The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

By NPR

A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

Try Planet Money+! a new way to support the show you love, get a sponsor-free feed of the podcast, *and* get access to bonus content. You'll also get access to The Indicator and Planet Money Summer School, both without interruptions. sign up at plus.npr.org/planetmoney

Episodes

Why tariffs are SO back

Last week, President Biden placed tariffs on a slew of Chinese goods. When Donald Trump was president, he did the same. Regardless of who wins the election, the US is gearing up for heavy tariffs on imports in 2024. But this is far from the first time the economic tool has been in style. Today, a brief history of US tariffs: how they came into fashion, fell out of fashion, are now back again and why economists aren't too happy about it.Related Episodes:Trade wars and talent shortages (Apple / Spotify) The surprising leader in EVs (Apple / Spotify) A brief history of tariffs Worst. Tariffs. Ever. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/05/249m 25s

How Fortnite brought Google to its knees

In August 2020, Epic Games launched a legal assault against both Google and Apple, alleging that their mobile app stores are illegal monopolies. Almost four years later, Epic could be close to forcing Google to make major changes to its Play Store. Today, we explain the legal battle behind Epic v. Google and why the outcome could have major implications for where consumers get their apps and how they pay for them.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/05/248m 38s

AI Tupac and the murky legality of digital necromancy

With a few clicks of AI software, anyone can conjure the voice or visual likeness of a dead celebrity — or really anyone. This new world has opened up a bunch of new legal questions about the rights of people and their heirs to control digital replicas of themselves. Today on the show, how a Drake diss track featuring the voice of Tupac made it into the Congressional record, and how it may lead to more regulation of AI. To read more of Greg Rosalsky's reporting, subscribe to Planet Money's newsletter. Related episodes:AI creates, transforms and destroys ... jobs (Apple / Spotify) Are the Products in your shopping cart real? (Apple / Spotify) Planet Money makes an episode using AI For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/05/249m 32s

Building generational wealth in rural America

Homes are not just where we eat and sleep, but one of the primary ways people build generational wealth in the U.S. But with home shortages and harsh climates, rural America's path to building that wealth looks a little different than other parts of the country. Today on the show, we focus in on housing challenges in Alabama's Black Belt and one innovative solution to preserving generational wealth.Related:There is growing segregation in millennial wealth For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/05/249m 25s

Trade wars and talent shortages

Indicators of the Week is back. This time, an in-depth look at what Biden's massive tariffs on Chinese imports might mean for inflation and jobs. After that, why it may soon become easier to become a certified public accountant, addressing that nagging CPA shortage. Related Episodes:If the world had no accountants (Apple / Spotify) The surprising leader in EVs (Apple / Spotify) How electric vehicles got their juice (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/05/249m 29s

How the Dominican Republic became Latin America's economic superstar

For decades, the Dominican Republic's economy has been growing at a remarkably steady pace. The Caribbean nation of 11 million people is today considered a middle-income nation, but the International Monetary Fund projects it could become an advanced economy within the next 40 years.Today on the show, we uncover the reasons behind the Dominican Republic's economic success and whether or not these benefits are being felt widely in the country.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/05/248m 48s

The highs and lows of US rents

The latest inflation numbers are in. This month's Consumer Price Index, or the CPI, is ... well, good and bad news for renters. Shelter prices went up over the last year, but at a slower pace. Shelter makes up nearly a third of the CPI. Today's episode: Rent. Where is it high? Where is it low? What exactly is "coffee milk"? The Indicator tours the U.S. to bring you the answers.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/05/249m 12s

The "Winner Take All" problem

When June Carbone, Naomi Cahn and Nancy Levit set out to write a book about women in the workforce, they initially thought it would be a story all about women's march towards workplace equality. But when they looked at the data, they found something more disturbing: of the ways in which women's push toward workplace equality has actually been stalled for years. In today's episode, law professor June Carbone argues that the root of the problem lies in something they call the "winner take all" approach to business. That's the thesis of their new book, "Fair Shake: Women & the Fight to Build a Just Economy". Related episodes:What would it take to fix retirement? (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/05/249m 29s

Is 'government crypto' a good idea?

Advancements in cryptocurrency networks are sparking conversations about the potential for Central Bank Digital Currencies, or CBDCs for short. Advocates for CBDCs think they would provide security and unlock more efficient fiscal policy actions. However, opponents believe they would provide a shortcut for government interference and the erosion of privacy. Today on the show, we'll dive deep into the world of CBDCs and pose the question if countries actually need them at all. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/05/249m 7s

A new gold rush and other indicators

Indicators of the Week is back! This time, we dig into why gold prices are spiking, why the Biden administration has only spent a small portion of money pledged to infrastructure projects, and what the spurt of streaming consolidations means for you. Related episodes:Gold Rush 2.0 The semiconductor shortage (still) (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) The secret entrance that sidesteps Hollywood picket lines (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/05/249m 20s

Iceberg ahead for Social Security

According to a government report released this week, Congress has until 2033 to fix Social Security before retirees receive an automatic benefit cut of about 21%. This is a more optimistic estimate from a previous report that stated the Social Security Trust Fund would run dry sooner, but it still paints a grim picture for a program that millions of retirees rely on.Today, NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent joins the show to explain what exactly lawmakers can do to fix Social Security and why proposed solutions might be easier said than done.Related episodes:What would it take to fix retirement? (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/05/249m 29s

Why Venezuela is no longer in freefall

Back in 2019, The Indicator started checking in on with a Venezuelan economist Gabriela Saade. The economy was in freefall. The country was suffering from hyperinflation and a huge jump in poverty. Today, the U.S. faces a spike in migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border, many from Venezuela. So we check back in with Gabriela. Venezuela is due to go to the polls in July. We ask Gabriela and two other Venezuelans: what are economic conditions like at the moment? How has life changed since the pandemic? Some of the answers surprised us.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/05/248m 57s

Hazard maps: The curse of knowledge

What happens when small town politics collide with the climate crisis? And how do hazard maps—maps that show which homes in your neighborhood are at risk of getting destroyed or damaged by a natural disaster—come into play? On today's episode, how some people—from Indiana to Oregon to Alaska—are facing some very real concerns about insurance and the ability to sell their houses.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/05/248m 59s

How Colorado towns are trying to get some water certainty

In Western Colorado, towns and farms are banding together to pay a hundred million dollars for water they don't intend to use. Today on the show, how scarcity, climate change and a first-dibs system of water management is forcing towns, farms and rural residents to get spendy. Related episodes:A watershed moment in the West? (Apple / Spotify) The Amazon, the Colorado River and a price on nature Water in the West: Bankrupt? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/05/249m 33s

Not too hot, not too cold: a 'Goldilocks' jobs report

It's Jobs Friday and the jobs report is in! There's more jobs! ... but not as many as expected. And there's a teensy bit more unemployment and slower wage growth. But there's an upside ... Plus, healthcare is growing like gangbusters and how immigrants affect American-born workers.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/05/249m 6s

Protesters want schools to divest from Israel. How would that work?

College campuses nationwide are erupting with protests against Israel's war on Hamas in Gaza. A consistent theme among these actions: a call for university endowment "divestment." Today, we unpack what that means and how divestment would work. Plus, we hear from an expert who explains why divestment might not have the effect that many believe.Related episodes:Why Israel uses diaspora bonds (Apple / Spotify) How much of your tax dollars are going to Israel and Ukraine (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/05/249m 23s

What a cabinet maker can teach us about interest rates

The Beigie Awards are back to recognize the regional Federal Reserve Bank with the best Beige Book entry. This time, we shine a spotlight on one entry that explains how some businesses are feeling the impacts of higher for longer interest rates.Related episodes:The interest-ing world of interest rates (Apple / Spotify) The Beigie Awards: Why banks are going on a "loan diet" (Apple / Spotify) Where are interest rates going? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/05/249m 16s

Is the federal debt REALLY that bad?

Sandwiched between a burger joint and an oyster bar in New York City hangs a daunting image: The National Debt Clock. And that debt number? It just keeps ticking up. How deep in the hole are we? Nearly a hundred percent of gross domestic product. And counting. Today on the show, the federal debt. Is it time to freak out? Or is there nothing to see here?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/05/249m 9s

Taxing the final frontier

Launches by commercial space companies are becoming more frequent. Last year, the Federal Aviation Administration licensed 117, an all-time high. But these spaceflight companies aren't paying for all of the FAA's services that they use. Today, we explore why the government is looking to change that and dig into the larger debate over whether human activity in space is a public or private project.Related episodes:Economics in space Planet Money goes to space Space economics For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/04/248m 54s

Video Game Industry Week: The Final Level

We wrap up our series on the economics of the video game industry with a triple roundup. Today, how the new ban on noncompete contracts could affect the gaming industry, whether young men are slacking off work to play games and the ever-controversial world of loot boxes. Related episodes: Forever games: the economics of the live service model (Apple / Spotify) Designing for disability: how video games become more accessible (Apple / Spotify) The boom and bust of esports (Apple / Spotify) Work. Crunch. Repeat: Why gaming demands so much of its employees (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/04/249m 8s

Work. Crunch. Repeat: Why gaming demands so much of its employees

Employees at video game companies are known for working long hours to meet product launch deadlines. This pressure, known in the industry as crunch, has only gotten more intense as games have grown more complex. Mounting layoffs in the growing industry have only made things worse on the labor front, inspiring some workers to take matters into their own hands.Today, in the next installment of our series on the business of video games, we speak to several workers in the industry about their experiences with crunch and why they feel unionization is the key to preserving their careers.Related episodes:Forever games: the economics of the live service model (Apple / Spotify) Designing for disability: how video games become more accessible (Apple / Spotify)The boom and bust of esports (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/04/249m 21s

The boom and bust of esports

The origins of competitive gaming are rooted in college campuses going back to the early 1970s. Now a globally popular industry, esports is at the center of many questions about long-term financial viability. Today, we dive deep into the hype surrounding esports and why the luster seems to be rubbing off the industry that was once seen by some as the next NBA.Related episodes:Forever games: the economics of the live service model (Apple / Spotify) Designing for disability: how video games become more accessible (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/04/249m 13s

Designing for disability: how video games become more accessible

Gaming provides entertainment and community for billions of people worldwide. However, video games haven't always been accessible to those with disabilities. But this is changing.Today, in the next installment of our series on the business of video games, we explain how accessibility has become an increasingly important priority for game developers and how advocates pushed them to this point.Related episodes:Forever games: the economics of the live service model (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/04/249m 10s

Forever games: the economics of the live service model

People used to pay one standard price for their favorite games in a one-off transaction. But now, many game companies are offering their games for free, supported by in-game purchases. This is called the live service model. Today, the first episode of a week-long series about the video game industry. We investigate the promise and pains of the live service model and explain how it turned the industry upside down. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/04/249m 3s

Ticketmaster's dominance, Caitlin Clark's paycheck, and other indicators

It's highs and lows in this edition of Indicators of the Week! The surprisingly high amount of electricity needed for artificial intelligence, basketball star Caitlin Clark's surprisingly low base salary, plus a potential crackdown on the ticketing company everyone loves to hate (possibly because of those high fees).Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/04/249m 29s

Inside the epic fight over new banking regulations

After the financial crisis of 2008, regulators around the world agreed banks should have more of a cushion to weather hard times. Now, U.S. regulators are once again looking to update minimum capital requirements through a set of proposals called Basel III Endgame. Today, on the show, a blow-by-blow account of this battle between bankers and regulators. Related episodes: Time to make banks more stressed? (Apple / Spotify) SVB, now First Republic: How it all started (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/04/249m 29s

Profiting off greater risk: the reinsurance game

When an insurance company can't cover all of its claims, it actually has its own insurance. This is called "reinsurance." How does that work and why do reinsurers look at their risk pool differently than say home or auto insurers? Related episodes: Why is insurance so expensive right now? And more listener questions (Apple / Spotify) When insurers can't get insurance (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/04/249m 26s

What is a 'freedom economy'?

Anti-vaccine activists, far-right groups and some religious conservatives convened in Las Vegas this spring to discuss the creation of a parallel economy. These are groups who believe their speech is threatened by big banks and big tech. On today's show, what is a "freedom economy," and how would it work? Related episodes: A Supreme Court case that could reshape social media (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/04/249m 31s

Why is insurance so expensive right now? And more listener questions

We are back to answer your listener questions. On today's show, we explain reverse mortgages and their risks, why insurance has gotten so expensive, and whether there's a catch to charitable donations at the store. If you have a question you'd like us to answer, email us at indicator@npr.org. Related episodes:When insurers can't get insurance (Apple / Spotify) Are we counting jobs right? We answer your listener questions (Apple / Spotify) When mortgage rates are too low to give up (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/04/249m 29s

What Subway's foot-long cookie says about inflation

In this edition of Indicators of the Week: the new incentive for speed in cash prizes for Olympic track and field, growing iPhone assembly in India and the curious inflation puzzle of the foot-long cookies at Subway. Related episodes: Can India become the next high-tech hub? (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/04/248m 26s

The IRS wants to do your taxes for free. Will it last?

With tax season upon us, many people are paying someone or a software to get their tax returns done. A small group of people, however, are filing online directly with ... the IRS. For free. Today on the show: how the IRS's tax filing experiment came to be, how it's been working so far, and who doesn't like it.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/04/249m 29s

Why the EU is investigating China's wind turbines

Europe wants clean energy, but it's struggling to compete with the low cost of China's green technology. The E.U. just announced it's investigating the subsidies received by Chinese wind turbine suppliers, which play a part in those low costs. On today's episode, we speak with Margrethe Vestager, the European Commissioner for Competition, about how the E.U. is trying to build and maintain a competitive green tech industry in the face of low-price Chinese imports. And we ask how the U.S.'s climate industrial policy fits into all this action.Related Episodes:The surprising leader in EVs (Apple / Spotify) Industrial policy, the debate! (Apple / Spotify) Why offshore wind is facing headwinds (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/04/249m 27s

What do the royals do all day, anyway?

