TED Health

TED Health

By TED

What does exercise do to your brain? Can psychedelics treat depression? From smart daily habits to new medical breakthroughs, welcome to TED Health, with host Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider. TED speakers answer questions you never even knew you had, and share ideas you won't hear anywhere else, all around how we can live healthier lives.

Episodes

What happens to sex in midlife? A look at the "bedroom gap" | Maria E. Sophocles

Menopause isn't just hot flashes, says gynecologist and sexual medicine specialist Maria Sophocles. It's often accompanied by overlooked symptoms like painful sex or loss of libido. Shedding light on what she calls the "bedroom gap," or the difference in sexual expectations of men and women in midlife due to societal norms, Sophocles advocates for education, medical advancement and a new understanding of menopause — because sex should be pleasurable and comfortable for everyone. After the talk, join Shoshana for a conversation with OB/GYN and women’s health advocate Dr. Jessica Shepherd.
21/05/2434m 16s

How to make smart decisions more easily | Alexandra Panzer

Everything our bodies do— whether physical or mental— uses energy. Studies have found that many individuals seem to have a daily threshold for making decisions, and an extended period of decision-making can lead to cognitive exhaustion. So, what kinds of choices lead us to this state, and what can we do to fight fatigue? Explore the psychology of decision fatigue and ways you can avoid fatigue. Directed by Jolene Tan, narrated by Alexandra Panzer and music by Jeremie Lim.
14/05/247m 8s

The science of laughter | Sasha Winkler

Isn’t it odd that, when something’s funny, you might show your teeth, change your breathing, become weak and achy in some places, and maybe even cry? In other words, why do we do this bizarre thing that is laughter? Since there’s no archaeological record of laughter, it’s impossible to say exactly how and why it evolved, but scientists have some theories. Sasha Winkler digs into the reflex. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Hanna Rybak, narrated by Susan Zimmerman and the music is by Jarrett Farkas.
07/05/247m 1s

What if a simple blood test could detect cancer? | Hani Goodarzi

Catching cancer at its earliest stages saves lives. But in a body made up of trillions of cells, how do you spot a small group of rogue cancer cells? Biomedical researcher Hani Goodarzi discusses his lab's discovery of a new class of RNAs that, when paired with emerging AI tools, could help detect cancer earlier, more precisely and even through routine blood work — potentially transforming our understanding of the disease.
30/04/249m 6s

The diseases that changed humanity forever | Dan Kwartler

Since humanity’s earliest days, we’ve been plagued by countless disease-causing pathogens. Invisible and persistent, these microorganisms and the illnesses they incur have killed more humans than anything else in history. But which disease has been the deadliest? Dan Kwartler digs into how human progress and innovation throughout history exposed us to surprising new maladies. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by BASA, narrated by Addison Anderson and the music was created by Igor Figueroa, Estudio Mono.
23/04/247m 25s

A campaign for period positivity | Ananya Grover

Having your period is exhausting — and for many people across the world, menstruation is even more challenging because of stigmas and difficulty getting basic hygiene supplies, says social activist Ananya Grover. In this uplifting, actionable talk, she shares how "Pravahkriti," her campaign to spread period positivity, creatively engages with everyone to promote menstrual health, raise awareness and break taboos around periods. After the talk, Shoshana has a sweeping conversation with OB/GYN, activist and fellow TED Audio Collective host Dr. Jen Gunter on breaking down period myths and misconceptions.
16/04/2428m 55s

Do gut microbes control your personality? | Kathleen McAuliffe

Biologist Kathleen McAuliffe dives into emerging research that explores how certain gut bacteria can influence major parts of who you are, from your personality to life-changing neurological disorders. Learn more about how this ongoing clinical medical and pharmaceutical research might change how we treat disease — and discover the impact of your internal microbial makeup on your mood, weight and more.
09/04/2412m 18s

How to hack your brain when you're in pain | Amy Baxter

Have we misunderstood pain? This week we’re revisiting a talk by researcher and physician Amy Baxter as she unravels the symphony of connections that send pain from your body to your brain, explaining practical neuroscience hacks to quickly block those signals. Her groundbreaking research offers alternatives for immediate pain relief -- without the need for addictive opioids. (Followed by a Q&A with TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers)
02/04/2417m 26s

What happens as we die? | Kathryn Mannix

Have we lost the practical wisdom of what happens as people die? With lessons from a career witnessing thousands of people's final breaths, palliative care expert Kathryn Mannix urges us to demystify the experience of death, sharing how a better understanding of what actually happens can reduce fear in the final days, for you and your loved ones. After the talk, Shoshana shares how one patient changed her life forever and led her to found endwellproject.org, a platform dedicated to making end-of-life PART of life.
26/03/2423m 17s

Is alternative meat the recipe for a healthier planet? | Tao Zhang

A Chinese saying goes, "There's no pleasure in eating without meat." And the data backs that up: every year, China consumes 26 percent of the world's meat and 45 percent of its seafood — numbers that could grow alongside rising incomes. Impact investor Tao Zhang shows why getting Chinese consumers to switch to plant-based alternatives is vital to tackling climate change and explores how it's also a massive business opportunity to bring tasty, affordable new proteins to market.
19/03/2412m 47s

What happens when we deny people abortions? | Diana Greene Foster

How does getting an abortion — or not — influence a woman's life? Demographer Diana Greene Foster puts forward the results of The Turnaway Study, her landmark work following nearly 1,000 women through abortion or childbirth, presenting definitive data on the long-term physical, mental and economic impacts of the right to choose on pregnant people and their families. "Access to abortion is about control over one's body, life and destiny," says Foster.
12/03/2416m 13s

My mission to change the narrative of mental health | Glenn Close

Legendary actor and mental health advocate Glenn Close is on a quest to change how we think about mental health, starting with her decision to speak out about her own family's struggles — a brave choice considering the stigma that pervades the topic. In a sweeping conversation with TEDWomen curator Pat Mitchell, Close shares the inspiration behind the advocacy group she founded to combat the crisis, underscoring the transformative power of community and the critical need for comprehensive mental health care systems.
05/03/2413m 43s

Why you shouldn't trust boredom | Kevin H. Gary

Are you actually bored, or is something else going on? Educator Kevin H. Gary shares three practical takeaways to deal with the doldrums, so you can take control of your attention, figure out which feelings to trust and name the real problem. After the talk, join Shoshana for a sweeping conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Harstad on the relationship between boredom and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD.
27/02/2427m 15s

Racism has a cost for everyone | Heather C. McGhee

Racism makes our economy worse — and not just in ways that harm people of color, says public policy expert Heather C. McGhee. From her research and travels across the US, McGhee shares startling insights into how racism fuels bad policymaking and drains our economic potential — and offers a crucial rethink on what we can do to create a more prosperous nation for all. "Our fates are linked," she says. "It costs us so much to remain divided." After the talk, Shoshana sits down with Dr. Aletha Maybank — physician, chief health equity officer and senior vice president of the American Medical Association — to discuss how our neighborhoods impact our health.
20/02/2428m 40s

The science behind how sickness shapes your mood | Keely Muscatell

Your immune system is more socially aware than you think, says social neuroscientist and psychology professor Keely Muscatell. Investigating the interconnectedness of your mood and your inflammatory system, she offers an evolutionary reason as to why being sick may make you feel depressed — and vice versa.
13/02/2416m 18s

Are you really as good at something as you think? | Robin Kramer

Does confidence equal competence? Not quite. In a talk that will make you better aware of yourself, experimental psychologist Robin Kramer delves into the Dunning-Kruger effect — which argues that those who are least capable often overestimate their skills the most — and explores just how good you are at judging your own abilities.
06/02/2411m 4s

Which is better for you: "Real" meat or "fake" meat? | Carolyn Beans

In 2021, a survey of over 1,000 Americans found that nearly two-thirds had eaten plant-based meat alternatives in the past year. Many cited potential health and environmental benefits as their motivation. But are these alternative meats actually better for us and the planet? Carolyn Beans investigates the differences between farmed meat, plant-based meat, and lab-grown meat. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Laura Jayne Hodkin, and narrated by Alexandra Panzer and the music is by Carlos Magaña Bru, cAMP Studio.
30/01/247m 23s

The truth about human population decline | Jennifer D. Sciubba

With birth rates falling, the worldwide human population is getting older and smaller. According to traditional thinking, this spells a future of labor shortages, bankrupt social security systems and overall economic collapse. Before you panic about the end of life as we know it, political demographer Jennifer D. Sciubba has a thoughtful playbook for managing the new normal — including ideas on the future of work and migration — and a reminder that a resilient future relies on present-day action.
23/01/2412m 36s

Why I gave my teenage daughter a vibrator | Robin Buckley

"Why does a vibrator make us uncomfortable, but Viagra does not?" asks cognitive-behavioral coach Robin Buckley. Sharing her own personal story of empowering her teenage daughter to explore the power of pleasure, Buckley encourages parents to talk to their teens about healthy sexual development -- and shares why the awkward conversations are worth it.
16/01/2413m 26s

So much sitting, looking at screens. Can we combat our sedentary lives? | Body Electric

This is an episode we think you might enjoy of Body Electric. TED Radio Hour host Manoush Zomorodi investigates the relationship between our technology and our bodies and asks: How are we physically adapting to meet the demands of the Information Age? Why do so many of us feel utterly drained after a day spent attached to our devices? This episode explores how economic eras have shaped the human body in the past with author Vybarr Cregan-Reid. Additionally, hear from Columbia University researcher and exercise physiologist Keith Diaz on how moving our bodies (and staying off our screens) helps us feel our best.  Click here to find out more about the project: npr.org/bodyelectric
11/01/2428m 56s

Artificial skin? We made it — here's why | Anna Maria Coclite

Material scientist Anna Maria Coclite unveils "smart skin" — artificial skin technology that responds to touch, temperature and humidity like your very own. (It's actually even more sensitive than human skin!) From helping burn victims to paving the way to smarter, safer humanoid robots, Coclite highlights the broad-ranging potential of this innovation.
09/01/2411m 7s

Why you feel anxious socializing (and what to do about it) | Fallon Goodman

In crowds, at meetings, get-togethers with friends, everyday interactions: social anxiety can show up as an unwelcome guest at any time. But why? Psychologist Fallon Goodman digs into the source of social anxiety, setting the record straight about this common condition with practical solutions to help you feel the most authentically "you" while out and about. After we revisit this talk, mental health specialist Dr. Jessi Gold joins Shoshana in a sweeping conversation on social media’s impact on social anxiety and how we can best support ourselves and others.
02/01/2435m 1s

The secret to a happy life — lessons from 8 decades of research | Robert Waldinger

The happiest and healthiest people are those who have an abundance of warm connections with others, says psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, who leads the Harvard Study of Adult Development — one of the longest-running studies of adult life ever conducted. We’re revisiting a conversation that explores the link between social bonds and quality of life, as Waldinger shares insights into how to identify and strengthen the relationships that impact your well-being most. This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member. After the talk, Shoshana shares a surprising perspective shift that may boost your happiness.
26/12/2320m 18s

Are life-saving medicines hiding in the world's coldest places? | Normand Voyer

Could the next wonder drug be somewhere in Canada's snowy north? Take a trip to this beautiful, frigid landscape as chemist Normand Voyer explores the mysterious molecular treasures found in plants thriving in the cold. These scarcely investigated organisms could hold immense medical promise, he says — so long as we work quickly enough to discover them.
19/12/2313m 58s

