Latino USA

Latino USA

By PRX

Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.

Episodes

La Brega: Vieques And The Promise To Build Back Better

Weeks after Hurricane María, the Government of Puerto Rico accepted an emphatic suggestion from officials of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), put it in writing as if it were its own decision, and celebrated it would be used to rebuild in a “resilient” way. On the island of Vieques — which has a very high rate of cancer — they were supposed to rebuild its only hospital, destroyed by the hurricane in 2017. Now, a young girl has died from lack of care, and a neglected community fights for their basic human right: access to quality medical services. Reporter Cristina del Mar Quiles from El Centro de Periodismo Investigativo explains how federal red tape has hindered hurricane recovery.
05/03/2146m 59s

How I Made It: Futuro Conjunto

What will the music of Texas’ Rio Grande Valley sound like 100 years from now? That’s the premise at the heart of Futuro Conjunto, a multimedia sci-fi project by artists Charlie Vela and Jonathan Leal. Futuro Conjunto is an expansive work of speculative fiction, but it also revolves around urgent issues of our present, such as climate change, technology, war, and class disparity. The multimedia project also draws from the Rio Grande Valley’s history and musical traditions, and Vela and Leal collaborated with more than 30 local artists to make this project happen. Futuro Conjunto is, first and foremost, a musical album. But it’s complemented by animated clips, an interactive website, and a detailed history that imagines the events that came to pass between today and several generations into the future. In this “How I Made It” segment, Vela and Leal explain the inspiration behind Futuro Conjunto and break down how they captured the sounds of the Rio Grande Valley’s future.
02/03/2118m 42s

Gustavo Dudamel’s Harmony In Times Of Crisis

Gustavo Dudamel is one of the most famous and acclaimed conductors in the world. He’s been the Music and Artistic Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic since 2009, when he was just 27 years old. El maestro is the best-known graduate of El Sistema, Venezuela’s national youth music education program. In the years since, Dudamel made a name for himself conducting world-famous orchestras, running his own arts charity —The Gustavo Dudamel Foundation— and founding the Youth Orchestra Los Angeles. Even amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Dudamel has been living up to his personal passion of finding creative ways to play and expand access to music, all while stressing the importance of staying in touch with his Venezuelan roots. In this episode of Latino USA, Dudamel talks about staying indoors, calling family home, and his belief that music will inspire a stronger future for all.
26/02/2136m 1s

La Brega, Episode 2: Levittown, Where The Good Life Begins

Alana Casanova-Burgess traces the history and development of Levittown, a massive suburb that was founded on the idea of bringing the American middle-class lifestyle to Puerto Rico during a time of great change on the island. Casanova-Burgess (herself the granddaughter of an early Levittown resident) traces back the story of the boom and bust of Levittown and explores what its shortcomings tell us about the promises of the American Dream in Puerto Rico.
24/02/2142m 41s

La Brega, Episode 1: What Is La Brega?

In this kick off episode, host Alana Casanova-Burgess sets out to define la brega and examine what its ubiquity among boricuas really means. A brega implies a challenge we can’t really solve, so you have to hustle to get around it. In Puerto Rico, Cheo Santiago runs a social media account called Adopta Un Hoyo, where people deal with the huge problem of potholes by painting their edges white and posting photographs of craters to the site. Because the roads are rarely fixed properly, the challenges of potholes (hoyos) and what people do to fix them or get around them is a metaphorical and literal brega in Puerto Rico. Plus, the scholar Arcadio Diaz Quiñones reflects on how this useful word has its limitations, and how la brega sometimes asks too much of boricuas.
24/02/2118m 0s

Yesika Salgado On Love, Lust, And Being A Hopeless Romantic

Yesika Salgado grew up in Los Angeles in a Salvadoran family, and she calls herself a fat, fly poet—her most recent book of poems is titled "Hermosa." Yesika and Maria start this episode with a trip to the world’s largest wholesale produce market, where they go on a quest to find the sexiest fruit. Then, they sit down to talk about how love has changed Yesika’s relationship with her body and how her literary success has shaped what she wants out of love.
23/02/2127m 22s

Portrait Of: José Feliciano

Every holiday season, you can't help but sing along to the infectious melody of José Feliciano's 1970 mega single, "Feliz Navidad." But aside from the holiday hit, the Puerto Rican singer boasts an almost 60-year musical career and one of his specialties is recording covers like "California Dreamin'" and "La Copa Rota"—blending them with his own sound of blues, folk, soul and Latin. In this conversation with Maria Hinojosa, José Feliciano opens up about why he keeps the 70s alive and about one of his favorite relationships: the one he has with his guitar. This story originally aired in February of 2020.
19/02/2127m 1s

Suave: Episode 2 'The Hustle'

In this second episode of our new podcast series, Suave, Maria Hinojosa learns more about Suave’s early life in the South Bronx and the crime Suave was convicted of as a teenager in the Badlands of Philadelphia. We explore the "tough on crime" politics of the 80's and early 90's and the ruthless tactics of prosecutors that led to Pennsylvania becoming the state that sentenced the most minors in the country to life in prison without parole. Meanwhile, Suave anxiously awaits the decision from a judge that could grant him the opportunity to finally leave prison.
16/02/2138m 25s

Suave: Episode 1 'The Sentence'

Suave has been serving a life sentence at a Pennsylvania maximum-security prison since he was a teenager. In 1993, he meets Maria Hinojosa when she's invited to speak at the prison and they begin a decades-long journalist-source relationship. Now nearly 50, Suave has come to terms with the fact that he will never leave the confines of Graterford prison. That is until a Supreme Court ruling in 2016 changes everything — and suddenly grants him a second chance to fight for his freedom.
12/02/2134m 51s

Selena And Abraham

Journalist Maria Garcia tells her story as she began to report on the lasting legacy of Selena Quintanilla. Maria's reporting begins not with Selena herself, but with Abraham Quintanilla: Selena's father, manager and mentor, known for guarding his daughter’s legacy with an iron fist. Maria confronts Abraham’s complicated legacy and reflects on fatherhood in Latinx cultures. Subscribe to Anything For Selena wherever you get your podcasts.
09/02/2144m 13s

Dr. Fauci: One Year Into The Pandemic

Dr. Anthony Fauci has served as Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases under seven presidents stemming back to the 1980s. He is often seen as the leading voice in combating COVID-19, which has now killed more than 440,000 people and infected over 26 million across the country. A disproportionate number of those have been Black, Latino and Indigenous people. During the past administration, Dr. Fauci at times contradicted President Trump, who would often promote unscientific or unproven cures, minimize the threat of COVID-19 or underestimate the gravity of the emergency. Today, Dr. Fauci is President Joe Biden’s chief medical advisor and is back at the forefront of the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. On this episode of Latino USA, Dr. Fauci discusses his early childhood, similarities in combating the AIDS/HIV epidemic and the COVID-19 pandemic, and what the Biden administration plans on doing to eliminate inequalities that have led to Black and brown communities being heavily impacted by the virus.
05/02/2123m 6s

How I Made It: Omar Apollo

Omar Apollo, a rising star in the indie R&B scene, began making music on his own by teaching himself chords from YouTube videos and honing his sound in an attic in a small town in Indiana. His first breakthrough came on Spotify in 2017, with the song “Ugotme.” Four years later, Omar has amassed more than 100 million streams on the platform and has toured internationally. In this “How I Made It” segment, Omar Apollo takes us back to the days of making music on borrowed equipment, and shares how he explored everything from funk music to corridos to make his debut album, “Apolonio.”
02/02/2114m 46s

Decriminalizing The War On Drugs

In the summer of 1971, President Nixon declared a “War on Drugs.” Today, with over 2 million people behind bars, the U.S. is the world's most carceral nation. Many of those serving time are there for crimes related to drugs. Meanwhile, more than 70,000 people died last year as a result of drug overdoses. Nearly 50 years later, the so-called War on Drugs is failing. And advocates for reform have long argued that punitive policies have not reduced the flow of drugs across the country but have actually strengthened illicit drug markets, creating risky and unhealthy conditions for drug users by focusing on the criminal element of drug use instead of seeing it through a lens of healthcare access and social justice. In this episode of Latino USA, Maritza Perez from the Drug Policy Alliance in Washington, DC breaks down the racial history behind the War on Drugs and why decriminalization may be the only way to end the persecution of people of color under the guise of drug enforcement.
29/01/2138m 53s

In The Mouth Of The Wolf

Since January 2019, nearly 68,000 asylum seekers have been ordered to wait in Mexico as their cases make their way through the U.S. courts system. The wait can take years, and it can often be deadly. After Mexico boasted its highest number of deportations ever in 2019, a group of local researchers and advocates set out to document just how extensive the cooperation has become between the U.S. and Mexico. The study concluded that Mexico violated its guaranteed constitutional protections when, under the Trump administration, the country mirrored its immigration policies after those of the U.S. In this episode of Latino USA, Maria Hinojosa talks to Alicia Moncada and Gretchen Kuhner about their findings and why President Biden should prioritize reform of the U.S. asylum in his first 100 days of office.
26/01/2129m 36s

Goya In Three Boycotts

Goya Foods was has been on the spotlight after its CEO Robert Unanue expressed his support for former president Donald Trump. Calls for boycotts flooded social media over the summer. But that wasn’t the first time the food giant got caught in political turmoil. From labor disputes with its Latino workers trying to unionize in Miami to the Puerto Rican community in New York, three boycotts tell a “not-so-rosy” story about Goya. In this episode of Latino USA, we look into how Goya became a badge of identity for Latinos in the US, and why these boycotts were about much more than a can of beans.
22/01/2141m 32s

President Biden Has Promises To Keep

This past November, Latino voters helped Joe Biden win the Presidency. He had made a long list of commitments to Latinx communities, from investing in healthcare and education and creating a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants to cleaning up pollution in communities of color. Now, on the eve of Biden’s inauguration, Latino USA speaks with young Latinxs across the country whose lives would be directly impacted by these commitments.
19/01/2128m 46s

Selena And Me

Maria Garcia can still remember the first time she saw Selena Quintanilla on TV: red lips, brown skin, big hoops. Maria was just 7 years old, new to the United States, and figuring out how to belong. For her and so many others, it was nothing short of a revolution, to see a Mexican-American woman, with working class roots, take pride in who she was, and have the world love her for it. And then, suddenly, on March 31st of 1995, Selena was gone. A quarter century later, Journalist Maria Garcia investigates Selena’s legacy and what Selena can tell us about race, class, body politics, and Latinx identity. This is the first episode of a new podcast called Anything For Selena — a collaboration between WBUR and Futuro Studios, available wherever you can find podcasts.
15/01/2132m 42s

Portrait Of: Gabby Rivera

When Gabby Rivera wrote her coming-of-age novel “Juliet Takes a Breath” in 2016, she didn't know that it would get her attention from an unusual place: Marvel Comics. They asked her to write for America Chavez, their first queer Latina superhero. Gabby said yes. But as she was writing for their superhero, she found herself swept up in #comicsgate, an online harassment campaign against the comic book industry’s efforts to include more women, people of color and LGBTQ characters. In this "Portrait Of," Maria sits talked to Gabby about her beginnings as a writer, her difficult experience with #comicsgate and about returning to comic book writing.
12/01/2124m 21s

City Of Oil

Los Angeles, you might be surprised to learn, sits on top of the largest urban oil field in the country and has been the site of oil extraction for almost 150 years. Today, nearly 5,000 oil wells remain active in Los Angeles County alone, many operating in communities of color, often very close to homes, schools and hospitals. Latino USA visits a neighborhood in South Los Angeles, the epicenter of an anti-oil-drilling movement that is gaining momentum. We meet Nalleli Cobo, the 19-year-old who’s working to shut down the oil industry, one well at a time. This story originally aired in June of 2019.
08/01/2131m 53s

