TED Tech

TED Tech

By TED Tech

From the construction of virtual realities to the internet of things—technology is changing our world every day. But how can we make sure that the quickly-evolving role that tech plays in our lives is one that builds, empowers, and connects us? Host Sherrell Dorsey guides you through the latest ideas from TED Speakers, uncovering the riveting questions that sit at the intersection of technology, society, science, design, business, and innovation. Listen in every Friday.

Episodes

Your creative superpowers can help protect democracy | Sofia Ongele

"Democracy is more fun and inviting when you take it into your own hands," says creator and activist Sofia Ongele. Sharing how she's using coding and social media to defend democracy, Ongele invites us to identify our own creative superpowers — whether it's community organizing, making music or telling stories — and use them to cause a ruckus and bring movements to life.
01/03/24·11m 50s

The exciting, perilous journey toward AGI | Ilya Sutskever

Just weeks before the management shakeup at OpenAI rocked Silicon Valley and made international news, the company's cofounder and chief scientist Ilya Sutskever explored the transformative potential of artificial general intelligence (AGI), highlighting how it could surpass human intelligence and profoundly transform every aspect of life. Hear his take on the promises and perils of AGI — and his optimistic case for how unprecedented collaboration will ensure its safe and beneficial development.
23/02/24·15m 26s

Why you should ditch deadly fossil-fuel appliances | Donnel Baird

In the US, people spend the overwhelming majority of their time inside buildings that burn fossil fuels, which are bad for both the environment and human health. (Think: breathing in air pollution from gas stoves, furnaces and water heaters.) If we're going to fix this problem, we need to retrofit millions of buildings with all-electric equipment, says energy upgrader Donnel Baird. Hear about his ambitious plan to rip the fossil fuel infrastructure out of aging buildings and upgrade it with smarter, cleaner, healthier technology.
16/02/24·12m 17s

How one small idea led to $1 million of paid water bills | Tiffani Ashley Bell

When programmer Tiffani Ashley Bell learned that thousands of people in Detroit were facing water shutoffs because they couldn't afford to pay their bills, she decided to take action -- in the simplest, most obvious way possible. It's an inspiring story of how one person with tenacity and an idea can create monumental change -- and a demonstration that each of us can find our own way to help the world, even if it means starting without all the answers.
09/02/24·13m 36s

When AI can fake reality, who can you trust? | Sam Gregory

We're fast approaching a world where widespread, hyper-realistic deepfakes lead us to dismiss reality, says technologist and human rights advocate Sam Gregory. What happens to democracy when we can't trust what we see? Learn three key steps to protecting our ability to distinguish human from synthetic — and why fortifying our perception of truth is crucial to our AI-infused future.
02/02/24·14m 40s

How to harness abundant, clean energy for 10 billion people | Julio Friedmann

We can produce abundant, sustainable and cheap energy — for everyone, says physicist Julio Friedmann. He explores the infrastructure, innovation and investment needed to supply energy to 10 billion people, offering case studies from Chile's refurbished supply chain, built in partnership with Japan, to Namibia's budding clean hydrogen production, inviting us to envision a greener, more equitably powered world.
26/01/24·15m 20s

The most important century in human history | George Zaidan

Is it possible that this century is the most important one in human history? The 21st century has already proven to be a period of rapid growth. We're on the cusp of developing new technologies that could entirely change the way people live— and could contribute to unprecedented levels of existential risk. Explore how the decisions we make now might have a major impact on humanity's future. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Jon Mayes, AIM Creative Studios, narrated by George Zaidan and the music was made by André Aires.
19/01/24·7m 16s

The powerful possibilities of recycling the world's batteries | Emma Nehrenheim

The world has plenty of clean energy. The problem is storing that energy and getting it where we need it, when we need it, says battery recycling pioneer Emma Nehrenheim. While batteries are fundamental to powering a sustainable future, their production is surprisingly harsh on the environment. She lays out the science behind a breakthrough in recycling a battery's core elements, offering a manufacturing solution that could vastly reduce the industry's environmental impact and demand for new materials from mining.
12/01/24·12m 36s

Over 20,000 joined the NPR/Columbia study to move throughout the day. Did it work? | Body Electric

This is an episode we think you might like of Body Electric. TED Radio Hour host Manoush Zomorodi digs into the preliminary results of the listener study with Columbia University researcher Keith Diaz. He shares the surprising — and encouraging — initial findings from more than 20,000 listeners who tried to incorporate movement breaks into their day.
11/01/24·11m 31s

The awesome potential of many metaverses | Agnes Larsson

In the multitude of metaverses that exist there are infinite possibilities for inclusivity and creativity. As we revisit a talk that invites us to craft our own digital universes, Minecraft's game director Agnes Larsson shares how the experience of building and sharing metaverses can foster dialogue, friendship and trust — pointing to the meaningful impact virtual worlds can have on the real world. Following the talk, Sherrell explores how these safer metaverses have the power to spill beyond the digital realm and positively impact our entire society.
05/01/24·15m 58s

How global virtual communities can help kids achieve their dreams | Matthew Garcia

How do we make historically exclusive fields like classical music, fine arts or academic research more accessible to everyone? Education equalizer and violist Matthew Garcia thinks one way to remove barriers is to create free, virtual education programs that connect talented young minds to the resources they need to thrive in their future careers. Learn more as we revisit this talk about the power of virtual nonprofits to overcome geographic borders and deliver opportunity -- and how you can help every kid reach their dreams.
29/12/23·11m 20s

Is technology our savior — or our slayer? | Ruha Benjamin

When it comes to technology, we're often presented with two contrasting visions of the future: one where technology fulfills all our desires, and another where it leads to chaos and conflict. Sociologist Ruha Benjamin is here with a more radical vision of the future — one where humanity isn't saved or slayed by technology, but rather uses it to uplift ordinary people and make things like health care and housing for all a reality. After the talk, Sherrell expands on how tech improves individual lives, and communities at large.
22/12/23·16m 20s

AI is dangerous, but not for the reasons you think | Sasha Luccioni

AI won't kill us all — but that doesn't make it trustworthy. Instead of getting distracted by future existential risks, AI ethics researcher Sasha Luccioni thinks we need to focus on the technology's current negative impacts, like emitting carbon, infringing copyrights and spreading biased information. She offers practical solutions to regulate our AI-filled future — so it's inclusive and transparent.
15/12/23·12m 35s

How to make learning as addictive as social media | Luis von Ahn

When technologist Luis von Ahn was building the popular language-learning platform Duolingo, he faced a big problem: Could an app designed to teach you something ever compete with addictive platforms like Instagram and TikTok? He explains how Duolingo harnesses the psychological techniques of social media and mobile games to get you excited to learn — all while spreading access to education across the world.
08/12/23·14m 46s

A brain implant that turns your thoughts into text | Tom Oxley

What if you could control your digital devices using just the power of thought? That's the incredible promise behind the Stentrode — an implantable brain-computer interface that collects and wirelessly transmits information directly from the brain, without the need for open surgery. Neurotech entrepreneur Tom Oxley describes the intricacies of this breakthrough technology, which is currently enrolling participants in human trials, as well as how it could help restore dignity to those with disabilities — and transform the future of communication. Stay tuned after the talk to hear our host Sherrell talk about the promise and potential of technology when it comes to serving one of humanity's greatest needs: connection.
01/12/23·17m 20s

The tech we need to fight workplace ageism | Piyachart Phiromswad

From exoskeletons and robotic arms to the mass adoption of remote work, economist Piyachart Phiromswad explores what seniors need to overcome the physical, mental and societal barriers to employment, a necessary shift in our rapidly aging world. Learn more about how these tools could empower elderly workers and better the world — for everyone. After the talk, Sherrell explores the ethical considerations of keeping aging populations in the workforce for the sake of productivity.
24/11/23·15m 54s