CRISPR's next advance is bigger than you think | Jennifer Doudna

You've probably heard of CRISPR, the revolutionary technology that allows us to edit the DNA in living organisms. Biochemist and 2023 Audacious Project grantee Jennifer Doudna earned the Nobel Prize for her groundbreaking work in this field — and now she's here to tell us about its next world-changing advancement. She explains how her team at the Innovative Genomics Institute is pioneering a brand new field of science — precision microbiome editing — that uses CRISPR in an effort to solve seemingly insurmountable problems like asthma, Alzheimer's and climate change. This ambitious idea is part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.
12/12/239m 24s

What did people do before anesthesia? | Sally Frampton

The quest for anesthetics that could induce unconsciousness and enable more meticulous surgeries began around the early 3rd century CE. Before anesthesia was widely used, patients had to consciously endure every moment of surgery. So, what methods did doctors use before modern medicine caught up? Sally Frampton traces the history of anesthetic drugs. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Alexander Hellebaut, narrated by Alexandra Panzer and the music by Arthur Brouns.
05/12/2312m 18s

A flavorful field guide to foraging | Alexis Nikole Nelson

Whether it's dandelions blooming in your backyard or purslane sprouting from the sidewalk, forager Alexis Nikole Nelson is on a mission to show how freely growing flora could make its way to your plate. With contagious enthusiasm and a live cooking demo, she explains the benefits of expanding your palate to include "wild" foods that are delicious, nutritious and planet-friendly — and gives three tips for helping others go from skeptical to confident in their own food adventures. Stay tuned to hear how the honey bee plays an important role in your health as Shoshana sits down with entomologist and educator Dr. Samuel Ramsey.
28/11/2323m 34s

The single most important parenting strategy | Becky Kennedy

Everyone loses their temper from time to time — but the stakes are dizzyingly high when the focus of your fury is your own child. Clinical psychologist and renowned parenting whisperer Becky Kennedy is here to help. Not only does she have practical advice to help parents manage the guilt and shame of their not-so-great moments but she also models the types of conversations you can have to be a better parent. (Hint: this works in all other relationships too.) Bottom line? It's never too late to reconnect. After the talk, stick around for a conversation between Shoshana and author Emily Oster on how to use data in everyday parenting decisions.
21/11/2332m 46s

The world's rarest diseases — and how they impact everyone | Anna Greka

Physician-scientist Anna Greka investigates the world's rarest genetic diseases, decoding the secrets of our cells through "molecular detective work." She explains how her team is using new, advanced technology to solve decades-old medical mysteries — and shows how this work could help develop precision treatments for millions of people across the globe.
14/11/2313m 59s

Can you change your sleep schedule? | Alexandra Panzer

An early bird rises with the sun, springing out of bed abuzz with energy. Meanwhile, a night owl groggily rises much later, not hitting their stride until late in the day. How many people are truly night owls or early birds? And are our sleep schedules predetermined at birth, or can we change them? Explore how our circadian systems act as internal clocks to keep our bodies functioning properly. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Avi Ofer, narrated by Alexandra Panzer and the music is by André Aires.
07/11/2310m 52s

How to hack your brain when you're in pain | Amy Baxter

Have we misunderstood pain? Researcher and physician Amy Baxter unravels the symphony of connections that send pain from your body to your brain, explaining practical neuroscience hacks to quickly block those signals. Her groundbreaking research offers alternatives for immediate pain relief -- without the need for addictive opioids. (Followed by a Q&A with TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers)
31/10/2317m 26s

How targeted ads might just save your life | Sandersan Onie

Could the tech industry's complex algorithms support people during their darkest times, rather than just deliver targeted ads? Drawing from his own experience with depression, global mental health researcher Sandersan Onie shows how internet search behaviors can provide valuable insights into suicide risk and potentially help save lives by reaching people in a deeply personal way, at a crucial moment.
24/10/2312m 29s

Blindness isn't a tragic binary — it's a rich spectrum | Andrew Leland

When does vision loss become blindness? Writer, audio producer and editor Andrew Leland explains how his gradual loss of vision revealed a paradoxical truth about blindness — and shows why it might have implications for how all of us see the world.
17/10/237m 37s

How to calm your anxiety, from a neuroscientist | Wendy Suzuki

What if you could transform your anxiety into something you can actually use during your work day? Neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki shares two evidence-based activities — breathing and movement — that can soothe your nervous system and fuel creativity and connection.
10/10/239m 9s

The epidemics that almost happened | George Zaidan

In 2013, an Ebola outbreak began in Guinea. The country had no formal response system and the outbreak became the largest Ebola epidemic in recorded history. Guinea then completely overhauled their response system, and were able to successfully combat another outbreak in 2021. So what does an effective epidemic response look like? George Zaidan explores how different communities have taken action. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Gavin Edwards, Movult, narrated by Jack Cutmore-Scott, music by Cem Misirlioglu.
03/10/238m 2s

Introducing Body Electric

We’ve got a special 6-part series with an interactive twist coming your way: On Body Electric, TED Radio Hour host Manoush Zomorodi investigates the relationship between our bodies and our technology…and she has a challenge for YOU. Starts Tuesday, October 3rd
02/10/232m 0s

Sex education should start with consent | Kaz

Consent can be a tricky topic to talk about in sex education curriculums, but it doesn't have to be. This week, we're revisiting a hilarious and relatable talk where sex educator and TED Fellow Kaz offers a fresh look at teaching young people about the core principles of consent -- and shows how demystifying this topic leads to healthier and more satisfying relationships for people of all ages. Hear more from OB/Gyn Dr. Danielle Jones in conversation with our host Shoshana, as they discuss practical ways to teach consent -- in our own lives.
26/09/2319m 23s

Why is it so hard to get effective birth control in the US? | Mark Edwards

Nearly half of all pregnancies in the United States are unplanned, the result of millions of people being unable to get the birth control method that works best for them. Reproductive health advocate and 2023 Audacious Project grantee Mark Edwards discusses Upstream USA's nationwide effort to expand access to high-quality contraceptive care by integrating it into primary health-care settings -- a crucial shift towards increasing equal health opportunities and empowering people to decide when and if they want to start families. (This ambitious idea is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
19/09/238m 15s

Your right to mental privacy in the age of brain-sensing tech | Nita Farahany

Neurotechnology, or devices that let you track your own brain activity, could help you deeply understand your health. But without privacy protections, your innermost thoughts, emotions and desires could be at risk of exploitation, says neurotech and AI ethicist Nita Farahany. She details some of the field's promising potential uses -- like tracking and treating diseases from depression to epilepsy -- and shares concerns about who collects our brain data and how they plan to use it, ultimately calling for the legal recognition of "cognitive liberty" as we connect our brains and minds to technology.
12/09/2314m 15s

The tragedy of air pollution -- and an urgent demand for clean air | Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah

"Breathing clean air is every child's human right," says grassroots campaigner Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, while sharing the heartbreaking story of her seven-year-old daughter, Ella Roberta, whose asthma was triggered to a fatal point by air pollution. Now, Adoo-Kissi-Debrah is on a mission to raise awareness about the harmful effects of unsafe air on our health and the planet. In this moving talk, she details why governments have an urgent responsibility to take action on air pollution -- and ensure that all children have a chance to live full and healthy lives. After the talk our host Shoshana speaks with health policy expert Dr. Cara James on the necessary steps towards protecting everyone's right to a healthy environment.
05/09/2317m 1s

Why do we have crooked teeth when our ancestors didn't? | G. Richard Scott

According to the fossil record, ancient humans usually had straight teeth, complete with wisdom teeth. In fact, the dental dilemmas that fuel the demand for braces and wisdom teeth extractions today appear to be recent developments. So, what happened? While it's nearly impossible to know for sure, scientists have a hypothesis. G. Richard Scott shares the prevailing theory on crooked teeth. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Igor Coric, Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Salil Bhayani, cAMP Studio.
29/08/236m 39s

Why thinking about death helps you live a better life | Alua Arthur

As a death doula, or someone who supports dying people and their loved ones, Alua Arthur spends a lot of time thinking about the end of life. In a profound talk that examines our brief, perfectly human time on this planet, she asks us to look at our lives through the lens of our deaths in seeking to answer the question: "What must I do to be at peace with myself so that I may live presently and die gracefully?"
22/08/2320m 5s

Why having fun is the secret to a healthier life | Catherine Price

Have you had your daily dose of fun? It's not just enjoyable, it's also essential for your health and happiness, says science journalist Catherine Price. She proposes a new definition of fun -- what she calls "true fun" -- and shares easy, evidence-backed ways to weave playfulness, flow and connection into your everyday life. After the talk, Shoshana dives into what happens to your body when you play.
15/08/2316m 50s

Is someone you love suffering in silence? Here's what to do | Gus Worland

Lots of people talk about the need to be physically fit, but mentally fit? Not as much. In a powerful talk, mental health advocate Gus Worland shares how an experience of deep grief from his own life sparked his mission to advocate for suicide prevention -- and shows why "looking after your own village" can be as simple as sending a text message, right now, to the person you cannot imagine living without.
08/08/2312m 57s

The Internet's First Main Character? | The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks

What if the most exciting achievement in your career also created a cultural phenomenon that pushed your mental health to the brim? In this new podcast from the TED Audio Collective, host Dylan Marron explores the story behind one of the world's most controversial characters and the man who brought him to life. It's 1999, and sixteen years after its original release, a new Star Wars is finally coming. Fans have been camping out in front of theaters across the country just to be the first to see it. The beloved intergalactic saga is set to debut a slew of brand new characters, one of whom is a revolutionary CGI creation named Jar Jar Binks. Whispers begin to spread about big changes coming to the galaxy far, far away — and not everyone’s happy about it. This is the first episode of The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks. If you like what you hear, find The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks wherever you get your podcasts.
01/08/2332m 29s

Lessons from losing my mind | Andy Dunn

Neurodiversity and innovation often go hand in hand, but does that mean visionary entrepreneurs get a free pass to say and do anything they want? Bonobos founder and mental health advocate Andy Dunn shares his experience navigating bipolar I in the midst of running a successful startup, offering lessons learned on his journey to wellness and steps to create a future where everyone is able to "dream crazy dreams" -- while being held accountable.
25/07/2315m 21s

What is a poop transplant, and how does it work? | Kathryn M. Stephenson and David L. Suskind

1,700 years ago, Chinese alchemist Ge Hong was renowned for his soup that could cure diarrhea-stricken patients. It had one surprising secret ingredient: feces. While it might seem absurd, and nauseating, to consume feces, exciting new research suggests that taking poop into the body in other ways might provide health benefits. Kathryn M. Stephenson and David L. Suskind share the science of fecal microbial transplantation. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Luisa Holanda, narrated by Susan Zimmerman and music by Gabriel Maia. After the talk, Shoshana delves into how your gut microbiome impacts your overall health.
18/07/2310m 37s

How to keep house while drowning (w/ KC Davis)

Let’s face it: if chores were fun, they probably wouldn’t be called that. Because for most people, life can be overwhelming – and that means it doesn’t always look like a cleaning commercial where everyone is dancing their way to do laundry, take out trash, or smiling while washing the dishes. KC Davis is a therapist, author, podcaster, and TikToker who knows that caring for yourself can be a struggle. In this episode, she shares how radically rethinking “care” tasks – like not seeing a lack of cleanliness as shameful, or viewing messiness as a moral failure – can improve our quality of life. She also shares small strategies that could help us take better care of ourselves because we deserve it. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts This is an episode of How to Be a Better Human, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes on being a little less terrible, follow the podcast wherever you're listening to this.
11/07/2334m 51s

