LSE: Public lectures and events

LSE: Public lectures and events

By London School of Economics and Political Science

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

Episodes

SHORTCAST | Duck – Rabbit: what drives our polarised culture?

Contributor(s): Dr Lasana Harris, Professor Anil Seth, Dr Jennifer Sheehy Skeffington, Dr Tiffany Watt Smith, Professor Paul Dolan | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on 28th June 2021. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.
30/07/2125m 33s

Revisiting the 3D Perspective on Low Long Term Interest Rates

Contributor(s): Dr Gertjan Vlieghe | Gertjan Vlieghe's term as an external member of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee comes to an end in August. Join us for his final lecture as a member of the MPC. In this speech, Dr Vlieghe will consider what we have learned in the past five years about some of the persistent structural drivers of low neutral interest rates, such as demographics, debt and the distribution of income. Considerable new research has been published in these areas, both theoretical and empirical, which explores these drivers, including the extent to which they are interlinked. Since these developments constrain the available monetary policy space, Dr Vlieghe then considers how monetary policy should be set in a constrained environment, as well has how these constraints could be lifted to ensure the effectiveness of future monetary policy. Meet our speaker and chair Gertjan Vlieghe is a member of the Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England. Prior to his appointment he was a partner and senior economist at Brevan Howard Asset Management. Prior to this he has held positions at Deutsche Bank and the Bank of England including Economic Assistant to Governor Mervyn King. Dr Vlieghe's published research has focused on the importance of money, balance sheets and asset prices in the economy. He holds a doctorate from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. She is an alumna of LSE. More about this event The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) is a research centre that brings together a group of world class experts to carry out pioneering research on the study of nations’ prosperity, and the crises that afflict them, helping to design policies that will create a healthier and more resilient economy. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVlieghe Transcript A transcript of Dr Gertjan Vlieghe's speech is available to download from Revisiting the 3D Perspective on Low Long Term Interest Rates. Slides A copy of Dr Gertjan Vlieghe's slides is available to download from Revisiting the 3D Perspective on Low Long Term Interest Rates.
26/07/211h 4m

Online Opportunities for Children

Contributor(s): Professor Shakuntala Banaji, Dr Koen Leurs, Dr Giovanna Mascheroni, Professor Jochen Peter, Dr Mariya Stoilova | Online opportunities bring diverse benefits for children, including positive outcomes on learning, participation, creativity, and identity. An important “ladder of opportunities” for children in Europe, digital technologies can activate the potential for social inclusion, equality and children’s rights. Even so, relatively little is understood about how online opportunities generate benefits for children. Opportunities for children have long been theorised, but how should they be rethought in a digital world? In this webinar we will debate the theories and concepts that underpin such questions, drawing on different disciplinary approaches. Meet our speakers and chair Shakuntala Banaji is Professor of Media, Culture and Social Change and Programme Director for the Msc in Media, Communication and Development in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Her forthcoming book Social Media Hate with Ram Bhat (scheduled spring, 2022) theorises the landscape of disinformation and trolling in the U.K., India, Brazil and Myanmar with particular attention to the connections between contemporary and historical violence. Koen Leurs (@koenleurs) is an Assistant Professor in Gender and Postcolonial Studies at the Department of Media and Culture, Utrecht University. He works on digital migration and recently directed the projects Connected migrants: comparing digital practices of refuge and expatriate youth and Media literacy through making media: a key to participation of migrant youth?. Currently Koen is a fellow at the Netherlands Institute of Advanced Studies, writing a book on digital migration. Giovanna Mascheroni (@giovannamas) is Associate Professor at the Department of Communication and Performing Arts, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. She is part of the management team of EU Kids Online, and WP leader in the H2020 project, ySKILLS. She is also leading DataChildFutures, a national project investigating the data practices of Italian families with children aged 0- to 8-year-olds. Her work focuses on the social shaping and the social consequences of digital media, internet of things and datafication for children and young people. Her forthcoming book, Datafied childhoods: Data practices and imaginaries in children’s lives, co-authored with Andra Siibak, will be published in the Digital Formations series. Jochen Peter is a Full Professor at the Amsterdam School of Communication Research (ASCoR), University of Amsterdam. His work explores how young people’s use of new technologies affects their psycho-social development, including the antecedents and consequences of children’s interaction with social robots, the impact of online communication on teenagers’ sociality, and the relationship between sexually explicit material online and adolescents’ sexual attitudes and behaviour. Peter Jochen has published more than 100 journal articles and book chapters. Mariya Stoilova (@Mariya_Stoilova) is a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Her area of expertise is at the intersection of child rights and digital technology with a particular focus on the opportunities and risks of digital media use in the everyday lives of children and young people, data and privacy online, digital skills, and pathways to harm and well-being. Sonia Livingstone (@Livingstone_S) is Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She has published 20 books including The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age. Since founding the 33 country EU Kids Online network, Sonia has advised the UK government, European Commission, European Parliament, Council of Europe, OECD and UNICEF. More about this event The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2021 QS World University Rankings). This event is part of the CO:RE - Children Online: Research and Evidence webinar series on theory for the EU H2020 project. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChildren Featured image (used in source code with watermark added): Photo by Robo Wunderkind on Unsplash.
12/07/211h 30m

Social Infrastructures for a Post-COVID-19 World

Contributor(s): Samira Ben Omar, Dr Atiya Kamal, Caroline MacDonald, Pasha Shah | The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed both how essential and how fractured Britain’s systems of social care and community health are and the racial and economic divides that determine who is able to access them. It has also, paradoxically shown some ways forward for community engagement as local authorities, the NHS and community groups have built new caring relationships that have saved lives and generated mutual support. This event brings together a diverse range of speakers involved in these policies and local initiatives to move beyond recovery and renewal from COVID-19 and question what equitable social infrastructures might look like in a post-covid world. The event also marks the launch of the LSE Covid and Care Research Group's second report, based on deep ethnographic and qualitative research across the UK. It hopes to set an agenda for investment, research and policy for both central government and local authorities. Meet our speakers and chair Samira Ben Omar (@benomsam) is Assistant Director of Equalities for the North West London Collaboration of CCGs and co-founder of the Community Voices movement for change. Atiya Kamal (@Atiya_K) is a Senior Lecturer in Health Psychology at Birmingham City University. Caroline MacDonald is Assistant Director of People, Places and Communities, at the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government. Pasha Shah is Head of Community Engagement at the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government. Laura Bear (@BearLauraLSE) is Professor of Anthropology at LSE, and a participant in the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behaviours, the ethnicity subgroup of Sage and Independent Sage. She leads the LSE Covid and Care research group. More about this event The Covid and Care Research Group, hosted by LSE's Anthropology Department, are building a conversation between policy makers and the UK population over issues of disadvantage and recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. You can view the full LSE Covid and Care Research Group's second report, based on deep ethnographic and qualitative research across the UK here: Social Infrastructures for the Post-COVID recovery in the UK. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Featured image (used in source code with watermark added): Photo by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Unsplash.
12/07/211h 28m

The Powerful and the Damned: life behind the headlines in financial times

Contributor(s): Lionel Barber | Join us for this event with former editor of the Financial Times Lionel Barber at which he will discuss his new book, The Powerful and the Damned: life behind the headlines in financial times. Lionel Barber spent over a decade rubbing shoulders with the global giants of business, finance and politics. Recounting conversations, late-night dinners and unexpected comic nuggets from those who make the news, The Powerful and the Damned is a portrait of the rich, famous, powerful and occasionally damned. In his first authored book, Barber offers unflinching pen portraits of the world’s leading characters, from Trump, Merkel and Draghi, to Prince Andrew, Mohammed Bin Salman and Dominic Cummings. In parallel, Barber provides a personal account of how he transformed the FT into a multi-channel global news organisation with a strong of international awards and groundbreaking reporting. This created a monumental shift for the whole news media landscape. You can order the book, The Powerful and the Damned: life behind the headlines in financial times (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Meet our speaker and chair Lionel Barber (@LionelBarber) was editor of the Financial Times from 2005 until January 2020, widely credited with transforming the FT from a newspaper publisher into a multi-channel global news organisation. During his editorship, the FT passed the milestone of 1million paying readers, winning many international awards and accolades for its journalism. Charlie Beckett (@CharlieBeckett) is the founding director of Polis, the think-tank for research and debate around international journalism and society in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. More about this event The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2021 QS World University Rankings). Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBarber
08/07/2156m 9s

SHORTCAST | How Much is Your Health Worth?

Contributor(s): Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Professor Mariana Mazzucato, Dr Clare Wenham | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on 17th March 2021. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.
07/07/2119m 34s

Reset: Reclaiming the internet for civil society

Contributor(s): Professor Ron Deibert | Join us to hear from Ron Deibert as he explores the disturbing impact of the internet and social media on politics, the economy and the environment, and asks us to consider how best to construct a viable communications ecosystem that supports civil society and contributes to the betterment of the human condition. Disruptive technology, scientific advancements, and a global pandemic have forever changed the way we live and work. Our digital tools allow us to innovate, accelerate growth, and connect with one another as never before, but they often come with unexpected consequences. The same technologies that had been used for public uprisings against oppressive governments are now being used by those governments against political demonstrators, whistleblowers and dissidents. Meet our speaker and chair Ron Deibert (@RonDeibert) is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science, as well as the Director of the Munk School's Citizen Lab. The Citizen Lab is an interdisciplinary laboratory focusing on research, development, and high-level strategic policy and legal engagement at the intersection of information and communication technologies, human rights, and global security. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. More about this event The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips its students with the skills and ideas needed to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. The School's approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto (@munkschool) is a leading hub for interdisciplinary research, teaching and public engagement. It is home to world-class researchers and more than 50 academic centres, labs and programs. The school is made up of 60 faculty members, academic directors and chairholders, with many more affiliated faculty engaged in teaching and research. Find out more about the LSE and University of Toronto double degree – Master of Public Administration and Master of Global Affairs. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMunk
07/07/211h 2m

Seven Ways to Change the World - How To Fix The Most Pressing Problems We Face

Contributor(s): Gordon Brown | Join us to hear from United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education and former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown speaking about his new book. When the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the globe in 2020, it created an unprecedented impact, greater than the aftermath of 9/11 or the global financial crisis. But out of such disruption can come a new way of thinking, and in this new book Gordon Brown offers his solutions to the challenges we face in 2021 and beyond. In the book, he states that there are seven major global problems we must address: global health; climate change and environmental damage; nuclear proliferation; global financial instability; the humanitarian crisis and global poverty; the barriers to education and opportunity; and global inequality and its biggest manifestation, global tax havens. Each one presents an immense challenge that requires an urgent global response and solution. All should be on the world’s agenda today. None can be solved by one nation acting on its own, but all can be addressed if we work together as a global community. You can order the book, Seven Ways to Change the World, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Meet our speaker and chair Gordon Brown (@GordonBrown) is the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education and former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He is Chair of the Global Strategic Infrastructure Initiative of the World Economic Forum and also serves as Distinguished Global Leader in Residence of New York University. He served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2007 to 2010. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. She is an alumna of LSE. More about this event The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips its students with the skills and ideas needed to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. The School's approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
06/07/2157m 40s

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?

Contributor(s): Dr Ela Drazkiewicz-Grodzicka, Professor Bradley Franks, Dr Erica Lagalisse | Conspiracy theories fomented by political division and a global pandemic have gained traction in the public consciousness in the last couple of years. For some people these ideas are just fun and entertaining, but for others their interest in them becomes much more consuming. Why do people become involved in this kind of conspiratorial thinking? That’s the question that LSE iQ tackles in this month’s episode. Concerns that 5G phone masts reduce our bodies’ defences against COVID-19 and that vaccines are being used to inject us with micro-chips - allowing us to be tracked and controlled - may seem extraordinary to many of us. But these beliefs have led to the vandalism of 5G phone masts and made some reluctant to be vaccinated. In this episode of LSE iQ, Sue Windebank finds out how left-wing anarchists got caught up in conspiratorial thinking and how Irish parents looking for support and community were accused of spreading a conspiracy. And is LSE unknowingly carrying out the wishes of the Illuminati? Listen to hear how LSE became embroiled in a global conspiracy. Sue talks to: Dr Ela Drążkiewicz from the Institute for Sociology at the Slovak Academy of Sciences; Professor Bradley Franks from LSE’s Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science; and Dr Erica Lagalisse from LSE’s Institute of Inequalities.   Contributors Dr Ela Drazkiewicz-Grodzicka Professor Bradley Franks Dr Erica Lagalisse   Research Taking vaccine regret and hesitancy seriously. The role of truth, conspiracy theories, gender relations and trust in the HPV immunisation programmes in Ireland (2021) by Elżbieta Drążkiewicz Grodzicka in Journal for Cultural Research Beyond “Monologicality”? Exploring Conspiracist Worldviews (2017) by Bradley Franks, Adrian Bangerter, Martin W. Bauer, Matthew Hall and Mark C. Noort in Frontiers in Psychology Occult Features of Anarchism: With Attention to the Conspiracy of Kings and the Conspiracy of the Peoples (2019) by Erica Lagalisse
06/07/2144m 4s

Perspectives on the COVID-19 Pandemic

Contributor(s): Professor Francisco Ferreira, Professor Ricardo Hausmann, Professor Adnan Khan, Professor Lucinda Platt | Join us to discuss a special issue of LSE's Public Policy Review, a brand new public policy journal. The special LSEPPR issue on COVID 19 is now available LSE's Public Policy Review. The COVID-19 pandemic represents an extraordinary health and economic global challenge as well as an opportunity to re-evaluate many aspects of modern economy, society, and government. The crisis has mobilised scientific efforts at an unprecedented scale, with an impressive emerging body of research spanning across disciplines. This special issue invites scholars from across the School to explore a range of key questions the pandemic has raised - from the factors shaping government responses and collective behaviour, to the relationship between policy-making and scientific evidence; from the impact of the pandemic on economic policy and employment, to how it intersected with inequalities related, for instance, to gender or ethnicity. Through their different disciplinary lenses the papers in this issue offer a rich and comprehensive insight into some of the key questions emerging from the current crisis. Meet our speakers and chair Francisco Ferreira (@fhgferreira) is Amartya Sen Professor of Inequality Studies and Director of the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. Ricardo Hausmann (@ricardo_hausman) is Rafik Hariri Professor of the Practice of International Political Economy and the Director of the Growth Lab at the Harvard Kennedy School. Adnan Khan (@adnanqk) is Professor in Practice at LSE's School of Public Policy. Lucinda Platt (@PlattLucinda) is Professor of Social Policy and Sociology and Head of Department of Social Policy at LSE. Tania Burchardt is Associate Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and Deputy Director of STICERD. More about this event The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Beveridge 2.0 Redefining the Social Contract is a programme hosted by the School of Public Policy that aims at bringing LSE's community together with the intent of exploring important policy questions, fostering dialogue across disciplines and identifying avenues for collaborative cross-disciplinary research. The LSE Public Policy Review is a public policy journal hosted by the School of Public Policy at LSE and published by LSE Press (@LSEPress). It brings together policy-relevant research from across the social sciences. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Featured image (used in source code with watermark added): Photo by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Unsplash. Podcasts
29/06/211h 33m

Youth and Inequalities in the UK

Contributor(s): Michaela Rafferty, Jeremiah Emmanuel, Jason Allen | Even before the pandemic, young people in the UK faced many forms of inequality and their health and wellbeing was being eroded by a lack of jobs, a shortage of affordable housing, and cuts to public services. As the gap between the generations grows and young people’s voices and concerns are not adequately taken into account by policy makers and politicians, it is no surprise that young people increasingly feel anxious of what the future holds. This panel brings three young leaders who are working in and beyond their local communities to address inequalities in education, housing, employment and the criminal justice system. The three panellists, Jason Allen, Jeremiah Emmanuel, and Michaela Rafferty, will draw on their ongoing work and share their experiences in dialogue with one another and the audience. In doing so, they will not only consider the consequences of inequalities on young people’s lives and their wellbeing, but also discuss what can be done to tackle those inequalities. Meet our speakers and chair Jason Allen has a dedicated career and specialism in the treatment of trauma in young people. He is recognised as an national expert in gang and youth violence in London and currently runs Mary’s, a hub for counselling, mentoring and gang mediation in Camden which he built from its inception in 2006. His professional training is wide-ranging and he is currently completing a Masters Degree in Psychology and Trauma. Jeremiah Emmanuel (@je1bc) was raised in a single-parent family in south London and started working within his local community from a young age, campaigning around issues that affect his generation. He was elected into the UK Youth Parliament and later became a young mayor within London, as well as setting up a Youth Council for the BBC. Dreaming in a Nightmare, his new book, is a manifesto for how we can tackle inequality in the UK and improve the lives of young people today. Michaela Rafferty (@MichaelaRaffert) is a Youth Engagement and Campaigns Organiser at Just for Kids Law, who exist to ensure young people have their legal rights and entitlements respected and promoted, and their voices heard and valued. She spent 12 years as a community youth worker and human rights activist in Belfast, and has worked in youth rights initiatives in Palestine, women’s empowerment projects in Tajikistan and human rights education in refugee camps in Greece. Michaela is a Senior Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Associate Professor of Social Policy and the Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at LSE. Her research focuses on the relationship between civil society, policy processes, and social transformation. She is co-convenor of the Politics of Inequality research theme based in the International Inequalities Institute. More about this event The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIII Featured image (used in source code with watermark added): Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.
29/06/211h 18m

Duck – Rabbit: what drives our polarised culture?

Contributor(s): Dr Lasana Harris, Professor Anil Seth, Dr Jennifer Sheehy Skeffington, Dr Tiffany Watt Smith, Professor Paul Dolan | Join Paul Dolan and his guests to launch the latest series of his podcast, Duck - Rabbit, with a discussion of the neuroscience and social science behind our polarisation problem. Why do we respond to the world in one way and not another? What makes us want to be, or feel, part of a group? What drives our judgements, choices and assumptions? Think of this: you’re shown a picture, it's black and white and sort of blurry, and you are asked what animal you see. You look closely and you see that it’s a duck. But if you’re told it’s a rabbit? Well, you can see for a second how someone could think that but it’s definitely a duck. That’s true of life isn’t it? Think Brexit, climate change, marmite, and even Covid – once we’ve chosen our tribe, we rarely change our minds and see the other side. Meet our speakers and chair Lasana Harris (@lasana_harris) is Associate Professor in Experimental Psychology at University College London, having previously held positions at New York University, USA, Duke University, USA, and Leiden University, the Netherlands. A social neuroscientist who takes an interdisciplinary approach to understand human behaviour, his research explores the neural correlates of person perception, prejudice, dehumanization, anthropomorphism, social learning, social emotions, empathy, and punishment. Anil Seth (@anilkseth) is Professor of Cognitive and Computational Neuroscience at the University of Sussex and Founding Co-Director of the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science. In his work, he seeks to understand the biological basis of consciousness by bringing together research across neuroscience, mathematics, artificial intelligence, computer science, psychology, philosophy and psychiatry. His new book - Being You: A New Science of Consciousness - will be published in autumn 2021. Jennifer Sheehy Skeffington (@jsskeffington) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE, researching the interface between psychology and society. One stream of research examines how socioeconomic status and inequality shape basic decision-making processes. Another reveals the psychological underpinnings of ideology, and what this means for intergroup conflict and political polarisation. Tiffany Watt Smith (@drtiffwattsmith) is Reader in Cultural History at Queen Mary University of London, where she is also Director of the Centre for the History of Emotions. Her books include: Schadenfreude (2019), The Book of Human Emotions (2015), and On Flinching (2015). In 2019 she was awarded a Philip Leverhulme Prize, and her research has been funded by the Wellcome Trust, the British Academy and the AHRC. In 2015 she was named a BBC New Generation Thinker and her TED talk The History of Human Emotions has been viewed more than 4 million times. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. He is host of the Duck – Rabbit podcast, in which he discusses the polarisation problem with members of the public, academics, commentators, politicians and activists to try to understand why we can’t be more understanding of each other. Episodes currently available discuss marriage and monogamy; security and liberty; freedom of speech; lifestyle choices; and class. This event marks the release of two new episodes. Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is the Pro-Director for Research and the Harold Laski Professor of Political Science at LSE. An LSE alumnus, he is one of the leading researchers, teachers, and commentators on European and comparative politics in the UK. Simon has recently been appointed Stein Rokkan Chair in Comparative Politics at the European University Institute in Florence and will take up his new post in September. More about this event The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Featured image (used in source code with watermark added): Kaninchen und Ente by unknown artist (1892) (public domain).
28/06/211h 7m

The Greek War of Independence: re-appraising its economic legacies

Contributor(s): Dr Maria Christina Chatziioannou, Dr Andreas Kakridis, Professor Stathis N Kalyvas | How far may the economic problems of the modern Greek state be attributed to the nature of its origins? It’s small, albeit enlarging, size; the lack of popular trust in public institutions and authority; the recourse to patrons and to ‘rent-seeking’; and, its own vulnerability to external powers: are these path-dependent features that overwhelm the scope for change? This panel will discuss the inheritance of 1821 for the course of development taken by modern Greece and how it has structured options and choices. When, and how, has or might such historical determinism be overcome? Meet our speakers and chair Maria Christina Chatziioannou is the Director of the Institute for Historical Research at the National Hellenic Research Foundation. She is Editor of the Historical Library for 1821 supported by the Aikaterini Laskaridis Foundation as part of the "Bicentennial Initiative 1821-2021". Her latest publication is Entangled histories and collective identity: Narratives of the Chios massacre (1822) (2021). Andreas Kakridis is Assistant Professor of Economic History at the Ionian University, Corfu; since 2017 he has also served as the Scientific Advisor to the Historical Archive of the Bank of Greece. He has taught at the University of Athens (2009-16) and the Panteion University (2016-19), and has also been a visiting fellow at the University of Columbia, New York (2014-15). Stathis Kalyvas (@SKalyvas) is Gladstone Professor of Government at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford, and a fellow of All Souls College. Until 2018 he was Arnold Wolfers Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he founded and directed the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence and co-directed the Hellenic Studies Program. In 2019 he founded and directs the T. E. Lawrence Program on Conflict and Violence at All Souls College. He has written extensively on civil wars, ethnicity, and political violence. His current research focuses on global trends in political violence and conflict. He has an additional interest in the history and politics of Greece. Joan R. Rosés is Head of the Department of Economic History at LSE. His research interests comprise historical economic geography, European economic history (19th and 20th centuries), long term economic growth and productivity, and labour markets. More about this event The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. The event is part of 21 in 21, celebrating the 2021 bicentenary of the outbreak of the Greek War of Independence in 21 Greek-British encounters. The 21 in 21 events are sponsored by the A.G. Leventis Foundation. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreece
24/06/211h 28m

Awakening the Giant Beast: from pandemic to economic recovery

Contributor(s): Dr Cecilia Rouse | How does the Biden-Harris Administration evaluate the current state and growth trajectory of the U.S. economy as it emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic? How are the Administration’s plans to expand infrastructure investment and aid to families and children likely to impact the U.S. in the long run? In this lecture, Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers Cecilia E. Rouse will offer a rare inside view of U.S. economic policymaking at the beginning of a new presidency. Her lecture will provide a fast-paced tour of the macroeconomic issues confronting the Administration and discuss the role of economists and economic research in U.S. policy debates. Meet our speaker and chair Cecilia Rouse (@CeciliaERouse) is the 30th Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers. Before joining the Administration, she was dean of Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs, as well as the Lawrence and Shirley Katzman and Lewis and Anna Ernst Professor in the Economics of Education at the university. From 2009 to 2011, Rouse served as a member of President Barack Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers and, from 1998 to 1999, worked at the National Economic Council in the Clinton administration as a Special Assistant to the President. Her distinguished academic research has explored a wide array of topics in the economics of education. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. More about this event The Morishima lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESTICERD
23/06/2152m 9s

Feminist Global Health Security

Contributor(s): Professor Sophie Harman, Professor Naila Kabeer, Dr Gustavo Matta, Dr Clare Wenham | At this book launch, we discuss the need for gender mainstreaming in global health security. As many news reports have made clear during COVID-19, there has been a recent sea change in thinking about the secondary effects of infectious disease control policy on women. However, we have yet to see this reflected in global health policy. When Zika made headlines in 2016, images of women cradling babies affected with microcephaly spread across the media and pulled on heartstrings. But, as this book argues, whilst this outbreak was about women and babies, it also highlighted the lack of broader gendered considerations in global health security. Taking Zika as its primary case but also touching on more recent experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic, Feminist Global Health Security asks what the policy response to disease outbreaks tell us about the role of women in global health security. Meet our speakers and chair Sophie Harman (@DrSophieHarman) is Professor of International Politics at Queen Mary, University of London, with a specific interest in global health, African Agency, film and visual methods, and gender politics. She was awarded the Joni Lovenduski Prize for outstanding professional achievement by a mid-career scholar by the Political Science Association (PSA) in 2018, the Philip Leverhulme Prize in 2018, and nominated for the BAFTA for Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director, or Producer in 2019 for her feature film Pili. Naila Kabeer (@N_Kabeer) is Professor of Gender and Development at the Department of Gender Studies and Department of International Development at LSE. Her research interests include gender, poverty, social exclusion, labour markets and livelihoods, social protection and citizenship and much of her research is focused on South and South East Asia. Naila is currently involved in ERSC-DIFD Funded Research Projects on Gender and Labour Market dynamics in Bangladesh and India. Gustavo Matta (@GustavoCMatta) is a public health Researcher at Sergio Arouca National School of Public Health at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He is also the Coordinator of Zika Social Sciences Network. Clare Wenham (@clarewenham) is Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at LSE. She specialises in global health security, the politics and policy of pandemic preparedness and outbreak response. She has researched this for over a decade, through influenza, Ebola and Zika. Her research poses questions of global governance, the role of WHO and World Bank, national priorities and innovative financing for pandemic control. More recently she has been examining the role of women in epidemics and associated policy. For COVID-19, Clare is Co-Principal Investigator on a grant from the CIHR and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation analysing the gendered dimensions of the outbreak. Justin Parkhurst (@justinparkhurst) is an Associate Professor of Global Health Policy in the LSE Department of Health Policy. He is co-director of the MSc in Health Policy, Planning, and Financing programme, and the current serving Chair of the LSE Global Health Initiative. Dr Parkhurst’s research interests lie in global health politics and policy, as well as the political nature of evidence use to inform policy decisions. More about this event The Global Health Initiative (@LSEGlobalHealth) is a cross-departmental research platform set up to increase the coherence and visibility of Global Health research activity across the School, both internally and externally. It provides support for interdisciplinary engagement and showcases LSE’s ability to apply rigorous social science research to emerging global health challenges. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. You can order the book, Feminist Global Health Security, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
23/06/211h 27m

Migration Crisis and its Impact for Europe

Contributor(s): Maria Gavouneli, Notis Mitarachi | Join us for the 18th Hellenic Observatory Annual Lecture which this year will be delivered by Notis Mitarachi, Greece's Minister of Migration & Asylum. Greece has been at the epicentre of much of the migration crisis in the Mediterranean. The accommodation and processing of asylum-seekers and refugees in Greece has proved both challenging and controversial. But there are also major implications of the crisis for the European Union and its individual member states in their burden-sharing. What are the lessons from this humanitarian crisis on Europe’s shores? We explore the ways forward. Meet our speaker and chair Notis Mitarachi is Minister of Migration & Asylum of the Hellenic Republic and an MP in the constituency of Chios (New Democracy Party - EPP). In 2019 he was appointed as the Deputy Minister of Labour and Social Affairs, responsible for the Social Security & Pension System. In 2012-2015 he served as Deputy Minister for Economic Development and Competitiveness. He has also served as Alternate Governor in the BoG of the World Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction & Development (EBRD) and as Governor in the BoG of the Black Sea Trade & Development Bank (BSTB). Before returning to Greece in 2010, he had a long international career in the private sector. He is a graduate of INSEAD (MBA), Oxford University (MSc in Industrial Relations) and The American College of Greece (BSc in Business Administration). He is a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute and a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Charterholder. Maria Gavouneli is Associate Professor of International Law, Faculty of Law at the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is the President of the Greek National Commission for Human Rights, Member of the Managing Board, National Transparency Authority and Senior Policy Advisor, Hellenic Foundation for European & Foreign Policy – ELIAMEP. She was a Fulbright Scholar – Greece at the University of California Berkeley (2018-2019) and Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London (2005-2019). She has published extensively on the law of the sea, energy and environmental law as well as migration issues. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics in the European Institute at LSE, where he is also Director of the Hellenic Observatory. More about this event This event is the Hellenic Observatory Annual Lecture. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreece
22/06/211h 27m

Knowledge as a Source of the Great Divergence

Contributor(s): Professor Joel Mokyr | Joel Mokyr will discuss the Great Divergence, the rapid economic and technological growth between c. 1500 and 1950, that gave the West the opportunity to dominate (and often oppress and exploit) the rest of the world. The lecture will answer a simple but haunting question: how were they able to do that? Meet our speaker and chair Joel Mokyr is the Robert H. Strotz Professor of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Economics and History at Northwestern University and Sackler Professor (by special appointment) at the Eitan Berglas School of Economics at the University of Tel Aviv. His most recent book is A Culture of Growth, published in 2016. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Mary Morgan is Albert O. Hirschman Professor of History and Philosophy of Economics in the Department of Economic History at LSE. More about this event The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEconomics
17/06/211h 0m

Recovery or Radical Transformation: the effect of COVID-19 on justice systems

Contributor(s): Sir Geoffrey Vos | In discussion with Andrew Murray, the Master of the Rolls, Sir Geoffrey Vos, will be outlining the evolution of the civil justice system, including the potential of technology to alter fundamentally the administration of justice, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. Meet our speaker and chair Geoffrey Vos began his appointment as Master of the Rolls and Head of Civil Justice in January 2021. Sir Geoffrey previously served as Chancellor of the High Court of England and Wales from October 2016 to January 2021, and prior to this was President of the European Network of Councils for the Judiciary, and Lord Justice of Appeal. Andrew Murray (@AndrewDMurray) is Professor of Law with particular reference to New Media and Technology Law and a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (FRSA). He is also Deputy Head of LSE's Department of Law. More about this event The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Our community is one of the largest in the School, and has played a major role in policy debates, policy-making and the education of lawyers and law teachers globally. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
17/06/2157m 53s

Europe's Refugee 'Crisis': where are we now?

Contributor(s): Catherine Woollard | Six years after the beginning of Europe’s so called ‘refugee’ or ‘migration’ crisis, we ask what has happened since and (how) has Europe changed? This event will explore Europe’s ‘refugee’ or ‘migration’ crisis, asking whether Europe has changed since, and what happened to the people who arrived and the policies that governed their arrival. Meet our speakers and chair Heaven Crawley (@heavencrawley) is Professor of International Migration at the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations at Coventry University. She is also the Director of the UKRI GCRF South-South Migration, Inequality and Development Hub (MIDEQ). Lucy Mayblin (@LucyMayblin) is a political sociologist whose research focuses on asylum, human rights, policy-making, and the legacies of colonialism. She was recently awarded the Philip Leverhulme Prize for her research achievements in the area of asylum and migration. Masooma Torfa (@MasoomaTorfa) was born and grew up in Jaghuri, Afghanistan. She is currently a PhD researcher on forced migration and refugee integration at the University of Hohenheim in Germany. She is the co-founder and directing member of Female Fellows an NGO that is working on the integration and empowerment of migrant women in southern Germany. Masooma has professional work experiences in development projects in Afghanistan with the United Nations Kabul Office and USAID. In the field of migration, she has worked with numerous institutions including the European Commission, the European Council on Refugees and Exiles (ECRE), the European Program for Integration and Migration (EPIM), Advocate Europe, and Malteser. Catherine Woollard is Director of the European Council of Refugees and Exiles. Manmit Bhambra (@BhambraManmit) is Research Officer in the Religion and Global Society Research Unit at LSE, and Research Director for Migration at the 89 Initiative, Belgium. More about this event The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The 89 Initiative (@89initiative) is a European think-do tank. Through cutting-edge research, the Initiative seeks to help solve Europe’s biggest generational challenges and nudge policy-makers and society forward. This event is part of the LSE European Institute Series, Beyond Eurocentrism. This event series aims to explore how the shape and shaping of Europe – its political-economy, its political policy making, or its political culture – needs to be rethought in a time of the exhaustion of Eurocentrism. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurocentrism
16/06/211h 31m

International Religious Freedom under the Biden Administration

Contributor(s): Dr Judd Birdsall, Dr H A Hellyer, Dr Courtney Freer | This roundtable discussion will bring together experts from around the world to examine the Biden Administration’s approach to international religious freedom and the implications this has on American foreign policy. Biden’s predecessor made Religious Freedom a cornerstone of its foreign policy, notably highlighted by the creation of the State Department’s “Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom”, which the UK is expected to host in 2022. Will he carry on a similar legacy? Or will we see a substantial shift from the Biden Administration? Finally, what does this mean for America’s foreign policy? Featured image (used in source code): Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons Meet our speaker and chair Judd Birdsall (@JuddBirdsall) is a Senior Research Fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs at Georgetown University. He was previously based at the Centre for Geopolitics at Cambridge University and continues to serve as an affiliated lecturer in the Cambridge University Department of Politics and International Studies. He has served in the U.S. State Department’s Office of International Religious Freedom and on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff. Courtney Freer (@courtneyfreer) is Assistant Professorial Research Fellow at the Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and a non-resident fellow in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings Institution. Her book Rentier Islamism: The Influence of the Muslim Brotherhood in Gulf Monarchies, published in 2018, traces the political and social role of Islamists in the Arabian Gulf. H A Hellyer, (@hahellyer) a Carnegie Endowment scholar, is Fellow of Cambridge University’s Centre for Islamic Studies, and Senior Associate Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute. A prolific public intellectual on governance, international relations, security, and religion, in the West & the Arab world, he is the author of 7 books in these areas. A former Brookings Fellow, he currently helps steer the EU-funded project ‘GREASE’ on “Radicalisation, Secularism & the Governance of Religion”. James Walters (@LSEChaplain) is Director of the LSE Religion and Global Society research unit and a senior lecturer in practice in the Department of International Relations. More about this event International Relations (@LSEIRDept) has been taught at LSE since 1924. The Department was not only the first of its kind, but has remained a leading world centre for the development of the subject ever since. The Department has always been strongly international in character and today the majority of our graduate students, a good proportion of our undergraduates, as well as many members of the faculty are drawn from Europe, North America and further afield. At the same time we have always prided ourselves as having both a national and an international role in training diplomats and future university teachers. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. LSE Religion and Global Society (@LSE_RGS) is an interdepartmental research unit which conducts, coordinates and promotes social science research that seeks to understand the many ways in which religion influences, and is influenced by, geopolitical change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFoRB
15/06/211h 26m

The Privatized State and Government Outsourcing of Public Powers

Contributor(s): Dr Chiara Cordelli | Many governmental functions today—from the management of prisons and welfare offices to warfare and financial regulation—are outsourced to private entities. Education and health care are funded in part through private philanthropy rather than taxation. Can a privatised government rule legitimately? The Privatized State argues that it cannot. In this new book, Chiara Cordelli argues that privatisation constitutes a regression to a precivil condition—what philosophers centuries ago called “a state of nature.” Chiara is going to discuss her book and issues such as privatisation in the democratic state , role of private actors and a new way of administering public affairs with LSE academic Kate Vredenburgh. Meet our speaker and chair Chiara Cordelli (@chiaracordelli) is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. She is the co-editor of Philanthropy in Democratic Societies. Kate Vredenburgh is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at LSE. Stephan Chambers will provide a brief welcome speech. Stephan is the inaugural director of the Marshall Institute at LSE. He is also Professor in Practice at the Department of Management at LSE and Course Director for the new Executive Masters in Social Business and Entrepreneurship. More about this event The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. You can order the book, The Privatized State, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPrivatizedState
15/06/211h 0m

What Does Responsible Business Look Like in a Post-Pandemic World?