Uber, and how to fix things when trust is broken | Fixable

This is an episode of Fixable, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. This week, Anne and Frances dive into their area of expertise: trust. Frances recounts the time when she was brought in to help Uber fix their huge trust breakdown. Using Uber as a case study, they explain the three pillars of trust — authenticity, empathy and logic — and actionable solutions to strengthen each leg when they’re on shaky ground.
17/11/23·35m 5s

Can AI help solve the climate crisis? | Sims Witherspoon

“AI can be a transformational tool in our fight against climate change," says Sims Witherspoon, a leader at the AI research lab Google DeepMind. Using wind power as her case study, she explains how powerful neural networks can help us better predict Earth's changing ecosystems and accelerate the breakthrough science needed to create a carbon-free energy supply.
10/11/23·15m 5s

How "digital twins" could help us predict the future | Karen Willcox

From health-tracking wearables to smartphones and beyond, data collection and computer modeling have become a ubiquitous part of everyday life. Advancements in these areas have given birth to "digital twins," or virtual models that evolve alongside real-world data. Aerospace engineer Karen Willcox explores the incredible possibilities these systems offer across engineering, climate studies and medicine, sharing how they could lead to personalized medicine, better decision-making and more.
03/11/23·18m 14s

The future of machines that move like animals | Robert Katzschmann

Imagine a boat that propels by moving its "tail" from side to side, just like a fish. That's the kind of machine that TED Fellow Robert Katzschmann's lab builds: soft-bodied robots that imitate natural movements with artificial, silent muscles. He lays out his vision for machines that take on mesmerizing new forms, made of softer and more lifelike materials — and capable of discovering unknown parts of the world.
27/10/23·9m 31s

War, AI and the new global arms race | Alexandr Wang

Lethal drones with facial recognition, armed robots, autonomous fighter jets: we're at the dawn of a new age of AI-powered warfare, says technologist Alexandr Wang. He explores why data will be the secret weapon in this uncharted landscape and emphasizes the need to consider national security when developing new tech — or potentially face all-out AI warfare.
20/10/23·12m 28s

Could an orca give a TED Talk? | Karen Bakker

What if we could hear nature's ultrasonic communication -- and talk back? From a bat's shrill speech to a peacock's infrasound mating call, conservation technology researcher Karen Bakker takes us through a sound bath of animal noises that are far outside humanity's range of hearing, demonstrating how artificial intelligence has translated the incredible complexity of nature's soundtrack. She asks us to consider the moral weight of such transformative technology and explores the futuristic opportunities presented for conservation, interspecies communication and more. The TED team is saddened to share that Karen Bakker passed away in August 2023. We’re grateful for the opportunity to uplift her work.
13/10/23·15m 37s

The growing megafire crisis — and how to contain it | George T. Whitesides

Megafires, or fires that burn more than 100,000 acres, are becoming more frequent worldwide, wreaking havoc on landscapes and communities -- and fire experts say the problem is only going to get worse. George T. Whitesides is focused on fighting these devastating natural disasters through innovative technologies and intentional changes to how we build communities. He presents three emerging solutions to this blazing dilemma, calling for us to redefine our relationship with fire in order to build a more resilient and sustainable future. After the talk, Sherrell highlights the importance of looking to Indigenous practices when it comes to curbing wildfires.
06/10/23·14m 14s

So much sitting, looking at screens. Can we combat our sedentary lives? | Body Electric

This is an episode of Body Electric a series airing over at the TED Radio Hour. In this special series, host Manoush Zomorodi investigates the relationship between our technology and our bodies and asks: How are we physically adapting to meet the demands of the Information Age? Why do so many of us feel utterly drained after a day spent attached to our devices? Part one kicks off with an exploration into how economic eras have shaped the human body in the past with author Vybarr Cregan-Reid. Then, Columbia University researcher and exercise physiologist Keith Diaz and Manoush discuss his findings and propose a challenge to listeners: Let's see if we can end this cycle of type, tap, collapse together. Click here to find out more about the project: npr.org/bodyelectric
03/10/23·28m 28s

Introducing Body Electric

We’ve got a special 6-part series with an interactive twist coming your way: On Body Electric, TED Radio Hour host Manoush Zomorodi investigates the relationship between our bodies and our technology…and she has a challenge for YOU. Starts Tuesday, October 3rd
02/10/23·2m 0s

The urgent risks of runaway AI -- and what to do about them | Gary Marcus

Will truth and reason survive the evolution of artificial intelligence? AI researcher Gary Marcus says no, not if untrustworthy technology continues to be integrated into our lives at such dangerously high speeds. He advocates for an urgent reevaluation of whether we're building reliable systems (or misinformation machines), explores the failures of today's AI and calls for a global, nonprofit organization to regulate the tech for the sake of democracy and our collective future. (Followed by a Q&A with head of TED Chris Anderson)
29/09/23·14m 50s

What the world can learn from China's innovation playbook | Keyu Jin

In the last few decades, China has gone from technological scarcity to abundance. What sparked this shift? Economist Keyu Jin explores how China has fostered a model of innovation unlike any other and shows why understanding its competitive, collaborative approach could benefit the world -- and perhaps demystify some contradictions.
22/09/23·16m 3s

A powerful new neurotech tool for augmenting your mind | Conor Russomanno

In an astonishing talk and tech demo, neurotechnologist Conor Russomanno shares his work building brain-computer interfaces that could enable us to control the external world with our minds. He discusses the quickly advancing possibilities of this field -- including the promise of a "closed-loop system" that could both record and stimulate brain activity -- and invites neurohacker Christian Bayerlein onto the TED stage to fly a mind-controlled drone by using a biosensing headset.
15/09/23·14m 9s

The incredible creativity of deepfakes -- and the worrying future of AI | Tom Graham

AI-generated media that looks and sounds exactly like the real world will soon permeate our lives. How should we prepare for it? AI developer Tom Graham discusses the extraordinary power of this rapidly advancing technology, demoing cutting-edge examples -- including real-time face swaps and voice cloning -- live from the TED stage. In conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, Graham digs into the creative potential of this hyperreal content (often referred to as "deepfakes") as well as its risk for exploitation and the new legal rights we'll need in order to maintain control over our photorealistic AI avatars.
08/09/23·12m 22s

The outlaws of the ocean -- and how we're reeling them in | Tony Long

Pirate fishing, oil spills and other undetected crimes are destroying ocean ecosystems -- but we can't stop what we can't see. Harnessing the power of satellite data and AI to catch maritime offenders in the act, ocean conservation expert and 2023 Audacious Project grantee Tony Long introduces the first-ever live map of all industrial human activity at sea. He shares how his team at Global Fishing Watch is making it freely available to the world so conservationists, researchers and the public can help protect precious aquatic habitats. (This ambitious idea is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
01/09/23·8m 57s

How wireless energy from space could power everything | Ali Hajimiri

Modern life runs on wireless technology. What if the energy powering our devices could also be transmitted without wires? Electrical engineer Ali Hajimiri explains the principles behind wireless energy transfer and shares his far-out vision for launching flexible solar panels into space in order to collect sunlight, convert it to electrical power and then beam it down to Earth. Learn how this technology could power everything -- and light up our world from space.
25/08/23·11m 50s

Why the passport needs an upgrade | Karoli Hindriks

It's time to give paper passports a digital upgrade, says entrepreneur Karoli Hindriks. Looking to Estonia's technology-driven government for inspiration, she envisions a world where immigration is no longer hindered by bureaucracy and needless repetition. Travel with her to a future beyond borders where universal digital passports replace paper ones -- and where outdated systems stop wasting our time and money.
18/08/23·11m 37s

