Sky News Daily

Sky News Daily

By Sky News

The Sky News Daily podcast with Niall Paterson brings a deeper look at the big stories - with Sky News correspondents and expert guests.

Episodes

Crowdstrike chaos: What are the lessons from the world's biggest IT failure?

It’s been an extraordinary day of cancelled flights, disrupted businesses, problems for healthcare and TV stations not being able to get on air (ahem). And all because of an update for Microsoft Windows. So what caused one of the biggest IT failures ever seen – and what do we know about Crowdstrike, the company which released the update?  Ali Fortescue’s in for Niall to discuss it all with our science and technology editor Tom Clarke and data and forensics correspondent Tom Cheshire.     For further background from Sky News, you can read Tom Clarke’s analysis on the questions Microsoft now has to answer here.    Producers: Soila Apparicio, Rosie Gillott Editor: Paul Stanworth
19/07/2413m 15s

Baird Inquiry: How Greater Manchester Police acted unlawfully

The Baird Inquiry was set up to look into the treatment of people in the custody of Greater Manchester Police, following a Sky News investigation by our home affairs editor Jason Farrell.  Dame Vera Baird, a former victim's commissioner, examined 15 cases and found GMP were guilty of unlawful arrests, demeaning strip searches and exercising powers they do not have.  Niall Paterson is joined by Jason to hear more of the stories of people mistreated by GMP and to look at Dame Vera's findings.  Plus, Niall speaks to Maggie Oliver, a former GMP detective constable who campaigns for greater accountability from the police. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Editor: Wendy Parker Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John
18/07/2422m 10s

King’s speech: What are Labour’s key plans?

King Charles has delivered the new Labour government’s first King’s Speech setting out their priorities for the months ahead.   On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson looks at what the government has promised with Sky’s deputy political editor Sam Coates and economics editor Ed Conway.  Plus, Niall speaks to people and politics correspondent Nick Martin about what the Labour government are doing to tackle the ‘ghost children’ epidemic.Producer: Rosie GillottEditor: Philly Beaumont
17/07/2423m 6s

JD Vance: Who is Trump's running mate?

Donald Trump has announced Ohio senator, JD Vance, who once compared him to Hitler, as his running mate for November's US election.But who really is the 39-year-old former venture capitalist and now potential future vice president? On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Sky's US correspondent James Matthews, plus Josh Glancy, editor of The News Review, who interviewed Vance in 2017.  Plus, Niall also speaks to Sky's security and defence editor Deborah Haynes about what implications politics across the pond will have on UK defence, which is undergoing a major review. Producers: Rosie Gillott and Emma Rae WoodhouseEditor: Philly Beaumont
16/07/2423m 13s

Trump, Biden and a divided States

President Joe Biden has stressed the need for divided Americans to come together as he addressed the nation, after Donald Trump was shot in an assassination attempt.    As former President Trump heads to the Republican National Convention to receive the party's nomination for the upcoming election, will he seek to 'lower the temperature' or capitalise on the polarisation of the nation?   On today's Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our US correspondent James Matthews to explore how realistic President Biden’s calls for unity are during this heated election campaign.   Plus, Dr James Cooper, associate professor of history and American studies at York St John University, explains why political violence is nothing new in the US.    Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse, Rosie Gillott, Soila ApparicioEditor: Philly BeaumontPodcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku
15/07/2419m 43s

How the Trump assassination attempt changes the US election

Saima Mohsin presents this extra episode on the attempted assassination of Donald Trump.    She's joined by US correspondent James Matthews and International Affairs editor Dominic Waghorn to discuss the FBI investigation, what it means for security at future rallies and this week's Republican National Convention.  They also discuss how it changes the rest of an already bitter and divisive presidential election campaign. For more analysis click here: https://news.sky.com/story/us-politics-is-laced-with-malevolence-and-division-it-needs-a-reset-13177684        Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Editor: Paul Stanworth
14/07/2424m 1s

How the psychology of Southgate got England to the final

England manager Gareth Southgate says his team are ready to "make history" in the Euros final on Sunday.   The last time they reached a final in a major tournament was back in 2021, when England lost the COVID-delayed Euro 2020 final in a penalty shootout against Italy at Wembley.    On today's Daily, Niall Paterson looks at the build-up to the big match with our sports correspondent Rob Harris and assesses Southgate's use of sports psychology to build a winning team with sports psychologist and former colleague of Southgate, Michael Caulfield. Podcast producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Rosie Gillott Podcast promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editors: Philly Beaumont and Paul Stanworth
12/07/2420m 18s

Water: Bills to rise but how do we clean up the industry?

Water bills are to rise by an average of 21% over the next five years, the industry regulator Ofwat has ruled.  But with the impact of the cost-of-living, water companies spilling record amounts of sewage into our waters, and controversial bonuses for senior leaders, do we need a complete overhaul of the industry?    On this episode, Niall Paterson hears from our business correspondent Paul Kelso in Henley, on the impact for consumers, providers and our water ways.  Niall also speaks to Stuart Colville, deputy CEO of Water UK, which represents the water companies, asking why they disagree with Ofwat’s plans.  Plus, Feargal Sharkey, campaigner and former lead vocalist of The Undertones, joins Niall to share his reaction and the story behind his efforts to protect our rivers and seas. For further background from Sky News, you can read Paul Kelso’s further analysis of Ofwat's business plans for Thames Water’s survival here.   Producers: Soila Apparicio, Rosie Gillott Editor: Paul Stanworth Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku 
11/07/2421m 29s

How does Keir Starmer reach out to the world?

As the new prime minister, Sir Keir Starmer makes his international debut at the NATO summit in Washington – what does he need to do to make a quick impact with international colleagues?    On today's Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Sky's political correspondent Tamara Cohen to discuss how Sir Keir is tackling his first international visit.    Plus, Lord Peter Ricketts, former diplomat and French Ambassador, joins Niall to take a look at Labour's wider foreign policy plans.   For further background from Sky News, you can read our political editor Beth Rigby’s analysis of Starmer’s plans to argue the case to NATO that all members should increase their defence spending here.   Producers: Rosie Gillott, Soila Apparicio Editor: Paul Stanworth  Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku 
10/07/2423m 22s

Ukraine hospital attack – and how the world reacts

Ukraine has published what it says is "unequivocal" evidence a Russian missile hit Kyiv's largest children's hospital.   The Okhmatdyt hospital treats 20,000 people a year. A two-storey wing helping children with cancer was destroyed in the attack.   It's the deadliest airstrike in Ukraine for months - on the eve of a NATO summit and as China and Belarus start military exercises near the Polish border - what reaction can we expect?   Niall Paterson is joined by Jimmy Rushton, a Kyiv-based journalist and defence analyst, to hear more about the damage and the reaction from those in Ukraine's capital. Plus, he speaks to our defence and security editor Deborah Haynes. For further background from Sky News, you can read more of Deborah’s analysis here, and our Moscow correspondent Ivor Bennet’s on Putin’s power play here.  Producer: Rosie Gillott Editor: Paul Stanworth Promotions producer: Jada Kai Meosa-John
09/07/2418m 23s

Finding a French PM: Who is Jean-Luc Melenchon?

The left-wing alliance in France has won the most seats in a dramatic election, dealing a surprise blow to the far-right party of Marine Le Pen.  Le Pen's National Rally was aiming to become the biggest party in parliament for the first time but was stopped by tactical voting and collaboration between her opponents.  On this episode, Niall Paterson speaks to Europe correspondent Adam Parsons about the shock result and to Philippe Marliere, professor of French and European Politics at University College, about far-left politician Jean-Luc Melenchon and whether he could be the new French prime minister.      Producer: Soila Apparicio Editor: Philly Beaumont Promotions producer: Jada Kai Meosa-John 
08/07/2417m 20s

After the ‘revenge’ election, what’s politics going to be like now?

Thursday’s election results have transformed Parliament. Not only do Labour have a huge majority but also the smaller parties, the Liberal Democrats, Reform and the Greens made big gains.     There is also now a record number of women MPs, and first time MPs, many of them much younger than the MPs they are replacing.     Niall Paterson talks to Sky’s political commentator Adam Boulton about the new-look parliament and what it means for UK politics in the coming months.    Plus, our correspondents Greg Milam and Tom Cheshire join from Leicester South and Clacton respectively, on the part Gaza played in the election and the case for reforming the electoral system.  Producer: Soila Apparicio Editors: Wendy Parker, Paul Stanworth
05/07/2428m 53s

Will Biden fight on?

US President Joe Biden has admitted he "screwed up" in the first presidential debate against Donald Trump, but has vowed to fight on until the US election in November.   Donald Trump has told reporters Mr Biden is quitting, while prominent Democrat figures, including Barack Obama, say the current president has their full support.     On today's Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our US correspondent James Matthews to assess the likelihood of President Biden withdrawing from the presidential race, and what it would mean for the Democratic Party - and the future of America - if he did.        Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Editor: Philly Beaumont  Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku
04/07/2417m 44s

The stories from the election battle buses

On the final day of campaigning, the Sky News correspondents who have followed party leaders to every corner of the UK reflect on the key moments.    From kayaking photo opportunities to people who bet against their own election chances – they tell Niall Paterson how the stories have cut through and the impact they could have on polling day.    Joining Niall are our political correspondents - Darren McCaffrey with the Conservatives, Serena Barker-Singh on the Labour bus, Matthew Thompson following the Liberal Democrats, Gurpreet Narwan from the Reform trail, and in Scotland Connor Gillies on the Scottish National Party.Producers: Rosie Gillott, Soila Apparicio Editor: Paul Stanworth   Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku
03/07/2427m 34s

The British companies keeping Russian gas flowing into Europe

The UK, US and Europe have sanctioned the importation of Russian oil and gas since the start of the full-scale invasion of Ukraine.   But from 2022, European nations have spent €10bn on Russian Liquid Natural Gas (LNG), and British companies are facilitating the trade.     Our economics and data editor Ed Conway sits down with host Niall Paterson to tell the story of how an obscure company based in an office block on a quiet street in Glasgow became an accessory in Vladimir Putin's war on Ukraine. Producer: Rosie Gillott  Editor: Paul Stanworth  Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku
02/07/2421m 9s

Five things the main parties aren't mentioning this election... and how exit polls are done

The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) says there's a "conspiracy of silence" at this election; that all of the major political parties aren't being honest enough about their fiscal plans.  The thinktank says all the major parties are avoiding discussion around the black hole in their spending plans for after the election - but what else are they not talking about?   On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by economics and data editor Ed Conway to look at why topics from tax to Brexit might be missing from the campaigning.     Plus, Ed explains how exit polls, the first and most accurate early indications of who might win the general election on voting day, are put together.   Producer: Rosie Gillott Editor: Paul Stanworth Podcast promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John
01/07/2418m 30s

Can Joe Biden carry on?

Joe Biden and Donald Trump faced off in the first election debate of this year's US presidential campaign on Thursday night.   The president was seen to mumble and stumble his way through, while former president Trump repeated false claims that the 2020 election was rigged.   On this episode Niall Paterson unpicks the debate between the senior citizens, with our US correspondent James Matthews in Georgia on the hits and misses, and pollster Scarlett Maguire on how American voters are feeling about the upcoming election.  Producer: Soila Apparicio Editor: Philly Beaumont
28/06/2423m 12s

Gareth Southgate: How do you lead a team that’s not performing?

England manager Gareth Southgate has faced growing criticism over his leadership this week, despite guiding the Three Lions to the knockout stage of the Euros as group winners.   Some fans are disappointed with the lacklustre performances and have vented their anger towards Southgate, who has responded by calling for continued support of the team. “I understand the feeling towards me, but back the players,” he said. “It’s crucial the fans back the players.”   On this episode Niall Paterson is joined by Rob Harris, our sports correspondent, and Andy Brassell, host of The Football Ramble podcast, for a debrief on the challenge Southgate faces in managing his team amid the criticism.  Producer: Soila Apparicio Editor: Philly Beaumont
27/06/2422m 37s

Does 'gamblegate' mean the Conservatives are a busted flush for voters?

In any election campaign, a lot of attention shifts to undecided voters. As this campaign moves into its final week, Niall Paterson looks at how the election date betting scandal is cutting through to those who are still wondering who to support - and those who could change their mind.  He speaks to political correspondent Darren McCaffrey who has spent the campaign covering the Conservatives and to pollster Luke Tryl, from More In Common UK, about how this scandal has compared to other moments of the election.   Producer: Soila ApparicioEditor: Philly Beaumont
26/06/2419m 1s

Is this the end of the Assange story?

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange is almost at the end of a 14-year legal battle, which saw the US demanding his extradition for conspiracy to obtain and disclose national defence information, following diplomatic cables and military files that WikiLeaks put online in 2010.    In return for a guilty plea, Assange becomes a free man and will not face being sent to the US, having already served almost 5 years in a British prison.     On this episode, Niall Paterson is joined by Alex Rossi, our international correspondent, to discuss the timeline of Assange's fight against extradition to both the US and Sweden.    Plus, joining Niall is Vaughan Smith, founder of Frontline Club and a friend of Julian Assange, who shares details from the times he saw him at the Ecuadorian embassy and Belmarsh prison – they talk about what Assange’s next steps could be.  Producer: Soila Apparicio Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
25/06/2422m 17s

What could have happened to Jay Slater?

Jay Slater went missing while on holiday on the island of Tenerife last week. The last known contact the 19-year-old had was during a short phone call to a friend, in which he said he had missed a bus trying to get back to his accommodation and so was attempting to walk instead - a journey that would take 11 hours.    Rescue teams including helicopters, rescue dogs and drones have entered the second week of the search, as his family and friends become desperate for answers. What could have happened to him?    On this episode, Niall Paterson learns more about Jay Slater’s story and what might have happened to him from our correspondent Shingi Mararike. Plus, Sue Sim, former chief constable of Northumbria Police, joins Niall to discuss the social media wildfire surrounding the case. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Philly Beaumont
24/06/2419m 57s

Why won't politicians really talk about social care?