How does alcohol cause hangovers? | Judy Grisel

The molecule responsible for hangovers is ethanol, which we colloquially refer to as alcohol. Ethanol is present in all alcoholic beverages, and generally speaking, the more ethanol, the greater the potential for a hangover. So, how exactly does alcohol cause a hangover -- and is there any way to prevent one? Judy Grisel explores the surprising ways that alcohol affects the body. This was originally an animated TED-Ed lesson. It was directed by Anton Bogaty and narrated by Alexandra Panzer, with music by Jarrett Farkas. After the lesson, our host Shoshana dives deeper into the effects of drinking alcohol and the specific impact it may have on women's health.
04/07/239m 42s

The science of preserving sight | Joshua Chu-Tan

As you get older, your eyes worsen and become susceptible to a disease called age-related macular degeneration -- the leading cause of blindness, with no cure in sight. Sharing the science of how your vision works, researcher Joshua Chu-Tan offers breakthrough insights on a lesser-known RNA that could change the treatment for this disease, preserving the gift of sight for longer and improving the quality of life for millions of people.
27/06/2315m 15s

The bias behind your undiagnosed chronic pain | Sheetal DeCaria

While doctors take an oath to do no harm, there's a good chance their unconscious biases can seep into how seriously they treat pain. This week we are revisiting a talk by physician Sheetal DeCaria, as she explains how perception impacts medical care and treatment -- and calls for health care professionals to check in with themselves before checking in with their patients. Stay tuned after the talk as Shoshana digs deeper into how implicit bias impacts the quality of health care Black women receive.
20/06/2319m 35s

A sex therapist's secret to rediscovering your spark | Ian Kerner

Sex therapist Ian Kerner hears about a common problem from his patients: "failure to launch," or the inability to build and maintain sexual momentum. What's the solution? Whether you're looking to reignite the spark in your relationship or reconnect with your own desire, Kerner shares advice on how to cultivate your erotic imagination and get back on the "arousal runway." Note: This talk contains mature content. In order to protect patient privacy, the speaker has combined or adjusted several patients' experiences.
13/06/2313m 18s

Mental health care that disrupts cycles of violence | Celina de Sola

In Latin American countries like El Salvador, homicide rates are alarmingly high thanks in large part to a vicious cycle of violence -- people don't have a chance to heal from recurrent individual and collective trauma. With her team at Glasswing International, de Sola is hoping to break this cycle by equipping government employees like teachers and police officers with the skills and knowledge they need to provide mental health care to those who need it most. Their goal: to transform more than 2,000 frontline institutions in 25 of the highest risk municipalities in Central America with community-based approaches to mental health support, reaching nearly 10 million people along the way. This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.
06/06/239m 42s

What girls and women in sports need to unlock their potential | Kate Ackerman

As a sports scientist, athlete and director of the Female Athlete Program at Boston Children's Hospital, Kate Ackerman understands that women athletes need more than pretty sports bras or new sneakers to achieve peak performance -- they need true investment committed to their health and well-being. Ackerman advocates for a long overdue sports medical system that's dedicated to the study and development of women athletes, supporting lifelong success on and off the field
30/05/2317m 23s

Why nurses are key to medical innovation | Ben Gran

Nurses represent the front line of health care -- from first breaths to last moments, and everything in between. But there's a vital place nurses are missing in action, says nurse and health educator Ben Gran. He makes the case that their insight and experience rarely make it past the front lines and into the health tech they use, which could improve our health care today -- and for generations to come. Stay tuned after the talk for a sweeping conversation on empowering nurses to drive innovation between Shoshana and host of the See You Now podcast Shawna Butler.
23/05/2337m 6s

Why autism is often missed in women and girls | Kate Kahle

Women and girls with autism spectrum disorder often don’t display the behaviors people typically associate with neurodivergence, greatly impacting when, how -- and if -- they are diagnosed. Autism acceptance advocate Kate Kahle makes the case for more research into this gender discrepancy, sharing her personal experience with masking, being diagnosed as a teenager and how it allowed her to better understand herself. “Autism is not a disease, and it doesn’t need to be cured,” she says. “It’s just a different way some brains can work.”
16/05/2314m 26s

3 steps to help kids process traumatic events | Kristen Nguyen

What do we say to kids when intensely traumatic events interrupt everyday life? Whether you're a teacher, parent or community builder, educator Kristen Nguyen provides three research-backed steps for navigating these difficult conversations, restoring a sense of safety and facilitating collective healing.
09/05/2312m 30s

May the 4th Be With You: Introducing The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks

Love him or hate him, ever since his debut in Star Wars Episode 1, Jar Jar Binks has been one of the most divisive characters in movie history. And the backlash against him? It almost destroyed the man who played him. Host Dylan Marron goes back in time to learn what we got wrong about Jar Jar the first time around. Coming June 28 from the TED Audio Collective. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts or visit tedtalks.social/3HEinGi
04/05/232m 29s

Fixable: Kelli - “How do I deal with a communication breakdown?"

Kelli is a nurse at a leading teaching hospital where communication issues are not only leading to resentment – they could also be affecting patient care. After hearing from Kelli about the larger problems at play in the healthcare space, Anne and Frances discuss the link between communication and transparency and guide Kelli into taking matters into her own hands. This is an episode of Fixable, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. You can follow Fixable wherever you are listening to this.
02/05/2328m 6s

The secret to a happy life -- lessons from 8 decades of research | Robert Waldinger

The happiest and healthiest people are those who have an abundance of warm connections with others, says psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, who leads the Harvard Study of Adult Development -- one of the longest-running studies of adult life ever conducted. Exploring the link between social bonds and quality of life, he shares insights into how to identify and strengthen the relationships that impact your well-being most. (This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.) After the talk, Shoshana shares a surprising perspective shift that may boost your happiness.
25/04/2320m 18s

Where does your sense of self come from? A scientific look | Anil Ananthaswamy

Our memories and bodies give us clues about who we are, but what happens when this guidance shifts? In this mind-bending talk, science writer Anil Ananthaswamy shares how the experiences of "altered selves" -- resulting from schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, foreign limb syndrome or other conditions -- shed light on the constructed nature of identity. He breaks down where our sense of self comes from and invites us to challenge our assumptions about who we are, with the aim of building a better you and a better world.
18/04/2313m 53s

How puberty changes your brain | Shannon Odell

While we often talk about puberty's effect on the body, what gets overlooked are the fascinating changes that happen in the brain. Puberty, in fact, begins in the brain, and lasts as long as five years. And during this extended process, the brain undergoes its own transformation, thanks to estrogen and testosterone. Shannon Odell details what we know -- and still don't know -- about puberty. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Biljana Labović, narrated by Alexandra Panzer and Adrian Dannatt, with music by Weston Fonger.
11/04/236m 0s

Why you feel anxious socializing (and what to do about it) | Fallon Goodman

In crowds, at meetings, get-togethers with friends, everyday interactions: social anxiety can show up as an unwelcome guest at any time. But why? Psychologist Fallon Goodman digs into the source of social anxiety, setting the record straight about this common condition with practical solutions to help you feel the most authentically "you" while out and about. After the talk, mental health specialist Dr. Jessi Gold joins Shoshana in a sweeping conversation on social media’s impact on social anxiety and how we can best support ourselves and others.
04/04/2335m 1s

How to do laundry when you're depressed | KC Davis

Ever had a hard time doing daily household tasks -- cooking, cleaning, laundry -- and felt like a terrible person for struggling in the first place? Therapist KC Davis is here to flip that negative internalized script with a simple yet perspective-shifting fact that may change your approach to life. Learn a gentler, more practical approach to mental health as Davis shares hard-won wisdom and helpful shortcuts on how to get by when you feel like you've barely got it together.
28/03/2314m 18s

A disability-inclusive future of work | Ryan Gersava

One billion people worldwide are living with a disability, and too many of them are left unemployed or feeling like they need to hide their conditions due to discriminatory hiring practices, says social innovator and TED Fellow Ryan Gersava. With a focus on healing and disclosure, he created an online school to provide people like him with the technical skills and employment aid they need to thrive. Now he's calling for every company to initiate efforts to welcome and support those with disabilities, creating a future of work that leaves no one behind.
21/03/236m 53s

How to preserve your private life in the age of social media | Bryce Dallas Howard

Growing up in the public eye, multi-hyphenate creator Bryce Dallas Howard experienced the familiar pressure to share her life with the world on social media. But with her mother's steadfast guidance, Howard learned to set personal boundaries and savor the beauty of private moments. In this personal talk, she draws on three generations of family wisdom to remind us that "a private life makes a public life worth living." After the talk, TED Tech host Sherrell Dorsey dives into some of the dangers of oversharing on social media. If you'd like to hear more ideas on how tech is transforming humanity, follow TED Tech wherever you're listening to this.
14/03/2316m 6s

3 ways community creates a healthy life | Olivia Affuso

Maintaining a healthy weight takes more than diet and exercise, says physical activity epidemiologist Olivia Affuso. In this episode of TED Health we are revisiting her actionable talk on how you can kickstart a healthy life by tapping into the collective power of a community that supports and motivates your health goals.
07/03/239m 42s

Why is it so hard to cure the common cold? | George Zaidan

On average, adults catch more than 150 colds throughout their lives. Even with similar symptoms, the cause could be different each time. Common colds are caused by at least 8 different families of virus, each of which can have its own subtypes. How can so many different viruses cause the same illness? And is a cure even possible? Explore the two main strategies we employ to fight viruses. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Anton Bogaty, narrated by George Zaidan and the music is by Nikola Radivojevic.
28/02/236m 5s

The truth about faking orgasms | Karen Gurney

Whose pleasure is prioritized during sex, and why? Psychosexologist Karen Gurney explains how a lack of equal pleasure in the bedroom actually reflects broader gender inequality in society -- and asks you to reconsider what dynamics are at play, even behind closed doors.
21/02/2312m 40s

Introducing Good Sport

This week on TED Health we’re excited to introduce TED’s newest podcast, Good Sport, hosted by veteran sports producer Jody Avirgan. What can sports teach us about life – and each other? Good Sport brings you invigorating stories from on and off the field to argue that sports are as powerful and compelling a lens as any to understand the world – from what happens when you age out of a sport, to how we do or don't nurture talent, to analyzing how sports arguments have become the mode for all arguments. Good Sport launched on February 8th and you can find it anywhere you’re listening to this. TED Audio Collective+ subscribers on Apple Podcasts can hear the whole season early and ad-free.
14/02/233m 34s

An Olympic champion's mindset for overcoming fear | Allyson Felix

Getting pregnant as a track and field athlete is often called the "kiss of death" -- a sign your athletic career will soon end. Olympic champion, entrepreneur and proud mother Allyson Felix thinks it shouldn't be that way. She tells the story of starting a family while fighting to change her former sponsor's maternity policy -- and paving the way for others to get greater protection and more support. Her message is a testament to the power of believing in and advocating for yourself. "You don't have to be an Olympian to create change for yourself and others," she says. "Each of us can bet on ourselves." This week, the TED Audio Collective is releasing a bunch of great episodes about sports, in celebration of the launch of a new podcast: Good Sport with Jody Avirgan. It’s a show that takes sports seriously, as the best way to understand humans and our world. Check it out wherever you’re listening to this.
07/02/2310m 30s

How does heart transplant surgery work? | Roni Shanoada

Your heart beats more than 100,000 times a day. In one minute, it pumps over five liters of blood throughout your body. But unlike skin and bones, the heart has a limited ability to repair itself. So if it’s ever severely damaged, there's often only one medical solution: replacing it. Roni Shanoada explores how this complex and intricate procedure works. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Alexia Roider and Zedem Media and narrated by Addison Anderson. After the talk, Shoshana demystifies what happens if you opt to be an organ donor.
31/01/2311m 21s

