control of her personal or professional affairs. Laura Snapes and Sam Levin describe how she’s challenging the situation in court. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/07/2132m 34s

How a pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong died

Apple Daily was a beacon of free speech. Now it has been forced to close by China’s sweeping national security law. Does its demise signal a new chapter in Hong Kong?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/07/2129m 15s

How the Batley and Spen byelection turned toxic

Maya Wolfe-Robinson visits the Labour-held West Yorkshire seat of Batley and Spen, which votes in an increasingly heated byelection tomorrow. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/06/2135m 4s

Matt Hancock’s downfall

Boris Johnson has a new health secretary this week after the resignation of the man tasked with leading the government’s Covid response. But there are plenty of unanswered questions, says Jonathan Freedland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/06/2132m 27s

Young, hot and bothered: going through menopause in my 30s

Harriet Gibsone tells the scary, sad, and surprisingly funny story of going through early menopause – and hoping for a baby. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/06/2129m 48s

The new Brexit crisis for Northern Ireland’s unionists

From a leadership fiasco to the ‘sausage wars’, the Democratic Unionist party’s stance on Brexit has forced it to contend with a new – perhaps even existential – set of problems. What will they mean for the region’s future?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/06/2130m 54s

How meme stars of the early internet are striking it rich with NFTs - podcast

The growth of non-fungible tokens has given rise to massive windfalls for those behind early virals. Sirin Kale and Alex Hern explain all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/06/2126m 17s

Police corruption and the unsolved murder of Daniel Morgan

The brutal murder of a private investigator in 1987 has become the UK’s most investigated killing – but 34 years later it remains unsolved and mired in new official findings of police corruption. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/06/2133m 27s

Do we have to learn to live with Covid-19?

The Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, weighs up the race between vaccines and variants and explains why the end of the pandemic does not mean the end of Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/06/2128m 16s

Karim’s story: Egypt’s crackdown on human rights workers

Ten years since the Arab spring rocked Egypt and removed its president, the country is still detaining human rights workers and locking up political prisoners. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/06/2133m 55s

Why England’s footballers are so determined to keep taking the knee

England’s footballers will take the knee before their match against Scotland at Wembley tonight in an anti-racism protest that has divided supporters. Liam Rosenior and Paul MacInnes reflect on how football became enmeshed in the culture wars. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/06/2136m 49s

Is the truth out there? The US government prepares its landmark report on UFOs

A hotly anticipated US government report on decades of mysterious sightings of UFOs is due for release this month. The Guardian’s Adam Gabbatt and former Ministry of Defence employee Nick Pope investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/06/2134m 45s

Israel’s unlikely coalition: is this the end for Netanyahu?

Israel has a new coalition government made up of eight very different parties. But having ousted Benjamin Netanyahu, can it hold together?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/06/2124m 35s

What’s behind the mass protests in Colombia?

A demonstration against tax rises has morphed into a mass movement against the government, says Joe Parkin Daniels in Bogotá. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/06/2128m 43s

What went wrong with the Covid-19 response in the US?

Author and journalist Lawrence Wright has been writing about pandemics for decades. So when Covid-19 struck the US, he was ideally placed to report on the political response. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/06/2128m 12s

GB News enters the culture war

To its critics, it is a British Fox News; to its creators, it is a vital correction to a liberal London-centric media. Can Andrew Neil’s upstart news channel change the face of British broadcasting?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/06/2127m 55s

The G7 and a crucial moment for the climate

The world’s richest democracies will come together in Britain this week with global heating high on the agenda. Can they match big promises with concrete action?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/06/2127m 17s

The interrogation of Matt Hancock

Two weeks after Dominic Cummings told MPs that the health secretary was a serial liar who lost the trust of No 10, Matt Hancock will face the same committee to defend himself. Heather Stewart explains what is at stake, and what it could mean for the next stage of the pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/06/2127m 43s

The danger – and beauty – of ultrarunning

After 21 competitors died during a 100km mountain race in Gansu province, the Chinese government last week suspended all extreme sports. But those who love ultrarunning insist it can be safe – and has changed how they see the world. What keeps them coming back?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/06/2130m 16s

Why every statue should come down

Gary Younge was glad to see the figure of Edward Colston removed in Bristol a year ago – but, he argues, even monuments to civil rights leaders are a distortion of how history really works How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/06/2131m 44s

Australia’s mouse plague

Families and farmers in New South Wales are doing everything they can to fend off a biblical incursion of rodents. Guardian Australia’s Matilda Boseley has spent months reporting on the story – and hearing the experiences of those who have been affected. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/06/2126m 28s

The Wuhan lab leak theory

Joe Biden has asked US intelligence services to urgently investigate the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic, including the possibility that it began with an accident in a laboratory. The Guardian’s Peter Beaumont looks at the available evidence. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/06/2127m 2s

Bashar al-Assad’s decade of destruction in Syria

Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad, has presided over a devastating civil war that has caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people. Martin Chulov describes a man who came back from the brink of defeat to strengthen his grip on a country deeply scarred by war. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/06/2126m 39s

Will Tokyo really host a pandemic Olympics?

The Games were meant to be a moment of national celebration but – with coronavirus cases rising in Japan – this summer’s postponed Olympics are the subject of recrimination and protest. Can widespread public opposition overcome huge commercial pressure to go ahead?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/06/2129m 58s

Can the US avoid another Trump?

Former Obama adviser Ben Rhodes has travelled the world looking for clues to how the US came to elect Donald Trump and he found parallels everywhere. But is there a way of stopping it from happening again?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/05/2126m 53s

A state-sponsored ‘hijacking’ – the arrest of Belarus blogger Raman Pratasevich

Belarusian journalist Hanna Liubakova examines why Alexander Lukashenko, the president of Belarus, apparently diverted a Ryanair flight in order to arrest 26-year-old blogger Raman Pratasevich. Guardian Moscow correspondent, Andrew Roth, discusses the fallout from the action. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/05/2128m 11s

‘The government failed’: Dominic Cummings takes aim at No 10’s Covid response

Former aide lashed out at every aspect of the government’s approach and Boris Johnson and Matt Hancock in particular. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/05/2130m 35s

Is Britain becoming a hostile environment for EU citizens? | Podcast

As Covid travel restrictions begin to be lifted, a new, far less welcoming post-Brexit attitude is greeting EU citizens at the UK border. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/05/2127m 10s

Two lives changed by the death of George Floyd

A year ago, the murder of George Floyd caused outrage in Minneapolis – and kicked off a protest movement that spread across the world. How do the young Black people at the heart of the story live with his legacy?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/05/2130m 10s

The pandemic scam artists making millions during lockdown – podcast

When Rose got an email about a missed parcel, she thought nothing of arranging a new delivery – a mistake that would ultimately cost her thousands. The Guardian’s money editor, Hilary Osborne, reveals the scale of a lucrative new scam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/05/2124m 9s

Life inside Gaza during 11 days of bombardment

Guardian journalist Hazem Balousha describes living in, and reporting from, Gaza, under heavy bombardment until a ceasefire began on Friday, while historian Rashid Khalidi discusses the history of the Palestinian struggle for statehood. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/05/2136m 25s

Rio de Janeiro’s deadliest police raid

Guardian Latin American correspondent Tom Phillips visits Jacarezinho, one of Rio’s biggest favelas, the day after police carried out the deadliest raid in the city’s history. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/05/2128m 11s

Apple versus Epic: how the Fortnite app led to a legal showdown

As Apple takes on games developer and Fortnite creator Epic, UK technology editor Alex Hern describes a battle of the tech titans that could reshape the app industry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/05/2127m 46s

How worrying is the India coronavirus variant for UK plans to unlock this summer?

Monday’s change in the rules was supposed to be a moment of celebration – but the new variant spreading in the UK meant it came with a cautionary note. Can the next stage of the government’s ‘irreversible’ plan go ahead?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/05/2123m 18s

Big Short author Michael Lewis on the inside story of America’s failed Covid response

The author and journalist Michael Lewis discusses reporting on a group of individuals who tried to alert the US government to the dangers of its inaction as coronavirus cases began to rise at an alarming rate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/05/2128m 10s

Are Israel and Palestine on the brink of another war?