Contributor(s): Alexandra Palt | As we emerge from a global pandemic, businesses are being forced to re-evaluate their role. More than ever, businesses are being held accountable for demonstrating purpose and acting responsibly. Alexandra Palt, Executive Vice-President and Chief Corporate Responsibility Officer of L’Oréal, the world’s number one cosmetics group, will discuss how companies can transform their business model to ensure the respect of planetary boundaries, encourage their ecosystem of suppliers, customers and consumers to follow their lead, and be part of the solution to some of the world’s most pressing challenges. Meet our speaker and chair Alexandra Palt is Executive Vice-President and Chief Sustainability Officer of L’Oréal and Executive Vice-President of the L’Oréal Foundation. Sandy Pepper is Professor of Management Practice in the Department of Management at LSE. More about this event The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
14/06/211h 0m

Haldane and LSE: applying political philosophy to public service in today's polarised politics

Contributor(s): Gordon Brown, John Campbell, Dr Jill Pellew, Professor Andrés Velasco | Richard Haldane pioneered cross-party and cross-sector cooperation. How might Haldane's approach - that of the philosopher-statesman - be applied to politics today? A close friend of Beatrice and Sidney Webb, Haldane was involved in the founding of LSE and his visionary thinking also laid the foundations for Imperial College, the ‘red brick’ universities, the University Grants Committee and the Medical Research Council. As Minister for War he shaped the modern British Army, and was instrumental in the creation of the BEF, the Territorial Army, the Imperial General Staff, the RAF, MI5 and MI6. As a lawyer and philosopher and in particular in his judicial work after becoming Lord Chancellor he was deeply concerned with the development of an effective State and Civil Service. His influence extended beyond the UK to the continent of Europe and to the Empire, especially Canada. Meet our speakers and chair Gordon Brown (@OfficeGSBrown) is the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education and former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He is Chair of the Global Strategic Infrastructure Initiative of the World Economic Forum and also serves as Distinguished Global Leader in Residence of New York University. He served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2007 to 2010. John Campbell is the Co-founder and Chair of Campbell Lutyens. He read Economics at the University of Cambridge, winning an exhibition at Sidney Sussex College for his work in economic history. He began his career in corporate finance at N.M. Rothschild. Married with three children, he has long been inspired by Lord Haldane's example. His book, Haldane: The Forgotten Statesman Who Shaped Modern Britain, was published by Hurst and Co in July 2020. Jill Pellew is a Senior Fellow of the Institute of Historical Research, School of Advanced Studies, University of London and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. She is currently a Trustee of the Victoria County History for Oxfordshire, a Fellow of the Salzburg Global Seminar, and a Trustee of the 21st Century Trust. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Julia Black is LSE Strategic Director for Innovation and Professor of Law at the Department of Law. More about this event The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. You can order the book, Haldane: The Forgotten Statesman Who Shaped Modern Britain (UK delivery only), from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Gordon Brown will be joining this event via a pre-recorded talk, and will not be speaking live. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHaldane
10/06/211h 27m

Move On Up

Contributor(s): Professor Stephen Machin, Professor Anna Vignoles | Current Centre Director, Stephen Machin, reflects on 30 years of CEP research to look at the education and economic inequalities facing younger generations and asks what are the longer-term consequences for social mobility in the UK? Meet our speaker and chair Stephen Machin (@s_machin_) is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, has been President of the European Association of Labour Economists, is a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists and was an independent member of the Low Pay Commission from 2007-14. Anna Vignoles (@AnnaVignoles) is the Director of the Leverhulme Trust, taking up her position in January 2021. Previously, she was Professor of Education and fellow of Jesus College at the University of Cambridge, where her research focused on the economic value of education and issues of equity in education. Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is the Pro-Director for Research and the Harold Laski Professor of Political Science at LSE. An LSE alumnus, he is one of the leading researchers, teachers, and commentators on European and comparative politics in the UK. Simon has recently been appointed Stein Rokkan Chair in Comparative Politics at the European University Institute in Florence and will take up his new post in September. More about this event The Centre for Economic Performance (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at LSE. Established by the ESRC in 1990, it is now one of the leading applied economic research groups in Europe. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
09/06/211h 6m

The Response of Major Cities to the Challenges of the 21st Century

Contributor(s): Ada Colau | null
08/06/2159m 56s

Empires Past and Present: empires today

Contributor(s): Professor Odd Arne Westad | For the last seventy years, the United States has been the predominant state within the international system. Does it make sense to call the United States an empire? Is its power now irrevocably waning? Are we in the midst of a transfer of global power and wealth from west to east? Will China — another international power that can be seen as an empire — be the state benefitting most from the global changes we are now seeing? Meet our speaker and chair Odd Arne Westad is the Engelsberg Chair for 2020/21 at LSE IDEAS. He is currently the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, and is a former director of LSE IDEAS. Christopher Coker is Director of LSE IDEAS. More about this event In this series of four lectures, the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, Odd Arne Westad, will discuss the concept of empire and why it is still relevant today. This event is the final in the series. A podcast of the first lecture can be found at Empires Past & Present: the idea of empire. The second lecture, Empires Past and Present: empire around 1800, took place in January, a podcast is available. The third lecture, Empires Past and Present: empire around 1900, took place in March, a podcast will be available. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
08/06/211h 30m

The Modern Mind

Contributor(s): Lauren Slater, Professor Tim Lewens, Dr Adrian Alsmith | We trace the development of our modern ideas about the mind, from the highly influential work of Descartes and the impact of Darwinian evolution to more recent accounts of the ‘extended’ mind and the enhancements made possible by new technologies. Why is Descartes so important? What changed with Darwin? And in what ways have technological advances changed how we think about the mind? Join us as we explore the story of one of the central concerns of philosophy. Meet our speakers and chair Adrian Alsmith is Lecturer in Philosophy at Kings College London. Tim Lewens is Professor of Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. Lauren Slater (@laurenamslater) is Associate Tutor of Philosophy at Birkbeck. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy at LSE and IRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Trinity College Dublin. More about this event The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) hosts events exploring science, politics, and culture from a philosophical perspective. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
07/06/211h 15m

The Return of Inequality

Contributor(s): Professor Patrick Le Galès, Madeleine Bunting, Professor Gurminder K Bhambra, Professor Mike Savage | In his new book, The Return of Inequality, which he will discuss at this event, sociologist Mike Savage explains inequality’s profound deleterious effects on the shape of societies. Meet our speakers and chair Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) joined LSE in 2012 and is now Martin White Professor of Sociology. Between 2015 and 2020, he was Director of LSE’s International Inequalities Institute, which hosts the Atlantic Fellows programme, the largest global programme in the world devoted to challenging inequalities. Gurminder K Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex, and a Fellow of the British Academy (2020). She was previously Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick. She is author of Connected Sociologies and Rethinking Modernity: Postcolonialism and the Sociological Imagination and co-editor of Decolonising the University. Madeleine Bunting is an award winning freelance writer and former Guardian columnist and associate editor. Her recent books include Love of Country and Island Song. Patrick Le Galès is CNRS Research Professor of Sociology and Politics at Sciences Po in Paris, Centre for European Studies and Comparative Politics, and founding Dean of Sciences Po Urban School. His research deals with the governance and the political economy of metropolis in different parts of the world, on mobility inequalities and class, the reconfiguration of the state and political authority. Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor of Anthropology at LSE and leads the International Inequalities Institute research theme on Global Economies of Care. More about this event The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change. You can order the book, The Return of Inequality (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
07/06/211h 29m

The Global Infrastructure Gap: potential perils, and a framework for distinction

Contributor(s): Professor Peter Henry | In a 2015 communique, the World Bank claimed that rich-country private capital could close the infrastructure services gap, achieve the sustainable development goals, and make money by moving from “billions to trillions” in infrastructure investment in poor countries. This lecture introduces an equilibrium framework. The framework compares a poor country’s social rate of return on infrastructure investment with: (a) the poor country’s return on private capital, and (b) the average rich country’s return on private capital. Applying the framework to the existing, comprehensive cross-country estimates of the social rate of return on infrastructure, reveals, contrary to the World Bank’s claim, that only 7 of 53 poor countries clear the dual-hurdle rate in both paved roads and electricity. Meet our speaker and chair Peter Henry (@PeterBlairHenry) is WR Berkley Professor of Economics and Finance and Dean Emeritus at NYU’s Stern School of Business, and Principal Investigator the Ph.D. Excellence Initiative, a post-baccalaureate program that addresses underrepresentation in economics by mentoring exceptional students of color interested in pursuing doctoral studies. He is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles, as well as Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth. Tim Besley is Professor of Economics and Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. More about this event The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. This event is in honour of W. Arthur Lewis. He taught at LSE from 1938 until 1948 and went on to serve as an economic advisor to numerous African and Caribbean governments. He received a Nobel Prize in Economics in 1979, sharing it with Theodore Shultz, “for their pioneering research into economic development research with particular consideration of the problems of developing countries". This event also forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Live captions
03/06/211h 11m

The Long-term Impact of the COVID-19 Crisis on the Euro Area

Contributor(s): Poul Mathias Thomsen | The event will assess the long-term impact of COVID-19 crisis on the Euro Area taking into account the existing structural differences between member states and in particular the fundamental limitations on policies evident from past experience. It will discuss, the pandemic crisis in relation to the North-South fragmentation within the Euro Area as COVID-19 will significantly increase public debt levels in countries with already limited fiscal space, despite the transfers and debt mutualization implied by the policy response at the European level. Meet our speaker and chair Poul Mathias Thomsen is former Director of the IMF's European Department and Visiting Professor in Practice at LSE European Institute. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics in the European Institute at LSE. More about this event The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series (@leqsLSE) was established in May 2009 to publish high quality research on Europe and the European Union from scholars across LSE and beyond. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
03/06/211h 3m

Good Girls and an Ordinary Killing: Alpa Shah in conversation with Sonia Faleiro

Contributor(s): Dr Alpa Shah, Sonia Faleiro | Sonia Faleiro will be in conversation with Alpa Shah about her new book Good Girls: An Ordinary Killing. A deep investigation into the death of two low-caste teenage girls, Faleiro explores the coming of age, the failures of care, and the violence of caste, honour and shame in contemporary India. Meet our speakers and chair Sonia Faleiro (@soniafaleiro) is a journalist and writer. She is the author of Beautiful Thing: Inside the Secret World of Bombay’s Dance Bars, a book of the year for the Guardian, Observer, Sunday Times, Economist and Time Out. Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor of Anthropology at LSE and leads the International Inequalities Institute research theme on Global Economies of Care. Her most recent book is the award winning Nightmarch: Among India’s Revolutionary Guerrillas. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Associate Professor of Social Policy and the Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at LSE. Her research focuses on the relationship between civil society, policy processes, and social transformation. She is co-convenor of the Politics of Inequality research theme based in the International Inequalities Institute. More about this event The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. You can order the book, The Good Girls: An Ordinary Killing (UK delivery only), from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIII
02/06/211h 28m

Food Security and Africa After COVID-19

Contributor(s): Leena Koni Hoffmann, Rachel Bezner-Kerr, Miltone Ayieko | The COVID-19 pandemic is set to radically increase food insecurity in Africa, exacerbating an issue that has only worsened in recent years. The World Bank warns Africa is heading from a health crisis into a food crisis, and the United Nations predicts the rate of chronic malnutrition over the next twelve months could double. Decisive lockdowns, imposed by many African governments to prevent the virus’ spread, have disrupted the continent’s supply chains and led to rising unemployment. At the same time, huge locust swarms continue to devastate crops across East Africa and, in the continent’s southern region, years of drought have led to repeated crop failures. African countries have quickly become more reliant on externally sourced food at a time when international markets are experiencing unprecedented changes. Government and international interventions are already in motion, but questions remain about the scale and nature of their delivery. This is especially the case for people living in conflict-affected regions, where humanitarian food aid is harder to deliver. What can be done to address the upcoming emergency? If regional or global collaboration is needed, how and when can this be delivered for those most in need? Join our event as experts discuss the outlook for the continent’s food security, and what measures should be taken.
01/06/211h 27m

What does it really mean to be a citizen?

Contributor(s): Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel, Dr Megan Ryburn | Citizenship. What does that word really signify? This episode of LSE IQ takes a look at the issue in all its complexities, uncovering how decisions made by a 19th century West African Gola ruler connect to today’s Liberian land ownership laws; why British citizenship became racialised in the decades following the second world war – legislation that led to the Windrush Scandal, devastating the lives of hundreds of black Britons; and how Bolivian migrants in the present day have struggled to create new lives in Chile. To understand more about the many ways citizenship can impact our lives, Jess Winterstein spoke to Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel and Dr Megan Ryburn Speakers: Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel and Dr Megan Ryburn   Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Department of Social Policy, LSE https://www.lse.ac.uk/social-policy/people/academic-staff/dr-robtel-neajai-pailey Dr Ian Sanjay Patel, Department of Sociology, LSE https://www.lse.ac.uk/sociology/people/ian-patel Dr Megan Ryburn, Latin America and Caribbean Centre (LACC), LSE https://www.lse.ac.uk/lacc/people/megan-ryburn   Research Development, (Dual) Citizenship and its Discontents in Africa: The political economy of belonging to Liberia by Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey (Cambridge University Press). To read the Introduction free of charge see https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/development-dual-citizenship-and-its-discontents-in-africa/B96CB2D100CFEC03EE476D103F46348B# The ebook is also available in the LSE library. We’re Here Because You Were There: Immigration and the end of empire by Dr Ian Sanjay Patel (Verso) https://www.versobooks.com/books/3700-we-re-here-because-you-were-there Uncertain Citizenship: everyday practices of Bolivian migrants in Chile by Dr Megan Ryburn (University of California Press). https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520298774/uncertain-citizenship
01/06/2144m 15s

LSE Directors Reflect

Contributor(s): Baroness Shafik, Professor Lord Giddens, Professor Craig Calhoun, Professor Julia Black | Join us for this special event to celebrate 125 years of the London School of Economics and Political Science. We will be joined by the current director and former directors of LSE. Meet our speakers and chair Julia Black is Strategic Director of Innovation and Professor of Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She was Pro Director of Research from 2014-19 and Interim Director of LSE from 2016-17. Craig Calhoun (@craigjcalhoun) is Professor of Social Sciences at Arizona State University and Centennial Professor at LSE. He was Director of LSE from 2012 to 2016. Anthony Giddens was Director of LSE from 1997-2003. He was educated at the University of Hull and the London School of Economics and Political Science. At LSE, he wrote a dissertation on 'Sport and Society in Contemporary Britain'. He has taught at the University of Leicester and subsequently at Cambridge, where he was Professor of Sociology. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. She is an alumna of LSE, having studied MSc Economics. Michael Cox is Emeritus Professor of International Relations whose most recent work includes an introduction to a centennial edition of J.M. Keynes’s The Economic Consequences of the Peace. He is currently working on a new history of LSE entitled, The "School": LSE and the Shaping of the Modern World. More about this event 125 years of LSE It’s our anniversary! Join our celebrations as we explore the past, discover new stories, and impact the future. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSE125
27/05/211h 25m

Liars: falsehoods and free speech in an age of deception

Contributor(s): Professor Andrés Velasco | Join us to hear from Harvard law professor Cass Sunstein speaking about his new book. Voter fraud, the legitimacy of COVID-19, and fake news are just a few examples of the lies that have recently been spreading like wildfire. Lying has been around for as long as we can remember but today is different, and in many respects, worse. Falsehoods are amplified as never before through powerful social media platforms that reach billions. And unfriendly governments, including Russia, are circulating lies in order to destabilize other nations, including the United Kingdom and the United States. In the face of those problems, Cass Sunstein probes the fundamental question of how we can deter lies while also protecting freedom of speech in his new book Liars: Falsehoods and Free Speech in an Age of Deception. Meet our speaker and chair Cass R. Sunstein (@CassSunstein) is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Professor Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations. His latest book is Liars: Falsehoods and Free Speech in an Age of Deception. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. More about this event The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. You can order the book, Liars: falsehoods and free speech in an age of deception, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
27/05/2153m 45s

Rescue: from global crisis to a better world

Contributor(s): Professor Ian Goldin | We are at a crossroads. The wrecking-ball of COVID-19 has destroyed global norms. Many think that after the devastation there will be a bounce back. The event will explore Ian Goldin's latest book, Rescue: From Global Crisis to a Better World. Ian Goldin believes that this crisis can create opportunities for change, just as the Second World War forged the ideas behind the Beveridge Report. Published in 1942, it was revolutionary and laid the foundations for the welfare state alongside a host of other social and economic reforms, changing the world for the better. Ian Goldin tackles the challenges and opportunities posed by the pandemic, ranging from globalisation to the future of jobs, income inequality and geopolitics, the climate crisis and the modern city. It is a fresh, bold call for an optimistic future and one we all have the power to create. Meet our speaker and chair Ian Goldin (@ian_goldin) is the Oxford University Professor of Globalisation and Development and was the founding Director of the Oxford Martin School. Ian leads the Oxford Martin Programmes on Technological and Economic Change, Future of Work and Future of Development. Ian previously was World Bank Vice President and the Group’s Director of Development Policy, after serving as Chief Executive of the Development Bank of Southern Africa and Economic Advisor to President Nelson Mandela. Ian is an alumnus of LSE. You can order the book, Rescue: From Global Crisis to a Better World, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. More about this event The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
26/05/2156m 33s

For a Reparatory Social Science

Contributor(s): Professor Gurminder K Bhambra | The social sciences are implicated in the reproduction of the very structures of inequality that are ostensibly their objects of concern. This is partly the result of their failure to acknowledge the ‘connected histories’ of one of their primary units of analysis – the modern nation-state, postcolonial scholar Gurminder K. Bhambra will argue. In the inaugural Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity Keynote Lecture, Professor Bhambra will explore the social sciences’ failure to acknowledge the extent to which modern nation-states were bound up with relations of colonial extraction and domination. Without putting such relations at the heart of our analyses, we cannot address global inequality effectively. Positing colonial histories as central to national imaginaries and the structures through which inequalities are legitimated and reproduced, she will explore a framework for a reparatory social science, oriented to global justice as a reconstructive project of the present. The past cannot be undone, she will conclude, but its legacies can be transformed to bring about a world that works for us all. Meet our speaker and chair Gurminder K. Bhambra (@gkbhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex, and a Fellow of the British Academy (2020). She was previously Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick. She is author of Connected Sociologies and Rethinking Modernity: Postcolonialism and the Sociological Imagination and co-editor of Decolonising the University. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Associate Professor of Social Policy and the Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at LSE. Her research focuses on the relationship between civil society, policy processes, and social transformation. She is co-convenor of the Politics of Inequality research theme based in the International Inequalities Institute. More about this event The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme is a Global South-focused, funded fellowship for mid-career activists, policy-makers, researchers and movement-builders from around the world. Based at the International Inequalities Institute, it is a 20-year programme that commenced in 2017 and was funded with a £64m gift from Atlantic Philanthropies, LSE’s largest ever philanthropic donation. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequalities
26/05/2159m 33s

Modern Greek Politics

Contributor(s): Professor Kevin Featherstone, Professor Brigid Laffan, Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis, Professor Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos, Professor George Tsebelis | Join us for this event that will introduce the new volume The Oxford Handbook of Modern Greek Politics, edited by Kevin Featherstone and Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos. This ground-breaking volume provides a panorama of Greek politics from the transition to democracy in 1974 to the present day. Its 43 chapters are written by leading Greek and international specialists, providing unprecedented breadth and authority. Join the editors in a discussion with Brigid Laffan, Kalypso Nicolaidis and George Tsebelis, concerning its major arguments and themes and the challenges for Greece. Meet our speakers and chair Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics in the European Institute at LSE, where he is also Director of the Hellenic Observatory. He was the first foreign member of the National Council for Research and Technology (ESET) in Greece, serving from 2010-2013. He has contributed regularly to international media on European and Greek politics. Brigid Laffan (@BrigidLaffan) is Director and Professor at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute (EUI), Florence. She was Vice-President of UCD and Principal of the College of Human Sciences from 2004 to 2011. She was the founding director of the Dublin European Institute UCD from 1999 and in March 2004 she was elected as a member of the Royal Irish Academy. Kalypso Nicolaidis is professorial Chair in Transnational Governance at the EUI School of Transnational Governance in Florence. She is currently on leave from the University of Oxford where she has been Professor of International Relations and a governing body fellow at St Antony’s College at the European Studies Centre since 1999. Previously Professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and at ENA, she has worked with numerous EU institutions. Her last book is: Exodus, Reckoning, Sacrifice: Three Meanings of Brexit. LSE alumnus Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos (@DimitriASotiro1) is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Political Science and Public Administration of the University of Athens. In 2003 he was Senior Research Fellow at LSE's Hellenic Observatory, in 2009-2010 Visiting Fellow in South East European Studies at St. Antony’s College, Oxford and in the autumn of 2016 Visiting Fellow at the Science Po, Paris. In 2018-2019 he was Visiting Professor at Tufts University and Visiting Fellow at Harvard’s Center of European Studies at Princeton’s Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies. George Tsebelis is the Anatol Rapoport Collegiate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan; member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; honorary PhD from the University of Crete. His work uses Game Theoretic models to analyze the effects of institutions; it covers Western European countries and the European Union. His more recent work studies institutions in Latin America and in countries of Eastern Europe, as well as Greece. Spyros Economides is Associate Professor in International Relations and European Politics at LSE and Deputy Director of the Hellenic Observatory. His current research concentrates on the external relations and security policies of the EU; Europeanisation and foreign policy, and the EU’s relationship with the Western Balkans. His latest publication is Economides and Sperling (eds.) EU Security Strategies: Extending the EU System of Security Governance. More about this event The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. You can order the book with a 30% discount ahead of its launch by using code ASFLYQ6 at checkout at The Oxford Handbook of Modern Greek Politics. An interview with the editors about the book can be found at The Oxford Handbook of Modern Greek Politics: An interview with the editors. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreece
25/05/211h 35m

Unconditional Equals

Contributor(s): Professor Anne Phillips | Drawing on her forthcoming book Unconditional Equals, Anne Phillips explores the dangers of treating equality as conditional on some supposedly shared human characteristic. The claim to be regarded as an equal, or to consider others as our equals, is often explained by reference to some quality all humans are said to possess, something like rationality, a capacity for autonomy, or a sense of justice. This sounds inclusive, but this kind of justification sets up a test. Historically, many millions have been deemed to fail the test: women, the enslaved, the colonised, and those too poor to be considered fully human. The legacy of this way of understanding equality continues today: in philosophical argument, in public policy, and in everyday talk. One of the consequences is that we cannot be confident of a shared belief in even ‘basic’ human equality, not to mention support for the kind of socio-economic equality usually associated with those on the left. This lecture explores whether we can think of an equality that is genuinely unconditional. That is, not based on supposed facts about human beings, not something we might forfeit through our actions or character, but something we ourselves enact through our commitments and claims. Meet our speaker and chair Anne Phillips is the Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science in the Department of Government at LSE. She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2003 and Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in 2013, She holds honorary degrees from the Universities of Aalborg and Bristol, and in 2016 received the Sir Isaiah Berlin Award for Lifetime Contribution to Political Studies. She is the author of several books including The Politics of Presence: the Political Representation of Gender, Race, and Culture (1995) and the forthcoming book Unconditional Equals. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. You can pre-order the book, Unconditional Equals (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. More about this event The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is home to some of the most internationally respected experts in politics and government; producing influential research that has a global impact on policy, and delivering world-class teaching to our students. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUnconditionalEquals
24/05/211h 27m

A New Global Purpose for Education?

Contributor(s): Vishal Talreja | Education is a national endeavour, but with our growing interdependence, is it time we acknowledge it has a global purpose? Join us for the launch of Thrive: The Purpose of Schools in a Changing World. The event will take the form of an open conversation about the risks and opportunities as education takes a new course. There is no denying that education is in a moment of flux. With disrupted labour markets, entrenched inequality, and stalled social mobility, long-standing international assumptions about education’s purpose are under strain. Meanwhile, the climate crisis and the reckoning with colonialism are pressing for wholescale reform of what schools and universities prioritise. What movements or institutions are fit to lead this change? And what form should change take? There is a need for a new narrative of what education is for: can it be global? Meet our speakers and chair Suchetha Bhat (@suchethab) is the CEO of Dream a Dream, a nonprofit in India working with 3 million children a year in four states across India, empowering those from vulnerable backgrounds to overcome adversity and thrive in a fast-changing world. She is on the Advisory Board of Amani Institute and Kizazi. She mentors many young women social entrepreneurs and non-profits in India, and is an advisor to the Delhi government on the establishment of a new school board of education. Tom Fletcher (@TFletcher) is the Principal of Hertford College, Oxford, a former UK Ambassador to the Lebanon, and founder of the movement Towards Global Learning Goals. He has been a No 10 Foreign Policy Advisor, a Visiting Professor at New York University, and authored The Naked Diplomat. Valerie Hannon (@valeriehannon) is the author of Thrive: the Purpose of Schools in a Changing World. She was co-founder of Innovation Unit and of the Global Education Leaders’ Partnership, and has been a consultant advisor to the OECD and to various Education Ministries worldwide. Andreas Schleicher (@SchleicherOECD) is Director for Education and Skills at the OECD. He initiated and oversees the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and has worked for over 20 years with ministers and education leaders to improve education. Vishal Talreja (@vishaltalreja) is the Co-founder and Trustee of Dream a Dream. He is an Ashoka Fellow, Eisenhower Fellow, Salzburg Global Fellow and a Board Member at PYE Global and Goonj. He is a Founding Member of Weaving Lab, Catalyst2030 and a Steering Committee Member of Karanga. He is also an advisor to the Delhi government in curriculum reforms. Amelia Peterson (@AKMPeterson) is a Fellow in the Social Policy department at LSE, where she currently convenes the MSc course in Education Policy. She studies education system reforms in multiple countries around the world, with a focus on assessment and qualification reform. More about this event The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) is an internationally recognised centre of research and teaching in social and public policy. From its foundation in 1912 it has carried out cutting edge research on core social problems, and helped to develop policy solutions. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
24/05/211h 16m

Where Are All the ‘Welfare Queens?’ Diversity and European Evidence on Single-Parent

Contributor(s): Professor Janet C. Gornick, Dr Laurie C. Maldonado, Professor Ive Marx, Dr Rense Nieuwenhuis | In the United States, single mothers are often blamed for their own circumstances and offered little support. The American social policy discourse is very much shaped by the image of the “welfare queen” – a never-married single mother who is dependent on public assistance and refuses to work. However, experiences of lone parents across Europe and other countries calls this stereotype into question. So what does this mean for social policy? Our panel will engage in discussion and provide comparative policy lessons intended to improve the lives of single-parent families in the United States. The panel will also discuss future directions and pressing challenges for single-parent families during a time of COVID-19, as well as social and political unrest in the U.S. Meet our speakers and chair Janet C. Gornick (@JanetGornick) is the Director of the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality, Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and Director of the US Office of LIS. She has published widely on social welfare policies and their impact on gender disparities in the labor market and/or on income inequality. She has published widely in academic journals. Laurie C. Maldonado (@LCMaldonado1) is Assistant Professor of Social Work at Molloy College, New York. Her research examines the consequences of social policy on the lives of single parent and their families. She has co-edited a book, titled The Triple Bind of Single-Parent Families. Previously, she has worked as a research associate for The Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality. Ive Marx (@IveMarx) is a Professor at the University of Antwerp where he also services as the Director of the Centre for Social Policy Herman Deleeck. His main research interest is labour market and welfare state change in relation to the distribution of income, with a particular focus on poverty. Rense Nieuwenhuis (@RNieuwenhuis) is Associate Professor at Stockholm University SOFI. He studies how family diversity and social policy affect poverty and economic inequality. His research is country-comparative and has a gender perspective. Dr Nieuwenhuis’s recent research is on single-parent families, how women’s earnings affect inequality between households, and family policy outcomes. Amanda Sheely (@AmandaSheely3) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She studies social assistance programs for lone mothers, with a primary focus on the United States. More about this event The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) provides top quality international and multidisciplinary research and teaching on social and public policy challenges facing countries across the world. From its foundation in 1912 it has carried out cutting edge research on core social problems, and helped to develop policy solutions. LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Its mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESingleParent
20/05/211h 30m

Doom: the politics of catastrophe

Contributor(s): Professor Niall Ferguson | Disasters are inherently hard to predict. But when catastrophe strikes, we ought to be better prepared than the Romans were when Vesuvius erupted or medieval Italians when the Black Death struck. We have science on our side, after all. Yet the responses of many developed countries to a new pathogen from China were badly bungled. Why? While populist rulers certainly performed poorly in the face of the pandemic, Niall Ferguson argues that more profound pathologies were at work - pathologies already visible in our responses to earlier disasters. Drawing from multiple disciplines, including economics, network science and cliodynamics, his new book, Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe offers not just a history but a general theory of disaster. Meet our speaker and chair Niall Ferguson (@nfergus) is one of Britain's most renowned historians. He is the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, a senior faculty fellow of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard, and a visiting professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He was a presidential candidate in Chile in 2013. He also was the Minister of Finance of Chile between March 2006 and March 2010. During his tenure he was recognized as Latin American Finance Minister of the Year by several international publications. More about this event The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. You can order the book, Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
20/05/211h 2m

A Decade of Behavioural Science at LSE - Part 2

Contributor(s): Professor Paul Dolan | Join us for this fireside chat where Paul Dolan will continue his reflection on ten years of behavioural science at LSE, discussing biases, narratives, happiness, resilience and more. We will be drawing from research from LSE walls and beyond. We will also be looking to the future, mapping out the most important and exciting areas of study. Those that join us can expect to laugh, learn and lean into behavioural science. Meet our speaker and chair Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After and host of a new podcast series Duck – Rabbit, which explores our polarised culture. Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is an associate professor in behavioural science at LSE. Her research focuses on why some people have successful lives as compared to others because of factors beyond their own control. She is the founder and director of The Inclusion Initiative, a research centre at LSE and the author of Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Career You Want. More about this event The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPBS
19/05/2156m 30s

Financing the Green Transition: what role for multilateral development banks?

Contributor(s): Dr Amal-lee Amin, Carlota Cenalmor, Professor Lord Stern, Josué Tanaka | The challenge of scaling up sustainable investments to support a strong and green recovery and the much more difficult environment for mobilising finance in the post-pandemic world has highlighted the importance of strengthening the role of national and international development banks. This panel event examines the role of the multilateral development banks (MDBs) in achieving this mobilisation from the global north to the global south including scaling up and aligning action with climate responsible development, and sustaining that action. Even though the need to mobilise greater sums of private finance to meet climate goals is well accepted, this will only increase in the post-COVID-19 world. The three agendas of climate finance, MDBs and mobilisation are the key channels where the global north currently takes actions consistent with its “responsibilities” (including as set out in the Paris agreement). Yet, none of these channels directly set out north-south equity arguments or justifications for global north responsibility around recovery and transformation in the global south. Meet our speakers and chair Amal-lee Amin (@AmaleeAmin) is Director of Climate Strategy at CDC Group and Senior Advisor to the UK Government on COP26. Before this she was Chief of the Climate Change Division at the Inter-American Development Bank. At CDC, she has been leading work with the Adaptation and Resilience Collaborative to accelerate investments in adaptation and resilience. Carlota Cenalmor (@CarlotaCenalmor) is Permanent Representative of the European investment Bank Group, Washington D.C. Before this she was a senior lawyer at the EIB's headquarters in Luxembourg, responsible for new financial instruments as well as for compliance, procurement, and institutional policies. Nick Stern (@lordstern1) is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Head of the India Observatory at the London School of Economics. Josué Tanaka is the founding leader of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) climate finance initiative launched in 2006 covering investment, policy development, capacity building and technical assistance across the EBRD countries of operations. He was the Managing Director responsible for climate action and operational strategy and planning at the EBRD until December 2020. He is Visiting Professor in Practice, Grantham Research Institute at LSE. Nick Robins (@NVJRobins1) is Professor in Practice for Sustainable Finance at the Grantham Research Institute at LSE. More about this event The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
18/05/211h 30m

Who's a Good Boy?

Contributor(s): Professor Kristin Andrews, Professor Sarah Brosnan, Dr Susana Monsó | Do non-human animals have morals? Can chimpanzees tell right from wrong? Do dolphins think about what they ought to do? And can a dog really be good? Recent scientific work can shed light on these issues, but they also take us to the heart of two great philosophical questions: what does it mean to be moral and what (if anything) makes humans unique? Meet our speakers and chair Kristin Andrews (@KristinAndrewz) is York Research Chair in Animal Minds at York University, Canada. Sarah Brosnan (@drsfbrosnan) is Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Philosophy and Neuroscience at Georgia State University. Susana Monsó (@Susana_MonsO) is Lise Meitner Fellow at the Messerli Research Institute, Vienna. Jonathan Birch (@BirchLSE) is Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Associate Professor of Philosophy at LSE. More about this event The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) hosts events exploring science, politics, and culture from a philosophical perspective. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
17/05/211h 14m

Lessons learnt from the Pandemic

Contributor(s): Dr Mukulika Banerjee, Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Andrés Velasco, Dr Clare Wenham | Over a year on from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, what key lessons have been learnt that should shape the policies that national and global actors should pursue. Meet our speakers and chair Mukulika Banerjee (@MukulikaB) is a social anthropologist at LSE and was the inaugural director of the LSE South Asia Centre from 2015-2020. She was awarded an LSE Research Grant to study the impact of COVID-10 in India, with Maitreesh Ghatak (LSE Economics). Her forthcoming monograph Cultivating Democracy : politics and citizenship in agrarian India, will be published later this year, and is based on over 20 years of research in rural India. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After and host of a new podcast series Duck – Rabbit, which explores our polarised culture. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Clare Wenham (@clarewenham) is Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at LSE. She specialises in global health security, the politics and policy of pandemic preparedness and outbreak response. She has researched this for over a decade, through influenza, Ebola and Zika. Her research poses questions of global governance, the role of WHO and World Bank, national priorities and innovative financing for pandemic control. More recently she has been examining the role of women in epidemics and associated policy. For COVID-19, Clare is Co-Principal Investigator on a grant from the CIHR and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation analysing the gendered dimensions of the outbreak. Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is the Pro-Director for Research and the Harold Laski Professor of Political Science at LSE. An LSE alumnus, he is one of the leading researchers, teachers, and commentators on European and comparative politics in the UK. Simon has recently been appointed Stein Rokkan Chair in Comparative Politics at the European University Institute in Florence and will take up his new post in September. More about this event The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
13/05/2159m 49s

Responsible Persons: thinking about resentment, trust and hope in everyday life

Contributor(s): Professor Cheshire Calhoun | Join us for the Brian Barry Memorial Lecture, an annual event honouring the work of political philosopher and former colleague, Professor Brian Barry. Embedded in our social practices are three distinct, default conceptions of a responsible person connected with three distinct basic expectations of and stances toward responsible persons. First is the conception of responsible persons as capable of living up to normative expectations and thus being accountability responsible. Second is a conception of responsible persons as in fact disposed to satisfy minimal normative expectations and thus as compliance responsible. Third is a conception of responsible persons as responsibility takers, that is, as both capable of electing and disposed at least sometimes to actually take the initiative to do good things that could be omitted without blame. In this event Cheshire Calhoun argues that these conceptions are not competing and are rather jointly essential for capturing the complex ways we think about and interact with responsible persons and the centrality of resentment, trust, and hope in everyday life. Meet our speaker and chair Cheshire Calhoun is Professor of Philosophy and head of Philosophy faculty at Arizona State University. She has recently been elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Her work stretches across the philosophical subdisciplines of normative ethics, moral psychology, philosophy of emotion, feminist philosophy, and gay and lesbian philosophy. Kai Spiekermann (@SpiekermannKai) is Professor of Political Philosophy in the Department of Government at LSE. Among his research interests are normative and positive political theory, philosophy of the social sciences, social epistemology and environmental change. More about this event The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEResponsible
13/05/211h 0m

What is to be done about fake news in politics?