The bias behind your undiagnosed chronic pain | Sheetal DeCaria

While doctors take an oath to do no harm, there's a good chance their unconscious biases can seep into how seriously they treat pain. Physician Sheetal DeCaria explains how perception impacts medical care and treatment -- and calls for health care professionals to check in with themselves before checking in with their patients. Stay tuned after the talk as Shoshana digs deeper into how implicit bias impacts the quality of health care Black women receive.
24/01/2319m 35s

How to squeeze all the juice out of retirement | Riley Moynes

Despite common belief, retirement takes more than financial planning. And while you may be beyond ready to go on permanent vacation, you also have to psychologically prepare for when the novelty wears off. Riley Moynes explains the four phases of retirement and offers a framework for how to avoid the inevitable pitfalls of taking it too easy in order to help you make the most of your golden years.
17/01/2313m 23s

Why having fun is the secret to a healthier life | Catherine Price

Have you had your daily dose of fun? It's not just enjoyable, it's also essential for your health and happiness, says science journalist Catherine Price. She proposes a new definition of fun -- what she calls "true fun" -- and shares easy, evidence-backed ways to weave playfulness, flow and connection into your everyday life. After the talk, Shoshana dives into what happens to your body when you play.
10/01/2316m 50s

What's your happiness score? | Dominic Price

How do you rediscover a happier, more purpose-driven (and less productivity-obsessed) version of yourself at the start of 2023? Quiz yourself alongside work futurist Dominic Price as he lays out a simple yet insightful four-part guide to assessing your life in ways that can help you reconnect with what's really important. Listen to the end to hear commentary from our host Shoshana Ungerleider, MD, for ideas on how to cultivate a little bit of happiness and wellbeing every day.
03/01/2319m 57s

The affordable, 3D-printed bionics of the future | Enzo Romero

Creating functional prosthetics at a fraction of the cost of imported tech, bionic innovator and TED Fellow Enzo Romero shares a groundbreaking model for designing 3D-printed assistive technology sourced from recycled materials -- built in and for his native Peru. Hear how Luke Skywalker's bionic hand in Star Wars inspired Romero to pursue mechatronics engineering and help people with disabilities and limited resources fully live again. After the talk, TED Tech host Sherrell Dorsey expands upon the benefits of manufacturing more -- with less -- and how that may transform global access to these life-changing devices. If you'd like to hear more ideas on how tech is transforming humanity, follow TED Tech wherever you're listening to this.
27/12/229m 21s

A brain implant that turns your thoughts into text | Tom Oxley

What if you could control digital devices using just the power of thought? That's the incredible promise behind the Stentrode -- an implantable brain-computer interface that collects and wirelessly transmits information directly from the brain, without the need for open surgery. Neurotech entrepreneur Tom Oxley describes the intricacies of this breakthrough technology, which is currently enrolling participants in human trials, as well as how it could help restore dignity to those with disabilities -- and transform the future of communication. After the talk, Shoshana shares a brief but informative lesson on the prevalence and history of Sign Language.
20/12/2217m 52s

Why the price of insulin is a danger to diabetics | Brooke Bennett

The price of insulin in the US is both outrageous and deadly to those who can't live without it. Diabetes advocate Brooke Bennett shares her own struggles living with type 1 diabetes and how the astronomical cost of a life-saving drug leaves millions struggling to survive. A rallying cry for an affordable and humane livelihood for those with chronic illness. Stay tuned after as Shoshana talks about the lifecycle of medication, from when it's made to how it's priced -- and the companies looking to disrupt that process to make life-saving drugs more accessible.
13/12/2222m 30s

Is there a link between cancer and heart disease? | Nicholas Leeper

Does the key to stopping cancer lie in the heart? Cardiologist Nicholas Leeper digs into emerging scientific research on the link between the world's two leading causes of death, heart disease and cancer, sharing how their biological origins may be connected -- and treatable with the same therapeutics. A call to challenge dogma and break down traditional silos in science, with the hope of saving lives. After the talk, our host Shoshana shares her own deeply personal experience with illness and the power of preventative action.
06/12/2218m 48s

It's impossible to have healthy people on a sick planet | Shweta Narayan

This week on TED Health, we are revisiting an episode focused on the Hippocratic Oath. It states: "first, do no harm" and is one of the world's oldest codes of ethics. It governs the work of physicians -- but climate and health campaigner Shweta Narayan says it should go further. In this essential talk, she highlights the interdependence of environmental and human health and emphasizes the necessity of placing health at the heart of all climate solutions.
28/11/228m 51s

How to have great sex (with Siphumeze Khundayi and Tiffany Mugo) | How To Be A Better Human

Sex is a normal part of human life, but it can also get complicated–whether you’re having it or not! The way we approach, think, and engage with our sexuality varies widely our culture, community, identity, and more. But one thing we can all strive for is healthy and safe sex. Siphumeze Khundayi and Tiffany Mugo are two sex educators and the co-founders of HOLAAfrica (HOLAA!) a Pan-Africanist digital platform that focuses on creating spaces that deal with safe sex and pleasure. Today they share insights on the kinds of mental and emotional tools we can turn to in order to have great sex, why it’s ok to take small steps on your sexual journey, and why it’s important to take ownership of your pleasure. This is an episode of How to Be a Better Human, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes on being a little less terrible, follow the podcast wherever you're listening to this.
22/11/2237m 4s

Surgeon Atul Gawande wants everyone to have a coach | ReThinking w/Adam Grant

Atul Gawande was advised by a colleague to say yes to every opportunity until he turned 40. Since then he’s been a renowned surgeon, a public health leader and government policymaker, and a bestselling author and “New Yorker” writer. In this episode of ReThinking with Adam Grant, he dives into his fascinating career and how he balances his passions for different fields, why he works with a coach even in the operating room, and how he’s working in The White House to end our current pandemic–and prevent the next one. ReThinking with Adam Grant is another show in the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes on the science of what makes us tick, follow the podcast wherever you're listening to this. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/RWAG3
15/11/2241m 35s

Why public health messaging matters | Peter Hotez

Whether you're aware of it or not, public health messaging shapes many aspects of our lives. The way medical institutions and the government communicate messages to do with our health (like when to get the flu shot or how often to wash your hands) is often the link between science and society. This week on TED Health, pediatrician and scientist Peter Hotez joins our host Shoshana Ungerleider for an expansive conversation surrounding the visibility of science in culture and its public reception.
08/11/2214m 36s

Are women more likely to get Alzheimer's? | Maria Shriver

Does Alzheimer's disease disproportionately affect women? In this episode of TED Health, author and health advocate Maria Shriver joins our host Shoshana in a conversation that delves into the gender-based factors of Alzheimer's, the shift in society's narrative around the disease -- and the importance of voicing your own concerns to your doctor.
01/11/2214m 10s

How your body could become its own diagnostic lab | Aaron Morris

In this episode, we are revisiting a talk about an inside-out approach to how we diagnose disease. Immuno-engineer and TED Fellow Aaron Morris unveils implantable technology that gives real-time, continuous analysis of a patient's health at the molecular level. "We're creating a diagnostic lab inside your body," Morris says -- and it may pave the way to diagnosing and treating disease better and faster than ever before.
25/10/225m 44s

How to protect your mental well-being online -- from a Gen-Z | Peachy Liv

Whether you have one follower or a million, we've all witnessed nastiness and hate speech on social media. YouTube content creator and mental well-being motivator Peachy Liv advocates for a kinder, more respectful digital world -- and urges us all to reflect before we share our thoughts online. Hear her tips for dealing with cyberbullying and personal insights on how we can all make the internet a safer place. After the talk, hear our host Shoshana speak with college mental health psychiatrist Jessi Gold on the importance of protecting mental health in the age of social media.
18/10/2223m 57s

Is the pandemic actually over? It’s complicated | Anthony Fauci

“Be spreaders of facts and truths,” says scientist and immunologist Dr. Anthony Fauci. Having advised seven US presidents on various disease outbreaks including COVID-19, he shares insights on the present and future of pandemics, backed up by decades of experience in public health. Hear him dive into the latest on protecting yourself from the virus, his unwavering faith in science, what he plans to do after retiring (or “rewiring”) -- and soak up some hard-won wisdom for the next generation. This conversation, hosted by TED science curator David Biello, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.
11/10/2229m 17s

How does alcohol cause hangovers? | Judy Grisel

The molecule responsible for hangovers is ethanol, which we colloquially refer to as alcohol. Ethanol is present in all alcoholic beverages, and generally speaking, the more ethanol, the greater the potential for a hangover. So, how exactly does alcohol cause a hangover— and is there any way to prevent one? Judy Grisel explores the surprising ways that alcohol affects the body. This was originally an animated TED-Ed lesson. It was directed by Anton Bogaty and narrated by Alexandra Panzer, with music by Jarrett Farkas. After the lesson, our host Shoshana dives deeper into the effects of drinking alcohol and the specific impact it may have on women's health.
04/10/229m 42s

Why are eating disorders so hard to treat? | Anees Bahji

Globally, about 10% of people will experience an eating disorder during their lifetime. And yet, eating disorders are profoundly misunderstood. Misconceptions about everything from symptoms to treatment make it difficult to navigate an eating disorder or support someone you love as they do so. Anees Bahji shares what is— and isn't— true about eating disorders. Directed by Laura Jayne Hodkin, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by Stephen LaRosa. After the talk our host Shoshana shares six treatment approaches to learn more about the path to recovery.
27/09/229m 58s

The tragedy of air pollution -- and an urgent demand for clean air | Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah

Breathing clean air is every child's human right," says grassroots campaigner Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, while sharing the heartbreaking story of her seven-year-old daughter, Ella Roberta, whose asthma was triggered to a fatal point by air pollution. Now, Adoo-Kissi-Debrah is on a mission to raise awareness about the harmful effects of unsafe air on our health and the planet. In this moving talk, she details why governments have an urgent responsibility to take action on air pollution -- and ensure that all children have a chance to live full and healthy lives. After the talk our host Shoshana speaks with health policy expert Dr. Cara James on the necessary steps towards protecting everyone's right to a healthy environment.
20/09/2217m 1s

A flavorful field guide to foraging | Alexis Nikole Nelson

Whether it's dandelions blooming in your backyard or purslane sprouting from the sidewalk, forager Alexis Nikole Nelson is on a mission to show how freely growing flora could make its way to your plate. With contagious enthusiasm and a live cooking demo, she explains the benefits of expanding your palate to include "wild" foods that are delicious, nutritious and planet-friendly -- and gives three tips for helping others go from skeptical to confident in their own food adventures. Stay tuned to hear how the honey bee plays an important role in your health as Shoshana sits down with entomologist and educator Dr. Samuel Ramsey.
13/09/2223m 34s

Transforming the US social safety net | Amanda Renteria | TED Tech

Digital public servant Amanda Renteria has seen that the millions of people who rely on government welfare services are often discouraged from seeking them out, frustrated by long lines and unnecessarily complicated processes. At Code for America, a project supported by The Audacious Project, Renteria is helping develop human-centered technology that "respects you from the start, meets you where you are and provides an easy, positive experience." She details the four factors that hinder effective delivery of government benefits and explains Code for America's plan to bring user-centric, digital-first social services to more than 13 million Americans and unlock 30 billion dollars in benefits for low-income families. After the talk, TED Tech host Sherrell Dorsey and co-founder of Promise, Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins. highlight the importance of tech that's designed for the people it's helping. If you'd like to hear more ideas on how tech is transforming humanity, follow TED Tech wherever you're listening to this.
06/09/2216m 38s