Oliver Holmes, the Guardian’s Jerusalem correspondent, discusses what has prompted the worst unrest in Israel and Palestine since 2014. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/05/2126m 36s

Why is the UK slashing its international aid budget?

Boris Johnson’s government has blamed the Covid crisis for its decision to cut its international aid budget, but is there more to it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/05/2128m 16s

Can Labour survive Britain’s political realignment?

After another set of disappointing election results, columnist John Harris asks if Labour can ever reconnect with voters in its former heartlands, where support is increasingly swinging to the Conservatives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/05/2128m 13s

The Post Office scandal – part 2

Janet Skinner was jailed for false accounting after being wrongfully accused by her employer, the Post Office, of responsibility for the loss of more than £59,000. Now, with her conviction quashed, she and others are demanding answers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/05/2138m 6s

The Post Office scandal – part 1

When a computer system installed by the Post Office went haywire, it led to the convictions of scores of subpostmasters for theft and false accounting. Lives were wrecked. But after a devastating ruling by the court of appeal, the full truth can now be finally told about the extent of the great Post Office scandal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/05/2132m 42s

Noel Clarke and the allegations that have shaken the film and television industry

Journalists Lucy Osborne and Sirin Kale discuss the allegations of verbal abuse, bullying and sexual harassment by 20 women against Clarke. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/05/2130m 9s

How Jewish parents used Guardian ads to save their children’s lives

This month is 200 years since the Guardian was first established in Manchester. For the Guardian’s world affairs editor, Julian Borger, a part of that history is deeply personal. In 1938, there was a surge of classified ads in the Guardian as parents – including his grandparents – scrambled to get their children out of the Reich. What became of the families?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/05/2138m 31s

The fight for Hartlepool

Hartlepool has sent a Labour MP to parliament in every election since 1964. But as old allegiances fray, Anushka Asthana looks back at how this previously thriving shipbuilding town has lost out over successive governments and wonders if the ‘red wall’ seat could be about to go blue at tomorrow’s byelection. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/05/2140m 54s

America’s gun debate – why we’re getting it so wrong

Abené Clayton, a reporter on the Guardian’s Guns and Lies in America project, examines why the debate on guns in the US does not treat shooting victims and their families equitably, and the impact that can have on communities. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/05/2129m 8s

Why have sperm counts more than halved in the past 40 years?

Dr Shanna Swan has spent more than 20 years examining how chemicals in plastics are causing our fertility to decline – and what we can do about it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/05/2124m 27s

Scotland’s election: a stepping stone to independence?

Constitutional questions have dominated the Scottish election campaign. As voters go to the polls next week, Libby Brooks assesses whether they will give the SNP a majority and a mandate for a new independence referendum. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/04/2125m 28s

Cash for curtains: how damaging are the allegations involving Boris Johnson? –podcast

For months, information has been leaked to the press from inside Downing Street, including allegations Boris Johnson was given the cash – which has not yet been published in any declarations – to do up his official residence. The Guardian columnist Rafael Behr discusses how damaging this could be for the prime minister. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/04/2127m 23s

Inside Afghanistan as troops prepare to leave after the US’s longest war

Fawzia Koofi is an Afghan politician who for the past few years has been one of the few women in peace talks with the Taliban. Last August she was wounded in an assassination attempt. She discusses the attack and the threat the Taliban pose to women’s rights, while the Guardian’s world affairs editor, Julian Borger, discusses the legacy of the US ‘forever’ war. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/04/2123m 19s

India’s Covid disaster: a crisis for the world

A catastrophe is unfolding in India as hospitals run out of oxygen, the Guardian’s south Asia correspondent, Hannah Ellis-Petersen, reports from Delhi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/04/2130m 12s

The Seaspiracy controversy: should we stop eating fish?

The Netflix documentary on the impact of commercial fishing has received celebrity endorsements and a huge audience around the world, but it has also attracted criticism from experts who accuse it of making misleading claims. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/04/2131m 26s

Chaos and collapse: European football’s not-so-super league

Plans for a breakaway super league rocked European football this week as fans, politicians and the game’s governing bodies united in fury. After two chaotic days, the whole scheme had collapsed. David Conn looks back on a week of humiliation for football’s richest clubs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/04/2124m 0s

George Floyd: will Derek Chauvin’s guilty verdict change US policing?

Oliver Laughland, the Guardian’s US southern bureau chief, covered the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, who was found guilty of the murder of George Floyd on Tuesday – a landmark moment in US criminal justice history. Oliver looks at what the verdict means for America. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/04/2128m 50s

Is sitting still slowly killing us?

Modern lifestyles are increasingly sedentary and inactive, and the public health effects of this are only just starting to show up, says author and Guardian reporter Peter Walker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/04/2124m 9s

How UK scientists are tracking down new Covid variants

Since the pandemic began, a crack team of scientists have been working to track Covid variants as they appear, to try to stop them from spreading. The Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, has been speaking to some of them. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/04/2125m 15s

Did ‘eat out to help out’ cost lives?

Last August, Bob Pape and his family went on a city break to Birmingham, making the most of the chancellor Rishi Sunak’s ‘eat out to help out’ scheme. The day after he arrived home, his Covid symptoms began. Guardian writer Sirin Kale looks at the links between the scheme and the rise in Covid numbers. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/04/2128m 22s

Becoming Prince Philip: an interview with The Crown’s Tobias Menzies

Tobias Menzies played Prince Philip in Netflix hit The Crown. On the eve of the royal’s funeral, Menzies discusses the unique challenge of trying to get inside the mind of a person seen by so many but known by so few. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/04/2128m 54s

David Cameron’s lobbying scandal

The Guardian’s banking correspondent, Kalyeena Makortoff, and political correspondent Rajeev Syal discuss the unprecedented formal inquiry into lobbying by the former prime minister David Cameron on behalf of the collapsed finance company Greensill Capital. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/04/2127m 21s

Will we need a Covid pass to get into the pub?

The UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, has announced plans for a domestic Covid-status certificate. We look to Israel, where a similar scheme has been introduced, and discuss how it might work here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/04/2128m 20s

What is really behind the riots in Northern Ireland?

The Guardian’s Ireland correspondent, Rory Carroll, looks at what is fuelling loyalist anger in Northern Ireland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/04/2130m 22s

Remembering the Brixton riots 40 years on

In April 1981, a simmering tension between the police and Brixton’s black community erupted in violence. Forty years, on Aamna Modhin revisits that weekend with those who witnessed the events unfolding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/04/2126m 23s

Risk, reward and the AstraZeneca vaccine

People in the UK under 30 will be offered an alternative to the AstraZeneca vaccine because of a possible link to rare blood clots. Could the move dent confidence in the widely used jab?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/04/2120m 0s

The death of George Floyd and the case against Derek Chauvin – podcast

The death of George Floyd after being restrained by Minneapolis police last year sparked a wave of outrage that swept across the US and then the world. Now the police officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes is on trial for his murder. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/04/2128m 57s

How can the UK stop harassment and sexual abuse in schools? – podcast

The Everyone’s Invited website has collected 14,000 testimonies so far, painting a picture of widespread sexual harassment and violence in our schools. Everyone’s Invited founder Soma Sara and the Guardian’s senior news reporter Alexandra Topping discuss the outcry, the impact and whose responsibility it is to do something about it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/04/2128m 49s

Why the government's race report sparked a furious backlash

A new report into racial inequality in the UK has been condemned by campaigners and was called a ‘green light for racists’ by Doreen Lawrence. Aamna Mohdin examines what it says and why the response has been so damning. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/04/2131m 12s

A year of Keir: has the Covid pandemic sidelined Labour's leader?

Keir Starmer is marking a year as leader of the Labour party in which one issue has dominated above all else. The Guardian’s political editor, Heather Stewart, examines where the party is heading under his leadership. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/04/2128m 58s

Why are gay conversion practices still legal in the UK?

The UK government has pledged to ban gay conversion practices – which involve trying to change a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity. But they are still legally taking place across the country. George and Joe describe the impact of going through it and the MP Alicia Kearns talks about the fight to have it banned. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/04/2126m 17s

What is the police and crime bill and why are people protesting against it?