How I Made It: Jessie Reyez

Jessie Reyez sings sad songs, but it's those songs along with her soulful voice and brutally honest lyrics that have garnered her fans around the world. In this "How I Made It" segment, Jessie Reyez talks about the role of music in her childhood, how she writes through her own emotional pain, and how even when her fans sing along to her saddest songs—she feels more connected to them than ever. This story originally aired in January of 2020.
05/01/2119m 18s

Portrait Of: Residente

In 2005, a duo of Puerto Rican artists released their eponymously titled debut album "Calle 13." Their mix of reggaeton and rap took the Latinx music scene by storm and got them three Latin Grammy awards. In 2017, one half of that duo, René Juan Pérez Joglar—better known as Residente—released his first solo album. To find inspiration, he took a genealogical DNA test and traveled to every part of the world that showed up in the test, where he collaborated with local musicians. Now, Residente is working on his second solo album, which involves the brainwaves of worms. Maria Hinojosa sits down with Residente to dig into the mind of the man who has experimented with so many musical genres. This story originally aired in March of 2020.
01/01/2135m 39s

Unjust And Unsolved: JJ Velazquez

In 1998, JJ Velazquez was sentenced to life for the murder of a police officer in Harlem, New York. The twenty-one-year-old father had an alibi that day, yet was placed in a lineup and identified as the shooter. Since then, identifying witnesses have recanted their testimony that JJ was the shooter and there is no evidence placing JJ at the scene. In fact, new evidence points away from JJ. The real killer is still out there and JJ has been in prison for over 20 years.
29/12/2046m 9s

A Socially Distant Christmas Special

Christmas and the holiday season are usually a time for Latinos and Latinas to gather together and celebrate, but COVID-19 has turned those holiday celebrations upside down. Yet for many people in the Latino community, spending the holidays away from family is not new. In this episode of Latino USA we hear from Latinos and Latinas who are used to not being able to celebrate Christmas with their loved ones, and we learn some tips on how to cope with these socially distant holidays.
25/12/2029m 58s

From Cop To Progressive Prosecutor: George Gascón

George Gascón was recently elected as Los Angeles County’s District Attorney, and his victory was hailed as a big win for a movement of progressive prosecutors aiming to end mass incarceration. Gascón immigrated from Cuba to Cudahy, a suburb of Los Angeles, as a teenager. He spent more than thirty years as a police officer before becoming District Attorney for San Francisco in 2011. On this episode of Latino USA, Gascón talks with Maria Hinojosa about getting harassed by the cops as a teenager, how his years as a cop shaped his philosophy of law enforcement, and his vision for his new job.
22/12/2024m 45s

Equations For Liberation, A Conversation With Kelly Lytle Hernandez

When historian Kelly Lytle Hernandez was denied access to Los Angeles Police Department’s arrest records for her research on mass incarceration, she decided that she would not go down without a fight. Kelly sued the LAPD for access to this data and used the information gathered to create Million Dollar Hoods, a project that maps the fiscal and human cost of mass incarceration in Los Angeles. We speak with Kelly and her students about how they are using this data to create equations for reparations and liberation.
18/12/2034m 1s

How I Made It: From Med School Student To Cimafunk

It was only a few years ago that Erik Rodriguez was attending medical school in his native Cuba, following his family of careerists’ footsteps. But then, when he heard James Brown’s "I feel good," he realized that he was meant for a different path. In this segment of “How I Made It,” Erik takes us through his transformation into Afro-Cuban artist Cimafunk—a Billboard’s “Top 10 Latin Artists to Watch”—and explains how someone who had never studied music before found the confidence to listen to himself and be listened to by others.
15/12/2016m 6s

The Amazon's Burning Libraries

The arrival of the novel coronavirus in Munduruku territory, in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, has threatened the lives of the group, and its entire culture. COVID-19 took the life of an important Munduruku leader, bringing both sadness to an embattled people and hampering language revitalization efforts. But the Munduruku are a warrior people defined by their fierceness and tenacity. They have approached this struggle as they have all their battles, whether against miners, loggers, and invaders of a different stripe: without reservations.
11/12/2032m 40s

Getting Real About Pregnancy

Pregnancy comes with all kinds of questions, but the journey to pregnancy and the mishaps along the way are often overlooked or taboo in the Latino community. How can we as a community help break the silences surrounding some of the more difficult aspects of pregnancy? Maria Hinojosa sits down with producer Jeanne Montalvo – who is currently pregnant – and certified birth doula Elizabeth Perez to discuss all things pregnancy: the highs, the lows, the miscarriages, the triumphs, and having babies during the COVID-19 pandemic.
08/12/2034m 37s

Ilia Calderón: My Skin Color Doesn't Define Me

Ilia Calderón was still a little girl when she first experienced racism. But being rejected by part of her native Colombia's society would not deter her from following her dreams. She became the anchor of a national news network in Colombia and, after joining Univision in Miami, the first Afro-Latina to host a national newscast in the U.S. Listen to Ilia as she tells us about her debut book, her journey to becoming a prominent journalist, and what it's like to raise a mixed-race child.
04/12/2028m 19s

How I Made It: La Doña

Cecilia Peña-Govea who calls herself La Doña, grew up in the Mission District in San Francisco. She started playing music in her family's band at just seven years old. Now, she's blazing her own musical path and keeping the city she grew up in at the heart of her work. In her debut EP “Algo Nuevo” she touches on love, heartbreak, and rising rent. In this edition of our “How I Made It” series La Doña breaks down one of her new songs “Cuando Se Van” and talks about taking her fears and turning them into a powerful anthem for a gentrifying city.
01/12/209m 22s

By Right Of Discovery

On Thanksgiving Day, hundreds of people gather on Alcatraz Island, the famous former prison and one of the largest tourist attractions in San Francisco, for a sunrise ceremony to honor Indigenous culture and history. In 1969, an intertribal group of students and activists took over the island for over 16 months in an act of political resistance. Richard Oakes, a young Mohawk from New York, was one of the leaders in this movement dubbed the "Red Power Movement." Latino USA tells the story of Richard Oakes' life, from his first involvement in activism to his untimely death at the age of 30. This episode originally aired on November, 2018.
27/11/2048m 28s

Kate's Summer

The summer of 2020 was filled with uncertainty as more than 20 million people in the U.S. were left unemployed — including Kate Bustamante’s parents. Bustamante is a 20-year-old student at Santa Ana College in Santa Ana, California. She’s always worked part-time and attended school as long as she can remember. But this summer was different. Overnight, Bustamante dropped out of classes and became her family’s breadwinner. In this personal piece Bustamante, through diary recordings and personal reflections, takes us into her world and what she went through over the summer.
24/11/2031m 0s

Portrait Of: Gloria Estefan

Gloria Maria Milagrosa Fajardo Garcia was a shy, quiet young woman who joined a band named the Miami Latin Boys. Although she had no plans of international fame, and intended to continue her studies, life had different plans for her. The Miami Latin Boys became The Miami Sound Machine, Emilio and Gloria married, and the newlywed, Gloria Estefan began to take over the spotlight. The rest, is music history. In this Portrait Of: Gloria Estefan, Latino USA sits down with the icon to discuss her life, her relationships, how she overcame trauma, and how she manages to be excited about everything she does.
20/11/2036m 0s

How I Made It: From Foster Kid to Judge

When she was nine years-old, Xiomara Torres fled the civil war in her home country of El Salvador and came to the U.S. As a child she adjusted to her new life in East Los Angeles before she was removed from her family and put into foster care—where she spent six years of her life moving from home to home. Now, she's the subject of a local play in Oregon titled, "Judge Torres." In this edition of “How I Made It,” Judge Torres shares how she overcame the hurdles of the foster system and made her way to the Oregon Circuit Court. This story originally aired in March of 2019.
17/11/2014m 36s

The Myth Of The 'Latino Vote'

A major lesson from the 2020 election is one that Latinos already know: The idea of a single “Latino vote” is a myth. Latinos and Latinas throughout the United States draw from different histories that have shaped their different policy interests, ideologies, and personal experiences—and that all inform how they ultimately cast their ballots. President Trump won Florida, including nearly half of all Latinx-identifying voters in the state. But across the country in Arizona, grassroots groups led a wave of younger Latinx voters to flip the state blue for President-elect Joe Biden. In this episode of Latino USA, we take a closer look at the Latino and Latina voters that made it out to the polls in these states and how they decided who to cast their critical votes for.
13/11/2054m 12s

How I Made It: Las Cafeteras

Las Cafeteras are a band out of East LA that met while doing community organizing. They began playing at the Eastside Cafe, where they discovered Son Jarocho, traditional Afro-Mexican music from Veracruz. They quickly began to adapt the music to their realities fusing it with hip hop, rock, ska, and spoken word. They are known for their politically charged lyrics, speaking out against injustices within the immigrant community and their experiences as chicanos in East LA. On today’s “How I Made It”, we sat down with members of the group to discuss how they got started, and their work to tell and preserve brown stories.
10/11/2013m 56s

Reclaiming Our Homes

On March 14th of 2020, Martha Escudero and her two daughters became the first of a dozen unhoused families to occupy one of over a hundred vacant houses in El Sereno, Los Angeles. Some call them squatters, but they call themselves the Reclaimers. The houses the Reclaimers are occupying actually belong to a state agency that purchased the houses in the 1960’s in order to demolish them and build a freeway through this largely Latinx and immigrant neighborhood. This is the story of one of these houses, and its residents, past and present, who have fought to make it their home.
06/11/2041m 42s

The American Dream Daughter: A Conversation With Author Karla Cornejo Villavicencio

On paper, author Karla Cornejo Villavicencio is the poster child for the American Dream. She’s a Harvard graduate, a Yale Ph.D. candidate, and, now, a 2020 National Book Award finalist for her debut book, “The Undocumented Americans.” As a child, Villavicencio’s parents left her in their native Ecuador while they worked in the U.S., a period that continues to shape her and her work today. From parent-child separation to the stigma of mental health among the Latinx community, Villavicencio sits down to talk about the painful, tragicomic, and warm moments that come with being a child of immigrants.
03/11/2031m 47s

A Third Of The Latino Vote

Why do Latinos support Trump? Many people have asked this question since 2016, when, after launching his campaign by calling Mexican immigrants rapists, Trump still won almost a third of the Latino vote. Polls indicate that Trump could do it again—or even increase his support among Latino voters in 2020. In this episode, we talk to historian Geraldo Cadava and to longtime Latino Republicans to understand why roughly a third of Latino voters have supported Republican presidential candidates ever since the 1970s.
30/10/2037m 9s

Breaking Down The U.S. Deportation Machine

The United States runs on migrant labor. That’s been the case for most of this country’s history, and the demand for cheap workers over the past two centuries led to waves of immigration from China, Japan, Europe, and Latin America, especially Mexico. This trend also led to the creation of the deportation machine. That’s how Adam Goodman, a professor of Latin American and Latino/a Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago, describes the U.S.’s systemic efforts to expel noncitizens. In his recent book, "The Deportation Machine: America’s Long History of Expelling Immigrants", Goodman explores how today’s “country of immigrants” is built on a long history of deportation.
27/10/2028m 35s

Why Campaigns Fail To Get Latinos To Vote

Thirty two million Latinos are eligible to vote this election – a record. But research suggests that, in battleground states, 57% of them are not going to cast ballots. Historically, Latino turnout has been lower than that of whites, Blacks and Asians. Many hoped things would be different this time around. Instead, traditional political strategies plus the challenges presented by COVID-19 made Latino voters a low priority again. Reporter Gisele Regatāo reports on how that is playing out in two key swing states, Florida and Pennsylvania.
23/10/2028m 12s

Portrait Of: Danny Trejo

Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa sits down with actor and entrepreneur Danny Trejo. Trejo has starred in over 300 films, often playing villains and tough guys of all sorts. He now runs Trejo's Tacos, Trejo's Cantina, and Trejo's Donuts in Los Angeles. He shares how he went from regular stints in prison to being one of Hollywood's most recognizable faces. This story originally aired in April of 2019.
20/10/2021m 1s