The energy Africa needs to develop -- and fight climate change | Rose M. Mutiso

In this perspective-shifting talk, energy researcher Rose M. Mutiso makes the case for prioritizing Africa's needs with what's left of the world's carbon budget, to foster growth and equitably achieve a smaller global carbon footprint. After the talk, our host Sherrell expands upon the ways some nations have been historically neglected when it comes to climate adaptive technologies and shares commentary from climate tech founder Donnel Baird on advocating for underserved communities.
11/08/23·12m 52s

The disappearing computer -- and a world where you can take AI everywhere | Imran Chaudhri

In this exclusive preview of groundbreaking, unreleased technology, former Apple designer and Humane cofounder Imran Chaudhri envisions a future where AI enables our devices to "disappear" -- seriously, like one day making a phone call on the palm of your hand. He gives a sneak peek of his company's new product -- shown for the first time ever on the TED stage -- and explains how it could change the way we interact with tech and the world around us. Witness a stunning vision of the next leap in device design. After the talk, Sherrell points to a few potential unintended consequences of sleeker tech.
04/08/23·16m 39s

Who owns the internet of the future? | Ordinary Things

The emergence of data-driven mass surveillance "is threatening to turn privacy into a relic of the 20th century," says the anonymous YouTube creator known as Ordinary Things. Meanwhile, state-funded troll farms are spreading disinformation and curating chaos on platforms meant to connect us and revolutionize the way we live. Ordinary Things gives an enlightening account of the internet's strengths and weaknesses, warning that the fight for a free internet is a fight for our collective future.
28/07/23·19m 55s

How one small idea led to $1 million of paid water bills | Tiffani Ashley Bell

When programmer Tiffani Ashley Bell learned that thousands of people in Detroit were facing water shutoffs because they couldn't afford to pay their bills, she decided to take action -- in the simplest, most obvious way possible. It's an inspiring story of how one person with tenacity and an idea can create monumental change -- and a demonstration that each of us can find our own way to help the world, even if it means starting without all the answers.
21/07/23·13m 36s

How AI could save (not destroy) education | Sal Khan

Sal Khan, the founder and CEO of Khan Academy, thinks artificial intelligence could spark the greatest positive transformation education has ever seen. He shares the opportunities he sees for students and educators to collaborate with AI tools -- including the potential of a personal AI tutor for every student and an AI teaching assistant for every teacher -- and demos some exciting new features for their educational chatbot, Khanmigo.
14/07/23·15m 45s

The Internet's First Main Character? | The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks

It's 1999, and sixteen years after its original release, a new Star Wars is finally coming. Fans have been camping out in front of theaters across the country just to be the first to see it. The beloved intergalactic saga is set to debut a slew of brand new characters, one of whom is a revolutionary CGI creation named Jar Jar Binks. Whispers begin to spread about big changes coming to the galaxy far, far away – and not everyone’s happy about it. This is an episode of another podcast from the TED Audio Collective: The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks, hosted by Dylan Marron. If you like what you hear, find The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks wherever you get your podcasts.
12/07/23·32m 7s

The AI Dilemma | Your Undivided Attention

This is an episode from Your Undivided Attention, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. At Center for Humane Technology, we want to close the gap between what the world hears publicly about AI from splashy CEO presentations and what the people who are closest to the risks and harms inside AI labs are telling us. We translated their concerns into a cohesive story to heads of institutions and major media organizations in New York, Washington DC, and San Francisco. The talk you're about to hear is the culmination of that work, which is ongoing. For more Your Undivided Attention, listen wherever you get your podcasts. Your Undivided Attention is produced by the Center for Humane Technology. Follow them on Twitter: @HumaneTech_
07/07/23·44m 12s

Why AI is incredibly smart -- and shockingly stupid | Yejin Choi

Computer scientist Yejin Choi is here to demystify the current state of massive artificial intelligence systems like ChatGPT, highlighting three key problems with cutting-edge large language models (including some funny instances of them failing at basic commonsense reasoning.) She welcomes us into a new era in which AI is becoming almost like a new intellectual species -- and identifies the benefits of building smaller AI systems trained on human norms and values. (Followed by a Q&A with head of TED Chris Anderson)
30/06/23·18m 13s

TikTok's CEO on its future -- and what makes its algorithm different | Shou Chew

TikTok CEO Shou Chew dives into how the trend-setting video app and cultural phenomenon works -- from what distinguishes its algorithm and drives virality to the challenges of content moderation and digital addiction. In a wide-ranging conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, he tells stories about the TikTok creators he loves and digs into thorny issues like data privacy and government manipulation -- as well as speaking personally about his commitment to inspiring creativity and building community. After the talk, Sherrell delves a little deeper into the implications of TikTok’s presence is society.
23/06/23·41m 38s

The inside story of ChatGPT's astonishing potential | Greg Brockman

In a talk from the cutting edge of technology, OpenAI cofounder Greg Brockman explores the underlying design principles of ChatGPT and demos some mind-blowing, unreleased plug-ins for the chatbot that sent shockwaves across the world. After the talk, head of TED Chris Anderson joins Brockman to dig into the timeline of ChatGPT's development and get Brockman's take on the risks, raised by many in the tech industry and beyond, of releasing such a powerful tool into the world.
16/06/23·24m 59s

How we could solve the dark matter mystery | Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

The universe that we know, with its luminous stars and orbiting planets, is largely made up of elements we can't actually see -- like dark energy and dark matter -- and therefore don't fully understand. Theoretical physicist Chanda Prescod-Weinstein takes us inside the search for this cosmos-shaping invisible matter and explains how, with the help of a new generation of telescopes, we could be closer to demystifying it than ever before. "The universe is more queer and fantastical than it looks to the naked eye," she says. After the talk, our host Sherrell talks about the importance of inclusivity when it comes to who gets credit for technological advances. (If you want to hear more from Prescod-Weinstein, check out her episode on "The TED Interview" podcast wherever you're listening to this.)
09/06/23·15m 58s

Cultivating good power with longtime IBM CEO Ginni Rometty | ReThinking with Adam Grant

Ginni Rometty rose through the ranks at IBM to become their first female CEO. After leading the iconic tech company from 2012 to 2020, Ginni chronicled the experiences and lessons learned in her memoir, “Good Power.” In a candid conversation at the Authors@Wharton series, Ginni talks with Adam about cultivating and harnessing influence, leading change through highlighting what will stay the same, and her cautious optimism about the future of AI. For episodes on the psychology of the world's most interesting minds, follow ReThinking wherever you're listening to this. Transcripts for ReThinking are available at go.ted.com/RWAGscripts.
02/06/23·35m 7s

Why people and AI make good business partners | Shervin Khodabandeh

What happens when the data-driven capabilities of AI are combined with human creativity and ingenuity? Shining a light on the opportunities this futuristic collaboration could bring to the workplace, AI expert Shervin Khodabandeh shares how to redesign companies so that people and machines can learn from each other. Hear more after the episode from our new host, Sherrell Dorsey, on the potential promises (and pitfalls) of AI-work integration.
26/05/23·15m 44s

What if buildings created energy instead of consuming it? | Ksenia Petrichenko

Buildings are bad news for the climate -- but they don't have to be. While our structures are currently responsible for a third of global energy consumption and emissions, a future where they create more energy than they consume is possible. Energy policy analyst Ksenia Petrichenko has a three-tiered strategy for thinking differently about buildings, transforming them from passive users to active players in the energy system and bringing us closer to our climate targets.
19/05/23·15m 57s

Fixable: Nai’a - "How do I get the attention of a distracted manager?"