Thousands of people have been protesting against the government’s police, crime, sentencing and courts bill, which would allow police to take a more proactive approach in managing protests, but many worry is an attempt to restrict the right to protest. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/04/2121m 46s

Unblocking the Suez canal

The gigantic cargo ship the Ever Given blocked the world’s busiest shipping lane for a week. Michael Safi reports on what the costly nautical traffic jam can tell us about global trade. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/03/2127m 57s

Joe Biden's border challenge: reversing Trumpism

The 46th US president took office promising a more welcoming immigration policy. But Republicans are calling a new wave of migrants at the southern border a ‘crisis’ and demanding he addresses it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/03/2130m 40s

Freshwater part 6: the decision

The court of appeal heard the appeal of the Freshwater Five last week. In the final part of our miniseries, we hear how the judges reached their decision and what it means. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/03/2155m 24s

The aftermath of a rape

While working in Abu Dhabi launching a literary festival, Caitlin McNamara alleges she was raped by a member of the Emirati royal family. A year on, she describes her struggle to hold her attacker to account, and to come to terms with what happened to her. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/03/2125m 46s

Europe's third Covid wave

As a deadly third wave of Covid infections sweeps across the continent, Jon Henley reports on how EU leaders are considering restricting exports of vaccines in a move that could inflame tensions with the UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/03/2127m 23s

Men! What can you do to help fight misogyny?

Educator and author Dr Jackson Katz discusses why all men need to be part of ending violence against women, and what they can do to help. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/03/2129m 4s

A year inside: what shielding has meant for the most vulnerable

The first national lockdown began in Britain a year ago today, but for those identified as clinically vulnerable, the restrictions often mean total isolation. Frances Ryan reports on what it has meant for those who have been shielding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/03/2132m 0s

Professor Neil Ferguson on the Covid year that shattered our way of life

Prof Neil Ferguson was one of the first scientists to raise the alarm in Britain that unless the government radically changed policy, it was heading for a disaster that the NHS could not cope with. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/03/2127m 59s

Is it time to abolish the monarchy?

Jonathan Freedland looks at whether the fallout from last week’s Oprah Winfrey interview with Harry and Meghan has moved the monarchy closer to collapse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/03/2125m 15s

What do progressives make of Joe Biden's presidency so far

Lauren Gambino, political correspondent for Guardian US, discusses the $1.9tn Covid relief package, which was passed by Congress last week. It was seen as a major legislative victory for Joe Biden. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/03/2129m 5s

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow’s story and the campaign to end femicide

Police response to death of Sarah Everard reminds reporter Yvonne Roberts of the Yorkshire Ripper killings; Helen Pidd reports on the murder of an Afghanistan veteran that has also put the spotlight on cycle of women being killed by men. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/03/2129m 48s

Why are women so angry after the killing of Sarah Everard?

The death of Sarah Everard has shocked the UK and ignited a furious debate around the issue of male violence. Guardian senior reporter Alexandra Topping discusses why Everard’s case has prompted so many women to speak out. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/03/2125m 43s

Scandal, riots and the Dutch election

The Dutch cabinet resigned in disgrace earlier this year after admitting it falsely accused thousands of citizens of cheating the benefits system. Then a strict second lockdown sparked riots. Now Dutch voters go to the polls, but are they in the mood for a change of government?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/03/2124m 43s

Hostage diplomacy: when will Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe be free?

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe has endured a five-year nightmare after being arrested and jailed in Iran while on holiday. But now as her husband, Richard Ratcliffe, and the Guardian’s Patrick Wintour explain, having served her sentence she is being threatened with further charges. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/03/2134m 2s

Is the government ready to lead the fight against the climate crisis?

Later this year, the government will host COP26 in Glasgow – possibly one of the last opportunities for the world to avert global climate catastrophe. Guardian environment journalist Fiona Harvey examines whether the UK government is equipped to lead the world in the crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/03/2126m 5s

The great global vaccine divide

The speed at which the world’s scientists have managed to create several effective Covid vaccines has been close to miraculous. But as Michael Safi says, the richest countries have taken the lion’s share. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/03/2126m 57s

Meghan and Harry's brutal takedown of the royal family

Reporters Archie Bland and Aamna Mohdin discuss the impact of Oprah Winfrey’s interview with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, which contained shocking revelations, including allegations of racism at the heart of the royal family. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/03/2129m 24s

Why has there been a rise in anti-Asian hate crime in the US?

A rise in anti-Asian hate crime during the pandemic is forcing the US to reckon with a racism that’s been overlooked for decades. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/03/2130m 5s

The lawyer who fought to free Guantánamo's highest-value detainee

Nancy Hollander has taken on many difficult cases in her career, but none quite like that of the Guantánamo detainee Mohamedou Ould Salahi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/03/2128m 4s

Guantánamo’s highest-value detainee and the guard who befriended him

Mohamedou Ould Salahi was once Guantánamo’s highest-value detainee, but during the 14 years he spent behind bars he was never charged with a crime. Salahi and his former guard Steve Wood reflect on their time at the prison. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/03/2141m 12s

Alex Salmond, Nicola Sturgeon and the turmoil inside Scottish politics

With Scotland’s first minister Nicola Sturgeon giving evidence today, the Guardian’s Scotland correspondent, Libby Brooks, charts the unravelling of the alliance between first minister Nicola Sturgeon and her predecessor Alex Salmond – once seen as Scotland’s greatest political partnership. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/03/2130m 39s

Why has the Brazilian butt lift become so popular? – podcast

The Brazilian butt lift (BBL) has become the world’s fastest growing cosmetic surgery, despite mounting concerns over the growing number of deaths from the procedure. What is driving its popularity?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/03/2130m 30s

The life and death of Robert Maxwell

In 1991, the tycoon Robert Maxwell died in circumstances that have yet to be fully explained. Thirty years on, his legacy is still being felt, says the author John Preston. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/03/2131m 17s

Is this the worst year ever for the UK music industry?

Guardian music writer Laura Snapes, singer-songwriter Arlo Parks and musician Nitin Sawhney discuss the impact that Covid, Brexit and the ‘streaming economy’ are having on the sector. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/02/2128m 47s

No sex please, we're British. Dating in a pandemic

Lockdown rules have left little opportunity for people who aren’t already living with a partner to pursue romantic relationships, explains Zoe Williams. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/02/2128m 51s

The science behind England’s Covid exit plan – podcast

Nicola Davis runs through the science behind the government’s decision to begin lifting lockdown restrictions, a four-stage plan that starts with the reopening of schools and could see the return of nightclubs on 21 June. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/02/2122m 26s

Freshwater part 5: the appeal

Today, the Freshwater Five case is in front of the court of appeal after the disclosure of new evidence that the defence says points to the men’s conviction being unsafe. Why has it taken a decade to get to this point? Listen to episode 1 Listen to episode 2 Listen to episode 3 Listen to episode 4. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/02/2143m 47s

Freshwater part 4: radar

When the Freshwater Five’s lawyer, Emily Bolton, found new evidence not disclosed at the men’s trial, it set her on a path to the court of appeal and another version of events that adds weight to their claims Listen to episode 1 Listen to episode 2 Listen to episode 3. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/02/2146m 34s

Freshwater part 3: the clifftop evidence

A major part of the evidence against the Freshwater Five came from the clifftop above Freshwater Bay. It was there that police saw bags being thrown from the men’s boat. But the defence still have questions about what the police actually saw Listen to episode 1 Listen to episode 2. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/02/2136m 9s

Freshwater part 2: the circumstantial evidence

In the second part of Freshwater, Anushka Asthana examines the circumstantial evidence presented at trial against the Freshwater Five including a series of phone calls from sea and why a man with no prior fishing experience was onboard the boat that night Listen to episode 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/02/2149m 31s

Freshwater part 1: are the wrong men in jail?

In 2011, five men were sentenced to a total of 104 years for conspiracy to import £53m worth of cocaine. They have always said they are innocent. Now, as new evidence is due to be put before the court of appeal, we investigate the case of the Freshwater Five Listen to part 2 Listen to part 3 Listen to part 4 Listen to part 5. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/02/2143m 38s

Catherine Flowers and her fight for environmental justice in Alabama

In parts of the American south, many homes don’t have access to working waste treatment – something activist Catherine Flowers is fighting to change. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/02/2122m 2s

Inside Napier: the former army barracks housing asylum seekers

The Guardian’s home affairs correspondent, Jamie Grierson, discusses the government’s decision to use two former army barracks, Napier and Penally, to house up to 600 vulnerable asylum seekers. Amid allegations of cover-ups, poor access to healthcare and legal advice, and crowded conditions, one former resident describes the impact Napier had on him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/02/2128m 42s

Why are farmers protesting against the Indian government?