You've heard of the British royal family, but what about the "working royals?" Today on the show, an expert on the royals explains what the job is like — how they measure productivity, how they get paid, and how this tiny, specialized workforce of 11 people might cope with the health crises of King Charles III and Kate Middleton. Subscribe to journalist Elizabeth Holmes' newsletter on the British royal family. Related episodes:The U.K.'s most famous family firm in crisis For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/04/249m 9s

Why companies spin off

General Electric has been staggering along for years as a conglomerate. But recently, it's turned to a popular strategy to unlock new value: spinning off. Just last week, GE spun off its clean energy business into a new company: GE Vernova. On today's show, we explore what a spin off is and why companies do them.Related Episodes:What happened to GE? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/04/249m 22s

Do I need a four-year degree?

The U.S. labor market continues its hot streak, adding 303,000 jobs last month — more than expected. Many of these jobs will require a four-year degree despite a push among some employers to eliminate these requirements. On today's show, we look at the state of the job market for people without a four-year college degree. Related episodes:The lopsided market for higher ed Enough with bachelor's degrees The cost of student debt Failing college For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/04/249m 25s

How the 'shadow fleet' helps Russia skirt sanctions

"Shadow fleet" refers to the collective of ships used by countries that have sanctions against them, like Russia, to transport commodities around the world. These ships pose threats to global and environmental security because they skirt international maritime law. So what can be done about them?Today on the show, we explain what exactly makes the shadow fleet so dangerous and why there are surprisingly limited options for how to deal with these problem ships.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/04/249m 22s

Can an old law bring down grocery prices?

Since 2020, grocery prices have shot up. If you're looking to save a buck, it's often more affordable to shop for groceries at a big retailer like Walmart. But some smaller grocers say those low prices are the result of an unfair playing field—and they're looking to a little-used antitrust law from the 1930s as a solution. Today, we consider the Robinson-Patman Act and whether reviving it could bring consumers some relief.Related episodes: Grocery delivery wars (Apple / Spotify) Feeling inflation in the grocery store (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/04/249m 15s

The Indicator Quiz: Labor Edition

The sun is shining, birds are singing, and...our allergies are going NUTS. That can only mean one thing: It's time for The Indicator Quiz! The show where we bring a lucky listener on to test their econ knowledge. Today's quiz focuses on questions related to labor. Play along with us and see how you do! Are you interested in being a contestant on our next Indicator Quiz? Email us your name and phone number at indicator@npr.org and put "Indicator Quiz" in the subject line.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/04/249m 29s

Can breaking the law be good for business?

Does breaking the law ... make financial sense? Paying future fines and settlements at the risk of harm to people and the environment? Some legal scholars argue that's just the cost of doing business.Today, we ask whether a company's duty is to the law ... or to its shareholders.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/04/249m 28s

Three ways consumers are feeling the pinch

Many broad economic indicators are positive, but consumer sentiment is negative. Even with cooling inflation and low unemployment, consumers are still feeling the economic strain. In today's episode, we look at three ways the US consumer is feeling the pinch.Related episodes: Dollar stores vs. lettuce Factory boom, credit card debt defaults and housing (Apple / Spotify) Are we counting jobs right? We answer your listener questions (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/03/248m 13s

Should schools be paying their college athletes?

March Madness is in full swing as Men's and Women's college basketball teams across the country compete for the NCAA championship. However, the Dartmouth Men's Basketball team made headlines just before the tournament for its successful unionization vote. Today, we break down why the Dartmouth men are pushing to unionize and what a college athletics union could mean for the future of college sports.Related episodes:The monetization of college sports (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/03/249m 19s

Help Wanted at Boeing

Boeing's CEO Dave Calhoun has resigned and will step down at the end of the year. It comes after a series of mishaps with the aviation company including a door plug blowing off a 737 MAX 9 mid-flight. In today's episode, we turn to a head-hunter to explore what Boeing might look for in a new CEO. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/03/249m 28s

Name our mascot. No, really.

You might notice we're looking a little refreshed thanks to our new podcast logo. Today on the show, we ask some marketing experts what goes into building a strong brand, and whether our own makeover hits the mark. Listeners, help us name our new Indi-Gator mascot! Email your suggestion to indicator@npr.org with "Indi-gator" in the subject line. Related episodes: How to make an ad memorable (Apple / Spotify) BRAND new friends For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/03/249m 18s

The interest-ing world of interest rates

Countries all over the world are making big moves in monetary policies. From unexpected cuts to long-awaited hikes to a cautious cling to the status quo, this edition of Indicators of the Week has it all. Today, we explain the motivations for these drastically different approaches.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/03/249m 16s

How ski resorts are (economically) adjusting to climate change

Snowmaking has helped cover up the effects of climate change for a long time. But by the turn of the century, that started to change. A recent report shows US resorts are opening later, closing earlier, and taking a financial hit. For an industry that relies on snow, the threat is existential. Can ski resorts survive?Related Episodes: Ski resorts are welcoming winter storms The Backcountry BoomFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/03/249m 13s

When does youth employment become child labor?

The number of teenagers in the workforce today is at its highest level in about 20 years. At the same time, child labor violations are up and states are relaxing some protections for their youngest workers. On today's show, we examine the state of the Gen Z labor force, and the distinction between youth employment and child labor. Related episodes: Young, 'spoiled and miserable' in China (Apple / Spotify) Teenage (Employment) Wasteland For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/03/249m 5s

Tick tock for TikTok?

The political pressure on TikTok continues to ratchet up. This week Biden administration officials are throwing their support behind legislation that would essentially give an ultimatum to TikTok's Chinese parent company ByteDance. Sell TikTok to another owner not controlled by a "foreign adversary" or be banned from US app stores.It's a big step towards an outcome that some high-ranking U.S. officials have desired for years. But why is there so much concern about TikTok, and just how likely is a ban? Today, a couple of TikTok creators talk about what a ban would mean for them, and NPR tech correspondent Bobby Allyn explains how we got where we are and what could be coming next. Related episodes:Is Project Texas enough to save TikTok? (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/03/249m 32s

Can Europe fund its defense ambitions?

The majority of European members of NATO are not spending as much on defense as they agreed to. But that may change as the European Union considers a move to a "war economy." Today, we examine what that means and what barriers to a "war economy" look like.Related episodes: The Military Industry ... It's ComplexAre we overpaying for military equipment? (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) Can Just-In-Time handle a new era of war? (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) How to transform a war economy for peacetime (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/03/249m 18s

Biden's economic pitch for a second term

It's Indicators of the Week, our up close and personal examination of economic headlines. Today we have three indicators from President Joe Biden's economic agenda. His budget proposals include fixes for childcare, home buying and hiking corporate taxes.Related episodes:Shopping for parental benefits around the world (Apple / Spotify) When mortgages are too low to give up (Apple / Spotify) Paying for the Inflation Reduction Act 'Dune: Part Two' is a grand spice opera For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/03/249m 31s

How are moving companies faring with high mortgage rates?

HOOAH! It's our first Beigie Award for 2024! The Beigie Award is back to recognize the regional Federal Reserve Bank with the best Beige Book entry. This edition's winner took us to the City of Brotherly Love, detailing how high home interest rates and low existing home sales in the area are financially affecting our buff brethren in arms: movers.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/03/249m 18s

Are data breaches putting patients at risk?

Cyberattacks are plaguing the healthcare industry. It's an expensive and dangerous trend that's on the rise. Today, we consider why hacking is surging right now, why healthcare companies are being targeted and what hackers want from them.Related episodes: Cracking the code on cyber insurance One hack to fool them all (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) How to launder $600 million on the internet (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/03/249m 28s

What's behind Bitcoin's bullrun?

The introduction of brand new spot bitcoin ETFs has put bitcoin on a bit of a hot streak. Just this week, the price of bitcoin reached a record high of about $72,000 which is about 70% higher than it was a couple of months ago. So why exactly have these ETFs changed the perception around bitcoin so quickly? Today on the show, we talk with a Bitcoin believer and a skeptic to understand what exactly all the fuss is about for these bitcoin ETFs. Related episodes:WTF is a bitcoin ETF? (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/03/248m 52s

Is the financial media making us miserable about the economy?

There's been a disconnect between how the US economy is doing and how people actually feel about it. Maybe people are still burnt from when inflation was high, maybe it's the expensive cost of borrowing for a car or a mortgage, or maybe it's ... wait, are WE the problem?! Today we look in the mirror and find out if financial media contributes to negative economic sentiment.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/03/249m 12s

Why wind techs are so in demand

The job that's projected to be the fastest-growing in the U.S. is wind turbine service technician. So we wanted to learn what they actually do. Today on the show, reporter Darian Woods travels to a windy corner of Maine for a day in the life of one of these green-collar jobs. Related episodes: Why offshore wind is facing headwinds (Apple / Spotify) A Man, a plan, wind power, Uruguay (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/03/249m 11s

How to get Russia to pay Ukraine

Ukraine desperately needs money. And there's a tempting solution sitting in a Belgian financial institution: nearly $200 billion in frozen Russian assets. In today's episode, we learn about this unique depository where most of the Russian assets are stored and two proposals to get some of this money to Ukraine.Related episodes:The cost of a dollar in Ukraine (Apple / Spotify) Russia's sanctions, graded (Apple) Why Israel uses diaspora bonds (Apple / Spotify) Economic warfare vs. Fortress Russia For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/03/249m 9s

What would it take to fix retirement?

The rising cost of living and longer life expectancy is making it harder for Americans to retire comfortably. Millions of Americans are behind on saving for retirement and face the possibility of working in their old age. Economist Teresa Ghilarducci says she has a plan that could fix retirement in America. In her book, "Work, Retire, Repeat: The Uncertainty of Retirement in the New Economy," she proposes a few policies that she believes can help Americans currently struggling to retire. Today on the show, we talk to her about her ideas and why the current status quo is more serious than we think.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/03/249m 26s

How the SEC's new rule could reveal more about a company's emissions

The Securities and Exchange Commission is expected to issue new rules this week on how companies disclose their greenhouse gas emissions. This is part of a broader movement for more environmentally and socially conscious financial options, known as ESG investing. Today on the show, what the proposed climate disclosure rule says, why it's so controversial, and if it passes, what that'll mean for investors and the stock market. Related episodes:The OG of ESGs (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/03/248m 42s

The growing industry of green burials

One estimate says 2.4 million people die in the U.S. each year, and burying them is expensive: a typical burial can cost about $10,000. That's a lot of money, caskets, and plots filling up cemeteries. But ... what if there was a cost-effective option to bury people, one that was good for the Earth and your pocket book? Today, we look at the prices and features of sustainable burials.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/03/248m 58s

Wendy's pricing mind trick and other indicators of the week

It's Indicators of the Week, our weekly look under the hood of the global economy! Today on the show: Tyler Perry halts his film studio expansion plans because of AI, Wendy's communications about a new pricing board goes haywire and a key inflation measure falls. Related episodes:Listener Questions: the 30-year fixed mortgage, upgrade auctions, PCE inflation (Apple / Spotify) AI creates, transforms and destroys... jobs (Apple / Spotify) The secret entrance that sidesteps Hollywood picket lines (Apple / Spotify) The Birth And Death Of The Price Tag For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/03/248m 55s

Why Israel uses diaspora bonds

Israel has long raised money from individual supporters living overseas through a tool called diaspora bonds. This financing tool is part patriotic gift and part investment. Today, we look at how diaspora bonds work and how Israel is making use of them for its war effort.Related episodes: The Great Remittance Mystery Oil prices and the Israel-Hamas war (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/02/248m 52s

What the data reveal about U.S. labor unrest

From "Hot Labor Summer" to "Striketober," 2023 was another big year for workers joining picket lines. Today on the show, we'll dig into two recent reports that shed light on the state of labor unrest in the U.S.. We'll look at what industries are driving this trend, how workers are feeling about their jobs and what that says about the American labor movement. Related episodes: Why residuals are taking center stage in actors' strike (Apple / Spotify) The never-ending strike (Apple / Spotify) The strike that changed U.S. labor For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/02/249m 11s

How to make an ad memorable

Super Bowl ads this year relied heavily on nostalgia and surprise –– a few tricks that turn out to embed information into our brains. Today, neuroscientist Charan Ranganath joins the show to dissect the world of marketing to its biological fundamentals and reveal advertisers' bag of tricks. Charan Ranganath's new book is Why We Remember: Unlocking Memory's Power to Hold On to What Matters. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/02/249m 30s

Reddit's public Wall Street bet

Any day now, social media platform Reddit is expected to launch an initial public offering (IPO), earmarking shares for its most dedicated users. On today's show, our friends at WBUR podcast Endless Thread help us unpack why Reddit is making this move, and what it might mean for Reddit's stock. Related episodes: r/boxes, r/Reddit, r/AIregs (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/02/249m 5s

An oil boom, a property slump and dental deflation

Indicators of the week is back! This time, we explore why oil and gas companies are pulling in record profits, whether bad commercial property debt is likely to spark a financial crisis and how much a lost tooth goes for in this economy. Related EpisodesWhat could break next? (Apple / Spotify) What's really happening with the Evergrande liquidation (Apple / Spotify) How an empty office becomes a home For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/02/249m 26s

A Supreme Court case that could reshape social media

Next week, the US Supreme Court will hear a case that pits the Attorneys General of Texas and Florida against a trade group representing some of the biggest social media companies in the world. Today, how we got here, and now the case could upend our online experience.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/02/249m 40s

Why Capital One wants Discover

Capital One Financial Corporation plans to acquire Discover Financial Services in a $35 billion deal that would combine two of the largest U.S. credit card companies. Today on the show, five big questions about the deal, and the opaque system behind every swipe, tap or insertion of your credit card. Related:Planet Money's TikTok on the secret behind credit card rewards For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/02/249m 29s

Could fake horns end illegal rhino poaching?