Four out of five people will need social care before they die - yet it's hardly been mentioned in the election campaign to date.     The architect of the government's delayed social care reforms, Sir Andrew Dilnot, has told Sky News politicians need to "grow up" and tackle the crisis in the sector.     On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by political correspondent Rob Powell to discuss the current state of social care and what political parties are promising to change.     We also hear from Norman Phillips who is a full-time carer for his wife, Ros, who lives with multiple sclerosis and dementia. He tells them the physical, mental and financial toll the lack of access to social care is taking on their lives.Producer: Sydney Pead Editor: Philly Beaumont
21/06/2421m 43s

Putin, North Korea and a ballistic bromance

Russia and North Korea have signed a defence pact to help each other in the event of aggression against them.As part of a two day trip, Putin visited Pyongyang, greeted by a red carpet, roses and ceremonial gunfire before signing what Kim Jong Un has called an alliance.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Sky's Moscow correspondent Ivor Bennett and Beijing correspondent Nicole Johnston about what this unusual relationship between the leaders means for their respective countries, and the rest of the world.Producer: Sydney PeadEditor: Philly BeaumontPromotions Producer: David Chipakupaku
20/06/2419m 10s

Poll suggests record Tory slump - what could change in two weeks?

Sky News has partnered with YouGov for the general election campaign and today the second of their three MRP polling projections is out.  It makes for very bleak reading for the Conservatives, suggesting they have not made any gains during the campaign and could slump to historically low seat numbers.     The poll also suggests Labour's majority is up, the Liberal Democrats are up as well and Reform UK could win several seats.    On this episode, Niall Paterson analyses the implications of today’s poll with our deputy political editor Sam Coates.   Plus, Sky’s political correspondent Tamara Cohen joins us from Edinburgh where she was at the launch of the SNP manifesto. Producers: Sydney Pead Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku   Editor: Wendy Parker
19/06/2420m 31s

'We need to have an adult conversation about migration'

More people in the UK think immigration has a negative impact on society than a positive one, according to a YouGov survey for Sky News.      In the first general election since Brexit, all the major parties mention migration in their manifestos. Both the Conservatives and Labour are placing promises to tackle illegal boat crossings high on their list of promises if they get into Number 10.     So what do voters think about immigration and how could it affect these elections?  Host Niall Paterson is joined by Sky News’ community correspondent, Becky Johnson, who’s been speaking to voters in Swindon about their views. Plus, economics and data editor Ed Conway digs into the statistics to reveal exactly how big an impact migration, both legal and illegal, has on the UK.     Producers: Emma-Rae Woodhouse  Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku   Editor: Philly Beaumont  
18/06/2421m 4s

Reform's election promises examined | Royal return

Reform have launched their manifesto which they're calling "Our Contract With You" in South Wales. The "contract" is promising big spending, dwarfing what Labour and the Conservatives have committed to. The party says it will pay for the plans by measures including scrapping net zero targets and what remains of HS2. In this episode Niall Paterson gets analysis on what's in the "contract" from our chief political correspondent Jon Craig. He also speaks with our royal correspondent Rhiannon Mills about the Princess of Wales and the King – and their return to public life. Full list of candidates for North West Essex constituency, which we mention in the podcast:  -Kemi Badenoch, Conservative and Unionist Party  -Erik Bonino, Independent -Edward Gildea, Green Party -Andrew David Green, Independent -Niko Omilana, Independent -Smita Rajesh, Liberal Democrats  -Grant StClair-Armstrong, Reform UK -Issy White, Labour Party Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Wendy Parker
17/06/2420m 34s

Is new Ukraine support a 'game-changer?' | Your Euro 2024 primer

In a show of unity aimed at President Putin, G7 leaders meeting in Italy this week finally agreed to a deal to use profits from frozen Russian assets to provide around $50bn (£40bn) worth of support to Ukraine. And in another significant announcement, President Biden signed a 10-year bilateral security deal between the US and Ukraine which Kyiv is calling 'historic'.   On this episode, Niall Paterson explores the impact these deals will have for Ukraine in its war against Russia with international editor Dominic Waghorn.   Plus, Rob Harris, our sports correspondent, joins Niall to talk us through what to look out for as the European football championships get under way.  Producer: Sydney Pead Editor: Wendy Parker Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John
14/06/2420m 10s

Got any change? Why were there no surprises in Labour’s manifesto?

It was Labour’s turn to launch their election manifesto today. It was a restatement of the party’s main policies with no surprise announcements in the 133-page document.     Sir Keir Starmer reiterated his key pledges including no new taxes on “working people” and a promise of “economic stability”.   Niall Paterson digs into Labour’s promise of economic growth with Ed Conway, Sky’s economics and data editor, and speaks to political correspondent Serena Barker-Singh, who was at the launch in Manchester.    Plus, John McTernan, political strategist and former political secretary to Tony Blair, discusses the politics of their manifesto and whether it matters that there were no new announcements.  Producer: Sydney Pead Editor: Wendy Parker Promotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John
13/06/2420m 51s

Is bigger always better? Why smaller parties are having a good election

While the Conservatives and Labour battle it out for No10, recent polling reflects a changing mood from the electorate towards the smaller parties.    The latest YouGov poll suggests Reform UK have climbed within one point of the Conservatives, the Lib Dems are up four points, and Labour are dropping below 40%. In 2017, the two big parties got 82% of the vote. Now, the combined Labour-Tory vote could be as low as 56%.   With the Green Party launching its manifesto today, on this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson and our deputy political editor Sam Coates dive into the dissatisfaction with Sunak and Starmer.    Plus, Scarlett Maguire, pollster with JL Partners, discusses how well the smaller parties are doing.  Producer: Sydney PeadEditor: Wendy Parker
12/06/2419m 38s

Can the Conservative Party manifesto revive Sunak's campaign?

Rishi Sunak has launched the Conservative's election manifesto, promising to slash taxes in a bid to revive the party's floundering campaign.     In his address at the home of the British Grand Prix, the prime minister pledged £17bn in tax cuts including lowering national insurance by 2p, scrapping it entirely for the self-employed and stopping state pensions being taxed with "triple lock plus" - which the party said would all be paid for with £12bn in cuts to the civil service and welfare.   But will it be enough to turn around the fortunes of the Conservatives?   Today on the Daily, Niall Paterson crunches the numbers with Sky's economics and data editor Ed Conway and political communications strategist Jo Tanner unpicks what the Tories are trying to do with this manifesto. Plus, Sky News' political correspondent Darren McCaffrey on if it will shift the dial for the election.   Podcast Producer: Sydney PeadPodcast Promotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa JohnEditor: Philly Beaumont
11/06/2424m 2s

Will Macron's 'big gamble' election pay off? | Lib Dems promise 'to save the NHS'

Far-right parties have made gains in Germany, France and Italy - the EU's biggest member states.Their success has already led to a fall in the value of the euro as markets anticipate turbulent times ahead. President Macron's high-risk response to his Renaissance party losing to Marine Le Pen's National Rally was to call a snap election for the French parliament.  Niall Paterson talks to Sky's Europe correspondent Adam Parsons about what's behind the far-right surge and Macron's decision.  Plus, the Liberal Democrats launch their manifesto saying it's fully costed. Niall asks economics editor Ed Conway if their numbers add up and he talks to Jon Craig, Sky's chief political correspondent, to find out more about their policies.  Producers: Sydney Pead Promotion Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker This episode mentions the constituency of Aberdeenshire North and Moray East. Here is the full list of candidates: Ian Bailey, Liberal DemocratsAndy Brown, Labour PartyJo Hart, Reform, UKSeamus Logan, SNPDouglas Gordan Ross, Conservative and Unionist PartyWe also mentioned the constituency of Basildon and Billericay. Here is the full list of candidates:Christopher Bateman, British Democratic PartyStephen Conlay, Reform UKStewart Goshawk, Green PartyAlex Harrison, Labour PartyRichard Holden, Conservative and Unionist PartyDave Murray, Trade Unionist and Socialist CoalitionEdward Sainsbury, Liberal Democrats
10/06/2421m 18s

Sunak's D-Day 'mistake': How damaging is it for his campaign?

The prime minister has faced criticism for leaving the 80th anniversary D-Day commemorations early to record a TV interview that's due to go out next week.    Rishi Sunak has since apologised - saying that "on reflection" leaving early "was a mistake", but also that it shouldn't be politicised.   Niall Paterson looks at how damaging this misstep is for Mr Sunak with Claire Pearsall, former Conservative special adviser at the Home Office, and Joe Twyman, the co-founder of the polling company Deltapoll.   Plus, our chief political correspondent Jon Craig tells us just how big of a political blunder it was. Producer: Sydney Pead Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John  Editor: Wendy Parker
07/06/2423m 51s

'My father was on Sword Beach': Professor Michael Clarke on the difference D-Day made

Today marks the 80th anniversary of the D-Day landings which were a turning point in the Second World War and ultimately led to the Allied victory over Nazi Germany.  On this episode, Niall Paterson sits down with historian and security analyst Professor Michael Clarke to talk about why the beachheads in Normandy were so critical, his father's experience there, what happened next in the war and why there are parallels between now and then as Vladimir Putin threatens Europe.  Plus, Royal correspondent Rhiannon Mills on the events in Normandy today commemorating D-Day. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
06/06/2424m 37s

Man City v The Premier League

Manchester City – a Premier League club with deep pockets thanks to its Abu Dhabi owners – is taking the league to court.  It’s over the current Associated Party Transaction (APT) rules which determine whether sponsorship deals are financially ‘fair’ and require independent valuation for such deals.The rules aim to prevent clubs from inflating sponsorship deals with companies linked to their owners, ensuring fair competition. Man City claim the rules restrict their ability to raise revenue, are unlawful and discriminatory. They argue that sponsors, like those with ties to their Abu Dhabi ownership, should have free rein to set sponsorship prices. Niall Paterson is joined by our business correspondent Paul Kelso to explain City’s legal action, and the potential repercussions for the Premier League. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
05/06/2418m 13s

Captured, injured, in the control bunker: Veterans remember D-Day 80 years on

This week marks 80 years since the D-Day landings, a key turning point of World War II.  Sky News has spoken to some of the few remaining veterans who were involved in the Normandy landings about their memories of that day.   Host Niall Paterson explores the stories of radio operator Marie Scott, Ken Hay who served in the 43rd Essex regiment and landed on the beaches, and Bill Gladden of the 6th Airborne Reconnaissance Regiment who flew into Normandy on a glider.  Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
04/06/2417m 40s

Landslides and wipe-outs - reaction to latest election poll

Sir Keir Starmer could be heading to Downing Street with a majority of 194 seats, bigger than what Tony Blair achieved in 1997, according to the first polling projection by YouGov of the campaign. The projection shows a historic Labour landslide, with the party getting the highest number of seats of any party at an election in history. At the same time, the Tories are trying to boost ratings by talking about culture wars while Labour is talking about real wars in terms of what they would do for defence. And Nigel Farage has announced he's standing for Reform UK.  On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson talks to Sky's chief political correspondent Jon Craig about the poll and today’s developments, and to Scarlett Maguire, director of the polling organisation JL Partners.Producer: Sydney Pead Editor: Philly Beaumont
03/06/2419m 8s

Will Trump's conviction make a difference in the US election?

Donald Trump has become the first-ever former American president to be convicted of a crime.     A New York jury found him guilty on all 34 counts of falsifying business records to cover up hush money he paid to bury a sex scandal ahead of the 2016 presidential election.   On this Sky News Daily, Tom Cheshire speaks to Sky's US correspondent James Matthews about how the trial unfolded and what it could mean for this year's White House race.   Political commentator and Trump biographer Michael Wolff also joins the podcast to discuss the choice that US voters now have between an increasingly unpopular incumbent or a convicted criminal.     Podcast Producer: Sydney Pead Editor: Paul Stanworth
31/05/2420m 19s

Beth Rigby interviews Labour’s Angela Rayner

Labour's Angela Rayner speaks to Sky News’ political editor Beth Rigby in an extended interview for the Daily podcast.The party’s deputy leader says that she believes Diane Abbott should be able to stand as an MP - and she denied leader Sir Keir Starmer was acting "in a factional way".On the first official day of campaigning, she also spoke about the investigations into her living arrangements - and revealed the details of her campaign battle bus.Producer: Soila Apparicio Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
30/05/2422m 46s

South African elections: Why Nelson Mandela's party could lose its dominance

It's been 30 years since Nelson Mandela led the African National Congress (ANC) to power, ending apartheid in South Africa.     But as voters head to the polls, the party is on the verge of losing dominance, after coming under fire over corruption, high levels of crime and economic woes. Even in the birthplace of the late human rights fighter, communities are suffering from poverty, hunger and no running water.     On the Sky News Daily, Mark Austin speaks to Sky’s Africa correspondent Yousra Elbagir about the decline of Mandela’s legacy, the party’s decreasing popularity and what happens if they lose power. 👉 Listen above then tap here to follow the Sky News Daily wherever you get your podcasts 👈 Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Paul Stanworth
29/05/2420m 56s

How long will Labour's 'no additional taxes' promise last?

In her first major campaign speech, Rachel Reeves has pitched herself as the UK's next chancellor to an audience of company bosses, promising the "most pro-growth Treasury in our country's history" if Labour wins the election. But after pledging not to announce any new tax hikes and that Labour policies would be fully funded and costed, how she intends to pay for Labour's plan for the UK remains unclear.  Today on the Sky News Daily, Sophy Ridge speaks with our deputy political editor Sam Coates to discuss the woman hoping to be in charge of the public finances, and whether Labour will be able to please workers and businesses while delivering on a promise of "economic stability" at the same time. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku   Editor: Philly Beaumont
28/05/2428m 28s

You're in 'la la land': Paula Vennells's last day at Post Office Inquiry

After avoiding public scrutiny for nearly a decade, Paula Vennells, the former Post Office boss, finally faced questions about her role in the most widespread miscarriage of justice that Britain has ever seen.She has been giving evidence at the Post Office Horizon Inquiry for the last three days – and today she was accused by lawyers of talking "rubbish" and being in "la la land".Sky's Jonathan Samuels spoke to Sky's business correspondent Paul Kelso who's been at the Post Office Inquiry for us.Plus, a record number of Conservative MPs have now said they are not standing in July's general election. Political correspondent Rob Powell talks to Jonathan about that and all the other latest news from the election campaigns. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
24/05/2421m 43s

And they're off... what has the first day of the election campaign told us?