The Rehab Empire Built On Cakes

It's a common sight in Puerto Rico—men in bright yellow T-shirts going door-to door-selling cakes. They're residents at Hogares CREA, Puerto Rico's biggest drug treatment program. Since CREA’s founding 1968, they've grown to a sprawling network of about 150 centers in Puerto Rico, the U.S. mainland and elsewhere in Latin America. But since the 1990s, the organization has been under fire for their methods. Latino USA takes a look at how this rehab empire built by a former heroin addict continues to be funded by millions of tax dollars, despite dozens of reported cases of physical and sexual abuse. This story originally aired in December of 2018.
16/10/2031m 30s

How I Made It: Buscabulla

Buscabulla is a Puerto Rican indie duo formed by wife and husband Raquel Berrios and Luis Alfredo del Valle. Around 2018, Buscabulla was one of the most beloved Latinx bands in New York City. Raquel and Luis had just released their second EP and confirmed a performance in that year’s Coachella music festival. Around this time of success, Raquel and Luis decided to move back to Puerto Rico. It was a significant life change, but one they were certain they wanted to make... as artists, and as new parents. In this segment of our "How I Made It" series, Raquel and Luis join us from Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, and they tell us about their debut album "Regresa."
13/10/2019m 16s

The Matter Of Castro Tum

In 2018, a young Guatemalan man named Reynaldo Castro Tum was ordered deported even though no one in the U.S. government knew where he was, or how to find him. Now, more than two years later, his unusual journey through the United States' immigration system has sucked another man back into a legal quagmire he thought that he'd escaped. This episode follows both of their stories and the fateful moment they collided.
09/10/2041m 17s

The Parents Are Not Alright

When cities across the country began going on lockdown in March, parents all over the U.S. had to scramble to balance taking care of their children, helping them with remote learning, while also working. Essential workers had to figure out who would watch their kids, and many of those same parents had to make difficult decisions. Seven months in, the mental load on parents continues to take its toll. Latino USA sits down with a group of mothers and fathers across the country to discuss how it has been going for them, how they’ve coped, and how they have found a silver lining parenting during the pandemic.
06/10/2032m 12s

From Chicago To Oaxaca

Back in March, Lili Ruiz moved out of New York City to reunite with her family in Chicago. As the first months of quarantine passed by, Lili’s family remained safe and kept in communication with their indigenous community in Oaxaca, Mexico. At the beginning of June, however, things would take a turn. Through intimate calls and memory descriptions, Lili takes us through a tumultuous summer with her family – from fighting bureaucracy to finding peace in the midst of grief.
02/10/2028m 49s

How I Made It: Chicano Batman

Chicano Batman is out with their newest album "Invisible People," which celebrates diversity. The band from Southern California has been on an upward climb since forming in 2008, fusing a kind of vintage psychedelic rock with more traditional Latin American rhythms. With this album, the band explores something new as they play around with R&B, funky bass lines, and prog-rock. While the sound of Chicano Batman keeps evolving, their music has managed to stay true to what got them noticed in the first place. On this week's "How I Made It" segment, the band talks about their rise to the top, playing with beats, and how they were never pigeon-holed as a Latinx/alternative band.
29/09/2012m 51s

Estrella, Revisited

In February of 2017, ICE agents arrested Estrella, an undocumented trans woman, inside an El Paso courthouse. Estrella was there after filing for a protective order, testifying in a domestic abuse hearing against her U.S. citizen ex-boyfriend. Her case became national news — it was the first time that federal immigration agents had ever arrested someone at court. Estrella was later sentenced to serve nine years behind bars for a non-violent crime that she has always maintained her abuser forced her to participate in. In this episode of Latino USA Estrella takes us into the maximum-security Texas men's prison where she is serving out her sentence. Through intimate phone conversation with Maria Hinojosa, we follow Estrella through her first years of incarceration — through the joys of transitioning and finally feeling at home in her body, to the dangers that come from being a woman in one of Texas' most infamous men's prisons. We also learn about a surprising accusation that puts Estrella's relationship with Maria at risk.
25/09/2041m 43s

The Breakdown: The Spell Of Yma Sumac

In the 1950s, singer and diva Yma Sumac took over the North American airwaves with her mystical voice. The Queen of Exotica and Inca Princess was said to cast a spell on anyone who came across her with her exotic look and nearly five-octave range. But while Yma Sumac rose to prominence across the globe, the Peruvian public in her home country, was not seduced by her song—or her representation of indigenous Peruvians. Today, Latino USA breaks down the phenomena behind one of the original divas, her conflicts and criticisms, and the impact of her legacy. This story originally aired in September of 2019.
22/09/2037m 53s

'Hatemonger': Author Jean Guerrero On Stephen Miller

Maria Hinojosa talks with reporter Jean Guerrero about her new book, "Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, and the White Nationalist Agenda," which chronicles the rise of one of President Trump's most influential advisors. Guerrero discusses Miller's California roots, the right-wing figures who mentored him as a young man, and how he's transformed the United States' immigration system.
18/09/2026m 36s

A Conversation With Maria Hinojosa And Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Today, September 15th, marks the launch of Maria Hinojosa's new book, "Once I Was You: A Memoir of Love and Hate in a Torn America." So we are bringing you an extended version of the conversation Maria had with Lulu Garcia-Navarro for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday. An edited version of this interview first aired on NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday on September 13th.
15/09/2031m 11s

Alzheimer's In Color

Latino USA and Black Public Media bring you Alzheimer's In Color. It's the story of Ramona Latty, a Dominican immigrant, told by her daughter Yvonne, and it mirrors countless other families of color navigating a disease that is ravaging the Latino community. It's been four years now since Ramona was diagnosed. Four years of the lonely journey, which in the end her daughter walks alone, because her mom has no idea what day it is, how old she is or where she is. Ramona lives in a nursing home and COVID-19, and months of separation have accelerated the disease, and Yvonne's despair.
11/09/2042m 44s

How I Made It: A Trip To Sesame Street With Rosita

Can you tell us how to get to Sesame Street? Rosita can! In this installment of our How I Made It series, we visit the friendliest block on television to speak with the first full-time bilingual muppet on Sesame Street: Rosita, la Monstrua de las Cuevas. The fuzzy, turquoise-colored 5-year-old first appeared on the show nearly 30 years ago with muppeteer Carmen Osbahr, who helped create the muppet's bright look and personality. Rosita and Carmen talk about their journeys moving from Mexico to Sesame Street and revisit their greatest adventures after nearly 30 years on the show.
08/09/2015m 0s

How I Made It: Lido Pimienta On 'Miss Colombia'

Colombian-Canadian singer-songwriter Lido Pimienta tells us how her experience of migration led to her love of Afro-Colombian music, how a beauty pageant and its underlying anti-blackness inspired her new album, and how she came to collaborate with the legendary Afro-Colombian ensemble, Sexteto Tabalá, in her track "Pelo Cucú."
04/09/2013m 43s

The Strange Death Of José De Jesús, Part 2

In part two of our two-part special, we continue our investigation into the death of a man in a U.S. immigration detention center in 2015. José de Jesús turned himself into Border Patrol saying somebody was after him. Three days later, he died by suicide after stuffing a sock down his throat. In part two of this story, surveillance video reveals clues about what happened inside his cell, and an internal investigation from Immigration and Customs Enforcement answers many of our questions about what happened to José in the days leading up to his death. This story originally aired in July of 2016.
01/09/2047m 54s

The Strange Death Of José De Jesús, Part 1

A man dies in a U.S. immigration detention center, under unusual circumstances. He is found unresponsive in his cell, with a sock stuffed down his throat. His death is ruled a suicide, but little information is put out about what happened, and the family wants answers. In this first part of a special two-part series, Latino USA investigates why José de Jesús died in the custody of the U.S. government, and what his death tells us about conditions—especially mental health services—inside the immigration detention system. This story originally aired in July of 2016.
28/08/2049m 46s

José Ralat, Taco Editor

José Ralat is the Taco Editor at Texas Monthly Magazine and consequently the only taco editor in the United States. In his book, "American Tacos: A History and Guide," Ralat dives into the evolution of tacos in the United States and its history in the borderlands. According to Ralat, tacos were introduced into the U.S. in the late 1800s. Since then, tacos have evolved into fusions —like Korean and Cajun tacos— as cultures blended with one another and chefs across the country experimented with different flavors. In this episode, Ralat gives us a brief history of the American taco and why eventually, all foods will make its way into a tortilla.
21/08/2014m 14s

The Migrant Student Club

Over 300,000 students in the U.S. migrate every year to work in agriculture, from spring to fall. At a high school in South Texas, when these students return, they gather at the Migrant Student Club to discuss their experiences and get support from a migrant student counselor. At a special gathering of the club we met Reyes, who started picking asparagus in Michigan to help support his family when he was 9 years old. And over the course of his last semester of school, we follow him as he works to graduate, financially support his family, and deal with an unexpected twist: the pandemic.
18/08/2036m 4s

Reporter's Notebook: Puerto Ricans Living In The Center Of The COVID-19 Outbreak

The Puerto Rican population living in the United States is largely concentrated in New York, New Jersey, and Florida — all of which are regions hit hard by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. An investigation by the Puerto Rico-based Center for Investigative Journalism (or CPI in Spanish) found that stateside Puerto Rican communities live in areas that are at the highest risk of infection and death by COVID-19, a vulnerable position only compounded by factors such as poverty, high unemployment rates, English-language barriers, and lack of health care and insurance. On this episode of Latino USA, CPI reporters Vanessa Colón Almenas and Coral Murphy break down their findings.
14/08/2017m 40s

The Children Of Smithfield

Maira Mendez's parents work at a massive pork processing plant in Nebraska. Last March, as meatpacking plants across the nation quickly became invisible hotspots for the coronavirus, it became clear to her that the plant, owned by Smithfield Foods, wasn't able to ensure social distancing or provide enough protective equipment. Maira was alarmed at the conditions—and that workers found it difficult to speak up. So she became part of a group called the "The Children of Smithfield," joining other family members of meatpacking workers, to begin calling for action from the plant and the state.
11/08/2030m 24s

After The Mississippi Raids

August 7th, 2019 was the day that tore apart an unlikely community of Guatemalan immigrants in central Mississippi. A year ago, hundreds of ICE agents arrived at seven chicken processing plants and arrested 680 workers. Many of them were fathers and mothers whose kids were left behind for days, weeks, or even months. Today, many families are still dealing with the consequences of those arrests, many remain unable to work, as they grapple with the traumatic psychological repercussions. Latino USA traveled to the heart of Mississippi to hear about the long term effects of the largest single-state immigration raid in U.S. history.
07/08/2050m 3s

Alice Bag And A Quinceañera Reimagined

For Alice Bag, punk is much more than just a genre, it is an attitude and a way to challenge the expectations and limitations placed on her due to her race, gender, or age. Alice Bag was the lead singer and co-founder of "The Bags," one of the first bands in LA's punk scene in the 1970's. In 2019 Alice performed at "Quinceañera Reimagined," a party that brought together women of color artists across disciplines to challenge the patriarchal history of the quinceañera tradition, and celebrate milestones of growth beyond age and beauty. In this episode of our How I Made It series, Alice Bag looks back at her own growth as an artist, reflecting on how she came to be the fearless musician and feminist she is today.
04/08/2012m 32s

And They Will Inherit It

Almost 70 years ago, a group of majority Mexican-American miners in New Mexico readied themselves for a showdown with their bosses. The miners were going on strike to demand an end to discriminatory practices at the mines. The events inspired the 1954 film "Salt of the Earth"—made by filmmakers who had been blacklisted in Hollywood for supposed leftist sympathies. Latino USA heads to Grant County, New Mexico, to uncover the history of the The Empire Zinc Strike, to find out how a sleepy mining town erupted in protest and if almost 70 years later, anyone still remembers.
31/07/2040m 2s