The Guardian’s south Asia correspondent and the founder of a sustainable farming movement explain why farmers are so angry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/02/2125m 31s

It's a Sin: a nurse reflects on the Aids crisis of the 80s

Channel 4/HBO Max’s new drama It’s a Sin, written by Russell T Davies, follows a group of friends living through the 1980s Aids crisis. Leigh Chislett worked as a HIV nurse at St Mary’s hospital in London during that period. Watching the show, he saw himself not just in the nurses caring for patients but also in the young gay men navigating their lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/02/2130m 20s

Covid-19 variants and what they mean for vaccines

The Guardian’s health editor, Sarah Boseley, looks at why variants of the Covid-19 virus are alarming scientists. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/02/2122m 37s

The coup in Myanmar and a fight for democracy

A military coup in Myanmar has removed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and sent tens of thousands of protesters onto the streets. Rebecca Ratcliffe describes how the country risks turning back the clock to the decades of military dictatorship and economic isolation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/02/2129m 51s

How the Queen lobbied for changes in the law to hide her wealth

Government memos discovered in the National Archives reveal that the Queen lobbied ministers to alter proposed legislation. The Guardian’s David Pegg follows the trail and explains its implications for a monarchy which is supposed to stay out of politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/02/2129m 55s

Alexei Navalny’s imprisonment: how Putin put his opponent behind bars

The sentencing of opposition leader Alexei Navalny marks a dramatic turning point in Russian politics, says Andrew Roth. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/02/2126m 30s

Inside the trial against the 'Ndrangheta, Italy's biggest mafia syndicate

Guardian journalists Lorenzo Tondo and Clare Longrigg discuss the trial against the ‘Ndrangheta, the largest mafia trial in three decades. At the centre is Emanuele Mancuso, son of boss Luni Mancuso, who has been revealing the clan’s secrets after accepting police protection. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/02/2126m 30s

Donald Trump's second impeachment: will the Senate convict him?

Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial begins in the Senate next week. Lawrence Douglas explains the process and politics of the spectacle ahead. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/02/2134m 6s

Wall Street versus the Redditors: the GameStop goldrush

When a group of amateur investors on a Reddit messageboard began buying up stock in a video games retailer it forced huge losses on major Wall Street hedge funds that had bet against it. But following a trading frenzy the stock began to fall, almost as quickly as it had risen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/02/2126m 52s

How the EU’s vaccine effort turned into a crisis

Daniel Boffey, the Guardian’s Brussels bureau chief, looks at why the EU’s vaccination programme has become so chaotic. Last Friday the commission attempted an ill-fated plan to seek to erect a vaccine border on the island of Ireland by triggering a clause in the Brexit withdrawal agreement. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/02/2129m 22s

Inside LA’s Covid crisis – podcast

Guardian US correspondent Sam Levine visits Martin Luther King Jr community hospital in Los Angeles county, an area battling one of the worst Covid outbreaks in the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/02/2129m 1s

Conversations with kids about coronavirus

Children across the UK talk about how the pandemic has affected their lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/02/2134m 38s

What's up with WhatsApp?

A routine update to WhatsApp’s privacy policy resulted in a public relations fiasco earlier this month, when viral posts questioning the changes prompted users to try out alternative apps. Kate O’Flaherty breaks down what’s next for WhatsApp. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/01/2120m 42s

Why Brazilians are having to take the Covid crisis into their own hands

Tom Phillips, the Guardian’s Latin America correspondent, looks at the surge of infections in the Brazilian state of Amazonas that has left many hospitals without the most basic supplies and has prompted yet more protests against Bolsonaro. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/01/2126m 4s

Behind closed doors: Filipina workers trapped by the pandemic

Journalist Corinne Redfern discusses the impact the pandemic has had on the Filipino women trapped overseas, including Mimi (not her real name) who works for a wealthy family in London for just £5 an hour. Mimi was asked to keep working through the first lockdown with the family coaching her on what to say if the police stopped her. In her spare time, Mimi helps other overseas workers escape situations where they are being abused. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/01/2128m 55s

Vaccine hesitancy: what is behind the fears circulating in BAME communities?

Several national surveys suggest people from black, Asian and minority backgrounds are far more likely to reject having the Covid-19 vaccine than their white counterparts. Nazia Parveen and Annabel Sowemimo explain the root causes of this hesitancy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/01/2128m 35s

The fight for recovery from a lifelong eating disorder

The Guardian’s Jenny Stevens struggled with an eating disorder throughout her 20s. When she was able to finally access the treatment she needed, she began a slow recovery – which she is still coming to terms with. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/01/2126m 21s

Surviving cardiac arrest: what it's like to come back to life

Last year the Guardian’s Jonathan Watts underwent a lifesaving operation following a cardiac arrest. He tells Anushka Asthana what it taught him about life and death. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/01/2133m 22s

Why is Sex and the City coming back to our screens?

Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman discusses why Sex and the City was such a successful TV series, while the Guardian’s deputy television editor, Hannah J Davies, looks at what the reboot tells us about TV commissioning today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/01/2128m 7s

The end of Trump: where will the Biden era take America?

Guardian US columnist Robert Reich reflects on the unfinished business of the Trump presidency, and what Biden’s administration should aim to accomplish. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/01/2124m 22s

Is bitcoin a scam?

In 2013 James Howells threw out a computer hard drive containing bitcoin. Last week he again asked his local council for permission to dig for it at his local dump as he believes it is now worth about £200m. The Guardian’s UK technology editor, Alex Hern, looks at the rise of bitcoin and whether it should be banned. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/01/2126m 16s

Inside an NHS hospital at the peak of the coronavirus crisis

As the latest wave of Covid infections hits hospitals, wards are nearing capacity and oxygen supplies are straining at the volume of new patients. The Guardian’s Helen Pidd spent a day at Milton Keynes University hospital to witness the crisis up close. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/01/2128m 50s

Trump, the death penalty and its links with America’s racist history

This week, Donald Trump sanctioned the execution of the only woman on federal death row: Lisa Montgomery. She was the 11th prisoner to be killed since the president restarted federal executions in July last year. The Guardian US’s Ed Pilkington looks at why Trump has carried out more federal executions than any other president in almost 200 years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/01/2132m 51s

Bobi Wine: the reggae singer vying to be Uganda’s next president

Ugandans go to the polls today to elect a new president. Can a charismatic young musician end three and a half decades of rule by a strongman? Freelance reporter Samuel Okiror has been following Bobi Wine’s campaign to defeat Yoweri Museveni. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/01/2124m 28s

Covid: vaccinating our way out of a crisis

Government aims to vaccinate 12 million people by middle of February. With the NHS struggling, Robin McKie asks whether it is fast enough. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/01/2126m 40s

Inside the investigation into how Covid-19 began

This week a team of international experts from the WHO will arrive in China to investigate the origins of Covid-19. A year into the pandemic, Guardian health editor Sarah Boseley looks at what questions still need to be answered. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/01/2123m 17s

From Yemen to the UK: Noor's story

A women’s rights activist tells the extraordinary story of how she fled Yemen after her life was threatened, and her devastation at having to leave her four children behind. She describes her terrifying journey to the UK, where she faces an uncertain future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/01/2125m 9s

The storming of the Capitol and the end of the Trump era

When rioters stormed into the Capitol building in Washington DC this week, it marked a new low for the Trump presidency. David Smith and Lauren Gambino describe a week in US politics like no other. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/01/2129m 46s

How the Covid surge has left the NHS on the brink

Boris Johnson has announced a new national lockdown amid fears the NHS could be overwhelmed within weeks with Covid patients. Denis Campbell and Dr Samantha Batt-Rawden describe a service already at breaking point. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/01/2129m 55s

Is your boss spying on you?