Contributor(s): Kate Klonick | The problem of fake news and other contentious online content is one of our most pressing challenges - it is widely believed to have played a major role in the election of President Donald Trump, the outcome of the Brexit Referendum, and in general threatens the healthy functioning of news media in modern democracy. Our panellists will discuss the risks of deceptive content (both mis and dis information) and will examine what a healthy and mature democracy such as the United Kingdom should do to combat those risks while protecting the rights of individuals and political parties to engage in open and free political debate. Meet our speakers and chair Kate Klonick (@Klonick) is an Assistant Professor at St. John's University Law School and an Affiliate Fellow at Yale Law School’s Information Society Project. Her research on networked technologies' effect on social norm enforcement, freedom of expression, and private governance has appeared in the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, The New Yorker, New York Times, The Atlantic, The Guardian and numerous other publications. Andrew Murray (@AndrewDMurray) is Professor of Law at LSE with particular reference to New Media and Technology Law. He is also Deputy Head of the Department. In 2018/19 he was the specialist advisor to the House of Lords Communications Committee inquiry “Regulating in a Digital World”. Chi Onwurah (@ChiOnwurah) is the Shadow Minister for Science, Research & Digital and the Labour MP for Newcastle upon Tyne Central. Prior to this she was Shadow Minister for Industrial Strategy, Science and Innovation. Jeremy Horder is Professor of Criminal Law at LSE. He was Chairman of Oxford’s Faculty of Law from 1998-2000. From 2005-2010, he was a Law Commissioner for England and Wales, with responsibility for criminal law reform, before becoming Edmund Davies Professor of Criminal Law at King’s College London, from 2010-2013. More about this event The Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Our community is one of the largest in the School, and has played a major role in policy debates, policy-making and the education of lawyers and law teachers globally. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
12/05/211h 28m

The 'Human' in Human Rights Part II - Transformations

Contributor(s): Professor Craig Calhoun | n the second part of his three-part lecture series, Craig Calhoun will chart the implications of genetic engineering and other transformations of the biological human being for an era which has put the human at the centre of its conception of the good. Meet our speaker and chair Craig Calhoun (@craigjcalhoun) is Professor of Social Sciences at Arizona State University and Centennial Professor at LSE. He is also a previous Director of LSE. Monika Krause is an Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology and co-Director of LSE Human Rights. More about this event A podcast of the first lecture in this series is available to download from The Human in Human Rights. LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights. The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECalhoun
11/05/211h 2m

The Geopolitics of Health in the Middle East

Contributor(s): Dr Weeam S Hammoudeh, Dr Omar Dewachi, Dr Ghassan Abu-Sittah | Regional politics in the Middle East continues to have a cumulative impact on health, affecting health systems capacity and delivery of services. Conflicts in the region are deeply influenced by historical, ethnic, cultural and political factors. This event will discuss the geopolitical barriers to strengthening health systems in the region, presenting a country case study comparison of Palestine, Lebanon and Iraq. Panellists will also discuss how COVID-19 has exacerbated existing health insecurities and threats. Meet our speakers and chair Ghassan Abu-Sittah is a British-Palestinian Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon. In 2012 he became Head of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the AUBMC and in 2015 co-founded and became director of the Conflict Medicine Program at Global Health Institute at the American University of Beirut. Omar Dewachi (@Khanabat) is Associate Professor at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Trained in medicine and anthropology, Omar works at the intersections of global health, history of medicine and political anthropology. He focuses on the human and environmental manifestations of decades of conflict and military interventions in Iraq and the broader Middle East. Weeam S Hammoudeh (@Whammoudeh) is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Community and Public Health, and coordinator of the mental health unit. She holds a PhD and MA in Sociology from Brown University, and an MPH in Community and Public Health from Birzeit University. Tiziana Leone (@tizianaleone) is an Associate Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tiziana’s research agenda is focused around maternal and reproductive health, including a lifecourse approach to women’s health. More about this event The Global Health Initiative (@LSEGlobalHealth) is a cross-departmental research platform set up to increase the coherence and visibility of Global Health research activity across the School, both internally and externally. It provides support for interdisciplinary engagement and showcases LSE’s ability to apply rigorous social science research to emerging global health challenges. The LSE Middle East Centre builds on LSE's long engagement with the Middle East and North Africa and provides a central hub for the wide range of research on the region carried out at LSE. The Middle East Centre works to enhance understanding and develop rigorous research on the societies, economies, politics and international relations of the region. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
10/05/211h 31m

The Importance of Not Being Earnest

Contributor(s): Robert Newman, Professor Kieran Setiya, Dr Zoe Walker | We explore what’s philosophically interesting about comedy. Both have a lot in common: showing up the ordinary as odd, critiquing the status quo, hecklers… But can humour be a source of knowledge? What does it tell us about how we interact with one another? What role does it play in our social and political life? And will we ruin the joke by explaining it?! Meet our speakers and chair Robert Newman (@mrrobnewman) is a comedian and author. Kieran Setiya (@KieranSetiya) is Professor of Philosophy at MIT. Zoe Walker is Lecturer in Philosophy at Magdalene College, Cambridge. Sarah Fine (@DrSJFine) is Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy at LSE and Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at King’s College London. More about this event The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) hosts events exploring science, politics, and culture from a philosophical perspective. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
10/05/211h 13m

SHORTCAST | Financing a Green and Just Recovery from COVID-19

Contributor(s): Naïm Abou-Jaoudé, Sharan Burrow, Rathin Roy, Dr Rhian-Mari Thomas | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on March 2nd 2021. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.
10/05/2122m 33s

SHORTCAST | COVID-19 in the UK: where are all the women?

Contributor(s): Mandu Reid, Bell Ribeiro-Addy, Mary-Ann Stephenson, Dr Clare Wenham | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on March 3rd 2021. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.
10/05/2123m 33s

Children and the Digital Environment

Contributor(s): Dr Taina Bucher, Professor Christine Hine, Dr Jean-Christophe Plantin, Dr Bieke Zaman | Technologies are spreading into all aspects of our lives via smart devices, internet of things, augmented reality, and data profiling. Children’s lives have become digital by default and technology is the taken-for-granted means of playing, seeing family, doing schoolwork, hanging out with friends in a post-COVID world. The distinction between the offline and online no longer offers a meaningful way of conceptualising the infrastructure of life but what can we replace it with? Where does the digital begin and end, what does it incorporate? What are the implications for children? In this webinar we will debate the theories and concepts that underpin such questions, drawing on different disciplinary approaches. Meet our speakers and chair Taina Bucher (@tainab) is an Associate Professor in Screen Cultures at the Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo. She studies the relationships and entanglements between algorithms, social and political concerns – examining how users experience and make sense of algorithmic power and politics. Her first book, IF…THEN: Algorithmic power and politics details the ontological politics at stake in the algorithmic media landscape. Christine Hine (@DigiSocSurrey) is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Surrey. Her work offers a sociology perspective on science and technology with a particular focus on the role played by new technologies in the knowledge construction process. She is interested in the development of ethnography in technical settings and in "virtual methods" (internet-based social research). She has developed mobile and connective approaches to ethnography that combine online and offline social contexts. Jean-Christophe Plantin (@JCPlantin) is Associate Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. His research investigates the politics of digital platforms, the evolution of knowledge infrastructures, and the rise of digital sovereignty. His first book, Participatory Mapping: New Data, New Cartography details the use of web-based mapping platforms by non-experts to participate in socio-technical debates. Bieke Zaman (@biekezaman) is an Associate Professor in Human-Computer Interaction and research group leader of the Meaningful Interactions Lab (Mintlab) at the Institute for Media Studies, KU Leuven, Belgium. Her work lies primarily at the intersection of human computer interaction research and communication sciences and focuses on children, digital media and design; media convergence in a digital society; progressive research and dissemination methods. Sonia Livingstone (@Livingstone_S) is a Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She has published 20 books including “The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age.” Since founding the 33 country EU Kids Online network, Sonia has advised the UK government, European Commission, European Parliament, Council of Europe, OECD and UNICEF. More about this event The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2021 QS World University Rankings). This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
07/05/211h 27m

China and the West in the Era of COVID-19

Contributor(s): Dr Michael Fullilove | COVID-19 originated in Wuhan, China’s authoritarian system enabled it to contain the virus even as the United States became a global epicentre of disease. Does this point to a long-term shift in international relations? Or will the traditional strengths of liberal nations reassert themselves? And how should the West respond to the China challenge? Meet our speaker and chair Michael Fullilove (@mfullilove) is the Executive Director of the Lowy Institute. He previously worked as a lawyer, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, and an adviser to Prime Minister Paul Keating. He is Nonresident Senior Fellow at Brookings and serves on the Advisory Council of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) in London. Dr Fullilove writes widely on foreign policy in publications including The New York Times, Financial Times and The Atlantic. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. More about this event The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
06/05/211h 1m

The Work of the Future: where will it come from?

Contributor(s): Professor Judy Wajcman, Professor David Autor | How will technological innovation change the workplace? How can we harness technological advances for social benefit? Join leading economist David Autor in discussion with Judy Wajcman as we explore the relationships between emerging technologies and the future of work in America and beyond. Meet our speakers and chair David Autor (@davidautor) is Ford Professor of Economics and Associate Department Head of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Economics. He is Co-Director of the MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future and the National Bureau of Economic Research Labor Studies Program. Professor Autor has written extensively on labor-market impacts of technological change and globalization’s effects on wages, inequality and electoral politics. Judy Wajcman (@jwajcman1) is the Anthony Giddens Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is the Principal Investigator on the Women in Data Science and Artificial Intelligence research project at the Alan Turing Institute, a member of the AI100 Standing Committee, and a Fellow of the British Academy. Professor Wajcman has published widely in the fields of work and organizations, science and technology studies and feminist theory. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations, and Director of the US Centre at LSE and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. More about this event The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
05/05/211h 30m

The Power of Creative Destruction - Economic Upheaval and the Wealth of Nations

Contributor(s): Professor Philippe Aghion | Philippe Aghion, Professor at the Collège de France and LSE, offers a cutting-edge analysis of what drives economic growth and a blueprint for prosperity under capitalism. With the launch of his book, of which he is a co-author, The Power of Creative Destruction, Philippe Aghion draws on cutting-edge theory and evidence to examine the roots of growth and inequality, competition and globalisation, the determinants of health and happiness, technological revolutions, secular stagnation, middle-income traps, climate change, and how to recover from economic shocks. He shows that we owe our modern standard of living to innovations enabled by free-market capitalism. We hear more and more calls for radical change, even the overthrow of capitalism. Aghion suggests the answer is to create a better capitalism by understanding and harnessing the power of creative destruction—innovation that disrupts, but that over the past two hundred years has also lifted societies to previously unimagined prosperity. The Power of Creative Destruction shows that a fair and prosperous future is ultimately ours to make. Meet our speaker and chair Philippe Aghion is Professor at the Collège de France and the London School of Economics and Political Science and was previously Professor of Economics at Harvard. His new book The Power of Creative Destruction, is co-authored with Céline Antonin and Simon Bunel. Steve Pischke has been in the Economics Department at LSE since 2000, is an associate in the CEP, and currently Head of the Department. His key expertise is in Labour Economics, Economics of Education, and Applied Econometrics. More about this event The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. You can order the book, The Power of Creative Destruction - Economic Upheaval and the Wealth of Nations, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
04/05/2156m 20s

Do algorithms have too much power?

Contributor(s): Ken Benoit, Andrew Murray, Seeta Peña Gangaradhan, Alison Powell, Bernhard von Stengel | Computer algorithms shape our lives and increasingly control our future. They have crept into virtually every aspect of modern life and are making life-changing choices on our behalf, often without us realising. But how much power should we give to them and have we let things go too far? Joanna Bale talks to Ken Benoit, Andrew Murray, Seeta Peña Gangaradhan, Alison Powell and Bernhard Von Stengel. Research links: Hello World by Hannah Fry; Information Technology Law: The Law and Society by Andrew Murray; Explanations as Governance? Investigating practices of explanation in algorithmic system design by Alison Powell (forthcoming).
04/05/2144m 34s

The Impossible Office? 300 years of the British Prime Minister

Contributor(s): Sir Anthony Seldon | The Office of the British Prime Minister has endured longer than any other democratic political office, but how have the 55 remarkable individuals who have led the country through peace, crisis and war shaped the role? Join us as we mark the third centenary of the office of the Prime Minister by exploring some of the greatest achievements, the relationship with the monarchy and who has been most effective and why in their time at Number 10. Meet our speaker and chair Anthony Seldon (@AnthonySeldon) is a contemporary historian who has written and edited numerous books, including the definitive accounts of the last five Prime Ministers. He is the honorary historian at Number 10 Downing Street, chair of the National Archive Trust, and has interviewed virtually all those who have worked in Number 10 in the last 50 years. Anthony is an alumnus of LSE. Tony Travers is Professor in LSE's Department of Government and Associate Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. His expertise lies in local and national government and cities. More about this event The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is home to some of the most internationally respected experts in politics and government; producing influential research that has a global impact on policy, and delivering world-class teaching to our students. You can order the book, The Impossible Office? The History of the British Prime Minister, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPrimeMinisters
29/04/2157m 36s

Predatory States and Ungoverned Spaces: who assumes the responsibility to protect?

Contributor(s): Muna Luqman, Fatou Bensouda, Hamsatu Allamin | Focusing on the escalating violence and ongoing kidnappings of women and girls in Nigeria and the continued targeting of civilians in Yemen, for this fourth session of the Coming of Age of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda series Sanam Naraghi Anderlini will be in conversation with Hamsatu Allamin, founder of the Allamin Foundation for Peace Development in Maidugiri, Nigeria; Fatou Bensouda, Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC); and Muna Luqman, leading peacebuilder and founder of Food4Humanity in Yemen.  Reflecting on their personal experiences and journeys into their fields of expertise, this discussion will draw attention to the growing challenge of failed governance by states, the emergence of ungoverned and ‘alternatively governed’ spaces, and the implications for civilians. The panellists will also discuss the role of the ICC when states are implicated in violence against their own citizens, and what can be done when the state is absent and new entities emerge, with no respect for international norms. Meet our speakers and chair Hamsatu Allamin is an educator by profession, with 32 years’ experience in teaching, public administration, and project management. She is a gender activist and human rights defender, who initiated the creation of the Network of Civil Society for Peace in Borno and Yobe states in Nigeria. Fatou Bensouda is the first woman to serve as Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), having assumed office in 2012. In 2011, she was elected by consensus by the Assembly of States Parties to serve in this capacity. Through her work, she has strived to advance accountability for atrocity crimes, highlighting in particular the importance of addressing traditionally underreported crimes such as sexual and gender-based crimes, mass atrocities against and affecting children, as well as the deliberate destruction of cultural heritage within the Rome Statute framework. Muna Luqman (@munaluqman) is the Founder and Chairperson of Food4humanity. She is an activist for women, peace and security; co-founder of the Women Solidarity Network; and member of the Women’s Alliance for Security Leadership. Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini (@sanambna) is the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. More about this event The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWPS
29/04/211h 33m

Mary Wollstonecraft and the Vindication of Human Rights

Contributor(s): Professor Amartya Sen, Bee Rowlatt | Join two great minds in exploring the themes of justice and equality: Amartya Sen and Enlightenment hero Mary Wollstonecraft, as Amartya Sen gives the inaugural Wollstonecraft Society Lecture. Mary Wollstonecraft claimed human rights for all. She overcame limited education and a background of domestic violence to become an educational and political pioneer, and one of the greatest thinkers of the eighteenth century. As well as her intellectual audacity, it is Wollstonecraft’s love for humanity, her self-proclaimed “ardent affection for the human race” that continues to inspire. This event explores how, despite a savage pandemic, economic downturn, and increasing isolation in both political and individual life, there is a counter-story of community building and education, of optimism and hope. Meet our speakers and chair Bee Rowlatt (@BeeRowlatt) is a writer and public speaker, and a programmer of events at the British Library. Her most recent book In Search of Mary retraced Wollstonecraft’s 1795 treasure hunt over the Skagerrak sea. She led the campaign for the Wollstonecraft memorial sculpture and is chair of the Wollstonecraft Society. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. His research has ranged over social choice theory, economic theory, ethics and political philosophy, welfare economics, theory of measurement, decision theory, development economics, public health, and gender studies. Amartya Sen’s books have been translated into more than thirty languages and his awards include the Nobel Prize in Economics. He was Professor of economics at LSE from 1971 to 1977, and he taught part-time at the School from 1978 to 1982. His memoir, Home In The World, will be published in July by Penguin. LSE announced the Amartya Sen Chair in Inequality Studies in 2019. Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor of Anthropology at LSE and leads the International Inequalities Institute research theme on Global Economies of Care. Her most recent book is the award winning ‘Nightmarch: Among India’s Revolutionary Guerrillas’. More about this event The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Wollstonecraft Society (@TheWollSoc) is a registered charity carrying Mary Wollstonecraft’s legacy of human rights, equality and justice into young people’s lives. It delivers learning materials and experiences, inspired by Wollstonecraft’s work, for young people who might not have heard of her. The annual WS lecture features an outstanding speaker on themes related to her work, and each year it awards a state-educated student the Wollstonecraft Prize for Political Engagement. This lecture is also part of a week-long celebration of events around Mary Wollstonecraft organised by the Newington Green Meeting House. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Featured image (used in thumbnail): Mary Wollstonecraft by John Opie (c. 1797), National Portrait Gallery, London is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0.
28/04/211h 19m

Duck – Rabbit: taking sides

Contributor(s): Professor Paul Dolan | Listen to a preview of a new podcast by Professor Paul Dolan, which explores the problem of polarisation. LSE Professor Paul Dolan has spent years researching happiness. Can he find a way through the divisions that make us miserable? In this podcast series Paul brings together friends from the different worlds he straddles in his own life to work through the issues that most divide us - COVID, freedom of speech, class and lifestyle choices. He uses insights from behavioural science to explain why we’re split and how we might fix it. Listen now: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0zUaiarx2SxILYha3gAtGE Acast: https://play.acast.com/s/duck-rabbit/duck-rabbit This podcast series forms part of LSE's Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative. A Mother Come Quickly production.
27/04/212m 10s

The New Age of Empire: how racism and colonialism still rule the world

Contributor(s): Professor Kehinde Andrews | Coretta Phillips will be in conversation with Kehinde Andrews to discusses his new book, The New Age of Empire. A book that offers no easy answers to critical questions, The New Age of Empire presents a new blueprint for challenging age-old systems. Andrews argues that the "West is rich because the Rest is poor", and that reforming a racist global order calls for radical solutions. Meet our speaker and chair Kehinde Andrews (@kehinde_andrews) is Professor of Black Studies at the School of Social Sciences at Birmingham City University. Kehinde led the development of Europe’s first Black Studies undergraduate degree. He is also director of the Centre for Critical Social Research, founder of the Harambee Organisation of Black Unity, and co-chair of the Black Studies Association. You can order the book, The New Age of Empire: how racism and colonialism still rule the world, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Coretta Phillips is Professor of Criminology and Social Policy in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Author of the award-winning book The Multicultural Prison, she researches race, ethnicity, crime, criminal justice and social policy. Her current multi-disciplinary project will provide the first systematic, comprehensive and historically grounded account of the crime and criminal justice experiences of Gypsies and Travellers in England since the 1960s. More about this event The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) is an internationally recognised centre of research and teaching in social and public policy. From its foundation in 1912 it has carried out cutting edge research on core social problems, and helped to develop policy solutions. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
27/04/2159m 17s

Debating Capital and Ideology

Contributor(s): Professor Gurminder Bhambra, Dr Jens Lerche, Dr Sanjay G. Reddy, Professor Diego Sánchez-Ancochea, Dr Nora Waitkus, Professor Thomas Piketty | This event will debate Thomas Piketty’s urgent new book, Capital and Ideology, and will feature an interdisciplinary panel of experts. The conversation will probe his views on race and slavery, the nature of capitalism, the impact of political divides, and the contours of long-term social change. Piketty, in conversation with interlocutors, will present the book’s framework and his historically-informed approach for understanding and combating inequalities today. This discussion is linked to a just-published special issue of The British Journal of Sociology, featuring a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary set of responses to Piketty. Meet our speakers and chair Gurminder Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex. Jens Lerche (@JensLerche) is Reader in Agrarian and Labour studies in the Department of Development Studies at SOAS. LSE alumnus Thomas Piketty (@PikettyLeMonde) is Professor at EHESS and the Paris School of Economics. Sanjay G. Reddy (@sanjaygreddy) is Associate Professor of Economics at The New School for Social Research. Diego Sánchez-Ancochea (@dsanco) is Professor of the Political Economy of Development, University of Oxford. Nora Waitkus (@nora_wait) is Research Officer at the International Inequalities Institute at LSE and Assistant Professor at Tilburg University. Poornima Paidipaty (@paidipaty) is an LSE Fellow in Inequalities. More about this event The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The British Journal of Sociology (@BJSociology) is a leading international sociological journal, with a focus on the social and democratic sociological questions of our times, the journal leads the debate on key methodological and theoretical questions and controversies in contemporary sociology. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
26/04/211h 30m

Irrationality - A History of the Dark Side of Reason

Contributor(s): Professor Richard Bradley, Professor Justin E. H. Smith | Julian Le Grand will talk with Justin E. H. Smith about his new book, Irrationality - A History of the Dark Side of Reason. Irrationality ranges across philosophy, politics, and current events. Challenging conventional thinking about logic, natural reason, dreams, art and science, pseudoscience, the Enlightenment, the internet, jokes and lies, and death, the book shows how history reveals that any triumph of reason is temporary and reversible, and that rational schemes, notably including many from Silicon Valley, often result in their polar opposite. The problem is that the rational gives birth to the irrational and vice versa in an endless cycle, and any effort to permanently set things in order sooner or later ends in an explosion of unreason. Because of this, it is irrational to try to eliminate irrationality. For better or worse, it is an ineradicable feature of life. Meet our speaker and chair Justin E. H. Smith (@jehsmith) is Professor of the history and philosophy of science at the University of Paris 7–Denis Diderot. His books include The Philosopher: A History in Six Types. Richard Bradley is Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research is concentrated in decision theory, formal epistemology and the theory of social choice but he also works on conditionals and the nature of chance. His book Decision Theory with a Human Face, recently published with Cambridge University Press, gives an account of decision making under conditions of severe uncertainty theory suitable for rational but bounded agents. Julian Le Grand has been Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science since 1993. From 2003 to 2005 he was seconded to No 10 Downing St to serve as Senior Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister. He is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books, and more than one hundred refereed journal articles and book chapters on economics, philosophy, and public policy. More about this event The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. You can order the book, Irrationality - A History of the Dark Side of Reason, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIrrationality
26/04/2158m 50s

Cosmopolitanisms: past, present, future?

Contributor(s): Professor Etienne Balibar | A cosmopolitics that allows it for mankind to address its common interests is clearly needed, as demonstrated again by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is even urgent, a matter of life and death for millions, and survival for the planet as a livable environment. But there can exist no cosmopolitics without a cosmopolitan idea. From this point of view, we find ourselves in an extremely contradictory situation: always an “essentially contested concept” throughout history, cosmopolitanism today appears squeezed between powerful nationalisms competing for global or local hegemony, and utopian ideals in search of their capacity to rally the multitude. The lecture does not offer a blueprint, it traces a genealogy and delineates some possibilities for the future which is already our actuality. Meet our speaker and chair Etienne Balibar is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris-Nanterre, and Anniversary Chair of Contemporary European Philosophy at Kingston University, London. He is also visiting professor at Columbia University in the City of New York. Ayça Çubukçu (@ayca_cu) is an Associate Professor of Sociology at LSE and co-director of LSE Human Rights. More about this event LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights. The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECosmopolitanisms
21/04/211h 30m

The Technological Revolution in Financial Services

Contributor(s): Professor Michael R. King, Richard Nesbitt, Ghela Boskovich, Vineet Malhotra, Brenda Trenowden | Join us for a panel discussion on The Technological Revolution in Financial Services: How Banks, Fintechs and Customers Win Together, edited by Michael R. King and Richard W. Nesbitt. Financial services is going through a global transformation. Structural changes are being driven by three forces: regulation, technology, and demographics. This combination is changing the competitive landscape by lowering barriers to entry and increasing competition from outside the industry. These new entrants are leveraging technology to gain a foothold in financial services, with many of them following the disruption playbook and building a foothold at the bottom end of the market by targeting underserved customers. Rather than being threatened by Fintech startups, banks will be more threatened by global technology companies like the Chinese Techfins Alibaba and Tencent and the bigtech companies Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. These tech companies have platform ecosystems that embed financial services, including payments, lending, investing, and insurance. Technology companies will prove to be the real threats to incumbents over the next decade. You can order the book at The Technological Revolution in Financial Services: How Banks, Fintechs, and Customers Win Together. Meet our speakers and chair Ghela Boskovich (@GhelaBoskovich) is a self-proclaimed Fintech fanatic, and Founder of FemTechGlobal™, a network dedicated to challenging the status quo, and improving the inclusiveness and diversity in Financial Services. She is also Head of Europe for the Financial Data and Technology Association. Michael R. King is the Lansdowne Chair in Finance at University of Victoria’s Gustavson School of Business. Prior to UVic, Michael was at Ivey Business School (2011-2019), where he held the Tangerine Chair in Finance and co-founded the Scotiabank Digital Banking Lab – Canada’s first FinTech research centre. He is the co-author of The Technological Revolution in Financial Services: How Banks, Fintechs and Customers Win Together (with Richard W. Nesbitt). Vineet Malhotra is MD and Head of Retail and Alternate Solutions Group at CIBC Capital Markets. Vineet is also Head of Simplii, an online bank serving Canadian customers. The Retail Solutions Group manufactures and delivers Global Markets products, including Foreign Exchange, Fixed Income, Precious Metals, and Structured Solutions for CIBC Capital Markets’ 6 million retail clients in Canada. Richard Nesbitt is an Adjunct Professor of the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. Richard is working with the London School of Economics and Political Science as Chair of a new research institute “The Inclusion Initiative at LSE”. Richard was Chief Operating Officer of CIBC until September 2014. From 2004 to 2008 Richard was Chief Executive Officer of Toronto Stock Exchange. Richard is an alumnus of LSE. Brenda Trenowden (@BTrenowden) is a Partner at PwC leading the Inclusive Culture, Diversity and Purpose consulting practice. As Global Chair of the 30% Club, Brenda worked with Chairs, CEOs and leaders around the world. Brenda was listed as one of the 100 Most Influential Women in Finance for 3 years running and in 2018, was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for services to the financial sector and gender equality. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. More about this event The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.
19/04/211h 22m

Inequality: the misallocation of talent and economic development

Contributor(s): Dr Daphne Nicolitsas | Putting available talent to its best use is key for the welfare of individuals and of the society to which they belong. Unequal access to opportunity in education and labour markets tampers with the allocation of talent leading to more inequality, poverty traps and lower welfare for all. This lecture reviews recent evidence on the misallocation of talent by economic class and gender in different settings, highlighting how temporary shocks - such as the current pandemic can have permanent consequences. Meet our speakers and chair Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Professor of Economics at LSE, and a fellow of the British Academy, the Econometric Society, CEPR, BREAD and IZA. She is co-editor of Econometrica, vice-president of the European Economic Association, and director of the Gender, Growth and Labour Markets in Low-Income Countries (G²LM|LIC) programme. She serves on the council of the Econometric Society, on board of the International Growth Centre and as vice-president of the Collegio Carlo Alberto. Aristides N. Hatzis is Professor of Philosophy of Law and Theory of Institutions at the University of Athens. He is the Director of Research at the Center for Liberal Studies-Athens, a Fellow of the Institute for Research in Economics and Fiscal Issues-Paris, and a member of the Advisory Board of the Society of European Contract Law, the Steering Committee of the European Network for Better Regulation and the Editorial Board of the European Review of Contract Law. Daphne Nicolitsas is, since Feb 2014, an Assistant Professor at the Department of Economics of the University of Crete. Prior to that she worked in economic policy related jobs and in the financial sector. Her main research interests lie in labour economics and in industrial organization, fields in which she has publications in international journals. Currently, she is co-ordinating an EU-funded project, with partners from top EU Universities, on the structure and conduct of Employers’ Associations in the EU. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory. More about this event The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. The National Bank of Greece (@NationalBankGR), backed by its 179-year participation in the country's economic and social life, is one of the leading Greek financial organisations, with strong tradition and noteworthy contribution to the economic and social transformation of Greece. The Bank’s broad customer base, respected brand name, strong market share in deposits and enhanced capital adequacy ratios secure it with the liquidity needed to finance Greek businesses and reflect the long-standing relationship of trust it enjoys with its clientele. This event forms part of the Hellenic Observatory Athens Lecture Series, co-organised with the National Bank of Greece and supported by the LSE Hellenic Alumni Association. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEAthensLectures
15/04/211h 27m

SHORTCAST | Gender and COVID-19: a feminist economic lens

Contributor(s): Professor Naila Kabeer | Join us for this first lecture in our new series organised in memory of Sylvia Chant which will be delivered by Naila Kabeer. Professor Kabeer will use a feminist economic lens to analyse a range of different impacts associated with COVID-19 and to explore the kinds of policies that such a lens would suggest for a more resilient and equitable future. Meet our speaker and chair Naila Kabeer (@N_Kabeer) is Professor of Gender and Development at the Department of Gender Studies and Department of International Development at LSE. Eric Neumayer is Professor of Environment and Development and Pro-Director (PVC) Planning and Resources at LSE. More about this event The Sylvia Chant Lectures are organised in memory of Sylvia Chant, Professor of Development Geography. The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change. LSE Gender (@LSEGenderTweet) pioneers intersectional, interdisciplinary and transnational teaching and research, addressing the tenacity of gendered power relations and gendered inequalities in times of global transformations. Established in 1993, LSE Gender is the largest Department of Gender Studies in Europe. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
01/04/2123m 22s

SHORTCAST | What We Owe Each Other: a new social contract

Contributor(s): Baroness Shafik, Juan Manuel Santos, Professor Amartya Sen | What should a social contract for the 21st century look like? Launching her new book, What We Owe Each Other, LSE Director Minouche Shafik draws on evidence from across the globe to identify key principles for a social contract for every society. She will be in conversation with Juan Manuel Santos and Amartya Sen. The social contract governs all aspects of society, from politics and law to our families and communities. Accelerating changes in technology, demography, climate and global health, as we have seen over the last year, will reshape our world in ways we have yet to fully grasp. How do we pool risks, share resources and balance individual with collective responsibility? What part do we each have to play? You can order the book, What We Owe Each Other: a new social contract, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Meet our speakers and chair Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Baroness Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. In 2020 the UK Government announced that she would be made a Life Peer in the House of Lords. Juan Manuel Santos Calderón (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. He was Colombia’s first Foreign Trade Minister, has been Minister of Finance and before being elected President, was Minister for National Defence. Prior to entering politics, President Santos was deputy director of El Tiempo newspaper, and wrote a weekly opinion column. He was awarded the King of Spain International Journalism Award and named president of the Freedom of Expression Commission for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA). In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. His research has ranged over social choice theory, economic theory, ethics and political philosophy, welfare economics, theory of measurement, decision theory, development economics, public health, and gender studies. Amartya Sen’s books have been translated into more than thirty languages and his awards include the Nobel Prize in Economics. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and British Academy. He is also a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Economic Association and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
01/04/2119m 40s

The Psychology of Intergroup Inequality

Contributor(s): Professor Jim Sidanius | The Black Lives Matter and #MeToo movements have led to a renewed focus on the persistence of inequality along the lines of race, gender, and their intersection. Political psychology attempts to shed light on this through connecting individual behaviour to wider institutional and ideological dynamics. On the eve of the completion of an updated edition of his now classic text, Social Dominance: An Intergroup Theory of Hierarchy and Oppression, political psychologist Jim Sidanius will present some of his latest ideas on the psychological foundations of intergroup inequality, followed by a conversation on their relevance to twenty-first century struggles for social justice. Meet our speaker and chair Jim Sidanius is the John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in memory of William James and of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington (@jsskeffington) is an Assistant Professor in the department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. More about this event The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.
31/03/211h 10m

Race and Democracy in America

Contributor(s): Professor Khalil Gibran Muhammad | A discussion about race and racial inequity in the United States, past and present. Meet our speaker and chair Khalil Gibran Muhammad (@KhalilGMuhammad) is Professor of History, Race and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies. He is the former Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a division of the New York Public Library and the world’s leading library and archive of global black history. Khalil’s scholarship examines the broad intersections of race, democracy, inequality and criminal justice in modern U.S. history. He is author of The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America (Harvard), which won the 2011 John Hope Franklin Best Book award in American Studies. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. More about this event The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSRace
30/03/211h 2m

Empires Past & Present: empire around 1900

Contributor(s): Professor Odd Arne Westad | In this series of four lectures, the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, Odd Arne Westad, discusses the concept of empire and why it is still relevant today. Even if the Europeans had deemed the 19th century a “long peace”, the world had changed tremendously between 1800 and 1900. Of the 1800 powers only a few remained strong, and they were all European. But, at the same time, the concept of empire was changing, and new forms of anti-imperial resistance was starting to grow. This third lecture will discuss high imperialisms, their relationship to globalising capitalism, and how a destabilised European world initiated the tragedies of the 20th century. Meet our speaker and chair Odd Arne Westad is the Engelsberg Chair for 2020/21 at LSE IDEAS. He is currently the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, and is a former director of LSE IDEAS. Christopher Coker is Director of LSE IDEAS. More about this event A podcast of the first lecture can be found at Empires Past & Present: the idea of empire. The second lecture, Empires Past and Present: empire around 1800, took place on 26 January, a podcast is available. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEngelsberg
30/03/211h 27m

Drugs and Development Policies: a discussion with the Global Commission on Drug Policy

Contributor(s): Kgalema Motlanthe, Ruth Dreifuss, Helen Clark, Juan Manuel Santos Calderón | In the last decade, the negative consequences of the international drug control regime based on repression and coercion have increasingly become visible barriers to sustainable development. Despite important reforms and paradigm changes in certain countries and regions, drug policies still pose serious challenges to the international development objectives. These consequences range from negative outcomes in control of infectious diseases, in access to controlled pain relief, in over incarceration and disproportionality of sentencing targeting certain populations, to breaches in the rule of law as drug laws are not complied with. These consequences are visible and dire at all levels of governance, and affect the most marginalized populations first. What can be done to mitigate the negative consequences of drug policies on development, and what reforms are suggested? This high-level discussion will explore the experiences of four former heads of state or government, from four regions in the world, to discuss the medium and long-term solutions to the harms created by current drug control policies. Meet our speakers and chair Juan Manuel Santos Calderón (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. He was Colombia’s first Foreign Trade Minister, has been Minister of Finance and before being elected President, was Minister for National Defence. Prior to entering politics, President Santos was deputy director of El Tiempo newspaper, and wrote a weekly opinion column. He was awarded the King of Spain International Journalism Award and named president of the Freedom of Expression Commission for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA). In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders, a member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975. Helen Clark (@HelenClarkNZ) is a global leader on sustainable development, gender equality and international co-operation. She served three successive terms as Prime Minister of New Zealand between 1999 and 2008. She then became the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator for two terms from 2009 to 2017, the first woman to lead the organisation. She was also the Chair of the United Nations Development Group, a committee consisting of the Heads of all UN funds, programmes and departments working on development issues. In 2019 Helen Clark became patron of The Helen Clark Foundation. In 2020, she was elected chair of the Global Commission on Drug Policy. Ruth Dreifuss was elected Federal Councillor in 1993 by the Federal Assembly, and was re-elected twice. From 1993 to her resignation in 2002, she was Head of the Federal Department of Home Affairs, in charge of public health and social insurance. During the year 1999, Ruth Dreifuss was President of the Swiss Confederation. After her retirement from government, she chaired the commission mandated by WHO that reported on public health, innovation and intellectual property rights, and co-chaired the High Level Panel on Access to Medicines, mandated by the United Nations Secretary-General. Ruth Dreifuss is member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy, which she chaired from 2016 to 2020. She also serves as a member of the International Commission against the Death Penalty. Kgalema Motlanthe was elected President of the Republic of South Africa by the Parliament in September 2008, a position he held until 9 May 2009. He was appointed by President Jacob Zuma to serve as the Deputy President. He served in that position from 11 May 2009 until 24 May 2014. Motlanthe also served two five-year terms as Secretary General of the ANC from December 1997 to December 2007, and was the Deputy President of the African National Congress from December 2007 to December 2012. He now heads the Kgalema Motlanthe Foundation that was established when he left office of government and is a member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. He was the Minister of Finance in Chile between 2006 and 2010 and has held professorial roles at the Harvard Kennedy School and Columbia University´s School of International and Public Affairs. More about this event The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The purpose of The Global Commission on Drug Policy (@globalcdp) is to bring to the international level an informed, science-based discussion about humane and effective ways to reduce the harm caused by drugs and drug control policies to people and societies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPolicy
29/03/211h 33m

The Power to Say Yes, The Right to Say No

Contributor(s): Dr Natalia Kanem | Natalia Kanem, Executive Director of UNFPA, the United Nations sexual and reproductive health agency, will discuss why bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights are fundamental to advancing human dignity and equality, prosperity and peace, and sustainable development that leaves no one behind. Meet our speaker and chair Natalia Kanem (@Atayeshe) is United Nations Under-Secretary General and Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (@UNFPA). UNFPA is the United Nations sexual and reproductive health and rights agency. Appointed by United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres in 2017, Dr. Kanem has more than 30 years of strategic leadership experience in the fields of preventive medicine, public and reproductive health, social justice and philanthropy. She started her research career in academia with the Johns Hopkins and Columbia University schools of medicine and public health. Rishita Nandagiri is an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Methodology at LSE. Her doctoral research (Department of Social Policy, LSE; 2019) was a multimethod study investigating women’s abortion-related trajectories to care in Karnataka, India. She was previously an LSE Fellow in Health and International Development at the Department of International Development. More about this event The Global Health Initiative (@LSEGlobalHealth) is a cross-departmental research platform set up to increase the coherence and visibility of Global Health research activity across the School, both internally and externally. It provides support for interdisciplinary engagement and showcases LSE’s ability to apply rigorous social science research to emerging global health challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHealth
29/03/211h 0m

Tackling the COVID-19 Pandemic of Inequality to Build a Green, Inclusive, & Resilient Recovery

Contributor(s): David R. Malpass | Join World Bank Group President David Malpass, ahead of the Spring Meetings, at the London School of Economics and Political Science as he discusses what is needed to build a green, inclusive, and resilient recovery from the pandemic. The crisis has worsened inequality and disproportionately impacted the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly women and children. In his conversation with Minouche Shafik, Director of LSE, President Malpass will share his thoughts on accelerating a recovery that tackles growing inequalities and improves livelihoods. Meet our speaker and chair David R. Malpass (@DavidMalpassWBG) was selected as 13th President of the World Bank Group by its Board of Executive Directors on April 5, 2019. His five-year term began on April 9. Mr Malpass previously served as Under Secretary of the Treasury for International Affairs for the United States. Mr Malpass represented the United States in international settings, including the G-7 and G-20 Deputy Finance Ministerial, World Bank–IMF Spring and Annual Meetings, and meetings of the Financial Stability Board, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. More about this event This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 A transcript of David Malpass's speech is available at Tackling the COVID-19 Pandemic of Inequality to Build a Green, Inclusive, & Resilient Recovery.
29/03/2157m 28s

Think Big

Contributor(s): Dr Grace Lordan | In this event, Paul Dolan will be in conversation with Grace Lordan about her new book, Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Future You Want. In this book, drawing on cutting-edge research from behavioural science, Grace offers immediate actionable solutions and tips that will help you get closer to your dream future. Focusing on six key areas - time, goal planning, self-narratives, other people, your environment, and resilience - Dr Lordan reveals practical, science-backed life hacks that will help you get ahead. Join us in this special event, to mark the launch of Think Big where Grace will be talking about her practical framework that will keep you moving in the right direction towards any goal, even during a pandemic. You can order the book, Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Future You Want, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Meet our speaker and chair Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is an associate professor in behavioural science at LSE. Her research focuses on why some people have successful lives as compared to others because of factors beyond their own control. She is the founder and director of The Inclusion Initiative, a research centre at LSE and the author of Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Future You Want. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. More about this event The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
25/03/2159m 1s

The Hype Machine: how social media disrupts our elections, our economy and our health

Contributor(s): Professor Sinan Aral | Join us for this talk by MIT professor Sinan Aral who will draw on two decades of his own research and business experience and go under the hood of the biggest, most powerful social networks to tackle the critical question of just how much social media actually shapes our choices, for better or worse. In his new book, which he will be talking about, Aral shows how the tech behind social media offers the same set of behaviour-influencing levers to both Russian hackers and brand marketers—to everyone who hopes to change the way we think and act—which is why its consequences affect everything from elections to business, dating to health. Along the way, he covers a wide array of topics, including how network effects fuel Twitter’s and Facebook’s massive growth to the neuroscience of how social media affects our brains, the real consequences of fake news, the power of social ratings, and the impact of social media on our kids. In mapping out strategies for being more thoughtful consumers of social media, The Hype Machine offers the definitive guide to understanding and harnessing for good the technology that has redefined our world overnight. Meet our speaker and chair Sinan Aral (@sinanaral) is the David Austin Professor of Management, Marketing, IT, and Data Science at MIT; director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy; and head of MIT’s Social Analytics Lab. Edgar Whitley is an Associate Professor (Reader) of Information Systems at LSE Department of Management.
24/03/2159m 26s

A Theory of Everything?