What happens to people's donated eggs and sperm after they die? | Ellen Trachman

Today, there are many ways to conceive a child, thanks to assisted reproductive technologies like IVF and egg-freezing. But the law lags behind these advancements, says attorney Ellen Trachman, troubling parents-to-be with stranger-than-fiction mix-ups and baffling lawsuits. Trachman makes the case for legality to reflect the realities of reproductive innovation -- and prompts you to reconsider what could happen to your own genetic material. Then listen to our host Shoshana as she dives into another critical example of medical technology outpacing the laws that govern it.
30/08/2217m 58s

Why ASMR is good for your brain | Craig Richard

A curious, quiet revolution of sound has taken over the internet. Physiologist Craig Richard explains the soothing brain science of Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR), tracking its rise in popularity and why this fascinating phenomenon is so relaxing to millions of people around the world. After the talk join our host Shoshana for a deep dive into how noise pollution may effect your body.
23/08/2214m 11s

How to find your voice | Greta Morgan

What would happen if the thing that defined you disappeared overnight? Whether it’s our job, our abilities, or output—many of us meld our identities with the things we do, and often forget who we are in the process. Greta Morgan is a writer and musician whose musical projects include Vampire Weekend, Springtime Carnivore, and Gold Motel. In 2020, Greta was diagnosed with a disorder that completely changed her ability to sing. In this episode of How to Be a Better Human, she shares what her vocal loss and recovery taught her about her inner voice, and how we might find our voice and resilience in both art and the creative process. We're sharing it with you because we think it's a powerful example of how our health can impact our identity and sense of being; we hope you enjoy. How to Be a Better Human is another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes, follow the podcast wherever you're listening to this.
16/08/2232m 3s

How sugar affects the brain | Nicole Avena

When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine -- an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more. Nicole Avena explains why sweets and treats should be enjoyed in moderation. (Directed by STK Films, narrated by Michelle Snow, music by Michael Dow.) Stay tuned after the talk to hear our host Shoshana and biochemist Jessie Inchauspé dive into the importance of blood sugar awareness.
09/08/2216m 27s

Racism has a cost for everyone | Heather McGhee

Racism makes our economy worse -- and not just in ways that harm people of color, says public policy expert Heather C. McGhee. From her research and travels across the US, McGhee shares startling insights into how racism fuels bad policymaking and drains our economic potential -- and offers a crucial rethink on what we can do to create a more prosperous nation for all. "Our fates are linked," she says. "It costs us so much to remain divided." After the talk, Shoshana sits down with Dr Aletha Maybank -- physician, Chief Health Equity Officer, and Senior Vice President of the American Medical Association -- to discuss how our neighborhoods impact our health.
02/08/2228m 40s

How technology has changed what it's like to be deaf | Rebecca Knill

"Complete silence is very addictive," says Rebecca Knill, a writer who has cochlear implants that enable her to hear. In this funny, insightful talk, she explores the evolution of assistive listening technology, the outdated way people still respond to deafness and how we can shift our cultural understanding of ability to build a more inclusive world. "Technology has come so far," Knill says. "Our mindset just needs to catch up." After the talk hear from former TED speaker and palliative care physician Dr. BJ Miller in conversation with our host Shoshana on how his own disability has informed the way he cares for patients.
26/07/2229m 53s

The breakthrough science of mRNA medicine | Melissa J. Moore

The secret behind medicine that uses messenger RNA (or mRNA) is that it "teaches" our bodies how to fight diseases on our own, leading to groundbreaking treatments for COVID-19 and, potentially one day, cancer, the flu and other ailments that have haunted humanity for millennia. RNA researcher Melissa J. Moore -- Moderna's chief scientific officer and one of the many people responsible for the rapid creation and deployment of their COVID-19 vaccine -- takes us down to the molecular level, unraveling how mRNA helps our bodies' proteins maintain health, prevent disease and correct errors in our genetic code. "We have entered an entirely new era of medicine," Moore says. Stay tuned after the talk to hear from the hosts of the popular podcast Unbiased Science, Dr. Jessica Steier and Dr. Andrea Love, in conversation with our host Shoshana on what they think the end of the pandemic could actually look like.
19/07/2233m 8s

From Revisionist History: Way to Go, Ohio

We’re sharing a bonus episode from our friends at Revisionist History, Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast about things misunderstood and overlooked. This season, Malcolm’s obsessed with experiments – natural experiments, scientific experiments, thought experiments. In this preview, you’ll hear about a mysterious and disfiguring disease that plagued parts of the world in the last century. No one could find a remedy, until a doctor in Ohio conducted a controversial experiment and finally found a cure…with an everyday condiment. You can hear more of Revisionist History at https://podcasts.pushkin.fm/rhs7?sid=health.
14/07/2212m 50s

Sex education should start with consent | Kaz

Consent can be a tricky topic to talk about in sex education curriculums, but it doesn't have to be. In this hilarious and relatable talk, sex educator and TED Fellow Kaz offers a fresh look at teaching young people about the core principles of consent -- and shows how demystifying this topic leads to healthier and more satisfying relationships for people of all ages. Hear more from OB/Gyn Dr. Danielle Jones in conversation with our host Shoshana, as they discuss practical ways to teach consent -- in our own lives.
12/07/2219m 23s

The inaccurate link between body ideals and health | Nancy N. Chen

Global obesity rates are on the rise, but body shaming campaigns are doing more harm than good, says medical anthropologist Nancy N. Chen. Reflecting on how the cultural histories of body ideals have changed over time, she offers a new way to view ourselves and our health by enhancing body diversity to close the gap between what's ideal and what's real.
05/07/229m 51s

We can make COVID-19 the last pandemic | Bill Gates

Building a pandemic-free future won't be easy, but Bill Gates believes that we have the tools and strategies to make it possible -- now we just have to fund them. In this forward-looking talk, he proposes a multi-specialty Global Epidemic Response and Mobilization (GERM) team that would detect potential outbreaks and stop them from becoming pandemics. By investing in disease monitoring, research and development as well as improved health systems, Gates believes we can "create a world where everyone has a chance to live a healthy and productive life -- a life free from the fear of the next COVID-19." Join our host Shoshana after the talk as she delves into why it feels like the latest science is always changing – and why that’s exactly what it’s supposed to do. We love making TED Health, and we want to make it better. So if you have a few minutes, share your thoughts at surveynerds.com/ted
28/06/2222m 46s

Inside the bizarre world of internet trolls and propagandists | Andrew Marantz

Journalist Andrew Marantz spent three years embedded in the world of internet trolls and social media propagandists, seeking out the people who are propelling fringe talking points into the heart of conversation online and trying to understand how they're making their ideas spread. Go down the rabbit hole of online propaganda and misinformation -- and learn how we can start to make the internet less toxic. After the talk, our host Shoshana shares some scientific insights on how social media interacts with your brain’s wiring. We love making TED Health, and we want to make it better. So if you have a few minutes, share your thoughts at surveynerds.com/ted
21/06/2219m 39s

How comic strips create better health care | Sam Hester

Comics creator Sam Hester is part of a growing movement within health care: graphic medicine. In short, literally drawing attention to a patient's needs and goals with pictures to foster better and more accessible caretaking. Hester shares how illustrating small details of her mother's medical story as she struggled with mysterious symptoms alongside her Parkinson's and dementia led to more empathy, understanding, communication and peace of mind. Hear more after the talk from our host, Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider, on why compassion should take center stage in doctor-patient communications.
14/06/2218m 19s

Can I speed up my metabolism?

From metabolism gummies to spicy foods, the Keto diet to intricate exercise routines—it seems there’s always something that is being sold or promoted to speed up your metabolism. But do most of us even know what our metabolism IS? And is there any way to hack it (you know, so we can eat pizza all day and not stress about it)? In this episode, Dr. Jen outlines what science knows about this process and why the myths and misunderstandings about our metabolism’s ability to change can actually do us more harm than good. This is an episode of Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter. To hear more episodes on the lies we're told—and sold—about our personal health, follow the show wherever you're listening to this.
07/06/2231m 8s

How we can protect truth in the age of misinformation | Sinan Aral

Fake news can sway elections, tank economies and sow discord in everyday life. Data scientist Sinan Aral demystifies how and why it spreads so quickly -- citing one of the largest studies on misinformation -- and identifies five strategies to help us unweave the tangled web between true and false. After the talk, Shoshana sits down with former White House Senior Adviser for the COVID-19 response, Andy Slavitt, to hear how we can spot public health misinformation.
31/05/2223m 58s

4 kinds of regret -- and what they teach you about yourself | Daniel H. Pink

Regret is one of our most powerful emotions -- and also one of the most misunderstood. Over the past two years, author Daniel H. Pink has collected a trove of more than 16,000 regrets from people in 105 countries in an effort to better understand this mysterious emotion. He shares the key patterns that emerged (it all boils down to the same four core regrets, he says) and explains how to transform your own regrets in order to create the life you've always wanted to live. This talk and conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Hear more from our host Shoshana at the end of the episode on what regret can teach us -- and when it's time to let it go.
24/05/2212m 1s

Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

Can you REALLY boost your metabolism? Is blue light actually ruining your sleep? How much vaginal yeast is healthy and when is it … too much? Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter is BACK for a second season to bust the lies you’re told—and sold—about your personal health. Join Dr. Jen Gunter as she addresses common myths– from breaking down the incredible ways our senses of taste and smell work, to debunking some of the harmful misconceptions about opioids, to addressing the biggest pain on our backs (literally). Whether you are curious to learn more about the world inside you, or are wanting to escape the online hot takes that promise to tell you how to optimize your health, this season dives even deeper into helping you understand how your body REALLY works. Body Stuff is another podcast in the TED Audio collective, and you can find it wherever you're listening to this.
20/05/221m 31s

You shouldn't have to choose between filling your prescriptions and paying bills | Kiah Williams

As prescription drug costs skyrocket in the US, thousands of people are forced to forgo lifesaving medications -- all while manufacturers and health care facilities systematically destroy perfectly good, surplus pills. Kiah Williams shares how SIRUM -- a nonprofit that delivers unused medications to families who need them most -- plans to drive down prescription prices by recycling almost a billion dollars' worth of medications in the next five years. This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change. After the talk hear from radiation oncologist Dr. Fumiko Chino, in conversation with our host Shoshana, on her heartfelt and tireless work investigating the high cost of medical care.
17/05/2217m 9s

The cure for burnout (hint: it isn't self-care) | Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski

You may be experiencing burnout and not even know it, say authors (and sisters) Emily and Amelia Nagoski. In an introspective and deeply relatable conversation, they detail three telltale signs that stress is getting the best of you -- and share actionable ways to feel safe in your own body when you're burning out. This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series. Join our host, Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider, at the end of the episode for a deeper dive into how burnout affects health care workers – and some tips to prevent it.
10/05/2224m 1s

What's your happiness score? | Dominic Price

How do you rediscover a happier, more purpose-driven (and less productivity-obsessed) self in the wake of the pandemic? Quiz yourself alongside work futurist Dominic Price as he lays out a simple yet insightful four-part guide to assessing your life in ways that can help you reconnect with what's really important. Listen to the end to hear commentary from Shoshana Ungerleider, MD, for ideas on how to cultivate a little bit of happiness and wellbeing every day.
03/05/2219m 57s