The political parties have been setting out their election campaigns, with voters going to the polls exactly six weeks from today.    On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson speaks to deputy political editor Sam Coates who is following the prime minister on his campaign trail around the UK, visiting four nations in two days. He also chats with chief political correspondent Jon Craig about the launch of Labour's campaign in Kent.    Plus, Sky's online campaign correspondent Tom Cheshire tells Niall why the parties are spending big money online and whether it could affect the election outcome. Producers: Soila Apparicio, Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker 
23/05/2420m 54s

It’s a date – Rishi Sunak calls a July election

The prime minister has called a general election for 4 July. It means parliament only has a few days to pass any bills still waiting to become law before MPs leave Westminster to begin campaigning.   On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson gets the very latest from our deputy political editor Sam Coates and political correspondent Tamara Cohen on why the election was announced today, and what the next six weeks of campaigning could have in store. Producers: Rosie Gillott  Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku   Editor: Philly Beaumont
22/05/2419m 54s

'I don't believe a word': Paula Vennells at the Post Office Inquiry

The former Post Office boss, Paula Vennells, has been testifying at the Inquiry examining the Horizon IT scandal.It's the first time Paula Vennells has spoken publicly in nearly ten years.The hundreds of wronged Post Office workers, and their families, have been keenly anticipating her evidence, as, on her watch, prosecutions continued, despite mounting evidence that there was something wrong with the system.On the Sky News Daily, Sarah-Jane Mee has been in Fenny Compton, in the village hall where Alan Bates began his campaign against the Post Office, to meet the sub-postmasters whose lives were ruined by Horizon.Plus, one former sub-postmistress, Nicole, shares her story for the first time.Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse, Soila ApparicioEditor: Wendy ParkerPodcast Promotion: Jada-Kai Meosa John
22/05/2419m 53s

Jobs or the environment? And, how do pilots prepare for turbulence?

How do we help people keep their jobs and livelihoods alongside the pressure to move to an environmentally friendly and sustainable future?  It's been estimated that 1.3 million jobs in the UK could be affected by the drive to get to net zero emissions - many in traditional industries such as steelmaking.  Sophy Ridge presents this episode with Sky News' people and politics correspondent Nick Martin whose reporting has been focusing on Port Talbot in south Wales where thousands are employed in the steel industry.   Plus, following severe turbulence on a London to Singapore flight where one passenger, a 73-year-old British man died, "likely from a heart attack" and more than two dozen injured, Sophy speaks to pilot and aviation consultant Tim Atkinson about how commercial pilots plan for, and deal with, turbulence.   Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Paul Stanworth
21/05/2419m 16s

Infected Blood: The PM apologies for a 50 year cover-up

The infected blood scandal was "not an accident" and its failures lie with "successive governments, the NHS, and blood services", a public inquiry has found. More than 30,000 people were infected with HIV and hepatitis C from 1970 to 1991 after being given contaminated blood products and transfusions - about 3,000 of whom have since died.Sir Brian Langstaff, who chaired the inquiry, said the scale of what happened was "horrifying". On the Sky News Daily, Matt Barbet talks to Sky's health correspondent Ashish Joshi about the report and Rosamund Cooper who was given blood products contaminated with Hepatitis C. Producer: Soila Apparicio Editor: Philly Beaumont
20/05/2420m 46s

Infected Blood Inquiry: Will victims finally get justice?

Thousands of people died after being given infected blood transfusions by the NHS.   They were people with haemophilia, women giving birth, and cancer patients who died after contracting HIV or Hepatitis C from infected blood.   An inquiry has been studying millions of pages of evidence from hundreds of sources and witnesses for six years.   From its source in the early 1970s via warnings, missed opportunities, delays and perhaps even deliberate cover ups, this episode of the Sky News Daily explores the story behind the worst treatment scandal in NHS history.   Niall Paterson is joined by Sky's science and technology editor Tom Clarke in preparation for the final report from the inquiry - due to be published on Monday.  Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Wendy Parker 
17/05/2422m 46s

Two and a bit world leaders: Putin, Xi and Starmer

China's Xi Jinping and Russia’s Vladimir Putin have met in Beijing – promoting their alliance and their new ‘world order’ away from the West.  On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Sky’s Asia correspondent Nicole Johnston in Beijing and Sky’s Moscow correspondent Ivor Bennett to discuss the highlights of the summit so far.Plus, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer made a key speech to lay out six pledges ahead of his election campaign. Sky’s deputy political editor Sam Coates joins Niall to unpick the key moments.  Producer: Soila ApparicioEditor: Paul Stanworth
16/05/2420m 41s

Out of Africa – and those worried about a return

Hundreds of young men have died trying to use boats to get from Senegal to the Canary Islands.    On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson hears about what's been called the "deadliest and busiest migrant passage in the world".    Niall is joined by our Africa correspondent Yousra Elbagir who has been to the fishing town of Mbour on the Senegalese coast to see the scale of the problem.  Plus, in the UK, our communities correspondent Becky Johnson has been speaking to asylum seekers who say they're considering not attending appointments which are a condition of their immigration bail.  It comes as the Home Office tries to trace thousands of missing asylum seekers, with a view to deporting some of them to Rwanda in a bid to deter illegal small boat Channel crossings. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Podcast promotions producer: David Chipakupaku    Editor: Paul Stanworth
15/05/2423m 1s

Could Ozempic save you from a heart attack?

Anti-obesity jabs like Ozempic could reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes or heart failure in obese people regardless of the amount of weight they lose while on the drug.     Researchers found after three years of treatment participants had a 20% lower risk of obesity and its associated health impacts, which currently cost the NHS over £6bn per year.    On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Sky’s science and medical correspondent Thomas Moore about the implications of reducing heart disease cases for the NHS, and senior lecturer in physiology at Anglia Ruskin University Dr Simon Cork explains how the wonder-drug actually works.      Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku   Editor: Philly Beaumont
14/05/2417m 56s

‘Shockingly poor’: What needs to change in maternity care?

A landmark parliamentary inquiry into traumatic childbirths has called for an overhaul of the UK's maternity services after finding poor care is "all-too-frequently tolerated as normal".  The report calls for a new maternity commissioner who will report to the prime minister, better staffing levels on maternity wards, and for mothers to be listened to more. On the Sky News Daily, Matt Barbet speaks to campaigner and mother-of-two Tinuke Awe about her experiences of giving birth and is joined by Sky correspondent Laura Bundock to find out what the government plans to do to address the issues raised in the report.   Producer: Rosie Gillott Podcast Promotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John    Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles  Editor: Wendy Parker         
13/05/2415m 45s

Faultlines: Can British farming survive?

Across the UK anger is brewing among farmers.  Protests have already been held in London, Dover and Wales, with more on the way - mirroring similar tensions seen across Europe in the last six months.     Their anger is focused on cheap foreign imports and changes to subsidies forcing farmers to give up land in favour of environmental schemes.    But what does this mean for the food on our table - and is British produce now a luxury product for the wealthy only?    On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by West of England and Wales correspondent Dan Whitehead to find out why farmers are so concerned, and speaks to Liz Webster, the founder of Save British Farming, about why she believes eating British isn't just good for our farmers - it's good for the nation's health, too.   In response to our report, Farming Minister Mark Spencer, said:“We firmly back our farmers. British farming is at the heart of British trade, and we put agriculture at the forefront of any deals we negotiate, prioritising new export opportunities, protecting UK food standards and removing market access barriers.“We’ve maintained the £2.4 billion annual farming budget and recently set out the biggest ever package of grants which supports farmers to produce food profitably and sustainably.”The Welsh government said: “A successful future for Welsh farming should combine the best of our traditional farming alongside cutting-edge innovation and diversification. It will produce the very best of Welsh food to the highest standards, while safeguarding our precious environment and addressing the urgent call of the climate and nature emergencies.” Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku  Editor: Paul Stanworth 
10/05/2420m 58s

The toddler born deaf whose hearing’s been restored | Labour’s newest MP apologises

On this episode, Niall speaks to one of the doctors who worked to restore the hearing of an 18-month-old girl – who was born deaf.      Medics at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge have used gene therapy to help a rare condition, auditory neuropathy. It’s caused by the disruption of nerve impulses travelling from the inner ear to the brain.       Opal Sandy can now respond to her parents’ voices and can communicate words such as “Dada” and “bye-bye”.    Plus, Natalie Elphicke, the MP who defected from the Conservatives to Labour yesterday, apologises for comments she made after her ex-husband, and predecessor as MP for Dover, was convicted of sexual assault in 2020.      She said at the time that being "attractive" and "attracted to women" had made him an "easy target".      Niall talks to deputy political editor Sam Coates about the disquiet within Labour about Mrs Elphicke’s arrival.  Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Paul Stanworth
09/05/2420m 3s

Can social media ever be a safe place for kids?

The UK media regulator has set out new rules for social media companies designed to keep children safe online.   The new Ofcom rules include age verification and reformulating algorithms to keep children away from "toxic" content. But parents whose children have died as a result of exposure to harmful content have called the rules an "insult". On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson is joined by technology correspondent at the Financial Times Cristina Criddle to discuss what the measures are and how they can be delivered.   Niall is also joined by John Carr, who is on the government's principal advisory body for online safety and security for children, to discuss the challenges of enforcing the rules and if they go far enough to protect children.    Producers: Soila Apparicio, Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
08/05/2417m 37s

Israel Hamas latest: Why the ceasefire never happened

The Israeli Defense Force says it has taken 'operational control' of the Gaza side of the Rafah crossing, the main entry point for aid into the region. It comes less than 24 hours after Hamas said they would accept a ceasefire deal drawn up by Egyptian mediators.  On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson talks to our international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn to explore why Israel rejected the deal, saying it fell "far from meeting" its "core demands", and Aaron David Miller, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and former Middle East negotiator under Republican and Democratic US administrations. Producer: Rosie Gillott Senior Producer: Annie Joyce Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku  Editor: Philly Beaumont
07/05/2420m 50s

Elections fallout: What does it mean for the general election?

Labour are celebrating big wins in the Blackpool South by-election, in the local elections and in most of the mayoral races that have declared so far.   The Conservatives could lose up to 500 councillors, though their candidate Ben Houchen did hold on to his role as mayor of Tees Valley. A win which gave the prime minister something to be pleased about and will probably help him keep his job for now.  But are these grim results for the Tories enough to see Labour winning the next election? Sky News's projection is that it won't be. They will be the largest party but short of an overall majority.  On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson talks to Professor Michael Thrasher who carried out the analysis and Sky's deputy political editor Sam Coates on what signals we can take from these results.   Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Podcast Promotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
03/05/2424m 23s

Fourth time lucky? When will Manchester’s Co-Op Live actually open?

Thousands of fans have been left frustrated after Manchester’s newest venue delayed its launch again after a string of technical problems.The Co-op Live arena will be the UK’s largest indoor arena accommodating 23,500 people at a cost of £365m - but it’s yet to officially open its doors, cancelling tours from Peter Kay, Boogie Wit Da Hoodie and Olivia Rodrigo.   On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson speaks to Sky’s chief North of England correspondent Greg Milam to find out what is behind the delays as well as Pauline Forster, landlady at a gig venue, which has launched several celebrity careers. They discuss the realities and costs of running a small gig venue and why such spaces are important.  Also on the podcast, Niall gets the latest from the university protests in the US, where riot police have been firing rubber bullets at protesters refusing to disperse from campus. Sky’s US correspondent Martha Kelner shares her eyewitness account from University of California.  Producers: Rosie Gillott and Emma Rae Woodhouse  Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku  Editor: Paul Stanworth
02/05/2420m 31s

US protests: Campus crackdowns, Gaza protests and the free speech debate

Violent protests over the Israel-Hamas war have reached boiling point across university campuses in the United States.Pro-Palestinian protesters are demanding their universities cut ties with Israel or any companies that support its ongoing war in Gaza.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson gets eyewitness analysis from US correspondent Mark Stone in George Washington University. They discuss the arrests, tear gas and counter-protest violence that is taking over universities. Plus, Lauren Lassabe Shepherd, a historian at the University of New Orleans and author of ‘Resistance from the Right: Conservatives and the Campus Wars’, looks at how these protests compare to others the US has seen and analyses if the action could lead to change. Producer: Soila Apparicio and Emma Rae WoodhouseEditor: Philly Beaumont
01/05/2418m 24s

The Return of the King

The King has returned to official public duties for the first time since being diagnosed with cancer. Alongside the Queen, he visited a cancer treatment centre to meet staff and patients as part of his new role as patron of Cancer Research UK.Sources have stressed that despite his return to public engagements, the King still has cancer and will continue to be treated for the undisclosed form of the disease.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Sky’s royal correspondent Rhiannon Mills and NBC royal commentator Daisy McAndrew to discuss how the Palace has managed this turbulent period and how it has been received on both sides of the Atlantic.    Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Rosie GillottPodcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku  Editor: Philly Beaumont
30/04/2420m 16s

Humza Yousaf quits - does this spell the end for Scottish independence?

Scotland's First Minister Humza Yousaf has resigned – days after he cut the SNP's power-sharing deal with the Scottish Greens.   It followed a bitter row over the SNP's climbdown on climate targets as he said the agreement between the parties had "served its purpose".   As a result, his former Green allies teamed up with the Conservatives, Labour and Liberal Democrats to get behind two no-confidence motions, one in himself as leader of Scotland and another regarding the entire Scottish government.   Now – attention turns to another SNP leadership contest and what the divisions in Scottish politics could mean for the future of the independence campaign.     On the Sky News Daily, Matt Barbet speaks to Paul Hutcheon, political editor of the Daily Record, and Shona Craven, from The National, about how the SNP can move on after Mr Yousaf's resignation.   Plus, Connor Gillies, our Scotland correspondent, explains how the leadership election will unfold.   Producer: Rosie Gillott Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
29/04/2418m 58s

Local elections: What’s at stake - for voters and parties?