Contributor(s): Professor Jessica Wilson, Dr Vanessa Seifert, Philip Ball | The biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky wrote that nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. Is there an even more general theory that can make sense of all the sciences? The various scientific disciplines each have their own methods, theories, and practices. This is the case even when different sciences try to explain the same phenomena. Can we translate between these distinct disciplines? What does this even mean? Might all of science be reduced to physics one day? Our panel discuss reduction, emergence, and the unity of the sciences. Meet our speakers and chair Philip Ball (@philipcball) is a science writer and Editor of Nature. Vanessa Seifert (@seifert_vanessa) is Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Bristol. Jessica Wilson is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and IRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Trinity College Dublin. More about this event The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) hosts events exploring science, politics, and culture from a philosophical perspective. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
23/03/211h 14m

Regimes of Inequality: the political economy of health and wealth

Contributor(s): Professor Julia Lynch | Inequality has become an intractable feature of the rich industrialised democracies, despite consensus among mass publics and experts that more social and economic equality is desirable. In this lecture, Julia Lynch will examine the political dynamics underlying the “new normal” of high and rising inequality since 1980. To do so, she'll trace the largely unsuccessful attempts of west European governments during this period to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in health and argue that inequality persists despite growing awareness of the harms it creates because of the way political leaders choose to talk about it — and not only because of economic necessity or demands from the electorate. Meet our speaker and chair Julia Lynch is Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on the politics of inequality, public health, and social policy in the rich democracies, particularly the countries of western Europe. Her latest book is Regimes of Inequality: The Political Economy of Health and Wealth. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Professor of Comparative Politics, in the Department of Government at LSE. You can order the book, Regimes of Inequality: The Political Economy of Health and Wealth, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. More about this event The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
23/03/211h 3m

The Left in Power: reflections on SYRIZA’s promise and achievements

Contributor(s): Euclid Tsakalotos | When SYRIZA came to power in January 2015, it promised an end to the bailouts and to austerity. After a major political struggle, it was obliged to accept new bailout terms and it spent its remaining years in office, in part, implementing its painful measures. In this conversation with Kevin Featherstone, Euclid Tsakalotos will discuss its achievements and setbacks; what lessons its experience suggests for the Left in Europe; and the future for the Left in Greece and elsewhere. Meet our speaker and chair Euclid Tsakalotos (@tsakalotos) was born in 1960. He studied Economics, Politics and Philosophy at the University of Oxford, Development at the University of Sussex, and completed his D.Phil in Economics at Oxford in 1989. He has taught at the University of Kent and Athens University of Economics and Business. Since 2010 he has been Professor of Economics at the University of Athens, and a Syriza MP since May 2012. He was Minister of Finance of the Syriza Governments from July 2015 until July 2019. He is currently serving as the Speaker of Syriza parliamentary group, and coordinator of Economic Policy of the leading opposition. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory. More about this event The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute.
22/03/211h 34m

From Subject to Citizen – And Back: crises of the republic

Contributor(s): Professor Charles Tripp | This year’s Fred Halliday Memorial Event will explore how and why the symbolic investment in republican discourse and the building of republican institutions can be so detrimental to the rights of the very public that they are meant to represent, even embody. In the construction and history of the republic, the qualities of liberty, of solidarity and of equality have been powerful affective rallying points, shaping the political imagination and holding out the promise of active citizenship. However, the practices of republics have more often than not borne out the charge of ‘organised hypocrisy’. Even where these principles have not been overturned, there remains a tension between them and the political and economic forces that demand a more disciplined, hierarchical order for the reproduction of their power. Using, by way of illustration, examples from across the Middle East and North Africa, it will nevertheless be argued that these are more universal features of the ways in which republican ideals have materialised – but at the same time, the very tensions and contradictions provide incentives and spaces for an insurgent citizenship. Meet our speaker and chair Charles Tripp is Professor Emeritus of Politics with reference to the Middle East and North Africa, and a Fellow of the British Academy. His research interests include the nature of autocracy, state and resistance in the Middle East, the politics of Islamic identity and the relationship between art and power. He is currently working on a study of the emergence of the public and the rethinking of republican ideals in Tunisia. Together with other colleagues he has been one of the founders of the Centre for Comparative Political Thought at SOAS. Karen E. Smith is Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at LSE, and is Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit. More about this event The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. The LSE Middle East Centre (@LSEMiddleEast) builds on LSE's long engagement with the Middle East and North Africa and provides a central hub for the wide range of research on the region carried out at LSE. Find out more about the Fred Halliday memorial lecture series. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHalliday
22/03/211h 29m

Celebrating Ruth Bader Ginsburg 1933-2020

Contributor(s): Professor Anne Phillips, Dr Mona Pinchis-Paulsen, Kelsi Brown Corkran | Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg served on the Supreme Court of the United States for 27 years, the first Jewish woman to do so, and only the second woman in the court’s history. During her tenure, she carved out an extraordinary place in American legal history, as well as a unique standing in popular culture as a passionate and fearless defender of liberal principles in general and of gender equality in particular. At this event, our panelists will celebrate her achievements and assess her legacy. Meet our speakers and chair Kelsi Brown Corkran (@KelsiCorkran) is a former law clerk to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, based in Washington, DC. She recently joined Georgetown University Law Center as a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy & Protection, where she focuses on civil rights litigation in the United States Supreme Court; before that, she was the head of the Supreme Court practice at Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe. Kelsi recently argued two significant civil rights cases before the Supreme Court, and she has argued over 30 cases in the courts of appeals. Prior to joining Orrick, Kelsi was with the Civil Appellate Staff at the U.S. Department of Justice, and she also worked in the White House Communications Office under President Obama, where she assisted with judicial nominations, including the confirmation hearings of Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Mona Pinchis-Paulsen (@loyaladvisor) joined LSE in 2020 as Assistant Professor in International Economic Law. She holds a Ph.D. in International Economic Law from The Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London and a LL.M. in International Law from The George Washington University School of Law. Mona teaches and researches in the fields of public international law, international trade law, economic development, and international investment law and arbitration. She is part of the managing editorial team for World Trade Review and is co-chair of a seminar series on International Economic Law & Policy, based in London. Prior to joining LSE, Mona was Teaching Fellow for the International Economic Law, Business, and Policy LL.M. Program at Stanford Law School. Anne Phillips is the Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science in the Department of Government. She joined LSE in 1999 as Professor of Gender Theory, and was Director of the Gender Institute until September 2004. She subsequently moved to a joint appointment between the Gender Institute and Government Department, and later to a sole appointment in Government. Her most influential work is The Politics of Presence: the Political Representation of Gender, Race, and Culture (1995). She is currently writing a book on Unconditional Equality. Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy. From 1998 to 2010 she held a Chair in Criminal Law and Legal Theory at LSE; she returned to LSE in 2013 after spending three years as Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, and Professor of Criminal Law and Legal Theory at the University of Oxford. More about this event The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. The Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Our community is one of the largest in the School, and has played a major role in policy debates, policy-making and the education of lawyers and law teachers globally.
18/03/211h 26m

Getting Developing Asia Back on Track

Contributor(s): Masatsugu Asakawa | Asia has successfully transitioned from a low-income agrarian region in the 1960s to a global manufacturing powerhouse today, driving growth around the world. COVID-19 is threatening to turn back the clock on some of that progress. Policy makers in the region are striving to regain and sustain growth momentum. The Asian Development Bank stands ready to help its developing members toward the path of resilient and sustainable recovery through deeper regional cooperation, inclusive human resource development, green infrastructure, accelerated digitalization, and stronger domestic resource mobilization. Meet our speaker and chair Masatsugu Asakawa is the President of the Asian Development Bank (@adb_hq) and the Chairperson of ADB’s Board of Directors. He was elected President by ADB’s Board of Governors and assumed office on 17 January 2020. Prior to joining ADB, he served as Special Advisor to Japan’s Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, and has a close-to-four decades’ career at the Ministry of Finance with diverse professional experiences that cut across both domestic and international fronts. Hyun Bang Shin (@urbancommune) is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies, Department of Geography and Environment, and Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre at LSE. More about this event The Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre (@LSESEAC) is a multidisciplinary Research Centre of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). It develops and fosters academic and policy-oriented research, drawing on a rich network of experts across disciplines at LSE and beyond, while serving as a globally recognised hub for promoting dialogue and engagement with Southeast Asia and the world.
18/03/211h 55m

How Much is Your Health Worth? The Human and Economic Value of Health in the Era of COVID-19

Contributor(s): Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Professor Mariana Mazzucato, Dr Clare Wenham | As part of our online public events programme, we are pleased to invite you to a unique session with: Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization; Mariana Mazzucato, Chair of the WHO Council on the Economics of Health for All and Professor of the Economics of Innovation and Public Value at University College London (UCL) and author of Mission Economy: A Moonshot Guide to Changing Capitalism; and Clare Wenham, Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at LSE. The COVID-19 pandemic has posed extraordinary challenges to all sectors of society and underscored the centrality of human health and well-being to the very survival of economies and societies at large. It has exposed the great social disparities and inequities found in communities worldwide, including racial, gender and financial, and highlighted the critical need for global solidarity and multilateralism to drive a fair and just response that reaches all. This discussion, to be chaired by Minouche Shafik, Director of LSE, will explore the human and economic value of health with Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the Director-General of the World Health Organization, and Mariana Mazzucato, the Chair of the newly formed WHO Council on the Economics of Health for All. It will also demonstrate the need for investing in a wide range of essential sectors, from preparedness and universal health coverage to equitable delivery of vaccines, in order to enable people to attain the highest levels of health and wellbeing, and for countries and economies to be able both thrive as well as withstand shocks caused by health crises like COVID-19. Meet our speakers and chair Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus (@DrTedros) is the Director-General of the World Health Organization and was elected to the post in May 2017. Dr Tedros is the first WHO Director-General to have been elected from multiple candidates by the World Health Assembly, and is the first person from the WHO African Region to serve in the role. After taking office, Dr Tedros outlined five key priorities for the Organization: universal health coverage; health emergencies; women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health; health impacts of climate and environmental change; and a transformed WHO. Prior to his election, Dr Tedros served as Ethiopia’s Minister of Foreign Affairs from 2012–2016, and Minister of Health from 2005–2012. Mariana Mazzucato (@MazzucatoM) is Professor in the Economics of Innovation and Public Value at University College London (UCL), where she is Founding Director of the Institute for Innovation & Public Purpose (IIPP). She is the author of three highly acclaimed books: The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths, The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy and Mission Economy: A Moonshot Guide to Changing Capitalism. She advises policy makers around the world on innovation-led, inclusive and sustainable growth. Clare Wenham (@clarewenham) is Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at LSE. She specialises in global health security, the politics and policy of pandemic preparedness and outbreak response. She has researched this for over a decade, through influenza, Ebola and Zika. Her research poses questions of global governance, the role of WHO and World Bank, national priorities and innovative financing for pandemic control. More recently she has been examining the role of women in epidemics and associated policy. For COVID-19, Clare is Co-Principal Investigator on a grant from the CIHR and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation analysing the gendered dimensions of the outbreak. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.
17/03/211h 29m

Embedding Health Policy into Broader Economic Thinking

Contributor(s): Lord O’Neill | Diseases present us with obvious health costs, but there are significant economic costs to illness too. Investing more in health systems and disease prevention, including the use of modern technologies and diagnostics, would not only allow us to cope with future health challenges, but possibly reduce the cost of maintaining and responding to ongoing health care. In this talk, Jim O’Neill will discuss the need to embed health policy in broader economic thinking, reflecting on his experience working in Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and his observations about COVID-19. Meet our speaker and chair Jim O’Neill is Chair of Chatham House. His previous roles include, joint head of research at Goldman Sachs (1995–2000), its chief economist (2001–10) and chairman of its asset management division (2010–13); chair of the City Growth Commission (2014) commercial secretary to the Treasury (2015-16). He is a board member, and one of the founding trustees of educational charity SHINE. Lord O’Neill was created a life peer in 2015 and serves as a crossbench member of the House of Lords. He is an honorary professor of economics, University of Manchester, and holds honorary degrees from the University of Sheffield, University of Manchester, University of London and from City University London. He received his PhD from the University of Surrey and is now a Visiting Professor there. Jim chaired the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance [AMR] from 2014-16. He also recently joined a new EU/WHO Commission on COVID-19. Alistair McGuire is Head of Department and Chair of Health Economics in the Department of Health Policy. His research interests cover all topics in health economics, including international comparisons, economics of the hospital, public/private sector interface and cost-effectiveness analysis of health technologies. More about this event The Department of Health Policy (@LSEHealthPolicy) trains and inspires people passionate about health by advancing and challenging their understanding of health systems and the social, economic and political contexts in which they operate.
16/03/2157m 9s

The Future of Work in Africa

Contributor(s): Professor Kenneth Amaeshi, Kojo Boakye, Oyin Solebo, Sharmi Surianarain, Dr David Luke | Africa is a 1.2 billion person market on the cusp of dramatic and transformative growth. It is adopting new technology and fostering new entrepreneurial ventures to address challenges to its development. At the same time, it is the continent with the largest rate of population growth with the number estimated to double by 2050. With this growing population, there is a challenge of addressing youth unemployment as it is estimated that 18 million new jobs need to be created annually in order to compensate for the youth that will be entering into the labour market. Currently 3 million are made annually. Along with this, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the state of work on the continent has changed. The tourism and service sector has been hit the worst, and employers are looking for new ways to increase productivity, engage with new customers, and grow their business. In order to do this new ideas and skills are needed from employees to promote this transition and to attract investors that will help unlock Africa's economic future. With this, new conversations are occurring around what measures African nations need to take to address the new terrain in their countries. Many innovative organisations are working to establish pathways for young people into employment and to help Africa capitalise on their fast-growing economies. In order to meet the needs of the coming decade to build profitable, and sustainable enterprises, executives need to meet challenges with innovation, and job-seekers will need to develop the skill-sets necessary to meet the unmet market demands. Meet our speakers and chair Kenneth Amaeshi (@kenamaeshi) is the Chair in Business and Sustainable Development and Director of the Sustainable Business Initiative at Edinburgh. He joined the University of Edinburgh in 2010 following a career in management consultancy. Kenneth's research interest currently focuses on sector-level policies for sustainability and sustainability strategy in organisations. He has an expert level knowledge of developing and emerging economies. He has an extensive network in Africa. He was recently a Scholar in Residence at the National Pension Commission, Nigeria, and is currently a Visiting Professor of Strategy and Governance at the Lagos Business School, Nigeria. Kojo Boakye is Facebook’s Director of Public Policy for Africa. He’s an experienced ICT for Development Practitioner, with 15+ years’ experience working with governments, fixed-line and mobile operators, development partners, online service providers, content developers and civil society organisations. Before joining Facebook, he was the Deputy Director of the Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI), and the Head Research and Consultancy at the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation (CTO) prior to that. Oyin Solebo (@OyinSolebo) is a co-founder of the organisation MoveMeBack. Movemeback aspires to drive positive economic and social growth in Africa by providing a platform through which individuals, organisations and institutions across the world interact and partner with Africa. Oyin was previously an Investment Associate at Goldman Sachs and a Strategy Consultant for Roland Berger's Sub-Saharan Africa, Financial Services Team. Sharmi Surianarain serves as the Chief Impact Officer, Harambee Youth Accelerator in South Africa. Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator develops African solutions for the global challenge of youth unemployment. Sharmi brings extensive experience in human capital management, education, and facilitating links to employment across Africa, India, and the United States. She served as Vice President of Lifelong Engagement at the African Leadership Academy (ALA). Sharmi is an Aspen African Leadership Initiative Fellow, Class of 2020 and sits on the Boards of Ongoza, Metis and is on the Advisory Council for the NextGen Ecosystem Builders Africa 2020. David Luke (@DavidLukeTrade) has recently joined LSE as a Professor in Practice in the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (FLCA) and oversees the new Africa Trade Policy Programme at the FLCA. He is Coordinator of the African Trade Policy Centre at the UN Economic Commission for Africa with the rank of a director at the Commission. Prior to joining ECA in 2014, he served as UNDP trade policy adviser in Southern Africa and Geneva and also as Senior Economist and Chief of Trade at the Organization for African Unity/African Union Commission, and as an Associate Professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. Tim Allen is the inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa, and is a Professor in Development Anthropology in the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. More about this event As part of the Africa Talks series by the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (FLCA) and in collaboration with Movemeback, a community connecting overseas leaders, influencers, talent and organisations to unique, exclusive and exciting high potential opportunities on the African continent, this event marks the announcement of the AEP Careers Transition Lab initiative launched by Africa Engagement Programme at FLCA. The Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre connects social sciences disciplines and works in partnership with Africa to bring African voices to global debates. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
16/03/211h 31m

Is Europe White? Assessing the Role of Whiteness in Europe Today

Contributor(s): Dr Jean Beaman, Dr Neema Begum, Professor David Theo Goldberg | In the form of white privilege, ‘colour-blindness’ and supremacy, how does whiteness shape individual lives and European societies alike? This event will explore the role of whiteness in Europe and for European identities. Meet our speakers and chair Jean Beaman (@jean23bean) is Associate Professor of Sociology, affiliated with Political Science, Feminist Studies, Global Studies, and the Center for Black Studies Research at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Previously, she was faculty at Purdue University and held visiting fellowships at Duke University and the European University Institute (Florence, Italy). Her research is ethnographic in nature and focuses on race/ethnicity, racism, international migration, and state-sponsored violence in both France and the United States. She is author of Citizen Outsider: Children of North African Immigrants in France (University of California Press, 2017), as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Her current book project is on suspect citizenship and belonging, anti-racist mobilization, and activism against police violence in France. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Northwestern University. She is also an Editor of H-Net Black Europe, an Associate Editor of the journal, Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, and Corresponding Editor for the journal Metropolitics/Metropolitiques. Neema Begum (@NeemaBegum) is Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Manchester Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity (CoDE). Her research is on the voting behaviour, political attitudes and representation of British Black and Asian people. Her PhD was on British ethnic minority attitudes towards European integration and their voting behaviour in the Brexit referendum. David Theo Goldberg (@theodavid) is Director of the systemwide University of California Humanities Research Institute. He is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature, Anthropology, and Criminology, Law, and Society at UC Irvine. His work ranges over issues of social, political, and critical theory, race and racism, the future of the university, and digital technology. His numerous books include Are We All Postracial Yet? (Polity, 2015), and Dread: Facing Futureless Futures (Polity, July 2021). Earlier in his career, he produced independent films and music videos (some of which aired on MTV), and co-directed the award-winning short film on South Africa, The Island. Jennifer Jackson-Preece is Associate Professor in Nationalism at LSE's European Institute and Department of International Relations. More about this event The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. This event is part of the LSE European Institute Series: 'Beyond Eurocentrism’. This event series aims to explore how the shape and shaping of Europe – its political-economy, its political policy making, or its political culture – needs to be rethought in a time of the exhaustion of Eurocentrism.
15/03/211h 31m

Social Solidarity and the Virus

Contributor(s): Tim Dixon, Professor Kate Pickett | Has the sudden, intense common experience of the virus crisis generated a reservoir of social solidarity? How have public attitudes and political culture shifted and what is the significance of these changes for progressive politics? Meet our speaker and chair Tim Dixon (@dixontim) co-founded the More in Common organisation, and was previously an economic adviser and chief speechwriter for two Prime Ministers. He was born in Australia and trained and worked as an economist and a lawyer in the tech sector, as well as founding an educational publishing business that was acquired by Pearson. For the past decade he has worked between the UK and the US, establishing several nonprofits and social movement organisations, working to unite divided societies and strengthen democracy. He has jointly authored eight national reports published by More in Common since 2017. Kate Pickett (@ProfKEPickett) is Professor of Epidemiology and Deputy Director of the Centre for Future Health at the University of York. She is a co-founder of The Equality Trust and Chair of the Greater Manchester Independent Inequalities Commission. With Richard Wilkinson, she is the co-author of The Spirit Level (2009), and The Inner Level (2018). Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme.
15/03/211h 29m

SHORTCAST | Going for Growth

Contributor(s): Professor John Van Reenen | How can the UK and the world get back to sustainable growth following the COVID-19 pandemic? Pulling together the lessons of 30 years of work on technology, management and productivity, John Van Reenen will argue that innovation is the key to rekindling our economies. Meet our speaker and chair John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Ronald Coase School Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science and was previously Director of CEP from 2003-2016. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. More about this event The Centre for Economic Performance (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at LSE. Established by the ESRC in 1990, pit is now one of the leading applied economic research groups in Europe. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
12/03/2123m 33s

SHORTCAST | Beveridge 2.0 The Supportive State

Contributor(s): Jonathan Reynolds | The COVID-19 emergency is testing the protective capacity of welfare states in the most dramatic way. In virtue of their scale and nature, only the state can respond to on-going challenges, but policy responses need to be understood in relation to the capacity of different systems to provide protection and support. Prior to the COVID crisis, recent years had seen a growing debate around different approaches to address human needs: these differed in a variety of ways – in terms of type and coverage of provision, level of generosity and conditionality arrangements – which in turn reflected different priorities and policy goals. The new issue of the LSE Public Policy Review, ‘Beveridge 2.0: The Supportive State’ discusses a range of these approaches, from Universal Basic Income and Universal Capital Grants to Universal Basic Services. It also addresses the radical changes that have affected the development of social security systems and tries to understand contemporary challenges to provide human security more broadly. Further information about the event and how to attend is available via the LSE Events. A podcast of this event is available to download here.   Chair: Professor Tony Travers Associate DeanSchool of Public Policy, LSE Respondent: Jonathan Reynolds Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Guests: Professor Oriana Bandiera Sir Anthony Atkinson Professor of EconomicsDepartment of Economics, LSE Professor Julian LeGrand Professor of Social PolicyMarshall Institute for Philanthropy and Social Entrepeneurship, LSE Dr Abigail McKnight DirectorCentre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE   The LSE Public Policy Review issue 'The Supportive State' is now available online here with contributions from: Nidhi Parekh and Oriana Bandiera (Economics, LSE) David Piachaud (Social Policy, LSE) Maitreesh Ghatak and Xavier Jaravel (Economics, LSE) Malcolm Torry (Social Policy, LSE) Julian Le Grand (Marshall Institute, LSE) Ian Gough (Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion/ Grantham Institute, LSE) Mary Kaldor (International Development, LSE) The Beveridge 2.0 Redifining the Social Contract is programme hosted by the School of Public Policy that aims at bringing the LSE community together with the intent of exploring important policy questions, fostering dialogue across disciplines and identifying avenues for collaborative cross-disciplinary research.
12/03/2122m 50s

Women in International Thought

Contributor(s): Shruti Balaji, Professor Michael Cox, Professor Patricia Owens | There is a rich history of scholarly work by women on International Relations that has often been ignored in the discipline. This event, taking place shortly after International Women’s Day, will uncover and explore women’s often foundational role in thinking about international politics. Meet our speakers and chair Shruti Balaji (@shrutibalaji1) is a PhD researcher in the International Relations Department at LSE, working on Indian women international thinkers in the late colonial period in India (c. 1920-50). Michael Cox is Emeritus Professor of International Relations whose most recent work includes an introduction to a centennial edition of J.M Keynes’s The Economic Consequences of the Peace. He is currently working on a history of International Relations at LSE. Patricia Owens is Director of the Leverhulme Research Project, Women and the History of International Thought (@leverhulmewhit) and co-editor with Katharaina Rietzler of Women’s International Thought: A New History You can order the book, Women's International Thought: A New History, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Karen E. Smith is Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at LSE, and is Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit. More about this event The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. It is ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies.
10/03/2159m 19s

A Brief History of Equality

Contributor(s): Professor Thomas Piketty | Will the Covid-19 pandemic fuel social demand for equality and economic justice? In this lecture, Thomas Piketty offers a refreshing perspective on the historical rise of equality from the 18th century until the early 21st century. The primary determinants of inequality regimes across societies, Piketty argues, are political and ideological, rather than economic or technological. If we remember lessons as to how societies handled past inequality crisis, it is possible to pursue the long-run trend toward equality. Meet our speaker and chair LSE alumnus Thomas Piketty (@PikettyLeMonde) is Professor at EHESS and the Paris School of Economics. He is the author of numerous research articles and of a dozen books. He has done historical and theoretical work on the interplay between economic development, the distribution of income and wealth, and political conflict. He is also co-director of the World Inequality Lab and the World Inequality Database. He is the author of the international best-sellers Capital in the 21st Century (2014) and Capital and Ideology (2020). Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission and, for 2018, is President of the Econometric Society. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and British Academy. He is also a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Economic Association and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. More about this event The Economica Coase lecture series (after Ronald Coase's celebrated work on the theory of the firm published in Economica) was inaugurated in 2007. Economica (@EconomicaLSE) is an international peer-reviewed academic journal covering research in all branches of economics. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching.
10/03/211h 3m

UK Market Regulation After Brexit: higher, lower or stay the same?

Contributor(s): Minette Batters, Tony Danker, Professor Sam Fankhauser, Frances O'Grady | How best can the UK economy compete in the world of the future? What model of market regulation should we seek and can we realistically attain? And, over what time scale? How far might the UK’s strategy be blown off course by wider, exogenous pressures or by domestic pushback? What accommodation should we seek in regulatory standards with our external partners? The panel will discuss the prospects for the future, the opportunities and the threats. Meet our speakers and chair Minette Batters (@Minette_Batters) is the President of the National Farmers Union of England and Wales. She has been an NFU member from grassroots through to County Chairman; she served as Wiltshire’s Council delegate and also as Regional Board Chairman for the South West. Minette has also been a member of NFU Governance Board and served as NFU deputy president for four years from 2014 to 2018, before being elected as president in February 2018. Tony Danker (@tonydanker) is the Director-General of CBI. Prior to this, Tony was the first CEO of Be the Business, a business-led movement created to transform UK’s productivity founded by a group of FTSE-100 Chairmen and the former Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne. From 2010-2017 Tony was International Director, then Chief Strategy Officer, at Guardian News & Media. Prior to that, he was a Policy Advisor HM Government (2008-10), joining the Cabinet Office and HM Treasury. Sam Fankhauser (@SamFankhauser) is Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change at LSE. As part of this role, he also directs the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) and the Place-based Climate Action Network (PCAN), funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). In January 2013, Frances O'Grady (@FrancesOGrady) became the General Secretary of the TUC, the first woman ever to hold this post. Before the TUC, Frances worked for the Transport and General Workers Union. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Programme, 'Brexit and Beyond'. The LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond is a dedicated series to stimulate the public debate and informed discussion about this most pivotal topic. It comprises a variety of events, targeting LSE staff and students, as well as the general public and specific categories of policy-makers, practitioners and professionals working on Brexit; with the aim of continuing to shape the discussion surrounding its complex and uncertain agenda. The Programme is organised by LSE's European Institute and School of Public Policy. The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
09/03/211h 33m

Safety Culture: what can the post-COVID world learn from high-risk industries

Contributor(s): Dr Tom Reader | In the post-COVID world, companies (and indeed societies) will need to develop a culture that allows them to maximise productivity whilst retaining safety. How might the principles developed for managing safety in high-risk industries help organisations successfully balance these twin aims? Organisations in high-risk domains, like aviation, energy and healthcare, have been managing risks around productivity and safety for many years. It is a tricky balance to reach: they must prioritise safety in order to not jeopardise operations, yet to remain solvent and successful they must also focus on productivity, and thus manage risk.   Meet our speaker Tom Reader is an Associate Professor of Organisational Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) at LSE. He directs the MSc in Organisational and Social Psychology, leads an MSc and Executive course on Organisational Culture, and is a chartered psychologist. This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week.
09/03/219m 7s

Shaping the Post-COVID City

Contributor(s): Professor Tony Travers, Kieron Boyle | How can policy makers and urban health leaders plan through this uncertainty, and how can those plans help to address the changing nature of and existing inequalities in urban health? To explore this question, we focus on a scenario planning approach undertaken by the Guys’ and St Thomas’ Charity and LSE Cities. Developed using a combination of social and spatial data analysis, existing research, and community input, we will discuss the five scenarios, or imagined futures, and what each might mean for urban health policymaking in years to come. Living in cities has always carried distinct health challenges. Not only has COVID-19 emphasised issues of poor-quality housing and the importance of access to adequate green spaces, it has also challenged many of the previously considered health benefits of urban life: good public transport links, better employment options, and access to culture and leisure opportunities. The effects of the pandemic in cities have not been experienced equally and it is vital to remember that those worst affected often have little option over whether they live in cities or not. Meet our speakers and chair Kieron Boyle (@KieronJBoyle) is Chief Executive at the Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy and Director of LSE London at LSE. Suzanne Hall (@SuzanneHall12) is Associate Professor in Sociology and Director of the Cities Programme at LSE. More about the event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. LSE Cities (@LSECities) studies how people and cities interact in a rapidly urbanising world, focusing on how the design of cities impacts on society, culture and the environment. Through research, conferences, teaching and projects, the centre aims to shape new thinking and practice on how to make cities fairer and more sustainable for the next generation of urban dwellers, who will make up some 70 per cent of the global population by 2050. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
06/03/211h 0m

Not Suitable for Work

Contributor(s): Dr Odul Bozkurt, Professor Brian O'Connor, Professor Judy Wajcman | When it comes to work, is less more? Our panel discuss whether work is making us bad citizens and unhappy humans. Is there something to be said for being idle? Bertrand Russell wrote that "immense harm is caused by the belief that work is virtuous". In more recent times, organisations from Microsoft to the Wellcome Trust have experimented with a four-day week, and advocates argue that shorter working weeks will solve everything from unemployment to the gender pay gap. Brian O’Connor has recently argued that idleness allows us to be truly free. Meet our speakers and chair Odul Bozkurt (@OdulBozkurt) is Senior Lecturer in International Human Resource Management at the University of Sussex. Brian O'Connor is Professor of Philosophy at University College Dublin. Judy Wajcman (@jwajcman1) is Anthony Giddens Professor of Sociology at LSE. Sarah Fine (@DrSJFine) is Forum Fellow and Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at King's College London. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organisation that hosts weekly events exploring science, politics, and the arts from a philosophical perspective.
06/03/2158m 56s

After COVID, What Next for Urban Humanitarian Responses?

Contributor(s): Romola Sanyal | What lessons have been learned from the pandemic in managing humanitarian responses in urban settings? How can we harness this to create a more just world where rights and dignity become the cornerstones of practice? The pandemic has had significant effects on vulnerable populations, particularly the urban poor, migrant and displaced populations around the world. They have not only been victims of the virus, but lockdowns, travel restrictions and economic downturns have severely impacted their livelihoods. Displaced populations are particularly affected due to their precarious legal and socio-political situations in many cities around the world. Meet our speaker Romola Sanyal is Associate Professor in Urban Geography and Program Director of BA Geography at LSE. This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, urban, cities, humanitarianism, equity, health, wellbeing, poverty.
05/03/219m 11s

Humans, Animals and Pandemics: what needs to change?

