Hidden Histories

Hidden Histories

By History Hit Network

Hidden Histories sees Helen Carr exploring some of the country's hidden treasures, as she and some of our finest historians scramble through the actual spaces where history happened. Whether she's visiting the whorehouses of Covent Garden, or retracing the steps of the Peasants Revolt, Helen and her guests are a delightful guide to the hidden histories that lie just off the beaten track.

Episodes

Seb Falk on The Light Ages

Were the Dark Ages really that dark? Seb Falk argues that science and religion weren't at odds with each other in the medieval era, but two sides of the same coin. His main story focuses on the life of John Westwyk, a medieval monk, and through John's eyes we understand how the medieval man or woman might have viewed the world.He talks about the medieval equivalent of the smartphone, the legendary story about trying to steal the testicles and anal glands of beavers, and how to attract a unicorn with nothing but a virgin and a forest glade. Seb Falk is a historian, teacher, broadcaster and historical consultant. Find out more about Seb and his work here: https://www.sebfalk.com/about-seb  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/12/2027m 18s

Victoria Donovan on Preservation and Patriotism in Russia

Victoria Donovan chats to Helen about how present-day Russia and the USSR have grappled with the legacy of Russia's buildings. The atheist USSR frequently deployed images of ruined Orthodox churches in the aftermath of the Second World War - it was great propaganda. But this posed problems - the USSR was an atheist state, and did not want to be seen harking back to fervently to the religiosity of the Kievan Rus.Debates about what should and shouldn't be preserved under Communism helped to form anti-socialist groupings. Those who became fervent preservationists sought to undermine the USSR, while town planners and ministers often demolished the building blocks of Russia's history.Victoria Donovan is a Senior Lecturer in Russian and Director of the Centre for Russian, Soviet, Central and East European Studies at the University of St Andrews. Her book is Chronicles in Stone. Read more from Victoria here: https://www.combinedacademic.co.uk/blog/2020/11/05/victoria-donovan-chronicles-in-stone/Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/12/2023m 30s

Sam Goodman on Imperialism, Britishness and Ales

Sam Goodman talks to Helen about the end of the British empire and how Britains choose to remember and interact with their former colonies, particularly India. Sam also talks about where alcohol fit into the British Empire - from guides that advised the drinking stout to fortify oneself, to the formation of cultures of drinking in India and at home, to the story about the inadvertent creation of the India Pale Ale.Sam Goodman is Lecturer in English and Communication at Bournemouth University. Read Sam's Blog: https://imperialmeasuresblog.wordpress.com/Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/12/2031m 20s

Michael Talbot on the Ottoman Empire and Piracy

Michael Talbot starts with a broad overview of the Ottoman Empire's interests and what power it held, before moving on to a problem that would haunt the Ottomans consistently - pirates. These weren't necessarily pirates in a Disney sense - war between the British and the French consistently spilled over into the Meditterenean, and often Ottoman goods and shipping came under attack.Michael explores the Ottoman response, and how they sought to protect their shipping from pirates, corsairs and all sorts, with mixed results. Michael also approaches this story from the Ottoman perspective, a side of the story that we don't often get to hear.Read some of Michael's work here: https://www.historytoday.com/reviews/interpreting-ottoman-empireFind out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/12/2024m 34s

Christienna Fryar on the Emancipation of Jamaica

Christienna Fryer talks to Helen about the emancipation of slaves in Jamaica in 1838. While the colonial government thought that a similar plantation system might exist with the addition of wages, their formerly enslaved subjects disagreed. Christienna talks about how Jamaicans resisted British rule, and particularly about the Morant Bay rebellion in 1865, which caused brutal British repression. The likes of Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle and J. S. Mill discussed whether the British response could be justified and came to very different conclusions.Christienna looks at how people in Jamaica resisted and challenged colonial structures and systems, and how in challenging them, they helped to reshape them. She talks about one particular case in the Kingston Lunatic Asylum that would change how the British approached asylums all over the empire, as well as much more.Christienna Fryar is a lecturer in Black British History at Goldsmiths, University of London. Find out more about her here: https://www.cdfryar.com/Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/11/2032m 38s

Edmund Richardson on Charles Masson and Discovering the Lost Cities of Alexander the Great