In business, the million-dollar question is how to get people to buy stuff. But in wildlife conservation, the challenge is: how do we get people to not buy stuff? How do we bring down demand for fur, ivory and rhino horns? Today on the show, the story of a business trying to make lab-grown rhino horns and the backlash that followed. Check out more of Juliana Kim's reporting for NPR here. Related: Supply, demand, extinction (Apple / Spotify) Rhino Bonds Shooting Bambi to Save Mother Nature For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/02/248m 35s

Chocolate, Lyft's typo and India's election bonds

It's Indicators of the Week — our weekly look under the hood of our global economy. Today we look at why cocoa prices are soaring, whether India's electoral bonds are bad for democracy and how a typo sent Lyft shares (briefly) soaring. Related: Cocoa prices hit a 47-year high before Valentine's Day Can India become the next high-tech hub? (Apple / Spotify) Lyft going public: The dual-class share dilemma Big donors and pay-to-play politicsFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/02/249m 18s

Why banks are fighting changes to an anti-redlining program

In 2023, The Federal Reserve and other banking regulators announced they were making changes to how they grade banks on servicing local communities. This all stems from a 1977 law called the Community Reinvestment Act, which was designed to encourage banks to better meet the needs of moderate and low-income borrowers. However, major banking trade groups weren't too excited about the new rules and filed a lawsuit against the banking regulators last week. Today on the show, we explain the history of racist housing policies in the United States and how that history informs the banks' fight with the government today.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/02/249m 2s

How Egypt's military is dragging down its economy

Egypt's economy is facing its worst crisis in decades. The situation could further destabilize the Middle East if it goes unresolved. Now, the International Monetary Fund is working with Egyptian leadership to figure out another deal for a multi-billion dollar loan ... but will it be enough? Today, we look at how Egypt has fallen into economic crisis and whether its economy is too big to fail.Related episodes:What could convince Egypt to take in Gaza's refugees? (Apple / Spotify)Red Sea tensions spell trouble for global supply chains (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/02/249m 21s

How's your defense industry knowledge?

Roses are red. Violets are blue. We have another Indicator Quiz for you! Today's episode tests one loyal listener on their econ knowledge about our recent defense series, and they give us their best Valentine's Day cocktail recommendation. Play along with us and see how you do! Are you interested in being a contestant on our next Indicator Quiz? Email us your name, city and phone number to indicator@npr.org and put "Indicator Quiz" in the subject line. Related episodes:Can Just-In-Time handle a new era of war? (Apple / Spotify) Are we overpaying for military equipment? (Apple / Spotify) How to transform a war economy from peacetime (Apple / Spotify) How to transform a war economy from peacetime (Apple / Spotify) How the world economy could react to escalation in the Middle East (Apple / Spotify) How niche brands got into your grocery store (Apple / Spotify) WTF is a bitcoin ETF (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/02/248m 51s

What's really happening with the Evergrande liquidation

China is in the economic doldrums in part due to its slumping real estate market. And one of the largest property developers in mainland China is a huge part of the story. Evergrande is drowning in about $300 billion of debt. And after months of attempting to restructure, one of its entities is now being forced to liquidate. We look at what that means and how the Chinese economy will be affected. Related episodes:China's weakening economy in two Indicators (Apple / Spotify) Tumbling Chinese stocks and rapid Chipotle hiring (Apple / Spotify) The mess at the heart of China's economy (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/02/249m 19s

A Swiftie Super Bowl, a stumbling bank, and other indicators

It is Friday, and Indicators of the Week is back — SUPER Edition. Today, what one New York bank's shakiness means for the wider economy, why Mexican imports in the US are super surging, and the T. Swift effect on the Super Bowl. Related Episodes:Economics, boosternomics and Swiftnomics (Apple/Spotify)Does the U.S. have too many banks? (Apple/Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/02/248m 46s

Why Saudi Arabia is building a new city in the desert

For decades, Saudi Arabia's economy has been defined by its abundant oil reserves. Its ability to influence global oil supply propelled Saudi Arabia to one of the richest countries in the world. The Saudi royal family became important players on the world stage. However, waning dominance in the oil market is forcing the Saudi government to think differently about its reliance on the commodity.Today on the show, we explain Saudi Arabia's fantastical vision for its future and how the government is using its present influence in the oil market to fund it.Related episodes:Why oil in Guyana could be a curseFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/02/249m 15s

Is Wall Street's hottest trend finally over?

WeWork, DraftKings, Lucid Motors. These are a few companies that have taken an untraditional route to go public through something called SPACs or special purpose acquisition companies. The obscure investment vehicle took off during the pandemic, but has since fallen back to earth. Today, we consider the rise and fall of SPACs and how recent rule changes will affect these deals.Related episodes: The SPAC is backFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/02/248m 42s

Did pandemic business support work?

The U.S. launched the Paycheck Protection Program in April 2020 to save jobs and businesses from the worst effects of the pandemic. Today on the show, a post-mortem on the controversial program and whether it fulfilled its objective. Also, we hear from one company that voluntarily paid back its PPP loan — with interest — even though it could have qualified for forgiveness. Related episodes: Could cash payments ease recessions? (Apple / Spotify) Small banks' corona crunch The big small business rescue For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/02/249m 22s

Could cash payments ease recessions?

Although we have dodged the bullet for now, the threat of a recession is always a concern for policy makers. The question is: will we be prepared next time? In this episode, we consider an alternative approach to stabilizing the economy during a recession through automatic monthly cash payments. The hope: faster relief, a reduced racial wealth gap and predictable income. Can it work? Related episodes: The Sahm Rule with the eponymous economistHear us out: We ban left turns and other big ideas (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/02/248m 41s

How local government is propping up the U.S. labor market

The most recent jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the United States economy exceeded expectations by adding 353,000 jobs in January. This continues the labor market's years-long trend of resilience in the face of the Federal Reserve's interest rate hikes. However, digging deeper into the numbers reveals figures that economists are keeping a close eye on.Today, we explain why it's not necessarily ideal for local government jobs to lift up a booming labor market.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/02/248m 1s

Why the FTC is cracking down on location data brokers

It's no secret — your phone knows where you are, and if that data exists, someone else might have it. Back in 2022, we covered the murky market for smartphone location data. Now, the Federal Trade Commission is cracking down on this multi-billion dollar industry. In today's episode, we explain why the agency is trying to ban a data broker from selling information tied to sensitive places like medical facilities. Related episodes: Ad targeting gets into your medical file (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/02/248m 59s

How to transform a war economy for peacetime

In the 1980s, California was the heart of the aerospace industry. But when the Cold War ended, military spending cuts put those defense jobs in jeopardy. This week, we're bringing you a three-part series on the defense industry. In this episode: how the state redirected some of those defense dollars to another economic opportunity provides an example of how the "peace dividend" can be used effectively. Related episodes: Are we overpaying for military equipment? (Apple / Spotify)Can Just-In-Time handle a new era of war? (Apple / Spotify)Industrial policy, the debate! (Apple / Spotify) Giant vacuums and other government climate bets (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/01/248m 48s

Can Just-In-Time handle a new era of war?

Just-in-time manufacturing began as a way to save space, remove costs and improve efficiency ... for Toyota. The U.S. defense industry has since incorporated this approach. Now, leaders in the defense industry question whether it's to blame for weapons and ammunition shortages. This week, we're bringing you a three-part series on the defense industry. Today on the show, we look at how a just-in-time mindset filtered through the military contracting system, and we ask whether bare-bones manufacturing styles are leaving the U.S. in a bind. Related EpisodesAre we overpaying for military equipment? (Apple / Spotify)How to transform a war economy from peacetime (Apple / Spotify)Toyota Camry, supply-chain heroFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/01/249m 29s

Are we overpaying for military equipment?

If the proposed defense budget is passed, it will account for roughly 3.5 % of U.S. GDP. The military buys everything from pens and paper clips to fighter jets and submarines. But the market for military equipment is very different from the commercial market. And sometimes the system results in the Pentagon, and taxpayers, overpaying. This week, we're bringing you a three-part series on the defense industry. Today, we unpack how defense costs are getting so high and why it's happening.Related:Can Just-In-Time handle a new era of war? (Apple / Spotify)How to transform a war economy from peacetime (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/01/249m 29s

Tumbling Chinese stocks and rapid Chipotle hiring

It's Indicators of the Week, that time each Friday when we look at the most fascinating numbers from the news. Today, we explain the different directions of the Chinese and American economies ... and how a burrito can be a bellwether. Related Episodes:Young, "spoiled and miserable" in China (Apple / Spotify)The mess at the heart of China's economy (Apple / Spotify) China's Big Tech Crackdown For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/01/248m 18s

How niche brands got into your local supermarket

From salsas to barbecue sauces to refrigerated beverages, small artisanal brands are infiltrating grocery shelves everywhere. How did this happen? Today on the show, we team up with Dan Pashman of The Sporkful food podcast to follow the rise of niche soda maker Olipop, and share the hidden incentives that have grocers making shelf space for these products. Listen to The Sporkful on Apple or Spotify. Related episodes:Grocery delivery warsHow grocery shelves get stacked For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/01/249m 15s

A manifesto for feeding 8 billion people

In her new book, Our World In Data's Head of Research Hannah Ritchie investigates how to meet the needs of people without destroying the planet. Today we ask Hannah: Can we feed the world, sustainably? Related episodes The Amazon, the Colorado River and a price on nature (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) The Problem with the US's Farm Worker Program (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/01/249m 11s

Are we counting jobs right? We answer your listener questions

Listener questions are back! On today's show, we answer whether universities are banks, how — or if — 401(k) contributions affect the stock market, and whether jobs report numbers account for people holding down multiple jobs. If you have a question you'd like us to answer, email us at indicator@npr.org.Related Episodes:Higher wages, fewer temp workers and indicators of the year results (Apple / Spotify) Why pizza costs more in Iceland and other Listener Questions (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/01/249m 10s

The tensions behind the sale of U.S. Steel

In the 1980s, economic tensions between the U.S. and Japan permeated American politics and pop culture. Similar tensions are resurfacing as Japan's Nippon Steel tries to buy U.S. Steel. Today on the show, the history of U.S.-Japan trade friction and why a new round of anxieties is complicating the sale of U.S. Steel. Related episodes: How one small change in Japan could sway U.S. markets (Apple / Spotify) What Japan's lost decade teaches us about recessions For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/01/248m 57s

Walmart scams, expensive recycling, and overdraft fees

It is Friday. And Indicators of the Week is back — Plastics Edition. Today, we dig into how fraudsters have used Walmart gift cards to scam consumers out of more than $1 billion. We also find out why recycled plastic is actually more expensive now than newly produced plastic. And we learn how overdraft fees might be going way down. Related ArticlesProPublica - How Walmart's Financial Services Became a Fraud MagnetFinancial Times - Petrochemical glut makes new plastic cheaper than recycledRelated episodesOverdraft fees: From perk to penaltyThe problem with banning plastic bagsFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/01/248m 56s

Five tips for understanding political polls this election season

Election season is upon us, and so is the barrage of election polls. What differentiates a good poll from a bad one? How can we be smarter poll consumers? Today on the show, a couple of polling experts give us their top tips. Related episodes:Planet Money tries election polling For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/01/249m 29s

The surprising leader in EVs

The number one producer of electric vehicles in the world is ... BYD? On today's show, we look at how the Chinese EV manufacturer rose from a battery company to global dominance. It took a mix of obsessive attention to detail, scale, government support and ... guitar-string-related quirks. Plus, we consider whether BYD can crack the U.S. market. Related Episodes:How electric vehicles got their juice (Apple / Spotify) How the South is trying to win the EV race (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/01/249m 20s

How the world economy could react to escalation in the Middle East

The conflict between Israel and Hamas has been going on for more than three months, and is now beginning to spill into other parts of the Middle East. That includes attacks on commercial ships in the Red Sea, rocket attacks by Hezbollah and U.S. airstrikes in Yemen. On today's show, we'll consider what escalation could mean for global trade and the region's most important export: oil. Related episodes: Red Sea tensions spell trouble for global supply chains (Apple / Spotify) Oil prices and the Israel-Hamas war (Apple / Spotify) What could convince Egypt to take in Gaza's refugees (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/01/248m 51s

Offloading EVs, vacating offices and reaping windfalls

It's Indicators of the Week, that time each Friday when we look at three of the most fascinating numbers from the news. Today we explain why Hertz is trying to sell off part of its EV inventory, why office vacancy rates are still climbing and what Apple's class-action payout yielded one of our hosts. Related Episodes:What could break next? (Apple / Spotify) How the South is trying to win the EV race (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/01/249m 16s

The lawsuit that could shake up the rental market

A number of lawsuits against Texas-based company RealPage are putting increased attention on how algorithms can interact with the rental market. In the lawsuit, RealPage is accused of facilitating a cartel between major property managers that results in higher prices for renters and increased profits for landlords who use RealPage's software. RealPage, however, denies any wrongdoing. Today on the show, we dive into the details of the lawsuit and explain why this case challenges typical notions of cartel behavior. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/01/249m 12s

Why oil in Guyana could be a curse

In 2015, Guyana changed forever when ExxonMobil discovered major oil deposits off its coast. The impoverished South American country known for its thick rainforest was suddenly on course to sudden wealth. But while a mining boom may seem like only a good thing, it can often be bad for countries long-term. Today on the show, how Guyana can still avoid the so-called resource curse.Related episodes:Norway has advice for LibyaFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/01/249m 25s

Ad targeting gets into your medical file

More doctors' offices are ditching clunky clipboards and embracing digital records and online check-ins. But some patients may be unaware that their sensitive health data could be accessible to more than just their health care provider. Today on the show, how ad targeting has moved into the doctor's office, why that's rubbing some patients the wrong way, and why health companies say it can lead to better care.Related Episodes:The hidden market for your location data (Apple) This is your brain on drug ads This ad's for you For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/01/249m 20s

Five reasons why Americans and economists can't agree on the economy

One of the most puzzling developments for economists in recent months is the disconnect between positive traditional economic data and how people say they feel negatively about the economy. Add to that, people's behavior tracks with what economists would normally expect for happy times. So what's going on? Today on the show, we turn to something economists have tracked for decades called the misery index. Right now, it says America shouldn't be so miserable, but as we've covered before, surveys say otherwise. We identify five reasons that explain the disconnect. Related Episodes: Americans don't like higher prices but they LOVE buying new things (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/01/249m 18s

Higher wages, fewer temp workers and indicators of the year results

The U.S. economy added a solid number of jobs, the unemployment rate held steady, and a lot of people got raises. But, today we ask whether fewer temporary workers could mean recession, and whether higher wages might cause interest rates to stay high. Related episodes:The Indicator of the Year (Apple / Spotify) Predicting next year's economic storylines (Apple / Spotify) The money illusion For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/01/249m 27s

WTF is a bitcoin ETF?