Contributor(s): Dr Jonathan Birch | What steps to improve animal welfare do governments need to take to save humanity from a catastrophe that may be far greater than the ongoing COVID disaster? Governments around the world have long identified an influenza pandemic as one of the greatest risks they face. Enduring a coronavirus pandemic will do virtually nothing to reduce that risk - unless it leads to a step change in the precautions we take against it. Measures previously seen as proportionate can now be seen, in light of COVID-19, to be far too weak. From banning live-animal markets to incentivising reductions in meat consumption, Jonathan Birch argues that the cost of compensating those affected by a range of (previously seen as unreasonable) measures will be less costly than managing another pandemic. Meet our speaker Jonathan Birch is an Associate Professor in LSE's Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, specializing in the philosophy of the biological sciences. Let us know what you think or ask Jonathan a question after you have watched the film via Twitter @birchlse #LSEFestival Further reading: Preventing the next pandemic - Zoonotic diseases and how to break the chain of transmission (UN Environment Programme report) This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, pandemics, models, predictions, animals, farming, intensive farming, probability, future pandemics.
05/03/219m 37s

Accelerating Gender Equality in India post-COVID

Contributor(s): Farzana Afridi, Diva Dhar | To mark International Women’s Day 2021, we explore how India can adopt more gender inclusive policy planning and implementation to manage the impact of COVID-19. Meet our speakers and chair Farzana Afridi is Lead Academic for IGC India and an Associate Professor in the Economics and Planning Unit at the Indian Statistical Institute in Delhi. Her areas of interest are education, health, gender, and political economy. Diva Dhar (@diva_dhar) is a Senior Program Officer with the Gender Equality team at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, where she leads a portfolio of grants on gender data, measurement and evidence with a focus on East Africa and South Asia. She was previously with the Measurement, Learning and Evaluation team at the Gates Foundation, leading work on health, nutrition, youth and gender in India. Prior to joining the foundation, Diva worked for over a decade in public policy evaluation research, capacity building and use for J-PAL, Innovations for Poverty Action, World Bank, Planning Commission of India and other non-profit organizations. Naila Kabeer (@N_Kabeer) is Professor of Gender and Development at the Department of Gender Studies and Department of International Development. Her research interests include gender, poverty, social exclusion, labour markets and livelihoods, social protection and citizenship and much of her research is focused on South and South East Asia. Naila is currently involved in ERSC-DIFD Funded Research Projects on Gender and Labour Market dynamics in Bangladesh and India. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. The International Growth Centre (@The_IGC) aims to promote sustainable growth in developing countries by providing demand-led policy advice based on frontier research. Access IGC's COVID-19 webpage for research content and policymaker resources. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
05/03/2158m 16s

How to Harness Data to improve your Decision-making and Increase your Probability of Success

Contributor(s): Dr James Abdey | Data-driven decision-making and the ability to communicate a large amount of information to audiences efficiently are vital in any industry. Bringing data to life in meaningful ways can identify important trends, patterns, relationships, and anomalies that facilitate successful strategies. It is also necessary to construct models to deep dive into the world of data analytics. From forecasting to “understanding the causes of things”, join Dr James Abdey as he considers the essentials for an analyst’s statistical toolbox in a post-COVID world. Meet our speaker James Abdey is Assistant Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Statistics at LSE. His research interests include market research techniques and forensic statistics – the interplay of statistics and the law. Outside of academia, he has worked on various quantitative-based consultancy projects in areas including the art market, and the World Gold Council, he has also given seminars at the UK parliament. He is Course Convenor of LSE’s online certificate course Data Analysis for Management. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival's 'Skills for a Post-COVID World' series. LSE experts discuss research trends in their field about professional skills we need for success in a post-COVID world. The series is hosted by LSE Executive Education and Online Learning. Find out more about online certificate courses. The LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World is running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
05/03/2158m 4s

Health Policy in a Post-COVID World

Contributor(s): Dr Lucy Kanya, Dr Matthias Wismar, Dr Josep Figueras | COVID-19 has presented an opportunity to address some of the profound underlying problems of our health systems. We compare international health system responses to COVID-19, and outline clear lessons from the pandemic on how we might move forward. Meet our speakers and chair Update, Friday 5 March: Professor Elias Mossialos is no longer speaking at this event due to unforeseen circumstances Josep Figueras is the Director and co-founder of the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. In addition to WHO, he has served major multilateral agencies such as the European Commission and the World Bank, and has worked as a policy advisor in more than 40 countries in the European Region and beyond. He is a member of several governing, advisory and editorial boards, including the governance board of the European Health Forum Gastein. Dr Matthias Wismar (@matthiaswismar) is Programme Manager at the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. He is leading, managing and developing studies and face-to-face dissemination and knowledge brokering events. Matthias has worked extensively on COVID-19 health systems responses and governance. Since October 2020, he has led a weekly COVID-19 response webinar discussing a wide range of health systems responses to the pandemic. He holds a doctorate in political science from Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany). Lucy Kanya (@Lucy_Kanya) is Assistant Professorial Research Fellow at the LSE Department of Health Policy. Her research interests include: the economics of health care financing in low and middle income countries, private sector engagement in health and the use of stated preference techniques. Lucy is currently part of the LSE team working on the African Health Observatory – Platform on Health Systems and Policies (AHOP). Justin Parkhurst (@justinparkhurst) is an Associate Professor of Global Health Policy in the LSE Department of Health Policy. He is co-director of the MSc in Health Policy, Planning, and Financing programme, and the current serving Chair of the LSE Global Health Initiative. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. The Department of Health Policy (@LSEHealthPolicy) trains and inspires people passionate about health by advancing and challenging their understanding of health systems and the social, economic and political contexts in which they operate. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
05/03/2159m 15s

What can Health Services Learn from COVID-19?

Contributor(s): Alistair McGuire | COVID-19 has tested many countries’ health systems beyond their limits. Health services were overwhelmed by COVID patients and populations also faced barriers trying to get care and diagnoses for other conditions. We could – and should – have been better prepared for this crisis. Professor Alistair McGuire talks about what a new LSE venture with the World Economic Forum and AstraZeneca, the Partnership for Health System Sustainability and Resilience (PHSSR) seeks to do. He discusses the need for sustainable and resilient health systems, and what the partnership’s findings mean for the future of health services. Meet our speaker Alistair McGuire is Head of Department and Chair of Health Economics in the Department of Health Policy (@LSEHealthPolicy) at LSE. Prior to this he was Professor of Economics at City University, London after being a tutor in Economics at the University of Oxford. He has acted as an advisor to governments and governmental bodies in the UK and internationally, as well as pharmaceutical and health care insurance companies. Further reading: Partnership for Health System Sustainability and Resilience (PHSSR) What can health services learn from the COVID-19 catatastrophe? A new platform for sharing insights. This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, health, healthcare, health services, health policy, future of healthcare.
05/03/218m 14s

Isolationism: the future of US foreign policy?

Contributor(s): Professor Charles Kupchan, Dr Leslie Vinjamuri | During the presidency of Donald Trump, the US pursued a more self-interested and transactional foreign policy, often seeing relations with other countries as a zero-sum game. Charles Kupchan discusses his new book, Isolationism: A History of America’s Efforts to Shield Itself from the World. He looks at how the resurgence of isolationism is reshaping America foreign policy and what it means for the post-COVID world. You can order the book, Isolationism: A History of America’s Efforts to Shield Itself from the World, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Meet our speakers and chair Charles A. Kupchan is Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He served as Special Assistant to the President in the Obama White House and on the National Security Council in both the Obama and the first Clinton administrations. His latest book is Isolationism: A History of America’s Efforts to Shield Itself from the World (2020). Leslie Vinjamuri (@londonvinjamuri) is a Reader (Associate Professor) in International Relations and Chair of the International Relations Speaker Series at SOAS and an alumna of LSE. Leslie is Head of the US & the Americas Programme and Dean of the Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership in International Affairs at Chatham House. From 2010-2018 she was (founding) co-Director then Director (from 2016) of the Centre on Conflict, Rights and Justice at SOAS. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations, and Director of the US Centre at LSE and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. His main teaching and research interests are in the fields of international security and US foreign policy. He also writes and comments frequently on US politics. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
04/03/2159m 35s

What is the Future of Diplomacy?

Contributor(s): Tristen Naylor | Are pixellated images of leaders in tiny squares on a computer screen the 'new normal' for international diplomacy? What are the implications of the loss of physicality in diplomacy? And what does this portend for international relations in the post-Covid world? As with all facets of life, COVID-19 brought the world of international diplomacy to a halt, forcing diplomats and heads of government to quickly overhaul how they do their work. Forced to move their interactions online, an institution that is fundamentally about bringing people together was acutely weakened by the need for social distancing. Most significantly, this severely undermined the ability of the G20 to address the twin crises of the pandemic and the global economic crisis it ushered in, reducing the summit of the world's most powerful leaders to being little more than an extended Zoom call. Meet our speaker Tristen Naylor is a Fellow in International Relations at LSE. His most recent book, Social Closure and International Society, examines the history of international summits over the past two hundred years. Previously, he was the Lecturer in Diplomatic Studies at the University of Oxford and, before joining academia, was a Foreign Policy Analyst and Advisor to the Government of Canada. He is a recipient of the Canadian Public Service Award of Excellence. Find out more about Tristen’s research: All That’s Lost: The Hollowing of Summit Diplomacy in a Socially Distanced World This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, diplomacy, politics, face-to-face, Zoom, online, virtual, networking, international relations, foreign policy.
04/03/2111m 33s

Why is Unemployment Bad for Gender Equality?

Contributor(s): Aliya Rao | Aliya Rao explores how unemployment reinforces gender inegalitarian norms and behaviours when it comes to time, space and emotions. How might we tackle this seemingly backwards step? The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed rampant gender inequalities. The economic downturn we are facing has led to mass unemployment, which has had a disproportionate impact on women. Research from before and during the pandemic shows that women’s job loss and unemployment – more prevalent now than ever – is becoming yet another factor that pushes women out of the workforce, out of economic self-sufficiency, and toward unpaid work in the domestic realm. Meet our speaker Aliya Rao is an Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology in the Department of Methodology and author of Crunch Time: How Married Couples Confront Unemployment. Find out more about Aliya’s research: The ideal job-seeker norm: unemployment and marital privileges in the new economy. From professionals to professional mothers?: how college-educated, married mothers experience unemployment in the US. Stand by your man: wives’ emotion work during men’s unemployment This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, gender equality, economics, equality, unpaid work, workforce, gender balance.
04/03/218m 41s

How Can We Shape a More Inclusive Future?

Contributor(s): Dr Manmit Bhambra | The politics of ‘difference’ remain salient in contemporary societies; discrimination often encompasses the sometimes less obvious, but equally damaging forms of prejudice, which can lead to a breakdown of dialogue and trust between people. So how can we shape a more inclusive future? We can achieve greater inclusivity if we focus on achieving and maintaining dialogue between the diverse social groups that make up our society. Representation is also key; by striving to include more voices in debates around identity and belonging, we can better understand what facilitates and hinders acceptance and inclusion and take that forward through our research. Fostering a positive sense of national identity can also help create a sense of inclusion and belonging. Is there a way that we can have a renewed debate around Britishness that can bridge divides and foster a common culture? And what is the role of young people? Meet our speaker Manmit Bhambra is a Research Officer in the Religion and Global Society Unit at LSE. This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, inclusivity, equity, diversity, prejudice, national identity, Britishness, young people.
04/03/219m 29s

How to Manage Technological Disruption: tech giants, competition, and the future of work

Contributor(s): Dr Niamh Dunne, Dr Robert Falkner, Dr Carsten Sørensen, Professor Leslie Willcocks | The Fourth Industrial Revolution has transformed the way we work and live. Digital platforms have upended traditional business models and are disrupting ever more industries in a post-COVID world. Novel technologies (AI, robotics) are replacing ever more human tasks, raising fears about increasing unemployment. While technological innovation is a source of prosperity, its impact on business and society needs to be carefully managed. Our panel considers both the disruptive nature of technological change and the practical ways we can respond to it from a multidisciplinary perspective. Meet our speakers Niamh Dunne is an Associate Professor of Law at LSE, teaching in the areas of competition and EU law. She has also worked in competition enforcement for the Competition Authority of Ireland, and as a consultant in competition policy, primarily for the OECD. She is a course contributor to LSE’s online certificate course Technological Disruption: Managing the Impact on Business, Society and Politics. Robert Falkner is an Associate Professor of International Relations at LSE and the Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. His research centres on global environmental politics and international political economy, with a particular focus on climate policy and the role of business in international relations. Previously, he held academic positions at the universities of Oxford, Kent, and Essex, and was a visiting scholar at Harvard University. He is the Course Convenor of LSE’s online certificate course Technological Disruption: Managing the Impact on Business, Society and Politics. Carsten Sørensen is an Associate Professor of Information Systems and Innovation at LSE. He has studied the business and consumer impact of mobile and ubiquitous information technology innovations, organisational innovation with mobile computing. His research has also focused in particular on the innovation dynamics of mobile infrastructures and platforms. He is a course contributor to LSE’s online certificate course Technological Disruption: Managing the Impact on Business, Society and Politics. Leslie Willcocks is an Emeritus Professor of Work, Technology and Globalisation in the Department of Management. His major research interests include service automation, artificial intelligence, digital transformation and emerging technologies. He is also engaged in looking at technology in globalisation and the strategic use of IT, IT leadership and IT enabled organisational change. He is a course contributor to LSE’s online certificate course Technological Disruption: Managing the Impact on Business, Society and Politics.
04/03/2159m 27s

Breaking the Inequality Mould in Latin America

Contributor(s): Dr Amir Lebdioui, Dr Alice Krozer, Professor Francisco Ferreira, Dr Laura Carvalho | Rethinking inequality reduction programmes in post-COVID Latin America is timely and urgent. What are the pathways forward? After a decade or more in which inequality had fallen in Latin America, in recent years inequality had risen once more, motivating waves of protests across the region. COVID-19 has exploited existing inequalities affecting both the health outcomes and livelihoods of the poorest segments of the population. Maintaining the status quo is unlikely to be sustainable and may further hinder political stability in the region. An increasing number of scholars, politicians, civil society groups and other members of society have called for a new economic model in order to reduce income inequality. Leading experts on economics and inequality discuss the paths towards a sustainable and just model of development in Latin America and reflect on how and what we can learn from both the pre- and post-COVID situation in order to improve inequality reduction programmes. Meet our speakers and chair Laura Carvalho (@lauraabcarvalho) is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of São Paulo. She completed a PhD in Economics at the New School for Social Research in 2012. She is presently Senior Fellow at the Schwartz Center of Economic Policy Analysis (Scepa). Her research focuses on topics in macroeconomics and development economics, and particularly on the relationship between economic growth and income distribution. She acted as a weekly columnist for Brazilian newspaper Folha de S. Paulo between 2015 and 2019 and is also the author of the best-selling book Valsa Brasileira: do boom ao caos econômico on the rise and fall of the Brazilian economy, published in Brazil in 2018. Francisco Ferreira (@fhgferreira) is Amartya Sen Professor of Inequality Studies and Director (designate) of the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Prior to returning to LSE, Francisco had a long career at the World Bank. He is an economist working on the measurement, causes and consequences of inequality and poverty, with an emphasis on developing countries in general and Latin America in particular. Chico has also previously taught at the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and at the Paris School of Economics. Alice Krozer (@alicekrozer) is a postdoctoral researcher in Social Inequalities at Colegio de México. Her main research interests include elites and privileges, discrimination and racism - as well as perceptions of inequality. She has worked as a consultant for the United Nations Economic Commission of Latin America and the Caribbean, Oxfam, among other institutions. Amir Lebdioui (@Amirlbd) is Canning House Research Fellow based at the Latin America and Caribbean Centre at LSE. His research has focused on the political economy of resource-based development, export diversification strategies, and green industrial policy in the context of renewable energy development and climate change. Cristina Cortes is the CEO of British think tank Canning House. She has worked in government, banking and energy across a variety of commercial, business development and government relations roles in London, Houston, Venezuela, Colombia, Argentina and Brazil. Cristina is an Oxford and LSE politics and economics graduate. Gareth Jones is Director of the Latin America and Caribbean Centre, as well as Professor of Urban Geography in the Department of Geography and Environment at LSE and an Associate Member of the International Inequalities Institute. He has an interdisciplinary academic background having studied economics, geography and urban sociology, and holds an undergraduate degree from University College London and a doctorate from University of Cambridge. He has held numerous visiting positions including at University of California San Diego, University of Texas at Austin, and the Universidad Iberoamericana. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. Opened in January 2016 to serve as a focal point for LSE’s research and public engagement with Latin America and the Caribbean, LSE's Latin America and Caribbean Centre builds upon the School’s long and important relationship with the region. The Centre supports the research of faculty from nearly every department across the School whose research is principally focussed on or relevant to the region. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
04/03/211h 2m

How to Be Effective Leaders in the Context of Organisational Change

Contributor(s): Dr Emma Soane, Dr Rebecca Newton, Professor Sandy Pepper | Effective leadership is essential in any organisation. In an uncertain world, resilient leaders are more important than ever to the survival and success of a business. In this session, Dr Rebecca Newton, Professor Sandy Pepper and Dr Emma Soane will discuss how you can use the dynamics of authentic and transformational leadership to change organisations for the better. They will consider business ethics, as well as character, the need for “good” business and organisational resilience. During their conversation, Rebecca, Sandy and Emma will also reflect on the challenges of leadership development and the practices that foster commitment to change. Meet our speakers Rebecca Newton is an Organisational Psychologist and Senior Visiting Fellow in the Department of Management at LSE. She has spent 20 years researching and teaching on leadership, change, organisational culture and management practice. Rebecca is a coach and adviser to leadership teams globally. She serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Change Management, is the author of Authentic Gravitas: Who Stands Out and Why, and is a regular contributor to the Harvard Business Review. She is a Course Convenor on LSE’s online certificate course Leadership and Change. Emma Soane is an Assistant Professor of Management at LSE. Her research examines how individual differences, team working, and organisational environments influence decisions, performance, and risk taking. Her projects include studies of decision processes in financial decision-making, healthcare, IT, and television production. Emma has extensive fieldwork experience in public and private sector organisations, including government departments, local government, NHS hospitals, manufacturing, waste management, and top-tier investment banks. She is a Course Convenor on LSE’s online certificate course Leadership and Change. Alexander (Sandy) Pepper is a Professor of Management Practice at LSE. He was previously a partner at PricewaterhouseCoopers, where he held various senior management roles. Sandy’s research and teaching interests include organisations and management theory, with a particular focus on the theory of the firm and corporate governance. Sandy is also interested in behavioural and new institutional economics, business ethics, business history, and the relationship between management theory and practice. He is a Course Convenor on LSE’s online certificate course Leadership and Change. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival's 'Skills for a Post-COVID World' series. LSE experts discuss research trends in their field about professional skills we need for success in a post-COVID world. The series is hosted by LSE Executive Education and Online Learning. Find out more about online certificate courses. The LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World is running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
03/03/2159m 37s

Digital by Default: the COVID-19 generation

Contributor(s): Patricio Cuevas-Parra, Laurie Day, Maya Göetz, Konstantinos Papachristou | Almost overnight, following lockdown, children’s lives became digital by default. We critically reflect on how children’s experiences, needs and rights are being, and could be better, served in a digital world. COVID-19 transformed society’s reliance on digital technologies as the infrastructure for work, family, education, health and more. Supposedly the digital natives are ahead of their parents and other adults in being media-savvy. In practice, children face unique challenges. Social science has identified a range of adverse consequences, including digital exclusion, edtech inequalities, child sexual abuse and unmet mental health needs - notwithstanding that many educational and welfare services also became digital by default. Meet our speakers and chair Patricio Cuevas-Parra (@PatricioCuevasP) is the Director of Child Participation and Rights at World Vision International, and a children's rights advocate who manages research and information analysis on social justice issues affecting children and young people. He has published a variety of books and reports on the topics of children's rights, child participation, indigenous children and gender equality. Laurie Day is a Director at Ecorys UK, with a lead for children, young people and families research. He has over 20 years applied research and evaluation experience, with the UK Government, local authorities and third sector organisations. He is also currently overseeing a study for the European Commission on the role of digital tools in supporting inclusive education across Europe, and a research project funded by the Nuffield Foundation exploring the social impacts of the COVID-19 crisis with young action researchers. Maya Göetz is Head of the International Central Institute for Youth and Educational Television (IZI) at the Bayerischer Rundfunk (Bavarian Broadcasting Corp), Munich, and of the PRIX JEUNESSE Foundation. Her main field of work is research in the area of children, youth and television, and has published more than 240 articles and 14 books within the field. Konstantinos Papachristou is the Youth Lead in the “#CovidUnder19 - Life Under Coronavirus” global research project and the creator of Teens4greece, an online forum for young people to express their ideas to help Greece. Sonia Livingstone (@Livingstone_S) is a professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. She has published 20 books, including her latest co-authored publication, Parenting for a Digital Future: How Hopes and Fears about Technology Shape Children's Lives. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. The Department is ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in the field of media and communications (2020 QS World University Rankings).
03/03/211h 2m

We Have Declared a Climate Emergency! Now what?

Contributor(s): Candice Howarth | The translation of climate policy into “on the ground” actions in our communities should deliver healthier, more prosperous and resilient cities with reduced greenhouse gas emissions, but how can we achieve that, and fast? Local councils have now declared climate emergencies across the UK, but the impact and effectiveness of these declarations on enhancing long-term climate action has yet to be seen. What do these declarations mean for future climate governance and mechanisms for engaging stakeholders and the public? Meet our speaker Candice Howarth is a Senior Policy Fellow at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at LSE, leading the Place-based Climate Action Network (PCAN) activities. She Chairs the Royal Geographical Society Climate Change Research Group, sits on the Royal Meteorological Society Climate Science Communication group, the London Heat Risk Group and the UCL Policy Commission on Communicating Climate Science. This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, climate emergency, climate crisis, policy, local councils, local government, social policy.
03/03/217m 30s

COVID-19 in the UK: where are all the women?

Contributor(s): Mandu Reid, Bell Ribeiro-Addy, Mary-Ann Stephenson, Dr Clare Wenham | Women’s vulnerability must be considered in pandemic preparedness and response. We look at the role of UK policymakers in re-establishing the path to a more equal society for men and women in this context and draw comparisons with other countries who are doing well, and who have also fallen shy of the mark. While there have been significant advances in gender equality in the past 30 years, the COVID-19 pandemic threatens to undo much of this good work in countries across the globe. School closures, lockdowns and reduced access to healthcare are just some of the ways the pandemic is already exaggerating existing gender disparities. Meet our speakers and chair Mandu Reid (@ManduReid) has been Leader of the Women’s Equality Party since April 2019. She is also the party's candidate for the 2021 London mayoral election. Mandu Reid is an LSE graduate and has previously held roles at HM Treasury, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and the Greater London Authority. Bell Ribeiro-Addy (@BellRibeiroAddy) is the Labour MP for her home constituency of Streatham. Born and raised in Brixton Hill, Bell is a dedicated feminist, anti-racist and trade unionist who currently sits on the Women & Equalities Committee in Parliament. Mary-Ann Stephenson (@WomensBudgetGrp) is Director of the Women’s Budget Group. Mary-Ann has worked for women’s equality and human rights for over twenty years as a campaigner, researcher and trainer. She was previously Director of the Fawcett Society and a Commissioner on the Women’s National Commission. Clare Wenham (@clarewenham) is Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at LSE. She specialises in global health security, the politics and policy of pandemic preparedness and outbreak response. She has researched this for over a decade, through influenza, Ebola and Zika. Her research poses questions of global governance, the role of WHO and World Bank, national priorities and innovative financing for pandemic control. More recently she has been examining the role of women in epidemics and associated policy. For COVID-19, Clare is Co-Principal Investigator on a grant from the CIHR and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation analysing the gendered dimensions of the outbreak. Nicola Lacey CBE is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy at LSE. She has held a number of visiting appointments, most recently at Harvard Law School and at New York University Law School. She is an Honorary Fellow of New College Oxford and of University College Oxford, and a Fellow of the British Academy. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. The Department of Health Policy (@LSEHealthPolicy) trains and inspires people passionate about health by advancing and challenging their understanding of health systems and the social, economic and political contexts in which they operate.
03/03/2157m 27s

What is Colonial about Global Health?

Contributor(s): Professor Paul Farmer, Dr Mosoka Fallah, Dr Sumegha Asthana | Can COVID-19 invigorate an alternative vision for the future of global health? Our panel address the legacy of colonialism within international health systems and ask: what is the relationship between histories of imperialism and health, development and human rights? How can international institutions be reformed to overturn the global North’s dominance in health programming? How might new funding arrangements that empower global South infrastructures affect the public health agenda? The pandemic offers an opportunity to critically appraise the current state of global health and its governance structures. In disrupting health systems across the globe, it held a magnifying glass to the way colonial legacies shape the geopolitics of health responses, including power relations between different countries and international organisations. Here we discuss global, regional and local systems of oppression, what decolonisation means in global health, and offer integrative approaches to global health research, policy and practice. Meet our speakers and chair Sumegha Asthana is a physician, health administrator and a health policy and systems researcher by training. Her public health journey started ten years ago in India with a masters in health administration from Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. After which she worked with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW), India as a consultant. This was followed by her doctoral research in social medicine which is based at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi and focuses on the role of global actors in health systems strengthening in India. Sumegha is a Ryoichi Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellow (SYLFF) supported by the Tokyo Foundation, Japan and a DAAD scholar under the “A New Passage to India” program at Bielefeld University, Germany. She is an advocate for decolonizing global health and building HPSR capacities in LMICs. She is based in Delhi and works as an independent public health consultant . She is an honorary lecturer at Queen Mary University London, where she teaches global health policy and governance. Sumegha is also the country lead of the India chapter of a global social movement called Women in Global Health, which aims to achieve gender equality in global health leadership. Mosoka P Fallah is the Founder and Executive Director of Refuge Place International, an NGO in Liberia addressing access to affordable quality health care for poor urban and rural dwellers. He and his team are currently working to rapidly scale up this successful model across the country. Mosoka was the recent past Director-General of the National Public Health Institute of Liberia (NPHIL), which he co-founded in 2017. In this capacity, he oversaw the Divisions of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, National Public Health Laboratory, Medical and Public Health Research, Training and Capacity Building, and Environmental and Occupational Health. Mosoka also helped establish the first Master's of Public Health (MPH) programme in the University of Liberia's College of Health Sciences, previously serving as Chairman of the Department of Biochemistry in the AM Dogliotti College of Medicine. He was named one of Time Magazine's Persons of the Year in 2014 for his Ebola relief efforts in Liberia as well as USAID's Liberia Health Worker and Development Person of the Year in 2017 for his work with Refuge Place. Mosoka completed a PhD in Immunology at the University of Kentucky; he subsequently studied Global Health, with a concentration in Infectious Disease Epidemiology, at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health. Paul Farmer holds an MD and PhD from Harvard University, where he is the Kolokotrones University Professor and the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School; he is also Chief of the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston. He has written extensively on health, human rights, and the consequences of social inequality. He is the recipient of numerous honors, including the Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association, the Outstanding International Physician (Nathan Davis) Award from the American Medical Association, a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, and, with his PIH colleagues, the Hilton Humanitarian Prize. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His most recent book is Fevers, Feuds, and Diamonds: Ebola and the Ravages of History. Robtel Neajai Pailey is Assistant Professor in International Social and Public Policy at LSE. A scholar-activist working at the intersection of Critical Development Studies, Critical African Studies and Critical Race Studies, she centres her research on how structural transformation is conceived and contested by local, national and transnational actors from ‘crisis’-affected regions of the so-called Global South. Robtel's current project, Africa’s ‘Negro’ Republics, examines how slavery, colonialism and neoliberalism in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, respectively, have shaped the adoption and maintenance of constitutional clauses barring non-blacks from obtaining citizenship in Liberia and Sierra Leone. She is author of Development, (Dual) Citizenship and Its Discontents in Africa: The Political Economy of Belonging to Liberia (Cambridge University Press, 2021). More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. The Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre connects social sciences disciplines and works in partnership with Africa to bring African voices to global debates. The Global Health Initiative (@LSEGlobalHealth) is a cross-departmental research platform set up to increase the coherence and visibility of Global Health research activity across the School, both internally and externally. It provides support for interdisciplinary engagement and showcases LSE’s ability to apply rigorous social science research to emerging global health challenges. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
03/03/2155m 14s

What Work Disappeared? COVID-19 and Labour Market Outcomes for the Under 25s

Contributor(s): Erica Thompson | Has the COVID-19 pandemic led to worse career prospects for young people? Research has shown a widening gap in the likelihood of young people being in employment, particularly in banking, finance and insurance, and public administration, education and health. Teresa Almeida and Ganga Shreedhar discuss the need for more inclusive labour market policies to create opportunities for younger workers to counter the adverse, long-term impacts of COVID-19. Meet our speakers Teresa Almeida is a Research Officer in Behavioural Science at The Inclusion Initiative (TII). She holds an MSc in Behavioural Science from the London School of Economics. Her research is focused on inclusion, with particular interest in understanding how individual differences and contextual factors impact labour market outcomes. Ganga Shreedhar (@geeshree) is Assistant Professor in Behavioural Sciences at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Sciences, and an Affiliate at the Department of Geography ad Environment, The Grantham Research Institute for Climate Change and the Environment, and the Inclusion Initiative. She is an applied behavioural and experimental economist studying how to change human behaviour in ways that simultaneously benefit people and the planet by designing and analysing interventions that help understand consumer and citizen beliefs, preferences and behaviours. This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, labour market, youth unemployment, education, equity, The Inclusion Initiative, work, workforce, economy.
03/03/219m 30s

How Can We Do Good Science With Models?

Contributor(s): Erica Thompson | Given their power to influence the world, how can we ensure that mathematical models are developed in a transparent and accountable way, providing information that is useful and relevant without being over-confident or subject to hidden bias? We've heard a lot about models recently. Some have been in the news, like the epidemic models that shaped government decisions about lockdowns and the climate models that inform us about the potential consequences of our greenhouse gas emissions. Some are more personal, like the models that try to predict which advert you are most likely to click on. Some are behind the most complex financial trades, helping to make fortunes for their developers. Meet our speaker Erica Thompson is a Senior Policy Fellow in Ethics of Modelling and Simulation at the LSE’s Data Science Institute (@LSEDataScience). She is also a Fellow of the London Mathematical Laboratory, where she leads the research programme on Inference from Models. She is currently writing a book called Escape From Model Land, to be published next year by Basic Books. Find out more about Erica's research: Escape from Model Land This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, models, mathematics, epidemics, predictions, climate change, behavioural modelling, simulation
03/03/2110m 40s

How Can Policy Makers Use Behavioural Science?

Contributor(s): Professor Julian Le Grand, Dr Grace Lordan, Professor Paul Dolan, Teresa Almeida | What specific societal behaviours should policy makers want to shape as we move forward in a post-COVID world? We analyse what behavioural science research has added to the policy debate on COVID-19 so far, and what questions have been overlooked. Meet our speakers and chair Teresa Almeida is a Research Officer in Behavioural Science at The Inclusion Initiative, LSE. She holds an MSc in Behavioural Science from LSE. Her research is focused on inclusion, with particular interest in understanding how individual differences and contextual factors impact labour market outcomes. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. Julian Le Grand has been Professor of Social Policy at LSE since 1993. He was awarded a knighthood in the 2015 New Year's Honour's list for services to social sciences and public service. Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is Associate Professor in Behavioural Science at LSE. Her research focuses on why some people have successful lives as compared to others because of factors beyond their own control. She is the founder and director of The Inclusion Initiative, a research centre at LSE and the author of Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Career You Want. Tony Travers is Director of LSE London and Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
02/03/2159m 52s

Why Should We Build Back Differently?

Contributor(s): Dr Sunil Kumar | Post-COVID19, there is talk of ‘building back better’. What does this mean? Does it refer to making some improvement to existing economic and social arrangements whilst leaving much of its premise intact? Sunil Kumar draws upon his research on internal migrant construction workers in India, exploited in terms of wages as well as working and living conditions, to suggest that we should, instead, think of building back differently based on the idea of care. He argues that we need to go beyond the notion of ‘caring for’ (the material conditions of societal relationships) to encompass notions of ‘caring about’ – the person, the human. This will require a fundamental rethink of the value that society currently places on low-wage and precarious workers. Caring about will require investments of time: time for conversations, time to listen, time to understand, time for compassion, time for solidarity, and time to act. Each of us must carve out time to care about and share these experiences with others. The spin-offs of doing so can only be positive. Meet our speaker Sunil Kumar (@urban_sk) is a lecturer in Social Policy and Development in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Find out more about Sunil's research: Social Relations, Rental Housing Markets and the Poor in Urban India (2001) Urbanisation-Construction-Migration Nexus in Five Cities in South Asia’ (2016) This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week. Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, build back better, Sunil Kumar, compassion, caring for, caring about, compassion, economy, society.
02/03/2110m 23s

Start-up Survival: how do young innovators navigate the 'new normal'?

Contributor(s): Yohan Iddawela, Tara Chandra | From rehashing business models, securing necessary safety protocols, to creating robust digital presences, we hear from our student and alumni entrepreneurs on how they navigated the new norm and dealt with the challenges and conflicts while protecting their mental health. It's been a tough time for everyone, but especially for early-stage start-ups who rely on economic certainty, available customers and ease of communication to drive their brilliant ideas forward. Social distancing, widespread lockdown, and global restrictions on travelling and movement made business growth challenging, and at times, near impossible. While innovators are known to be agile and persevering, the gravity of the situation challenged even the most resilient of entrepreneurs and forced founders to dig deep and make some difficult decision to maximise their chances of survival. This pre-recorded film includes testimonies and honest insights from two young innovators building businesses focussed on the betterment of society. Meet our speakers Tara Chandra is co-founder of FLO. Tara received her master's from LSE, where she met her FLO co-founder, had the idea for FLO in the loos and received the C200 Award for exceptional MBA students. FLO launched in Autumn 2017 after a successful Kickstarter campaign and can now be found in retailers across the UK, US and EU, including Holland & Barrett, Planet Organic, Ocado, Whole Foods and Boots. Yohan Iddawela is co-founder of Lanterne, an early-stage data science company that specialises in predicting foot-traffic and crowd-density. During the pandemic, they launched the free Crowdless app, which showed people how crowded supermarkets were so they could avoid queues and crowds, and practice social distancing. He is also a PhD candidate in Economic Geography at LSE. This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week. Keywords: Shaping the Post-COVID World, LSE Generate, FLO, Lanterne, Crowdless, COVID, Economics, Entrepreneurship.
02/03/2110m 45s

How the Pandemic Polarised Us

Contributor(s): Professor Peter Trubowitz, Professor Sara Hobolt, Dr Florian Foos | We explore political polarisation in the UK, EU, US and on social media in light of COVID-19, and how democracy can be built back. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit and the world was plunged into lockdown, nations were unified in the fight against the virus. As time has rolled on, a suffering economy, rising infection and death rates, a historic election, Brexit, and confusion around devolved powers have intensified the divide in political attitudes to ideological extremes. Meet our speakers and chair Florian Foos (@FlorianFoos) is Assistant Professor in Political Behaviour, Department of Government, LSE. His research aims to identify the causal effects of formal and informal interactions between citizens, politicians and campaign workers on electoral mobilisation, opinion change and political activism. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is the Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and a professor in the Department of Government, LSE. She is the Chair of the European Election Studies, an EU-wide project studying voters, parties, candidates and the media in European Parliamentary elections, and the Principal Investigator of the ERC-funded project EUDEMOS: Constrained Democracy: Citizens’ Responses to Limited Political Choice in the European Union. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at LSE and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. His main teaching and research interests are in the fields of international security and US foreign policy. He also writes and comments frequently on US politics. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy, European Institute, LSE. His research has centred on the micro-foundations of markets and democracy. Past research projects have investigated the popularity of governments, the dynamics of public opinion about European integration, and people’s satisfaction with democracy. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
02/03/2159m 42s

Scroungers versus Strivers: the myth of the welfare state

Contributor(s): Professor John Hills | This episode is dedicated to social policy giant Professor Sir John Hills, who died in December 2020. In this episode, John tackles the myth that the welfare state supports a feckless underclass who cost society huge amounts of money. Instead, he sets out a system where most of what we pay in, comes back to us. He describes a generational contract which we all benefit from, varying on our stage of life. His words remain timely after a year of pandemic which has devastated many people’s livelihoods. Many of us have had to rely on state support in ways that we could not have anticipated, perhaps challenging our ideas about what type of person receives benefits in the UK. This episode is based on an interview that John did with James Rattee for the LSE iQ podcast in 2017. It coincided with the LSE Festival which celebrated the anniversary of the publication of the ‘Beveridge Report’ in 1942 - a blueprint for a British universal care system by former LSE Director William Beveridge. Professor Sir John Hills CBE, was Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE and Chair of CASE. His influential work didn’t just critique government policy on poverty and inequality, it changed it. He advised on a wide range of issues including pensions reform, fuel poverty, council housing, income and wealth distribution.   Contributors Professor John Hills   Research Good Times Bad Times: the welfare myth of them and us. Bristol: Policy Press by John Hills (2015)
02/03/2119m 35s

How to Develop your Presence and Influence

Contributor(s): Professor Connson Locke | Influencing others has always been an important skill and it will become even more critical in a post-COVID world. To create positive change in the world, we need to influence people who have more power than we do and convince them to listen to us. Drawing on material from her new book, Making Your Voice Heard, Professor Locke will provide practical tips for how to build your bases of power, influence others, and make your voice heard. Meet our speaker Connson Locke (@connsonlocke) is a Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Management at LSE. Her areas of expertise are leadership, negotiation, decision-making and organisational behaviour. Her research interests include gender and leadership, diversity, and organisational culture. Connson has extensive experience designing and teaching leadership development programmes and has worked in nearly 20 countries, including as Regional Training and Development Manager for the Boston Consulting Group. SShe is Course Convenor of LSE’s online certificate courses MBA Essentials and Negotiation. Her new book, Making Your Voice Heard, is out on 4 March 2021. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival's 'Skills for a Post-COVID World' series. LSE experts discuss research trends in their field about professional skills we need for success in a post-COVID world. The series is hosted by LSE Executive Education and Online Learning. Find out more about online certificate courses. The LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World is running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
02/03/2148m 4s

Financing a Green and Just Recovery from COVID-19

Contributor(s): Naïm Abou-Jaoudé, Sharan Burrow, Rathin Roy, Dr Rhian-Mari Thomas | How can we combine recovery from COVID-19 with the shift to an inclusive and sustainable global economy? Leading figures in government, business and civil society have pledged to “build back better”. In the run-up to the COP26 climate summit in November 2021, there’s a clear need for both greater ambition and greater practicality in mobilising the public and private finance that will be needed for a green and just recovery. Meet our speakers and chair Naïm Abou-Jaoudé is the Chief Executive Officer of Candriam, a $140bn global multi-specialist asset manager and a recognized leader in Sustainable Investing. He is also the Chairman of New York Life Investments International, in charge of the global development for New York Life Investments, a $560bn asset manager. Sharan Burrow (@SharanBurrow) is General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation, representing 200 million workers in 163 countries and territories with 332 national affiliates. Previously President of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) from 2000 – 2010, Sharan is a passionate advocate and campaigner for social justice, women’s rights, the environment and labour law reforms, and has led union negotiations on major economic reforms and labour rights campaigns in her home country of Australia and globally. Rathin Roy (@EmergingRoy) is Managing Director (Research and Policy) at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). His policy interests and research has mainly focused on fiscal and macroeconomic issues pertinent to human development in developing and emerging economies. Rhian-Mari Thomas (@RhianMariThomas) is CEO of the Green Finance Institute, backed by UK Government and City of London Corporation. Rhian spent 20 years in banking and was awarded an OBE for services to green banking. She is an Emeritus Member of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) and co-chair of the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD). She is a member of numerous advisory groups and boards across UK Government. Nick Robins (@NVJRobins1) is Professor in Practice for Sustainable Finance at the Grantham Research Institute at LSE. The focus of his work is on how to mobilise finance for a just transition, the role of central banks and regulators in achieving sustainable development and how the financial system can support the restoration of nature. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy.
02/03/2159m 0s

How Has COVID-19 Produced New Forms of Stigma?