How I Made It: Kichwa Hatari

In this segment of our "How I Made It" series, Charlie Uruchima shares his journey with his ancestral language and tells us how he created "Kichwa Hatari," the first Kichwa-language radio station in the U.S. From a bedroom-turned-radio studio, to building an entire community of radio hosts and language activists, Charlie tells us how he discovered the power of radio to build solidarity that defies borders.
28/07/2013m 49s

Portrait Of: Anthony Ramos

When Anthony Ramos discovered theater in high school, it changed his life. As a teenager, he had his sights set on baseball, but an injury led him down a very different path. Ramos first burst onto the scene in the 2015 smash Broadway hit "Hamilton," but since then he's had roles in major Hollywood films and television. In October of 2019, Ramos released his debut album 'The Good and the Bad', a personal journey set to funky bass lines and R&B vocals. Latino USA sits down with Ramos to discuss growing up in Brooklyn, how mentorship has played an important role in his career, and finding himself in "the room where it happens."
24/07/2027m 7s

Allyship And #BlackLivesMatter: A Conversation Across Cultures

The nationwide protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd have started a firestorm of activism. Crowds of people have taken to the streets to support Black Lives Matter, many of whom are non-black. YR Media and Latino USA bring you a discussion with four young adults from different racial backgrounds to discuss what it means to be an effective ally in the fight to end anti-Blackness, the role young people are playing in this new wave of activism, and the importance of "unlearning" long-held perspectives rooted in our communities.
21/07/2023m 56s

In The Bronx, A Progressive Battleground

In late June, Ritchie Torres made history when he took the lead in the Democratic primary to represent New York's 15th Congressional District, which is in the Bronx. While absentee ballots are still being counted, Torres is now poised to become the first openly LGBTQ Afro-Latino member of Congress. Torres was one of 12 candidates, among them a Pentecostal minister who opposes gay marriage and a political newcomer endorsed by Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. In this episode, Latino USA digs into this wild election and talks with Torres about what being progressive means to him.
17/07/2024m 29s

Kat Von D At Home

In an interview from before the pandemic, Latino USA visits the home of tattoo artist, entrepreneur, reality star, and goth icon Kat Von D. She first became famous in the early aughts as the first female tattooer on the hit reality television show 'Miami Ink'. Beloved for her artistry and straight shooting banter, she would soon get her own spinoff, 'LA Ink.' She gives us a tour of her baroque home, talks about scaring her Catholic mother, and the backlash she has gotten for her previous relationships and how it has raised accusations that she is a Nazi.
14/07/2024m 0s

Omar Jimenez: On Air And Under Arrest

While covering the protests sparked after George Floyd's murder in May, CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez was arrested by the Minnesota State Patrol. He was reporting live on the air at the time, and the video of that moment would go viral, as a symbol of racist comportment by the police. Omar Jimenez, who is Afro-Latino, reflects on that moment and talks about the role of his identity in his reporting.
10/07/2026m 45s

Portrait Of: Arca

Alejandra Ghersi, the experimental musician from Venezuela known as Arca, has been at the forefront of a movement that has pushed the boundaries of the pop music landscape. Since dropping her first mixtapes in 2011, she has produced album after album of boundary-defying music, and has been tapped as a producer for Kanye West, Bjork and FKA twigs. In this episode Arca talks with Maria Hinojosa about growing up in Venezuela, her philosophies around music, and about finding herself as a trans woman.
07/07/2027m 57s

Bobby Sanabria Reimagines West Side Story

Growing up as a Nuyorican kid in the Bronx, Bobby Sanabria first watched "West Side Story" in the movie theaters, on the 10th anniversary of the film's release. "I was mesmerized," said the Latin Jazz drummer and composer. In 2017, the Broadway classic celebrated its 60th anniversary and to honor this milestone, Sanabria re-envisioned what Latino New York City actually sounds like. The result was his album, "West Side Story Reimagined." Maria Hinojosa talks to the drummer and composer about what the iconic musical means to him and how he paid tribute to its legacy. This story originally aired in September of 2018.
03/07/2018m 50s

I'm Not Dead

In the early 70s, Miguel Angel Villavicencio was focused on making his most ambitious dream possible: to become a famous singer in Bolivia and across the world. And he was halfway there—his love songs were on the radio and he was appearing on TV. But to take his singing career truly international, he needed money. So he decided to work for Bolivia's most powerful drug cartel in the 80s—a major supplier for Pablo Escobar. Choosing this path would lead him on a journey of self-destruction, unexpected betrayal and finally, redemption. This story originally aired in January of 2019.
30/06/2033m 50s

How Brazil Became The Epicenter Of COVID-19

Brazil recorded its first death from COVID-19 on March 17th and by mid-June the country was the world leader in daily deaths. Overall, Brazil is only behind the United States both in the number of cases and deaths due to coronavirus. But Jair Bolsonaro, the country's right-wing nationalist president, continues to be dismissive about the threat posed by the virus. In this episode, we find out why Brazil, one of the largest economies in the world and a nation often in the forefront of innovative public health treatments, has failed to combat the pandemic.
26/06/2025m 33s

DACA Stands, But The Future Is Anything But Certain

On Thursday, June 18th, the Supreme Court issued a ruling that upheld the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. This comes over two years after the Trump administration moved to eliminate the program. About 700,000 people are currently enrolled in DACA, which grants temporary stays of deportation to undocumented immigrants who moved to the U.S. as children. As DACA recipients and supporters celebrate this win, they're also looking to the future. DACA could still be challenged by this administration. Meanwhile, many are calling for comprehensive immigration reform and a path to citizenship for both DACA recipients and the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. today.
24/06/2030m 22s

Resistance And Loss In The Age Of COVID-19 With Edwidge Danticat

According to Haitian American author Edwidge Danticat, stories are a way of finding inspiration and comfort during the times we're living through. Her award-winning writing portrays the immigrant experience, Haitian American identity, and loss. In conversation with Maria Hinojosa, Danticat dives into the history of resistance to the police violence that was all around her as a young adult in New York City, the loss of her own uncle who died at the hands of immigration authorities, and how she's making sense of the current moment.
19/06/2029m 2s

The Lone Legislator

In 1919, an intrepid Texas state representative, José Tomás Canales, decided to lead an investigation into the abuse of power by the Texas Rangers. For several years, residents of South Texas had been reporting that members of the law enforcement agency were going rogue: beating, torturing, and even killing people, in the name of protecting Anglo settlers. The subsequent investigation into these abuses would illustrate the difficulties of reforming and creating oversight over policing on the border—and would leave behind a narrative about justified violence against the Mexican-American community, that lingers to this day.
17/06/2035m 56s

Rosa Clemente On Allyship And Confronting Anti-Blackness

The killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police sparked worldwide protests against racism and police brutality. To many, this moment seems inevitable — and for the Latinx community, it's bringing up complex conversations on identity, race, and allyship with the Black community. In the first of several conversations we will be having on Latino USA, we're joined by Afro-Puerto Rican activist, organizer, and scholar Rosa Clemente to understand how we got to this crucial moment. We talk about what useful allyship looks like and where the next generation of Black and Latinx activist leaders go from here.
12/06/2022m 4s

How Puerto Rican Scientists Hacked The COVID-19 Response

In late February, the government of Puerto Rico was in denial over COVID-19. Top health officials were saying that the coronavirus would not reach the island—but the pandemic did arrive in early March. With hospitals that are still recovering from hurricanes and earthquakes, there was concern that the spread of COVID-19 would overwhelm a fragile health system. To prevent that from happening, a group of Puerto Rican scientists banded together to ramp up testing. In this episode, two scientists show us how Puerto Rico went from one of the U.S. jurisdictions with the least testing to over 100,000 COVID tests.
09/06/2028m 27s

Willie Perdomo Comes Home

In the early 1990s, Willie Perdomo was a teenager growing up in East Harlem. He saw and experienced firsthand a tumultuous moment in New York City, including the crack epidemic and the consequences of the war on drugs. In his latest book of poetry, "The Crazy Bunch," Perdomo wrangles with that history and the ghosts of that time. Latino USA's Antonia Cereijido takes a walk with Perdomo through his old neighborhood of Harlem to discuss his teenage years and how memories of that time inspired his newest work. This story originally aired in July of 2019.
05/06/2017m 44s

Dispatch From Atlanta's Nights Of Protests

It's been over a week since the death of George Floyd – a black man in handcuffs who died after being suffocated under the knee of a white officer in Minneapolis. Since Floyd's death, protests have erupted all over the country, calling for an end to police brutality on black citizens. One of the cities where residents have taken to the streets is Atlanta. The hometown of Martin Luther King, Jr. the city has a long history of protesting and was pivotal in the Civil Rights movement. Julieta Martinelli, one of Latino USA's producers, has been covering the protests for our website, latinousa.org. On today's episode, she brings us a reporter's notebook.
03/06/2013m 3s

Love & Walkouts

Today we're bringing you an episode from our vault — a love story of student activism. We're taking you back to 1968, when thousands of students participated in a series of protests that helped spark the Chicano Movement, historically known as the East L.A. Walkouts. It's also when high school sweethearts and student organizers Bobby Verdugo and Yoli Ríos danced to a Thee Midniters song and fell in love. This story originally aired in February of 2019.
02/06/2032m 44s

A Moment On The Farm

The COVID-19 pandemic is a moment in which our broader food supply chains have been challenged—dairy farmers dumping unused milk, farmers plowing over produce, meatpacking plants closing, and grocery store shelves running empty. In some communities, that means people are now turning to smaller, local farms for their produce. One of those farms is run by the Hernández family in Edinburg, Texas. Amid COVID-19, 26-year-old daughter Civia Hernández has been working to adapt and bring the farm online, to survive in this new world. In this dispatch, Civia brings us on the ground to her family's farm, which has become a place of peaceful sanctuary for her in these difficult times.
29/05/209m 17s

The Moving Border: Part Two, The South

In Part 2 of The Moving Border, we visit Tapachula, Mexico in search of a young man whose life is in danger. And we find a new frontier where refugees trying to make it to the U.S. are increasingly stuck, thanks to an international effort to make Mexico a destination state for asylum. The Moving Border series was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center, with additional support provided by the Ford Foundation.
27/05/2050m 13s

Inside An Intensive Care Unit In The Heart Of The Pandemic

As the coronavirus spread in New York City and reached its peak in April, some disturbing statistics were revealed: Black and Latino patients were disproportionately affected by the disease, and they were dying at twice the rate of other patients. Even after the peak of the outbreak in New York, intensive care units in hospitals across the city are still busy caring for COVID-19 patients. In this episode of Latino USA, we go inside the frontlines in Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital, part of the NYC Health + Hospitals system, where we learn about the Latino patients fighting for their lives against COVID-19.
22/05/2013m 46s

The Moving Border: Part One, The North

In this two-part investigation, "The Moving Border" from Latino USA, we delve into the increasing pressure put on refugees seeking safety in the United States via its southern border. It reveals the surprising support the Trump administration has received to create an impenetrable policy wall that pushes asylum seekers south, away from the U.S. In episode one, "The North," we visit Juárez and tell the story of a mother and daughter who are mired in a web of changing policy and subjected to ongoing violence. And we find evidence of how Mexican authorities are working hand-in-hand with the U.S. at the border. "The Moving Border" series was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center.
20/05/2036m 52s

Behind The Scenes With Documented

For our latest episode of Latino USA, we partnered up with Documented, a nonprofit news site that covers immigrants in New York City, to get a behind the scenes look at the experience of trying to navigate the immigration courts as an asylum-seeker under the Trump Administration. Maria Hinojosa sat down with co-founders of Documented, Max Siegelbaum and Mazin Sidahmed, to talk about what they observed in New York's immigration courts, and how federal policy changes have impacted the people moving through them.
14/05/2012m 29s

At The Mercy Of The Courts

In this episode of Latino USA we partner up with Documented, a nonprofit news site that covers immigrants in New York City, to get a behind the scenes look at the experience of trying to navigate the immigration courts as an asylum-seeker under the Trump Administration. We follow the story of Wendy and Elvis, Guatemalan newlyweds who flee violent extortion threats only to find themselves in a maddening and punishing U.S. court system that is now the norm for immigrants seeking safety.
13/05/2052m 29s