Nai’a is a product operations manager at an education technology company that has gone through a major restructuring. With a shifting team and a brand new manager, she struggles to make sure her colleagues recognize the value of her work and what she needs to continue achieving success in her role. Anne and Frances help Nai’a reframe her mindset to be around approaching the situation with curiosity rather than judgment, effectively communicating her needs, and seeing her manager as a collaborator. This is an episode of Fixable, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. You can follow Fixable wherever you are listening to this.
12/05/23·28m 26s

Meet the massive machines removing carbon from Earth's atmosphere | Jan Wurzbacher

To prevent global warming, we need to drastically reduce pollution. After that, we need to trap as much excess carbon dioxide from the air as possible. Enter Orca, the world's first large-scale direct air capture and storage plant, built in Iceland by the team at Climeworks, led by climate entrepreneur Jan Wurzbacher. With affordability and scalability in mind, Wurzbacher shares his vision for what comes after Orca, the future of carbon removal tech -- and why these innovations are crucial to stop climate change. After the talk, Sherrell shares examples of trailblazing companies and researchers that are supporting the shift towards less pollution by using tech to turn CO2 into soil nutrients and make eco-friendly gasoline.
05/05/23·14m 1s

May the 4th Be With You: Introducing The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks

Love him or hate him, ever since his debut in Star Wars Episode 1, Jar Jar Binks has been one of the most divisive characters in movie history. And the backlash against him? It almost destroyed the man who played him. Host Dylan Marron goes back in time to learn what we got wrong about Jar Jar the first time around. Coming June 28 from the TED Audio Collective. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts or visit tedtalks.social/415I7SZ
04/05/23·2m 29s

7 new species of robot that jump, dance -- and walk on water | Dennis Hong

More than a decade ago, roboticist Dennis Hong debuted a new generation of cutting-edge robots. Now he's back to reveal how his lab at UCLA has eclipsed its own achievements with a fleet of wildly advanced and delightful humanoid robots. Part demo, part time capsule, part glance into the future, Hong brings you into the excitement and potential of the next evolution in robotics engineering.
28/04/23·17m 32s

Are insect brains the secret to great AI? | Frances S. Chance

Are insects the key to brain-inspired computing? Neuroscientist Frances S. Chance thinks so. In this buzzy talk, she shares examples of the incredible capabilities of insects -- like the dragonfly's deadly accurate hunting skills and the African dung beetle's superstrength -- and shows how untangling the mysterious web of neurons in their tiny brains could lead to breakthroughs in computers, AI and more.
21/04/23·10m 38s

What the discovery of exoplanets reveals about the universe | Jessie Christiansen

What are the planets outside our solar system like? Astrophysicist and TED Fellow Jessie Christiansen has helped find thousands of them (and counting), and the variety is more wonderful and wild than you might imagine. She shares details on the trends emerging from the data -- including the intriguing possibility of "super-Earths" -- and what the discovery of exoplanets means for existential questions like: Where do we come from, and how did we get here?
14/04/23·7m 51s

The internet's accessibility problem -- and how to fix it | Clive Loseby

The internet provides access to knowledge for billions across the world, but how accessible is it really? Website accessibility advocate Clive Loseby sheds light on why many parts of the web are closed off to those with disabilities -- and lays out some steps to make being online better for everyone. After the talk, Sherrell shares practical examples on how to increase web accessibility for all users.
07/04/23·16m 7s

Exploring how we think: Mind, Body, Spirit - Part 1 | TED Radio Hour

For millennia, humans have debated the mind, body, spirit connection. But today, the phrase sounds trite -- a hallmark of the #selfcare industry. We need fresh perspectives on how we think, move, and feel. Physician and entrepreneur Tom Oxley asks: what if you could control a device, not with your hand, but with your mind? Tune in to hear about the implantable brain-computer interface that could revolutionize the way we communicate. This is part of an episode of the TED Radio Hour with NPR, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For more of this episode, the rest of the Mind, Body, Spirit series, and more find and follow the TED Radio Hour wherever you’re listening to this.
31/03/23·18m 34s

Demystifying the wild world of crypto | Laura Shin

Is crypto truly the next big thing, or is it just a money-sucking flash in the pan? In a wide-ranging interview, journalist Laura Shin explains what crypto is (and what it definitely isn't), taking us through the most recent turns in its constantly evolving story -- including the recent meltdown caused by the bankruptcy of FTX. This conversation, hosted by TED tech curator Simone Ross, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event on November 30, 2022. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.
24/03/23·54m 34s

Are video calls the best we can do in the age of the metaverse? | Josephine Eyre

Remote work, while redefining the workplace landscape, seems stuck behind endless video conference calls that hinder free-flowing conversation and collaboration. In the 21st century, is that really the best we can do? Digital anthropologist Josephine Eyre makes the case for embracing the metaverse as an immersive meeting place that could help reignite creativity and communication.
17/03/23·16m 16s

How will AI change the world? | George Zaidan and Stuart Russell

In the coming years, artificial intelligence is probably going to change your life -- and likely the entire world. But people have a hard time agreeing on exactly how AI will affect our society. Can we build AI systems that help us fix the world? Or are we doomed to a robotic takeover? Explore the limitations of artificial intelligence and the possibility of creating human-compatible technology. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Christoph Sarow, AIM Creative Studios and narrated by George Zaidan and Stuart Russell, music by André Aires.
10/03/23·7m 45s

Why the passport needs an upgrade | Karoli Hindriks

It's time to give paper passports a digital upgrade, says entrepreneur Karoli Hindriks. Looking to Estonia's technology-driven government for inspiration, she envisions a world where immigration is no longer hindered by bureaucracy and needless repetition. Travel with her to a future beyond borders where universal digital passports replace paper ones -- and where outdated systems stop wasting our time and money.
03/03/23·11m 37s

A future with fewer cars | Freeman H. Shen

What if your car could drop you off and then find parking by itself? According to electric vehicle entrepreneur Freeman H. Shen, this technology already exists. He shares his vision for a future where AI-powered electric vehicles will solve many of the problems cars currently cause, like smog, traffic congestion, accidents and, yes, endlessly circling the block looking for somewhere to park.
24/02/23·8m 25s

Introducing Good Sport

This week on TED Tech we’re excited to introduce TED’s newest podcast, Good Sport, hosted by veteran sports producer Jody Avirgan. What can sports teach us about life – and each other? Good Sport brings you invigorating stories from on and off the field to argue that sports are as powerful and compelling a lens as any to understand the world – from what happens when you age out of a sport, to how we do or don't nurture talent, to analyzing how sports arguments have become the mode for all arguments. Good Sport launched on February 8th and you can find it anywhere you’re listening to this. TED Audio Collective+ subscribers on Apple Podcasts can hear the whole season early and ad-free.
17/02/23·4m 28s

Esports, virtual Formula 1 and the new era of play | James Hodge

As the line between the physical and digital worlds blur, so does the line between real-world and virtual sports. Reframing our understanding of competition, data-driven technologist James Hodge explains how far esports (like virtual Formula 1 race car driving) have come in replicating the conditions of physical sports, making elite competition more accessible than ever before. "This really is the new era for play -- and it's open to everyone," he says. This week, the TED Audio Collective is releasing a bunch of great episodes about sports, in celebration of the launch of a new podcast: Good Sport with Jody Avirgan. It’s a show that takes sports seriously, as the best way to understand humans and our world. Check it out wherever you’re listening to this.
10/02/23·12m 21s

The future of machines that move like animals | Robert Katzschmann

Imagine a boat that propels by moving its "tail" from side to side, just like a fish. That's the kind of machine that TED Fellow Robert Katzschmann's lab builds: soft-bodied robots that imitate natural movements with artificial, silent muscles. He lays out his vision for machines that take on mesmerizing new forms, made of softer and more lifelike materials -- and capable of discovering unknown parts of the world.
03/02/23·9m 31s