With home working now well established, many companies are finding new ways to monitor the productivity of their employees often with intrusive spyware, says technology editor Alex Hern. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/01/2127m 44s

A new national lockdown

2021 has begun in crisis mode for Boris Johnson’s government as it scrambles to control new Covid infections by closing schools and implementing a new national lockdown. Peter Walker reports on the new measures Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/01/2122m 9s

Why do some people find it harder than others to lose weight?

After treating thousands of obese people, bariatric surgeon Andrew Jenkinson was left wondering why, when most people eat too many calories, only some become overweight. After years of research, he believes he has the answer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/01/2128m 42s

Revisited: the clitoris coverup – why do we know so little?

Medical textbooks are full of anatomical pictures of the penis, but the clitoris barely rates a mention and many medical professionals are uncomfortable even talking about it. Reporter Calla Wahlquist and associate news editor Gabrielle Jackson explain the history and science of the clitoris, and speak to the scientists and artists dedicated to demystifying it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/01/2127m 4s

Revisited: a cure for insomnia?

Like a growing number of people, Simon Parkin suffered from insomnia for years. After dozens of failed techniques, he finally found one that worked. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/12/2019m 38s

Revisited: Leonardo da Vinci and the mystery of the world's most expensive painting

Salvator Mundi was sold for a record $450m at auction in 2017 to an anonymous bidder. But the painting’s provenance as the work of Leonardo has been called into question. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/12/2024m 50s

Revisited: Otters, badgers and orcas – can the pandemic help rewild Britain?

Sound recordist Chris Watson shares the birdsong from his English garden, while environmentalist George Monbiot looks at how the pandemic might be an opportunity for rewilding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/12/2026m 44s

Revisited: is veganism the future?

Marco Springmann, a public health expert, tells Anushka Asthana why cutting out animal products is the best route to a healthy diet – and why veganism is good for the planet. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/12/2022m 28s

Culture 2020: a look back at the best TV, music and books

The Guardian’s deputy music editor, Laura Snapes, the assistant TV editor, Ammar Kalia, and books site editor, Sian Cain, discuss their favourite music, TV and books from the past six months and what they’re looking forward to hearing, watching and reading in 2021. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/12/2031m 37s

How Lewis Hamilton became one of the UK’s top sports stars and activists

Writers Michael Eboda and Oliver Owen look at how a 12-year-old go karting champion went on to become Formula One’s most successful driver. This year, more than ever, Hamilton has also been leading the fight against racism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/12/2028m 0s

The new strain of coronavirus that has cancelled Christmas

Guardian health editor Sarah Boseley looks at the fast-spreading Covid variant that has prompted the prime minister to put London, the south east and the east of England into tier 4 and more than 40 countries to ban UK arrivals because of concerns about the spread. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/12/2022m 38s

From Wuhan to an ICU in Wales: the people who helped us report the pandemic

Throughout 2020 we have reported on the shocking developments as Covid-19 swept through Britain, changing our way of life in a flash. In this episode we revisit people who helped us tell the story, from Wuhan, ICU wards, care homes and unemployment claims to a blind date that led to romance. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/12/2037m 30s

The Georgia runoff: an historic battle for control of the US Senate

Reporter Khushbu Shah discusses the runoff in Georgia. Republicans have 50 seats in the Senate and the Democrats 48, so much hangs on the outcome of the 5 January election. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/12/2027m 8s

Returning to Tunisia on the tenth anniversary of the Arab Spring – podcast

The Guardian’s international correspondent Michael Safi returns to Tunisia where, 10 years ago, fruit seller Mohamed Bouazizi set fire to himself. It triggered a wave of protests across North Africa and the Middle East which have had profound ramifications. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/12/2027m 46s

Rugby's dementia crisis – podcast

In 2003 Steve Thompson helped England win the World Cup, playing a part in one of the most memorable endings to a match. Now aged 43, he finds he has no memory of the match at all – and has been diagnosed with early onset dementia. Andy Bull describes how a group of former stars are launching a legal case against the sport’s governing bodies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/12/2030m 27s

Deal or no deal: where is Brexit heading?

With talks ongoing between the EU and UK over the final Brexit trade deal, the clock is running down and the January deadline is looming. Daniel Boffey explains what is at stake. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/12/2023m 23s

Has Labour lost its 'red wall' forever?

Labour’s historical general election victories were built on a bedrock of safe seats in the north of England. But a year ago it lost some of its most prized seats to the Conservatives – and so far voters appear to have few regrets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/12/2029m 36s

Looking back at 2020: a year like no other

A look back at how the Guardian covered a year that began with the outbreak of a pandemic, witnessed global anti-racism protests after the killing of George Floyd, and ended with the voting out of President Donald Trump. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/12/2033m 56s

The mystery of the Gatwick drone

In December 2018 a series of drone sightings forced the closure of Gatwick airport, causing chaos for Christmas travellers. Two years on and with the mystery still unsolved, Samira Shackle investigates what really happened. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/12/2027m 23s

The spy cops scandal: part 2

The Guardian’s Paul Lewis and Rob Evans on investigating one of British police’s most covert units and learning that they were using the identities of dead children. Frank Bennett reflects on the impact of discovering that a police spy had stolen his dead brother’s identity to infiltrate two leftwing organisations, and to deceive a woman into a sexual relationship. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/12/2034m 24s

The spy cops scandal: part 1

Guardian investigative editor Paul Lewis and investigative reporter Rob Evans detail their decade-long investigation into undercover policing. At least 139 officers were given fake identities to monitor the inner workings of more than 1,000 political groups. Jessica, a former member of one of those groups, describes the impact of discovering that a man with whom she began a relationship in 1992 was actually an undercover cop. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/12/2045m 27s

The rise of the 'chumocracy'

Investigations into how lucrative Covid-related government contracts were awarded have raised serious questions about cronyism. The Guardian’s Felicity Lawrence and David Pegg investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/12/2031m 44s

How to have a Covid-safe Christmas

Families across the UK are being allowed to gather over Christmas, even as tens of thousands of new coronavirus cases are recorded each day. Is it possible to have a safe holiday? The Guardian’s science correspondent Nicola Davis offers some guidance Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/12/2024m 43s

Three women on their fight for abortion rights in Poland

Academic Agnieszka Graff, lawyer Karolina Więckiewicz and gynaecologist Anna Parzyńska discuss their fight for abortion rights. An attempt by authorities to impose a near-total ban on terminations has sparked mass demonstrations across the country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/12/2023m 35s

The Crown – fact or fiction?

Royal correspondent Jennie Bond, who has covered some of the most dramatic years of the monarchy, discusses whether The Crown is an accurate depiction of palace life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/12/2026m 27s

The Nobel peace prize winner fighting a war in Ethiopia

Ethiopia’s prime minister was feted by the international community as a reformer and a peacemaker. Now, as the Guardian’s Jason Burke explains, he has launched a major military campaign in the north of his country that threatens the stability of the region. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/12/2032m 14s

He risked his life fighting the Californian wildfires, now he faces deportation

For weeks, the Guardian US reporter Sam Levin has been speaking to Bounchan Keola, who is being detained by Ice and facing deportation to Laos, a country he left when he was four, despite having risked his life to fight wildfires in California this year. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/11/2026m 27s

Is former Elite boss Gerald Marie the Harvey Weinstein of the fashion industry?

Wendy Walsh was 17 when she moved to Paris to be a model. Within weeks of arriving, Walsh alleges, she was raped by Gérald Marie. She is one of 16 women who have spoken to the investigative reporter Lucy Osborne, who has spent the past year looking into whether Marie was a sexual predator. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/11/2028m 42s

How the Covid-19 pandemic has increased Amazon's dominance

As high street rivals were forced to close this year, Amazon has gone from strength to strength. But reports of conditions in some of its huge warehouses have brought a new level of scrutiny, as John Harris explains. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/11/2024m 35s

A vaccine revolution

Results from clinical trials have shown that the world has three apparently highly effective vaccines for Covid-19. With the race now on for regulatory approval, production and distribution, is the end of the pandemic within reach?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/11/2027m 41s

Racism within the Windrush compensation scheme

The Guardian’s Amelia Gentleman wrote her first story on the Windrush scandal almost three years ago – yet she is still hearing from people facing injustice. Alexandra Ankrah, the most senior black Home Office employee in the team responsible for the Windrush compensation scheme, discusses why she resigned this year, describing the scheme as systemically racist and unfit for purpose while Samantha Cooper describes her frustrations with trying to access financial help. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/11/2028m 46s

Gary Younge on minority voters and the future of the Republican party

A look at the history of US voting rights and what the changing demographics of the country mean for Republicans. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/11/2031m 42s

How Samuel Paty's murder reignited France's free speech debate

The murder of a schoolteacher who had shown his class cartoons of the prophet Muhammad during a lesson on free speech has rekindled a debate in France over secularism and the state’s role in regulating free expression. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/11/2034m 43s

How will Joe Biden reset US relations with the world?