Contributor(s): Nikita Simpson | Throughout the pandemic, the general population alongside policymakers have faced extreme uncertainty. Without a full picture of the virus and how it spreads, there has been much speculation about COVID-19 transmission and how to prevent it. These new perceptions of risk can work to polarise, exclude and stigmatise certain groups or individuals, compounding existing stereotypes and forms of historical exclusion. Drawing on ethnographic insights, Nikita Simpson explores how these new relations of stigma have emerged in the UK during the pandemic. She considers how stigma has played out in relation to people from minoritised groups, essential workers and those living in multigenerational households and its damaging effects on mental health, wellbeing and social cohesion. How can we tackle these new forms of stigma? Meet our speaker Nikita Simpson is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at LSE, and Research Co-ordinator of the Covid and Care Research Group. This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week. Keywords: COVID-19, care, policy, health, anthropology, Shaping the Post-COVID World, Nikita Simpson, mental health, wellbeing.
01/03/2110m 37s

Life in a Post-COVID World: learning from Southeast Asia

Contributor(s): Professor Hyun Bang Shin, Dr Nicole Curato, Dr Sin Yee Koh, Professor John Sidel | Although the distinctive outcomes of COVID-19 in Southeast Asia are only now becoming clear, we expect that they can become the basis for innovative and impactful ideas that will matter for neighbouring regions and the world. Leading thinkers on Southeast Asia reflect on the lessons of COVID-19 for connectivity, governance, and urbanisation in the region and assess the futures it might foretell for Southeast Asia and the world. Meet our speakers and chair Hyun Bang Shin (@urbancommune) is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies, Department of Geography and Environment, and Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre at LSE. Nicole Curato (@NicoleCurato) is Associate Professor, Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance, University of Canberra. Sin Yee Koh (@koh_sy) is Senior Lecturer in Global Studies, School of Arts and Social Sciences, Monash University Malaysia. John Sidel is Sir Patrick Gillam Professor of International and Comparative Politics, Department of Government and Department of International Relations at LSE. Catherine Allerton (@allertonanthro) is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. The Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre (@LSESEAC) is a multidisciplinary Research Centre of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). It develops and fosters academic and policy-oriented research, drawing on a rich network of experts across disciplines at LSE and beyond, while serving as a globally recognised hub for promoting dialogue and engagement with Southeast Asia and the world. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
01/03/2158m 59s

How will New Technology Affect the Future of Work?

Contributor(s): Professor Alan Manning | Many fear the impact of robots and AI on the demand for labour in the future. Such techno-angst is nothing new and perhaps we can learn from the past what we need to worry about - and what we don't. Meet our speaker Alan Manning is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and Director of the Community Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at LSE (@CEP_LSE), which celebrates its 30th anniversary this year. Let us know what you think or ask Alan a question after you have watched the film via Twitter @alanmanning4 #LSEFestival This film is part of the 'Festival Shorts' series, 10-minute talks by LSE experts released during Festival week. Keywords: Technology, work, future of work, Alan Manning, AI, labour, Shaping the Post-COVID World.
01/03/218m 19s

We Are All in This Together: has COVID-19 taught us how to save the world?

Contributor(s): Dr Ganga Shreedhar, Professor Nick Chater, Sanchayan Banerjee, Dr Adam Oliver | Can the massive shift in the way we now relate to each other, and the rules we choose to live by, help us tackle other collective threats to humanity, like climate change? We need coordinated and cooperative collective action. Experts in behavioural public policy and sustainability discuss how the experience of the pandemic can be leveraged to enable new, transformative behaviours and policies. Meet our speakers and chair Sanchayan Banerjee (@SanchayanBanerj) is a third-year doctoral candidate in Environmental Economics at LSE. He is an Associate Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy and teaches in the area of applied environmental, developmental and quantitative economics. His doctoral thesis focusses on extending the theory of Nudge Plus, a modification of the toolkit of the policymaker which embeds reflective strategies in a nudge to improve its efficacy and preserve the autonomy and agency of the decision maker. Nick Chater (@NickJChater) is Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School. He works on the cognitive and social foundations of rationality and language. He has published more than 250 papers, co-authored or edited more than a dozen books, has won four national awards for psychological research, and has served as Associate Editor for the journals Cognitive Science, Psychological Review, and Psychological Science. He was elected a Fellow of the Cognitive Science Society in 2010 and a Fellow of the British Academy in 2012. He is co-founder of the research consultancy Decision Technology and is a member, representing behavioural science, on the UK’s Climate Change Committee. His is the author of The Mind is Flat (Penguin, 2018) Adam Oliver (@1969ajo) is a behavioural economist and behavioural public policy analyst at LSE. He has published and taught widely in the areas of health economics and policy, behavioural economics and behavioural public policy. He is a founding Editor in Chief of the journals Health Economics, Policy and Law and Behavioural Public Policy. He edited the book, also titled Behavioural Public Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2013), and authored The Origins of Behavioural Public Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and Reciprocity and the Art of Behavioural Public Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2019). Ganga Shreedhar (@geeshree) is Assistant Professor in Behavioural Sciences at LSE's Department of Psychological and Behavioural Sciences, and an Affiliate at the Department of Geography and Environment, The Grantham Research Institute for Climate Change and the Environment, and the Inclusion Initiative. She is an applied behavioural and experimental economist studying how to change human behaviour in ways that simultaneously benefit people and the planet by designing and analysing interventions that help understand consumer and citizen beliefs, preferences and behaviours. Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington (@jsskeffington) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE, Visiting Researcher at the Department of Political Science and Government at Aarhus University, and Associate Editor of the British Journal of Psychology. Her research focuses on the interface between socioeconomic conditions, social relations, and decision-making in personal and political domains. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change. The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) is an internationally recognised centre of research and teaching in social and public policy. From its foundation in 1912 it has carried out cutting edge research on core social problems, and helped to develop policy solutions. The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
01/03/2159m 22s

How to take control of your decisions

Contributor(s): Dr Barbara Fasolo, Dr Umar Taj | What is the next big decision you need to make? COVID-19 has had a profound impact on many of our behaviours. What is the impact it has had on the decisions we have made – or perhaps not made? In this session, Barbara and Umar will share tips based on decision science research and practical training which you can apply to your next decision and to shape the future to come. To get ready for the event, you might want to note down an important decision that you (or your family / team) is facing. If you wish, please go to this link and share it with us, before 22nd February. All responses as anonymous. Meet our speakers Barbara Fasolo (@barbarafasolo) is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science in the Department of Management, as well as Head of the Behavioural Research Lab and Director of the Executive Master in Behavioural Science at LSE. She is an expert in choice processes and choice architecture, with her work appearing in peer-reviewed journals, such as the Annual Review of Psychology and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and her work has been covered in media outlets, including the Harvard Business Review. She is Course Convenor of LSE’s online certificate course, Decision-making: Judgements, Biases, and Nudges. Umar Taj (@umar_taj) is guest teacher on the Executive master in Behavioural Science at LSE. He also delivers regular training and facilitation workshops, and has provided his services to over 50 global institutions. His interests lie in helping public and private institutions apply the latest insights from behavioural science to improve decision-making. His current projects span the domains of human resources, technology, health, finance, security, politics, education, and international development. He is the Deputy Course Convenor of LSE’s online certificate course, Decision-making: Judgements, Biases, and Nudges. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival's 'Skills for a Post-COVID World' series. LSE experts discuss research trends in their field about professional skills we need for success in a post-COVID world. The series is hosted by LSE Executive Education and Online Learning. Find out more about online certificate courses. The LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World is running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it.
01/03/2155m 11s

What We Owe Each Other: a new social contract

Contributor(s): Baroness Shafik, Juan Manuel Santos, Professor Amartya Sen | What should a social contract for the 21st century look like? Launching her new book, What We Owe Each Other, LSE Director Minouche Shafik draws on evidence from across the globe to identify key principles for a social contract for every society. She will be in conversation with Juan Manuel Santos and Amartya Sen. The social contract governs all aspects of society, from politics and law to our families and communities. Accelerating changes in technology, demography, climate and global health, as we have seen over the last year, will reshape our world in ways we have yet to fully grasp. How do we pool risks, share resources and balance individual with collective responsibility? What part do we each have to play? You can order the book, What We Owe Each Other: a new social contract, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Meet our speakers and chair Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Baroness Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. In 2020 the UK Government announced that she would be made a Life Peer in the House of Lords. Juan Manuel Santos Calderón (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. He was Colombia’s first Foreign Trade Minister, has been Minister of Finance and before being elected President, was Minister for National Defence. Prior to entering politics, President Santos was deputy director of El Tiempo newspaper, and wrote a weekly opinion column. He was awarded the King of Spain International Journalism Award and named president of the Freedom of Expression Commission for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA). In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. His research has ranged over social choice theory, economic theory, ethics and political philosophy, welfare economics, theory of measurement, decision theory, development economics, public health, and gender studies. Amartya Sen’s books have been translated into more than thirty languages and his awards include the Nobel Prize in Economics. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and British Academy. He is also a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Economic Association and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World running from Monday 1 to Saturday 6 March 2021, with a series of events exploring the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis and how social science research can shape it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival
01/03/211h 22m

A Letter on Feminist Peace

Contributor(s): | How could we create a world founded on an inclusive and intersectional concept of humanity and peaceful existence for all peoples? In September 2019, the Feminist International Law of Peace and Security project, at the LSE Centre for Women, Peace & Security, convened a workshop involving 19 legal academics and practitioners with the idea of drafting an alternative Security Council resolution to coincide with a number of anniversaries in 2020. The aim of the exercise was to reclaim the Women, Peace & Security agenda and to recast it as a transformative peace agenda, as originally envisaged by many women’s civil society groups at the time of its adoption. A year later, members of the team finalised the wording of a letter to the Member States of the General Assembly to be released on 21 September, International Peace Day. The letter draws attention to the failures of states to date to deliver on the promises of their forefathers at the founding of the United Nations and, in doing so, sets out a path forward to meet the twin aims of equality and peace, advocated for by decades of feminist activism. This film captures that letter in both voice and illustration; it is read by feminist and women’s rights activists in many languages and is interpreted through illustration. Download a rationale of the Letter Illustration by artist Rose (pdf)  Keywords: Centre for Women, Peace & Security, Letter on Feminist Peace, Security Council, feminism, equality, peace, activism, Shaping the Post-COVID World
01/03/219m 3s

The Costs of Connection: how data is colonizing human life and appropriates it

Contributor(s): Mutale Nkonde, Professor Ulises Ali Mejias, Professor Nick Couldry | Nick Couldry and Ulises Ali Mejias will discuss their book, The Costs of Connection: How Data Colonizes Human Life and Appropriates it for Capitalism. Couldry and Mejias argue that the role of data in society needs to be grasped as not only a development of capitalism, but as the start of a new phase in human history that rivals in importance the emergence of historic colonialism. This new "data colonialism" is based not on the extraction of natural resources or labour, but on the appropriation of human life through data, paving the way for a further stage of capitalism. Today’s transformations of social life through data must therefore be grasped within the long historical arc of dispossession as both a new colonialism and an extension of capitalism. Resistance requires challenging in their new material guises forms of coloniality that decolonial thinking has foregrounded for centuries. The struggle will be both broader and longer than many analyses of algorithmic power suppose, but for that reason critical responses are all the more urgent. New forms of solidarity are needed that help build connection on different terms from those currently on offer. Meet our speakers and chair Nick Couldry (@couldrynick) is Professor of Media Communications and Social Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and from 2017 has been a Faculty Associate at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. He is the author or editor of fourteen books including The Mediated Construction of Reality (with Andreas Hepp, Polity, 2016), Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice (Polity 2012), Why Voice Matters (Sage 2010), and Media: Why It Matters (Polity: October 2019). Ulises Ali Mejias (@UlisesAliMejias) is Professor of Communication Studies and director of the Institute for Global Engagement at the State University of New York, College at Oswego. He is a media scholar whose work encompasses critical internet studies, network theory and science, philosophy and sociology of technology, and political economy of digital media. He is the author of Off the Network: Disrupting the Digital World (University of Minnesota Press, 2013). Mutale Nkonde (@mutalenkonde) is the founding CEO of AI For the People (AFP), a non-profit communications agency. Prior to this Mutale worked in AI Governance. During that time she was part of the team that introduced the Algorithmic and Deep Fakes Algorithmic Acts, as well as the No Biometric Barriers to Housing Act to the US House of Representatives. She started her career as a broadcast journalist and produced documentaries for the BBC, CNN & ABC. She now also writes widely on race and tech, as well as speaking at conferences across the world and currently is on a fellowship at the Digital Civil Society Lab at Stanford and an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center of Internet and Society at Harvard. Bingchun Meng is an Associate Professor in the Department for Media and Communications at LSE. Her research interests include gender and the media, political economy of media industries, communication governance, and comparative media studies. She has published widely on these topic areas on leading international journals. Her book The Politics of Chinese Media: Consensus and Contestation was published by Palgrave in early 2018. You can order the book, The Costs of Connection (UK delivery only), from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. More about this event The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. The Department is ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in the field of media and communications (2020 QS World University Rankings). Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMedia
25/02/211h 28m

Making Your Voice Heard

Contributor(s): Professor Connson Locke | Drawing on research from her latest book, Making Your Voice Heard, Connson Locke will look at how to develop your leadership presence and be more influential in the workplace. Discover a fresh approach to influence, grounded in psychological research, and learn how to make your voice heard, regardless of your background or gender. How do you exercise influence when those around you have as much or more power than you do? Where does your power come from? Connson’s book, based on her hugely popular Guardian Masterclass ‘Developing your presence, power, and influence’, draws on the latest research in social psychology and looks to answer why some people are more influential than others and what can make people take notice. This practical guide will help you hone your personal style and enhance your presence and influence. Meet our speaker and chair Connson Chou Locke (@connsonlocke) joined LSE's Department of Management in 2008 where she teaches leadership, organisational behaviour, and negotiation and decision making. She received the Department of Management Outstanding Teaching Contribution Award in 2013, was Highly Commended for Inspirational Teaching in the Student-Led Teaching Excellence Awards in 2015 and 2017, and received the LSE Excellence in Education Award in 2018. Professor Locke holds a PhD and MSc in Business Administration (Organisational Behaviour) from the University of California at Berkeley and a BA in Sociology from Harvard University where she graduated with honours. You can pre-order the book, Making Your Voice Heard, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Conor Gearty is a Professor of Human Rights Law at LSE. More about this event The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVoice
24/02/211h 1m

A Polity Divided: empire, nation, and the construction of the British welfare state

Contributor(s): Professor Gurminder K Bhambra | The Annual British Journal of Sociology Lecture will examine national welfare in the context of being an imperial polity organised around hierarchies – and intersections – of class and race, and the consequences of this for social and political structures. Meet our speaker and chair Gurminder K Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex. Nigel Dodd (@nigelbdodd) is Professor of Sociology at LSE and Editor-in-Chief of the British Journal of Sociology. More about this event The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change. The British Journal of Sociology is a leading international sociological journal, with a focus on the social and democratic sociological questions of our times, the journal leads the debate on key methodological and theoretical questions and controversies in contemporary sociology.
24/02/211h 31m

Philanthropy - from Aristotle to Zuckerberg

Contributor(s): Paul Vallely, Professor Rob Reich, Fran Perrin | Join us for this talk by Paul Vallely who will be discussing his new book, Philanthropy: From Aristotle to Zuckerberg. The super-rich are silently and secretly shaping our world. In this exploration of historical and contemporary philanthropy, author Paul Vallely reveals how this far-reaching change came about. Vivid with anecdote and scholarly insight, this survey - from the ancient Greeks to today's high-tech geeks - provides an original take on the history of philanthropy. It shows how giving has, variously, been a matter of honour, altruism, religious injunction, political control, moral activism, enlightened self-interest, public good, personal fulfilment and plutocratic manipulation. Highly engaging and meticulously researched, Paul Vallely's authoritative account of philanthropy then and now critiques the excessive utilitarianism of much modern philanthrocapitalism and points to how philanthropy can rediscover its soul. Meet our speakers and chair Fran Perrin is the Founder and Director of the Indigo Trust and was awarded an OBE in 2020 for her services to charity. Fran is also co-founder and Chair of the Board of 360Giving. She was formerly an advisor at the Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit, in the UK Cabinet Office. Rob Reich (@robreich) is a Professor of Political Science and, by courtesy, Professor of Philosophy at the Graduate School of Education, at Stanford University. He is the director of the Center for Ethics in Society and co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, both at Stanford University. He is the author most recently of Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better. Paul Vallely (@pvall) is a writer and consultant on philanthropy, ethics, religion and international development. He has worked as a journalist and campaigner with government, businesses, NGOs and churches. He produced award-winning reports from more than 30 countries, was co-author of the report of Prime Minister Tony Blair’s Commission for Africa and has advised Bob Geldof, Bono and others. He has written on political, cultural, ethical and religious issues in the New York Times, Sunday Times, Guardian, Times and Independent. He was made a CMG in the 2016 Honours List. You can order the book, Philanthropy - from Aristotle to Zuckerberg, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Stephan Chambers is the inaugural director of the Marshall Institute at LSE. He is also Professor in Practice at the Department of Management at LSE and Course Director for the new Executive Masters in Social Business and Entrepreneurship. More about this event The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMarshall
22/02/211h 1m

SHORTCAST | Data-driven Responses to COVID-19: opportunities and limitations

Contributor(s): Dr Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Alison Powell, Dr Edgar Whitley | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on Thursday 15th October 2020. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.
22/02/2124m 28s

SHORTCAST | Growth and solidarity: cities reimagining human mobility in Africa and Europe

Contributor(s): Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, Giuseppe Sala, Marta Foresti, Professor Ricky Burdett | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on Friday 9th October 2020. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.
22/02/2120m 10s

Resilience

Contributor(s): Professor Serene Khader, Professor Mark Neocleous, Dr David Westley, Dr David Bather Woods | What do we mean by the term ‘resilience’? We trace the philosophical traditions of resilience and explore critical perspectives on its modern forms. Meet our speakers and chair Serene Khader (@SereneKhader) is Professor and Jay Newman Chair in Philosophy of Culture at CUNY. Mark Neocleous is Professor of the Critique of Political Economy, Brunel University London. David Westley (@David_Westley) is Associate Professor of Psychology, Middlesex University. David Bather Woods (@dbatherwoods) is Senior Teaching Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Warwick. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Professor at the University of the Arts London. More about this event The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organisation that hosts weekly events exploring science, politics, and the arts from a philosophical perspective.
22/02/211h 14m

Gender and COVID-19: a feminist economic lens

Contributor(s): Professor Naila Kabeer | Join us for this first lecture in our new series organised in memory of Sylvia Chant which will be delivered by Naila Kabeer. Professor Kabeer will use a feminist economic lens to analyse a range of different impacts associated with COVID-19 and to explore the kinds of policies that such a lens would suggest for a more resilient and equitable future. Meet our speaker and chair Naila Kabeer (@N_Kabeer) is Professor of Gender and Development at the Department of Gender Studies and Department of International Development at LSE. Eric Neumayer is Professor of Environment and Development and Pro-Director (PVC) Planning and Resources at LSE. More about this event The Sylvia Chant Lectures are organised in memory of Sylvia Chant, Professor of Development Geography. The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change. LSE Gender (@LSEGenderTweet) pioneers intersectional, interdisciplinary and transnational teaching and research, addressing the tenacity of gendered power relations and gendered inequalities in times of global transformations. Established in 1993, LSE Gender is the largest Department of Gender Studies in Europe. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
18/02/211h 1m

Wealth Inequality Across the Globe

Contributor(s): Professor Kwang-Yeong Shin, Svetlana Mareeva, Professor Li Chunling, Professor Louis Chauvel, Professor André J. Caetano | This event will introduce a special issue of The Journal of Chinese Sociology, which will showcase new analyses of wealth inequality and their implications for social stratification and inequality in comparative perspective. Chaired by Mike Savage, the contributions will range across Russia, China, South Korea, Brazil, as well as Europe and North America, to reflect on the size of the wealth gap, its dimensions and its significance for remaking traditional class divides. Meet our speakers and chair André J. Caetano is Professor of Sociology and Demography at the Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. His research focuses mainly on work and labour market, race/ethnicity inequalities and stratification methodology. Louis Chauvel is Professor of Sociology at the University of Luxembourg. His research mainly focuses on social welfare, income and wealth and social change in a comparative perspective. Li Chunling is Professor of Sociology at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. Svetlana Mareeva is Center Director of the Institute of Social Policy, Higher School of Economics (HSE) Moscow. Celi Scalon is Professor of Sociology at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro whose research focuses on social stratification and inequalities. Kwang-Yeong Shin is Professor of Sociology at Chung-Ang University in Seoul, Korea. He is also joint professorships in the Department of German and European Studies and the Cultural Studies. His research interests include the impact of the transformation of the labor market and population on social inequality, historical social democracy in Scandinavia, and neoliberal turns and the rise of precariat in East Asia. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and co-founder of LSE International Inequalities Institute leading a research theme 'Wealth, Elites and Tax Justice'. More about this event This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
18/02/211h 27m

How was Brexit for you? a reflection on what we learnt

Contributor(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Baroness Hoey, Dr Gerard Lyons, Sir Ivan Rogers | Brexit represents the biggest systemic shock to the UK economy, society and politics for generations. Adapting to the 2016 referendum result has confronted established assumptions about the system, created the need to shift behaviours, and raised new questions about the model to be championed – while institutions struggle with new policy dilemmas, often of a transformative nature. So, what are we learning and what do we still need to learn if the UK is to make a success of Brexit? The panel will consider the changes occurring across government, the economy and society. Meet our speakers and chair Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. Catharine Hoey (@CatharineHoey) is a non aligned Peer who took her seat in 2020. After 30 years as the Labour MP for Vauxhall, she stood down at the December 2019 election. During her time as an MP, Baroness Hoey served as a Home Office Minister and was then the first female Sports Minister. A vocal campaigner to Leave the EU, she co chaired Labour Leave and spoke on many all party platforms across the country. Her support for her home country of Northern Ireland has been constant throughout her career. Gerard Lyons (@DrGerardLyons) is an economist and Chief Economic Strategist at Netwealth Investments, having previously served as Chief Economic Adviser to Boris Johnson while he was Mayor of London. Ivan Rogers is the former UK Permanent Representative to the EU. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Programme, 'Brexit and Beyond'. The LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond is a dedicated series to stimulate the public debate and informed discussion about this most pivotal topic. It comprises a variety of events, targeting LSE staff and students, as well as the general public and specific categories of policy-makers, practitioners and professionals working on Brexit; with the aim of continuing to shape the discussion surrounding its complex and uncertain agenda. The Programme is organised by LSE's European Institute and School of Public Policy. The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
17/02/211h 34m

"World on the Edge": the crisis of the western liberal order

Contributor(s): Professor John J. Mearsheimer, Professor Beate Jahn, Professor G. John Ikenberry | This event will debate the crisis of the liberal order: is the cause of the crisis liberalism itself, or does it have as much to do with Trump and the rise of populism as anything else? Explore the clash between liberalism and realism. Meet our speakers and chair G. John Ikenberry is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University in the Department of Politics and the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. He is also Co-Director of Princeton’s Center for International Security Studies. Ikenberry is also a Global Eminence Scholar at Kyung Hee University in Seoul, Korea. Beate Jahn is Professor of International Relations, Head of the Department of International Relations and President of the European International Studies Association (EISA). John J. Mearsheimer is the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, where he has taught since 1982. Michael Cox was appointed to a Chair at the LSE in 2002, having previously held positions in the UK at The Queen's University of Belfast and the Department of International Politics, Aberystwyth. He helped establish the Cold War Studies Centre at the LSE in 2004 and later co-founded LSE IDEAS in 2008 with Arne Westad. More about this event The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. It is ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
16/02/211h 29m

Let’s Talk Careers in a Post-COVID world

Contributor(s): Dorie Clark, Dowshan Humzah, Professor Connson Locke, Simon Ong, Helen Tupper | The impacts of COVID-19 on career prospects will differ across individuals. In this session we will discuss the groups of people who have advanced and those who have been left behind during the pandemic, along with discussing how those who have been left behind can adapt in a post pandemic world. In this session Grace Lordan will discuss the lessons we can learn from the social science literature about how we should react to the world of work in this time of uncertainty. In this conversation style panel Grace will also be asking the panel of career experts for opinions and suggestions on how to advance in the world of work during and after the pandemic. Meet our speakers and chair Dorie Clark (@dorieclark) helps individuals and companies get their best ideas heard in a crowded, noisy world. She has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50, and was honored as the #1 Communication Coach in the world at the Marshall Goldsmith Coaching Awards. She is a keynote speaker and teaches for Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School. She is the author of Entrepreneurial You, which was named one of Forbes’ Top 5 Business Books of the Year, as well as Reinventing You and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. magazine. She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, and consults and speaks for clients such as Google, Yale University, and the World Bank. She is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School, a producer of a multiple Grammy-winning jazz album, and a Broadway investor. Dowshan Humzah (@DowshanHumzah) is an independent board director, known for business transformation and ‘access to opportunity’. As an executive, he delivered growth and digital innovation having held senior roles with RSA Insurance, Virgin Media, Orange, Procter & Gamble and four start-ups. Dowshan’s background explains his passion for ‘access to opportunity’ for those underestimated. In addition, he is known for developing diversity of POETS (Perspective, Outlook, Experience, Thought, Sector and Social Background) as an organisational imperative. His non-executive roles include Director of Board Apprentice Global, having been a Trustee of the MS Society and part of the Steering Board of 50:50 Parliament. Connson Locke (@connsonlocke) joined the Department of Management at LSE in 2008 where she teaches leadership and organisational behaviour. Over the past 30 years, her career has taken many twists and turns, starting in the non-profit world in Boston (USA), then management consulting in Hong Kong, training and development across the Asia Pacific region, and ending up as an academic in London. Her new book, Making Your Voice Heard (out on 4 March), uses the research on power and influence to help people speak up to those who have more power than they do. Everything that Simon Ong (@SimonAlexanderO) does is built to inspire people to see their world differently and ignite their imagination of what is truly possible so that they can live a better story. As an award-winning coach and motivational speaker, he has been interviewed on Sky News, BBC and Forbes, and has spoken at some of the planet's most successful organisations such as Virgin, Unilever, Salesforce and Microsoft. Helen Tupper (@HelenTupper) is the co-founder and CEO of Amazing If, an award-winning career development company with a mission to make work better for everyone. She is co-author of The Sunday Times No.1 Business Bestseller: The Squiggly Career and host of the UK’s no.1 careers podcast: Squiggly Careers. She also works as a Trustee for Working Families, a UK charity with a mission to support families and carers with their work and life commitments. Prior to Amazing If she held leadership roles for Microsoft, Virgin and BP and was awarded the FT & 30% Club’s Women in Leadership MBA Scholarship. Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is an associate professor in behavioural science at LSE. Her research focuses on why some people have successful lives as compared to others because of factors beyond their own control. She is the founder and director of The Inclusion Initiative, a research centre at LSE and the author of Think Big, Take Small Steps and Build the Future you Want.
16/02/211h 29m

Shaping Cities in an Urban Age

Contributor(s): Professor Ricky Burdett, Kostas Bakoyannis, Professor Lila Leontidou, Professor Georgios Petrakos | As cities struggle with the combined pressures of a killer disease and economic stress, the impacts of urban form on well-being, inequality and resilience are brought into even sharper focus. Using research from LSE’s global Urban Age programme – including new research on Athens - the illustrated lecture reviews how urban planning, governance and design are critical to shaping urban lives in the 21st century. Meet our speakers and chair Ricky Burdett (@BURDETTR) is Professor of Urban Studies at LSE and Director of LSE Cities, a global centre of research and teaching at LSE which received the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education 2016-18. At LSE he teaches in the Executive MSc in Cities and other courses and co-directs the Urban Age programme. Kostas Bakoyannis is Mayor of Athens. He served as Governor of Central Greece from 2014 to 2019 and as Mayor of Karpenissi, from 2011 to 2014. Βorn in 1978 in Athens, he graduated from Millfield School (UK) in 1996 before going to Brown University (USA) to study History and International Relations. He continued with postgraduate studies in Public Policy, with a specialization in Macroeconomics, at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government (USA). He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and International Relations, from the University of Oxford (2019). He has worked at the Greek Ministry of Foreign Affairs and as executive manager in the private sector in Athens. He has also held positions in the European Parliament in Brussels and the World Bank in Kosovo. He is a council member of the European Council on Foreign Relations and a Greek Leadership Council member of the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). Lila Leontidou is Professor Emerita of Geography and European Culture at the Hellenic Open University (ΕΑΠ). She has been elected at different times a Senior Lecturer and a Professor in four Greek Universities and a British one (Kings College London), from which she returned to Greece in 1996, in order to lead the establishment of the very first degree-course of Geography in the country, at the University of the Aegean. Her last professorship was at the EAΠ since 2001, where she has been twice the Dean of the School of Humanities. She has published 250 books and papers in Greek, English, French, and her work has been translated into Spanish, Italian, German and Japanese. George Petrakos is an economist and a Professor at the Department of Planning and Regional Development, University of Thessaly. His research interests include urban and regional economics, development, structural change, integration and regional policy. He has served a 4-years term as the Rector of the University of Thessaly. He has served the Government of Greece for 2.5 years as the Secretary General for Investment and Development in the Ministry of Economy and Development with responsibility for key aspects of the development policy of Greece, while in the same period he served as the President of the JESSICA and JEREMIE Investment Funds. In addition, he has served as the Vice-President of the European Regional Science Association (ERSA) (2007-11) and as a member of the Council of the Regional Science Association International (RSAI) (2008-11). Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics in the European Institute at LSE, where he is also Director of the Hellenic Observatory. More about this event The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. The event is also part of the Hellenic Observatory Athens Lecture Series, co-organised with the National Bank of Greece and supported by the LSE Hellenic Alumni Association and part of the LSE Athens Urban Age Task Force organised by LSE Cities and the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft. The National Bank of Greece (@NationalBankGR), backed by its 179-year participation in the country's economic and social life, is one of the leading Greek financial organisations, with strong tradition and noteworthy contribution to the economic and social transformation of Greece. The Bank’s broad customer base, respected brand name, strong market share in deposits and enhanced capital adequacy ratios secure it with the liquidity needed to finance Greek businesses and reflect the long-standing relationship of trust it enjoys with its clientele. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
11/02/211h 49m

Critical Race Theory and the Black Radical Tradition: engaging with structural racism in education

Contributor(s): Professor Paul Warmington, Professor Sabina Vaught | In the context of a global uprising for racial justice and the expansion of movements such as #BlackLivesMatter, universities have the opportunity and obligation to address structural racism. In the UK the backlash to these efforts has been swift. In October of 2020, members of Parliament attacked Critical Race Theory (CRT) and any institution that teaches it. Since then, CRT has entered into popular conversation in relation to schooling in the UK. But what does CRT really say about education and schooling? What connection does CRT have to the #BlackLivesMatter movement and global Black radical traditions? LSE EmbRace and LSE’s Eden Centre invite Sabina Vaught and Paul Warmington to engage in a dialogue on the topic of Critical Race Theory and education. Meet our speakers and chair Sabina Vaught is Professor and Inaugural Chair of the new Department of Teaching, Learning, and Leading in the School of Education at the University of Pittburgh. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh in 2020, Professor Vaught was scholar-in-residence at The Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington. At the University of Oklahoma, she established the Carceral Studies Consortium. In her scholarly work, Professor Vaught draws on a constellation of knowledge traditions that help make sense of insurgent and counterinsurgent movements in education: feminisms, the Black radical tradition, Indigenous studies, and legal studies/Critical Race Theory. Her most recent book, Compulsory: Education and the Dispossession of Youth in a Prison School (University of Minnesota Press, 2017), is an ethnographic study inside a U.S. state juvenile prison schooling system. Paul Warmington is Professor in the Department for Education Studies, University of Warwick. Professor Warmington has taught, written and researched on issues of race, class, education and social justice for over thirty years. He was one of the first UK academics to explore Critical Race Theory and has written about CRT's development in the British context. He has worked in higher education since 2000, teaching, researching and writing extensively on sociological and cultural aspects of education. Prior to this, Professor Warmington taught for eleven years in further education, specialising in English and in Black Studies. He teaches at BA, Masters and doctoral levels. His recent writing focuses race equality and education policy, and vocational education Akile Ahmet is the Senior Academic Developer for Inclusive Education in LSE’s Eden Centre. Central to Dr Ahmet’s work is the implementation of LSE’s Inclusive Education Action Plan under LSE’s new Race Equity Framework. She was previously a Senior Lecturer in the sociology of race and racism at Middlesex University where she developed, taught and led modules on race and racism, deconstructing sociology and race and social justice. More about this event This event takes place on the 56th anniversary of Malcolm X's speech delivered at LSE on 11 February, 1965, and marks LSE EmbRace launching its inaugural By Any Means Necessary event series. EmbRace (@lseembrace) is LSE's BME staff network. EmbRace exists to raise awareness of and influence change around culture and diversity issues which affect LSE staff. It seeks to promote mutual understanding through equality, transparency, respect and recognition. The aim of the network is to provide support as well as development and networking opportunities for all members. The Eden Centre (@EdenLSE), established in October 2019, is a pro-active, developmental centre of education expertise with a clear focus on academic staff development, curriculum enrichment and digital innovation. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECRT
11/02/211h 31m

The Recurring Crises of American Democracy

Contributor(s): Professor Robert Lieberman, Professor Suzanne Mettler | Join us for a discussion of America’s current predicament and how it differs from past threats to democracy in the US. You can order the book at Four Threats: The Recurring Crises of American Democracy. Meet our speakers and chair Robert Lieberman (@r_lieberman) is Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. He studies American political development, race and American politics, and public policy. He has also written extensively about the development of American democracy and the links between American and comparative politics. His most recent book is Four Threats: The Recurring Crises of American Democracy (St. Martin’s Press, 2020), co-authored with Suzanne Mettler. In 2021, he will be the John G. Winant Visiting Professor of Government at the University of Oxford. Suzanne Mettler (@SuzanneMettler1) is the John L. Senior Professor of American Institutions in the Government Department at Cornell University. Her research and teaching interests include American political development, inequality, public policy, political behavior, and democracy. She is the author of six books, including, most recently, Four Threats: The Recurring Crises of American Democracy (St. Martin’s Press, 2020), co-authored with Robert C. Lieberman. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the recipient of Guggenheim and Radcliffe Fellowships, and serves on the boards of the Scholars Strategy Network and the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. More about this event The United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Its mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
10/02/2158m 4s

Going for Growth

Contributor(s): Professor John Van Reenen | How can the UK and the world get back to sustainable growth following the COVID-19 pandemic? Pulling together the lessons of 30 years of work on technology, management and productivity, John Van Reenen will argue that innovation is the key to rekindling our economies. Meet our speaker and chair John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Ronald Coase School Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science and was previously Director of CEP from 2003-2016. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. More about this event The Centre for Economic Performance (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at LSE. Established by the ESRC in 1990, pit is now one of the leading applied economic research groups in Europe. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
08/02/211h 6m

Spaced Out

Contributor(s): Dr Katie Beswick, Dr Julia King, Professor Antoine Picon | City centres have experienced an exodus. Social distancing has emptied work places and theatres, and transformed the way we move through parks, streets, and supermarkets. At the same time, lockdown has meant that we are ever-present in our own homes. How can we plan for a future where human beings can share both public and private spaces? Join Katie Beswick, Julia King and Antoine Picon to discuss what this new COVID-19 world might look like. Meet our speakers and chair Katie Beswick (@DrKBeswick) is an author and Senior Lecturer in Drama at the University of Exeter. Julia King (@atjuliaking) is Research Fellow at LSE Cities. Antoine Picon is G. Ware Travelstead Professor of the History of Architecture and Technology at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Professor at the University of the Arts London. More about this event The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organisation that hosts weekly events exploring science, politics, and the arts from a philosophical perspective. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
08/02/211h 14m

Electoral Hostility: is the sanctity of elections under threat?