On today's show, we find out what the buzz is around something called a "spot bitcoin exchange-traded fund." Despite a volatile year for cryptocurrency companies, U.S. federal regulators are expected to approve this new financial product. So WTF is a bitcoin ETF? Related episodes:The spectacle of Sam Bankman-Fried's trial (Apple / Spotify) A former teen idol takes on crypto (Apple / Spotify) The rise and fall of FTX The aftermath of the cryptocurrency crash The promise and peril of crypto for Black investors For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/01/249m 24s

What a pot of gumbo can teach us about disinflation

News about inflation made a lot of noise in the past two years, but the national CPI reports seem to indicate that inflation is starting to normalize within the Federal Reserve's target range. However, the national CPI basket of goods can have trouble representing inflation at a local level. Today, we're joined by Drew Hawkins of the Gulf States Newsroom as he goes to the supermarket in New Orleans where the national CPI may not be the best measure of inflation for folks living in the South.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/01/249m 24s

Red Sea tensions spell trouble for global supply chains

The Red Sea is a crucial piece of the global supply chain, accounting for around 15% of the world's shipping. This includes oil tankers and massive container ships transporting everything from microchips to furniture. Recent attacks by Houthi rebels, backed by Iran, have destabilized the region and prompted the U.S. to organize a multinational naval force to protect commercial ships. Today on the show, what's going on with shipping in the Red Sea. Related Episodes:A drought, a jam, a canal — Panama! (Apple / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/01/248m 44s

Chasing the American Dream at Outback Steakhouse (Classic)

How often do you hang out with people in a different socioeconomic bracket than you? And where do you meet and congregate? Economist Maxim Massenkoff, and his co-author Nathan Wilmers, looked at cell phone location data to figure out where people with vastly different incomes commune together. Today on the show, Maxim discusses his research, and Darian and Alexi head to a restaurant to try and witness some of this class mixing in action.Related Episode: The Secret to Upward Mobility: FriendsFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/12/239m 29s

'Let's Get It On' ... in court (Update)

*This episode originally aired on April 20th, 2023*When it comes to making art, what's the difference between inspiration and theft? Between artistic license and copyright infringement? That is the question at the heart of one of the biggest musical copyright cases in years that went to trial this past year.Today on the show, did Ed Sheeran steal from Marvin Gaye's "Let's Get It On" in his hit single "Thinking Out Loud"? Law professor Jennifer Jenkins sits down at the piano to help us hear the differences and similarities between these two songs.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Pocket Casts and NPR One.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/12/239m 29s

A lesson in Barbie labor economics (Classic)

*This episode originally aired on July 24th, 2023*After a stunning box office opening of more than $300 million worldwide for the new Greta Gerwig film, the Barbieverse is having its moment. So what better time to examine what Barbie's 200-plus careers over the decades—from fashion model to astronaut to teacher—tell us about real-life women in the workforce. Today on the show, a former economics educator gives us a Barbie pink-colored lens on the labor market.You can find the St. Louis Fed's Barbie curriculum here.Related episodes:Want more Barbie-nomics? Check out our episode on how Mattel turned the Barbie brand around.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/12/239m 33s

The echo of the bison (Classic)

*This episode originally aired on August 21st, 2023*For over 10,000 years, many peoples in what's now known as North America relied on bison. Thirty million of these creatures stretched from modern Canada all the way down to Mexico.But in the late 1800s hide-hunters and the U.S. military annihilated the bison, bringing them to the brink of extinction. And that had consequences for the people who relied on the bison. Consequences that we still see today.Today, we hear from an economist who revealed the shocking numbers telling this story, and one member of the Blackfeet Nation who is trying to bring back the bison.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/12/239m 33s

Predicting next year's economic storylines

It's time for another intra-Family Feud! The friendly game-show competition where our hosts from Planet Money and The Indicator duke it out over which indicator will be the leading economic story in 2024. Will interest rates decline? Will 'Bidenomics' catch on? Will junk fees get taken out with the garbage? Tell us who won by submitting your vote to Planet Money's Instagram or email us with "Family Feud" in the subject line. Voting ends Dec. 31 at midnight, and we'll announce the winner(s) on our Jan. 5 episode. Related Episodes: The Indicator of the Year: 2023 (Apple / Spotify) The 'physics' behind potential interest rates cuts (Apple / Spotify) Junk fees, unfilled jobs, jackpot? (Apple / Spotify) We grade Fed Chair Jerome Powell (Apple / Spotify) Industrial policy, the debate! (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/12/238m 6s

The 'Yellowstone' effect on Montana

Yellowstone first aired in 2018, quickly becoming one of television's most popular shows. The show follows John Dutton, played by Kevin Costner, as he feuds with real estate developers threatening to encroach on his family ranch. Today on the show, how life imitates art in Montana, where tourism has boomed, the population has grown and housing prices have soared. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/12/239m 31s

How economics can help you stick to your New Year's resolution

Talk of New Year's resolutions is bubbling up as 2024 quickly approaches. Whether it's a fitness goal, wanting to learn a new skill or just trying to develop better habits, a new year is the perfect excuse to start. However, it can be difficult to maintain as time passes by. Today on the show, we talk to a behavioral economist about one of the best ways to stick to your New Year's resolutions using the power of economics. Mixed Signals: How Incentives Really Work by Uri GneezyFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/12/239m 32s

Coyote vs. Warner Bros. Discovery

The movie Coyote vs. Acme was set to release this summer featuring characters from the iconic Looney Tunes cartoons. The studio behind the film, Warner Bros. Pictures, had some other ideas. Instead of releasing the completed film, the studio canceled Coyote vs. Acme, with no intention of ever releasing it. Today on the show, we explain the Hollywood economics behind why Warner Bros. Discovery might not want to release movies that its own studio spent years putting together. Related Episodes:​​Why platforms like HBO Max are removing streaming TV shows (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/12/239m 8s

Would-be weed merchants hit a 'grass ceiling'

For decades, states have prosecuted and imprisoned people for selling weed. Today, recreational marijuana is legal in almost half of U.S. states, and many want to give individuals who were impacted by marijuana enforcement a chance to sell it legally. But as the roughly $30 billion cannabis industry grows, are these so-called social equity programs living up to their promise? Today on the show, why many would-be cannabis entrepreneurs find themselves hitting a 'grass ceiling'. RelatedSo you want to sell marijuana across state lines (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/12/239m 16s

The Indicator of the Year

By many measures, 2023 was a decent year for the U.S. economy, but that's not how people necessarily felt. So what economic story best defined the year? Soft landings? Hard feelings about the economy? An inhospitable housing market? Our hosts from Planet Money and The Indicator battle it out over which economic story best illustrates the year. Tell us who won by submitting your vote via Planet Money's Instagram or email us with "Family Feud" in the subject line. Related episodes:Taking the temperature of the US consumer (Apple / Spotify) A treacherous descent, what will the Fed do next? (Apple / Spotify) When mortgage rates are too low to give up (Apple / Spotify) Which economic indicator defined 2022? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/12/238m 43s

What women want (to invest in)

Women lag behind men when it comes to investing. Combine this with the fact that women tend to earn less than their male peers and live longer, and it can create a waterfall of awful long-term consequences for half of America's population. Today, we speak to an author of an investing study who says he's found a solution.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/12/238m 44s

The 'physics' behind potential interest rate cuts

In the world of science there are laws—rules that describe how the universe works. The Federal Reserve has its own set of rules, except its rules are more like guidelines to help the Fed decide where interest rates should be. Today on the show, we explain inertial and non-inertial rules in the world of monetary policy, and what they tell us about potential rate cuts in the year ahead. Related episodes:The rat under the Fed's hat (Apple / Spotify)The fed decides to wait and see (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/12/238m 34s

Are the products in your shopping cart real?

How often are you shopping online and think to yourself, is that shirt/dress/jeans in my shopping cart ... even real? That is a question some shoppers are asking themselves as AI-generated products increasingly infiltrate the world of e-commerce. Today on the show, we talk to an expert in digital forensics about how AI-generated merchandise is only likely to become more common, and what ought to be done to help prevent unethical sellers from abusing the technology.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/12/239m 16s

A countdown to climate action

Since the end of November, diplomats, scientists, activists and lobbyists from nearly every country on Earth have come together for COP 28, the United Nations climate negotiating talks. One of the goals of this gathering is for countries to agree on the best path forward to address human-driven climate change. Stakes are high as average global temperatures continue to approach a key threshold of 1.5 degree Celsius (or 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times — the level climate scientists say we must stay under to stave off severe climate disruptions that could contribute to flooding, drought, hunger, and conflict.As it comes to a close, Nathan Rott with NPR's climate desk helps us navigate the take-aways from the pivotal conference.Related Episodes:Gambling, literally, on climate change (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/12/239m 27s

AI creates, transforms and destroys... jobs

We often talk about the jobs lost due to artificial intelligence. But what about the ones created or even transformed? From the gig work of training AI on good and bad answers through to designing new AI models, AI jobs are popping up like mushrooms. Today on the Indicator, we talk to people in these new roles and consider what the bots mean for the labor market.Related Episodes:Is AI a job-killer or an up-skiller? (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/12/239m 31s

The wheel's many reinventions

"Don't reinvent the wheel" is a common phrase, but structural engineer Roma Agrawal doesn't buy it. Roma has a new book out, Nuts and Bolts: Seven Small Inventions That Changed the World (in a Big Way). And in it, she argues that the re-interpretation of the wheel has been critical to modernizing the economy from a pottery wheel in ancient Mesopotamia to the gyroscope on the International Space Station. Today, how this constant reinvention fuels economic progress.Related Episodes:What nails can tell us about the economyFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/12/238m 23s

What can we learn from the year's most popular econ terms?

In 2021, the most popular term on Investopedia was "capital gains tax." In 2022, it was "poison pill." These top terms help capture the economic zeitgeist of their year. So... what was it in 2023? Today, Investopedia's editor-in-chief — and a poet — help us make sense of what the website's top ten terms of the year tell us about our collective economic psyche.RELATEDWhen mortgage rates are too low to give up (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)Hedonic adjustment: how to measure pleasure (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)The inverted yield curve is screaming RECESSION (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/12/239m 24s

Americans don't like higher prices but they LOVE buying new things

Eight times a year, regional Federal Reserve Banks release a collection of anecdotes that reveal stories about the economy. These stories come together in what's known as the "Beige Book," and we award the regional bank with the best entry with our coveted Beigie Award. Today, we're highlighting an entry that gets to the heart of the contradictions we're seeing when it comes to consumer preferences and sentiment. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/12/239m 10s

Who can and cannot get weight-loss drugs

Drugs used for weight loss like Wegovy, Ozempic and Mounjaro are nearly everywhere in popular culture, but many patients struggling with obesity are still finding them hard to get. On today's show, what's slowing access to these drugs despite their long-term benefits for the economy and patients, and how social conditioning around obesity and excess weight clouds the conversation. Related Episodes:New drugs. Cheaper drugs. Why not both? (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/12/239m 20s

Endless shrimp and other indicators

On the latest edition of Indicators of the week, inflation in the U.S. and Europe is slowing down. Plus, a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston highlights the number of gig workers typical employment counts miss. And finally ... Red Lobster, endless shrimp and loss leaders. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/12/239m 26s

Could SCOTUS outlaw wealth taxes?

The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments next week on whether the federal government can tax some "unrealized" gains. That's when an asset you hold, rather than sell, gains value. Tax experts say it's the biggest constitutional tax case seen in a century. Today, we lay out the stakes and the massive implications for government revenue, taxpayers, and even wealth inequality.Related Episodes:Could a wealth tax workHow the proposed tax on billionaires would actually workFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/12/238m 51s

Putting the 80/20 rule to the test

A favorite of productivity hackers, the Pareto Principle, aka the 80/20 rule, has taken on a life of its own since it was first observed by an Italian economist over a century ago. The concept states that a small number of causes generates a large number of outcomes. Today on the show, the origins of the Pareto Principle, why marketing and business-types love it, and whether it holds up under scrutiny. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/11/238m 41s

Oil prices and the Israel-Hamas war

The Middle East is synonymous with oil production. And historically, oil prices usually surge when there's a conflict there. But right now, despite the Israel-Hamas war, we're seeing the opposite — oil prices have fallen.Today on the show: how the region's history, geography and markets are shaping oil prices.Related Episodes:Why oil price shocks are getting less shocking (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)What could convince Egypt to take in Gaza's refugees? (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/11/237m 40s

Texas' new power grid problem

In 2021, a huge winter storm hit Texas. It caused a days-long blackout that resulted in hundreds of deaths. The Texas grid operator adopted a new policy to guard against another blackout: it would incentivize plants to keep power in reserve. The problem is: that may have caused major price spikes.Today, we make sense of the reserve policy, increased electricity prices, and the future of Texas' unique energy market.Related Episodes:ESG bans cost Texas (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/11/238m 46s

A salary to be grateful for, and other Thanksgiving indicators

It's an Indicator Friendsgiving! You're not alone in feeling the news has been awfully grim this year. So we're taking a collective breath and sitting down at the table to find some economic indicators to be thankful for. That includes an end to global shipping turmoil, the green-blue bubble détente and a palatable salary. Related Episodes:The great turnaround in shipping (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)Wisdom from the top For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/11/238m 52s

How "dark defaults" could cost you

A lot of people have experienced some version of this: You sign up for the free one-week trial of some subscription service, only later to be surprised when you get a bill for the deluxe, forever plan. Or you log into a website once, and now your inbox is a flood of promotional emails. All because of a little pre-checked box tucked away, unnoticed.But what if that pesky, pre-checked box cost you thousands of dollars?On today's show, how some political campaigns used 'dark defaults' to raise millions of dollars from unsuspecting donors. Related Episodes: Confused when online shopping? It might be a Dark PatternFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/11/239m 14s

The messy human drama behind OpenAI

The company behind ChatGPT pushed out its CEO Sam Altman on Friday. OpenAI's board gave the public little insight into its controversial decision. On Sunday, Microsoft announced it was hiring Sam Altman. By Monday morning, hundreds of OpenAI employees are threatening to leave unless the board resigns. Kate Clark, deputy bureau chief at tech publication The Information, says the saga is far from over.Today on the show, we explore the fault lines below the world of artificial intelligence development, and how the pressure built until a leading CEO was fired.Related episodes:Bots, bootleggers and Baptists (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/11/239m 29s