Charles Masson set out one day to hunt down the lost cities of Alexander the Great. He was an private in the East India Company's army until he deserted, and was as such trying to both locate and excavate a mysterious lost city, whilst also being on the run. His story is full of hardship, and Edmund Richardson discusses why a man would choose to abandon his station, journey into the middle of a previously unexplored region (at least by Westerners), and start hunting for the lost city of Alexandria under the Caucasus.Later, when the British invade Afghanistan and threaten his excavation, he is faced with a terrible choice: either join with the British and abandon his friends, or betray those who were close to him.Stories about Alexander the Great abound, and hearing these stories may have inspired Charles Masson's passion. One of the more famous accounts is the Alexander Romance, a long series of tales about his adventures, a lot of which are probably fictionalised - at one point Alexander takes a submarine to the bottom of the sea. As Edmund himself notes, the Romance has been "translated and adapted into everything from an Icelandic Alexanders Saga to an Ethiopian Romance - so it's travelled much further than even Alexander himself." Try this translation of the Greek version of the Romance by Richard Stoneman if you're interested: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/351/35185/the-greek-alexander-romance/9780140445602.htmlFind out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/11/2031m 3s

Brendan McGeever on Anti-Semitism and the Russian Revolution

Brendan McGeever talks to Helen about the relationship between anti-semitism and the Russian Revolution. The Russian Revolution in 1917 was a complex event, with myriad factions vying for power. In the chaos, a wave of anti-semitic attacks occurred, and many of the those vying for control did little to stop this. The Bolsheviks, lead by Vladimir Lenin, opposed anti-semitism but had to confront it within the movement and the wider working class. This produced a fascinating and at times contentious relationship between the Bolshevik leadership and Jewish socialists within the party.Brendan McGeever is a Lecturer in Sociology at Birkbeck, University of London.Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/11/2019m 4s

Catherine Fletcher on the Dark Side of the Italian Renaissance

Catherine Fletcher talks about the Italian Renaissance, giving a run-down of her new book, The Beauty and the Terror. She talks about Florence, and the beginnings of the renaissance, discussing Lorenzo de' Medici as well as the Borgias, as well as the influence of Girolamo Savanorola.She also talks about the more brutal aspects of the renaissance, from the potential that the Mona Lisa was funded by money earned from slavery, to the brutal retribution courtesans who transgressed the rules could face. The courtesan Angela Zafetta, model of Titian's Venus of Urbino, is reputed to have faced a punishment far worse than the usual for one such act of transgression. Fletcher also talks Machiavelli: what he said and what he didn't say, and why he matters.Catherine Fletcher is a Professor of History at Manchester Metropolitan University.Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/11/2031m 33s

Tom Scott-Smith on the History of Famine Relief

Tom Scott-Smith and Helen talk about the history of famine relief and humanitarian aid, and how it has changed over time. Humitarian aid is intensely political, and the form that humanitarian aid takes today is heavily influenced by its past. That form is important, because the type of aid that refugees receive has a big impact on their lives; the quality and quantity of food matters.Tom also talks nutritional science, showing how overproduction of milk, soy and corn in the 1930s, have been responsible for the nutritional content of humanitarian food today. He and Helen also discuss the liberation of Belsen, and whether there is any truth to the story that those being liberated from Bergen-Belsen were more interested in getting their hands on lipstick, rather than food.Tom Scott-Smith is Associate Professor of Refugee Studies and Forced Migration.Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/11/2037m 5s

Joanna Cohen on the US and Early Patriotism

Helen talks to Joanna Cohen about the relationship between patriotism and consumption and how American attitudes towards consumption changed over the 19th century, particularly in response to the American Civil War. The ways people thought about the American flag, for instance, are particularly insightful as tools for understanding their attitudes towards these topics, as are societal attitudes towards women and commerce.More generally, she works on the relationship between capitalism, consumption and emotion, and her 2017 book Luxurious Citizens looks at a shift in consumer attitudes, from patriot-citizen to patriot-consumer. Cohen has thought at length about how people relate themselves to the marketplace. She explores the origins of detaching oneself from the marketplace, and trying to find an authentic 'self', differentiated from the consumer goods that one wears and purchases.Joanna Cohen is a historian of 19th century America, and a Senior Lecturer in American History at Queen Mary University of London.Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/11/2029m 54s

Geoffrey Chaucer with Marion Turner

Helen and Marion talk about the man that shaped the English literary canon, Geoffrey Chaucer. They discuss his life and his legacy, and how the son of a vintner came to write such an influential text.This will be the last episode for a while as Helen takes a well-earned break.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/08/2057m 16s

Cannibalism and Corpse Medicine with Dr Richard Sugg

Helen takes a deep dive into some gory medical history with Dr Richard Sugg, professor of renaissance literature in Durham. They talk about all manner of wacky medical cures, such as blood consumption and powdered skull, and how these were used by royal surgeons and paupers alike to cure themselves of diseases or to manipulate their enemies. Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/07/2033m 42s