We don't "move on" from grief. We move forward with it | Nora McInerny

In a talk that's by turns heartbreaking and hilarious, writer and podcaster Nora McInerny shares her hard-earned wisdom about life and death. Her candid approach to something that will, let's face it, affect us all, is as liberating as it is gut-wrenching. Most powerfully, she encourages us to shift how we approach grief. "A grieving person is going to laugh again and smile again," she says. "They're going to move forward. But that doesn't mean that they've moved on."
26/04/2219m 50s

How to manage your stress like an ER doctor | Darria Long

How do doctors in the emergency room stay calm and focused amidst the chaos? Drawing on years of experience, ER doctor Darria Long shares a straightforward framework to help you take back control and feel less overwhelmed when life starts to get "crazy busy."
19/04/2216m 35s

Listen now: WorkLife season 5

WorkLife with Adam Grant is back for a fifth season! Organizational psychologist Adam Grant knows that you spend a quarter of your life at work–and in this show, he talks to some of the world’s most unusual professionals to discover how we can actually enjoy all that time. From breaking down “The Great Resignation” to identifying the work culture that’s right for you, to learning the art of the pitch, this season is packed with actionable insights to help you make work not suck. To hear episodes right now, find and follow WorkLife with Adam Grant wherever you're listening to this.
12/04/223m 57s

My mother's final wish — and the right to die with dignity | Elaine Fong

After a terminal cancer diagnosis upended 12 years of remission, all Elaine Fong's mother wanted was a peaceful end of life. What she received instead became a fight for the right to decide when. Fong shares the heart-rending journey to honor her mother's choice for a death with dignity -- and reflects on the need to explore our relationship to dying so that we may redesign this final and most universal of human experiences.
05/04/2228m 41s

The power of venom -- and how it could one day save your life | Mandë Holford

Venom can kill ... or it can cure. From killer sea snails to platypuses and slow lorises, marine chemical biologist Mandë Holford shares her research into animal venom and explores its potential to one day treat human diseases like cancer. Although the mechanism behind this powerful substance is still mysterious, someday, Holford says, "snail venom might just save your life."
29/03/229m 21s

A smart bra for better heart health | Alicia Chong Rodriguez

Could an everyday clothing item help protect your health? In this quick talk, TED Fellow Alicia Chong Rodriguez introduces us to a smart bra designed to gather real-time data on biomarkers like heartbeat, breath and temperature. Learn how this life-saving gadget could help close the gender gap in cardiovascular research -- and, finally, usher women's health care into the 21st century.
22/03/226m 26s

3 ways to prepare society for the next pandemic | Jennifer B. Nuzzo

What if we treated the risk of pandemics the same way we treat the risk of fires? In this eye-opening talk, infectious disease epidemiologist Jennifer B. Nuzzo unpacks how the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 sparked a cultural shift in how we defend against fires -- and explains why pandemics demand the same sort of reaction. She breaks down the data we need to gather when facing possible danger, the drills we need to ready ourselves and the defenses that could keep future threats at bay -- so next time, we're prepared.
15/03/2214m 49s

Will humans one day hibernate? | TED Radio Hour

Bears and squirrels hibernate to survive harsh conditions; why not humans? If we want to travel deep into space or combat deadly diseases, physiologist Matteo Cerri says hibernation might be the key. This is part of "Work, Play, Rest" from the TED Radio Hour. In this series, TED speakers share evolving notions of what it means to pay bills, feel joy in play, and rest our minds and bodies. To hear the full episodes, find and follow the TED Radio Hour wherever you're listening to this.
08/03/2215m 12s

A new way to help young people with their mental health | Tom Osborn

TED Fellow Tom Osborn wants more young people to have access to the mental health support they need. With the Shamiri Institute, he and his team are training 18- to 22-year-olds to deliver evidence-based mental health care to their peers in Kenya -- which has only two clinicians for every million people. Hear how their community-first, youth-oriented model could become a template to help kids across the world lead successful, independent lives.
01/03/226m 47s

It's impossible to have healthy people on a sick planet | Shweta Narayan

The doctrine of "first, do no harm" is the basis of the Hippocratic Oath, one of the world's oldest codes of ethics. It governs the work of physicians -- but climate and health campaigner Shweta Narayan says it should go further. In this essential talk, she highlights the interdependence of environmental and human health and emphasizes the necessity of placing health at the heart of all climate solutions.
22/02/228m 54s

The mood-boosting power of crying | Kathy Mendias

Here's a talk about tears -- and why crying isn't something to be afraid or ashamed of. Exploring the science behind the mood-boosting power of crying, childbirth and lactation educator Kathy Mendias shows how tears can enhance your physical and mental well-being and deepen your relationship to yourself and others.
15/02/2211m 39s

The life-changing power of assistive technologies | Jane Velkovski

"This chair is my legs -- this chair is my life," says accessibility champion Jane Velkovski, who uses a wheelchair after being diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). With clarity and poise, he shares how his first motorized wheelchair empowered him with independence and ability -- and why assistive technology should be available to anyone who needs it. "Freedom of movement, no matter on legs or on wheels, is a human right," he says.
08/02/2213m 46s

The anxiety that comes from being treated like an outsider | Valerie Purdie-Greenaway

The stress you may feel being otherized or stereotyped can take a significant toll on your health and well-being. In this thoughtful conversation, social psychologist Valerie Purdie-Greenaway reveals the true source of this anxiety (hint: it isn't the individual) and shares strategies on building resilient systems of support for ourselves and others -- so that we can build a more inclusive, empathic and just world. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
01/02/2210m 42s

How we could eat real meat without harming animals | Isha Datar

What if you could eat chicken nuggets without harming a chicken? It's possible through "cellular agriculture," says Isha Datar. In a talk about cutting-edge science, she explains how this new means of food production makes it possible to eat meat without the negative consequences of industrial farming -- and how it could fundamentally change our food systems for the better. "It's our once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get a second chance at agriculture," she says.
25/01/2211m 54s

3 ways community creates a healthy life | Olivia Affuso

Maintaining a healthy weight takes more than diet and exercise, says physical activity epidemiologist Olivia Affuso. In this actionable talk, she shows how you can kickstart a healthy life by tapping into the collective power of a community that supports and motivates your health goals.
18/01/229m 42s

A simple solution to maintaining life-saving vaccines | Nithya Ramanathan

Refrigerators do much more than store your groceries -- they're also vital to preserving and distributing vaccines. Illustrating the realities of (and threats to) global vaccine supply chains, technologist and TED Fellow Nithya Ramanathan describes how smart sensors placed in fridges that store medical supplies can provide crucial, real-time data and ensure people get the life-saving care they need.
11/01/226m 0s

The brain science of obesity | Mads Tang-Christensen

Your belly and your brain speak to each other, says obesity researcher Mads Tang-Christensen. Offering scientific proof that obesity is a disease influenced by genetics and the environment, he introduces a molecule discovered in both the brain and gut that helps control appetite -- and which could be engineered to promote healthy weight loss for those living with obesity.
04/01/2210m 17s

The cure for burnout (hint: it isn't self-care) | Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski

With the end of the year fast approaching, you may be experiencing burnout and not even know it. That’s why we’re bringing back this introspective and deeply relatable conversation, where authors (and sisters) Emily and Amelia Nagoski detail three telltale signs that stress is getting the best of you -- and share actionable ways to feel safe in your own body when you're burning out. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
28/12/2117m 45s

Maternal and child health is a human right | Aparna Hedge

Overcrowded clinics, extensive wait times and overworked doctors are taking a devastating toll on mothers and children in India. In this eye-opening talk, urogynecologist and TED Fellow Aparna Hegde exposes the systemic gaps that lead to preventable deaths every minute -- and introduces a scalable, affordable and empowering tech solution that improves maternal and child health habits, upends patriarchal family dynamics and saves lives.
21/12/218m 17s

An NFL quarterback on overcoming setbacks and self-doubt | Alex Smith

Former NFL quarterback Alex Smith almost died after a particularly rough tackle snapped his leg in 2018 -- yet he was back on the field just two years later. In this inspiring talk, he shares his hard-won insights on overcoming fear, self-doubt and anxiety that could help anyone endure life's challenges. (This talk contains graphic images.)
14/12/2113m 52s

How humanity doubled life expectancy in a century | Steven Johnson

Doubling human life expectancy in a century is our greatest achievement, says author Steven Johnson. How did we make it happen -- and can we keep it going? Backed by fascinating historical anecdotes, he shares some life-lengthening innovations and reminds us of three key things needed to make sure all of humanity enjoys these advancements in health.
07/12/2111m 38s

Could you recover from illness ... using your own stem cells? | Nabiha Saklayen

What if diseases could be treated with a patient's own cells, precisely and on demand? Biotech entrepreneur Nabiha Saklayen explains how we could harness advances in biology, machine learning and lasers to create personalized stem cell banks -- and develop medicine uniquely designed for each of our bodies.
30/11/2110m 39s

Is drinking milk essential for building strong bones? | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

Got milk? When it comes to building strong bones, you shouldn’t just stick to the dairy aisle—but many people are starting to skip it all together, with a demonic narrative evolving around milk in recent years. So which should we believe? To find out, Jen travels to the hills of Mongolia to learn all about lactase and breaks down the basics of what makes bones weak, and where to find the key ingredient to make them stronger (spoiler: it’s not in your grocery cart). This is an episode of Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes, find and follow Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter wherever you're listening to this. Read the full transcript for this episode at go.ted.com/BSTscript4
23/11/2128m 11s

The Spermageddon is coming | Am I Normal?

"You should start thinking about kids at your age! Your biological clock is ticking!” When we talk about fertility, there's one section of the population that's consistently subjected to fear mongering: the people with the ovaries. But is that worry backed up by data? Should we be stressed out about sperm too? Scientist Joe Osmundson divulges his own fears and findings on the journey to save his sperm, and Mona breaks down the scientific, cultural, and psychological elements that have shaped the way we think and talk about fertility. This is an episode of Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes, follow Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi wherever you're listening to this.
16/11/2126m 9s

The future of psychedelic medicines and healthcare | Shoshana Clubhouse Conversation

We’re in the midst of a psychedelic renaissance, where this once demonized class of drugs is now front and center receiving attention among entrepreneurs, investors, clinical trials and even patients. In this special conversation, TED Health’s Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider speaks with 3 psychedelic medical experts: internist Dr. Molly Maloof, psychiatrist and neuroscientist Dr. Dave Rabin and palliative care and oncologist Dr. Anthony Back, about how these compounds may revolutionize the future of mental healthcare.
09/11/2138m 19s

The inaccurate link between body ideals and health | Nancy N. Chen

Global obesity rates are on the rise, but body shaming campaigns are doing more harm than good, says medical anthropologist Nancy N. Chen. Reflecting on how the cultural histories of body ideals have changed over time, she offers a new way to view ourselves and our health by enhancing body diversity to close the gap between what's ideal and what's real.
02/11/219m 51s

The power of venom -- and how it could one day save your life | Mandë Holford

Venom can kill ... or it can cure. From killer sea snails to platypuses and slow lorises, marine chemical biologist Mandë Holford shares her research into animal venom and explores its potential to one day treat human diseases like cancer. Although the mechanism behind this powerful substance is still mysterious, someday, Holford says, "snail venom might just save your life."
26/10/219m 21s

Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi

Today, a trailer from Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi, a new TED Original podcast. ​​Everyone wants to know if they're normal. Is my body normal, is my brain normal, are my feelings normal? When it comes to defining “normal,” data journalist Mona Chalabi isn’t interested in averages: she goes beyond the spreadsheet and digs into the deviations, talking to experts, strangers (even her Mum!) to see the bigger picture. Along the way, she will tackle urgent, random and sometimes deeply personal questions: How long does it take to heal from heartbreak? How many friends should I have? What makes “good” sperm? And does normal even exist? Subscribe to Am I Normal? wherever you're listening to this.
19/10/212m 54s