Latino-Owned And Without A Lifeline, Small Businesses Struggle To Survive

The COVID-19 shutdown has changed the lives of many across the country, including small business owners who are struggling to pay their rent, meet their payrolls and stay afloat. Texas has one of the highest rates of Latino-owned businesses in the country. Maria Hinojosa checks in with entrepreneurship reporter Paul Flahive of Texas Public Radio, who has been covering this story across Texas. He shares the story of two Latino-owned businesses who have been trying to access relief funds and have come up short in a very crucial moment for their businesses.
08/05/2026m 7s

Portrait Of: Immortal Technique

Felipe Coronel, aka Immortal Technique, is a legendary underground hip-hop artist known for his skills on the mic and his raw, highly political lyrics. Today, Immortal Technique spends his time working on philanthropic causes. Much of his work has been centered in Harlem, especially in the past two months of the coronavirus pandemic. Along with donating to various charity organizations, he is going out in the neighborhood to deliver food and run errands for those unable to go outside due to COVID-19. Between his runs, Immortal Technique is still writing music and hitting the studio, as fans hold their breath for the release of his first album in over a decade. We sit down with Immortal Technique to get a deeper sense of what it was like growing up in Harlem and how his rage has played into his successful music career. Part of this episode originally aired in January of 2019.
06/05/2030m 9s

Portrait Of: Enrique Bunbury

Enrique Bunbury is a rock legend in Spain and Latin America, and he's been touring in the United States for years. A pioneer of the "rock en español" movement, Bunbury's eclectic solo career spans decades. During this time he has taken his loyal fans on a musical journey from cabaret to electronic music, all driven by his rock and roll ethos. In this episode Bunbury sits down with Maria Hinojosa to talk about his most recent album, titled "Posible", his self-described "impossible tour" in the U.S., and what keeps him going after all these years.
01/05/2027m 54s

Across The River From Boston

New York City continues to be the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, but the state with the third most coronavirus cases —after New York and New Jersey— is Massachusetts. And just across the river from Boston is a city that has the highest per capita rate of infection in that state. It's the city of Chelsea. For generations, its residents have been primarily Latino or newly-arrived immigrants who commute to Boston to work. Maria Hinojosa sits down with Boston-based reporter and co-host of the In The Thick podcast Julio Ricardo Varela to talk about why this outbreak began and the healthcare response to it.
28/04/2023m 19s

With You, Peru

The 1970s were a golden age for soccer in Peru, one that producer Janice Llamoca only heard about growing up in Los Angeles in the '90s. The Peruvian soccer team went to three World Cups in that era. But after that, the team did poorly for decades — failing to qualify for the World Cup year after year. Then, in 2017, Peru qualified for the World Cup after 36 years — giving the Llamocas the opportunity of a lifetime to travel to Russia to see their team play on soccer's biggest stage. This story originally aired in July of 2018.
24/04/2031m 11s

Hola Papi's Advice For Life In Self-Isolation

In recent weeks, many of us have had to adjust to living and working remotely. It's a necessary precaution to keep yourself and your community safe during the coronavirus pandemic — but it's not always easy to do. John Paul Brammer, author of the popular advice column "Hola Papi," gets it. He's been getting lots of questions from readers about how to make it through life in self-quarantine, from navigating romantic relationships to creating your own space in a busy home. On this week's Latino USA, Brammer answers listener questions about these strange, uncertain times, and talks about how to give advice during a historic pandemic.
21/04/2021m 35s

Reporter's Notebook: Afro-Puerto Ricans Fighting To Be Visible On The Census

The 2020 census is underway, which counts everyone living in the U.S. and its five territories including Puerto Rico. The form consists of questions like name, age, sex and race, but some of these answers are complicated. One example is the race question. In Puerto Rico, residents choose "Puerto Rican" to describe their Hispanic origin, but historically residents have overwhelmingly identified as white on the census, despite the island's rich African history. In this segment, journalist Natasha S. Alford takes us through her reporting of Afro-Puerto Ricans and how activists are fighting to have their communities seen on the census.
17/04/2027m 53s

With Sanders Out, What Happens To The Latino Vote Now?

Latinos could play a decisive role in the swing state of Pennsylvania in November's presidential election. In 2016 Trump won the state by about 44,000 votes, and the campaign of Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders had been courting Latino voters there for months. Now that Sanders has dropped out of the presidential race, many wonder if former Vice-President Joe Biden will be able to win them over. In this episode of Latino USA, Maria Hinojosa speaks with reporter Gisele Regatao, who has been on the ground in Pennsylvania following Latino voters.
15/04/2026m 11s

Intuition

Light your candles and schedule your limpia because today's episode is all about the power of intuition. Reporter Cindy Rodriguez talks to scientist Galang Lufityanto about his research into intuitive decision-making. Then, we head to the Brooklyn Brujeria festival, and learn about how intuition has been part of a growing Latinx feminist movement. Finally we hear about Cindy's journey to accept her own sense of intuition, through her relationship to her mother.
10/04/2032m 54s

Immigrants In ICE Detention Face The Threat Of COVID-19

There are currently over 35,000 immigrants in detention in the United States, and most of them are in centers under the control of ICE, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency. As the spread of COVID-19 overwhelms some areas of the country, the situation that many immigrants in detention are facing has become an urgent concern. ICE has already started to report that some immigrants and employees have tested positive for the virus. In this episode of Latino USA, we speak with Noah Lanard, a journalist who has reported on the conditions in these detention centers for Mother Jones magazine, and Joaquin Castro, Chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.
07/04/2029m 6s

The Remarkable Rebirth Of Medellín

Medellín, Colombia, is lauded as one of the most innovative and tourist-friendly cities in the world. But 30 years ago, the city was the world's cocaine capital—ravaged by the cartel war led by Pablo Escobar. Latino USA travels to Medellín to hear how the city's violent and narcotic history changed the lives of one family and how Medellín went from being one of the most dangerous places in the world to the "model city" it is today. This story originally aired in June of 2018.
01/04/2037m 54s

Checking Up On The Clinic During COVID-19

A few months ago, we aired a story in which we spent 72 hours at CommunityHealth, a free health clinic in Chicago that only serves people without health insurance, and that's run primarily by volunteers. As the number of cases of COVID-19 rises rapidly, free health clinics are an important line of defense against the disease. The communities they serve, like older patients, patients with chronic conditions, and undocumented immigrants, are particularly vulnerable to the disease. For this episode, we check back-in with CommunityHealth and one of their patients, about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.
27/03/2022m 24s

For Immigrant Communities, Coronavirus Is A Different Kind Of Threat

Public health experts are urging people to stay at home during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic — but not everyone can afford to. Here in the United States, low-income immigrant communities are facing high risks during the outbreak. Many migrants are still working in essential retail, labor, and service industry jobs. Getting access to healthcare is also a challenge, especially after the Trump administration enacted a new policy measure limiting certain immigrants' access to federal benefits like Medicare. In this week's Latino USA, we explore the obstacles migrants face as the coronavirus threat grows.
25/03/2022m 2s

From Boyle Heights To Netflix... And Back To The Neighborhood

In February, Netflix premiered a comedy-drama series that features a Mexican-American family from the Los Angeles neighborhood of Boyle Heights. The show is called 'Gentefied' and it's a blend of two words: "gente", the Spanish word for people, and "gentrified." In Latino USA, we wanted to get the community's perspective on the show, so we reached out to the Boyle Heights Beat—a bilingual community newspaper produced by youth reporters—and handed them the mic. The result is a conversation that takes on gentrification, stereotypes and what it's like when a new show is set in your backyard.
20/03/2028m 6s

An Acid Attack In Milwaukee

Over the last few years, as immigration has become a heated topic of discussion, there are more and more stories about racist comments and instances of violence against Latinos. And that's reflected in FBI data on hate crimes—a 2018 report showed that personal attacks motivated by bias or prejudice had reached a 16-year high and that hate crimes specifically against Latinos and Latinas were rising. To better understand these trends, on this episode of Latino USA, Maria Hinojosa goes with reporter Angelina Mosher Salazar to Milwaukee, Wisconsin where they dive into one violent attack on a Peruvian immigrant and U.S. citizen.
18/03/2025m 5s

The Few Let In To Wait

In January 2019, the Trump administration began enforcing the Migrant Protection Protocols, more widely known as the "Remain in Mexico" policy. It forced an estimated 60,000 people, many of them Central American, to remain in Mexico while U.S. courts decide their fate. While the door has essentially been shut on newly arrived migrants, a few who are deemed "vulnerable" are still being allowed to enter. Mother Jones reporters Fernanda Echavarri and Julia Lurie went to Santa Fe, New Mexico to talk to some of the few people allowed into the U.S. And, in this episode of Latino USA, Fernanda takes us on a ride-along to meet two newly arrived families trying to make a life, while stuck in limbo.
13/03/2031m 33s

Sanders, Biden, And The Latino Vote

The Latino electorate has long been considered a sleeping giant in U.S. politics, but in the 2020 election, that giant is waking up. About 32 million Latinas and Latinos will be eligible to vote this year, the second largest voting bloc in the country. On this episode, Latino USA speaks with Sonja Diaz, Founding Executive Director of the UCLA Latino Policy Initiative, and Julio Ricardo Varela, co-host of the In The Thick podcast, about what we've learned about the Latino vote from the Democratic primaries so far. We talk about Senator Bernie Sanders' campaign strategy in Latino communities, Former Vice President Joe Biden's challenges reaching these voters, and what it all means as his campaign takes the lead in the race for his party's nomination.
12/03/2030m 53s

The Election Glitch That Sparked A Dominican Uprising

On February 27, thousands of Dominicans from around the country gathered for a massive rally in Santo Domingo. That date is normally one filled with carnival festivities to mark Independence Day. But this year—it had a completely different tone. Instead, protestors took to the streets, after the municipal elections were abruptly cancelled. The electoral board cited glitches with voting machines as the reason behind the cancelation, but for the public, this was the last straw in a series of concerns they have with the political party in power. Maria Hinojosa sits down with our Digital Media Editor Amanda Alcántara to talk about how this all got started, and what it means for Dominicans all over the world.
06/03/2029m 29s

Portrait Of: Residente

In 2005, a duo of Puerto Rican artists released their eponymously titled debut album "Calle 13." Their mix of reggaeton and rap took the Latinx music scene by storm and got them three Latin Grammy awards. In 2017, one half of that duo, René Juan Pérez Joglar—better known as Residente—released his first solo album. To find inspiration, he took a genealogical DNA test and traveled to every part of the world that showed up in the test, where he collaborated with local musicians. Now, Residente is working on his second solo album, which involves the brainwaves of worms. Maria Hinojosa sits down with Residente to dig into the mind of the man who has experimented with so many musical genres.
03/03/2035m 11s

The Persistent Problem Of Hunger

There are more than 800 million starving people on the planet, and more than 20,000 people on average continue to die from hunger every day. But the world produces more than enough food to feed the entire human population. Award-winning author and journalist Martín Caparrós traveled the globe to understand why people are still hungry, and wrote the international best-selling book, "Hunger," in the process. The book was recently published in English for the first time. Maria Hinojosa speaks with him about his findings.
28/02/2022m 36s

How I Made It: Yasser Tejeda & Palotré

The musical genres most people associate with the Dominican Republic are merengue and bachata. Yet, there's another set of rhythms that are essential to the spirit of the country, and that's Afro-Dominican roots music. That's where the band Yasser Tejeda & Palotré come in. They blend some of the country's black roots rhythms like palo, salve and sarandunga, with jazz and rock to bring a new spin to local sounds—and to reimagine what it means to be Dominican. In this segment of "How I Made It," the band's frontman Yasser Tejeda walks us through the inspiration behind their latest album "Kijombo," and the making of the single "Amor Arrayano," which is all about love across the Dominican-Haitian border.
25/02/2018m 53s