Prices fall, unemployment rises and Boomers have all the houses

We've been on a wild economic ride lately so let's find the key trends to make sense of where the economy's headed. On this edition of Indicators of the Week, the numbers you need to know about falling producer prices, rising unemployment claims and generational home-buying trends. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/11/239m 21s

How do cheap cell phone plans make money? And other questions

You ask, we answer! Today we answer listener questions on whether certain jobs are becoming "feminized" since COVID started and how that affects what these jobs pay. We also examine labor unions' economic impact and why Ryan Reynolds keeps sending one of our co-hosts a Christmas card. Related episodes:Women's labor comeback (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) A conversation with Claudia Goldin (Update) (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) Unions but make them grunge What's really going on with unions For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/11/239m 24s

The evidence on school vouchers that'll please nobody

School vouchers, or school choice as it's known among advocates, is public funding for children to attend private schools. It's a controversial policy — some say it undermines the public school system, others say it gives parents the ability to choose the best school for their children. And its popularity has been spiking recently. In 2021, 19 states introduced or expanded them. Partly it's been a reaction against public schools' covid control policies and teaching on sexuality, gender and race. But leaving aside the deeper political questions, what does the evidence say about the core thing school is supposed to be for: giving children a solid education?In this episode, we get into whether or not school vouchers improve student learning. The lesson: what may feel better may not have much of an effect.Related Episodes:The rise of the four-day school week (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/11/238m 23s

Xi and him

President Joe Biden and China's President Xi Jinping have not sat down for a face-to-face discussion in a year. In that time, Chinese-American relations have become even more tense with the spy balloon incident, the US cracking down on advanced computer chips and the continuing trade war. Today, we look at why the leaders of the world's two largest economies are meeting and what's at stake for their respective countries.Related Episodes:The mess at the heart of China's economy (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/11/239m 11s

When a staple becomes a luxury

Fish and chips have long been a staple cheap comfort food for millions of people in the U.K. However, economic headwinds are putting the squeeze on owners of fish and chip shops. Today, we explore how changes in economic conditions play a role in our dietary habits and how the U.K. is grappling with their affordable staple food turning into a luxury. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/11/239m 29s

Actors back. Pandas gone. WeBankrupt.

This time on Indicators of the Week: actors reached a deal with Hollywood studios after their months-long strike. The once-popular co-working company WeWork has filed for bankruptcy. Also, three pandas departed the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington D.C. as China repatriates the cuddly animals.Related Episodes:All WeWork and no playFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/11/239m 7s

A radical plan to fix Argentina's inflation

In a little over a week, Argentines will head to the polls to pick a new president. Polls show a tightening race between right-wing populist Javier Milei and centrist challenger Sergio Massa. Both are pledging to address the country's out-of-control inflation. Today on the show, we look at Milei's radical proposal to change Argentina's currency to U.S. dollars and whether that could fix inflation. Related Episodes:The push and pull of inflation (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) It's complicated. Argentina's relationship with the U.S. dollar (Planet Money+) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/11/238m 42s

Bond. World's oldest living bond.

Hidden deep in an archive in New Jersey is the world's oldest living bond. Originally issued to fund a dike in the Netherlands after a big flood, these days, it's gearing up for its 400th birthday and still paying interest. Today on the show, we visit this elder bond and hear its story.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/11/239m 4s

A bad economy can be good for your health

When economist Chris Ruhm first got the results from his study on the possible connection between recession and health, he thought he had made a mistake. But time and time again, he got the same results, overturning a decade of previous economic findings. Today, how a nation's health relates to your own. Related EpisodesHealthcare and economic despairYou can listen to an extended cut of Darian's interview with Christopher Ruhm by signing up for Planet Money+! (You'll hear stuff we couldn't fit into the regular episode, including what Ruhm thought might play out during COVID.) Planet Money+ gets you bonus content, sponsor-free episodes, and you get to support the work we do. Subscribe via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/11/239m 19s

The spectacle of Sam Bankman-Fried's trial

Last week, the former crypto wunderkind Sam Bankman-Fried was found guilty for his role in the collapse of the cryptocurrency exchange FTX. The 31-year-old former billionaire fashioned himself as someone who would revolutionize the crypto industry, but now faces the prospect of a life sentence. Today on the show, NPR business correspondent David Gura tells us what stuck out over the course of the four-week trial. Related Episodes:A former teen idol takes on crypto (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)The rise and fall of FTX (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/11/239m 40s

Why everyone in the labor market is being picky

The American economy is still running hot and the labor market is showing astounding resilience despite elevated interest rates. Things are so good that there's some pickiness being displayed by both employers and employees. Today, we look at what's turning out to be an unusual labor market and what that means for the wider economy.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/11/238m 32s

How the South is trying to win the EV race

A new Hyundai plant in Georgia. A Ford mega campus in Tennessee. The Southeast is quickly becoming a hub for electric vehicles and the manufacturing of its components. Today on the show, we explore the South's formula for landing EV makers and what it means for workers at legacy auto plants. Related Episodes:How EV batteries tore apart Michigan (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) How unions are stopped before they start (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/11/239m 2s

Trying to solve the mystery of big bond yields

If you're wincing at high interest rates on a potential loan right now, it's not just you. And the Federal Reserve's rate hikes actually isn't (entirely) to blame either. There's another culprit: the rate of a return, or yield, on a Treasury bond issued by the U.S. Today, we explore why this bond yield is so important and why it's at its highest level in years.Related EpisodesThe rat under the Fed's hat (Spotify/Apple Podcasts)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/11/238m 36s

Are real estate agent fees a racket?

In the typical home sale, the home seller pays a commission, not just to their agent, but also to the buyer's agent. This fee-sharing arrangement is part of a decades-old practice involving what real estate agents call an "offer of compensation." Others call it a conflict of interest. That's the dispute at the center of a class action lawsuit that has the potential to upend the real estate business. Today on the show, we'll explain how real estate agents and the National Association of Realtors allegedly conspired to inflate home prices by pushing agents to share fees. And why the industry says the plaintiffs should be careful what they ask for.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/11/239m 31s

A finance fright fest

Halloween is just around the corner and our hosts are scrambling to find the perfect costume. Today on the show, we scare up fresh costume ideas based on Wall Street's scariest financial jargon. If you know where to look, you can find witches and zombies lurking near dark pools and shadow banks. Are these terms as scary as they sound? Related Episodes:Are you afraid of inflation? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/10/239m 30s

Europe vs. US economies... and a dime heist

This time on Indicators of the Week: the U.S. is seeing massive economic growth, but there are a couple of asterisks. The European Central Bank is holding off on additional rate hikes, citing a weak economy in the eurozone.Also, the story of how nearly a quarter of a million dollars was stolen out of a truck... in dimes. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/10/239m 10s

What happened to the internet without net neutrality?

The fiery debate over how the government should regulate the internet came to a head in 2017. That's when the Trump-led Federal Communications Commission repealed so-called net neutrality rules put in place during the Obama administration. The rules were meant to curtail practices like intentionally slowing down someone's internet speed. Now, under a new Democratic majority, the FCC is proposing reviving net neutrality. Today on the show, what happened in the years without it and what happens next. Related Episodes:Forget Neutrality For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/10/239m 20s

The Beigie Awards: Why banks are going on a "loan diet"

Every time a new Beige Book report rolls around, we honor the regional Federal Reserve bank with the best anecdote with our prestigious Beigie Award. The winner of the October 2023 Beigie highlighted an interesting shift in the behavior of some big banks. Today, we talk to our winner all about "loan diets."For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/10/239m 14s

Why offshore wind is facing headwinds

The Gulf of Mexico saw its first-ever auction of leases for offshore wind this summer. It was another sign of the Biden administration's desire to get more renewable energy online as fast as possible. Expectations were high for the sale with over a dozen companies expressing interest. But two of the three patches of sea didn't get any bids at all. Today, we look at one clean energy experiment and see what choke points remain for offshore wind. RelatedA Man, A Plan, Wind Power, Uruguay - Planet Money (Spotify/Apple)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/10/238m 47s

How IBM's gamble ushered in the computer age

In the book of corporate folklore, former IBM CEO Thomas Watson Jr. deserves a special spot. Specifically, the massive gamble he took in 1964 to introduce the System/360, which had the potential to undermine his own company's entire business model. Today on the show, an interview with author Marc Wortman on what Watson Jr.'s decision reveals about the fragile relationship between innovation and destruction. Marc Wortman is co-author of the new book The Greatest Capitalist Who Ever Lived: Tom Watson, Jr., and the Epic Story of How IBM Created the Digital Age. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/10/239m 6s

More fraud, higher bond yields, and faster airline boarding

On this edition of Indicators of the Week: older Americans recorded higher losses to certain scams, the yield on the 10-year Treasury bond is up to the highest it's been in more than a decade and United Airlines has a plan to improve how it boards planes.RelatedYou should probably get your plane tickets soonFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/10/239m 31s

What could convince Egypt to take in Gaza's refugees?

One of the most crucial players in the war unfolding in the Middle East is Egypt, which neighbors Gaza and is facing pressure from the United States and its allies to open up its borders to refugees. Today, we explain how Egypt's rocky economy presents both a headwind and an opportunity for humanitarian talks in the Middle East and why this situation is testing the United States' economic and political influence. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/10/238m 57s

There's one business like show business

There's no business like show business. Or is there? It turns out the business of producing a Broadway hit shares a few things in common with the business of investing in tech start-ups. Today on the show, the producer of hits like Dear Evan Hansen and Leopoldstadt explains how he applies lessons learned from venture capital tech funding to investing in multi-million dollar Broadway productions.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/10/239m 25s

How a consumer watchdog's power became a liability

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was created in 2010 as the legislative response to the Great Recession. It's an aggressive regulator that challenges financial institutions on behalf of consumers. However, the unique power it wields may turn out to be its vulnerability. The bureau's critics take issue with the very tools that give the agency its might and are asking the Supreme Court to make changes. Today, we examine how the CFPB came to be such a powerful regulator and why some want to see the agency overhauled. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/10/239m 34s

The Indicator Quiz: Climate Edition

What's spicier than a pumpkin spice latte in the fall? The Indicator Quiz! The show where we bring a lucky listener on to test their econ knowledge. Today's quiz focuses on questions related to climate change. Play along with us and see how you do! Are you interested in being a contestant on our next Indicator Quiz? Email us your name and phone number at indicator@npr.org and put "Indicator Quiz" in the subject line. Related Episodes: Giant vacuums and other government climate bets Industrial policy, the debate! How EV batteries tore apart Michigan (Update) A drought, a jam, a canal — Panama! Selling safety in the fight against wildfires For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/10/238m 58s

Junk fees, unfilled jobs, jackpot

On this edition of Indicators of the Week: the FTC wants to ban hidden fees on what feels like every transaction. Down with junk fees! Germany has a possible fix for its struggling economy and unfilled jobs: immigrants. And we explore why the Powerball jackpots keep getting so big. Related Episodes:10 11 51 52 62 18For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/10/239m 28s

Taking the temperature of the US consumer

Economic indicators like the Consumer Price Index can tell us a lot about the past, but what about the future? For close to 80 years, policymakers have relied on the Surveys of Consumers to give them an idea of what the economy might do next. Today on the show, we go behind the curtain at the University of Michigan to meet the people in charge of checking the vibes of the U.S. consumer. Related Episodes:How do you measure inflation? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/10/239m 31s

A treacherous descent? What will the Fed do next?

In the world of summiting mountains, more accidents happen on the way down than on the climb up. Today on the show, why that could be a bad omen for interest rates.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/10/239m 29s

A conversation with Nobel laureate Claudia Goldin (Update)

This episode was originally published on November 30, 2021Earlier this week, Harvard economist Claudia Goldin won the economics Nobel for her research into the gender pay gap. Today, our 2021 interview with Claudia about her work, with an update from her after she learned about her award.Related episodes:When Uncle Sam stops paying the childcare bill (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/10/239m 25s

Wanted: Social workers

U.S. job growth just surged way past expectations. But one area of employment continues to need more hands on deck: social workers. The evolving occupation is getting new attention from schools all the way up to corporations. Today, we try to understand where this need is coming from and whether it can actually be met. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/10/238m 26s

Body Electric: What digital jobs are doing to our bodies

TED Radio Hour's Manoush Zamorodi joins us today to talk about her new series Body Electric. It's looking at how the information age is affecting our bodies in negative ways. Manoush spoke to researchers who say they've found simple solutions that offset the harms of sitting all day. But do those fixes work in the real world – outside of a lab? For this six-part limited series, NPR is partnering with researchers from Columbia University and maybe... you... to answer that question.Read more on how to join the study: NPR.org/bodyelectricFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/10/239m 20s

You tell us how to fix mortgages, and more

We love getting listener mail! Especially when it makes us think about a topic differently. Today on the show, we hear from listeners about host-free Airbnbs, a Danish solution to mortgage lock-in and a laughable policy for industrial policy. Have something to add to the conversation? Send us your letters to the editor: indicator@npr.org. Related Episodes: AI chips, shared trips, and a shorter work week (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) When mortgage rates are too low to give up (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) Industrial policy, the debate! (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/10/239m 2s

EVs killed the AM radio star

When some automakers confirmed this year that they were phasing out AM radio in their electric vehicles, the political backlash was immediate and remarkably bipartisan. Today on the show, what's all the fuss about AM radio? And why does the government want to keep AM radio in your car?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/10/239m 22s

When Uncle Sam stops paying the childcare bill

During the Covid-19 pandemic, the United States took dramatic action to invest in child care. Now in 2023, the majority of those investments are coming to an end. Today, we talk to childcare providers about what those funds meant—and where the end of the pandemic-era programs leaves an essential but strained system.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/10/239m 17s

Twerking, tote bags, and the top of the charts

On this musical edition of Indicators of the Week: Live Nation stops taking a cut of small artists' merchandise sales. Meanwhile, some fans are using the Billboard charts formula to boost their favorite artists to the top. And a Jamaican duo is staking a claim to the famous rhythm that defines Reggaeton. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/09/239m 25s

The walking dead NFTs

The NFT mania may have finally run its course. Not too long ago, these pieces of digital art exploded in value with the help of celebrities like Justin Bieber and Paris Hilton. But even the most successful digital artists knew it was a bubble. Today, we consider whether this multi-million dollar fad has truly come to an end or if it's still on its last legs and due for a reimagining.Related Episodes: The $69 Million JPEG (Apple Podcasts/Spotify) and The Celebrity Crypto Nexus (Apple Podcasts/Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/09/239m 27s

How EV batteries tore apart Michigan (Update)

This episode was originally published on November 14, 2022This week, Ford announced it was pausing work on a new $3.5 billion battery plant in Michigan. President of the United Auto Workers, Shawn Fain, viewed this as a "thinly veiled threat" to cut jobs. But this is a factory that's had controversy surrounding it even before this decision. And it all centers around a company called Contemporary Amperex Technology Limited, or CATL.Today, a classic Indicator on the history behind one of the most divisive factory plans in America and the man leading the charge behind the world's transition to electric vehicles.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/09/239m 11s

Chasing the American Dream at Outback Steakhouse

How often do you hang out with people in a different socioeconomic bracket than you? And where do you meet and congregate? Economist Maxim Massenkoff, and his co-author Nathan Wilmers, looked at cell phone location data to figure out where people with vastly different incomes commune together. Today on the show, Maxim discusses his research, and Darian and Alexi head to a restaurant to try and witness some of this class mixing in action.Related Episode: The Secret to Upward Mobility: Friends For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/09/239m 20s

Is the Canada, Meta news standoff coming to the US?