What if mental health workers responded to emergency calls? | Leslie Herod

When you report an emergency in the US, police, firefighters or paramedics answer the call. What if mental health professionals responded, too? Colorado State Representative Leslie Herod shares a straightforward and research-backed approach that brings heart and humanity to criminal justice rather than unnecessary fines and arrests -- and keeps crises from escalating into traumatic, or even deadly, events.
12/10/219m 58s

A smart bra for better heart health | Alicia Chong Rodriguez

Could an everyday clothing item help protect your health? In this quick talk, TED Fellow Alicia Chong Rodriguez introduces us to a smart bra designed to gather real-time data on biomarkers like heartbeat, breath and temperature. Learn how this life-saving gadget could help close the gender gap in cardiovascular research -- and, finally, usher women's health care into the 21st century.
05/10/216m 26s

The tiny balls of fat that could revolutionize medicine | Kathryn A. Whitehead

What if you were holding life-saving medicine ... but had no way to administer it? Zoom down to the nano level with engineer Kathryn A. Whitehead as she gives a breakdown of the little fatty balls (called lipid nanoparticles) perfectly designed to ferry cutting-edge medicines into your body's cells. Learn how her work is already powering mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines and forging the path for future therapies that could treat Ebola, HIV and even cancer.
28/09/2112m 52s

The anxiety that comes from being treated like an outsider | Valerie Purdie-Greenaway

The stress you may feel being otherized or stereotyped can take a significant toll on your health and well-being. In this thoughtful conversation, social psychologist Valerie Purdie-Greenaway reveals the true source of this anxiety (hint: it isn't the individual) and shares strategies on building resilient systems of support for ourselves and others -- so that we can build a more inclusive, empathic and just world. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
21/09/2110m 42s

Meet the scientist couple driving an mRNA vaccine revolution | Uğur Şahin and Özlem Türeci

As COVID-19 spread, BioNTech cofounders Uğur Şahin and Özlem Türeci had one goal: to make a safe, effective vaccine faster than ever before. In this illuminating conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, the immunologists (and married couple) share the fascinating story of how their decades of mRNA research powered the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine -- and forecast what this breakthrough science could mean for the future of vaccines and other immunotherapy treatments.
14/09/2121m 17s

3 ways to create a menopause-friendly work culture | Andrea Berchowitz

Hot flashes, joint pain, anxiety, depression, difficulty sleeping -- these unforgiving menopause symptoms directly impact work but often go overlooked and under-discussed as a taboo topic, says entrepreneur Andrea Berchowitz. She gives practical advice on how to create a menopause-friendly work culture that supports gender equity and diversity retention in the workplace.
07/09/218m 42s

How to find meaning after loss | David Kessler

You may be familiar with the five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. After decades of research and his own experience with tragic loss, grief expert David Kessler ventured beyond that classic framework and sought a sixth, crucial stage: meaning. He shares practical wisdom and strategies for anyone seeking to honor a loved one's memory and move through life in light of personal loss. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
31/08/2112m 42s

Could we treat spinal cord injuries with asparagus? | Andrew Pelling

Take a mind-blowing trip to the lab as TED Senior Fellow Andrew Pelling shares his research on how we could use fruits, vegetables and plants to regenerate damaged human tissues -- and develop a potentially groundbreaking way to repair complex spinal cord injuries with asparagus.
24/08/216m 56s

An innovative way to support children with special needs | Billy Samuel Mwape

After his son was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, Billy Samuel Mwape realized that his project management skills might be put to use to support his child's special needs. In this inspiring, personal talk, he describes how project management -- the process of leading a team's work to achieve goals on a tight timeline -- can help you tackle life's biggest challenges.
17/08/2113m 3s

How your body could become its own diagnostic lab | Aaron Morris

We need an inside-out approach to how we diagnose disease, says immuno-engineer and TED Fellow Aaron Morris. Introducing cutting-edge medical research, he unveils implantable technology that gives real-time, continuous analysis of a patient's health at the molecular level. "We're creating a diagnostic lab inside your body," Morris says -- and it may pave the way to diagnosing and treating disease better and faster than ever before.
10/08/215m 44s

The science behind how parents affect child development | Yuko Munakata

Parents, take a deep breath: how your kids turn out isn't fully on you. Of course, parenting plays an important role in shaping who children become, but psychologist Yuko Munakata offers an alternative, research-backed reality that highlights how it's just one of many factors that influence the chaotic complexity of childhood development. A rethink for anyone wondering what made them who they are today and what it means to be a good parent.
03/08/2117m 23s

How COVID-19 transformed the future of medicine | Daniel Kraft

The pandemic forced the world to work together like never before and, with unprecedented speed, bore a new age of health and medical innovation. Physician-scientist Daniel Kraft explains how breakthroughs and advancements like AI-infused antiviral discoveries and laboratory-level diagnostic tools accessible via smartphones are paving the way for a more democratized, connected and data-driven future of medicine and personalized care.
27/07/2115m 7s

How motivation can fix public systems | Abhishek Gopalka

How do you fix broken public systems? You spark people's competitive spirit. In a talk about getting people motivated to make change, public sector strategist Abhishek Gopalka discusses how he helped improve the health system of Rajasthan, a state in India home to more than 80 million people, using the powers of transparency and public accountability. "Motivation doesn't just appear," Gopalka says. "Something needs to change to make you care.”
20/07/2114m 20s

The cure for burnout (hint: it isn't self-care) | Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski

You may be experiencing burnout and not even know it, say authors (and sisters) Emily and Amelia Nagoski. In an introspective and deeply relatable conversation, they detail three telltale signs that stress is getting the best of you -- and share actionable ways to feel safe in your own body when you're burning out. (This conversation, hosted by TED curator Cloe Shasha Brooks, is part of TED's "How to Deal with Difficult Feelings" series.)
13/07/2117m 45s

What causes opioid addiction, and why is it so tough to combat? | Mike Davis

In the 1980s and 90s, pharmaceutical companies began to market opioid painkillers aggressively, while actively downplaying their addictive potential. The number of prescriptions skyrocketed, and so did cases of addiction, beginning a crisis that continues today. What makes opioids so addictive? Mike Davis explains what we can do to reverse the skyrocketing rates of addiction and overdose. [Directed by Good Bad Habits, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Landon Trimble/ Playdate].
06/07/218m 40s

Maternal and child health is a human right | Aparna Hedge

Overcrowded clinics, extensive wait times and overworked doctors are taking a devastating toll on mothers and children in India. In this eye-opening talk, urogynecologist and TED Fellow Aparna Hegde exposes the systemic gaps that lead to preventable deaths every minute -- and introduces a scalable, affordable and empowering tech solution that improves maternal and child health habits, upends patriarchal family dynamics and saves lives.
29/06/218m 17s

The mood-boosting power of crying | Kathy Mendias

Here's a talk about tears -- and why crying isn't something to be afraid or ashamed of. Exploring the science behind the mood-boosting power of crying, childbirth and lactation educator Kathy Mendias shows how tears can enhance your physical and mental well-being and deepen your relationship to yourself and others.
22/06/2111m 39s

How to manage your stress like an ER doctor | Darria Long

How do doctors in the emergency room stay calm and focused amidst the chaos? Drawing on years of experience, ER doctor Darria Long shares a straightforward framework to help you take back control and feel less overwhelmed when life starts to get "crazy busy."
15/06/2110m 41s

How your memory works -- and why forgetting is totally OK | Lisa Genova

Have you ever misplaced something you were just holding? Completely blanked on a famous actor's name? Walked into a room and immediately forgot why? Neuroscientist Lisa Genova digs into two types of memory failures we regularly experience -- and reassures us that forgetting is totally normal. Stay tuned for a conversation with TED science curator David Biello, where Genova describes the difference between common moments of forgetting and possible signs of Alzheimer's, debunks a widespread myth about brain capacity and shares what you can do to keep your brain healthy and your memory sharp. (This virtual conversation was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
08/06/2121m 59s

What is pneumonia and why is it so dangerous? | Eve Gaus and Vanessa Ruiz

Every time you breathe, air travels down the trachea through a series of channels, and then reaches little clusters of air sacs in the lungs. These tiny sacs facilitate a crucial exchange: allowing oxygen from the air we breathe into the bloodstream and clearing out carbon dioxide. Pneumonia wreaks havoc on this exchange system. Eve Gaus and Vanessa Ruiz detail how pneumonia attacks the lungs. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Alexandra Panzer].
01/06/214m 34s

How to deal with stress from COVID-19 and manage your well-being | Esther Perel

How do you effectively regulate stress? Therapist Esther Perel discusses the importance of creating routines, rituals and boundaries to deal with pandemic-related loss and uncertainty -- both at home and at work -- and offers some practical tools and techniques to help you regain your sense of self. (This conversation, hosted by TED's Helen Walters, was recorded February 2021.)
25/05/2116m 0s

The past, present and future of nicotine addiction | Mitch Zeller

Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, killing more people each year than alcohol, AIDS, car accidents, illegal drugs, murder and suicide combined. Follow health policy expert Mitch Zeller into the murky depths of the tobacco industry as he details the sordid history of nicotine addiction -- and invites us to imagine a world where policy change helps stop people from becoming addicted in the first place.
18/05/2113m 49s

The next software revolution: programming biological cells | Sara-Jane Dunn

The cells in your body are like computer software: they're "programmed" to carry out specific functions at specific times. If we can better understand this process, we could unlock the ability to reprogram cells ourselves, says computational biologist Sara-Jane Dunn. In a talk from the cutting-edge of science, she explains how her team is studying embryonic stem cells to gain a new understanding of the biological programs that power life -- and develop "living software" that could transform medicine, agriculture and energy.
11/05/2114m 4s

What it means to be intersex | Susannah Temko

For intersex people -- those born with sex characteristics outside the traditional definitions of female and male -- the stakes to appear "normal" are high. Drawing on her personal experience, Susannah Temko reveals the shame, prejudice and harm faced by the intersex community, as they're forced to conform to a binary understanding of sex that ultimately hinders their health and well-being. She calls on us all to discard outdated notions of biological sex and accept the complexity within humanity.
04/05/2114m 27s

My mother's final wish — and the right to die with dignity | Elaine Fong

After a terminal cancer diagnosis upended 12 years of remission, all Elaine Fong's mother wanted was a peaceful end of life. What she received instead became a fight for the right to decide when. Fong shares the heart-rending journey to honor her mother's choice for a death with dignity -- and reflects on the need to explore our relationship to dying so that we may redesign this final and most universal of human experiences.
27/04/2121m 29s

Why are drug prices so high? Investigating the outdated US patent system | Priti Krishtel

Between 2006 and 2016, the number of drug patents granted in the United States doubled -- but not because there was an explosion in invention or innovation. Drug companies have learned how to game the system, accumulating patents not for new medicines but for small changes to existing ones, which allows them to build monopolies, block competition and drive prices up. Health justice lawyer Priti Krishtel sheds light on how we've lost sight of the patent system's original intent -- and offers five reforms for a redesign that would serve the public and save lives.
20/04/2112m 48s

How menopause affects the brain | Lisa Mosconi

Many of the symptoms of menopause -- hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, memory lapses, depression and anxiety -- start in the brain. How exactly does menopause impact cognitive health? Sharing groundbreaking findings from her research, neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi reveals how decreasing hormonal levels affect brain aging -- and shares simple lifestyle changes you can make to support lifelong brain health.
13/04/2112m 30s