How global virtual communities can help kids achieve their dreams | Matthew Garcia

How do we make historically exclusive fields like classical music, fine arts or academic research more accessible to everyone? Education equalizer and violist Matthew Garcia thinks one way to remove barriers is to create free, virtual education programs that connect talented young minds to the resources they need to thrive in their future careers. Learn more about the power of virtual nonprofits to overcome geographic borders and deliver opportunity -- and how you can help every kid reach their dreams.
27/01/23·11m 20s

Meet the world's largest machine | Henry Richardson

In 1967, Homer Loutzenheuser flipped a switch and connected the power grids of the United States, forming one interconnected machine. Today, the US power grid is the world's largest machine, containing more than 7,300 electricity-generating plants. So how exactly do these power plants work? Henry Richardson digs into the delicate balancing act of how power grids supply us energy. This TED-Ed lesson was directed by Anna Benner, narrated by Jack Cutmore-Scott and the music by Raphael Tschernuth.
20/01/23·6m 3s

4 ways to design a disability-friendly future | Meghan Hussey

Nearly fifteen percent of the world's population lives with a disability, yet this massive chunk of humanity is still routinely excluded from opportunities. Sharing her experience growing up with an autistic sister, disability inclusion advocate Meghan Hussey illuminates the path towards an inclusive future in four steps, and it starts with an attitude check on assumptions and stereotypes. Designing a world built for everyone is not a "nice to have," Hussey says -- it's critical to the fabric of society. After the talk, Sherrell expands upon how tech that's designed with disability in mind can make for a more thoughtful world.
13/01/23·12m 20s

How gaming can be a force for good | Noah Raford

If you think social media is powerful, keep an eye on immersive video games, says futurist Noah Raford. As more and more people are drawn into gaming and virtual worlds, the communities they forge are spawning real-world social movements. Raford urges us to recognize what's really going on -- and then harness those forces to build the future we want. After the talk, our host Sherrell paints a picture of how physical spaces could be shaped by augmented reality.
12/01/23·17m 14s

A bold plan to transform access to the US social safety net | Amanda Renteria

This week on TED Tech we are revisiting a talk by digital public servant Amanda Renteria. Millions of people who rely on government welfare services are often discouraged from seeking them out, frustrated by long lines and unnecessarily complicated processes. At Code for America, Renteria is helping develop human-centered technology that "respects you from the start, meets you where you are and provides an easy, positive experience." She details the four factors that hinder effective delivery of government benefits and explains Code for America's plan to bring user-centric, digital-first social services to more than 13 million Americans and unlock 30 billion dollars in benefits for low-income families. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
02/01/23·16m 10s

Real social media solutions, with Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen | Your Undivided Attention

When it comes to social media risk, there is reason to hope for consensus. Center for Humane Technology co-founder Tristan Harris recently helped launch a new initiative called the Council for Responsible Social Media (CRSM) in Washington, D.C. It’s a coalition between religious leaders, public health experts, national security leaders, and former political representatives from both sides - people who just care about making our democracy work. During this event, Tristan sat down with Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen, to discuss the harm caused to our mental health and global democracy when platforms lack accountability and transparency—and identified actions that platforms could take TODAY to make these spaces safer. This is an episode of Your Undivided Attention, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes, follow the podcast wherever you're listening to this.
23/12/22·27m 51s

The shift we need to stop mass surveillance | Albert Fox Cahn

Mass surveillance is worse than you think, but the solutions are simpler than you realize, says lawyer, technologist and TED Fellow Albert Fox Cahn. Breaking down the crude tactics law enforcement uses to sweep up massive amounts of data collected about us by our everyday tech, he lays out how new legal firewalls can protect the public from geofence warrants and other surveillance abuses -- and how we might end the looming dystopia of mass surveillance. After the talk, our host Sherrell discusses why laws and technology need to work hand in hand.
16/12/22·10m 9s

What if you could sing in your favorite musician's voice? | Holly Herndon

What if you could create new music using your favorite musician's voice? Sharing her melodic gifts with the world, multidisciplinary artist Holly Herndon introduces Holly+, an AI-powered instrument that lets people sing with her own voice. Musician Pher joins her onstage to demonstrate this mind-blowing tech while singing into two microphones -- one that amplifies his natural voice and another that makes him sound just like Holly. Following the talk, Sherrell delves into the exciting promise of this technology -- while also highlighting potentially insidious applications to watch out for.
09/12/22·13m 4s

The energy Africa needs to develop -- and fight climate change | Rose M. Mutiso

In this perspective-shifting talk, energy researcher Rose M. Mutiso makes the case for prioritizing Africa's needs with what's left of the world's carbon budget, to foster growth and equitably achieve a smaller global carbon footprint. After the talk, our host Sherrell expands upon the ways some nations have been historically neglected when it comes to climate adaptive technologies and shares commentary from climate tech founder Donnel Baird on advocating for underserved communities.
25/11/22·12m 52s

How green hydrogen could end the fossil fuel era | Vaitea Cowan

As climate change accelerates, finding clean alternatives to fossil fuels is more urgent than ever. Social entrepreneur Vaitea Cowan believes green hydrogen is the answer. Watch as she shares her team's work mass producing electrolyzers -- devices that separate water into its molecular components: hydrogen and oxygen -- and shows how they could help make green, carbon-free fuel affordable and accessible for everyone. "This is how we end the fossil fuel era," Cowan says. Following the talk, Sherrell asks some crucial questions about how green hydrogen might realistically be adopted in the marketplace.
18/11/22·12m 18s

How video game skills can get you ahead in life | William Collis

What does it take to be a pro gamer? Esports expert William Collis charts the rise of the multibillion-dollar competitive gaming industry and breaks down three skills needed to master video games like Fortnite, League of Legends and Rocket League. And watch out, Collis says: these skills can set you up for crushing it at work, too. After the talk, Sherrell expands upon how gaming transcends online spaces and could pave the road to real-world leadership.
11/11/22·13m 21s

The awesome potential of many metaverses | Agnes Larsson

In the multitude of metaverses that exist there are infinite possibilities for inclusivity and creativity. Inviting us to craft our own digital universes, Minecraft's game director Agnes Larsson shares how the experience of building and sharing metaverses can foster dialogue, friendship and trust -- pointing to the meaningful impact virtual worlds can have on the real world. Following the talk, Sherrell explores how these safer metaverses have the power to spill beyond the digital realm and positively impact our entire society.
04/11/22·15m 58s

Could a DAO build the next great city? | Scott Fitsimones

Could DAOs, or "decentralized autonomous organizations," be the key to building the next great city? Experimental urbanist Scott Fitsimones shares how these mission-driven, blockchain-governed, collectively owned organizations could increase the speed and efficiency of building cities (among many other applications) -- all while pooling decision-making power in a radically collaborative way. Hear about how he started a "crypto co-op" that bought 40 acres of land in Wyoming and learn more about the potential for DAOs to get things done in the future. After the talk, our host Sherrell shares some crucial questions that should be asked when it comes to making this techno-future accessible to everyone.
28/10/22·15m 13s

How to preserve your private life in the age of social media | Bryce Dallas Howard

Growing up in the public eye, multi-hyphenate creator Bryce Dallas Howard experienced the familiar pressure to share her life with the world on social media. But with her mother's steadfast guidance, Howard learned to set personal boundaries and savor the beauty of private moments. In this personal talk, she draws on three generations of family wisdom to remind us that "a private life makes a public life worth living." After the talk, our host Sherrell dives into some of the dangers of oversharing on social media.
21/10/22·15m 39s