Joe Biden will enter the White House in 2021 facing numerous domestic crises. But as Patrick Wintour explains, he cannot ignore the rest of the world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/11/2026m 1s

What does the turmoil in Downing Street mean for Britain?

Boris Johnson has gotten rid of his chief adviser, Dominic Cummings, and his director of communications, Lee Cain. Katy Balls explains what it means for Brexit and the government’s handling of the Covid crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/11/2029m 46s

What will it take for Donald Trump to concede defeat?

Donald Trump is continuing to dispute the result of the US election and, far from offering his concession, is instead claiming victory. Lawrence Douglas describes what Trump’s behaviour means for the country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/11/2029m 40s

Why a plan to cut pollution is making people across England so angry

A slew of initiatives from local councils have meant drivers being moved off residential streets and on to busier main roads. But while many residents support the schemes, the measures have provoked protests. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/11/2020m 14s

Adrian Chiles on being diagnosed with ADD as an adult

A year ago, the broadcaster Adrian Chiles opened a book on attention deficit disorder (ADD). Suddenly the good, the bad and the mad bits of his life started to make sense. He describes the impact the diagnosis has had on his life. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/11/2027m 36s

The Karens: can friendship trump politics?

Karen Ward and Karen Cotter live in the town of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. There is one thing on which they really don’t agree: politics, and in particular, Donald Trump. Yet despite everything that sets them apart, these two women have become close friends and believe there is a way to heal the political rift that has torn apart so many communities in the past four years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/11/2033m 32s

The life and death of White Helmets' founder James Le Mesurier

James Le Mesurier died a year ago today. The Guardian’s Martin Chulov describes the immense pressure the co-founder of the White Helmets was under, as he saw the organisation he built appear to be slipping away from him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/11/2032m 54s

Labour's battle to root out antisemitism

Following the publication of the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in the Labour party its leader Keir Starmer called it a ‘day of shame’. Jessica Elgot reports on how the party is moving forward. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/11/2028m 33s

US election 2020: can Joe Biden unite America?

After days of tense counting in key states, Joe Biden was confirmed as the winner of the US election, beating the incumbent Donald Trump. But as David Smith explains, his job of uniting the country begins now – and it won’t be easy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/11/2024m 55s

US election 2020: will Donald Trump accept the result?

Joe Biden was still leading Donald Trump in the tense race to the critical 270 electoral votes as counting continued in key states. Jonathan Freedland describes an election that has provided one clear message: the US remains divided. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/11/2029m 51s

Light at the end of the lockdown tunnel

It’s day one of the lockdown in England, and it’s been a turbulent week in US politics. Thankfully Robin McKie, the Observer’s science editor, has some good news on the race to find a vaccine. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/11/2025m 23s

US election 2020: how the night unfolded

It’s been a night of increasingly tense election results. Pollsters had projected a big win for the Democratic candidate, Joe Biden, but with the major swing states too close to call at the time of recording, his route to the White House appeared to be narrowing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/11/2025m 55s

US election 2020: what kind of president would Joe Biden be?

If Joe Biden is elected president this week, it will be the culmination of a career in politics that has seen successes as well as controversies. Journalist and biographer Evan Osnos examines what his past can tell us about the kind of president he could become. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/11/2041m 50s

US election 2020: who are the voters sticking with Trump?

Donald Trump faces a major challenge to repeat the swing states victory he achieved in 2016. The Guardian’s Chris McGreal takes a US election road trip and meets voters who explain why they are standing by the White House incumbent. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/11/2030m 19s

US election 2020: Donald Trump and the rise of white supremacist extremism

White supremacist extremism is the most lethal terrorism threat to the United States. It’s a hateful ideology that the Guardian’s Lois Beckett says has infected many parts of American society. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/10/2038m 59s

Marcus Rashford, free school meals and Boris Johnson's political own goal

Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff looks at why the government has refused to extend the free school meals scheme and how the decision has backfired while Guardian journalist Aamna Mohdin reports from a food bank in Hillingdon. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/10/2027m 0s

The fight to 'EndSars' in Nigeria

The Guardian’s West Africa correspondent Emmanuel Akinwotu reports from the protests against the special anti-robbery squad (Sars), which have swept Nigeria and gained international support. For years, the police unit has been plagued with allegations of extrajudicial killings and abuse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/10/2022m 19s

US election 2020: are Democrats taking black voters for granted in Wisconsin?

The Guardian US reporter Kenya Evelyn grew up in Milwaukee, in the swing state of Wisconsin. She recently returned to see how this year’s pandemic, recession and Black Lives Matter protests are shifting the city’s politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/10/2022m 25s

10 years of Instagram: how it has transformed our lives

This October marks 10 years since the launch of Instagram. Tech journalist Sarah Frier looks at how it went from a tiny startup to a multibillion-dollar business, and the impact the social media company has had on our lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/10/2031m 50s

US election 2020: Can the Democrats win back trust in Ohio?

The race in Ohio has long been a reliable guide to the US election: the state’s winner usually goes on to win the presidency. In 2016, it broke decisively for Trump, but this year there are signs that its voters are turning away from the president. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/10/2029m 35s

US election 2020: can we trust the polls?

The Guardian US data editor, Mona Chalabi, casts a sceptical eye over the US polling industry that is once again predicting defeat for Donald Trump. Has it learned lessons from 2016?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/10/2029m 42s

Inside Australia’s asylum system: a possible model for the UK

Guardian Australia reporter Ben Doherty looks at the history behind Australia’s asylum seeker policies, including the controversial practice of offshore processing and resettlement. It’s one of the options the British government is allegedly considering to deter asylum seekers from attempting to cross the Channel to the UK. Journalist Behrouz Boochani, who spent seven years in detention in Papua New Guinea, discusses the impact the policy has had. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/10/2031m 49s

US elections 2020: Joe Biden and Donald Trump's possible paths to power

Lauren Gambino, political correspondent for Guardian US, discusses which states Biden will need to win to take the White House, and what Trump will need to do to retain the presidency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/10/2029m 35s

Leaded petrol, acid rain, CFCs: why the green movement can overcome the climate crisis

Guardian environment correspondent Fiona Harvey discusses why the last 50 years of environmental action have shown how civil society can force governments and business to change and why that should give campaigners optimism for the future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/10/2027m 55s

Covid in the UK: a new north-south divide?

Strict new measures have been imposed on cities in the north of England this week in an attempt to control the increasing spread of Covid-19 infections. But the way the new restrictions have been rolled out has angered local leaders and residents alike, says Josh Halliday. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/10/2026m 30s

The story of the Mangrove Nine

Guardian arts and culture correspondent Lanre Bakare discusses the Mangrove Nine, a group of black activists who found themselves on trial at the Old Bailey in 1971 after protesting against police harassment. Their story became a landmark moment in British history, though many have never heard of it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/10/2026m 12s

US election 2020: what if Trump refuses to concede?

Trump has repeatedly stated that he may refuse to accept defeat in the coming election. As Lawrence Douglas explains, things could get very messy if the result is close. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/10/2032m 46s

US election 2020: why are so many Americans being denied a vote?

Millions of American voters will be unable to cast their ballot in this year’s presidential election and those affected will be disproportionately first-time voters and from minority groups, reports Sam Levine. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/10/2029m 32s

US election 2020: who is supreme court nominee Amy Coney Barrett?