A Conversation With Elizabeth Warren

Latino USA continues its coverage of the Democratic field for the presidential nomination. This time, we sit down with the senator from Massachusetts, Elizabeth Warren. Senator Warren is a relative newcomer to politics—she was first elected in 2012. Now, a year after she declared her run for the presidency, primaries have started. Senator Warren has not had a strong start, but she plans to continue to fight for the nomination. Maria Hinojosa speaks with her about her views on immigration, Puerto Rico, and her campaign.
20/02/2033m 28s

Portrait Of: 'Taina' And The Love Of Nostalgia TV

In 2001, Nickelodeon started airing "Taina," a show about a Latina teen who attends a performing arts high school in NYC and daydreams of being a star. While the show only lasted two seasons, "Taina" is seared into the memories of many who grew up watching it, because at the time it was rare to see an authentic portrayal of what it was like to be a Nuyorican teen in the early 2000s. In this episode from our vault, Maria Hinojosa talks to the show's award-winning creator Maria Perez-Brown, who is Nuyorican herself, about jumping into the world of children's television after being a tax lawyer, and the surprisingly long legacy of "Taina."
18/02/2021m 51s

Yesika Salgado On Love, Lust, And Being A Hopeless Romantic

This Valentine's Day, Maria Hinojosa and Yesika Salgado talk about love, lust, and being a hopeless romantic. Yesika grew up in Los Angeles in a Salvadoran family, and she calls herself a fat, fly poet—her most recent book of poems "Hermosa" came out last fall. Yesika and Maria start this episode with a trip to the world's largest wholesale produce market, where they go on a quest to find the sexiest fruit. Then, they sit down to talk about how love has changed Yesika's relationship with her body and how her literary success has shaped what she wants out of love.
14/02/2027m 36s

Portrait Of: José Feliciano

Every holiday season, you can't help but sing along to the infectious melody of José Feliciano's 1970 mega single, "Feliz Navidad." But aside from the holiday hit, the Puerto Rican singer boasts an almost 60-year musical career and one of his specialties is recording covers like "California Dreamin'" and "La Copa Rota"—blending them with his own sound of blues, folk, soul and Latin. In this conversation with Maria Hinojosa, José Feliciano opens up about why he keeps the 70s alive and about one of his favorite relationships: the one he has with his guitar.
12/02/2028m 37s

Ornella & Violeta

For seventeen years, Ornella Pedrozo thought of her mom's detainment by ICE as her deepest, darkest secret. When she was four years old, her mother Violeta, who had fled the armed conflict in Peru, was abruptly detained by ICE. That separation, which lasted seven months, was something that Ornella didn't really talk about, until recently. In this episode, you'll hear fragments of a letter Ornella wrote about her complicated feelings back then, and she also sits down with Violeta to talk — at length for the first time — about how those seven months left a permanent mark.
07/02/2018m 36s

La Reina Del Rock: Alejandra Guzmán

Known by many as "La Reina del Rock," the queen of Latin American rock, Alejandra Guzmán has built a legacy for herself through her soulful performances and scandalous lyrics. Her famous Mexican parents, rocker Enrique Guzmán and actress Silvia Pinal, introduced her to the industry, but it's Alejandra's fierce stage presence and ambition that have sold over 12 million records over three decades. In this episode, Alejandra talks to Maria Hinojosa about her rebellious roots and what the rock 'n' roll lifestyle looks like with hip replacements.
05/02/2028m 33s

Puerto Rico Demands Answers

Recently, a local blogger broadcast his discovery of a warehouse full of aid supplies in Ponce, Puerto Rico, through Facebook Live — reportedly from disaster relief after Hurricane María in 2017. The public outrage was immediate. Thousands of people in the south of the island have been displaced by an earthquake swarm that's been going on for weeks, and government response has been slow. As protests break out to denounce corruption and ineptitude in the Puerto Rican government, there's also a pernicious narrative from the federal government: that the island is too corrupt to trust, and cannot manage federal aid.
31/01/2017m 59s

Digging Into 'American Dirt'

The novel American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins was released this January with much anticipation. Oprah selected it to be part of her book club, writer Don Winslow called it, "a Grapes of Wrath for our times" and celebrated Latina author Sandra Cisneros called it "the great novel of las Americas." But its release was met with a large backlash. Many Latinx writers felt the book furthered a stereotypical view of migrants from Mexico and Central America. For this episode, Maria Hinojosa engages in dialogue with voices central to the controversy: Myriam Gurba, Sandra Cisneros, Luis Alberto Urrea and Jeanine Cummins.
29/01/2053m 13s

How I Made It: Jessie Reyez

Jessie Reyez sings sad songs, but it's those songs along with her soulful voice and brutally honest lyrics that have garnered her fans around the world. Most recently, the Colombian-Canadian singer received her first Grammy nomination in the Best Urban Contemporary Album category for her EP, "Being Human in Public." In our latest "How I Made It" segment, Jessie Reyez talks about the role of music in her childhood, how she writes through her own emotional pain, and how even when her fans sing along to her saddest songs—she feels more connected to them than ever.
24/01/2020m 17s

Death Of A Blood Sport

In December 2019, a congressional ban made cockfighting illegal in U.S. territories. Animal rights activists argue the sport is cruel and inhumane. But Puerto Ricans say cockfighting is an integral part of their culture and economy. They also say they are tired of the U.S. imposing its values on the island, and much like their roosters, they're prepared to fight to the death to protect their heritage.
22/01/2038m 3s

Looking Back On A 'Decade Of Fire'

In the 1970s, a string of devastating fires would help make the South Bronx a symbol of urban decay. In her documentary "Decade of Fire," co-director Vivian Vázquez Irizarry, who grew up in the South Bronx, tries to dissect and counter that negative image through a personal lens. The documentary analyzes how the city, state, and federal governments abandoned the Bronx in the 1970s, and how despite the fact that black and Latino residents suffered the most, they were also the ones blamed for this catastrophe. Maria Hinojosa talks with Vázquez Irizarry about how that negative image came to be, the residents that rebuilt the neighborhood, and the new challenge of gentrification.
17/01/2028m 52s

Portrait Of: Rubén Blades

Rubén Blades is a singer, songwriter, actor, lawyer, and politician, born in Panama and a New Yorker since 1974. After four decades in the public eye, 17 Grammy Awards, and some of the best-selling records in salsa history, his unique storytelling across music styles has kept him relevant to this day. He's worked with a wide range of musicians including Héctor Lavoe, Willie Colón, Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, Sting, Michael Jackson, and Calle 13. Latino USA sits down with the author of the song Pedro Navaja to discuss highlights of his monumental career.This story originally aired in October of 2018.
10/01/2036m 36s

The Diary Of An 'Undesirable'

Anthony Acevedo was the first Mexican-American Holocaust survivor registered at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C. Latino USA follows Acevedo as he takes us through his journey as an Army medic stationed in Europe during World War II, to the moment when he was captured by the Nazis and taken to a concentration camp known as Berga in Germany. He recorded what he saw in a secret diary. Little did he know that his diary was going to become physical evidence of the horrors that American soldiers and other prisoners faced inside Berga.This story originally aired in May of 2018.
07/01/2030m 7s

The Battle Over Chavez Ravine

Vicente Montalvo's grandparents grew up and fell in love in Palo Verde, one of the neighborhoods that make up a community known as Chavez Ravine. In the early 1950s, the city decided that Chavez Ravine was the perfect site to build public housing. So the residents were forced to sell their homes under the city's use of eminent domain. But the election of a new mayor, would end up canceling those plans, and instead the land would become what many know today as Dodger Stadium. This segment was originally broadcast on November 3, 2017.
22/01/1920m 48s

I'm Not Dead

In the early 70s, Miguel Angel Villavicencio was focused on making his most ambitious dream possible: to become a famous singer in Bolivia and across the world. And he was halfway there—his love songs were on the radio and he was appearing on TV. But to take his singing career truly international, he needed money. So he decided to work for Bolivia's most powerful drug cartel in the 80s—a major supplier for Pablo Escobar. Choosing this path would lead him on a journey of self-destruction, unexpected betrayal and finally, redemption.
18/01/1935m 15s

Portrait Of: 'Taina' and the Love of Nostalgia TV

In 2001, Nickelodeon started airing "Taina," a show about a Latina teen who attends a performing arts high school in NYC and daydreams of being a star. While the show only lasted two seasons, "Taina" is seared into the memories of many who grew up watching it, because at the time it was rare to see an authentic portrayal of what it was like to be a Nuyorican teen in the early 2000s. Maria Hinojosa talks to the show's award-winning creator Maria Perez-Brown, who is Nuyorican herself, about jumping into the world of children's television after being a tax lawyer.
15/01/1921m 16s

Portrait Of: Rapper Immortal Technique

Felipe Coronel, aka Immortal Technique, is a legendary underground hip-hop artist known for his skills on the mic and his raw, highly political lyrics. The Peruvian-American rapper became well-known for his first album in 2001, "Revolutionary Vol. 1." Tech says growing up in Harlem during the 80's and 90's caused him to harbor a lot of rage. Much of his music discusses colonialism, poverty, and corruption. We sit down with Immortal Technique to get a deeper sense of what it was like growing up in Harlem and how his rage has played into his successful music career.
11/01/1924m 45s

Portrait Of: The Latinas of 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine'

Melissa Fumero and Stephanie Beatriz play Amy Santiago and Rosa Diaz, two Latina detectives in the diverse comedy series 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine.' The show premiered on Fox in 2013 and was canceled in 2017. But after fans expressed their anger, NBC took over the production and the sixth season will start on January 10th. The actresses both talk with Maria Hinojosa about how they got their roles, growing up between two worlds and struggling to find their identity. Stephanie also talks about her decision to disclose her sexuality on social media—and talk about it in the show.
08/01/1926m 3s

All They Will Call You Will Be Deportees

After a fiery plane crash in 1948, all 32 people onboard died—but they weren't all treated the same after death. Twenty-eight of the passengers were migrant workers from Mexico and they were buried in a mass grave. The other four were Americans and had their remains returned to their families for proper burial. It took the work of a determined Mexican-American author to find out who the Mexican passengers were and tell their stories. In this episode rerun, Latino USA follows Tim Hernandez on his seven-year journey to give names to the dead—a journey that all started with a Woody Guthrie song. This story first ran in February 2017.
04/01/1935m 10s

Two-Step Into the New Year

Happy 2019! If you're a long-time listener, you might know we have a tradition of doing a special show around New Year's, full of our favorite music stories of the year. Today, a selection of music pieces, including several that have not been previously aired on the podcast. We begin with the dreamy nostalgia pop of Cuco, then move on to a Los Angeles remake of a Peruvian chicha classic, "Cariñito." Mexican rapper Niña Dioz shares how she navigates a male-dominated music industry, and Grammy award-winning salsa legend Eddie Palmieri gets personal in a one-on-one conversation with Maria Hinojosa.
28/12/1853m 53s

Bonus: Traces of Alicia

A couple of months ago, we shared the story of Latino USA producer Sayre Quevedo as he searched for his lost family in an episode titled 'The Quevedos,' which was nominated for Best Audio Documentary at the 2018 IDA Awards. Today, we bring you a moment from Sayre's search that never made it to air, when he learns something important about his grandmother Alicia.
21/12/1815m 14s

Abuelos

In this special holiday rebroadcast episode, Latino USA explores the special bond between Latinos and their grandparents. We talk to TV's most famous Latina grandma Ivonne Coll, the abuela on "Glee," "Jane the Virgin" and "Switched at Birth." We hear stories of grandparents raising their grandchildren, including a Dominican grandma who supported her transgender granddaughter when no one else would. We also chat with Chilean writer Isabel Allende about how her grandparents put the magic in her magical realism. Plus, some grandparent memories from our listeners.
18/12/1843m 46s