The 2 May local elections will have more than 2,600 seats are at stake across 107 English councils. Labour’s Sadiq Khan and Andy Burnham are among the 10 city mayors up for re-election.  Those in Blackpool South will also be voting for their next MP after ex-Tory Scott Benton broke Commons lobbying rules, triggering a by-election.  With the Conservatives lagging behind Labour in the polls, the outcome will offer some insight on how voters in England and Wales feel ahead of the general election. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Sky’s deputy political editor Sam Coates to discuss why the elections are so important for the prime minister’s future and where the key political backgrounds are.   Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Soila Apparicio Podcast promotions producer: Iona Brunker Editor: Paul Stanworth
26/04/2417m 34s

Would nationalisation get the railways back on track?

Labour have promised to renationalise nearly all passenger railways within their first term if they win the next election. But will it leave the railways better off?  On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Sky's political correspondent Sam Coates to discuss the details of Labour's plan and assess if a Great British Railway would be more efficient and cost-effective than the current privatised system. Niall also speaks to the editor of Rail magazine, Nigel Harris, to discuss the current state of our railways and what he believes needs to change.   Elsewhere in politics, the Scottish government has ended its power-sharing agreement with the Greens. Sky's Scotland correspondent Connor Gillies discusses the implications of this for both parties – including a motion of no confidence in First Minister Humza Yousaf.   Producers: Iona Brunker, Soila Apparicio, Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Paul Stanworth
25/04/2426m 30s

TikTok and its possible US ban - here’s what happens next…

Only two months ago Joe Biden joined the social media platform TikTok with a video captioned "lol hey guys". Now, the US president is poised to sign a bill that could ban the popular app - unless its parent company sells it.    The country is concerned that TikTok's owner, Beijing-based tech firm ByteDance, could be forced by Chinese authorities to hand over the user data of almost 170 million American app users.    On this episode, Niall Paterson unpicks the possible ban with Arthi Nachiappan, our technology correspondent. Plus, Chris Stokel-Walker, author of TikTok Boom: China's Dynamite App And The Superpower Race For Social Media, joins Niall to discuss the app's impact in the US - as well as China's influence on technology. Since recording this episode, TikTok CEO, Shou Chew said in a statement: "This unconstitutional law is a TikTok ban, and we will challenge it in court. We believe the facts and the law are clearly on our side, and we will ultimately prevail."As we continue to challenge this unconstitutional ban, we will continue investing and innovating to ensure TikTok remains a space where Americans of all walks of life can safely come to share their experiences, find joy, and be inspired."Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Assistant producer: Iona BrunkerPromotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth 
24/04/2420m 26s

Sunak's Rwanda bill passes – what impact will it have on immigration?

After months of parliamentary ping-pong between the House of Commons and the Lords, Rishi Sunak's Rwanda Bill has passed. The prime minister called it a "landmark" law, saying that "nothing will stand in our way" of getting flights off the ground within 10 to 12 weeks.    However, the scheme could face yet more hurdles, with the potential for it to be held up by challenges in court.    On this episode, Matt Barbet takes stock of the bill with Adam Parsons, Sky's Europe editor in France, who has been watching migrant boats cross the English Channel even after the bill's passing.    Sky's communities correspondent Becky Johnson also joins Matt to share some of the stories from those asylum seekers already in the UK and what they might expect from the Rwanda bill.    And Dr Madeleine Sumption, director of the Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford, details the potential impact this new legislation might have on migration figures.   Producer: Rosie Gillott  Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles  Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku    Editor: Philly Beaumont
23/04/2420m 26s

Trump on trial: Porn stars, hush money and a presidential election

As the first of Donald Trump's four criminal trials begins this week, will it have any effect on his chances of re-election in November?   The former president faces 34 counts of falsifying business records in connection to $130,000 paid to porn star Stormy Daniels. He is accused of falsifying internal business records as part of an alleged scheme to bury stories that he thought might hurt his presidential campaign in 2016.   With all eyes on the New York courtroom, Daily host Matt Barbet speaks to US correspondent James Matthews from outside the first trial Trump will face this year... plus, Washington-based pollster John Zogby explains what it could mean for his popularity amongst voters.    Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku   Editor: Philly Beaumont
22/04/2421m 9s

Israel strikes Iran: What's the state of play?

An Israeli missile has struck Iran, in response to the unprecedented missile and drone attack on Israel over the weekend by the Iranians.  It seems an airfield outside of the city of Isfahan was targeted, but Tehran has played down the incident and has indicated it has no plans to retaliate.   On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by military analyst Sean Bell to find out what exactly happened in the latest attack and what it says about Israel's and Iran's respective military strengths.  Plus, Niall is also joined by Sky's international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn to analyse where this leaves tension in the Middle East.   Producer: Rosie Gillott & Emma Rae Woodhouse Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku  Editor: Wendy Parker
19/04/2418m 17s

Tory MP suspended | What's going on with climate targets?

Conservative MP Mark Menzies has been suspended from the parliamentary party in light of allegations he abused local Tory party funds to pay off "bad people".   Mark Menzies strongly disputes the claims which also allege he used campaign funds to pay his personal medical bills.   On the Conservatives' investigation into the claims, Defence Secretary Grant Shapps told Sky News: "There's further information that the Chief Whip I understand became familiar with yesterday and actions being swiftly taken on the basis of that further information."I think it is important to stress that the MP in question here denies the allegations and so on basis of sort of fairness and proper justice, I think it's important to mention that."On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by political correspondent Darren McCaffrey to analyse how Westminster will cope with another scandal.   Plus, the Scottish government has come under fire for rowing back on its climate commitments. Niall speaks to science correspondent Thomas Moore about the consequences of the government missing eight out of 12 of its annual climate commitments. 👉 Listen above then tap here to follow the Sky News Daily wherever you get your podcasts 👈     Senior producer: Annie Joyce Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Podcast Promotions Producer: Jada Meosa-John  Editors: Paul Stanworth
18/04/2420m 30s

Inflation falls - but what might it mean for interest rates?

The price of everyday things - mainly food - is now rising at the lowest level since 2021.  Official data shows inflation eased last month to 3.2% - down from 3.4% - but the fall was slightly less than economists expected.  On the Daily, Niall Paterson looks at what's going on with inflation and what it might mean for interest rates with Sky's economics and data editor Ed Conway - who's in the US looking at the situation there. They also discuss how the UK could be importing inflation from America.  Plus, Niall talks to Russ Mould, investment director at finance firm AJ Bell, about what's happening at the fashion retailer ASOS which says it's becoming "more agile" after an 18% drop in sales.    Producer: Rosie Gillott  Assistant Producer: Iona Brunker Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
17/04/2421m 14s

Is banning smoking "unconservative"?

'Absolutely nuts' was how former Prime Minister Boris Johnson described Rishi Sunak’s plan to gradually phase out smoking – banning anyone born since the start of 2009 from ever being able to buy cigarettes or tobacco products like vapes.    Liz Truss, who was also briefly prime minister in-between the two men, is also among some critical of the proposal – which she described as 'profoundly unconservative'.    Tories are being given a free vote in the Commons – allowing them to vote with their conscience, not necessarily the government.    But will the policy create a smokefree generation? And what will it mean for Conservative Party ideology?    Niall Paterson looks at the health implications with Alice Wiseman, vice president of The Association of Directors of Public Health, and the politics of the policy with Sky’s political editor Beth Rigby and Tory peer Lord Frost, who disagrees with the planned legislation.    Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Podcast Promotions Producer: Iona Brunker Senior producer: Annie Joyce Editors: Philly Beaumont and Paul Stanworth
16/04/2423m 39s

Why Iran hates Israel (and America)

Military experts have called Iran's ariel attack on Israel on Saturday night 'ambitious' and warn it could push an already fragile region into a dangerous new phase. On the Sky News Daily, host Matt Barbet examines how Iran and Israel's 'shadow war' has moved out into the open, alongside defence and security analyst Michael Clarke.  Matt is also joined by Dr Roxane Farmanfarmaian, affiliated lecturer in international relations of the Middle East at the University of Cambridge, to examine what Iran was really trying to achieve from its attack.Producer: Rosie Gillott  Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku  Editor: Philly Beaumont
15/04/2422m 41s

WEEKEND DAILY: Iran attacks Israel, but what happens next?

On Saturday night Iran launched an unprecedented drone and missile attack against Israel, which Tehran has claimed is in retaliation for an attack on the consular section of the Iranian embassy in Damascus by Israel on 1 April.    Some 170 explosive drones, 120 ballistic missiles, and 30 cruise missiles were launched by Iran, according to the Israel Defence Forces (IDF), who said "99%" were intercepted.     Leaders across the world have condemned the attack and stated their support for Israel’s security. However, Iran's foreign ministry said they would "not hesitate" to take "further defensive measures" to "safeguard its legitimate interests against any military aggressions".    On this extra Sky News Daily episode, Rob Powell sits down with our international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn to discuss the significance and implications of Iran’s attack, and the response from Israel and its allies. Producer: Rosie Gillott  Editor: Paul Stanworth
14/04/2418m 34s

Should the UK send troops to Ukraine?

Ex-armed forces minister James Heappey has told Sky's defence and security editor Deborah Haynes the UK should consider sending its forces to Ukraine to train troops.  On the Sky News Daily, host Tom Cheshire talks to her and Sky's military analyst Professor Michael Clarke about the interview with Mr Heappey, who stepped down from his role last month.  They assess the bleak situation in Ukraine and why the conflict is at a critical stage. They also discuss how prepared the UK would be if it faced a war in the near future. Senior producer: Annie Joyce  Editor: Wendy Parker
12/04/2420m 4s

OJ Simpson dies – the story of his complex legacy

The death of arguably one of America’s most talked about names in the 1990s has re-ignited conversations about who OJ Simpson was and how he will be remembered.  The former NFL star was tried and acquitted of the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman. He later spent time in jail for armed robbery and kidnap. On the Daily, Niall Paterson talks to our US correspondent James Matthews as they discuss his life and the controversies surrounding the 76-year-old, who died on Wednesday following his battle with cancer. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse, Rosie Gillott, Soila Apparicio Senior producer: Annie Joyce Editors: Paul Stanworth, Wendy Parker
11/04/2423m 15s

Israel v Iran - Is escalation inevitable?

President Biden has stated US support for Israel is 'ironclad' after reports an Iranian attack is imminent. Iran had promised to retaliate after Israel killed a top Iranian commander in Damascus, Syria, earlier this month. It has led to fears the Israel-Gaza war could escalate to a wider Middle East conflict. Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu did nothing to allay concerns when he said his forces were preparing for scenarios in other areas.  On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to our Middle East correspondent Ali Bunkall about how ready Israel is for any attacks by Iran and what its next moves might be. Plus, retired Air Vice-Marshal Sean Bell, who is a military analyst, details Iran's military capabilities and what form an attack by Tehran might take. Producers: Soila Apparicio, Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John, Iona BrunkerEditor: Wendy Parker
11/04/2423m 0s

Why are thousands of people refused asylum still in the UK?

More than 55,000 asylum seekers whose applications have been refused since 2011 may not have left the UK.The analysis of Home Office data does not include partners or children - so could be even higher.On the Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to our communities correspondent Becky Johnson about how delays in deporting failed applicants have led to some people being able to make multiple appeals.In one case, an asylum seeker has been in limbo for 18 years.Also, immigration lawyer Harjap Singh Bhangal talks about why so many appeals against deportation are successful. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse  Assistant producer: Iona BrunkerPodcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku  Editor: Wendy Parker
10/04/2425m 1s

How Gaza conflict could be worsening Yemen's humanitarian crisis

Yemen is in the middle of a humanitarian disaster after nearly a decade of civil war between the Saudi and Western-backed government, and the Iranian-backed Houthi militia. As Sky's special correspondent Alex Crawford has found, war in Gaza is making the situation even worse for Yeminis already facing violence, starvation and disease. On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Alex and Yemen-born producer Ahmed Baider to explore how Houthi attacks on shipping lanes in the Red Sea, ostensibly in support of Gaza, are preventing aid from getting into Yemen.  Senior Producer: Annie Joyce Producer: Rosie GillottAssistant Producer: Iona Brunker Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
09/04/2422m 17s

Angela Rayner tax claims: Smear, story or both?

Labour's deputy leader Angela Rayner is facing questions about whether she paid enough tax on a house sale, almost a decade ago.     She denies any wrongdoing and has been backed by the party's leader Sir Keir Starmer, with some colleagues claiming she's being "smeared".     On the Sky News Daily, Mark Austin unpicks exactly what Angela Rayner is accused of and discusses if the allegations are really in the public interest with Sky's political correspondent Rob Powell.     They also talk about how important Ms Rayner is to Labour's election ambitions with polling expert Scarlett Maguire.   Producers: Soila Apparicio, Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
08/04/2419m 1s

'Cosmic coincidence': What we can learn from the solar eclipse

Next week, millions of people across North America will be able to see a total solar eclipse, a once-in-a-lifetime experience for many. A total solar eclipse - where the moon moves in front of the sun - happens about every 18 months. However, it rarely takes place over land, so next week's is an incredibly rare opportunity for scientists and amateurs alike to witness the phenomenon.On the Sky News Daily, our data and forensics correspondent Tom Cheshire chats to NASA's deputy administrator and retired astronaut Pam Melroy about why solar eclipses are so important for scientists and learning more about the Earth and our nearest star.In addition, our science and medical correspondent Thomas Moore explains why eclipses happen - and why the vast majority in the UK won't be lucky enough to see it.You can watch our live coverage of the total eclipse on Monday 8th April, 7pm to 10pm, on the Sky News channel, the Sky News app or on our YouTube channel. 👉 Listen above then tap here to follow the Sky News Daily wherever you get your podcasts 👈 Producers: Rosie Gillott & Soila Apparicio Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Podcast Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
05/04/2418m 30s

Should the UK stop selling arms to Israel?

Three former Supreme Court justices have warned Prime Minister Rishi Sunak that the UK is breaching international law by continuing to arm Israel.   They are among over 600 lawyers and academics who are signatories of a 17-page letter, which also urges ministers to work towards a ceasefire in Gaza and resume funding to the UNRWA aid agency. It comes as civil servants overseeing arms exports could stop work over fears they may be complicit in war crimes.  On the Sky News Daily, Tom Cheshire asks Michael Mansfield KC, head of chambers at Nexus Chambers and former judge on the Russell Tribunal on Palestine, about why he has signed the letter.   Plus, our political correspondent Rob Powell details the current government's arms dealing with Israel and the response to calls to stop supplying weapons.  Senior producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-CharlesEditor: Philly Beaumont
04/04/2419m 58s

Is the UK prepared for a war?