The Biology of Sex | TED Radio Hour

Over a century ago, one part of our DNA got labelled the "sex chromosomes." Science journalist and Radiolab producer Molly Webster explains the consequences of that oversimplification. This is an excerpt from the TED Radio Hour episode The Biology of Sex. To listen to the whole episode, and to browse many other episodes from the podcast, find the TED Radio Hour wherever you're listening to this.
06/04/2113m 27s

What causes panic attacks and how you can prevent them | Cindy J. Aaronson

Countless poets and writers have tried to put words to the experience of a panic attack— a sensation so overwhelming, many people mistake it for a heart attack, stroke, or other life-threatening crisis. Studies suggest that almost a third of us will experience at least one panic attack in our lives. So what exactly is a panic attack, and can we prevent them? Cindy J. Aaronson investigates. [Directed by Aim Creative Studios, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by André Aires].
30/03/215m 25s

How synthetic biology can improve our health, food and materials | Emily Leproust

What if we could use biology to restore our balance with nature without giving up modern creature comforts? Advocating for a new kind of environmentalism, scientist and entrepreneur Emily Leproust rethinks modern sustainability at the molecular level, using synthetic biology to create green alternatives. From lab-developed insulin and disease-resistant bananas to airplanes made of super-strong spider silk, she explains how reading and writing DNA can lead to groundbreaking innovations in health, food and materials.
23/03/2111m 22s

How to avoid catching prickly emotions from other people | Jessica Woods

Difficult emotions can get under your skin if you're not careful. Sport and performance consultant Jessica Woods calls this the "jumping cholla effect," inspired by a sneaky kind of cactus that detaches and burrows its spines into unsuspecting passersby. In this empowering talk, she shares four mood-regulating strategies to help you gain self-awareness of your feelings, avoid catching other people's emotions and perform at your peak -- whatever the prickly situation may be.
16/03/2111m 20s

What causes headaches? | Dan Kwartler

In ancient Greece, the best-known remedy for a long-standing headache was to drill a small hole in the skull to drain supposedly infected blood. Fortunately, doctors today don't resort to power tools to cure headaches, but we still have a lot to learn about this ancient ailment. Dan Kwartler shares what we know (and don't know) about headaches. [Directed by Sharon Colman, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Miguel d'Oliveira].
09/03/215m 27s

TEDxSHORTS: Tal Zak

Today we're sharing another podcast from TED: TEDx SHORTS. Chief Medical Officer of Moderna Tal Zaks offers a look into the future of personalized medicine and how tailored vaccines might someday be used in the fight against cancer. This talk was filmed at TEDxBeaconStreet. All TEDx events are organized independently by volunteers in the spirit of TED's mission of ideas worth spreading. If you enjoyed this episode, you can subscribe to TEDxSHORTS wherever you’re listening to this.
02/03/215m 8s

How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics | Cara Greene Epstein

When catastrophe strikes, art prevails—and has done so for centuries. In this fascinating talk, writer and director Cara Greene Epstein places the closing of theaters during the coronavirus pandemic in a historical context, exploring how we can use this intermission to imagine a more just, representative and beautiful world, onstage and off.
23/02/2115m 6s

How to Be a Better Human: The emotional support you need right now | Guy Winch‪

Today we're sharing another podcast from TED: How to Be a Better Human. Have you been feeling isolated or emotionally vulnerable lately? Loneliness is universal and while we can experience it at any point in our lives, we may be feeling it now more than ever. In this first episode, Guy Winch explains why your emotional health is so important and how you can find the support you need right now—from cutting through the small talk to finding a deeper appreciation for what you already have. Drawing on extensive experience helping patients repair broken connections, we’ll explore how loneliness influences well-being—and Guy will offer strategies for practicing emotional self-care. Guy is a licensed psychologist who works with individuals, couples, and families. As an advocate for psychological health, he has spent the last two decades adapting the findings of scientific studies into tools his patients, readers, and audience members can use to enhance and maintain their mental health. As an identical twin with a keen eye for any signs of favoritism, he believes we need to practice emotional hygiene with the same diligence with which we practice personal and dental hygiene. If you enjoyed the episode, you can subscribe to How to Be a Better Human wherever you're listening to this.
16/02/2129m 33s

What you can do to prevent Alzheimer's | Lisa Genova

Alzheimer's doesn't have to be your brain's destiny, says neuroscientist and author of "Still Alice," Lisa Genova. She shares the latest science investigating the disease -- and some promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer's-resistant brain.
09/02/2114m 6s

How couples can sustain a strong sexual connection for a lifetime | Emily Nagoski

As a sex educator, Emily Nagoski is often asked: How do couples sustain a strong sexual connection over the long term? In this funny, insightful talk, she shares her answer -- drawing on (somewhat surprising) research to reveal why some couples stop having sex while others keep up a connection for a lifetime.
02/02/2110m 12s

Is marijuana bad for your brain? | Anees Bahji

In 1970, marijuana was classified as a schedule 1 drug in the United States: the strictest designation possible, meaning it was completely illegal and had no recognized medical uses. Today, marijuana's therapeutic benefits are widely acknowledged, but a growing recognition for its medical value doesn't answer the question: is recreational marijuana use bad for your brain? Anees Bahji investigates. This is a TED-Ed lesson directed by Anton Bogaty, narrated by Addison Anderson, with music by Bamm Bamm Wolfgang.
26/01/216m 45s

Can we edit memories? | Amy Milton

Trauma and PTSD rewire your brain -- especially your memory -- and can unearth destructive emotional responses when stirred. Could we eliminate these triggers without erasing the memories themselves? Enter neurologist Amy Milton's mind-blowing, memory-editing clinical research poised to defuse the damaging effects of painful remembered experiences and offer a potential path toward better mental health.
19/01/2116m 14s

The case for student mental health days | Hailey Hardcastle

School can be rife with stress, anxiety, panic attacks and even burnout — but there's often no formal policy for students who need to prioritize their well-being. Hailey Hardcastle explains why schools should offer mental health days and allow students time to practice emotional hygiene without stigma. Follow along to learn how she and a team of fellow teens transformed their advocacy into law.
12/01/217m 44s

How your brain's executive function works -- and how to improve it | Sabine Doebel

You use your brain's executive function every day -- it's how you do things like pay attention, plan ahead and control impulses. Can you improve it to change for the better? With highlights from her research on child development, cognitive scientist Sabine Doebel explores the factors that affect executive function -- and how you can use it to break bad habits and achieve your goals.
05/01/217m 40s

How changing your story can change your life | Lori Gottlieb

Stories help you make sense of your life -- but when these narratives are incomplete or misleading, they can keep you stuck instead of providing clarity. In an actionable talk, psychotherapist and advice columnist Lori Gottlieb shows how to break free from the stories you've been telling yourself by becoming your own editor and rewriting your narrative from a different point of view.
29/12/2016m 42s

What happens when biology becomes technology? | Christina Agapakis

"We've been promised a future of chrome -- but what if the future is fleshy?" asks biological designer Christina Agapakis. In this awe-inspiring talk, Agapakis details her work in synthetic biology -- a multidisciplinary area of research that pokes holes in the line between what's natural and artificial -- and shares how breaking down the boundaries between science, society, nature and technology can lead us to imagine different possible futures.
22/12/2011m 10s

The mental health benefits of storytelling for health care workers | Laurel Braitman

Health care workers are under more stress than ever before. How can they protect their mental health while handling new and complex pressures? TED Fellow Laurel Braitman shows how writing and sharing personal stories helps physicians, nurses, medical students and other health professionals connect more meaningfully with themselves and others -- and make their emotional well-being a priority.
15/12/2010m 3s

What yoga does to your body and brain | Krishna Sudhir

There are many different approaches to modern yoga— though most forms have three core elements: physical postures, breathing exercises, and spiritual contemplation.This blend of physical and mental exercise is widely believed to have a unique set of health advantages. But is yoga actually beneficial to your health? Krishna Sudhir examines how this ancient tradition impacts the body and mind. [Directed by Zsuzsanna Kreif, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Cem Misirlioglu / WORKPLAYWORK].
08/12/206m 5s

The way we think about biological sex is wrong | Emily Quinn

Did you know that almost 150 million people worldwide are born intersex -- with biology that doesn't fit the standard definition of male or female? (That's as many as the population of Russia.) At age 10, Emily Quinn found out she was intersex, and in this wise, funny talk, she shares eye-opening lessons from a life spent navigating society's thoughtless expectations, doctors who demanded she get unnecessary surgery -- and advocating for herself and the incredible variety that humans come in. (Contains mature content)
01/12/2014m 22s

You shouldn't have to choose between filling your prescriptions and paying bills | Kiah Williams

As prescription drug costs skyrocket in the US, thousands of people are forced to forgo lifesaving medications -- all while manufacturers and health care facilities systematically destroy perfectly good, surplus pills. Kiah Williams shares how SIRUM -- a nonprofit that delivers unused medications to families who need them most -- plans to drive down prescription prices by recycling almost a billion dollars' worth of medications in the next five years. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
24/11/208m 21s

The brain-changing benefits of exercise | Wendy Suzuki

What's the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory -- and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.
17/11/2011m 51s

The future of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy | Rick Doblin

Could psychedelics help us heal from trauma and mental illnesses? Researcher Rick Doblin has spent the past three decades investigating this question, and the results are promising. In this fascinating dive into the science of psychedelics, he explains how drugs like LSD, psilocybin and MDMA affect your brain -- and shows how, when paired with psychotherapy, they could change the way we treat PTSD, depression, substance abuse and more.
10/11/2014m 50s

What foods did your ancestors love? | Aparna Pallavi

Around the world, Indigenous food cultures vanish because of industrialized agriculture and a shifting, Western-influenced concept of the ideal diet. Food researcher Aparna Pallavi explores why once-essential culinary traditions disappear from people's lives and memories almost without notice -- and serves up a subtle solution to revitalize our connection to the foods we eat.
03/11/2015m 3s

A comprehensive, neighborhood-based response to COVID-19 | Kwame Owusu-Kesse

Crisis interventions often focus on a single aspect of a big, complicated problem, failing to address the broader social and economic context. Kwame Owusu-Kesse describes how the Harlem Children's Zone is taking a more holistic approach to the pandemic, weaving together a network of services to help communities recover and rebuild. Learn more about their comprehensive COVID-19 relief and recovery response focused on five primary areas of need -- and their plans to scale it across the US. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
27/10/206m 52s

How to manage your stress like an ER doctor | Darria Long

How do doctors in the emergency room stay calm and focused amidst the chaos? Drawing on years of experience, ER doctor Darria Long shares a straightforward framework to help you take back control and feel less overwhelmed when life starts to get "crazy busy."
20/10/2011m 55s

Sleep is your superpower | Matt Walker

Sleep is your life-support system and Mother Nature's best effort yet at immortality, says sleep scientist Matt Walker. In this deep dive into the science of slumber, Walker shares the wonderfully good things that happen when you get sleep -- and the alarmingly bad things that happen when you don't, for both your brain and body. Learn more about sleep's impact on your learning, memory, immune system and even your genetic code -- as well as some helpful tips for getting some shut-eye.
13/10/2018m 47s

Introducing TED Health

TED Health is re-launching in audio on October 13. What does exercise do to your brain? Can psychedelics treat depression? From smart daily habits to new medical breakthroughs, welcome to TED Health. TED speakers answer questions you never even knew you had, and share ideas you won't hear anywhere else, all around how we can live healthier lives.
06/10/2023s
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