The rebel radio that brought down a war criminal | Diana Sierra Becerra

Since the 1800s, a handful of oligarchs had controlled nearly all of El Salvador's land, forcing laborers to work for almost nothing. But in 1980, farmers and urban workers formed guerrilla groups to overthrow the US-backed dictatorship. These revolutionaries were attacked from every direction, but a group of rebels refused to be silenced. Diana Sierra Becerra shares the story of Radio Venceremos. This was originally an animated TED-Ed lesson. It was directed by Tomás Pichardo-Espaillat, narrated by Christina Greer, and the music was made by Cem Misirlioglu and Sergio Sayeg. After the lesson, our host Sherrell discusses why tech doesn't need to be complicated to be revolutionary.
14/10/22·9m 32s

Where on Earth will people live in the future? | Parag Khanna

From the return of nomadic living to a climate-disrupted world, author and global strategist Parag Khanna has some predictions for humanity. Get a fascinating glimpse at the future as he tackles an urgent question: Where on Earth will eight billion humans live in the uncertain times ahead? This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member. After the interview, our host Sherrell highlights the importance of investing in young talent as science and tech continue to advance.
07/10/22·20m 15s

How we could solve the dark matter mystery | Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

The universe that we know, with its luminous stars and orbiting planets, is largely made up of elements we can't actually see -- like dark energy and dark matter -- and therefore don't fully understand. Theoretical physicist Chanda Prescod-Weinstein takes us inside the search for this cosmos-shaping invisible matter and explains how, with the help of a new generation of telescopes, we could be closer to demystifying it than ever before. ""The universe is more queer and fantastical than it looks to the naked eye,"" she says. After the talk, our host Sherrell talks about the importance of inclusivity when it comes to who gets credit for technological advances. (If you want to hear more from Prescod-Weinstein, check out her episode on ""The TED Interview"" podcast wherever you're listening to this.)
30/09/22·15m 58s

An alternative to the Silicon Valley unicorn | Your Undivided Attention

What’s the alternative to the Silicon Valley unicorn? In this episode of the podcast Your Undivided Attention, co-hosts Tristan Harris and Aza Raskin talk with Mara Zepeda and Kate “Sassy” Sassoon of Zebras Unite about how to create the conditions for humane business, and in turn, humane technology. You can find more episodes of Your Undivided Attention anywhere you listen to podcasts.
23/09/22·51m 18s

Mark Cuban doesn’t believe in following your passions | ReThinking with Adam Grant

Mark Cuban has gone from selling garbage bags door-to-door to selling internet companies for billions, acquiring an NBA team, and becoming a beloved “Shark” on Shark Tank. Mark reveals to Adam how he turns problems into opportunities in entrepreneurship, basketball, and investing. They discuss his latest venture–disrupting the healthcare industry with an online pharmacy and a price-slashing philosophy that makes hundreds of drugs affordable–and why following your passion is not the best way to maintain your motivation. This is an episode of ReThinking with Adam Grant, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For episodes on the psychology of the world's most interesting minds, follow ReThinking wherever you're listening to this. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/RWAG1
16/09/22·45m 11s

How is your city tackling the climate crisis? | Marvin Rees

"If we can unlock the full potential of our cities, we can minimize the price the planet pays for hosting us in our growing numbers," says Marvin Rees, the Mayor of Bristol, UK. Rees notes that while sustainable infrastructure already exists in many parts of the world -- like electric buses in Colombia and freshwater reserves in Singapore -- major investments could make similar innovations more far-reaching and successful. He highlights the pivotal role of city mayors in advocating for a "worldwide network of efficient decarbonized cities" that will bring the world closer to its climate goals. After the talk, hear our host Sherrell Dorsey dig deeper into how cities can make sure the future is equitably sustainable.
09/09/22·20m 9s

5 ethical principles for digitizing humanitarian aid | Aarathi Krishnan

Over the last decade, humanitarian organizations have digitized many of their systems, from registering refugees with biometric IDs to transporting cargo via drones. This has helped deliver aid around the world, but it's also brought new risks to the people it's meant to protect. Tech and human rights ethicist Aarathi Krishnan points to the dangers of digitization -- like sensitive data getting into the hands of the wrong people -- and lays out five ethical principles to help inform humanitarian tech innovation. After the talk, our host Sherrell shares a practical way to assess the costs and benefits of digitizing aid using Krishnan's principles.
02/09/22·17m 53s

A brain implant that turns your thoughts into text | Tom Oxley

What if you could control your digital devices using just the power of thought? That's the incredible promise behind the Stentrode -- an implantable brain-computer interface that collects and wirelessly transmits information directly from the brain, without the need for open surgery. Neurotech entrepreneur Tom Oxley describes the intricacies of this breakthrough technology, which is currently enrolling participants in human trials, as well as how it could help restore dignity to those with disabilities -- and transform the future of communication. Stay tuned after the talk to hear our host Sherrell talk about the promise and potential of technology when it comes to serving one of humanity's greatest needs: connection.
26/08/22·17m 17s

You shouldn't have to choose between filling your prescriptions and paying bills | Kiah Williams

As prescription drug costs skyrocket in the US, thousands of people are forced to forgo lifesaving medications -- all while manufacturers and health care facilities systematically destroy perfectly good, surplus pills. Kiah Williams shares how SIRUM -- a nonprofit that delivers unused medications to families who need them most -- plans to drive down prescription prices by recycling almost a billion dollars' worth of medications in the next five years. This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change. Stay tuned after the talk to hear our host Sherrel speak with Jasmine Crowe, the CEO of Goodr: an organization leveraging tech to reduce food waste.
19/08/22·14m 38s

A creator-led internet, built on blockchain | Adam Mosseri

As digital assets like cryptocurrency and NFTs become more mainstream, design thinker and head of Instagram Adam Mosseri believes that creators are uniquely positioned to benefit. These blockchain-enabled technologies could remove the need for a "middleman" in the form of large social media platforms, allowing creators to more freely distribute their work and connect with their audiences. He explains how this new age of the internet will give way to "the greatest transfer of power from institutions to individuals in all time." After the talk, our host Sherrel digs into what blockchain and cryptocurrency could bring to the creator economy.
12/08/22·18m 46s

A bold plan to transform access to the US social safety net | Amanda Renteria

Digital public servant Amanda Renteria has seen that the millions of people who rely on government welfare services are often discouraged from seeking them out, frustrated by long lines and unnecessarily complicated processes. At Code for America, Renteria is helping develop human-centered technology that "respects you from the start, meets you where you are and provides an easy, positive experience." She details the four factors that hinder effective delivery of government benefits and explains Code for America's plan to bring user-centric, digital-first social services to more than 13 million Americans and unlock 30 billion dollars in benefits for low-income families. This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change. After the talk, hear our host Sherrell Dorsey and co-founder of Promise Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins highlight the importance of tech that's designed with the people it's helping in mind.
05/08/22·16m 10s

NFTs, the metaverse and the future of digital art | Elizabeth Strickler

In need of a brief yet illuminating lesson on the obsession with NFTs? Elizabeth Strickler breaks down the acronym and explains the fundamentals of non-fungible tokens, sharing how these digital assets are changing the landscape for artists and content creators looking to cash in on their creations -- in and out of the metaverse. Stay tuned after the talk to hear thoughts from author QuHarrison Terry and our host Sherrell Dorsey on NFTs and equity. from author QuHarrison Terry and our host Sherrell Dorsey on NFTs and equity.
29/07/22·17m 3s

Why people and AI make good business partners | Shervin Khodabandeh

What happens when the data-driven capabilities of AI are combined with human creativity and ingenuity? Shining a light on the opportunities this futuristic collaboration could bring to the workplace, AI expert Shervin Khodabandeh shares how to redesign companies so that people and machines can learn from each other. Hear more after the episode from our new host, Sherrell Dorsey, on the potential promises (and pitfalls) of AI-work integration.
22/07/22·15m 44s