The UK spends more than £50bn a year - 2.2% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) - on defence, but government documents shared with Sky News show the country has no preparations for a nuclear war.   In January, Defence Secretary Grant Shapps warned the country is approaching a pre-war era and that in five years' time the UK could be looking at conflicts with Russia, China, Iran and North Korea.   So, is the UK ready?   On the Sky News Daily, Tom Cheshire is joined by our security and defence editor Deborah Haynes, who has seen documents outlining the UK's preparedness for nuclear war, and asks former soldier and now defence policy expert, Robert Clark, what the military will need to do to prepare for war.  Producer: Soila Apparicio  Editor: Philly Beaumont
03/04/2422m 4s

Israel-Hamas war: Will volunteers leave Gaza after aid deaths?

Aid group World Central Kitchen says seven members of its team have been killed in an Israeli strike on Gaza. The charity said the volunteers had just unloaded more than 100 tonnes of humanitarian food aid brought to Gaza by sea. The foreign nationals killed were from the UK, Australia, Poland, and a dual US-Canadian citizen.    Israel Defence Forces (IDF) spokesperson Rear Admiral Daniel Hagari offered "deepest condolences" to the founder of the charity World Central Kitchen over the "tragic" deaths of its aid workers.    Aid convoys attempting to reach northern Gaza have either been forced to turn back or simply not made the journey because the risk of being hit by Israeli fire was too great. How will the latest deaths affect the work of aid agencies in the Palestinian territory?   On the Sky News Daily, Tom Cheshire explores what working in a 'death zone' in Gaza looks like for volunteers with Ahmed Bayram, media adviser for MENA (Middle East and North Africa) at the Norwegian Refugee Council.    Plus, our Middle East correspondent Alistair Bunkall reports on whether the IDF's review of the deaths will be enough to reassure foreign governments and humanitarian organisations.   Senior producer: Annie Joyce Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Editor: Philly Beaumont
02/04/2419m 16s

Unreliable Witness: Who is Ellie Williams?

It’s the height of lockdown, 19-year-old Ellie Williams claims on social media she's been raped and exploited by an Asian grooming gang across the north of England. Photos of her alleged injuries add to the outrage and the post goes viral - shared more than 100,000 times.  Social media rumours lead to attacks on Asian men and businesses in her hometown of Barrow-in-Furness. But when she's arrested for perverting the course of justice, things really explode and there are protest rallies and claims of a cover-up.  At her trial, the prosecution say she lied, faked text messages and even caused the catalogue of injuries to herself.    In season 6 of StoryCast, Sky News' Jason Farrell and Liz Lane, who reported on the case at the time, return to Barrow to investigate what could have led her to make these claims and if, underneath it all, there is some other truth buried among the lies.  With access to her family, police investigators and those most impacted by her allegations, we ask: Is Ellie Williams a villain - or a victim of something else? And what happened after the trial - once all the media attention died down and new allegations began to emerge?   This is episode one of Unreliable Witness. For the full season, follow Unreliable Witness wherever you get your podcasts.
28/03/2432m 35s

Water woes: Could sewage in the sea lead to higher bills?

The amount of raw sewage being spilled into England’s waterways has hit a record high – more than doubling since last year.  Water companies are allowed to do this, but only in exceptional circumstances to prevent sewage washing back up into our homes.  But, there’s growing evidence sewage is being routinely dumped by water firms when it’s not needed, polluting England’s waters more to the point where rowers in this year’s Oxford and Cambridge boat race have been warned not to go into the Thames.  Customers could end up paying more too – as water companies in England and Wales want bills to increase to fund the necessary infrastructure upgrades.  On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto is joined by climate reporter Victoria Seabrook and business correspondent Paul Kelso to explain how England’s rivers and seas have got to this state and what this could mean for our water bills.   Producer: Alex Edden Assistant producer: Iona Brunker  Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth 
27/03/2417m 58s

Baltimore bridge collapse: Expert view on what happened

In the early hours of Tuesday morning, a cargo ship leaving the US city of Baltimore catastrophically struck a major bridge. The entire middle section of the 1.6-mile-long Francis Scott Key Bridge collapsed into the Patapsco River.  The ship lost power as it left the port, but the crew had enough time to make a mayday call so officials on the bridge were able to shut it to most traffic. Two people were rescued from the water but several people are still missing.  There are now questions about how such a large vessel lost control and how the huge structure of the bridge crumbled so quickly.   On today's edition of the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto speaks to our US Correspondent Martha Kelner in Baltimore and our Science Correspondent Thomas More. Plus, Ben Schafer, a structural engineer at Baltimore's Johns Hopkins University explains why the bridge fell so quickly.   Senior producer: Annie Joyce Assistant producer: Iona Brunker  Editor: Wendy Parker
26/03/2419m 51s

How will Putin react to the Moscow concert attack?

Four men have been charged with carrying out an attack at a concert in Moscow on Friday that killed more than 130 people. They all appeared in court on Monday heavily bruised with swollen faces and black eyes – with one attending in a wheelchair wearing a hospital gown.  The Islamic State group said it carried out the attack on the Crocus City Hall, but President Putin has insisted Ukraine was involved. President Zelenskyy has strongly denied the claims and hit out at the Russian leader and others in Moscow, describing them as “scum”.   Questions are now mounting for President Putin as it emerged the US government warned Russia two weeks ago that an attack by extremists on “large gatherings including concerts” was imminent.  On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto is joined by international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn and international correspondent in Moscow Diana Magnay to discuss the mood in the Russian capital and how President Putin could react.Producer: Alex Edden Assistant producer: Iona Brunker  Editor: Paul Stanworth  
25/03/2416m 50s

US Gaza ceasefire vote - why did it fail?

The US has called for an immediate ceasefire in Gaza for the first time as secretary of state Antony Blinken lands in Tel Aviv for talks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. An American-sponsored resolution demanding a truce was rejected by the UN Security Council. The US policy change comes amid fears the Palestinian territory could be on the brink of famine. On the Daily, Niall Paterson talks to our Middle East correspondent Alistair Bunkall about how much US support for Israel is wavering.  Plus, Sky’s special correspondent Alex Crawford discusses the importance of being able to report freely from inside Gaza - something she and other foreign journalists have been unable to do since Hamas's attack on southern Israel on 7 October.   The war has meant images and information from inside Gaza have mostly come from a few Palestinian journalists in the territory. Foreign journalists can only report in Gaza while accompanied by Israeli authorities, who say it is for safety reasons. Senior producer: Annie Joyce  Producer: Alex Edden and Sydney Pead Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Editor: Wendy Parker  
23/03/2421m 3s

Kate’s cancer diagnosis – what we know

The Princess of Wales has issued a personal message revealing that she has been diagnosed with cancerfollowing her abdominal surgery earlier this year and that she is undergoing preventative chemotherapy.The news comes after many weeks of speculation about the health of the 42-year-old future queen, who has not been seen on official duties since Christmas.On the Sky News Daily, Jonathan Samuels is joined by our Royal Correspondent, Rhiannon Mills to discuss how this news will impact the Royal Family and when we can expect to see Catherine resume full duties.Producer: Rosie GillottEditor: Wendy Parker
22/03/2414m 27s

Will the government "do the right thing" for the Waspi campaigners?

Thousands of women should get payouts because of the way changes to the state pension affected them, according to a watchdog.The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) said the women who were born in the 1950s didn't get their pension when they expected because they didn't know about the reforms.  The PHSO report added that they are "owed" money by the Department for Work and Pensions. It criticised the department, claiming it has "clearly indicated that it will refuse to comply... this is unacceptable".  On this episode, Niall Paterson explains why the pension reforms were pushed through quicker than initially planned by the then coalition government and discusses the proposals for compensation and whether the payouts are likely to happen.  He's joined by Sky correspondent Shamaan Freeman-Powell and one of the Women Against State Pension Inequality (Waspi) campaigners, Michele Carlile. Producer: Sydney Pead Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Editor: Paul Stanworth
21/03/2415m 43s

What’s behind Leo Varadkar's shock resignation?

The resignation of Ireland's Prime Minister Leo Varadkar has come as a shock. He suffered defeats in two referendums earlier this month, where the public voted against the government's plans to remove "sexist" language from the constitution.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Ireland correspondent Stephen Murphy to look at Varadkar's legacy as both the youngest and openly gay Taoiseach.Plus, in Wales, history has also been made as Vaughan Gething was sworn in as first minister - the first black leader of a European country. He narrowly won the Welsh Labour leadership election against Jeremy Miles, with 51.7% of the vote. Questions over some of his campaign donations from a company run by a man twice convicted for environmental offences, and Conservative criticism over Welsh Labour's budget spending, give Gething plenty to defend and tackle in his first weeks in office. Niall explores what's in the new Welsh first minister's in-tray with Tomos Evans, our Wales reporter. Richard Wyn Jones, director of the Wales Governance Centre and dean of public affairs at Cardiff University, also talks about Mr Gething.Producer: Rosie Gillott Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Editor: Wendy Parker
20/03/2419m 31s

The Kate photos: When conspiracy theories meet the royals

More than half of people in the UK have seen online conspiracy theories about why the Princess of Wales has been absent from public life, but it hasn't dented trust in the Royal Family, according to Sky News polling.     Speculation on social media about Kate's health and whereabouts have been rife in recent days – despite Kensington Palace announcing she would be recovering from abdominal surgery until Easter – and suspicion has now spread from edited photos including the princess to photos of other members of the Royal Family.    So how has their brush with TikTok conspiracists impacted the royals and does the palace need to rethink its public relations strategy in the age of social media?     On the Sky News Daily podcast, Niall Paterson speaks to our royal correspondent, Rhiannon Mills, who has spent the day with Prince William in Sheffield, and to the late Queen's former communications secretary, Simon Lewis, about why he believes time is on the palace's side.  Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce  Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles  Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku  Editor: Philly Beaumont 
19/03/2420m 51s

Faultlines: Why isn’t housing a bigger election issue?

A new Sky News series 'Faultlines' covers in-depth and immersive reports exploring contemporary social challenges across the UK.     This episode asks 'is our housing market in crisis?', with not enough homes and expensive rentals forcing an increasing number of people into homelessness.   In 2021/22, just 7,528 new social homes were delivered. Nowhere near enough for the 1.1 million people on the waiting list and the government’s target of building 300,000 new homes a year. The seaside town Hastings is on the frontline of all that is wrong with the housing system, with evictions, social housing shortages and Airbnb among the issues behind the problem.   On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Tom Cheshire talks to our people and politics correspondent Nick Martin in Hastings, to uncover the scale of the problems, and hear from those at the heart of it. Producer: Alex Edden Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Editor: Paul Stanworth
18/03/2421m 6s

Putin's power – why Russia's election matters

As Russians go to the polls, the outcome is certainly already written as Vladimir Putin runs pretty much uncontested in his bid for a fifth term in office.   Opposition candidates were banned from standing, fled the country or are dead - like Putin's most prominent critic, Alexei Navalny.   So, what will another six years of rule mean for Russians, the war in Ukraine and the world?  On the Daily, Sky's Tom Cheshire looks at Putin's grip on power over the years as he's joined by our international correspondent Diana Magnay, who spent the past six years reporting from Moscow for us.   Plus, Tom talks to former British spy Christopher Steele - who previously ran MI6's Russia desk - about what challenges to Putin there could be.  Podcast producer: Sydney Pead   Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles  Senior podcast producer: Annie JoyceEditor: Wendy Parker
15/03/2418m 38s

British troops speak out about exposure to toxic chemicals | Redefining 'extremism' with Sam Coates

In the early months of the Iraq war in 2003, around 88 British troops were deployed to the Qarmat Ali water treatment plant to provide round-the-clock security. What the soldiers didn't know was that while on duty, they were being exposed to a carcinogenic chemical used to maintain the pipes in the plant.Ten ex-soldiers have now spoken out for the first time after suffering a range of health problems, including daily nosebleeds, a brain tumour and several diagnoses of cancer.Today on the Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Sky's Michael Drummond about his report into why the former troops are still seeking reparations, and to ex-RAF sergeant Andy Tosh who was exposed to the chemical and says his health has been permanently damaged.Plus, we'll get the latest from deputy political editor Sam Coates on the government's new definition of 'extremism'.Senior producer: Annie JoyceProducer: Sydney Pead Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-CharlesPromotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa JohnEditor: Wendy Parker
14/03/2425m 8s

Diane Abbott: Why the Tories won't return the race row money

The prime minister has resisted calls to hand back £10m donated to the Conservative Party by businessman Frank Hester. Speaking in the Commons, Rishi Sunak condemned Mr Hester's reported remarks about MP Diane Abbott as "racist" and "wrong" but insisted he had shown "remorse". Labour is calling on the Conservatives to give the money back.   Today on the Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Labour MP Dawn Butler and Sky's deputy political editor Sam Coates about the matter. Plus, Sky correspondent Amelia Harper takes us through her report uncovering a WhatsApp network of children who are filming themselves killing and torturing animals. Warning: this episode contains references to animal cruelty Producer: Soila Apparacio and Sydney PeadAssistant producer: Iona Brunker Editor: Philly Beaumont 
13/03/2428m 20s

How UK-made cars are getting into Russia despite sanctions

After Russia invaded Ukraine in 2022, the imposition of sanctions on the country meant direct exports of British-made luxury vehicles fell to zero.However, Sky News analysis shows that hundreds of millions of pounds worth of luxury cars are being sold to Russia through neighbouring countries.   Notably, Azerbaijan on Russia's southern border, where Britain recorded an unprecedented increase in car exports. In turn, Azerbaijan reported an unprecedented increase in car exports to Russia. Niall Paterson is joined by our economics and data editor Ed Conway on the Sky News Daily, to explain why luxury vehicles are still finding their way into Russia, and what can be done about it. Producer: Alex Edden Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Editor: Philly Beaumont
12/03/2418m 47s

Kate, the photo and trying to solve the conspiracy theory crisis

The Princess of Wales has apologised "for any confusion" after she admitted "editing" a Mother's Day image of her and her children.    Major international picture agencies told media outlets to "kill" the photo from their systems 12 hours after the picture was released by Kensington Palace on Sunday. AP told Sky News the photo broke their manipulation rules as it shows an "inconsistency in the alignment of Princess Charlotte's left hand".    Kill notices are uncommon and usually due to issues with copyright or journalistic process – and this has never happened to a royal picture.    On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Sarah-Jane Mee speaks to Adam Parker from our data and forensics unit, who reveals what the team have learned after analysing the photo’s metadata.    Plus, PR expert Mark Borkowski on whether this has fanned rather than extinguished online rumours, and our Royal Correspondent Rhiannon Mills on where this leaves the royal family.  Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Sydney Pead Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
11/03/2422m 38s

Everything that happened at the Oscars

The biggest night in Hollywood promised glitz and glamour, but there were no surprises when it came to the big Academy Award winners.Oppenheimer took home seven awards, including best picture, best actor and best director for Britain’s Christopher Nolan, with Emma Stone winning best actress for her role in Poor Things.   Sky News Arts and Entertainment correspondent Katie Spencer and Arts and Entertainment editor Claire Gregory were on the Vanity Fair red carpet for some celeb-spotting, with all details from this year’s Oscars. Podcast producer: Sydney Pead Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John   Editor: Paul Stanworth
11/03/2416m 34s

'More lives lost than saved': why Britain's IRA spy never faced justice

Freddie Scappaticci was Britain's most highly prized IRA informant.   His codename was 'Stakeknife' and the unit he led - ironically in charge of hunting informants like him - was called the 'nutting squad' as it shot people in the head after abducting and torturing them. Scappaticci never faced trial and lived under witness protection in England until his death last year, aged 77. Now, a seven-year investigation has concluded his actions probably resulted in "more lives being lost than saved", with the UK government being urged to acknowledge that many murders were avoidable and to apologise to bereaved families. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson examines what we know about the British mole and gets reaction to the Operation Kenova report with our senior Ireland correspondent David Blevins.Podcast producer: Sydney Pead  Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles  Promotion producer: Jonathan Day Senior producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Wendy Parker
08/03/2420m 22s

If National Insurance is scrapped, who wins and who loses?