The Return

Javier Zamora was nine years old when he made the journey from El Salvador to the U.S.-Mexico border. Now, nearly 20 years later, he has to return to the country where he was born, to apply for a visa to that will allow him to continue to live in the U.S. We follow Javier's return in his own words: through audio diaries, archival family tape, and interviews. "The Return" is an intimate portrait of what gets left behind when we immigrate and what we can gain when we return.
14/12/1837m 28s

Portrait Of: Alfonso Cuarón's Roma

Roma is Alfonso Cuarón's most personal film to date. Inspired by his own childhood growing up in Mexico City, the two central characters in the film are women: Cleo, an indigenous domestic worker and Margarita, Cleo's employer and a middle-class single mother of four. Cuarón sat down with Maria Hinojosa to talk about the role of women in his life and what it was like to grow up in Mexico in the early 1970s.
11/12/1826m 30s

Reporter's Notebook: Embedded With the Caravan

Over the last few weeks, thousands of migrants from Central America have arrived at U.S. ports of entry without proper shelter or food. Things have become increasingly tense, both with the migrants' Mexican hosts and U.S. authorities. Latino USA speaks with a reporter who traveled with the caravan and has been on the ground with them in Tijuana for weeks: Adolfo Flores of BuzzFeed News. He talks with Maria about being on the scene in Tijuana and witnessing the human consequences of thousands of people stuck in limbo.
07/12/1817m 31s

The Rehab Empire Built on Cakes

It's a common sight in Puerto Rico: men in bright yellow t-shirts going door-to door and selling cakes. They're residents at Hogar CREA, Puerto Rico's biggest drug treatment program. Since CREA's founding in 1968, they've grown to a sprawling network of about 150 centers in Puerto Rico, the U.S. mainland and elsewhere in Latin America. But since the 1990s, the organization has been under fire for their methods. Latino USA takes a look at how this rehab empire built by a former heroin addict continues to be funded by millions of tax dollars, despite dozens of reported cases of physical and sexual abuse.
05/12/1834m 51s

In the Hands of the State

In the United States today, there are about 437,000 children separated from their parents and living in the foster care system. More than half of them are kids of color. The reasons children end up in the child welfare system are widely misunderstood, and the journey to get a child back from foster care can be long and arduous, both for parents and for children. Today on our program, we bring you the story of Angelica, an immigrant woman from New York City who is navigating that system and trying to bring her children home.
30/11/1830m 8s

Stories From 'The Moth'

Since its launch in 1997, The Moth has presented thousands of stories told live and without notes by everyday people. Latino USA is now partnering with The Moth to feature some of their best Latino Storytellers on our show. This week, we hear from storyteller Carlos Kotkin about the birth of his first child who came sooner than expected and from Pilar Siman, who tells us about a crush she met at an unlikely place—11pm mass.Language advisory: there is explicit language in this episode.
27/11/1827m 4s

How I Made It: ÌFÉ

Otura Mun has been a central figure in the Puerto Rican independent music scene for over two decades, working as a producer and songwriter for some of the most important underground artists on the island. But, Mun didn't start out in Puerto Rico. He was born with a different name, growing up in an African-American Mennonite family from Indiana. After an accident of fate brought him to Puerto Rico as a young man, Mun became fascinated by a culture that transformed the way he thought about race, identity and the spiritual world, and began building himself a new home in the Caribbean.
23/11/1811m 47s

By Right of Discovery

On Thanksgiving Day, hundreds of people gather on Alcatraz Island, the famous former prison and one of the largest tourist attractions in San Francisco, for a sunrise ceremony to honor Indigenous culture and history. Almost 50 years ago, an intertribal group of students and activists took over the island for over 16 months in an act of political resistance. Richard Oakes, a young Mohawk from New York, was one of the leaders in this movement dubbed the "Red Power Movement." Latino USA tells the story of Oakes' life, from his first involvement in activism to his untimely death at the age of 30.
21/11/1850m 58s

Birthrights

A week before the midterm elections, President Trump announced that he wanted to end birthright citizenship in the United States. To help explain what realistically could happen, we spoke with professor Martha S. Jones of Johns Hopkins University. She's the author of "Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America." Then, Latino USA follows the story of a 2013 court decision in the Dominican Republic that stripped citizenship from the children of Haitian immigrants. One young man embarks on a quest to get documented—in the country where he was born.
16/11/1837m 58s

Portrait Of: Raúl Castillo

Until recently, Raúl Castillo was known primarily by those who watched HBO's "Looking," a show about thirty-something gay men in San Francisco, and saw his performance as sensitive barber Richie. Four years after the end of that show, Castillo's everywhere. He has appeared on the Netflix series "Atypical," landed a spot on the Starz show "Vida" and most recently played one of the leads in the breakout film "We the Animals." Maria sits down with Castillo to discuss how he went from a punk band bassist in McAllen, Texas, to a playwright in Boston, and then to a celebrated actor in New York City.
14/11/1818m 46s

Shades of Blue

The recent midterm elections highlighted a divide in the Democratic Party between its more centrist incumbents and a rising wave of young, progressive candidates. One of the most consequential races was in California. It featured longtime senator Dianne Feinstein and Kevin de León, who served as the leader of the California State Senate. Feinstein had the money, name recognition and poll numbers. But de León, the son of an undocumented Guatemalan immigrant, hoped to win by positioning himself as the more progressive choice. As de León tried (and failed) to become the first Latino senator from California, Latino USA shadowed his long-shot campaign to see what it can tell us about the future of the Democratic Party.
09/11/1828m 46s

Dolores Huerta and Her Daughter Talk Gender and Power

This Election Day, a record-breaking number of women are on the ballot, and 2018 has been a year in which women all across the country have been speaking up—in the workplace, in protests on the street, and in confirmation hearings. In partnership with WNYC's "United States of Anxiety" podcast, we sit down for an intimate conversation with a woman who helped pave the way: lifelong civil rights activist Dolores Huerta. Interviewed by her daughter Juana Chávez, Huerta speaks frankly about their experiences with gender and power.
06/11/1826m 42s

Portrait Of: Rosalía and the Future of Flamenco

Rosalía combines accents of flamenco with hip-hop and other modern sounds. The Spanish pop singer talks about El Mal Querer and some surprising dark themes that come up in her music.
02/11/1817m 36s

Memories of My Melancholy Ghost

Lucía Benavides is an Argentine-American journalist who moved from Texas to Barcelona to pursue a career as a foreign correspondent and freelance journalist. A year into her new life, she wasn't getting any stories commissioned and she was also dealing with a breakup. Lucía was sulking around her apartment when she got a text from a friend telling her that she lived in the very apartment Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez had lived in when he first moved to Barcelona 50 years earlier. That's when spooky things started happening.
31/10/1819m 25s

A Far-Right Populist Wins in Brazil

Brazil, the largest country in Latin America, elected a new president on Sunday: Jair Bolsonaro. The far-right congressman and former army captain has been called Brazil's Trump. He won with 55 percent of the vote against Fernando Haddad of the leftist Worker's Party, which governed for 13 years until a corruption scandal brought the party down. The scandal and an anti-establishment sentiment helped fuel Bolsonaro's victory. Latino USA talks to Brazilian journalist Adriana Carranca, who explains the forces that brought Bolsonaro to power.
30/10/1819m 18s

Portrait Of: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez became a national sensation after she won the Democratic primary in New York's 14th congressional district. Ocasio-Cortez, born in the Bronx and of Puerto Rican descent, beat Rep. Joe Crowley, who some have referred to as "one of the most powerful Democrats in the House." Ocasio-Cortez is a self-described socialist, and has made campaign promises some see as radical, such as abolishing ICE and supporting Medicare for All. In this personal interview with Latino USA, we get to know the young Latina candidate who is changing the face of the Democratic Party.
26/10/1826m 46s

Kris Kobach Profits, Small Towns Lose

Kris Kobach, the Secretary of State of Kansas, is known for his controversial views on immigration. Now, he's running for Kansas governor on the Republican ticket. An investigation co-published by ProPublica and the Kansas City Star found that Kobach profited handsomely from his work on anti-immigrant ordinances in four small towns across the country. Latino USA sits down with ProPublica journalist Jessica Huseman to talk about her investigation and Kobach's history of anti-immigrant sentiment.
25/10/1814m 48s

A Family and a 15-Year Sentence

Maria sits down with filmmaker Rudy Valdez to speak about his newest documentary film, "The Sentence," premiering on HBO. When his sister Cindy Shank received a 15-year mandatory sentence for charges related to her ex-boyfriend's crimes, Rudy began documenting the experience. Cindy and Rudy join Maria to talk about the impact of that sentence on her and the family.
23/10/1824m 1s

Texas vs. Lupe Valdez

Former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez is the Democratic candidate for governor in Texas—and she's on a mission to flip the governor's seat blue for the first time in nearly 30 years. If she does, she will be the first openly gay and Latina governor of Texas. She's also a Democrat with decades in law enforcement, but is it all enough to appeal to voters across all of Texas? And can she get young Latinos, whose vote is key in the state, to turn out for her? We ride along with the sheriff in her pickup truck as she campaigns through West Texas, hoping to be part of a blue wave in her state.
19/10/1829m 16s

Portrait Of: Rubén Blades

Rubén Blades is a singer, songwriter, actor, lawyer, and politician, born in Panama and a New Yorker since 1974. After four decades in the public eye, 17 Grammy Awards, and some of the best-selling records in salsa history, his unique storytelling across music styles has kept him relevant to this day. He's worked with a wide range of musicians, including Héctor Lavoe, Willie Colón, Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, Sting, Michael Jackson, and Calle 13. He has also kept a presence back home. He ran for president in Panama in 1994 and was appointed as minister of tourism in 2004. Latino USA sits down with the author of the song "Pedro Navaja" to discuss highlights of his monumental career, his new record, and his take on current affairs.
16/10/1836m 13s

The 30 Days

Last August, Arsenio De La Rosa had a stroke and doctors gave him only weeks to live. His kids were with him in Arizona, but his wife, Gloria, was an hour south in Mexico. Because she is unable to enter the country, she applied for a temporary permit to come to the U.S. to say goodbye to her husband and be there for her kids in such a tough time. After an initial denial, she ended up getting a 30-day pass. We take a look at those 30 days, a bittersweet reunion after being separated by immigration law for 9 years. A family brought together by tragedy, only to go back to living parallel lives.
12/10/1837m 35s

Portrait Of: Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor was an avid reader, especially as a young child growing up in the Bronx. So it's no surprise that she published two books aimed at younger audiences. The first is a story for young adults titled "The Beloved World of Sonia Sotomayor." The second is a children's illustrated book called "Turning Pages: My Life Story." Both books are an adaption of her 2013 memoir. Justice Sotomayor joins Maria Hinojosa to discuss why she wrote books for a younger audience and how the events of her youth and young adult life shaped her view of the world.
09/10/1820m 15s

Warehouse World

The town of Patterson in California's Central Valley has mostly been known as the "Apricot Capital of the World." But today, drive into town and you'll see an expanding cluster of low and flat buildings: warehouses. With the rise of e-commerce across the country, the need for warehouses continues to grow. By 2024, the industry will employ nearly 4.8 million people, and about 40 percent of young people working in warehouses are Latino. Latino USA visits a high school using virtual reality and a mock warehouse to train students for the industry, while asking the question: Are these "jobs of tomorrow" good jobs?
05/10/1830m 48s

Portrait Of: Fat Joe

Joseph Antonio Cartagena, aka Fat Joe, has had a career as a major figure in hip-hop for over two decades. With radio-friendly hit singles like "What's Luv?" and "Lean Back," the rapper has become one of the most recognized Latino rappers in the music industry. Cartagena has also made his way into acting—most recently, in the new comedy film, "Night School." Maria Hinojosa talks with the rapper/actor in an intimate conversation about growing up in the Bronx, fatherhood and his new career.
03/10/1824m 45s

The Immigrant Woman Who Confronted Senator Flake

A conversation with Ana María Archila, one of the women who shared their story of sexual abuse with Republican Senator Jeff Flake while he was in an elevator, right after he announced that he would vote to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. As it turns out, the Colombian-born activist had been preparing for that confrontation for a very long time, from her early days working with immigrants in New York City's Staten Island to studying the strategy known as "bird-dogging."
02/10/1821m 39s

Who Was Tío Alejandro?