The Uncrowned Queen of England with Dr Nicola Tallis

Helen talks to Dr Nicola Tallis about Margaret Beauford, who was instrumental in establishing the reign of her son, Henry Tudor, and thus the Tudor dynasty. Margaret had to balance her ambitions of power with her womanly status, which wasn't an asset when it came to the Tudor court, and yet she managed to wield significant autonomy. Nicola also dispels rumours about Margaret's piety that have persisted to this day.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/06/2031m 47s

Burn the Witch

Burn the Witch is a new collaborative podcast series between historians and podcasters Helen Carr and Rebecca Rideal, where they discuss new history in the media and in the world generally. They talk TV shows, movies, music, museums, archaeological discoveries, King Alfred, and viking beards, and more importantly, they talk about how history is represented, and how to make that representation better.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/06/2033m 35s

Race, Racism and Racist Pseudoscience with Adam Rutherford

Adam Rutherford chats to Helen about racism. Should we call race a construct? Why does Africa have the greatest genetic diversity of any continent? Where do common misconceptions about racist tropes come from?Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/06/2047m 11s

Witches with Professor Suzannah Lipscomb

Witches were around a long time before they were tried for heresy and crop failures. Why did governments start to hunt and prosecute witches and why did people begin to fear them? Helen talks to Professor Suzannah Lipscomb to find out.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/06/2030m 11s

Lord Byron and his Origins with Emily Brand

Emily Brand talks about the scandalous family of Lord Byron. They talk about Foulweather Jack, who couldn't find the right port in any storm, the Devil Byron, who squandered the family fortune and then outlived them all anyway, and finally Lord Byron himself, discussing his incestuous relationships and love for scandal. Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/05/2037m 53s

The History of Motherhood with Helen McCarthy

Helen speaks to Helen McCarthy about the history of motherhood through the 19th and 20th centuries. They discuss feminism and the struggle for women's rights more generally, but Helen McCarthy is absolutely fascinating on the struggles that mothers in particular faced, and how they fit into the broader women's movement.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/05/2039m 28s

The Five and Jack the Ripper with Hallie Rubenhold

Hallie Rubenhold talks about the five women who Jack the Ripper murdered. Their stories, like those of many women in history, have been corrupted and mistold over time, and Hallie talks to Helen to set the record straight.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/05/2030m 47s

The Great Fire of London with Rebecca Rideal

Rebecca Rideal talks to Helen about the Great Fire of London. How did it impact London? What was the aftermath? Was King Charles II really involved in fighting the fire? Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/05/2031m 50s

The Valkyries with Jh̤anna Katrn Friŗiksdt̤tir

Jh̤anna Katrn Friŗiksdt̤tir talks to Helen about Valkyries, the mystical supernatural beings that choose who live and die on the battlefield, as well as women in the viking world more generally. Did women take part in raids? What did those who stayed behind get up to? Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/04/2036m 42s

The Battle of Okinawa with Saul David

Professor Saul David talks to Helen about the Battle of Okinawa, one of the most significant battles of the Second World War, and yet one that does not occupy much space in Western discussions of the war. Saul espouses several theories, suggesting that it was the bloodiest battle of the war, and that it probably was the main reason that the Americans dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/04/2040m 13s

Christmas Special with Dan Snow

Dan Snow, international renowned public historian and broadcaster, comes in for a Christmassy chat with Helen about all things history.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/12/1940m 27s

Going on Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages with Dr Emma Wells

Helen and Emma talk about the rite of pilgrimage, and how pilgrimages shape the paths of the United Kingdom. Dr Emma Wells is a Lecturer in Ecclesiastical & Architectural History at the University of York.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/12/1930m 47s

Medieval Rulers At The National Archives with Sean Cunningham

Sean Cunningham talks Helen through the National Archives, and they look at the incredible source material that not only allows us to look inside the lives of monarchs from Henry V to Edward IV and Henry VIII, but also to get an understanding of how they thought.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/11/1941m 42s

The History of Crusading with Dan Jones

Dan Jones discusses the complete history of crusading, from Saladin and the Horns of Hattin, to figures who might not make the usual histories, as well as the tainted legacy that crusading has left behind.Producer: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/09/1949m 31s

Roman London and the Temple of Mithras with Daisy Dunn

Helen meets classicist, Daisy Dunn at the Mithraeum in London to discuss the hidden history of the Romans in England.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/08/1924m 29s

The Hidden History behind the House, with Mel Backe-Hansen

Helen talks to house historian, Mel Back-Hansen about the social history behind the home, the secrets that a house can hold, as well as some remarkable stories that Mel has unearthed in her research. Mel will also give a few hints and tips what to look for in your own home to catch a glimpse of its hidden history.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/08/1931m 18s