After cutting national insurance for the second time in yesterday's Budget, the prime minister has said it's his "long-term ambition" to eventually scrap the tax.As only those in work pay it, it's seen by many – including the Chancellor - as an unfair double tax on those in the workforce. But, completely abolishing it would cost the government £46bn.Labour have criticised the plans, saying the move would cost more than the cuts unveiled in Liz Truss' chaotic mini-budget and the director of the Institute of Fiscal Studies called it unrealistic.On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Greg Thwaites from the Resolution Foundation and Linda Yueh, broadcaster and economist, to explore how realistic scrapping NI would be and why it's so tricky to simplify the tax system.And, political editor Beth Rigby pops in to discuss how this idea is playing out politically. Producer: Sydney Pead Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
07/03/2422m 6s

Ed Conway and Beth Rigby: Was that a budget for a May election?

It was a budget of few surprises. As promised, the chancellor cut the rate of National Insurance tax by 2p in every pound but admits the overall tax burden is still higher than it has been in the last 70 years. The cuts have been labelled "Tory con" by Labour, which leaves people paying "more for less".On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by data and economics editor Ed Conway to break down the changes in tax and childcare, and if the chancellor's plan will help the economy.Plus, hear from political editor Beth Rigby about whether the budget can save the Tories from election defeat.Jeremy Hunt has delivered his last spring budget before a general election, hoping to revive the UK economy and his party's hopes of re-election.Producers: Soila Apparicio and Sydney PeadAssistant producer: Iona Brunker Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
06/03/2430m 19s

Council Tax: What could bankruptcy mean for our bills?

For most of us, our council tax bills are going up - with nearly every local authority in the country increasing it by the maximum amount. Nottingham City Council is the latest to declare itself bankrupt and has already approved huge cuts. Today, councillors in Birmingham consider whether to do the same.On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined from Birmingham by Midlands correspondent Becky Cotterill and local campaigner Shuranjeet Singh to look at what's gone wrong in the city and how it's affecting residents. Plus, Jessica Studdert from the thinktank New Local discusses why so many councils are struggling with their finances.Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
05/03/2418m 50s

Budget: Are tax cuts the vote winner they seem?

As the country gears up for the general election, Wednesday's budget may be the last before the voters go to the polls. Hailed as "a budget to save the Tory party", speculation has been mounting that the chancellor will cut taxes as a last-ditch attempt to boost the Conservatives' plunging support. To afford the move, funding to public services could be slashed - but Jeremy Hunt has insisted any cuts will be done "responsibly". On today's episode, Sophy Ridge looks ahead to the budget. She's joined by deputy political editor Sam Coates and pollster Scarlett Maguire to unpack whether cutting taxes really is the way to a Conservative election win. Producer: Soila Apparicio Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
04/03/2419m 30s

Introducing… Electoral Dysfunction

Today, something different – we're bringing you the first episode of an exciting new podcast from Sky called Electoral Dysfunction.Beth Rigby. Jess Philips. Ruth Davidson.With polls suggesting trust in politicians is low, three political powerhouses unite to unravel the spin and explain what’s really going on in Westminster and beyond.Every week, they will examine our political leaders and their policies – how they’re written, and how they’re sold to voters – as we prepare for a general election. With so much at stake, they will work out which politicians are coming out on top and who is having an Electoral Dysfunction – and what it all actually means for you.Here's the first epsiode. For more, follow Electoral Dysfunction now wherever you listen to podcasts.Warning: some explicit language.
01/03/2450m 36s

Putin's nuclear threat as Baltic states bolster their armies

In a national address, Russian President Vladimir Putin has threatened to use nuclear weapons if NATO countries were to join a ground offensive in Ukraine.The suggestion of NATO forces was made by France's President Emmanuel Macron but quickly dismissed by the US, Britain, and Germany.However, it comes amid calls to show more strength against the Kremlin from Baltic leaders, as Russian troops ramp up military operations along land and sea borders in the region.Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are now bolstering their civilian armies and have urged other NATO countries, including the UK, to do the same. Today on the Daily, Anna Jones speaks to Sky's international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn to unpack what Mr Putin said in his latest speech. She also speaks to security and defence editor Deborah Haynes about how Russia's neighbours are readying themselves for battle. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast Producer: Sydney Pead Assistant producer: Evan Dale Podcast promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
29/02/2420m 36s

Inside Ecuador's crackdown on drug cartels

Ecuador has become the deadliest country in South America with drug gangs and their Mexican cartel bosses murdering people, detonating car bombs and terrorising communities. The violence exploded earlier this year with gangs promising insurrection after the president of Ecuador put in place a nationwide crackdown following the escape of a drug lord from prison, and armed attack on a TV station. On this edition of Sky News Daily, Tom Cheshire speaks to our chief correspondent Stuart Ramsay, who has had rare access to a prison in the coastal city of Esmeraldas, as the government tries to get a handle on the violence that's taken over Ecuador. Producer: Sydney Pead Assistant producers: Iona Brunker, Evan Dale Promotion Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
28/02/2421m 14s

'Bombshell revelations' at Post Office scandal hearing... What's the truth?

It's been years since the extent of the Post Office Horizon scandal became clear - but hundreds of sub-postmasters, who were falsely convicted of fraud or financially crippled in the process, are still waiting for financial redress.Today, key players in the scandal - including former sub-postmaster Alan Bates and recently ousted chairman Henry Staunton - gave evidence to MPs about the government's compensation scheme - and why it's taken so long to pay it.But proceedings were somewhat overshadowed by an unexpected revelation by Mr Staunton. When asked about the investigation into his behaviour while at the Post Office, he claimed the main investigation was actually into current CEO Nick Read.On the Sky News Daily, Sophy Ridge is joined by business correspondent Paul Kelso to discuss the drama unfolding at the Post Office, and Labour MP Ian Lavery who's on the committee looking into the major miscarriage of justice. Producers: Alex Edden, Sydney PeadAssistant producers: Iona Brunker, Evan DalePromotion Producer: David ChipakupakuSenior producer: Annie JoyceEditor: Wendy Parker
27/02/2421m 53s

'Words matter' - Lee Anderson, heightened tension and MPs' safety

The former Tory deputy chair, Lee Anderson, has refused to apologise for comments that saw him suspended from the party.He said he believed "Islamists" had "got control" of London's mayor Sadiq Khan - a remark Prime Minister Rishi Sunak called "unacceptable".But Mr Anderson isn't the only politician stoking racial divides, with Azhar Ali standing in this week's Rochdale by-election despite making antisemitic remarks that cost him Labour's backing.The tensions have left many MPs fearing for their personal safety as security has had to be ramped up for several of them.On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Jonathan Samuels speaks to deputy political editor Sam Coates about the toxicity in politics.Plus, Anna Firth, the Conservative MP for Southend West - where the late MP Sir David Amess was killed by an Islamic State sympathiser - describes what it's like to be a member of parliament in the current political climate.Producer: Alex Edden Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Editor: Wendy ParkerPromotion producer: David Chipakupaku
26/02/2419m 0s

Two years on since Russia's invasion but Ukraine is still in the fight

Two years on from Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the war is largely at a stalemate but President Volodymyr Zelenskyy's troops face acute shortages of ammunition.Ukraine's cities still come under regular Russian bombardment, thousands of lives have been lost and many more displaced across Europe. Around 300,000 Ukrainians have applied for visas to come to the UK alone. Many more are in Poland and Germany. Tom Cheshire speaks to international correspondent John Sparks in Kharkiv about what life is like on the ground in Ukraine now and how Ukrainians are ready to continue the fight for their country. And we hear from Anfisa Vlasova who fled Kharkiv after the invasion to come to the UK on what life has been like here and how she and her fellow Ukrainian refugees feel about returning to their homeland. Senior producer: Annie Joyce Assistant producer: Iona BrunkerPromotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
23/02/2418m 8s

Commotion and a no confidence motion: What damage has the Commons Gaza row done?

The third largest party in the House of Commons, the SNP, says it doesn't have confidence in its Speaker, Lindsay Hoyle. The Speaker himself says he took decisions about how MPs debated and voted on calls for a ceasefire in Gaza because he wanted as broad a discussion as possible. He's apologised but said the safety of MPs on such a divisive issue was also on his mind. With thousands dead in Gaza and war continuing, the optics of MPs rowing about Commons procedure - rather than debating important international issues - have not sat well with everyone. Niall Paterson speaks to Dr Hannah White from the Institute for Government about why she thinks it's another example supporting the case for parliamentary reform. Conservative MP Tobias Ellwood describes it as his "worst day in Parliament". He recently had dozens of anti-Israel protesters gather outside his home. And chief political correspondent Jon Craig picks over how the chamber moves on from this - and whether Lindsay Hoyle will stay in his job. Producers: Soila Apparicio, Alex Edden Assistant producer: Evan Dale Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Editor: Paul Stanworth
22/02/2426m 14s

The Post Office scandal - more trouble on the Horizon?

The former chair of the Post Office, Henry Staunton, who was dismissed last month, claims he was told by a top civil servant to "hobble into the election" and delay payouts to sub-postmasters, in a newly released memo. But Business Secretary Kemi Badenoch told MPs there's "no evidence whatsoever that this is true", and called his allegations "a disgrace". The row comes as only 5% of sub-postmaster claimants have received compensation for the Horizon IT scandal so far.Late on Wednesday evening, the government published a letter from Sarah Munby, the former permanent secretary to Kemi Badenoch, responding to claims in The Times that government officials told Mr Staunton to stall on compensation payments to wronged postmasters. The letter stated: "It is not true that I made any instruction, either explicitly or implicitly, to Mr Staunton to in anyway delay compensation payments. I did not."On this edition of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Labour MP and chair of the Business and Trade Committee, Liam Byrne, who says it's now his job at next Tuesday's committee to "flush out who is telling the truth".Plus, our deputy political editor Sam Coates discusses the fallout from the row. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Assistant producer: Evan Dale Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
21/02/2424m 19s

Hacking the hackers: How cyber gang Lockbit was 'locked out'

One of the world's most prolific cyber crime gangs has been taken down by law enforcement agencies including the FBI, Europol and the UK's National Crime Agency.Lockbit is an extortion website that held its victims' data for ransom - some of the biggest UK bodies affected were the Royal Mail and the NHS.Five Russians have been charged by US authorities and dozens of crypto accounts frozen.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by science and technology editor Tom Clarke and crime correspondent Martin Brunt to discuss what Lockbit is, Operation Cronos and what this means for other cyber gangs.Senior podcast producer: Annie JoycePromotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa JohnEditor: Wendy Parker
20/02/2418m 13s

Did Russian opposition die with Alexei Navalny?

Hundreds of Russians have been detained at memorials to opposition politician Alexei Navalny. Navalny's mother and lawyers have been denied access to his body and authorities have not confirmed its exact whereabouts. Host Adam Parsons is joined by Sky News' Moscow correspondent, Diana Magnay, who has followed Navalny's journey for much of the past decade. She describes what’s happening in Russia, Navalny's legacy and the mood as people continue to pay their respects at makeshift memorials across the country. Adam also hears from Ekaterina Schulmann, a Russian political scientist in exile who has been marked as a foreign agent by Putin's government. Plus, Dr Maxim Alyukov, a political sociologist at King's College London, talks about the upcoming Russian election.Podcast Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Alex Edden Assistant Producer: Evan Dale Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
19/02/2417m 50s

Russian opponent Alexei Navalny dies... and analysing Labour's double by-election win

Alexei Navalny, the most prominent critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has died in jail. Barred in 2018 from running in elections, he remained Mr Putin's most powerful political opponent. He survived a novichok poisoning, after being treated in Germany. But still he chose to return to Russia knowing he would be arrested. He was just 47 when he died while serving a 19-year sentence on charges of extremism in a prison near the Arctic circle. Today on Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto speaks with our Moscow correspondent Diana Magnay about Mr Navalny's life and how his death will have an impact on his supporters in Russia. We'll also unpack Labour's win in two by-elections overnight with our political correspondent Rob Powell who is in Wellingborough, and what the results could mean for the next general election.Producers: Soila Apparicio, Sydney Pead Assistant Producer: Evan Dale Editor: Wendy Parker
16/02/2419m 36s

Technically it’s a recession, but what’s actually changed? With Ed Conway

Sky News’ economics and data editor Ed Conway looks at the implications of Britain entering recession on this episode. Although the two quarters of negative growth is a fairly arbitrary definition and could be revised, Ed tells host Greg Milam why the GDP per head figures is the one which could tell us more. They also discuss the political implications for Rishi Sunak who’d made growing the economy one of his big five pledges. Plus, Manchester restaurant owner Karina Jadhav on what recession means for her business. Producer: Alex Edden Assistant producers: Evan Dale, Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotions producer: Jonathan Day Editor: Paul Stanworth
15/02/2420m 56s

Can Starmer ever really deliver on his antisemitism promise?