Growing up, Jesse Alejandro Cottrell never knew exactly how his uncle and middle namesake, Alejandro Mendoza, died, but he did know that the Guatemalan government murdered Alejandro. The story went that in the 1970s, Alejandro was involved with the leftist guerrilla rebels fighting the country's oppressive authoritarian regime, a regime that eventually killed him for his activism. But a couple years ago on a visit to Guatemala, Jesse heard another story of how his uncle died that challenged what he knew about his family, his uncle, and his own name.
28/09/1821m 54s

Portrait Of: Bobby Sanabria

Growing up as a Nuyorican kid in the Bronx, Bobby Sanabria first watched "West Side Story" in the movie theaters, on the 10th anniversary of the film's release. "I was mesmerized," said the Latin Jazz drummer and composer. Last year, "West Side Story" celebrated its 60th anniversary and to honor this milestone, Sanabria re-envisioned what Latino New York City actually sounds like. The result was his album, "West Side Story Reimagined." Maria Hinojosa talks to the drummer and composer about what the iconic musical means to him and how he paid tribute to its legacy.
25/09/1820m 5s

The Breakdown: A Tale of Two Musicals

Ten years ago, Lin-Manuel Miranda's explosive musical "In the Heights" changed the game for how Latino stories are portrayed on Broadway. It won the Tony that year for Best Musical, and started Miranda on an impressive career path culminating with Hamilton. But how did we get here? Latino USA hits Broadway and takes a look at the portrayal of Latinos on stage throughout history, including the other seminal musical in Latino history, "West Side Story."
21/09/1832m 0s

Married to the Cartel

In 2014, the capture of drug kingpin "El Chapo" made headlines. Instrumental to that capture was two of El Chapo's own men—Junior and Peter Flores—twin brothers originally from Chicago. After a cartel war broke out in Mexico, the brothers decided to become informants to protect their families. Now, their wives, Mia and Olivia, tell all in their new book "Cartel Wives" about what it was like to be married to two of the world's biggest drug dealers.
18/09/1822m 37s

A Tragedy in Iowa Turned Political

Last July, Mollie Tibbetts, a 20-year-old college student from Iowa, disappeared after going for a run. When her body was found and authorities announced the suspect was in the country illegally, certain media and politicians began to use her death to make a case for stricter immigration laws just weeks from the midterm elections. Latino USA takes a look into Mollie's death and we revisit "the myth of the criminal immigrant."
14/09/1820m 50s

Portrait Of: Perez Hilton

Mario Armando Lavandeira Jr., better known as Perez Hilton, rose to notoriety in the mid-aughts when his bright pink website perezhilton.com became the go-to source for celebrity gossip. At a time when we have the first "reality-television president," Perez offers us a glimpse into how he created the site that helped catapult reality stars into household names and why he regrets the bullying tone his site propagated that is prevalent not just online but in our politics today.
11/09/1822m 53s

The Stolen Child

For decades in Argentina, Delia and her granddaughter Virginia searched for Virginia's brother, Delia's missing grandson. He was one of the hundreds of babies disappeared during the country's military dictatorship back in the 1970's. They're one of many families who suffered trauma and disruption following the regime's fall, as Argentina struggled to face its dark history.
07/09/1833m 24s

Portrait Of: Comedian Julio Torres

If you've watched Saturday Night Live recently, then you know Julio Torres. His skits are irreverent, often taking the perspective of people and even objects on the margins, with unexpected results. Torres was raised in El Salvador and he's a stand-up comedian and writer for SNL. Host Maria Hinojosa sits down with Torres to discuss his childhood, the trajectory to becoming a stand-up and his unique sense of humor.
04/09/1820m 41s

The Kid Mero Roasts America, One Trump Joke at a Time

Next year, Showtime will premiere its first-ever late-night talk show, and to host the show, the network tapped two guys from the Bronx: Desus Nice and The Kid Mero. Joel Martinez, aka The Kid Mero, is one of the stars of the comedy duo. Their late-night show career started on Viceland where every night, Mero and Desus Nice delivered smart and hilarious commentary on the day's news, politics and pop culture. However, Martinez didn't take the traditional career path of a comedian. Maria Hinojosa talks to the comedy star about his unlikely path to late-night.
31/08/1819m 53s

It's a Small World, After All

Latino USA takes a look back at Disney's relationship with Latin America. We start in the 1940s when Walt Disney and a group of animators were deployed by the U.S. government to Latin America in efforts to curb Nazi influence there. Then, we hear from a Chilean writer who wrote a book called "How to Read Donald Duck," critiquing Disney comics' American imperialism in the 1970s.
28/08/1830m 27s

An Update for You Binge-Listeners!

The Latino USA feed is now going to be longer. Soon - you can access the 50 latest episodes we publish, instead of just the last 30. That's why you may have gotten a bunch of annoying notifications for new episodes on your phone - sorry about that. Happy listening!
24/08/181m 7s

How I Made It: The Summer Music Spectacular

Today, we bring you a special podcast with some of our latest "How I Made It" segments: Stories about Latino creators and the work they make. This time, we go behind the scenes into the creative process with some of our favorite musicians. We'll hear from Uruguayan singer and composer Jorge Drexler, the Puerto Rican group Balún and Colombian rock legends Aterciopelados. So sit back, turn up your speaker and enjoy this summer music special.
23/08/1824m 17s

The Quevedos

Latino USA producer Sayre Quevedo grew up having only met two members of his blood family, his mom and his brother. His father left before he was born and his mother lost touch with her family after leaving home as a teenager. For a long time, Sayre's family history was shrouded in mystery. Until one Mother's Day, when everything changes, and he finds himself on a journey to untangle the story of his long-lost family and the secrets that have haunted them.
21/08/1843m 48s

Torn Apart 2: The Moral Dilemma of Juan Sanchez

Juan Sanchez is the CEO of Southwest Key Programs, a nonprofit that runs shelters for immigrant minors in the United States. He has been criticized for sheltering kids under Trump's "zero-tolerance" policy and making a profit. Southwest Key has received nearly $1 billion in government contracts, and Sanchez's compensation was nearly $1.5 million last year. The company was criticized even more after reports of sexual misconduct in its shelters. And yet, Sanchez's bio depicts a different narrative—that of a social justice champion praised by multiple Latino advocacy organizations. Which story is right?
17/08/1835m 46s

Torn Apart 1: Sign Here

Under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy, thousands of immigrant children have been torn apart from their parents. And when a federal judge ordered the government to reunite all of these families within 60 days, immigration authorities began to scramble. In part one of a two-part episode, Latino USA breaks down the family separation crisis and explores what happens to the hundreds of kids whose parents have been deported and who are still not reunited with their families.
14/08/1821m 38s

The USA v. Oscar López Rivera

Just a few days before President Obama was to leave office, he granted clemency to a man named Oscar López Rivera. In the 1970s, Oscar was considered by the FBI to be one of the most dangerous revolutionaries in the U.S. He belonged to an armed group called the FALN, which claimed responsibility for more than 70 bombings in American cities and demanded Puerto Rican independence. On today's episode, a story with secret identities and safe houses, an FBI manhunt and even a little bit of revolution. We ask the question: who is a freedom fighter, who is a terrorist and who gets to decide?
10/08/1852m 27s

The Skeleton by the Lake

In November 2011, a man and his son were walking along the shore of Lake Michigan when they spotted a body wedged in the rocks, badly decomposed. At the time, there were very few clues as to who the remains belonged to. The investigation spanned five years and stretched from Wisconsin to Texas to Illinois. It involved multiple agencies and dead ends. But ultimately, it took the skills of a forensic anthropologist from Puerto Rico to get answers—and simultaneously revealed the difficulties of identifying Latino remains in the United States.
03/08/1825m 11s

The Port of Entry

The wait time for migrants seeking asylum at legal ports of entry along the U.S.-Mexico border has recently increased from hours to weeks, causing some families to camp out for days. We go to the border to meet some of the people waiting there and explain the asylum process in the United States.
31/07/1826m 11s

Portrait Of: Miguel

"Too proper for the black kids, too black for the Mexicans," sings Grammy award-winning artist Miguel Pimentel. Miguel is the son of an African-American mother and a Mexican-born father. He's known for his eclectic sound, shaped by his home: Los Angeles. This year, he'll release a deluxe version of his album, "War & Leisure," which will include songs in Spanish. It was inspired by a trip to Zamora, where he met his family in Mexico for the first time. Maria Hinojosa talks to the singer-songwriter about his life-changing trip and how his multicultural upbringing influenced his unique sound.
27/07/1821m 49s

Nicaragua in Crisis

Sandinistas. Protests. Violence. Keeping up with what's happening in Nicaragua over the last few months has not been easy. It's a conflict that has roots in the current social climate of the country but also its fraught political history. Latino USA breaks down the root causes and realities of the conflict in Nicaragua that have been rocking the country since April.
24/07/1829m 7s

Valley of Contrasts

In most of the country, when someone says they are going to Coachella it means they are going to a music festival. But for many who grew up in the Coachella Valley in California, their experience has nothing to do with music. Coachella is divided into two parts. On the west Side, there are beautiful homes with large front and backyards. On the east side, you find the mobile homes of the mostly immigrant Mexican and Mexican American communities. The differences between the two sides are stark but there is one difference that has a particularly harsh health impact: access to clean water.
20/07/1851m 22s

Portrait Of: 80s Ball Subculture in FX's 'Pose'

When you think of the 1980's in New York City, you might think of grit and crime—but a vibrant, dazzling underground ball scene? Maybe not. A new hit series on FX is now telling the stories of that scene: a subculture of LGBTQ people of color creating a safe and joyous space during a time when they were not accepted. "Pose" is making history by featuring the largest cast of transgender actors ever on TV as well as the largest recurring cast of LGBTQ actors for a scripted series. Actresses Mj Rodriguez and Indya Moore talk with Latino USA about their roles in the series.
17/07/1826m 34s

With You, Peru

The 1970s were a golden age for soccer in Peru, one that producer Janice Llamoca only heard about growing up in Los Angeles in the '90s. The Peruvian soccer team went to three World Cups in that era. But after that, the team did poorly for decades, failing to qualify for the World Cup year after year. Then in 2017, Peru qualified for the World Cup after 36 years—giving the Llamocas the opportunity of a lifetime to travel to Russia to see their team play on soccer's biggest stage.
13/07/1832m 1s

Portrait Of: Tanya Saracho Gives Us 'Vida'

Tanya Saracho is the showrunner for acclaimed television series "Vida," on Starz. The show looks at the relationship between two sisters, Lyn and Emma, as they come to terms with the death of their mother and the secrets she kept from them. Saracho sits down with Latino USA to share the story of how she got where she is today and why telling complicated—sometimes dark— stories about Latinos is so important to her.
10/07/1824m 12s

The Breakdown: Frida Barbie

When Mattel announced the release of a Barbie inspired by late Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, a flurry of tweets ensued. Many felt that Mattel was harming the legacy of the radical leftist painter who may not have wanted to be associated with one the greatest symbols of American consumerism. But while Frida Kahlo and Barbie may seem like antithetical symbols, their backstories have very interesting parallels—the main one being that both have played a big role in how we view what it means to be a modern woman. Producer Antonia Cereijido breaks down the history behind Frida and Barbie and how we got to a world in which such a doll exists.
06/07/1834m 59s

Mexico's New, Leftist President

The recent presidential elections in Mexico were historic. For the first time in almost a century, Mexico will not be ruled by its two major political parties. After running for office twice before, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a.k.a. AMLO, was elected Mexico's first leftist president in decades, channeling anger at the nation's elites and campaigning with a strong anti-corruption message. Latino USA's María Hinojosa speaks with Mexican political analyst Denise Dresser about what this all means for Mexico's future.
03/07/1817m 45s
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