Canadians are in a bit of a pickle when it comes to getting timely news updates through Facebook. The Canadian government passed a law requiring Meta and Google pay media outlets when news content is posted on social media platforms. Meta's reaction, to block all news from its Canadian users, left many citizens and its government frustrated. Today on the show, what are tech companies' public service obligations in an era of declining news outlets? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/09/239m 23s

A million-dollar fossil, and other indicators

Today on the show, we cover this week's top indicators in new work permits for Venezuelan migrants, behind-the-scenes climate meetings and a million-dollar dinosaur skeleton sale. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/09/239m 21s

Selling safety in the fight against wildfires

Wildfires are becoming more frequent and serious due to human-caused climate change. This is prompting a new industry focused on residential wildfire preparedness. Today, we consider the new technology addressing wildfire risk and the cost of protecting yourself.Related Episodes:Gambling, literally, on climate change (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/09/239m 17s

The rat under the Fed's hat

The Federal Reserve said today it wasn't raising interest rates, but left the door open to keep hiking later. But there's more to this decision than meets the eye. Today on the show, we use Disney's Ratatouille to explain the Fed's recipe for monetary policy — and take off the chef's hat to reveal the two interest rates that really matter when the Fed is hiking rates. Related Episodes:AP Macro gets a makeover (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/09/237m 56s

The Beigie Awards: Manufacturing takes center stage

The Beigies roll around once again to recognize the regional Federal Reserve Bank with the best Beige Book entry. This edition's winner put a spotlight on a company increasing their efforts to recruit young people for an important piece of the manufacturing puzzle.Related Episodes:The Beigie Awards: China Edition (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/09/239m 9s

Coca Cola v. Coca Pola

The coca leaf has been an important part of Andean culture for thousands of years. But when one indigenous woman decided to use the plant in a drink she calls Coca Pola, she awoke a sleeping giant. Today on the show, a small business goes head to head with Coca-Cola over a trademark dispute.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/09/239m 17s

Economics, boosternomics and Swiftnomics

For this week's Indicators of the Week, Darian is joined by NPR colleagues Jeff Guo and Sydney Lupkin. We get into the latest numbers on child poverty in the U.S. and what it tells us about effective policy intervention. Sydney brings an update on the new covid booster and who's paying for it. And Jeff talks about Taylor Swift...again. He promises it has to do with economics.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/09/239m 21s

Wait — did we really need to raise rates?

Inflation remains stubbornly high as the Federal Open Markets Committee weighs whether they will raise interest rates again. However, new research suggests that elevated interest rates weren't the primary driver for the decline in inflation. Today, we take a look at the debate surrounding disinflation and what comes next for the Federal Reserve.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/09/239m 7s

Giant vacuums and other government climate bets

Yesterday we brought you a debate over whether the government should subsidize industries in the name of economic growth and societal benefits. Today on the show, we zero in on the climate industrial policy of the Biden administration, which is funneling billions into experimental projects that promise to remove, capture and store carbon. It's an effort by the U.S. to meet its ambitious climate goals, but it's not without its skeptics. Related Episodes:Industrial policy, the debate! (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/09/239m 0s

Industrial policy, the debate!

There is a lot of taxpayer money going into propping up industry in the U.S. From semiconductor chip fabrication in Arizona to green hydrogen plants in California. Is this smart policy? Today on the Indicator, our guests debate! We're joined by Réka Juhász, economist at the University of British Columbia and Adam Posen, president of the Peterson Institute for International Economics.After the debate, tell us what you thought! Did anything you heard change your mind or make you think differently about industrial policy? Send us a note at indicator@npr.org.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/09/239m 29s

Is retail theft getting worse?

Lately, retailers have been complaining to their investors about thieves coming to their stores and stealing stuff and blaming them for falling profits. It's the biggest part of a well-known industry problem called "shrink," but is this trend as pervasive as stores are making it out to be? Today on the show, retail theft and what stores are doing about it. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/09/238m 47s

Apple, drugs, Grindr

Today on Indicators of the Week: government iPhone restrictions in China that walloped Apple's market value. Plus plans emerge over how the US government plans to negotiate drug prices. Also, a mass exodus of employees from a top dating app that sheds some light on where the whole working from home debate is. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/09/239m 15s

'Welcome to the USA! Now get to work.'

When refugees arrive in the U.S. the clock starts ticking. They usually have up to 90 days to get a job and become 'self-sufficient'.Researcher Blair Sackett says that that's simply not enough time for refugees to acclimate to a totally new country and culture and find work. She argues that current policy essentially resettles refugees into poverty. Today on the show we explore that 90-day policy and potential solutions to help refugees find their financial footing.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/09/239m 28s

The dementia tax

More than 7 million Americans are living with dementia. To take care of this population, family members must often make the difficult choice of giving up work or paying for a costly facility. Today on the show, the rising cost of memory care in an aging population. Related Episodes:Who's gonna take care of grandma? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/09/238m 27s

The Beigie Awards: China Edition

The Beigies are back, with a twist! In China, data on the economy is sometimes difficult to come by, so we thought we'd take a leaf out of the US Federal Reserve's Beige Book instead. Today, we bring you some colorful anecdotes about China's economy, on inbound tourism and revenge spending, neither of which is fueling an economic comeback.Related Episodes:Boats, bikes and the Beigies (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)Young, 'spoiled and miserable' in ChinaTwo Indicators shaking China's economyFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/09/239m 17s

Jobs Friday: More jobs and more unemployment

The jobs report is in! And both the rate of employment AND unemployment went up in August. How does that happen? Plus, how disabled people are doing in the labor market.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/09/238m 56s

A drought, a jam, a canal — Panama!

The Panama Canal links the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It sees hundreds of billions worth of stuff pass through it every year. But a historic drought is making it a little harder for big cargo ships to get through the fifty-one mile long channel. Today on the show, we look at how this backup presents yet another test for global supply chains. Related Episode: Two Indicators: supply chain and solutions (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/08/239m 5s

Young, "spoiled and miserable" in China

Every day, A Ze, a young woman in Beijing, would wake up early, do her makeup, and walk to her old work bus stop... and keep going. She'd left her job but couldn't let her parents know. China's urban youth unemployment rate hit 21% in June, a number way up from pre-pandemic times. But at the same time, factories are crying out for workers. Today, we talk about China's slowdown in growth, and how it's hit white-collar job openings the hardest, and how China's educated young people are sometimes opting out of work entirely.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/08/239m 31s

The problems with the US's farm worker program

Over the years, U.S. agriculture has grown increasingly dependent on the H-2A Guest Worker program to bring in foreign workers to harvest crops. H2A is a vestige of a U.S. and Mexican policy called the Bracero Program, which ended in the 1960s. Today on the show, why farmers and farm worker advocates are calling for more scrutiny of the current-day visa program, which has been dogged by concerns about worker exploitation and safety. Related Episodes:Farm Jobs Friday (Apple Podcasts / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/08/239m 17s

The Indicator Quiz: The Internet

What's hotter than a leather car seat in the late summer? The Indicator Quiz! We bring a listener onto the show and test their econ knowledge. Today's quiz is all about the Internet and artificial intelligence. Play along with us and see how you do! Are you interested in being a contestant on our next Indicator Quiz? Just email us your name and phone number at indicator@npr.org and put "Indicator Quiz" in the subject line. Related Episodes: Breaking up big business is hard to do A night at the museum of the economy r/Boxes, r/Reddit, r/AI Is AI a job-killer or upskiller? Inside the underwater cables powering the economyFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/08/239m 24s

AI chips, shared trips, and a shorter work week

It's Indicators of the Week, our weekly news roundup. Today, AI doesn't want to invest in AI, a county in Washington state implements a 4-day work week, and NYC says bye bye to Airbnb, sorta.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/08/239m 21s

Why a weak ruble is good for Russia's budget but not Putin's image

Russia's Ruble is hovering around its lowest value against the dollar since June 2022. A weak currency is already a big deal for ordinary people affected by inflation, but in Russia, the concern is only amplified because of the Ruble's unique history in Russia. Today, we dive deep into Russia's historical connection to the Ruble and why a weak Ruble puts Russia in a difficult position today. Related Episodes: The artificial strength of the Russian ruble (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/08/239m 26s

How fed up farmers started the only government-run bank in the US

The idea of a state-run bank in the United States feels like a foreign concept. While public banks are fixtures of the financial system in countries like Canada and Chile, only one state in the U.S. can say they have a public bank. Today, we explore the promises and challenges of public banking in the U.S. and what advocates can learn from 20th-century farmers in North Dakota. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/08/239m 27s

Why pizza costs more in Iceland and other listener questions

You ask, we answer! We help a parent explain exchange rates to their kid, a high school teacher explain bond prices to his students, and we follow up on what happened to the diversity of the student body at the University of California after the state's ban on affirmative action. If you have a question you'd like us to answer, email us at indicator@npr.org.Can't get enough of these topics? We've got you covered! Here's our reporting on how ending affirmative action changed California and NPR's follow up on what happened after. More on the birth of the bond, the bond market and the yield curve. And a whole lotta Iceland (Justin Bieber, planes), plus dollar-slice pizza.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/08/239m 16s

The echo of the bison

For over 10,000 years, many peoples in what's now known as North America relied on bison. Thirty million of these creatures stretched from modern Canada all the way down to Mexico. But in the late 1800s hide-hunters and the U.S. military annihilated the bison, bringing them to the brink of extinction. And that had consequences for the people who relied on the bison. Consequences that we still see today.Today, we hear from an economist who revealed the shocking numbers telling this story, and one member of the Blackfeet Nation who is trying to bring back the bison.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/08/239m 27s

Metals, government debt, and a climate lawsuit

Last year, the Inflation Reduction Act was signed into law as the Biden Administration's signature attempt to combat climate change. Today, we present three climate-related indicators with guest Nate Hegyi of the public radio podcast, Outside/In.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/08/239m 6s

When mortgage rates are too low to give up

The average mortgage rate in the U.S. just hit 7.09%—its highest level in more than two decades. And that's having ripple effects in the wider economy. Some homeowners feel locked in, tethered to their super low interest rates and unable to find something better. Today on the show, what happens when homeowners are locked in by low rates? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/08/238m 39s

How Yellow wound up in the red

Yellow stunned the trucking industry when it filed for bankruptcy this month. The nearly hundred-year old company said it will lay off 30,000 employees and liquidate all of its assets. On today's show, a glimpse into Yellow's bankruptcy process: who's blaming who for what, and an explainer on a specific type of loan - the debtor in possession financing - which promises some rich returns to the lender in this case.For more on challenges in the trucking industry check out our story on the spot market and the so-called freight recession.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/08/239m 26s

Is math real? And other existential questions

We are often taught to think of math as a rigid set of rules, never to be questioned. But that is exactly the wrong way to think about it, according to one mathematician. Today on the show, we talk to Eugenia Cheng about her new book "Is Math Real?: How Simple Questions Lead Us to Mathematics' Deepest Truths" and how math can help us ask more probing questions about the world around us. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/08/239m 30s

Breaking up big business is hard to do

The Federal Trade Commission is the sheriff for big businesses. One of its main functions is to stop companies from buying up other companies in a way that hurts competition. Those investigations have been going way up under FTC Chair Lina Khan, and it's not gone unnoticed by critics in business and some Republican lawmakers. Today on the show, we look at the FTC's scorecard under Lina Khan. Related Episodes: Listen to Planet Money's three-part series on antitrust. • Antitrust one • Antitrust two • Antitrust three For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/08/239m 16s

Tale as old as time: Indicators of the Week

In a week jam-packed with major economic news, we've selected a few of our favorite stories for Indicators of the Week. Today we cover an Italian bank story, the drop in Chinese imports and the $1.6 billion acquisition of Simon & Schuster.Related Episodes: Are we entering a new dawn for antitrust enforcement? (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/08/239m 30s

Is this a bank?

You've heard of The Price Is Right, but what about Is This A Bank? It's a game show where contestants puzzle over some obvious and not-so-obvious places where people store their money. This podcast may or may not remind you where your secret stashes of cash are hidden.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/08/239m 30s

A night at the museum of the economy

Dinosaur museums have dinosaurs. Space museums have spacecraft. But what would a dedicated museum of the economy have in it? That was a question author and friend of the show Tim Harford recently posed in his column for the Financial Times. So we decided to run with this thought experiment, too. Today on the show, get ready for a night at the museum — of the economy. Read Tim's original column and listen to his podcast.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/08/239m 30s

Return of the crab twins

RaeShawn and LaShone Middleton are twin sisters and business owners based in Columbia, Maryland. We last talked to them in the midst of the pandemic when they were just getting started with their steamed crab delivery service called R&L Crab. Today, we check back with the sisters and see how their business is fairing two years later.Related Episodes: Entrepreneurship On The Rise (Apple Podcasts / Spotify)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/08/239m 13s

What could break next?