In his early weeks as Labour leader, Sir Keir Starmer said: “It was very important to me to seek to address the disgrace of antisemitism in our party as soon as possible.” Almost four years on, and months out from a general election, he’s facing a new row about the extent of antisemitism within Labour. Three of his party’s politicians, including two who were standing for parliament, are now linked to a meeting of activists where it’s claimed antisemitic remarks were made. On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Alex Hearn, director of Labour Against Antisemitism, who says this week has been embarrassing for the Labour leader – who put tackling antisemitism at the centre of his political strategy. Plus, our political correspondent Serena Barker-Singh looks at how the party is trying to show its diligence in picking parliamentary candidates.A full list of the candidates standing in the Rochdale by-election can be found here. This episode contains strong language. Producers: Soila Apparicio, Alex EddenInterviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotions producer: Jonathan Day Editor: Paul Stanworth
14/02/2423m 27s

Has Starmer been ‘decisive’ over Rochdale.. and the battle for The Body Shop

Labour is no longer backing a candidate in the Rochdale by-election. Party spokespeople had been out to bat for local councillor Azhar Ali up until Monday afternoon - saying his comments about the Hamas attacks on Israel were informed by an online conspiracy theory and "didn't represent his view". By Monday evening, the full recording of his comments came to light - and Labour backtracked, saying he'd be on the ballot paper but no longer had its support. Sky's chief political correspondent Jon Craig reckons it's Sir Keir Starmer's "biggest crisis yet" - he joins Leah Boleto to explain why.And Leah speaks to marketing expert Catherine Shuttleworth about The Body Shop entering administration. They explore where it went wrong for the chain – and there's a bit of reminiscing about white musk and dewberry oil too. A full list of the candidates standing in the Rochdale byelection can be found here.Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Alex EddenAssistant Producer: Iona BrunkerPromotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Paul Stanworth
13/02/2420m 13s

Israel-Hamas war: Will Netanyahu pause the offensive on Rafah?

The UK says Israel should "stop and think seriously", the US wants to see a credible plan for civilians - but Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu insists an offensive in Rafah is needed to defeat Hamas.As Israel rescued two hostages in the southern city, dozens were killed in the airstrikes that accompanied the operation.There are now more than a million people in the city - with the UN agency for Palestinian refugees saying conditions are getting worse.So can Israel be convinced to pause any ground offensive?On this Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto speaks to our correspondent in Jerusalem, Diana Magnay, and defence and security analyst Professor Michael Clarke.Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
12/02/2420m 57s

WEEKEND DAILY: Work until you're 71? What's the alternative?

A new report has suggested the state retirement age may need to rise to 71 to maintain the number of people who financially support the pension system - and it adds that it might need to happen as soon as 2040. On this Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson explores what effect this would have with pensions expert and Conservative peer, Baroness Ros Altmann. Plus, economist and co-author of The 100-Year Life, Andrew Scott, discusses why our outlook on retirement might need to change sooner than we think. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Alex Edden Assistant producer: Iona BrunkerPromotion producer: Jonathan DayEditor: Wendy Parker
10/02/2417m 55s

Biden: 'My memory is fine' - what's just changed for the presidential election?

Joe Biden couldn't remember when he was vice president, according to a new report. And, according to the same investigation, he couldn't remember when his son died. Then, when trying to reassure everyone about the claims about his memory, he confused the presidents of Mexico and Egypt. Not ideal for someone who wants to run for president - and even worse for someone already doing the job. So what has the speculation done for his election chances this year - and for those of his rival, Donald Trump? Yalda Hakim presents this Sky News Daily with political strategist Hilary Rosen and pollster Scarlett Maguire. Senior podcast producer: Annie JoycePodcast producer: Alex Edden Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Editor: Wendy Parker
09/02/2421m 19s

Labour's climate climbdown - how damaging is it?

After weeks of confusion, Sir Keir Starmer has finally announced a row back in Labour's pledge to spend £28bn a year on its flagship green prosperity plan. While the policy will not be completely scrapped, the climbdown comes in the form of the party's spending commitments. The party says the £28bn target will be dropped due to uncertain public finances, and comes a week after Labour's shadow chancellor Rachel Reeves refused to commit to the green spending target ten times, in an interview with Sky's Beth Rigby. On Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson explores this latest backtrack with our deputy political editor Sam Coates and our science and technology editor Tom Clarke. Podcast producers: Sydney Pead and Alex Edden Assistant producer: Evan Dale Editor: Wendy Parker
08/02/2419m 48s

Rishi Sunak's transgender jibe dominates PMQs

Chants of 'shame' were heard during Prime Minister's Questions today, after Rishi Sunak made a cutting remark about trans-rights aimed towards Labour leader, Sir Keir Starmer. The mother of Brianna Ghey was in Parliament today - just days after her daughter's killers were sentenced.Niall Paterson speaks to our political correspondent, Amanda Akass, about the prime minister's comments and the backlash. Also - should the government pay compensation to the thousands of victims who suffered injuries from pelvic mesh implants and the epilepsy drug, Valproate?It follows a new report calling on the government to urgently set up a financial package worth half a billion pounds, after Sky News reported regulators knew of the effects of Valproate since the 1970s but failed to disclose them to patients.Our home editor, Jason Farrell, looks at the prospects the victims have of receiving compensation, and the damage caused by the scandal. Podcast producers: Alex Edden and Sydney Pead Assistant producer: Evan Dale Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotions Producer: Jonathan Day Editor: Paul Stanworth
07/02/2423m 44s

The King and cancer: What's the experience of the thousands diagnosed each day?

In Buckingham Palace’s statement about the King’s cancer diagnosis, it said: “His Majesty has chosen to share his diagnosis to prevent speculation and in the hope it may assist public understanding for all those around the world who are affected by cancer.” Britain still lags behind comparable countries when it comes to improving cancer survival rates. So what’s a more typical NHS experience for the almost 400,000 cases diagnosed each year – including the wait between diagnosis and treatment. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson explores the issue with our data and forensics correspondent, Tom Cheshire, and Dr Katharine Halliday, president of The Royal College of Radiologists. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Assistant producers: Evan Dale and Iona Brunker Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
06/02/2419m 21s

King Charles has cancer: What we know so far

Buckingham Palace has revealed King Charles has been diagnosed with a form of cancer. While it's not been revealed what type he's being treated for, we know it's not prostate cancer. The announcement marks a big shift in how much the public is being told about a British monarch's health. On this special episode of the Sky News Daily, Mark Austin takes a closer look at what we know so far, its significance and what might happen next with our royal correspondent, Rhiannon Mills and Sky's royal commentator, Alistair Bruce. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Assistant podcast producer: Evan Dale Editor: Dave Terris
05/02/2413m 8s

‘In touching distance’: Is a united Ireland now a realistic prospect?

Two years after power-sharing collapsed in Northern Ireland, Stormont is back in business with Sinn Fein’s Michelle O’Neill becoming its first nationalist First Minister. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak met leaders of the new restored devolved government, asking them to focus on day-to-day issues rather than the issue of Irish unity. On the Sky News Daily, Jonathan Samuels looks at how much closer we could be to a united Ireland. He’s joined by our senior Ireland correspondent David Blevins to explain the significance of Michelle O’Neill’s historic appointment, while Deirdre Heenan, professor of social policy at Ulster University, and Brian Feeney, historian and political columnist with the Irish News, explore the reunification debate. Podcast producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Junior podcast producer: Evan DaleInterviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Wendy Parker
05/02/2422m 45s

Brianna Ghey's murderers: Should children who kill be named?

The names of two teenagers who murdered 16-year-old schoolgirl Brianna Ghey have been revealed for the first time just hours before they were sentenced. Sixteen-year-olds Scarlett Jenkinson and Eddie Ratcliffe, who were both 15 at the time of the attack in Warrington, Cheshire, last February, were told they will spend a minimum of 22 and 20 years in prison respectively. Under-18s are not usually named in the UK criminal justice system for welfare reasons but judges can make exceptions if they think it is in the public interest. This case has reignited the debate over whether children who kill should ever be named.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson explores the issue with Laura O’Brien, who represents children and young adults at Hodge Jones and Allen Solicitors, and David James Smith, author of The Sleep of Reason: The James Bulger Case. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
02/02/2420m 53s

Is business loving Labour?

Labour’s Rachel Reeves wants to be the next chancellor. She’s used an event in London to try to convince hundreds of business leaders that her party is the best option for the British economy. The shadow chancellor said she’d cap corporation tax at 25% for five years if she’s the one moving into 11 Downing Street. But when asked by Sky News if Labour will drop plans to spend £28bn a year on green energy, she wasn’t so committed. On the Sky News Daily, Sophy Ridge sits in for Niall Paterson to discuss if Labour is convincing business with its message. She’s joined by economics and data editor Ed Conway. Plus, Paul Drechsler, president of the Society of Chemical Industry (SCI) - and both a former CBI president and ex-prime minister David Cameron's 'skills tsar' - to find out why he believes that Labour is "winning" the economic argument. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
01/02/2420m 8s

WhatsApp'ened with Nicola Sturgeon at the COVID Inquiry?

Former First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has told the COVID Inquiry: "I was the first minister when the pandemic struck and part of me wishes I hadn't been.” She denied that she used platforms including WhatsApp to have serious policy discussions. She said she'd deleted messages but relevant information was all on public records. On this Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson goes through her answers with Scotland correspondent Connor Gillies. They also talk about whether the pandemic claims have damaged her leadership legacy. Plus, with claims of key Tory cabinet names being part of an "Evil Plotters" WhatsApp group this week - our deputy political editor Sam Coates on the impact WhatsApp messages are having on politics. Producers: Soila Apparicio and Alex Edden Assistant producer: Iona Brunker Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
31/01/2423m 57s

Northern Ireland, cheese and fish: Why it's an important week in life after Brexit

After nearly two years of political deadlock in Northern Ireland, the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) agreed a deal on Monday to restore power sharing to the country, which will be subject to legislation by the UK government. The DUP walked out over post-Brexit trade arrangements that created trade barriers between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. There's been a big impact on public services and a new power sharing government is being promised over £3bn to spend on them. And new post Brexit border controls coming in from 31 January could result higher prices and delays in fresh goods coming in from the EU. On the Sky News Daily with Niall Paterson, our senior Ireland correspondent David Blevins takes us through the significance of the DUP’s agreement. Plus, our business correspondent Paul Kelso explains the latest warnings on trade with Patricia Michelson, founder of London cheese chain La Fromagerie which has been importing artisan cheese from Europe for 40 years. Producer: Emma Rae WoodhouseSenior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-CharlesPromotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
30/01/2421m 28s

Patient 11 | Locked-up and drugged

Something a little different today from the Sky News podcast team: episode 1 of Patient 11, a new investigation from Sky News and the Independent.Young mother and former GB youth swimmer, Alexis Quinn, agrees to enter NHS England psychiatric care following a family tragedy. She could never imagine that her three-day admission will turn into a three-year ordeal. Then undiagnosed with autism, and often the subject of 24-hour surveillance as well as long periods in solitary confinement, Alexis descends to the darkest reaches of locked-in, psychiatric care. There, she encounters the kind of threat she never could have imagined in a secure mental health hospital. In a bid to break free, Alexis plots a daring escape. Making it back to her daughter, however, will pit her against some of the most powerful institutions in the State, including the police.This episode contains discussions about sexual assault. Narrated by Nicholas Pinnock (Top Boy, Django, For Life). To hear all episodes now, follow Patient 11 on your favourite podcast player.
29/01/2419m 43s

Israel-Hamas war: How much pressure is Benjamin Netanyahu under?

Benjamin Netanyahu is Israel’s longest serving prime minister but also one of the most divisive figures in Israeli politics. He was facing huge protests from Israelis against his government long before the October 7 terrorist attacks, and now he is under growing pressure from both inside Israel and from his international allies over his Gaza strategy. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson takes a closer look at the man himself, how he has managed to survive so long at the forefront of Israeli politics and whether Gaza could change that. Niall’s joined by our Middle East correspondent Alistair Bunkall as they discuss Netanyahu’s unpopularity, his record and stance on a two-state solution. Plus, Israeli political analyst Daliah Scheindlin on how long she thinks Israel’s PM can maintain his grip on power. Podcast producer: Sydney Pead Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Promotion producer: Jonathan Day Editor: Wendy Parker
26/01/2421m 7s

Nottingham attacks: Why so many missed chances to stop Valdo Calocane?

The man who killed three people, and injured three others, has been sentenced to detention in a high-security hospital – with the judge saying he'll probably remain there for the rest of his life. Valdo Calocane fatally stabbed 19-year-olds Barnaby Webber and Grace O'Malley-Kumar and school caretaker Ian Coates in Nottingham in June last year. Speaking outside court, relatives of the victims criticised police, prosecutors and the NHS – saying they felt "let down" as Calocane’s mental health issues were widely known. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson looks at what more could have been done to prevent the killings as he's joined by our communities correspondent Becky Johnson and Lisa Townsend, who is Conservative Police and Crime Commissioner for Surrey and mental health lead for the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners.Since recording this episode, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust said the organisation had "robustly" reviewed its care of Calocane between May 2020 and September 2020. It added that it will continue to work with the police and health services to learn lessons. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion producer: Jonathan Day Editor: Paul Stanworth
25/01/2422m 48s

Could Brits really be called up to serve in the army?