Kevin Roose | How to Be a Better Human

This is an episode of How to Be a Better Human, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. To hear more episodes, follow How to Be a Better Human wherever you're listening to this. We'll be back on July 22 with a new season of TED Tech—and a surprise.
15/07/22·34m 41s

3 tips for leaders to get the future of work right | TED Business

Work that's dictated by a fixed schedule, place and job description doesn't make sense anymore, says leadership expert Debbie Lovich. In light of the cultural shift towards remote work sparked by the pandemic, Lovich gives three essential tips to leaders so employees can keep their autonomy (while remaining productive), companies can let go of rigid bureaucracy and we can all reshape work to better fit our lives. After the talk, host Modupe Akinola explores the benefits and downsides of attending meetings remotely. This is an episode of TED Business, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. To hear more episodes, follow TED Business wherever you're listening to this. We'll be back on July 22 with a new season of TED Tech—and a surprise.
08/07/22·16m 22s

How to predict the future w| The TED Interview

Future forecaster and game designer Jane McGonigal ran a social simulation game in 2008 that had players dealing with the effects of a respiratory pandemic set to happen in the next decade. She wasn’t literally predicting the 2020 pandemic—but she got eerily close. Her game, set in 2019, featured scenarios we're now familiar with (like masking and social distancing), and participant reactions gave her a sense of what the world could—and eventually, did—look like. How did she do it? And what can we learn from this experiment to predict—and prepare for—the future ourselves? In this episode, Jane teaches us how to be futurists, and talks about the role of imagination—and gaming—in shaping a future that we’re truly excited about. This is an episode of The TED Interview, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. To hear more episodes—starting with a season all about the future of intelligence—follow The TED Interview wherever you're listening to this. We'll be back on July 22 with a new season of TED Tech—and a surprise.
01/07/22·43m 12s

How Caracas combats propaganda | Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala

We all know that information is power; but what if you live in a country without a free press or regular access to the internet? You have to be creative, and find nimble ways to help your community stay informed. That’s exactly what journalists in Caracas, Venezuela are doing by delivering the news every weekday…on public buses all over! Hop on a music-filled and inspiring journey as El Bus TV combats misinformation and arms you with the hope that there’s always a way to take action on the things that matter—wherever you are. This is an episode of Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. To hear more ideas from across the world, follow Far Flung wherever you're listening to this. We love making TED Tech, and we want to make it better. So if you have a few minutes, share your thoughts at surveynerds.com/ted
24/06/22·29m 33s

Satya Nadella is building the future | WorkLife with Adam Grant

Satya Nadella is a modern renaissance man; he’s a cricket enthusiast, poetry lover, oh, and the chairman and CEO of Microsoft with a nearly perfect approval rating on Glassdoor. Satya has led a transformation at Microsoft, up-ending the culture, and rethinking remote and hybrid work. In this episode, Adam talks to Satya about the future of work, leadership, and building cultures of care. This is an episode of WorkLife with Adam Grant, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes on the science of making work not suck, follow WorkLife with Adam Grant wherever you're listening to this. We love making TED Tech, and we want to make it better. So if you have a few minutes, share your thoughts at surveynerds.com/ted
17/06/22·28m 23s

What happens when biology becomes technology? | Christina Agapakis

"We've been promised a future of chrome -- but what if the future is fleshy?" asks biological designer Christina Agapakis. In this awe-inspiring talk, Agapakis details her work in synthetic biology -- a multidisciplinary area of research that pokes holes in the line between what's natural and artificial -- and shares how breaking down the boundaries between science, society, nature and technology can lead us to imagine different possible futures.
10/06/22·11m 28s

Your self-driving robotaxi is almost here | Aicha Evans

We've been hearing about self-driving cars for years, but autonomous vehicle entrepreneur Aicha Evans thinks we need to dream more daringly. In this exciting talk, she introduces us to robotaxis: fully autonomous, eco-friendly shuttles that would take you from place to place and take up less space on the streets than personal cars. Learn how this new technology works -- and what a future where we hail robotaxis would look like.
03/06/22·10m 34s

How to fix the "bugs" in the net-zero code | Lucas Joppa

Lucas Joppa, Microsoft's first chief environmental officer, thinks about climate change through the lens of coding, and he says the world's current net-zero approach simply won't compute. So how do we create a system that actually accounts for all the world's carbon emissions -- and helps us get to zero (as in zero additional carbon added to the atmosphere by 2050)? Joppa shares three "bugs" in our current net-zero code, a four-point plan for fixing them – and how logic can help us change the current course of climate change.
27/05/22·11m 9s

How AI can help shatter barriers to equality | Jamila Gordon

Jamila Gordon believes in the power of human connection -- and artificial intelligence -- to help people who might otherwise be left behind. Telling the story of her own path from refugee to global tech executive, she shows how AI is helping refugees, migrants and those from disadvantaged backgrounds find jobs and develop the skills they need to work effectively and safely.
20/05/22·6m 24s

The Dark Side of Decentralization | Your Undivided Attention

Today, something a little different: an episode from Your undivided Attention, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. It's a show that explores the incredible power that technology has over our lives -- and how we can use it to catalyze a humane future. These days, there's enthusiastic talk about the possibilities of decentralized technologies, like cryptocurrencies and 3D printing. But decentralization is cast in a different light when we're talking about decentralized weaponry. Security expert Audrey Kurth Cronin guides us in an exploration of decentralized weaponry throughout history, how social media is a new decentralized weapon, and how to wisely navigate these threats. If you enjoy the episode and want to hear more, find and follow Your Undivided Attention wherever you're listening to this.
13/05/22·49m 16s

The real hotbed of innovation (hint: it's not big cities) | Xiaowei R. Wang

"To see and understand the countryside is a crucial part of moving towards a more livable future for everyone," says coder, artist and organizer Xiaowei R. Wang. They've observed that some of the most careful, thoughtful innovation is happening in the world's rural communities, like Chinese chicken farmers using biometrics tracking and blockchain to improve supply chain transparency. In this talk, they advocate for a new perspective on the countryside: not as places lacking in tech or digital media literacy but as centers of humble innovation that emphasize community and sustainability.
06/05/22·8m 56s

Self-assembling robots and the potential of artificial evolution | Emma Hart

What if robots could build and optimize themselves -- with little to no help from humans? Computer scientist Emma Hart is working on a new technology that could make "artificial evolution" possible. She explains how the three ingredients of biological evolution can be replicated digitally to build robots that can self-assemble and adapt to any environment -- from the rocky terrain of other planets to the darkest depths of the ocean -- potentially ushering in a new generation of exploration.
29/04/22·10m 59s

The "greenhouse-in-a-box" empowering farmers in India | Sathya Raghu Mokkapati

For smallholder farmers in India, agriculture has long been an unreliable source of income -- crops that flourish one season can fail the next, thanks to heat, pests and disease. But climate risk is now making the profession nearly impossible. TED Fellow Sathya Raghu Mokkapati is determined to change that with "greenhouse-in-a-box": a small, low-cost, easy-to-build structure aimed at helping farmers weather sizzling summers, increase monthly revenues and grow more food with less water.
22/04/22·9m 4s

Listen now: WorkLife season 5

WorkLife with Adam Grant is back for a fifth season! Organizational psychologist Adam Grant knows that you spend a quarter of your life at work–and in this show, he talks to some of the world’s most unusual professionals to discover how we can actually enjoy all that time. From breaking down “The Great Resignation” to identifying the work culture that’s right for you, to learning the art of the pitch, this season is packed with actionable insights to help you make work not suck. To hear episodes right now, find and follow WorkLife with Adam Grant wherever you're listening to this.
15/04/22·3m 56s