Castle Series: Kenilworth Castle

For the second episode of the Castle Series, Helen heads to Kenilworth Castle in Warwickshire. 900 years old, Kenilworth is one of the best preserved castles in the country and demonstrate how the castle, demonstrates the inner workings of castle life from the Middle Ages, to the Elizabethan period.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/07/1932m 10s

The Boleyn Men with Lauren Mackay

In this episode of Hidden Histories, Helen speaks to Tudor historian, Lauren Mackay, about how the history of the Boleyn men has been overlooked in favour of the more famous Boleyn- Anne. They discuss Thomas and George Boleyn and how they played an important part in not only Anne's queenship and downfall, but the Tudor court itself.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/07/1935m 20s

Castle Series: Episode One, Leicester Castle with Tom Weir

As part of a brand new feature of Hidden Histories, Helen looks at the hidden history behind some of our best loved castles. For this episode, she travels to Leicester to talk to historian, Tom Weir, about Leicester Castle. They uncover its layers of history, from the Normans, to French Revolution and not forgetting Richard III, the king in the car park and why Leicester was so important for him.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/07/1923m 45s

The Woman who Saved the Children with Clare Mulley

Clare Mulley talks to Helen about the hidden history behind the charity, Save the Children.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/06/1930m 1s

Simon de Montfort Crusader and Rebel with Dr Sophie Thérèse Ambler

At Somerset House, Helen and Sophie discuss the 'Song of Simon de Montfort, England's first Revolutionary and the Death of Chivalry'- Sophie's recent biography of the colourful medieval crusader, courtier and rebel, Simon de Montfort.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/06/1940m 43s

Elizabeth I with Dr Estelle Paranque

Dr Estelle Paranque, a lecturer in early modern history talks about the relationship between Elizabeth I, Mary Queen of Scots and James I. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/04/1925m 31s

Women of the Tower of London with Lauren Johnson

Lauren Johnson talks us through the other side of the Tower of London's history, looking at women who worked, lived and were imprisoned in the tower, from Eleanor of Provence to Lady Jane Grey.For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, signup to History Hit TV. Use code 'pod4' at checkout to get a 30 day free trial and your first 4 months for £4/$4. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/04/1923m 20s

Lighthouses with Tom Nancollas

Tom Nancollas talks about offshore lighthouses, the men who worked within them and the hardships they endured. Recorded in a lighthouse on the Thames, the Trinity Buoy Wharf, which contains Longplayer, a continuous 1,000 year long piece of music, made of Tibetan Bells.For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, signup to History Hit TV. Use code 'pod4' at checkout to get a 30 day free trial and your first 4 months for £4/$4. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/04/1931m 16s

Marie of Romania with Tessa Dunlop

Helen chats to Tessa Dunlop, a historian and presenter, about Marie of Romania, her active work on the frontlines of the First World War, and how she pre-empted many of the ways that the monarchy has changed today all the way back in the postwar period. For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, signup to History Hit TV. Use code 'pod4' at checkout to get a 30 day free trial and your first 4 months for £4/$4. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/03/1928m 18s

Sir Walter Raleigh with Anna Beer

Helen chats to Anna Beer, professor of English at Oxford University, about the life of Sir Walter Raleigh, his relationship with Elizabeth I and his execution at the hands of James I.For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, signup to History Hit TV. Use code 'pod4' at checkout to get a 30 day free trial and your first 4 months for £4/$4. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/03/1941m 12s

Writing Historical Fiction and the Huguenots with Kate Mosse

Helen Carr chats to novelist Kate Mosse about the challenges of writing historical fiction, as well as the history of the persecutions of the Huguenots, all from the French Protestant Church of London, a refuge for fleeing Huguenots over the centuries.For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, signup to History Hit TV. Use code 'pod4' at checkout to get a 30 day free trial and your first 4 months for £4/$4. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/03/1933m 0s

Prostitution with Hallie Ruben-Hold

Hallie Rube-Hold runs Helen Carr through Harris's List of Covent Garden Ladies, as covered in the BBC 4 documentary, the Harlot's Handbook.For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, signup to History Hit TV. Use code 'pod4' at checkout to get a 30 day free trial and your first 4 months for £4/$4. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/03/1938m 40s

Joseph Lister with Lindsey Fitzharris

Helen Carr explores the hidden history of surgeons, operations and washing your hands with Lindsey Fitzharris. For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, signup to History Hit TV. Use code 'pod4' at checkout to get a 30 day free trial and your first 4 months for £4/$4. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/02/1936m 23s
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