Contributor(s): Jon Davies, Dr Sarah Harrison, Professor Michael Bruter, Dr Sandra Obradović, Adam Drummond, Thomas Hicks | A mere few years ago, who would have ever expected some people unhappy with the results of a US Presidential election to forcibly enter the Capitol to prevent a democratic result from being certified? Between the disruption from external threats such as covid and terrorism and the ever-increasing tension and frustration between voters, is the sanctity of elections under threat? Is there a risk that some will consider that electoral democracy – the very foundation of our modern societies – should no longer apply when they are unhappy with its outcomes? Join us on Global Elections Day to celebrate the first anniversary of our Electoral Psychology Observatory and discuss the future of the sanctity of electoral democracy when it is douby challenged by external threats and electoral hostility. Meet our speakers and chair Michael Bruter is Professor of Political Science in the Department of Government and Director of the Electoral Psychology Observatory at LSE. Jon Davies is CEO of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association which strengthens parliamentary democracy and relationships around the Commonwealth. Adam Drummond is Associate Director at Opinium Research, an online research agency based in London. Adam is Head of Political Polling, running regular voting intention and political surveys. Sarah Harrison is Associate Professorial Research Fellow in the Department of Government and Deputy Director of the Electoral Psychology Observatory at LSE. Thomas Hicks (@RedBlue2024) is Commissioner for the Federal Electoral Assistance Commission in the United States and served on the commission since 2014, having been nominated by President Obama. He was Chairman of the commission for two term and has focused his efforts on voter access. Sandra Obradović (pictured) is Associate Researcher at the Electoral Psychology Observatory and Lecturer in Psychology at the Open University. Florian Foos (@FlorianFoos) is Assistant Professor in Political Behaviour in the Department of Government at LSE, with research interests in election campaigns, opinion change and political activism.
04/02/211h 26m

Building a Caring Economy

Contributor(s): Madeleine Bunting, Professor Diane Elson, Professor Lynne Segal | The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has made us aware of an acute crisis of care that lies at the heart of global inequalities. Care has long been marginalised and neglected as a central part of our economy. It’s a crisis not just of care workers but moves from the intimate domain of our households to global planetary care itself. What is this crisis of care, how should we think about care, and what can be done to make care more central to what we value? How do we build back our global economy by putting care – care of people and care of the environment - at its centre? These crucial questions will be addressed through a discussion of three major recent interventions: The Labours of Love, The Care Manifesto and Creating a Caring Economy. You can order the books, Labours of Love: The Crisis of Care and The Care Manifesto (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. You can access a copy of the report by the Commission on a Gender-Equal Economy and Women's Budget Group at Creating a Caring Economy. Meet our speakers and chair Madeleine Bunting is an award winning freelance writer and former Guardian columnist and associate editor. Her recent books include Love of Country and Island Song. Diane Elson is a feminist economist who has published widely on gender equality and economic policy. She was awarded the Leontief Prize for Advancing Frontiers of Economic Thought in 2016. She was Chair of the Commission on a Gender Equal Economy. Lynne Segal (@lynne_segal) is Anniversary Professor of Psychology & Gender Studies at Birkbeck, University of London. Her many books include Beyond the Fragments (1980), What is to be done about the family? (1983), Why Feminism? Gender, Psychology, Politics (1999), Slow Motion: Changing Masculinities, Changing Men (2007), Straight Sex (1994), Making Trouble (2007) and Out of Time (2013). Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor of Anthropology at LSE and leads the International Inequalities Institute research theme on Global Economies of Care. Her most recent book is the award winning ‘Nightmarch: Among India’s Revolutionary Guerrillas’. More about this event This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
04/02/211h 31m

The Epic Potential of Empowering Women

Contributor(s): Professor Linda Scott | Linda Scott coined the phrase “Double X Economy” to address the systemic exclusion of women from the world financial order. In her new book, which she will talk about at this event, Scott argues on the strength of hard data and on-the-ground experience that removing those barriers to women's success is a win for everyone, regardless of gender. Meet our speaker and chair Linda Scott (@ProfLindaScott) is an internationally renowned expert on women's economic development, and Emeritus DP World Professor for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the University of Oxford. She is founder of the Power Shift Forum for Women in the World Economy, which brings together leaders from across sectors; and founder and senior advisor of the Global Business Coalition for Women’s Economic Empowerment, a consortium of major multinationals working to empower women in developing countries. She was formerly Senior Consulting Fellow at Chatham House, and is a frequent consultant to the World Bank Group on gender economics. Linda Scott’s work has been covered by The Economist, BBC, New York Times, Guardian and Financial Times, and Prospect magazine has twice listed her among their Top 25 global thinkers. Her latest book is Double X Economy. You can order the book, The Double X Economy (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Stephan Chambers is the inaugural director of the Marshall Institute at LSE. He is also Professor in Practice at the Department of Management at LSE and Course Director for the new Executive Masters in Social Business and Entrepreneurship. From 2000 to 2014 he directed the University of Oxford's MBA. More about this event The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
03/02/2156m 37s

Our Slim Window of Opportunity: what the climate change agenda must achieve in 2021

Contributor(s): Patricia Espinosa | In a world beset by a global pandemic and an existential climate change emergency, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change Patricia Espinosa will provide her vision for 2021 and discuss why this year’s global climate change negotiations, or COP26, will play a crucial role with respect to addressing climate change, building forward from COVID-19 and reinforcing the very concept of multilateralism itself. Meet our speaker and chair Patricia Espinosa (@PEspinosaC) is the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Ambassador of Mexico to Germany since 2012 and from 2001 to 2002, Ms Espinosa was Minister of Foreign Affairs of Mexico from 2006 to 2012, bringing more than 30 years of experience at highest levels in international relations, specialized in climate change, global governance, sustainable development, gender equality and protection of human rights. Nicholas Stern (@lordstern1) is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Head of the India Observatory at the London School of Economics and Political Science. More about this event The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUNFCCC
03/02/2159m 4s

Building Resilience Through Data Centricity

Contributor(s): Jacky Wright | Join us for this fireside chat with Jacky Wright, Chief Digital Officer and Corporate Vice President, Microsoft US. Meet our speaker and chair Jacky Wright (@WrightJacky) is the Chief Digital Officer and Corporate Vice President, Microsoft US, where she inspires and leads teams to help businesses leverage technology to drive innovation, adopt sustainable and accessible business models, and digitally transform. Wright rejoined Microsoft in 2019 after completing a two-year secondment as Chief Digital and Information Officer (CDIO) for HMRC, the British Government tax department. Jacky has extensive experience leading large-scale organisations driving digital transformation and market making solutions. Some of her previous roles include CIO roles at Microsoft, BP and GE. Wright is widely recognized as a transformational global leader, innovative technologist and recognized STEM advocate. She uses her broad platform to drive thought leadership not just for the positive impact of digital transformation for business, but also for social, economic and environmental change. As a woman of colour, her passion, advocacy and influence to create a truly inclusive world is demonstrated in the various forums where she regularly speaks on diversity, digital inclusion and the power of inclusive leadership. Kenneth Benoit (@kenbenoit) is Director of LSE's Data Science Institute and Professor of Computational Social Science in the Department of Methodology at LSE. More about this event The Data Science Institute forms the institutional cornerstone of the LSE's involvement in data science. Working alongside the academic departments across the School, the DSI's mission is to foster the study of data science and new forms of data with a focus on their social, economic, and political aspects. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEData
02/02/2159m 1s

Should we be optimistic?

Contributor(s): Dr Tali Sharot, Dr Joan Costa-Font, Professor David de Meza, Dr Chris Kutarna | Despite our growing collective pessimism about the state of the world, when it comes to our own lives, research suggests we are generally optimistic.   After a year that will remain synonymous with anxiety, isolation, endless devastating news reports, and for too many – loss, this episode of LSE IQ asks: is optimism is good for us? And, beyond the effects on our wellbeing, is optimism an accurate lens through which to view the world?   Addressing these issues are: Dr Tali Sharot, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at UCL; Dr Joan Costa-Font, Associate Professor in Health Economics at LSE; Dr David de Meza, Professor of Management at LSE; and Dr Chris Kutarna, author of Age of Discovery: Navigating the Risks and Rewards of our New Renaissance.     Contributors   Dr Tali Sharot Dr Joan Costa-Font Professor David de Meza Dr Chris Kutarna     Research   The Optimism Bias: Why we're wired to look on the bright side by Tali Sharot. Neither an Optimist Nor a Pessimist Be: Mistaken Expectations Lower Well-Being by David de Meza and Chris Dawson in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Why optimism and entrepreneurship are not always a good mix for business by David de Meza and Chris Dawson in The Conversation. Optimism and the perceptions of new risks by Elias Mossialos, Caroline Rudisdill and Joan Costa-Font in the Journal of Risk Research. Explaining optimistic old age disability and longevity expectations by Joan Costa-Font and Montserrat Costa-Font in Social Indicators Research. Does optimism help us during a pandemic? by Joan Costa-Font. Age of Discovery: Navigating the Risks and Rewards of Our New Renaissance by Chris Kutarna and Ian Goldin.
02/02/2139m 43s

Defending the Future: gender, conflict and environmental peace

Contributor(s): Hannah Bond, Bineta Diop, Helen Kezie-Nwoha | There is a growing recognition of the need for the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda to take into account how the climate crisis poses risks to women and girls’ peace and security, particularly in conflict and post-conflict contexts. Food security, water insecurity and displacement are issues affecting women and girls due to extreme weather and the climate emergency. The intersection of WPS, climate change, ecological destruction and conflict or post-conflict situations thus raises a myriad of issues. This discussion project addresses these issues and launches a report written in partnership between LSE's Centre for Women, Peace and Security, the Women’s International Peace Centre and Gender Action for Peace and Security.  Meet our speakers and chair Hannah Bond (@h_rbond) is Director of Gender Action for Peace and Security (GAPS). Hannah has worked with CSOs and government in the UK and Global South. In the early stages of her career, Hannah worked for the UK Women’s National Commission, focusing on violence against women. She has since worked for humanitarian and development NGOs in the Europe and Sub-Saharan Africa and for the British Embassy in Addis Ababa where she worked on Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somaliland. Hannah lived and worked for six years in Ethiopia, where she specialised in conflict, gender, human rights, community-based development and economic empowerment. Hannah focused on conflict and gender in her Master’s degree at King’s College London. Bineta Diop (@AUBinetaDiop) is currently the Special Envoy of the Chairperson of the African Union Commission on Women, Peace and Security. She is the founder and President of Femmes Africa Solidarité (FAS), an international NGO based in Geneva with its operation office in Dakar/Senegal. The organisation seeks to foster, strengthen and promote the leadership role of women in conflict prevention, management and resolution in Africa. Mme Diop played an instrumental role in the adoption of the Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa as well as the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa. She has led peacebuilding programs as well as many women’s peace and security initiatives. Helen Kezie-Nwoha (@keziehelen) is a feminist peace activist, women human rights defender and the Executive Director at The Women’s International Peace Centre. Helen has an academic background in gender and international development with over 20 years of experience working on women’s rights, gender, peace building, conflict resolution and governance. She has led peace advocacy efforts at international, regional and national levels specifically in Africa and Asia. Her research interests focus on women’s peace efforts and women’s participation in peace building and post conflict reconstruction; documenting women and girls’ refugee experiences; and gender and humanitarian response. Keina Yoshida (@intlawninja) is a Research Officer in the Centre for Women, Peace, and Security, where she works on the AHRC funded project Feminist Approaches to the International Law of Peace and Security (FILPS) led by Professor Christine Chinkin and Dr Louise Arimatsu. Keina is researching the links between the environment, nature, sustainable development goals, the gendered causes and impacts of violence against women, and structural inequalities in the context of international legal conceptions of peace and security. More about this event The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
01/02/211h 27m

SHORTCAST | Is it Time to Cancel Household Debt?

Contributor(s): Sarah-Jayne Clifton, Professor Deborah James, Dr Johnna Montgomerie, Dr Jerome Roos | Does the COVID-19 crisis mean that the time has now arrived for mass household debt cancellation? Central among the many social and economic policy challenges arising in our changed world is the pressing need to address high levels of household debt. Despite the lessons of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, our pre-COVID-19 economic order depended to a dangerous degree on extensive household borrowing – both to maintain household living standards and to fuel growth. The resultant heavy household debt burdens left advanced economies precariously ill-prepared for a shock such as a global pandemic. COVID-19 has put millions out of work and reduced incomes for many more, shattering households’ ability to repay debts and calling time on a cycle of ever-expanding borrowing and debt extension. A cycle of default spirals through the economy – from consumers and tenants to businesses and landlords, financial institutions and investors. The lifting of lockdown and measures to support firms may mean little if debt-burdened households lack resources to fund living necessities and to spend in reopened businesses. The question arises as to whether individual households, as well as our wider economy and society, can ever recover and rebuild without first escaping from the burden of excessive debt. This event considers these questions and considers how policy might move us beyond a debt-dependent economy in the post-Covid world. Sarah-Jayne Clifton (@sarahjclifton) is the Director of the Jubilee Debt Campaign, a leading organisation for research in global debt issues, education about their causes and solutions, and campaigning in solidarity with indebted people and countries. Deborah James (@djameslse) is a Professor of Anthropology at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Fellow of the British Academy. She is the author of Money from Nothing: Indebtedness and Aspiration in South Africa and has just completed work on an ESRC-funded project entitled An ethnography of advice: between market, society and the declining welfare state. Johnna Montgomerie (@j_montgomerie) is Head of the Department of European & International Studies, and Reader in International Political Economy, King’s College London. She is the author of Should We Abolish Household Debts? Jerome Roos (@JeromeRoos) is an LSE Fellow in International Political Economy at the LSE Department of International Development. He researches the political economy of global finance, sovereign debt, and international crisis management, and is the author of Why Not Default? Joseph Spooner (@jtspooner) is an Associate Professor in LSE Law and is the author of Bankruptcy: the Case for Relief in an Economy of Debt. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Our community is one of the largest in the School, and has played a major role in policy debates, policy-making and the education of lawyers and law teachers globally. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, convening a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis, collaboratively producing a roadmap for the future.
29/01/2126m 40s

Mission Economy: a moonshot guide to changing capitalism

Contributor(s): Professor Mariana Mazzucato | Join us for this public lecture by Mariana Mazzucato who will outline her new approach for governments to deal with inequality, disease and climate change. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, capitalism was stuck. It had no answer to the different challenges facing the world – from those related to health to digital privacy to the climate crisis. Taking inspiration from President Kennedy’s ‘moonshot’ programmes that successfully co-ordinated public and private sectors to put a man on the moon, Mariana Mazzucato calls for the same level of boldness and experimentation to be applied to the biggest social and political issues of our time. She argues we need to rethink the capacities and role of government within the economy and society, and above all recover a sense of public purpose. Meet our speaker and chair Mariana Mazzucato (@MazzucatoM) is Professor in the Economics of Innovation and Public Value at University College London (UCL), where she is Founding Director of the Institute for Innovation & Public Purpose (IIPP). Her highly-acclaimed book The Entrepreneurial State investigates the critical role the state plays in driving growth—and her book The Value of Everything looks at how value creation needs to be rewarded over value extraction. Her latest book Mission Economy: A Moonshot Guide to Changing Capitalism will be released in January 2021. She advises policy makers around the world on innovation-led, inclusive and sustainable growth. You can order the book, Mission Economy: a moonshot guide to changing capitalism, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Alan Manning is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. More about this event The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
29/01/211h 0m

Power and Impunity: what Donald Trump and Boris didn’t learn from the Ancient Greeks

Contributor(s): Professor Michael Cox, Professor Simon Goldhill, Dr Johanna Hanink | Are we living in a world marked by a new impunity of power? Political leaders discard established norms and taboos that have guided the behaviour of their predecessors and, in doing so, they win popular support from new areas of society, including the disengaged and excluded. How did we get here? Our notions of the good society, of the responsibility that comes with power, and, of course, democracy and its discourse, stem from ancient and classical Greece. Aristotle, Pericles, Plato, and Socrates etc. have shaped our political thinking, processes and systems. Our deepest sense of Western values, embedded in education curricula across our societies, emanates from classical Athens. Is it no longer of use or value? Are we now judging utility and cost differently? This panel will bring together a set of experts to address these issues from different vantage points. Meet our speakers and chair Michael Cox is Founding Director of LSE IDEAS. He was appointed to a Chair at LSE in 2002. He helped establish the Cold War Studies Centre at LSE in 2004 with Arne Westad, and later they were both Founding Directors of LSE IDEAS in 2008. Professor Cox has lectured to universities world-wide as well as to several government bodies and many private companies. He is currently visiting professor at the Catholic University in Milan. He is the author, editor and co-editor of over 30 books, including most recently a collection of his essays The Post-Cold War World, as well as new editions of J M Keynes’s, The Economic Consequences of the Peace and E H Carr’s Nationalism and After. He is now working on a new history of LSE entitled, The “School”: LSE and the Shaping of the Modern World. Simon Goldhill is Professor of Greek at the University of Cambridge and Foreign Secretary of the British Academy. He has written extensively about Greek society and the culture of ancient democracy. His books have been translated into ten languages and won three international prizes. He has lectured, and broadcast on television and radio, all over the world, from Canada to China. Johanna Hanink (@johannahan) is Associate Professor of Classics at Brown University and co-editor of the Journal of Modern Greek Studies. Her work focuses on classical Athens and the modern reception of Greek antiquity. She is author of Lycurgan Athens and the Making of Classical Tragedy and The Classical Debt: Greek Antiquity in an Era of Austerity. She is also a translator of Ancient and Modern Greek, and her new volume Andreas Karkavitsas: The Archeologist and Selected Sea Stories (translation with introduction and notes) is due out in autumn with Penguin Classics. Paul Kelly (@PjThinker) is Professor of Political Theory at the LSE, where he has taught for over 25 years. He is author and editor of fifteen books on political philosophy and the history of political ideas. His publications include Utilitarianism and Distributive Justice (Clarendon 1990), Liberalism (Polity 2005) and edited Political Thinkers with David Boucher (Oxford 2017). He has also been co-editor of Political Studies and editor of Utilitas: A Journal of Utilitarian Studies. He was recently Pro-Director Education at LSE and has recently returned to regular academic life. He is completing a book entitled Conflict, War and Revolution.
29/01/211h 29m

SHORTCAST | Behavioural Science and a Post-COVID World

Contributor(s): Professor Nick Chater, Professor Paul Dolan, Dr Grace Lordan, Professor Tali Sharot, Rory Sutherland | The impacts of COVID-19 on society post-COVID and how we deal with them hinge on how politicians, firms and the public respond. What valuable lessons can we learn from behavioural science in a post-COVID-19 world? These unique insights are crucial to mitigating the societal impacts of COVID-19. Nick Chater (@NickJChater) is Professor of Behavioural Science, Warwick Business School. He is co-founder of Decision Technology Ltd, and is a member of the UK's Committee on Climate Change. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. Grace Lordan is an associate professor in behavioural science at the LSE. Her research focuses on why some people have successful lives as compared to others because of factors beyond their own control. She is the founder and director of The Inclusion Initiative, a research centre at the LSE & the author of Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Career You Want. Tali Sharot is a Professor Cognitive Neuroscientist at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, where she is the director of the Affective Brain Lab. She is the author of The Optimism Bias and The Influential Mind, both of which received the British Psychological Society Book Award. She was also awarded fellowships from the Wellcome Trust and the British Academy. Rory Sutherland (@rorysutherland) is the Vice Chairman of Ogilvy, an attractively vague job title which has allowed him to co-found a behavioural science practice within the agency. Before founding Ogilvy Change, Rory was a copywriter and creative director at Ogilvy for over 20 years, having joined as a graduate trainee in 1988. He has variously been President of the IPA, Chair of the Judges for the Direct Jury at Cannes, and has spoken at TED Global. He writes regular columns for the Spectator, Market Leader and Impact, and also occasional pieces for Wired. Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is Pro-Director (Research) and Harold Laski Professor of Political Science at LSE. He is one of the leading researchers, teachers, and commentators on European and comparative politics in the UK. He has published over 100 books and articles and has won several prestigious prizes and fellowships for his research, including from the US-UK Fulbright Commission, the American Political Science Association, and the UK Economic and Social Research Council. He is also a prize-winning teacher, and continues to teach “Introduction to Political Science” to over 300 first-year undergraduate students. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 For more information Event posting LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative
28/01/2123m 21s

Mothering and Work, Mothering as Work

Contributor(s): Professor Shani Orgad, Professor Sarah Knott, Jess Brammar | In this event we will grapple with past and present experiences of mothering. How can we tell a story of maternal labour in the past, in the absence of data? What does it mean to study mothering today, in the context of intensified neoliberalism? How does mothering enter the radar of policymakers? And what is the relationship between these questions and how we study them in contemporary academia? Mothering experiences were almost entirely absent from public discourse in Britain and North America until around the 1970s, when the Women’s Liberation Movement directed long-overdue attention to mothering and maternal labour. Today, on the other hand, mothering is impossible to miss. Motherhood, mothering and mothers are the objects considerable attention: in memoirs, advice and self-help guides; in magazines, popular television and film; across a range of online platforms, and in policy debates about work-life balance, parenting and gender equality in the workplace. Historian Sarah Knott and sociologist Shani Orgad will discuss these topics, drawing on their rich work on mothering and reflecting on their different approaches to studying it. Meet our speakers and chair Jess Brammar (@jessbrammar) is the Editor-in-chief of HuffPost UK. She was previously Deputy Editor of BBC Newsnight, and led the programme's award-winning coverage of the Grenfell Tower disaster and other major news events. Prior to that she was a news producer at ITN, after beginning her career at BBC Question Time. She obtained her undergraduate degree in international history from LSE. Jess has recently returned to work from maternity leave. Sarah Knott (@knott_sarah) is Sally M. Reahard Professor of History at Indiana University and a Fellow of the Kinsey Institute. Among other publications, she is the author of Mother: An Unconventional History (2019) and co-editor of Mothering's Many Labours (2021). Sarah has served as an editor of the American Historical Review, the American Historical Association's flagship journal, and sits on the editorial board of Past and Present. She has held many fellowships including from the Andrew Mellon foundation, the Rothermere American Institute, and the Oxford Centre for Life Writing. Shani Orgad is Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Shani's research interests include gender, inequality, migration, feminism and media narratives. She is the author of numerous journal articles, blogs, and five books including: The Confidence Cult(ure) (with Rosalind Gill, forthcoming, Duke University Press), Heading Home: Motherhood, Work, and the Failed Promise of Equality (2019, Columbia University Press), Caring in Crisis? Humanitarianism, the Public and NGOs (with Bruna Seu, 2017, Palgrave), Media Representation and the Global Imagination (2012, Polity) and Storytelling Online: Talking Breast Cancer on the Internet (2005, Peter Lang). You can order the book, Heading Home: motherhood, work, and the failed promise of equality, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Wendy Sigle is Professor of Gender and Family Studies at the Department of Gender Studies. She has worked on a variety of issues related to families and family policy in historical and contemporary societies. More about this event The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. The Department is ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in the field of media and communications (2020 QS World University Rankings). Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMedia
28/01/211h 32m

The Politics of Inequality: why should we focus on resistance from below?

Contributor(s): Professor John Chalcraft, Dr Flora Cornish, Professor Ellen Helsper, Dr Armine Ishkanian, Dr Sumi Madhok | While it is now widely accepted that inequality is the defining issue of our time and there is growing research on the drivers and impacts of inequalities, there has been less focus on how inequalities are experienced and resisted by ordinary people and communities. The newly launched Politics of Inequality research theme at the International Inequalities Institute explores the practices of resistance, mobilisation, and contestation from a bottom-up perspective. This panel will discuss the following questions why we established this theme why research on collective action and everyday resistance against a wide range of social, cultural, economic and political inequalities is important in advancing our understandings of not only how inequalities are experienced, but also how they can be tackled how research on this theme brings together interdisciplinary perspectives to contribute to on-going research and teaching across LSE as well as engaging with wider global debates. The theme is linked with the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme, which is based at LSE, and is committed to building a community of people committed to using collective leadership to work towards social and economic justice for all. Meet our speakers and chair John Chalcraft is Professor of Middle East History and Politics in the Department of Government at LSE. Flora Cornish (@FloraCornish) is Associate Professor in Research Methodology in the Department of Methodology at LSE. Ellen Helsper (@EllenHel) is Professor of Digital Inequalities in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Associate Professor in Social Policy and Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity at the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. Sumi Madhok (@sumi_madhok) is Associate Professor in Transnational Gender Studies in the Department of Gender Studies at LSE. Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor in Anthropology and convenor of the Global Economies of Care theme in the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. More about this event The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
27/01/211h 31m

Empires Past & Present: empire around 1800

Contributor(s): Professor Odd Arne Westad | Around 1800 the world was dominated by a number of predominant empires at different stages of development: Britain, France, Austria, Russia, the Ottomans, Spain, and the Qing. This lecture will discuss each of these empires, the resistance against them, and how the future looked from the perspective of each. Meet our speaker and chair Odd Arne Westad is the Engelsberg Chair for 2020/21 at LSE IDEAS. He is currently the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, and is a former director of LSE IDEAS. Michael Cox was appointed to a Chair at LSE in 2002, having previously held positions in the UK at The Queen's University of Belfast and the Department of International Politics, Aberystwyth. He helped establish the Cold War Studies Centre at LSE in 2004 and later co-founded LSE IDEAS in 2008 with Arne Westad. More about this event In this series of four lectures, the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, Odd Arne Westad, will discuss the concept of empire and why it is still relevant today. This event is the second in the series. A podcast of the first lecture can be found at Empires Past & Present: the idea of empire. The third lecture, Empires Past and Present: empire around 1900, will take place on Tuesday 30 March. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEngelsberg
26/01/211h 12m

Misinformation

Contributor(s): Professor Lisa Bortolotti, Professor Quassim Cassam, Dr Cailin O’Connor | Information may be power, but misinformation appears to be usurping the throne. From COVID-19 to QAnon, misinformation is more ubiquitous and more dangerous than ever. But why is it so much more attractive to so many? Are there factors that make misinformation more (or less) likely to be believed? What draws people into the world of conspiracy theories? And if our media environment shoulders much of the blame, can democratic societies do anything to stem the flow of fake news? Quassim Cassam, Lisa Bortolotti, and Cailin O’Connor consider the world’s misinformation problem, its causes, and some potential solutions. Meet our speakers and chair Lisa Bortolotti (@lisabortolotti) is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Birmingham. Quassim Cassam (@QCassam) is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. Cailin O’Connor (@cailinmeister) is Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science at the University of California, Irvine. Jonathan Birch (@BirchLSE) is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at LSE, Fellow, Forum for Philosophy and author of The Philosophy of Social Evolution.More about this event The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organisation that hosts weekly events exploring science, politics, and the arts from a philosophical perspective. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
26/01/211h 14m

The Impact of Brexit on Higher Education

Contributor(s): Professor Simon Hix, Professor Wendy Thomson, Dr Beth Thompson | Universities increasingly compete in globalised markets. The EU has encouraged student mobility through programmes like Erasmus. Graduate students, in particular, seek education across Europe. Researchers collaborate in increasingly dense cross-national networks. What impact might Brexit have on students and research? What might universities themselves do to mitigate the impact of any new barriers? How can the UK best compete internationally? Our panel will consider where we are and where we might be heading. Meet our speakers and chair Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is Pro-Director for Research at LSE and Harold Laski Professor of Political Science in the Department of Government at LSE. Beth Thompson (@Beth_Thompson) is Head of Policy and Advocacy - UK & EU at the Wellcome Trust. Wendy Thomson (@Wendy_Thomson_) is Vice-Chancellor of the University of London. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. More about this event This event is part of the LSE Programme, 'Brexit and Beyond'. The LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond is a dedicated series to stimulate the public debate and informed discussion about this most pivotal topic. It comprises a variety of events, targeting LSE staff and students, as well as the general public and specific categories of policy-makers, practitioners and professionals working on Brexit; with the aim of continuing to shape the discussion surrounding its complex and uncertain agenda. The Programme is organised by LSE's European Institute and School of Public Policy. The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
25/01/211h 29m

COVID-19 and its Impact on Gender, Justice and Security

Contributor(s): Dr Josephine Ahikire, Dr Nelson Camilo Sanchez | The outbreak of a global pandemic has simultaneously revealed the fragility and robustness of health, education, economic, security, political and social systems. There is no shortage of exceptional responses to the pandemic. These have included the physical lockdown of millions of people, mandates to return millions from cities to rural communities, restrictions on expression that challenges government management of the crisis, data tracking on the movement of persons, extensive border controls, and a broad range of political and legal controls that are far-reaching across all levels of public and private life. Responses have also included remarkable initiatives at community level, often led by women, to provide care where state services fail and to maintain momentum for progressive policy agendas. This event will take stock of changing social and political landscapes, locally and internationally, one year into the COVID-19 pandemic. Three Co-Directors of the UKRI GCRF Gender, Justice and Security Hub will discuss questions such as: How have responses to COVID-19 affected the fight for gender justice and inclusive security? What are the impacts of the crisis on political and social rights agendas? Has the pandemic exacerbated the closing down of civil society space? How are gender roles and conceptions of masculinity challenged as a result of the reconfiguration of public and private spaces? And, perhaps most importantly, as we head towards a post-COVID reckoning: does the moment of crisis brought about by the pandemic offer opportunities for positive change? Meet our speakers and chair Josephine Ahikire (@Josephineahiki1) is Principal, College of Humanities and Social Sciences and former Dean, School of Women and Gender Studies. She is a Member of Council for Development of Social Research in Africa (CODESRIA). Dr Ahikire is a Co-Director of the Livelihood, Land and Rights stream on the Gender, Justice and Security Hub. Fionnuala Ní Aoláin (@NiAolainF) is University Regents Professor and faculty director of the Human Rights Center at the University of Minnesota Law School. She is concurrently a professor of law at the Queen’s University of Belfast, School of Law. Professor Ní Aoláin is currently the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and Counter-Terrorism and a Co-Director of the Transformation and Empowerment stream on the Gender, Justice and Security Hub. Nelson Camilo Sanchez (@NCamiloSanchezL) is an assistant professor of law at the University of Virginia School of Law and a research associate at the Center for the Study of Law, Justice and Society – Dejusticia, in Colombia. Dr Sanchez is a Co-Director of the Livelihood, Land and Rights stream on the Gender, Justice and Security Hub. Christine Chinkin, CMG, FBA is Professorial Research Fellow in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security, where she leads three major projects: ‘A Feminist International Law of Peace and Security’ funded by the AHRC, ‘Gendered Peace’ funded by the ERC and the UKRI GCRF Gender, Justice and Security Hub. Professor Chinkin was Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security from 2015-2018. More about this event The LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
25/01/211h 26m

The Next Four Years: what should we expect for America?