The promise of quantum computers | Matt Langione

What if tiny microparticles could help us solve the world's biggest problems in a matter of minutes? That's the promise -- and magic -- of quantum computers, says Matt Langione. Speaking next to an actual IBM quantum computer, he explains how these machines solve complex challenges like developing vaccines and calculating financial risk in an entirely new way that's exponentially faster than the best supercomputers -- and shares why industries should prepare now for this new leap in computing.
08/04/22·12m 40s

6 big ethical questions about the future of AI | Genevieve Bell

Artificial intelligence is all around us ... and the future will only bring more of it. How can we ensure the AI systems we build are responsible, safe and sustainable? Ethical AI expert Genevieve Bell shares six framing questions to broaden our understanding of future technology -- and create the next generation of critical thinkers and doers.
01/04/22·15m 28s

The untapped energy source that could power the planet | Jamie C. Beard

Deep beneath your feet is a molten ball of energy the same temperature as the surface of the sun -- an immense clean energy source that could power the world thousands of times over, says technologist and climate activist Jamie C. Beard. How do we tap it? She lays out a surprising solution, and an unlikely alliance, to harvest geothermal energy from the Earth's core and get it to anywhere in the world.
25/03/22·15m 15s

Why we're more honest with machines than people | Anne Scherer

For a genuine conversation, consider talking to a robot; the less humanized, the better. Consumer researcher Anne Scherer shares her findings on why some machines get us to open up better than actual people, revealing fascinating insights about human nature that could lead to more honest interactions in our day-to-day lives.
18/03/22·11m 48s

The problem of vaccine spoilage -- and a smart sensor to help | Nithya Ramanathan

Refrigerators do much more than store your groceries -- they're also vital to preserving and distributing vaccines. Illustrating the realities of (and threats to) global vaccine supply chains, technologist and TED Fellow Nithya Ramanathan describes how smart sensors placed in fridges that store medical supplies can provide crucial, real-time data and ensure people get the life-saving care they need.
11/03/22·6m 17s

The life-changing power of assistive technologies | Jane Velkovski

"This chair is my legs -- this chair is my life," says accessibility champion Jane Velkovski, who uses a wheelchair after being diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). With clarity and poise, he shares how his first motorized wheelchair empowered him with independence and ability -- and why assistive technology should be available to anyone who needs it. "Freedom of movement, no matter on legs or on wheels, is a human right," he says.
04/03/22·13m 46s

Visions for the future | Kai-Fu Lee and Chen Qiufan

How will the rise of artificial intelligence change our world? Former head of Google China Kai-Fu Lee and science-fiction writer Chen Qiufan (aka Stanley Chan) set out to answer this question in their new book "AI 2041: Ten Visions for the Future." In this wide-ranging discussion, they imagine different possibilities -- both from the imaginative lens of science fiction and with a perspective on what is actually plausible. (This conversation, hosted by TED technology curator Simone Ross, was part of a TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
25/02/22·29m 43s

A free and fair internet benefits everyone | Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa

Without the internet, how would you have coped with the pandemic -- from work and school, to maintaining your closest relationships? In the digital age, reliance on the internet is so common and seems ubiquitous, yet billions of people worldwide still go without it. Digital transformation strategist Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa advocates for collective access to the opportunities and potential the internet provides, underscoring the necessity of free and fair digital rights for all.
18/02/22·9m 56s

Super speed, magnetic levitation and the vision behind the hyperloop | Josh Giegel

What if your hour-long commute was reduced to just minutes? That's the promise of the hyperloop: a transit system designed around a pod that zooms through a vacuum-sealed space (roughly the size of a subway tunnel) at hyper-speed, powered by next-generation batteries and state-of-the-art magnetic levitation. In the visionary talk, Josh Giegel, the hyperloop's very first passenger, shares how this zipping innovation could launch us into a faster, cleaner future of transportation.
11/02/22·9m 14s

Why don't we cover the desert with solar panels? | Dan Kwartler

Stretching over roughly nine million square kilometers and with sands reaching temperatures of up to 80° Celsius, the Sahara Desert receives about 22 million terawatt hours of energy from the Sun every year. That's well over 100 times more energy than humanity consumes annually. So, could covering the desert with solar panels solve our energy problems? Dan Kwartler digs into the possibility. [Directed by Christoph Sarow, AIM Creative Studios, narrated by Jack Cutmore-Scott, music by André Aires].
04/02/22·6m 1s

Siri, Alexa, Google ... what comes next? | Karen Lellouche Tordjman

From Siri to Alexa to Google, virtual assistants already permeate our lives. What will the next generation of these digital helpers look and sound like? Customer experience professional Karen Lellouche Tordjman gives us a glimpse of where they're headed -- and breaks down the two key challenges engineers need to crack in order to usher in a new age of truly smart voice assistants.
28/01/22·11m 23s

The race to build AI that benefits humanity | Sam Altman

Will innovation in artificial intelligence drastically improve our lives, or destroy humanity as we know it? From the unintended consequences we've suffered from platforms like Facebook and YouTube to the danger of creating technology we can't control, it's easy to see why people are afraid of a world powered by AI. But in this interview, OpenAI CEO Sam Altman makes a case for AI's potential to make the future better for all of us—and explains how his company is leading that charge with an unusual new business model. This is an episode of The TED Interview, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For More episodes, find and follow The TED Interview wherever you're listening to this.
21/01/22·1h 8m

An ever-evolving map of everything on Earth | Jack Dangermond

What if we had a map of ... everything? Jack Dangermond, a visionary behind the geographic information system (GIS) technology used to map and analyze all kinds of complex data, walks us through the interconnected technologies gathering information about every crack and corner of the Earth. Learn how this "living atlas" and "geospatial nervous system" can help us better understand our changing planet -- and let nature guide our actions towards a more sustainable future.
14/01/22·6m 12s

Could you recover from illness ... using your own stem cells? | Nabiha Saklayen

What if diseases could be treated with a patient's own cells, precisely and on demand? Biotech entrepreneur Nabiha Saklayen explains how we could harness advances in biology, machine learning and lasers to create personalized stem cell banks -- and develop medicine uniquely designed for each of our bodies.
07/01/22·10m 59s

What happens when biology becomes technology? | Christina Agapakis

"We've been promised a future of chrome -- but what if the future is fleshy?" asks biological designer Christina Agapakis. In this awe-inspiring talk, Agapakis details her work in synthetic biology -- a multidisciplinary area of research that pokes holes in the line between what's natural and artificial -- and shares how breaking down the boundaries between science, society, nature and technology can lead us to imagine different possible futures.
31/12/21·11m 28s

Inside the massive (and unregulated) world of surveillance tech | Sharon Weinberger

What is a weapon in the Information Age? From microscopic "smart dust" tracking devices to DNA-tracing tech and advanced facial recognition software, journalist Sharon Weinberger leads a hair-raising tour through the global, unregulated bazaar of privatized mass surveillance. To rein in this growing, multibillion-dollar marketplace that often caters to customers with nefarious intents, Weinberger believes the first step is for governments to classify surveillance tools as dangerous and powerful weapons.
24/12/21·12m 2s

Why we have an emotional connection to robots | Kate Darling

We're far from developing robots that feel emotions, but we already have feelings towards them, says robot ethicist Kate Darling, and an instinct like that can have consequences. Learn more about how we're biologically hardwired to project intent and life onto machines -- and how it might help us better understand ourselves.
17/12/21·12m 15s

How NFTs are building the internet of the future | Kayvon Tehranian

In this revelatory talk, technologist Kayvon Tehranian explores why NFTs -- digital assets that represent a certificate of ownership on the internet -- are a technological breakthrough. Learn how NFTs are putting power and economic control back into the hands of digital creators -- and pushing forward the internet's next evolution.
09/12/21·10m 13s
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