Even if there isn't a recession right now, there are still vulnerable spots in the economy that could cause economic pain. Today on the show, we explore why some are concerned about the markets for commercial real estate and private credit. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/08/239m 26s

Farm Jobs Friday

Farm employment numbers are historically very hard to track. Partly because they fluctuate a lot from season to season, partly because a large portion of farm workers are undocumented. They're also not included in the monthly job numbers, which means we hardly ever talk about them on Jobs Friday. But today we're bringing you "Farm Jobs Friday" as we zoom in on three big trends in farm employment. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/08/239m 3s

The life and death spirals of social networks

Meta's new social media platform, Threads, had a rocket-like start when it launched a month ago as a challenger to X (formerly known as Twitter). But it's far from clear which platform will prove dominant. Today, an expert in online networks walks us through the economics of this social media battle. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/08/239m 15s

Fitch, please! Why Fitch lowered the US credit rating

The credit rating agency, Fitch, caused a stir yesterday when it downgraded the United States' credit rating from AAA to AA plus. This came less than a week since Federal Reserve staff stopped forecasting a recession on the horizon. So what gives? Today, we talk to an economist to break down the reasons why Fitch no longer views the US as among the safest of bets. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/08/239m 12s

When remote work works and when it doesn't

Do office workers get as much done working from home as they do in person? We've been debating this question for years. At the beginning of the pandemic, many economists thought yes, people can be just as productive from home. Wouldn't it have been nice if they'd just stopped there? Well, they didn't. And new evidence suggests working from home, at least full-time, may not be as productive as we once thought. Some of the research referenced in this show:Jose Maria Barrero, Nicholas Bloom and Steven J. Davis – The Evolution of Working from HomeNatalia Emanuel and Emma Harrington – Working Remotely?Natalia Emanuel, Emma Harrington and Amanda Pallais – The Power of Proximity to CoworkersFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/08/239m 30s

An economic argument for heat safety regulation (Encore)

It's been a summer of record breaking heat. And for both outdoor and indoor workers, that heat poses a growing health risk. Around the country, worker advocates and industry groups are in an ongoing fight over how to address extreme heat and workplace safety. And that got The Indicator team thinking about an episode we did last year. Co-hosts Adrian Ma and Darian Woods spoke to an economist who said heat safety regulations could be a win-win-win for workers, businesses and the economy. You can find the original episode from last year here. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/07/239m 12s

IRS, Ivies and GDP

In this edition of Indicators of the Week, we talk about the end of surprise IRS visits, new research on elite college admissions, and why a soft landing is in sight. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/07/239m 18s

Why residuals are taking center stage in actors' strike

Hollywood has been on strike for weeks with writers and actors hitting picket lines from California to New York. The unions for both groups, the Writers Guild of America and SAG-AFTRA, say a major sticking point in negotiations with major studios has been over one item in particular: residuals. Today on the show, we talk to SAG-AFTRA's chief negotiator on how residuals are drying up for actors in the age of streaming. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/07/239m 31s

Hiking the last mile on inflation

The Federal Reserve finds itself in a tricky spot with inflation just a notch above its target of 2%. This poses a challenge for the central bank as they enter what's known as the "last mile" of monetary policy. Today, we explain why the final stretch of the Fed's race to 2% inflation is considered the hardest. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/07/239m 18s

Women's labor comeback

Lots of women left the workforce early in the pandemic. At the time, there were fears these women would stay out of the workforce for years, if they returned at all. But women's participation in the labor force, between the ages of 25 and 54, is at an all time high.Check out more of NPR's Scott Horsley's reporting on women's return to the workforce. And listen back to our previous episodes about women leaving the workforce in 2020 and why many women didn't immediately return.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/07/239m 0s

A lesson in Barbie labor economics

After a stunning box office opening of more than $300 million worldwide for the new Greta Gerwig film, the Barbieverse is having its moment. So what better time to examine what Barbie's 200-plus careers over the decades—from fashion model to astronaut to teacher—tell us about real-life women in the workforce. Today on the show, a former economics educator gives us a Barbie pink-colored lens on the labor market. You can find the St. Louis Fed's Barbie curriculum here. Related Episodes: Want more Barbie-nomics? Check out our episode on how Mattel turned the Barbie brand around.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/07/239m 28s

Trucks, transfers and trolls

Tired of waiting days for your money to transfer in the bank? So is the Fed. It's just launched a new instant payment system that could mean no more waiting for your paycheck to come through.Plus, after a nearly four-year wait, the bizarre-looking Tesla Cybertruck is here! We check in on how it compares to other electric pickup trucks on the market.And a draft research paper has the economics profession on edge. A popular online forum for econ jobs has long been littered with abusive, racist, misogynistic and otherwise toxic posts. Planet Money did a story on the site back in 2019. This new research ties toxic content to the universities it came from.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/07/239m 3s

A first-class postal economics primer

The price of mailing a first-class letter in the U.S. went up to .66 this month, part of a series of price hikes that the postal service hopes will put it on a pathway to profitability. But from its inception, the United States Postal Service wasn't designed to run much like a business. Today on the show, how the U.S.P.S. went from a public service to a business burdened by debt.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/07/239m 29s

A former teen idol takes on crypto

Cryptocurrency's rise attracted the endorsements of several high-profile celebrities during the pandemic. Actor Ben McKenzie, however, wasn't really convinced by the promise of crypto and has emerged as a surprising skeptic of the industry. Today, we talk to him about his journey from former teen idol to outspoken crypto critic. Easy Money: Cryptocurrency, Casino Capitalism, and the Golden Age of FraudFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/07/239m 34s

Boats, bikes and the Beigies

The Beigies are back and headed down south! From boats and bikes to pigs and cows, you could call this one a wild ride. Eight times a year, the 12 regional Federal Reserve banks come together to share anecdotes from businesses and other industry experts in their respective parts of the country. These stories are published in the "Summary of Commentary on Current Economic Conditions by Federal Reserve District," more commonly known as the Beige Book. We pick our favorite anecdotes and crown a winner!Check out the previous Beigies winner here and click to listen to our recent story on greedflation.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/07/239m 19s

How Asimov's 'Foundation' has inspired economists

When we talk about classic economic texts, you might think of something like Adam Smith's "The Wealth of Nations." But how about the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov? One of the big ideas at the heart of this science fiction saga is that math can predict and shape the future. We hear from two economists who tell us how the ideas in Foundation helped set them on their career path. Related episodes:The carbon coin: A novel idea Beach reads for econ nerdsFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/07/239m 17s

@Threads, @Nasdaq, @Bank of America

It's time again for our Indicators of the Week! Today on the show, we've got a new social network, a new lineup for an old stock index and some new fines for old grievances. Listen to the numbers that caught our attention on the launch of Threads, the Nasdaq 100's stock shake-up and Bank of America's big fine.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/07/239m 29s

Time to make banks more stressed?

Stress tests are one of the many tools the Federal Reserve has to regulate the financial system. So why didn't stress tests help prevent the bank failures of Silicon Valley, Signature and First Republic? Today, we explain how stress tests work and why the Fed is considering an overhaul.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/07/239m 15s

What's behind the China deflation scare

Earlier this week, China reported a headline CPI of zero. Observers are concerned about the potential for a deflationary environment in China that could have ripple effects for the rest of the world. Today, we find out why prices are falling in China and what the CCP could do to reverse that trend. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/07/239m 17s

The Indicator Quiz: Jobs and Employment

It's another Indicator Quiz episode! We bring a listener onto the show and test their econ knowledge. Today's quiz is all about jobs and employment. Play along with us and see how you do! Are you interested in being a contestant on our next Indicator Quiz? Just email us your name and phone number at indicator@npr.org and put "Indicator Quiz" in the subject line.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/07/239m 29s

Why government websites and online services are so bad

Government websites and online services leave a lot to be desired. Today we look at California's unemployment insurance fiasco as a test case for how government can do digital services better.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/07/239m 28s

Good jobs Friday

The US economy added more than 200,000 jobs in June. But are these good jobs? Today, we look at some ways to answer this question, and what it takes to transform a job from bad to good.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/07/239m 16s

How Shein became a fast-fashion behemoth

In the past few years, Shein has grown into the world's largest online-only fashion retailer. And in the process, it has also drawn criticism, a cultural backlash, and the ire of U.S. lawmakers. Today on the show: how Shein's unusual business model helped it grow from a small internet startup to a global retail behemoth, and why it is so controversial.If you enjoyed this episode, check out our series on the influencer industry. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/07/239m 6s

The rise of American natural gas

In early 2016 the U.S. barely exported any liquified natural gas at all. Now it's the leading exporter of the fossil fuel — on track to way surpass Qatar and Australia. How did that happen? Today on the show, we talk to one of the men who triggered the American exporting revolution.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/07/239m 24s

Our fireworks show

We have a few fascinating fireworks facts for your Fourth of July picnics! Over the last few decades, states and counties across the U.S. have liberalized fireworks laws. It's just one reason why sales of backyard pyrotechnics have exploded. So what happened to safety over this period?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/07/239m 8s

Legacy admissions, the Russian Ruble and Final Fantasy XVI

On today's edition of Indicators of the Week, we cover the numbers behind stories relating to the Supreme Court's decision on affirmative action, the Wagner rebellion's effect on the Russian currency, and some huge 2023 sales numbers for the video game industry. Related Episode:How ending affirmative action changed California (June 8, 2023)For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/06/239m 26s

From no bank to neobank

Online banking has become so common that some banks don't have any physical locations at all. Today we track the transition to online banking in Mexico, where startups are eager to win over new customers who are tech-savvy but don't have any kind of bank account. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/06/238m 41s

Not your typical army: how the Wagner Group operates

The recent mutiny in Russia has put a spotlight on the quasi-military organization responsible: the Wagner Group. Today, we talk to an expert on the Wagner Group to get a sense of how it operates and what its failed rebellion against the Russian government means for the group's future.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/06/238m 39s

Gambling, literally, on climate change

Despite overwhelming scientific evidence that climate change is affecting our planet, a lot of people out there are still not convinced it's a problem. Today on the show, a tool that might actually shift people's opinions on climate change: gambling.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/06/239m 25s

Why building public transit in the US costs so much

American public transit is notoriously expensive to build compared to countries in Europe and Asia. Today, we visit a $837 million subway station in New York to learn why these projects come with such a high price tag all across the country.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/06/239m 22s

Home prices dip, Turkey's interest rate climbs, Amazon gets sued

Housing prices are easing! Good news for homebuyers, not great news for Adrian. Turkey's new central bank governor raises its interest rates. And is the FTC's Lina Khan riding into Amazon in a trojan horse?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/06/239m 30s

When insurers can't get insurance

Climate change is changing the property insurance market. California is one state where major insurers have opted out of writing new property insurance policies. So how does that affect the people living in these states? Today, how climate change is breaking down the insurance market.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/06/239m 24s

A watershed moment in the west?

Arizona officials announced this month that all the groundwater in the Phoenix metro area is spoken for, potentially affecting its fast-growing suburbs. Despite the initial shock, the news hasn't exactly slowed development — or home prices. On today's show, we ask whether Greater Phoenix, and the west overall, is inching closer to a reckoning over water.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/06/239m 32s

The migrant match game

About 2 percent of the global population lives in countries where they're not citizens, and many of these migrants are seeking economic opportunities. This flow of people can benefit countries with aging populations and shrinking workforces, but only when migrants' skills are in demand in the places where they land. Today on the show, we look at what it can take to make a good match.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/06/239m 10s

r/boxes, r/Reddit, r/AIregs

How boxes contain all of our consumer goods, hopes and dreams. Why communities on Reddit went dark this week. And the European Union's plan to regulate AI. It's Indicators of the Week!For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/06/239m 26s

How saving water costs utilities

Across the U.S. each month, utilities send meter readers out to record how much water their customers are using. Smart readers can do this virtually, and detect leaks, but many utilities have been slow to adopt the technology. On today's show, we dig into utilities' disincentives to save water.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/06/239m 8s

The Fed decides to wait and see

The Fed just announced a pause on interest rate hikes for the first time in over a year. With inflation still double the Fed's 2% target, what's the plan here? Today on the show, how a shower helps explain the Fed's incremental approach.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/06/238m 40s

Is greedflation really the villain?

Who's to blame for current inflation? It's one of the spiciest debates these days, with many fingers pointed at one villain: corporations. Today on the show, an economist who looked for evidence on whether or not greedflation is the answer.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/06/239m 29s

Listener Questions: the 30-year fixed mortgage, upgrade auctions, PCE inflation

It's another listener questions episode where we take on what you want to know! On today's show... The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage. It's a cornerstone of the U.S. housing market, but not so much in the rest of the world. Why? We also look at upgrade auctions in the economy and a measure of inflation often overshadowed by the CPI ... PCE.If you have a question you'd like us to answer, email us at indicator@npr.org. Please include your name and number.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/06/239m 29s

Text scams, crypto crackdown, and an economist to remember

Too many texts? Some of them could be scams! Plus the SEC is trying to play sheriff in the wild west that is crypto. And we remember the late economist William Spriggs who died this week, and read his open letter to economists. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/06/239m 29s

How ending affirmative action changed California

California's 25-year-old ban on affirmative action at public universities offers clues into how a Supreme Court ban on the policy would affect students and schools nationwide. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/06/239m 29s

Erdoganomics

Turkey's strong-arm President Erdogan is at war with interest rates, which he's called the mother and father of all evil. But inflation is out of control and the Turkish lira keeps losing value. How did Turkey get here, and what's the plan to turn things around?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/06/239m 22s

Freight drivers feel the flip-flop

Today, we power up our CB radios to find out what's roiling the transportation services sector, and talk to a trucking company operator who's feeling what one regional bank called a freight recession.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/06/238m 39s

A cashless cautionary tale

India's recent announcement that it'll get rid of its highest denomination bill brings back memories of a disastrous experiment to invalidate most of its currency in 2016. Today, a critical look at the challenges of going cashless around the world.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/06/239m 7s

A troubling cold spot in the hot jobs report

The job market continues to surge despite fears of an economic slowdown. In recent months, Black Americans benefited from strong labor market conditions. But May's unemployment numbers hint that could change. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/06/239m 10s

The OG of ESGs

Decades before the current debate about ESG and "woke capitalism," there was a guy on Wall Street investing money on behalf of nuns and labor unions. He's known today as one of the pioneers of socially responsible investing.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/06/239m 6s

The inventor's dilemma

New economic research suggests that large companies can hold back inventors, and the overall economy. Today we talk to an inventor who left a big pharmaceutical company to start afresh, leading to some incredible treatments for serious diseases.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/05/239m 26s

Elon's giant rocket

Is this Mars thing really happening? SpaceX did its first test launch of Starship this spring, the rocket that it's developing to send to Mars. But getting to Mars is still a long way off. So does SpaceX have the funding and business plan to pull it off?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/05/239m 19s

Receding rivers, party poopers, and debt ceiling watchers

Indicators all about kicking the can down the road but never far enough. A deal on water in the west, the US's tippy top credit rating gets put on notice, and tech companies want us to have less fun and fewer shared passwords.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/05/239m 11s

The dangers of money market funds

Money market funds are a key aspect of the financial system and hold about $5.75 trillion of assets. Today, we explain what makes up a money market fund, why they've been looking shaky lately, and why a potential debt default is making things worse. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/05/239m 1s

Bots, bootleggers and Baptists

A corporate titan and a cautious professor face off before Congress and ... agree with each other? From the ivory tower to inside the boardroom, the pressure campaign to regulate AI.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/05/239m 7s

Is AI a job-killer or an up-skiller?