Contributor(s): Professor Desmond King, Mark Landler, Professor Paula D. McClain, Professor Theda Skocpol | What will the next administration's international and domestic priorities be? A roundtable discussion with leading experts on American politics. Meet our speakers and chair Desmond King is Andrew W Mellon Professor of American Government and Professorial Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. He specializes in the study of the American state in US executive politics, race and politics in American political development, and the financial bases of US politics. He is a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA), and is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (FAAAS), the Academia Europaea (MAE), the Royal Irish Academy (MRIA), the National Academy of Social Insurance (FNASI) and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (FRHistS). Mark Landler (@MarkLandler) is the London bureau chief of The New York Times. In 27 years at The Times, he has been bureau chief in Hong Kong and Frankfurt, White House correspondent, diplomatic correspondent, European economic correspondent, and a business reporter in New York. He is the author of Alter Egos, a comparative study of the foreign policy of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Paula D. McClain is James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Professor of Public Policy and Dean of The Graduate School and Vice Provost for Graduate Education at Duke University. A Howard University Ph.D., her primary research interests are in racial minority group politics, particularly inter-minority political and social competition, and urban politics. Her 1995 book Can We All Get Along?: Racial and Ethnic Minorities in American Politics, co-authored with Joseph Stewart, Jr., won the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights in North America Award for Outstanding Scholarship on the Subject of Intolerance. Theda Skocpol is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University. She has authored many books, articles, and reports, won many awards, and been elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. Her ongoing research focuses on U.S. conservatives and the Republican Party, the politics of health care policy, and citizen reactions to the Obama and Trump presidencies. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. More about this event The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
21/01/211h 28m

Rebuilding the UK Economy for a More Secure Future

Contributor(s): Anneliese Dodds | As we head towards a year since the COVID-19 pandemic shocked not only global healthcare systems, but economies, many businesses are left wondering what the future holds and workers asking what will happen to their jobs. How will the country recover from one of the toughest years? Join Shadow Chancellor Anneliese Dodds as she sets out Labour’s plans to recover jobs, retrain workers and rebuild businesses to build a better, more secure future. Meet our speaker and chair Anneliese Dodds (@AnnelieseDodds) is Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer and MP for Oxford East. She holds a PhD from the Department of Government at LSE. Martin Lodge is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy in the Department of Government and Director of the Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation. More about this event The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
21/01/211h 0m

A Decade of Behavioural Science at LSE: A Fireside chat with Professor Paul Dolan

Contributor(s): Professor Paul Dolan | Join us for this fireside chat where Paul Dolan will be reflecting on ten years of behavioural science at LSE, discussing biases, narratives, happiness, resilience and more. We will be summarising the learnings from behavioural science in the last 10 years, drawing from research from LSE and beyond. We will also be looking to the future, mapping out the most important and exciting areas of study. Those that join us can expect to laugh, learn and lean into behavioural science. Meet our speaker and chair Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is an associate professor in behavioural science at LSE. Her research focuses on why some people have successful lives as compared to others because of factors beyond their own control. She is the founder and director of The Inclusion Initiative, a research centre at LSE and the author of Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Career You Want. More about this event The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.
20/01/2159m 25s

Solutions for a Planet in Crisis

Contributor(s): Inger Andersen | The planet is in the throes of the three connected crises of climate change, nature and biodiversity loss, and pollution and waste. We urgently need to start delivering solutions or face major disruption. Inger Andersen, UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme, discusses how we can make science more democratic and inclusive to inform better policies. How the economic and businesses community can recognise the true value of nature and so protect it. How governments can unite the nature, climate and pollution agendas to start delivering results. And how every one of us can contribute by making more sustainable choices in our daily lives. Meet our speaker and chair Inger Andersen (@andersen_inger) is Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations and Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme, headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya. Between 2015 and 2019, Ms. Andersen was the Director-General of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Ms Andersen has more than 30 years of experience in international development economics, environmental sustainability, strategy and operations. She has led work on a range of issues including agriculture, environmental management, biodiversity conservation, climate change, infrastructure, energy, transport, and water resources management and hydro-diplomacy. Between 1999 and 2014, Ms. Andersen held several leadership positions at the World Bank including Vice President of the Middle East and North Africa; Vice President for Sustainable Development and Head of the CGIAR Fund Council. Prior to her 15 years at the World Bank, Ms. Andersen worked 12 years at the United Nations, first on drought and desertification, beginning with the UN Sudano-Sahelian Office. In 1992, she was appointed UNDP’s Water and Environment Coordinator for the Arab Region. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Thomas Smith is Assistant Professor in Environmental Geography at LSE. He teaches on a number of environmental courses, focussing on innovative technology-enhanced experiential learning and field-based education in geography. More about this event The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUNEP
20/01/211h 0m

Warfare and Peacemaking in the 21st Century: who's taking responsibility to protect and promote peace

Contributor(s): HRH The Countess of Wessex, Visaka Dharmadasa, Abir Haj Ibrahim | In 2021, the UN Security Council’s Women, Peace and Security Agenda turns 21. The 20th anniversary year brought renewed commitments by member states, but the engine, ingenuity and commitment to this agenda has always come from the frontline peacebuilders, practitioners, and advocates. In this, the first 'In Conversation with' event, the director of the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security, Sanam Naraghi Anderlini, will delve into the real world experiences and efforts to bring the vision and promise of the WPS agenda to life. Sanam will have an in-depth conversation with HRH The Countess of Wessex, Visaka Dharmadasa, Founder of the Association of War Affected Women, Sri Lanka, and Abir Hajibrahim, Co-Founder of Mobaderoon, Syria, about their entry into the policy and practice of peace and security; their personal reflections and motivations, their analysis of the issues, the persistent challenges, their achievements to date, and their hopes for the future. Meet our speakers and chair A full-time working member of the Royal Family, The Countess of Wessex splits her time between work in support of The Queen and work with a large number of her own charities and organisations. Her Royal Highness is passionate about supporting women and championing gender equality and devotes much of her time to supporting the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda and Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative (PSVI). Since announcing her commitment to champion this work in 2019, The Countess has met regularly with women peacebuilders, survivors of conflict-related sexual violence, activists and academics to further the agenda, draw attention to the issues and deepen her knowledge of the international effort. Visaka Dharmadasa (@venuwan) is the founder and Chair of the Association of War Affected Women and Parents of Servicemen Missing in Action. Abir Haj Ibrahim (@ab_hajibrahim) is a Syrian peacebuilder and co-founder of Mobaderoon (a network of 4000 social activists), with 6 years experiences in the development sector, working closely with international NGOs, such as ICAN, UNICEF, ASC, Aflatoun, RTC, and Sida Sweden. Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini (@sanambna) is the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. More about this event The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world. This is the first in a series of events aligned with key themes in the UN Security Council Women, Peace and Security agenda. Each event will feature three guests who are active on the issues, bringing practical hands on knowledge to share with a public audience. Baroness Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will deliver welcoming remarks for the series at this event. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
19/01/211h 16m

Hayekian Behavioural Economics

Contributor(s): Professor Cass R. Sunstein | Friedrich Hayek argued for freedom of choice based on outsiders knowing much less than choosers so that interferences with personal freedom will make choosers worse off. This lecture will explore the challenge to that argument that comes from behavioural economics and discusses an ongoing program of research which has created a form of Hayekian behavioural economics. Meet our speaker and chair Cass R. Sunstein (@CassSunstein) is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Professor Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics at LSE. More about this event The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHayek
18/01/2156m 10s

Key Workers and Inequality

Contributor(s): Kate Bell, Deborah Hargreaves | The vital labour of 'key workers' has been widely lauded during the pandemic. But can the trend of recent decades toward inequalities in earning and status be reversed? Meet our speakers and chair Kate Bell (@kategobell) is the Head of the Rights, International, Social and Economics department at the TUC. Deborah Hargreaves (@deborahharg) is the Chair of the London Child Poverty Alliance and a founder and director of the High Pay Centre, an independent think-tank that monitors executive pay. She is a former business editor of the Guardian and previously worked at the Financial Times. She is the author of Are Chief Executives Overpaid? Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. More about this event The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
18/01/211h 20m

What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?

Contributor(s): Professor Laura Bear, Nikita Simpson, Professor Joan Roses, Dr Adam Oliver, Dr Clare Wenham, Professor Patrick Wallis | In this month’s episode of the LSE IQ podcast we ask, ‘What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?’. On the 23rd March 2020 Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced the country’s first national lockdown. In the months since, there has been a seismic shift in all our lives. As we embark on 2021 and, hopefully, the latter stages of the pandemic, now is an apt moment to reflect on how we’ve got to where we are. While the scientific community has taken centre stage in the fight to overcome the virus, how have social scientists helped us navigate – and evaluate –the UK’s response?   In this episode we talk to anthropologists Professor Laura Bear and Nikita Simpson, Economic historians Professor Patrick Wallis and Professor Joan Roses, Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy Dr Clare Wenham and behavioural economist Dr Adam Oliver.     Research   ’A good death’ during the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK: a report on key findings and recommendations, by the COVID and Care Research Group A Right to Care: The Social Foundations of Recovery from COVID-19, by the COVID and Care Research Group The Redistributive Effects of Pandemics: Evidence of the Spanish Flu. By Sergi Basco, Jordi Domenech, and Johanne Rohses Separating behavioural science from the herd by Adam Oliver Reciprocity and the art of behavioural public policy by Adam Oliver What is the future of UK leadership in global health security post Covid-19? By Clare Wenham A Dreadful Heritage: Interpreting Epidemic Disease at Eyam, 1666-2000, by Patrick Wallis Eyam revisited: lessons from a plague village, by Patrick Wallis   Contributors   Professor Laura Bear Nikita Simpson Professor Joan Roses Dr Adam Oliver Dr Clare Wenham Professor Patrick Wallis
05/01/2144m 49s

The 'True' Brexit: where are we now?

Contributor(s): Professor Tony Travers, Jill Rutter, Vicky Pryce, Professor Katy Hayward | In the aftermath of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the negotiations for the UK’s future relationship with the EU look even more challenging. Now that the UK is finishing its transition to Brexit, do we now know what it means? We explore the realities of Brexit for government, the economy, and our politics and look ahead to the policy choices we face. What are the unresolved questions for the UK? Our speakers will comprise a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law to assess where we might be heading. Katy Hayward (@hayward_katy) is Professor of Political Sociology in Queen’s University Belfast and a Senior Fellow at ‘The UK in a Changing Europe’ think-tank, where she leads a project on The future and status of Northern Ireland. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor at the Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service. Jill Rutter (@jillongovt) is Senior Research Fellow at the UK in a Changing Europe. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory. This event is part of the LSE Programme, 'Brexit and Beyond'. The LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond is a dedicated series to stimulate the public debate and informed discussion about this most pivotal topic. It comprises a variety of events, targeting LSE staff and students, as well as the general public and specific categories of policy-makers, practitioners and professionals working on Brexit; with the aim of continuing to shape the discussion surrounding its complex and uncertain agenda. The Programme is organised by LSE's European Institute and School of Public Policy. The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSEBrexit #LSECOVID19
10/12/201h 23m

Why Aren't Policy-Makers and the Public Demanding That More Emphasis is Placed in Happiness?

Contributor(s): Lord O'Donnell | Join Gus O'Donnell and Paul Dolan in conversation, as they discuss the role of happiness in public policy. Gus O'Donnell (@Gus_ODonnell) was Cabinet Secretary and Head of the British Civil Service from 2005-2011 and is currently Chairman of Frontier Economics. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHappiness
09/12/201h 11m

Report of the UK Wealth Tax Commission

Contributor(s): Dr Andy Summers, Emma Chamberlain, Dr Arun Advani | The unprecedented public spending required to tackle COVID-19 has been followed by debates about how to rebuild public finances and tackle inequalities exposed by the crisis. This event launches the final report of a major new project investigating the desirability and feasibility of a ‘wealth tax’ for the UK. Building on contributions by a network of world-leading experts on tax policy, the report will make recommendations to government on how to tax wealth more effectively. Arun Advani (@arunadvaniecon) is Assistant Professor of Economics and Impact Director of the CAGE Research Centre at the University of Warwick. He is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, and a Visiting Fellow at the LSE International Inequalities Institute. Emma Chamberlain is a barrister at Pump Court Tax Chambers and Visiting Professor in Practice at the LSE International Inequalities Institute. She is also a Visiting Professor at University of Oxford, where she teaches Taxation of Global Wealth. Andy Summers (@summers_ad) is Associate Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE and an Associate Member of the LSE International Inequalities Institute. He is also a Research Associate at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and CAGE Research Centre at the University of Warwick. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science in the Department of Economics at LSE. He was a member of the IFS’s Mirrlees Review panel, and is currently a Commissioner of the National Infrastructure Commission. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world’s best law schools. The department ranked first for research outputs in the UK's most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) and was in the top 5 law departments overall in the 2018 Complete University Guide. Our staff play a major role in helping to shape policy debates, and in the education of current and future lawyers and legal scholars from around the world. This research was made possible through funding by the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity (AFSEE) programme's Covid-19 Rapid Response fund, UKRI/ESRC (Grant number - ES/V012657/1) – Covid-19 Rapid Response and CAGE Research Centre at the University of Warwick. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
09/12/201h 28m

Why Does Globalisation Fuel Populism, and What Can We Do About It?

Contributor(s): Professor Sara Hobolt | Dani Rodrik will explore the globalisation backlash and the ways (hyper-) globalisation has produced a political counter-reaction. He will present an alternative model of globalisation that is more compatible with economic prosperity and social inclusion. Dani Rodrik (@rodrikdani) is the Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is currently President-Elect of the International Economic Association, and co-director of Economics for Inclusive Prosperity. His newest book is Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is the Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute. Previously, she has held posts at the University of Oxford and the University of Michigan. She is the Chair of the European Election Studies (EES), an EU-wide project studying voters, parties, candidates and the media in European Parliamentary elections, and the Principal Investigator of the ERC-funded project EUDEMOS: Constrained Democracy: Citizens’ Responses to Limited Political Choice in the European Union. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. The United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Its mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
08/12/201h 28m

Imperialism and the Developing World

Contributor(s): Professor Atul Kohli, Dr Natalya Naqvi | How did Western imperialism shape the developing world? And what effect has Anglo-American expansionism had on economic development in poor parts of the world? This discussion will cover how Atul Kohli tackles this question in his new book, Imperialism and the Developing World, by analyzing British and American influence on Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America from the age of the British East India Company to the most recent U.S. war in Iraq. Atul Kohli is the David K.E. Bruce Professor of International Affairs at Princeton University. His principal research interests are in the area of political economy of developing countries. He is the author of Imperialism and the Developing World: How Britain and the U.S. Shaped the Global Periphery (Oxford University Press, 2020); Poverty amid Plenty in the New India (2012) (a Foreign Affairs Best Book of 2012 on Asia and the Pacific); State-Directed Development: Political Power and Industrialization in the Global Periphery (2004) (winner of the Charles Levine Award (2005) of the International Political Science Association); Democracy and Discontent: India's Growing Crisis of Governability (1991); and The State and Poverty in India (1987). He has also edited or coedited ten volumes (most recently, Business and Politics in India, 2019; and States in the Developing World, 2017) and published some sixty articles. Through much of his scholarship he has emphasized the role of sovereign and effective states in the promotion of inclusive development. He currently serves as a co-chair of the editorial committee of the journal World Politics, where he also served as the chief-editor during 2006-13. During 2009-10 he was the Vice President of the American Political Science Association. He has received grants from the Social Science Research Council, Ford Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. He received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. You can order the book, Imperialism and the Developing World, from the Oxford University Press website. Natalya Naqvi (@natalyanaqvi) is Assistant Professor in International Political Economy in the Department of International Relations at LSE. Karen E. Smith is Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at LSE, and is Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. It is ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies.
08/12/201h 28m

Have We Reached The End Of The 1951 Refugee Convention?

Contributor(s): Professor Seyla Benhabib | The Annual Human Rights Day Lecture hosted by LSE Human Rights will be delivered this year by Professor Seyla Benhabib of Yale University. The 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol are the main legal documents governing the movement of refugees and asylum seekers across international borders. As the number of displaced persons seeking refuge has reached unprecedented numbers, states have resorted to measure to circumvent their obligations under the Convention. These range form bilateral agreements condemning refugees to their vessel at sea to the excision of certain territories from national jurisdiction. In this talk Professor Benhabib will analyse these movements in the context of a dual dynamic of deterritorialisation and reterritorialisation. While socio-economic developments and the rise of the world-wide web have led to the deterritorialisation of domains of the economy and the media, escaping legal control, territorial presence whether on terra firma or vessels at sea, continue to be the basis for the entitlement to human and citizens’ rights. The period ushered by The 1951 Convention was based on a sovereignty regime of territorial containment which seems to be nearing its end today. Seyla Benhabib is Emerita Professor at Yale University since June 2020, and currently Senior Research Fellow and Professor of Law Adjunct at Columbia Law School, with affiliation in the Philosophy Department of Columbia University. Ayça Çubukçu (@ayca_cu) is an Associate Professor in LSE Human Rights, Department of Sociology and the Co-Director of LSE Human Rights. LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHumanRightsDay
07/12/201h 23m

Trust, Resilience and the Effectiveness of Government: lessons from the COVID-19 crisis

Contributor(s): Professor Sir Tim Besley, Professor Maria Petmesidou, Professor Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos | Crises and wars have historically been drivers of political and economic change. Such moments create opportunities to reflect on the nature of the economic and political institutions in place and their capacities. This event will look at some emerging lessons of the COVID-19 crisis and directions of change and renewal. While the pandemic has unique features, many things that we have witnessed during the crisis reaffirm the importance of long-standing challenges that must be faced when building effective economies and polities. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission and, for 2018, is President of the Econometric Society. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and British Academy. He is also a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Economic Association and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Maria Petmesidou is Professor Emerita of Social Policy at Democritus University, Greece. For several years she was a fellow/member of the scientific committee of CROP (Comparative Research on Poverty) sponsored by the International Social Science Council (based at UNESCO) and the University of Bergen. She has served in various European expert networks and has directed (and participated in) a large number of research projects funded by Greek governmental bodies and the European Commission. Her research interests include welfare state development and comparative social policy, health and social care, youth labour market transitions, poverty, inequalities and social inclusion. Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos (@DimitriASotiro1) is a Professor of Political Science at the Department of Political Science and Public Administration of the University of Athens. In 2003 he was Senior Research Fellow at the Hellenic Observatory of the London School of Economics, in 2009-2010 Visiting Fellow in South East European Studies at St. Antony’s College, Oxford and in the autumn of 2016 Visiting Fellow at the Science Po, Paris. In 2018-2019 he was Visiting Professor at Tufts University and Visiting Fellow at Harvard’s Center of European Studies at Princeton’s Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies. Dimitri studied law and sociology at the Law School of the University of Athens (LLB), the London School of Economics (MSc) and Yale University (Ph.D., awarded with distinction, 1991). Kevin Featherstone is the Director of the Hellenic Observatory, Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies, and Professor of European Politics at LSE. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. The National Bank of Greece (@NationalBankGR), backed by its 179-year participation in the country's economic and social life, is one of the leading Greek financial organisations, with strong tradition and noteworthy contribution to the economic and social transformation of Greece. The Bank’s broad customer base, respected brand name, strong market share in deposits and enhanced capital adequacy ratios secure it with the liquidity needed to finance Greek businesses and reflect the long-standing relationship of trust it enjoys with its clientele. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
03/12/201h 38m

Educating Equally: what is needed?

Contributor(s): Jolanta Lasota, Professor Nicola Martin, Dr Amelia Roberts | On the International Day for People with Disabilities, this event looks at what is needed for children and adults with disabilities to have access to equal education, especially with the challenges of providing learning during and in the aftermath of COVID-19. This event marks 50 years since the Chronically Sick and Disabled Peoples’ Act was passed, which was passed as a private member’s bill brought to parliament by MP Alf Morris. (later Baron Morris of Manchester). The focus of education in this event relates to Morris’ background as teacher and university extension lecturer. We ask what would Alf Morris do today to ensure equity in education? Jolanta Lasota (@JLasota01) is Chief Executive of Ambitious about Autism, which is a national charity for children and young people with autism. It provides services, raises awareness and understanding, and influences policy. She also Chairs the Autism Education Trust, a not-for-profit programme funded by the Department for Education to improve educational access, experience and outcomes for children and young people with autism. Nicola Martin is Head of Research, Higher Degrees and Student Experience and Professor of Social Justice and Inclusive Education at London South Bank University. She was formerly Head of the Disability and Wellbeing Service at LSE. She has 35 years’ experience in education working with disabled pupils and students from nursery age to adults in FE and HE. Her research interests are informed by emancipatory principles and include critical disability /autism studies. Amelia Roberts is Deputy Director of the UCL Centre for Inclusive Education. She works internationally and with UK Local Authorities and School Alliances to improve the attainment and participation of pupils with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. She leads on the Knowledge Exchange programme in Social, Emotional and Mental Health; SWERL (Supporting Wellbeing, Emotional Resilience and Learning) which has been rolled out to over 55 schools since 2018. Amelia Peterson (@AKMPeterson) is a fellow at LSE Social Policy. Her research draws in part on her experience working with education practitioners and system leaders across a wide range of countries including an English secondary school. Her book on new purposes for education, written with Valerie Hannon, will be published by Cambridge University Press in February 2021. This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters. The British Library of Political and Economic Science (@LSELibrary) was founded in 1896, a year after the London School of Economics and Political Science. It has been based in the Lionel Robbins Building since 1978 and houses many world class collections, including The Women's Library. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
03/12/2056m 32s

10½ Lessons from Experience

Contributor(s): Sir Paul Marshall | Join us for this conversation between Minouche Shafik and Paul Marshall on his latest book, 10½ Lessons from Experience: Perspectives on Fund Management. In his book Paul Marshall, founder of LSE’s Marshall Institute distils the experience of 35 years of investing, including over 20 years at Marshall Wace, the global equity hedge fund partnership. The book describes the disconnect between academic theory and market practice, in particular the reality and persistence of 'skill' - the continuing ability of the best practitioners to beat the market. But he also underscores the prevalence of uncertainty and human fallibility, showing how a successful investment management business must steer a path which recognises both the persistence of skill and the pitfalls of cognitive bias, human fallibility and hubris. What do we know about finance in theory that’s wrong in practice? What do we do when investing in practice that’s wrong in theory? Paul Marshall debates these questions with Minouche Shafik, and tries to find a point at which theory and practice are in equilibrium. Paul Marshall is CIO and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP, a global hedge fund headquartered in London, with $48bn in AUM. As CIO he has overall responsibility for investment strategy and performance. He is a founding Trustee of Ark, the children’s charity, and Chairman of Ark Schools, which manages 39 primary and secondary academies in London, Birmingham, Hastings and Portsmouth. Marshall served as Lead-Non-Executive Director at the UK Department for Education from 2013 to 2016. In April 2015, he co-founded the Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and Social Entrepreneurship at LSE. He is founder and owner of UnHerd Media. He was co-editor of The Orange Book, editor of The Tail and author of 10 ½ lessons from Experience. Marshall was knighted in Her Majesty’s Birthday Honours’ list in June 2016 for services to education and philanthropy He holds an MBA from INSEAD Business School and a BA (Hons) from St John’s College, Oxford University. You can order the book, 10½ Lessons from Experience: Perspectives on Fund Management, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMarshall
02/12/201h 13m

Lives, Livelihoods and Lockdowns: debating COVID-19 policy trade-offs

Contributor(s): Professor David Hunter, Professor Carl Heneghan, Professor Sunetra Gupta, Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Dame Sally Davies | The policy responses to COVID-19 have involved severe restrictions on the contact we have with other people. By and large, the restrictions have been imposed on everyone irrespective of their risks from the virus. Some people consider this to be the most effective way to deal with impact of the virus, whilst others have argued that our policy responses ought to be targeted at those most at risk of morbidity and mortality. This panel discussion will seek to flush out the costs and benefits of these and other possible approaches. Sally Davies (@UKAMREnvoy) is Master of Trinity College in Cambridge and also the Special Envoy on AMR (antimicrobial resistance) for the UK Government. She has formerly held positions of Chief Medical Officer and Chief Medical Adviser to the UK government. She was a member of the WHO Executive Board. And Co-Convenor of the UN Inter Agency Coordinating Group on AMR. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. Sunetra Gupta (@SunetraGupta) is a professor of theoretical epidemiology at University of Oxford. Her main focus is the evolution of diversity in pathogens, using mathematical models to generate new hypotheses regarding the processes that determine the population structure of these pathogens. Carl Heneghan (@carlheneghan) is a clinical epidemiologist and professor of evidence-based medicine in Oxford university, as well as director of the centre for evidence-based medicine and a practising GP. He was one of the founders of AllTrials, an international initiative which calls for all studies to be published, and their results reported. His work includes investigating drugs and devices, advising governments on regulatory evidence, working with the media assessing health claims and research on common presenting conditions in primary care, including work on antivirals Tamiflu. He set up and directs the Oxford COVID Evidence Service. David Hunter is Richard Doll Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine and Director of the Translational Epidemiology Unit at the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, UK. His early work was on HIV transmission in East Africa and he subsequently went on to research diet and cancer etiology through large-scale prospective studies. He founded the Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics at Harvard and was co-chair of the steering committee of the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium at the National Cancer Institute. He was co-director of the NCI Cancer Genetic Susceptibility Markers poject focussed on genome-wide association studies, and Dean for Academic Affairs at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. He is Chief Science Advisor to the Early Disease Detection Research Project UK (EDDRP UK)." Julia Black is Strategic Director of Innovation and Professor of Law at LSE. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
02/12/201h 20m

Science Fiction And Philosophy

Contributor(s): Dr Lisa Walters, Professor Lewis Powell, Dr James Burton | Zombies, time travel, brain transplants… science fiction and philosophy have a lot in common. Indeed, they have a shared history, with some of the most important figures of the Enlightenment writing science fiction alongside their better-known philosophical work. And Naomi Alderman, Liu Cixin, and China Miéville are among the many that ensure this close relationship persists right up to today. From Francis Bacon’s utopian island to Margaret Cavendish’s polar bear army, our literary and philosophical experts discuss how science fiction and philosophy have influenced one another, putting the ‘phi’ back into ‘sci-fi’. James Burton is Lecturer in Cultural Studies and Cultural History at Goldsmiths, University of London. Lewis Powell is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Buffalo. Lisa Walters is Senior Lecturer in English Literature at Liverpool Hope University. Clare Moriarty is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin. The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organisation that hosts weekly events exploring science, politics, and the arts from a philosophical perspective. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
01/12/201h 13m

How can we end child poverty in the UK?

Contributor(s): Dr Kitty Stewart | A campaign by the Manchester United footballer, Marcus Rashford, has prompted the UK government to provide extra support for children from low-income families during the pandemic. Even before coronavirus, child poverty had been rising for several years. This latest bite-sized episode of LSE iQ explores the question, ‘How can we end child poverty in the UK?’ Joanna Bale talks to Kitty Stewart of LSE’s Social Policy Department and Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion. Dr Stewart is currently part of a major research programme examining what progress has been made in addressing social inequalities through social policies. Research links: K Cooper and K Stewart (2020): Does Household Income Affect children’s Outcomes? A Systematic Review of the Evidence   K Stewart and M Reader (2020 forthcoming): The Conservatives’ record on early childhood: policy, spending and outcomes 2015-20.   Polly Vizard, John Hills et al (2020 forthcoming): The Conservatives’ Record on Social Policy: Policies, spending and outcomes 2015 to pre-Covid 2020.
01/12/2017m 1s

Working From Home: legal issues arising from the 'new normal'

Contributor(s): Alice Carse, Professor Nicola Lacey, Dr Astrid Sanders, Dr Sarah Trotter | A panel discussion of legal issues that arise from many people increasingly working from home, a pattern that seems likely to persist even after the Covid 19 pandemic has finished. Issues that will be considered include health and safety, working time, discrimination law, and the effectiveness of employment regulation. Alice Carse practices in employment and industrial relations law at Devereux Chambers. She has particular experience of strikes and industrial action and has advised on some of the most high profile industrial disputes of recent years, for example acting (as junior counsel) for Royal Mail in successfully obtaining an injunction to prevent strike action over Christmas 2017. In summer 2020 Alice appeared (as junior counsel) for the successful Respondent in the Court of Appeal in Walker v Co-operative Bank leading a case on the material factor defence in equal pay claims. Alice is a contributing editor of Harvey on Industrial Relations and Employment Law. Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy. From 1998 to 2010 she held a Chair in Criminal Law and Legal Theory at LSE; she returned to LSE in 2013 after spending three years as Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, and Professor of Criminal Law and Legal Theory at the University of Oxford. She has held a number of visiting appointments, most recently at Harvard Law School. She is an Honorary Fellow of New College Oxford and of University College Oxford; a Fellow of the British Academy; and a member of the Board of Trustees of the British Museum. In 2011 she was awarded the Hans Sigrist Prize by the University of Bern for outstanding scholarship on the function of the rule of law in late modern societies and in 2017 she was awarded a CBE for services to Law, Justice and Gender Politics. Astrid Sanders is an Associate Professor of Labour Law and joined LSE in September 2013. She completed all her postgraduate and undergraduate studies at Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford. Astrid was awarded her doctorate from the University of Oxford in 2009. As well as her D.Phil, she earlier obtained two other postgraduate degrees at Corpus Christi College. She also achieved outstanding marks as an undergraduate in her law examinations. The University of Oxford notably awarded her two prizes for Best Performance. Prior to joining LSE, she was a Lecturer at Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham for four years from 2009 to 2013. Sarah Trotter joined the Law Department as an Assistant Professor in September 2018. Her research is about how particular categories (like ‘the child’ and ‘the individual’) are constructed in law and about the assumptions that are made in European human rights law and domestic law about relationships. She wrote her PhD thesis (‘On coming to terms: How European human rights law imagines the human condition’) at LSE. Prior to that, she studied at the University of Cambridge (LLM), Sciences Po (Erasmus year), and LSE (LLB). Hugh Collins has published research in contract law, employment law, European law, legal theory, and human rights law. He is currently Cassel Professor of Commercial Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science, having previously been the Vinerian Professor of English Law at All Souls College, Oxford 2014-2019, Professor of English Law at LSE 1991-2014, and a Fellow of Brasenose College, Oxford. He studied law at Oxford and Harvard. He is a Fellow of the British Academy. He served on the editorial committee of The Modern Law Review from 1991-2014, including a period as General Editor. He is co-founder of the European Review of Contract Law and has also served on the editorial committee of the Industrial Law Journal. The Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Our community is one of the largest in the School, and has played a major role in policy debates, policy-making and the education of lawyers and law teachers globally. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
30/11/201h 26m

Working From Home: legal issues arising from the 'new normal'

Contributor(s): Alice Carse, Professor Nicola Lacey, Dr Astrid Sanders, Dr Sarah Trotter | A panel discussion of legal issues that arise from many people increasingly working from home, a pattern that seems likely to persist even after the Covid 19 pandemic has finished. Issues that will be considered include health and safety, working time, discrimination law, and the effectiveness of employment regulation. Alice Carse practices in employment and industrial relations law at Devereux Chambers. She has particular experience of strikes and industrial action and has advised on some of the most high profile industrial disputes of recent years, for example acting (as junior counsel) for Royal Mail in successfully obtaining an injunction to prevent strike action over Christmas 2017. In summer 2020 Alice appeared (as junior counsel) for the successful Respondent in the Court of Appeal in Walker v Co-operative Bank leading a case on the material factor defence in equal pay claims. Alice is a contributing editor of Harvey on Industrial Relations and Employment Law. Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy. From 1998 to 2010 she held a Chair in Criminal Law and Legal Theory at LSE; she returned to LSE in 2013 after spending three years as Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, and Professor of Criminal Law and Legal Theory at the University of Oxford. She has held a number of visiting appointments, most recently at Harvard Law School. She is an Honorary Fellow of New College Oxford and of University College Oxford; a Fellow of the British Academy; and a member of the Board of Trustees of the British Museum. In 2011 she was awarded the Hans Sigrist Prize by the University of Bern for outstanding scholarship on the function of the rule of law in late modern societies and in 2017 she was awarded a CBE for services to Law, Justice and Gender Politics. Astrid Sanders is an Associate Professor of Labour Law and joined LSE in September 2013. She completed all her postgraduate and undergraduate studies at Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford. Astrid was awarded her doctorate from the University of Oxford in 2009. As well as her D.Phil, she earlier obtained two other postgraduate degrees at Corpus Christi College. She also achieved outstanding marks as an undergraduate in her law examinations. The University of Oxford notably awarded her two prizes for Best Performance. Prior to joining LSE, she was a Lecturer at Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham for four years from 2009 to 2013. Sarah Trotter joined the Law Department as an Assistant Professor in September 2018. Her research is about how particular categories (like ‘the child’ and ‘the individual’) are constructed in law and about the assumptions that are made in European human rights law and domestic law about relationships. She wrote her PhD thesis (‘On coming to terms: How European human rights law imagines the human condition’) at LSE. Prior to that, she studied at the University of Cambridge (LLM), Sciences Po (Erasmus year), and LSE (LLB). Hugh Collins has published research in contract law, employment law, European law, legal theory, and human rights law. He is currently Cassel Professor of Commercial Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science, having previously been the Vinerian Professor of English Law at All Souls College, Oxford 2014-2019, Professor of English Law at LSE 1991-2014, and a Fellow of Brasenose College, Oxford. He studied law at Oxford and Harvard. He is a Fellow of the British Academy. He served on the editorial committee of The Modern Law Review from 1991-2014, including a period as General Editor. He is co-founder of the European Review of Contract Law and has also served on the editorial committee of the Industrial Law Journal. The Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Our community is one of the largest in the School, and has played a major role in policy debates, policy-making and the education of lawyers and law teachers globally. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis
30/11/201h 26m

Theory and Practice: designing anti-poverty programs when power matters

Contributor(s): Professor Rohini Pande | Join us for the annual Coase-Phillips Lecture which this year will be delivered by Rohini Pande. Even before COVID-19 changed the trajectory of global poverty reduction, the returns to economic growth were increasingly unequally divided in developing economies. Based on lessons from India’s myriad social protection programs – including rural employment guarantee, post COVID-19 cash transfers to women and food transfer programs - this lecture will discuss the implications of unequal power structures and low state capacity for the design of effective anti-poverty programs. The talk will then ask – looking ahead, how should considerations of state capacity and accountability be factored in evaluating policy proposals, such as Universal Basic Income and urban employment guarantees? Or, in devising policies to eventually put an end to the pandemic? Rohini Pande is the Henry J. Heinz II Professor of Economics and Director of the Economic Growth Center at Yale. She is a co-editor of American Economic Review: Insights and an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Pande’s research is largely focused on how formal and informal institutions shape power relationships and patterns of economic and political advantage in society, particularly in developing countries. She is interested the role of public policy in providing the poor and disadvantaged political and economic power, and how notions of economic justice and human rights can help justify and enable such change. Her most recent work focuses on testing innovative ways to make the state more accountable to its citizens, such as strengthening women’s economic and political opportunities, ensuring that environmental regulations reduce harmful emissions, and providing citizens effective means to voice their demand for state services. Noam Yuchtman joined LSE as Professor in 2019, having been awarded a British Academy Global Professorship. In addition to his position at LSE, Noam is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves on the editorial boards of the Review of Economic Studies, the Economic Journal, the Journal of the European Economic Association, Economica, and the Journal of Economic History. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECoasePhillips
30/11/201h 15m

Making Wellbeing the Goal

Contributor(s): Baroness Tyler, Lord O'Donnell, Professor Lord Layard, Alan Jope | This 30th Anniversary CEP event will ask can wellbeing become the focus for social science? How would this change economics and policy analysis? How would it change policy priorities for a post-Covid-19 world? Alan Jope (@alanjope) was appointed CEO of Unilever in 2019, and has worked for the company in North America for 14 years and in Asia for 13 years. Richard Layard (@RichardLayard) is Emeritus Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science and currently heads the CEP's Wellbeing Research Programme. Gus O'Donnell (@Gus_ODonnell) was Cabinet Secretary and Head of the British Civil Service from 2005-2011 and is currently Chairman of Frontier Economics. Claire Tyler (@ClaireT_UKLords) is the Liberal Democrats Lords Spokesperson for Mental Health. She became Chair of CAFCASS (Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service) in February 2012. She became President of the NCB (National Children’s Bureau) in August 2012 and Vice President of Relate in November 2012. Previously, Claire was the Chief Executive Officer of Relate, the UK’s leading relationship support agency between 2007 and 2012. This followed a number of senior positions within Government, the last of which was Director of the Vulnerable Children’s Group at the DfES (now the Department for Education). She also chaired the ‘Kids in the Middle’ coalition, a group of national charities and agony aunts campaigning for better services for separating parents and their children. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Centre for Economic Performance (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at LSE. Established by the ESRC in 1990, pit is now one of the leading applied economic research groups in Europe. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19
26/11/201h 3m

Remembering the 1970 Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act

Contributor(s): Dr Miro Griffiths, Dr Gareth Millward, Gill Morris | An event to mark the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act with a personal view of Alf Morris, the MP who put the private members’ bill before Parliament. This event considers Alf Morris’ involvement in this Act and his work on behalf of people with disabilities, with perspectives on the legacy of the Act, and how debates and public awareness around disability have changed in the years since it was passed. Miro Griffiths (@Mirogriffiths) is Teaching Fellow in Disability Studies at the University of Leeds. He has been involved in disability rights since the age of fourteen and has ollaborated with various organisations, human rights institutes and government departments on a wide range of issues pertaining to disability politics and social theory. In May 2014, he was awarded an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) as recognition of his service to disabled people. Gareth Millward (@MillieQED) is Wellcome Trust Research Fellow at the University of Warwick and and his PhD at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2014 focused on how the category of disability policy was created and then evolved between 1965 and 1995. Gill Morris (@Gill_Morris) is founder of Connect Communications and has over 30 years’ experience in increasing lobbying transparency and improving public affairs practices in the UK. She is also the daughter of Alf Morris. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters. The British Library of Political and Economic Science (@LSELibrary) was founded in 1896, a year after the London School of Economics and Political Science. It has been based in the Lionel Robbins Building since 1978 and houses many world class collections, including The Women's Library. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDisabilityAct50
26/11/201h 14m