Today is the start of the confirmation process for Amy Coney Barrett, a deeply conservative judge who is Donald Trump’s pick for supreme court judge. Guardian US investigative journalist Stephanie Kirchgaessner has been looking at her career and personal life, including membership to the secretive Catholic group People of Praise, and discusses what her appointment would mean for the US. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/10/2030m 49s

Understanding the fight over trans rights – part 2

Last month the equalities minister, Liz Truss, announced that some reforms to the Gender Recognition Act would go ahead but one key aspect – allowing trans people to self-identify without a medical diagnosis - would not be adopted. The issue has divided ‘gender critical’ feminists from those who are more trans-inclusive. Is there a route to reconciliation? Listen to part 1. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/10/2048m 54s

Understanding the fight over trans rights — part 1

Stephen Whittle has been at the heart of trans activism for half a century. He discusses the legal and political progress that has been made over the past few decades while the Guardian’s Scotland correspondent Libby Brooks examines why there was a backlash over the 2015 Gender Recognition Act, which proposed a further expansion of trans rights Listen to part 2. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/10/2038m 57s

Does Sweden have the answer to living with Covid-19? – podcast

The Swedish example is regularly raised by libertarian-minded Conservatives when protesting against government restrictions aimed at quelling the spread of the virus in the UK. But what did the Scandinavian country do differently and could it be applied elsewhere?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/10/2030m 4s

US election 2020: how Covid-19 reached the White House

Donald Trump spent the weekend in hospital after developing symptoms following a positive test for coronavirus. But with confusing medical briefings and a controversial drive-by stunt, Americans are still trying to get answers as to how Trump became infected as the election approaches. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/10/2032m 34s

The ugly side of the modelling industry

When the model Emily Ratajkowski recently wrote an essay detailing the ways she has felt exploited by the modelling industry, readers were shocked. But on social media, many models responded with similar allegations. Former model Leanne Maskell and current model Magdalena Kossewska discuss their experiences, while John Horner, managing director of Models 1 looks at whether the industry needs better regulation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/10/2025m 52s

US election 2020: an ugly fight in the critical swing state of Florida

Oliver Laughland, the Guardian’s US southern bureau chief, discusses his recent road trip around Florida, a key state that Trump only narrowly won in 2016. He found two sides bitterly opposed. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/10/2027m 19s

Has Covid-19 turned the clock back on women's equality? – podcast

Women seem to be bearing the brunt of the economic fallout and taking on a greater share of domestic work and childcare. Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff looks at whether the virus has meant a huge step back for women’s rights. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/10/2029m 10s

An inevitable crisis: how Covid-19 hit universities

The academic year has started at universities across the UK but far from the promised freshers’ experience, new students are finding themselves forced to isolate and attend classes online. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/09/2030m 22s

Why has activist Nathan Law been forced to flee Hong Kong?

Nathan Law is one of Hong Kong’s most prominent democracy activists, but his years of campaigning have made him a target for the Chinese government. He discusses the toll it has taken and why he has now had to flee to London. Guardian correspondent Emma Graham-Harrison looks at what the future holds for Hong Kong. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/09/2031m 1s

Did the NHS 111 Covid helpline fail hundreds of families?

Hundreds of people believe the 111 helpline failed their relatives. Now the Guardian’s David Conn reports that they are demanding a full inquiry into the service. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/09/2027m 57s

Should men-only private members' clubs still exist?

The Garrick Club was founded in 1831 – a place where ‘actors and men of refinement and education might meet on equal terms’. Women were not allowed to be members and, almost 200 years on, that is still the case. Emily Bendell on why she is taking legal action against the Garrick and Amy Milne-Smith on the history of London’s clubland. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/09/2025m 35s

Is the UK ready for a Covid second wave?

From hospitals to care homes to community testing, the first wave of Covid-19 infections was met with unprecedented national efforts but also with panic, errors and delays. As infections begin to rise again, is the country better prepared? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/09/2032m 13s

How the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg could change America

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a pioneer of women’s rights and a liberal icon of the US supreme court. Her death last week will change the political balance of the court and has rocked the US election campaign with just weeks to go. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/09/2039m 54s

The fight over dyslexia

The question of who gets diagnosed with dyslexia and who then receives support was one of many that Guardian journalist Sirin Kale found herself examining when she began a year-long investigation into the condition. But what surprised her most was how fiery the conversation around this condition had become, with some asking whether the term dyslexia should even exist. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/09/2034m 4s

The growing influence of the QAnon conspiracy theory – podcast

The Guardian US tech reporter Julia Carrie Wong discusses the rise of QAnon, a wide-ranging and baseless internet conspiracy theory that has been festering on the fringes of rightwing internet communities for years. In recent months its visibility has exploded amid the social unrest and uncertainty of the coronavirus pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/09/2032m 53s

Former model Amy Dorris accuses Donald Trump of sexual assault

In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, the former model Amy Dorris talked to Lucy Osborne about allegations that Donald Trump sexually assaulted her at the US Open tennis tournament more than two decades ago, in an alleged incident that left her feeling ‘sick’ and ‘violated’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/09/2037m 50s

Brexit, Covid and u-turns: why Tory backbenchers are getting restless

The PM has been attempting to quell disquiet on several fronts, says the Guardian’s Jessica Elgot, with backbench Conservative MPs rebelling over the government’s latest Brexit plans, Covid-19 restrictions and a series of damaging U-turns. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/09/2027m 47s

The poisoning of Alexei Navalny

Luke Harding says alleged attack on Russian opposition figure has all the hallmarks of a state-sponsored hit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/09/2029m 21s

Why blaming young people for the Covid-19 spike could backfire

Before introducing new rules banning private gatherings of more than six people, the health secretary pointed the finger at young people for increasing rates of coronavirus. But could a blame game be counterproductive?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/09/2021m 37s

How an Austrian ski resort became the centre of Europe’s Covid-19 outbreak

When Nigel Mallender headed to Ischgl in March, he was looking forward to a fun-packed break with friends. Just four days later, he and thousands of other tourists were desperately trying to leave after authorities became aware of coronavirus cases. Mallender and the Guardian’s Philip Oltermann discuss the fallout from that week. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/09/2022m 27s

Alastair Campbell and family on living with his depression

Former Labour communications chief Alastair Campbell has always struggled with depression. He, his partner, Fiona Millar, and their daughter, Grace Campbell, discuss the impact it has had on their lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/09/2034m 11s

The women fighting sexual abuse in the factories where your jeans are made

An investigation into working conditions in garment factories in Lesotho revealed widespread sexual abuse of women. Annie Kelly travelled to southern Africa to investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/09/2027m 37s

Is democracy in America under threat?

As the US election draws closer, the Guardian’s Ed Pilkington hears from civil leaders on their fears for the integrity of the process and the future of their democracy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
09/09/2033m 46s

Rule, Britannia! and the manufacturing of culture wars

Was Rule, Britannia! going to be dropped from the Last Night of the Proms in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement? Apparently not, and yet Boris Johnson was moved to comment on the story. Guardian columnist Nesrine Malik looks at how culture wars have entered mainstream politics. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
08/09/2029m 3s

The life and death of Belly Mujinga

Guardian writer Sirin Kale spoke to friends and family of Belly Mujinga about her life and death. Belly, a transport worker and mother to an 11-year-old girl, developed Covid-19 after being allegedly spat on during her shift at London’s Victoria station. Her death made headlines and raised pressing questions about racial injustice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/09/2031m 57s

Will Trump’s law and order gamble pay off?

The Guardian’s US Washington DC bureau chief, David Smith, discusses Donald Trump’s law and order gamble on the election, and how it is impacting on Democratic candidate Joe Biden’s campaign. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/09/2026m 11s

Coronavirus: is it safe for children to go back to school?

As millions of children in England and Wales return to class, the Observer’s science editor, Robin McKie, weighs up the potential health impact Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/09/2021m 8s

What has four years of Donald Trump meant for the climate crisis?

Guardian US environment reporter Emily Holden looks at the Trump administration’s impact on the environment, and the consequences for the climate crisis if he wins another term. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
02/09/2028m 23s

Who are Europe's Dreamers?