For all the talk about AI, one of the burning questions is how the technology will affect the workforce. Today, we talk to the authors of one of the first empirical studies that looks at AI in the workplace. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/05/238m 47s

The Indicator Quiz: Banking Troubles

It's another Indicator Quiz episode! We bring a listener onto the show and test their econ knowledge. This time around, the quiz is all about the banking system and its recent troubles.Are you interested in being a contestant on our next Indicator Quiz? Just email us your name and phone number at indicator@npr.org and put "Indicator Quiz" in the subject line. You have until the end of the day, Monday (05/29), to enter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/05/239m 30s

Household debt, Home Depot sales and Montana's TikTok ban

It's Indicators of the Week! We round up the economic indicators that caught our attention. On today's episode, we look at growing U.S. household debt, the shrinking sales of Home Depot and Montana's new TikTok ban. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/05/239m 30s

Can YOU solve the debt crisis?

In the background of the debt ceiling fight between Congress and the Biden administration, we peek inside a little-known program created for citizens who want to help pay off the national debt. This special fund has been collecting donations from civic-minded Americans since the 1960s.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/05/239m 14s

The man who busted the inflation-employment myth

Nobel-winning economist Robert Lucas Jr. died on Monday. His revolutionary theories transformed the field of macroeconomics. His influential "Lucas critique" argued economic policy must take into account people's decisions in reaction to the policy itself, and just as importantly, their expectations. Not only is he remembered as a brilliant mind, but a supportive colleague as well. On today's episode, we remember Robert Lucas and his legacy.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/05/239m 14s

Does the U.S. have too many banks?

The United States is unusual in that it has thousands of relatively small and specialized banks. Even after adjusting for population size, countries like Canada, the U.K., India and Brazil have far fewer banks. Today, we examine America's love affair with small banks and why having so many could be a double-edged sword. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/05/238m 45s

Do dollar store bans work?

In recent years, we've seen dozens of cities ban new dollar stores from opening up. The thinking goes, by keeping dollar stores out, it'll be easier to get much-needed grocery stores to come in. On today's show, we visit two cities that have passed dollar store bans, New Orleans and Birmingham, to see if they've worked. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/05/238m 43s

The debt ceiling deadline, German economy, and happy workers

It's Indicators of the Week! We round up the economic indicators that caught our attention ... Germany's economic resilience comes in the form of a heat pump. As debt-ceiling negotiations continue, the debt default date continues to move around. And a new survey on job satisfaction that kind of surprised us.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/05/239m 28s

Twitter's concerning surge

Twitter's false labeling of the NPR Twitter account as "state-affiliated" put a spotlight on the website's handling of government-controlled accounts. Today, we talk to NPR tech reporter, Dara Kerr, about the recent surge in activity for state-controlled Twitter accounts. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/05/239m 12s

Congress could do more to fight inflation

The rate of inflation is slowing, but still uncomfortably high, according to today's consumer price index report. The Federal Reserve has been front and center in fighting inflation, cranking up interest rates for more than a year. But how about Congress? It has fiscal tools to help bring down prices, but they've largely gone unused. On today's show, we look at why. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/05/239m 30s

Housing dilemma in resort towns

Hot, fresh and kinda salty, the Beige Book is back! This time we're headed to the beach as businesses get ready for summer.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/05/239m 26s

What's the Commonwealth good for?

The coronation of King Charles III is putting the United Kingdom and its relationship with Commonwealth countries back in the spotlight. Today, we explore the economic links between the UK and Caribbean Commonwealth countries to see what the future might hold for them.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/05/238m 30s

Who's the boss in today's labor market?

It's one thing to quit your job and a completely other thing to get laid off or fired. A new indicator compares quits with firings and layoffs to measure who has more power in today's labor market, workers or employers.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/05/239m 19s

President Biden: Climate champion or fossil fuel friend?

As a presidential candidate, Joe Biden promised to make climate change a major priority, But since taking office, President Joe Biden seems pretty friendly to the fossil fuel industry. What gives?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/05/239m 26s

How the Fed got so powerful

How much power does the Fed have? According to Fed Chair Jerome Powell, the limit basically does not exist! New York Times reporter Jeanna Smialek joins the show to talk about her new book Limitless: The Federal Reserve Takes on a New Age of Crisis.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/05/239m 29s

The banking system that loaned billions to SVB and First Republic

Unsung hero of the financial system or enabler of failing banks? Today on the show, how the Federal Home Loan Bank system, originally designed to support homeownership and affordable housing, ended up loaning billions to failing banks like First Republic.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/05/239m 29s

SVB, now First Republic: How it all started

The turmoil in the banking industry isn't over yet. Today, First Republic Bank was seized, following the failures of Signature Bank and Silicon Valley Bank back in March. How did we get here? And how do we prevent banks from failing in the future? A show-stopping mea culpa from the Federal Reserve provides some answers. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/05/239m 30s

Our final thoughts on the influencer industry

As we wrap our series exploring the influencer marketing industry, we go to the cutting room floor for some extra insight into topics that we didn't have time for. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/04/239m 10s

The dark side of the influencer industry

When your lifestyle is your brand, the line between work and life can start to get blurred. From hate comments and sneaky contracts to prejudice and discrimination, it's not all sunshine and brand deals in the influencer industry.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/04/239m 9s

Gen Z's dream job in the influencer industry

'Do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life,' they said. How Gen Z is trying to do just that through ~influencing~For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/04/239m 17s

The economics of the influencer industry

We wanted to know how many influencers are making a living from their content creation. Turns out, not many are. On today's episode of our series on the influencer industry, we meet a fashion influencer trying to piece together sponsorship deals ... and hit the shops for styling advice.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/04/239m 28s

The origins of the influencer industry

This week, we're going deep into the multi-billion dollar influencer industry. Today, a researcher and two generations of influencers take us through the industry's history, from its origins in the blogosphere of the Great Recession to the sponsored content in your social media feeds today.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/04/239m 10s

Dollar v. world / Taylor Swift v. FTX / Fox v. Dominion

Why does Brazil's President Lula go to bed every night thinking about the US dollar? Did Taylor Swift know crypto exchange FTX was trouble? That and more on this week's financial news roundup.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/04/239m 6s

'Let's Get It On' ... in court

Did Ed Sheeran steal from Marvin Gaye's "Let's Get It On" in his hit single "Thinking Out Loud"? That case heads to trial next week, and our guest says the outcome should matter to music-lovers everywhere.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/04/239m 26s

A tech billionaire goes missing in China

Earlier this year, Bao Fan, a prominent Chinese banker and tech billionaire, went missing in China. According to a statement from his company, he's "cooperating in an investigation being carried out by certain authorities in the People's Republic of China." The details are very murky, but his disappearance raises questions about doing business in China right now.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/04/239m 2s

The dating game that does your taxes

A video game where you go on dates and also prepare your federal tax return? We obviously had to play. Plus the IRS's 20 year journey to make tax prep free.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/04/239m 21s

Can forcing people to save cool inflation?

"Forced savings, you cowards!" Those aren't his exact words, but in 1940, macroeconomist John Maynard Keynes advocated for compulsory savings to help tame inflation during World War II. Could that work today?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/04/239m 14s

Gloomy global growth, Tupperware troubles, RIP HBO Max

In this edition of Indicators of the Week, our hosts cover the latest news from the International Monetary Fund, Tupperware and the media conglomerate behind HBO Max — or is it just Max now? For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/04/239m 7s

When AI works in HR

Artificial intelligence has been portrayed as a solution to human bias. But, when it comes to finding top job talent, AI can get it just as wrong. So how can that be fixed?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/04/238m 49s

Prices: What goes up, doesn't always come down

Earlier in the pandemic, we saw many businesses raise their prices because of the higher costs they faced. So we wondered, now that some of those costs are coming down, will companies also pass along that price relief to consumers? The answer reveals a lot about how corporations make pricing decisions.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/04/239m 20s

How one small change in Japan could sway U.S. markets

You've heard of the butterfly effect, right? A seemingly small action causes ripples in unexpected ways elsewhere. So, what would it mean if Japan's central bank raised interest rates on its 10-year government bonds, which have been near zero percent since 2016?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/04/239m 18s

The Fed's radical new bank band-aid

Recent bank failures are putting a spotlight on risky behaviors in the financial sector. The Federal Reserve is introducing a new way for banks to borrow money that's better for banks, but exposes the government to more cost and risk. Today, we explain the Bank Term Funding Program.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/04/238m 3s

How much is your reputation worth?

Dominion Voting Systems is seeking $1.6 billion in damages from Fox News, which if it wins, would be the biggest defamation verdict in U.S. history. So we wondered, how do you price a reputation?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/04/239m 21s

Inside the underwater cables powering the economy

On the Internet, everything feels instantaneous. But how exactly did that data get to you? We'll take you on a virtual tour of the 19th-century technology that runs the modern world.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/04/239m 26s

The inverted yield curve is screaming RECESSION

There is one indicator that has predicted every recession since 1969, and that indicator is flashing red right now. It's the yield curve. But Mr. Yield Curve himself, Campbell Harvey, explains why this time he thinks his prediction could be wrong. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/04/239m 31s

What the "bonkers" bond market means for you

U.S. government bonds have long been seen as a steady, reliable place for investors. So why has this safe 'merry-go-round' option turned into a rickety roller coaster ride? We step into the financial markets theme park to explain.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/04/239m 29s

Binance lawsuit, bank failures and oil drilling

We cover some of this week's top economic stories: Cryptocurrency company Binance's legal issues, patching a hole in the banking system's rainy day fund, and newly approved waters for oil and gas drilling in the Gulf of Mexico.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/03/239m 29s

The cost of a dollar in Ukraine

How one Ukrainian is circumventing the government exchange rate to turn U.S. dollars into medicine for Ukrainians near the front lines.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/03/238m 41s

What's the cure for America's doctor shortage?

The doctor shortage is a growing problem across the U.S. But there was a time when the government, researchers, and medical professionals worried about a doctor surplus.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/03/239m 18s

Batteries are catching fire at sea

Lithium-ion batteries—used in everything from smart phones and laptops to electric scooters and cars—are catching fire on land and at sea. A former cargo ship captain walks us through why these fires are so hard to put out and why ocean-going car carriers are particularly at risk.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/03/239m 21s

Why tech bros are trying to give away all their money (kind of)

How do you do the most good in the world? Money and data! That's according to this new wave of philanthropy known as effective altruism, heralded by the likes of Sam Bankman-Fried. Today on the show we uncover the art and science of effective altruism.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/03/239m 29s

Too many subscriptions, not enough organs

Our indicators of the week: how a federal agency is trying to make it easier for you to cancel your subscriptions. And what's being done to address the 100,000-plus person backlog for organ transplants.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/03/239m 11s

The wide open possibility of the high seas

The high seas — water 200 nautical miles from shore — are an ocean of possibility for industries looking to cash in. But without proper oversight, the problems could be as deep as the ocean itself.Could an international agreement help?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/03/239m 16s

We grade Fed Chair Jerome Powell

We're putting Fed Chair Jerome Powell in the hot seat. Without fear and without favor, our guests look at Powell's record on jobs, inflation and financial stability. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/03/239m 16s

What banks do when no one's watching

Recent banking turmoil is shining a spotlight on the people whose job it is to monitor banks themselves. Today, we examine the bank examiners and learn why their job is so important for the banking sector. Plus, a recent government report that shows they could be in short supply very soon. For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/03/238m 53s

The demise of Credit Suisse

Credit Suisse was a 167-year-old financial giant. A favored place for the world's super-rich to stash their cash. So why did it collapse?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/03/239m 29s

Banks gone wild: SVB, Signature and moral hazard

The collapse of Silicon Valley Bank continues to ripple across banking and tech. Today, three indicators on the fallout, including what's next for some startup CEOs and why you might be hearing the term, moral hazard. And we talk about the other bank failure that's been overshadowed by SVB, New York-based Signature Bank.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/03/239m 28s

Need workers? Why not charter a private jet?

It's time for another edition of the Beigie Awards! Today, our winner comes through with one of the best anecdotes in Beigie history with a story about a Montana construction company that flew in workers via a private jet.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/03/238m 46s

New drugs. Cheaper drugs. Why not both?

Why are American consumers paying out the wazoo for drugs? Drug companies say it's because they need that money to fund the research and development that goes into making new life-saving drugs. Today we talk to a health economist who says you actually can have it all, lower prices and more innovation.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/03/238m 38s

The Fed's new dilemma: Protect banks or fight inflation?

Prices are rising. A major bank has collapsed. And the Fed is left holding the hose trying to put out these fires. The question of whether to raise interest rates or not just got even more challenging.For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/03/239m 14s
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