Across Europe, millions of young people live in undocumented limbo, in fear of deportation from the countries they grew up in because of hostile migration policies. Now, inspired by their US counterparts, they are fighting for recognition and residency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
01/09/2026m 20s

Leonardo da Vinci and the mystery of the world's most expensive painting

Salvator Mundi was sold for a record $450m at auction in 2017 to an anonymous bidder. But the painting’s provenance as the work of Leonardo has been called into question. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/08/2024m 55s

Revisited: the Windrush scandal isn't over

Hubert Howard, a prominent Windrush victim, died recently without receiving compensation or a personal apology. Amelia Gentleman discusses his case. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/08/2023m 45s

Revisited: Understanding white privilege, with Reni Eddo-Lodge

Reni Eddo-Lodge became the first black British author to top the UK bestseller list with her 2017 book Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race. In an exclusive interview with the Observer’s Nosheen Iqbal, she talks about global discussions on racism after the death of George Floyd. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/08/2023m 42s

Revisited: How the Bristol bus boycott changed UK civil rights

Marvin Rees, the mayor of Bristol, discusses the 1963 Bristol bus boycott – a protest that proved to be a watershed moment in the UK’s civil rights movement. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
26/08/2022m 11s

Revisited: Britain's reckoning with its racist past

UK Black Lives Matter protests have taken place across the country. They have not just been about solidarity with the US or racism in the UK today, but also about the need to address Britain’s past and the impact of that legacy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
25/08/2031m 28s

Revisited: The death of George Floyd – will anything change? – podcast

Protests ignited across the world after footage showed George Floyd dying under the knee of white Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Paul Butler discusses the history of police killings of black Americans and whether Floyd’s death could prove a turning point. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/08/2038m 22s

Who are the people risking everything to cross the Channel?

The number of migrants arriving in small boats this year is already double that of 2019. But those who manage to reach the UK find themselves confronted by a government that is increasingly hostile to new arrivals. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/08/2029m 4s

The trouble with England's test and trace system

Josh Halliday on failures in England’s coronavirus contact-tracing system as the government replaces the main public health body in the middle of the pandemic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/08/2027m 54s

The A-levels fiasco

When schools in England closed in March in response to the coronavirus pandemic, it meant students could no longer take their final exams. Instead, computer modelling was used to assign grades. But when results were unveiled, there was shock and anger at what looked like clear injustices. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
19/08/2031m 5s

Can Kamala Harris help Joe Biden win the US presidency?

Kamala Harris is the first Indian American and the first black woman to run for US vice-president on a major party ticket. Lauren Gambino discusses why as Joe Biden’s running mate, Harris is in prime position to go one step further. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
18/08/2030m 5s

The return of Extinction Rebellion

When Extinction Rebellion began holding protests two years ago, the movement could not have predicted its rapid growth or the public support it received. But missteps and the Covid-19 shutdown meant the group lost momentum. Now, it is planning a series of new actions in the autumn. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/08/2026m 29s

Could a Belarus protest movement bring down Alexander Lukashenko?

Since Sunday, thousands of protesters have taken to the streets in Belarus to contest the claimed election victory of the president, Alexander Lukashenko, and met a violent police response. Hanna Liubakova, a Belarusian journalist, describes being on the ground, while the Guardian’s Andrew Roth looks at how Lukashenko has remained in power for 26 years. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
14/08/2027m 26s

How Britain’s deepest recession is becoming a jobs crisis

Economics writer Aditya Chakrabortty describes how the coronavirus crisis has sent Britain plunging into a record recession and what it means for the millions of people fearing for their jobs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
13/08/2027m 6s

How one hotel outbreak of Covid-19 put an Australian state back in lockdown

Melbourne bureau chief, Melissa Davey, discusses life under a second lockdown after a hotel security breach in Victoria caused a resurgence of coronavirus cases. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
12/08/2022m 12s

After the Beirut explosion: anger, grief and the fall of the government

It is a week since the devastating explosion rocked Beirut, killing more than 200 people. As shock turns to anger and the cabinet resigns, Bethan McKernan and Martin Chulov report on what comes next for the Lebanese people. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
11/08/2027m 53s

The Covid long haul: why are some patients not getting better?

When the Guardian’s Luke Harding began suffering symptoms of Covid-19 he assumed he would be laid low for a couple of weeks. Five months later he is still unwell, and he has found hundreds of people like him. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
10/08/2022m 3s

Hadley Freeman on the future of the royals

Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman discusses the fallout from the publication of Finding Freedom, a biography of Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, and the latest allegations surrounding Prince Andrew. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
07/08/2024m 18s

How did President Trump get his pandemic response so wrong?

While Donald Trump continues to claim the US is ‘doing very well’ in its fight against Covid-19, the figures suggest a different story. The US has the highest death toll in the world, with over 150,000 deaths. Guardian US chief reporter Ed Pilkington examines how Trump got it wrong. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
06/08/2031m 28s

How the world is coping with coronavirus, six months on

From Portugal to Pakistan, the Guardian’s international correspondent Michael Safi looks at the different ways countries have been affected by the virus and the impact that is having on the lives of people there. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
05/08/2026m 40s

How cancer care was sidelined in the fight against Covid-19 – podcast

With NHS services consumed by the fight against Covid-19 in recent months, cancer care has been dealt a blow, with diagnoses and treatment delayed. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
04/08/2026m 5s

Inside Lebanon's economic crisis

Scenes of economic despair are visible across Lebanon – from shops to homes, businesses to hospitals. Guardian journalist Martin Chulov discusses why the country is verging on financial collapse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
03/08/2025m 53s

Young, British and black: a generation rises

The death of George Floyd in the US provoked massive anti-racism protests in the UK. Guardian reporter Aamna Mohdin discusses what she learned when she interviewed 50 young Britons at the heart of those rallies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
31/07/2021m 38s

How did Britain get so overweight?

As the government launches a newly interventionist strategy to tackle obesity, the Guardian’s Felicity Lawrence looks at whether it goes far enough to take on the might of the food industry. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
30/07/2028m 57s

Is Donald Trump playing politics with the Portland protests?

The anti-racism protests in Portland appeared to be dwindling in size until Donald Trump sent in federal officers to confront them, reports the Guardian’s Chris McGreal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
29/07/2027m 16s

Will we ever achieve immunity from Covid-19?

Recent studies suggest that even where immunity is developed to Covid-19, it may be fleeting. Science editor Ian Sample looks at what this means for vaccines, treatments and living long term with the coronavirus. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
28/07/2027m 11s

Are we creating a generation of problem gamblers?

Children as young as 11 are becoming problem gamblers as apps and websites make betting easier than ever. Journalist Jenny Kleeman investigates how it has been allowed to happen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
27/07/2025m 31s

Covid-19 and the EU: 'When Italy cried for help there was silence'

When coronavirus swept through the European Union, member states called on Brussels to help. But as Daniel Boffey in partnership with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism discovered, the distress calls too often went unanswered. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
24/07/2027m 11s

The shocking truth of racism in British schools

When a teenage activist sent a callout on social media for examples of racism within schools, he was deluged with responses. Aditya Chakrabortty began to investigate. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
23/07/2030m 38s

Sketching a crisis: John Crace on the politics of coronavirus

Sketch writer John Crace reflects on a surreal parliamentary session, including the daily indignities of the coronavirus press conferences, which some cabinet members mastered – and others clearly did not. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
22/07/2031m 20s

Is Kanye West seriously running for president?

The rapper has entered the race for the White House invoking his religious beliefs. Prof Josef Sorett looks at whether West’s presidential bid is anything more than a stunt. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
21/07/2026m 15s

Perseverance: the new mission to Mars

Planetary scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson describes how the latest mission to Mars builds on centuries of discoveries about the red planet, our nearest neighbour. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
20/07/2027m 34s

Poland divided and right-wing populists win again – podcast

A narrow win for the populist incumbent Andrzej Duda in Poland’s presidential election cleared the path for the right-wing Law and Justice party to pursue anti-LGBT policies and further assault the courts and free press. The Guardian’s Christian Davies reports from Warsaw. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
17/07/2028m 34s

Who is Ghislaine Maxwell and does she hold the key to justice for Epstein’s victims?

Ghislaine Maxwell, a British socialite and daughter of the media baron Robert Maxwell, once attended parties with princes, presidents and celebrities. Now she faces up to 35 years in a US prison for her alleged involvement in Jeffrey Epstein’s sex trafficking of underage girls. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
16/07/2030m 5s

In conversation with Benjamin Zephaniah and George the Poet

Benjamin Zephaniah and George the Poet are two of Britain’s most successful contemporary poets. They discuss why, despite being born a generation apart, their work is still exposing racial injustice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
15/07/2032m 39s
-
-
Heart UK
Mute/Un-mute