The head of the British Army has said we should "train and equip" a "citizen army" to prepare the country for any potential land war.The comments from General Sir Patrick Sanders, who stands down as chief of the general staff in six months, are being seen as a warning that British men and women could be called up to the armed forces if NATO was to go to war with Russia.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson gets reaction from former defence secretary Sir Michael Fallon and Sky's defence analyst Professor Michael Clarke as they examine the UK's military preparedness.Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Sydney PeadInterviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion producer: Jonathan Day Editor: Paul Stanworth
24/01/2423m 26s

Houthi strikes: Does Britain have an endgame?

A second major wave of airstrikes has been carried out by American and British forces on Houthi targets in Yemen in response to the group's attacks on merchant ships in the Red Sea. The first round of strikes did not deter the Houthis from continuing to attack shipping and the prime minister was pushed in the House of Commons today on what Britain's long-term strategy would be if the Houthis keep up their attacks. On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by military analyst Michael Clarke and Sky's international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn to analyse the latest decisions made in the conflict. Plus, Sky's deputy political editor Sam Coates discusses the politics behind the strikes and what the endgame looks like on home soil. Producer: Alex EddenEditor: Wendy Parker
23/01/2420m 52s

Whistleblower: Police still failing child sex abuse victims

Throughout the 2000s, serious allegations of child sex abuse became known to Greater Manchester Police. Girls as young as 11 were identified as potential victims. An independent review covering a period between 2004 and 2013, which was published last week, detailed multiple failed investigations by police and an apparent indifference to the safety of the young girls identified as possible victims. Now, one anonymous whistleblower who resigned from GMP last year says the force has not changed and that failures have left a paedophile ring at large for at least seven years. On the Sky News Daily, presenter Anna Jones is joined by our home editor Jason Farrell who has spoken to the anonymous former detective constable. Plus, ex-GMP detective constable Maggie Oliver, who blew the whistle on the poor handling of the Rochdale child sex abuse ring case by the force years ago, reacts to the new accusations. Producers: Soila Apparicio and Alex Edden Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
22/01/2418m 32s

Does it matter how young or old our politicians are?

Former prime minister Gordon Brown told Sky News he was too old to be a politician in the UK but too young to be one in the US. He has a point, with Americans set to choose between 81-year-old Joe Biden or 77-year-old Donald Trump in November's presidential election, while here in Europe, France's new prime minister is 34-year-old Gabriel Attal. On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson explores whether there is a perfect age for our politicians. He talks to Labour's Harriet Harman, who is the longest-serving woman MP and 'Mother of the House of Commons'. The 73-year-old representative for Camberwell and Peckham has been an MP for more than 40 years. Niall also speaks to Amy Callaghan, SNP MP for East Dunbartonshire, who was elected in 2019 aged 27. They discuss what makes a good MP, the challenges women MPs face when elected, and if age in politics is just a number. Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
19/01/2420m 32s

What's going on with asylum hotels?

The Home Office says it has closed 50 hotels to asylum seekers - something it had pledged to do by the end of this month with a promise to house them in cheaper types of accommodation like the Bibby Stockholm barge. But Sky News has found that asylum seekers are simply being taken from taxpayer-funded hotels and moved to other hotels. Our reporters have seen taxis full of migrants leaving one hotel only to arrive at another 70 miles away. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to our communities correspondent Becky Johnson and her producer Nick Stylianou who have been investigating. Plus, deputy political editor Sam Coates analyses Rishi Sunak's morning news conference to journalists, after seeing off a Tory rebellion over his Rwanda bill on Wednesday. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Alex Edden Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editors: Philly Beaumont and Dave Terris
18/01/2420m 25s

Sunak’s rebellion extinguished

Rishi Sunak has faced the toughest test of his premiership as MPs voted to save the government's Rwanda policy. The measures aimed at tackling the small boats crisis form the core of Mr Sunak's election strategy.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson looks at the fallout of the vote with our deputy political editor Sam Coates, as they discuss what it means for the prime minister's political future. Podcast producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
17/01/2419m 45s

Mr Bates Vs the Post Office – what Fujitsu told MPs

The man who has led fellow former sub postmasters in their campaign to overturn wrongful convictions, Alan Bates, was among those giving evidence to MPs today. The bosses of the Post Office and Fujitsu also faced the committee for the first time with the Post Office chief executive, Nick Read, admitting that it was possible that money paid by victims of the Horizon IT scandal may have been paid to Post Office executives.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson looks at what else we learned from the exchanges, as he is joined by journalist Nick Wallis, who wrote the book The Great Post Office Scandal, and Seema Misra, a former post office operator who was cleared of theft from the Post Office after being convicted and jailed in 2010.Podcast producer: Alex Edden Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
16/01/2418m 56s

Is Iran the world’s biggest threat?

Iran is a key player in the Middle East – the country supports extremist Islamic groups across the region, notably the Houthis in Yemen, and Hezbollah in Lebanon. Following UK airstrikes on Houthi rebels in Yemen last week, defence secretary Grant Shapps on Monday gave a major speech on his vision for UK defence, when he said the government would "consider" further action against the group in the Red Sea if needed. On this edition of the Sky News Daily, lead politics presenter Sophy Ridge looks into Iran's position as allies of the group - and the country's play for power in the Middle East. Sophy is joined by Rob Macaire, former Ambassador to the Islamic Republic of Iran from April 2018 to July 2021. Plus, more analysis from defence and security analyst Professor Michael Clarke. Producer: Soila Apparicio Editor: Philly Beaumont
15/01/2419m 3s

Houthi Strikes: all you need to know with Yalda Hakim, Alex Crawford and Deborah Haynes

In this episode, Sky News' new international presenter Yalda Hakim gets time with defence and security editor Deborah Haynes and special correspondent Alex Crawford to talk about the airstrikes on Houthis in Yemen - why they happened, how they happened and what could happen next. Alex has covered Yemen for years and has interviewed Houthi leaders. Deborah says the action is a "high-risk balancing act". Her analysis is it "could yet trigger a regional war". :: Our new primetime foreign affairs show, The World with Yalda Hakim, launches on Sky News on 22 January, airing Monday to Thursday from 9-10pm. Producer: Alex Edden Promotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
12/01/2421m 20s

The world’s biggest election year: Why does Taiwan matter?

Nearly half of the world’s population could vote in elections in 2024 – but some are more important than others when it comes to global security. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson talks to Sky’s Asia correspondent Helen-Ann Smith as Taiwan goes to the polls this weekend, to find out why China and others will be watching closely. Plus, our deputy political editor Sam Coates and US correspondent Mark Stone join Niall to look at the importance of other key elections taking place this year, including in the UK and America. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-CharlesPromotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
11/01/2426m 18s

'Why did we have to wait for a TV drama?': Post Office convictions quashed

Rishi Sunak's promised a new law to exonerate and compensate Post Office branch managers who were wrongly prosecuted in the Horizon IT scandal. But those seeking payouts will have to sign a statement of truth to say they didn't commit the crimes they were accused of. Lee Castleton - who was played by Will Mellor in ITV's drama about their plight - is back on the Sky News Daily with his reaction as he talks to Niall Paterson about the government's response alongside Bryan Glick, editor of Computer Weekly, which first exposed the story in 2009. Plus, Niall looks at what's happening in Ecuador after armed men stormed a TV station while it was on air. Joining him to talk about the drugs gangs that have declared war on the country's leaders is Dr Christopher Sabatini, a senior research fellow for Latin America at Chatham House and a senior professor of practice at the London School of Economics' School of Public Policy.On the Horizon scandal, the Post Office said: "We're continuing to make interim payments in other cases. We fully share the aims of the current public inquiry, set up to establish what went wrong in the past, and the accountability for it." Fujitsu said: “Fujitsu is fully committed to supporting the Inquiry in order to understand what happened and to learn from it. Out of respect for the Inquiry process, it would be inappropriate for Fujitsu to comment further at this time.” Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotions producer: Jonathan Day Senior producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
10/01/2422m 36s

Boeing’s loose bolts: How much trouble is the company in?

United Airlines has found loose bolts on plug doors on Boeing 737-9 Max aircrafts during inspections. These checks follow the Federal Aviation Administration's announcement that all 171 Boeing 737-9 Max aircraft will remain grounded after a window and fuselage parts blew out of an Alaska Airlines passenger plane in mid-air. On the Sky News Daily with Niall Paterson, Flight Radar 24’s director of communications and AvTalk host Ian Petchenik explores the Alaska Airlines incident and what it means for Boeing. Plus, recent polling suggested that one in three parents believe the COVID pandemic showed that children do not need to go to school every day. Both the government and Labour have announced plans to tackle school the rising problem of absenteeism. James Royal, Head Teacher of Blackrod Church School in Bolton and Keziah Featherstone, executive head of Q3 Academy Tipton join Niall to chat about what the best solutions to the problem are. Producer: Alex Edden Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Editor: Wendy Parker
09/01/2421m 56s

Post Office scandal: The victim, the journalist and the politician on what should happen next

More than 700 sub-postmasters were prosecuted between 1999 and 2015 in what's been deemed the biggest miscarriage of justice in British legal history. They were accused of theft, fraud and false accounting due to a faulty software system called Horizon. Many lost jobs, homes, faced court battles and some took their own lives. So far, fewer than 100 have had their convictions quashed. In 2023 an independent inquiry began, and the Horizon scandal story has been serialized in a TV drama on ITV, boosting renewed interest in their fight for justice. On the Sky New Daily, host Jonathan Samuels hears from three people who were portrayed in the ITV drama 'Mr Bates vs The Post Office', including former sub-postmaster Lee Castleton who had - within a year of owning his east Yorkshire post office - a computer system which showed around £25,000 in discrepancies. He was made to repay the money and pay costs of £321,000, which ended up bankrupting him. Jonathan also speaks to Lord James Arbuthnot, who has supported victims of the Horizon scandal in seeking justice, and journalist Rebecca Thomson who first reported on the scandal in 2009 writing for Computer Weekly magazine. Senior podcast producer: Annie JoycePodcast producer: Soila Apparicio Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
08/01/2422m 39s

How to fix the NHS: Public health

Sarah-Jane Mee is joined by Sir David Nicholson, who used to run the NHS in England, as they explore ‘How to fix the NHS’ - a new mini podcast series for 2024 from the Sky News Daily. On this week’s final episode, Sarah-Jane and Sir David look at the work going on in public health – which spans everything from preventing disease to giving people the tools and information to make healthier lifestyle choices. They’re joined by Greg Fell, who’s director of public health in Sheffield and chair of the Association of Directors of Public Health, as they discuss areas including the ‘nanny state’ debate around tobacco and calories on menus, and why he thinks primary care provision needs some “bravery”. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Health producer: Mark Thompson Editor: Paul Stanworth
05/01/2418m 56s

How to fix the NHS: Mental health

Sarah-Jane Mee is joined by Sir David Nicholson, who used to run the NHS in England, as they explore ‘How to fix the NHS’ - a new mini podcast series for 2024 from the Sky News Daily. This time, Sarah-Jane and Sir David tackle the issue of mental health and a growing demand on services – particularly among children. Before the pandemic, one in nine children needed help with their mental health but now, one in six are trying to access services. They’re joined by Dr Sarah Hughes, CEO of the charity Mind, discuss why they believe “it’s not about throwing money at the crisis end of the spectrum” - and how early intervention could provide more significant results. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Health producer: Mark Thompson Editor: Paul Stanworth
04/01/2421m 13s

How to fix the NHS: Cancer care

Sarah-Jane Mee is joined by Sir David Nicholson, who used to run the NHS in England, as they explore ‘How to fix the NHS’ - a new mini podcast series for 2024 from the Sky News Daily. This time, Sarah-Jane and Sir David look at the innovations being made in cancer care – including the prospect of a simple blood test which could detect if someone has cells which are turning into cancer. They’re joined by Lord Darzi of Denham, chair of surgery at the Institute of Cancer Research, who explains some of the opportunities which artificial intelligence could bring – particularly around reading mammogram results. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Health producer: Mark Thompson Editor: Paul Stanworth
03/01/2418m 35s

How to fix the NHS: Accident and emergency

Sarah-Jane Mee is joined by Sir David Nicholson, who used to run the NHS in England, as they explore ‘How to fix the NHS’ - a new mini podcast series for 2024 from the Sky News Daily. This episode focuses on the challenges facing accident and emergency departments and more importantly, possible ways to solve some of the issues impacting both staff and patients. To do that, Sarah-Jane and Sir David are joined by Dr Adrian Boyle, who is president of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine and a consultant in emergency medicine. Plus, we hear from paramedic Melissa who gives us a glimpse into life in the job right now. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-CharlesHealth producer: Mark Thompson Editor: Paul Stanworth
02/01/2421m 9s

Introducing... How to fix the NHS

Sir David Nicholson, former chief executive of NHS England, joins Sky’s Sarah-Jane Mee for ‘How to fix the NHS’ - a new mini-series from the Sky News Daily, exploring possible solutions to some of the biggest issues facing the health service. In episodes across the week, experts in emergency medicine, cancer care, mental health and public health offer their thoughts and ideas on how to make it better for everyone – staff, patients and partners. We’ll also hear personal stories from people working on the frontline and those accessing NHS services. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi-CharlesHealth producer: Mark Thompson Editor: Paul Stanworth
01/01/248m 9s

Queen Camilla: For The Love of Charles - Episode Three: The Queen

Motivated by love, Camilla and the then Prince Charles hatched an ambitious plan to win over the public: Operation Ritz. Camilla is no longer the other woman. At the coronation, she will be crowned as a queen. But getting the press, and most importantly Queen Elizabeth II, on her side was not easy.In the final episode of the series, Kay Burley takes a deep dive into the PR campaign that set out to transform Camilla's reputation. The unconventional affair would, of course, become a marriage. Ultimately, it’s the love story of a new King and Queen. For more from Queen Camilla: For The Love Of Charles, listen to the full series here.Presenter: Kay Burley Producer: Soila Apparicio Assistant Producers: Alex Edden and Lily Thomas Sound Designer: James Bradshaw Promotion Producer: David Chipakupaku Executive Producer: Rob Mulhern Editor: Paul Stanworth Audio credits: BBC EastEnders CBS Prince Harry The 60 Minutes Interview
30/12/2323m 12s

Queen Camilla: For The Love of Charles - Episode Two: “The Rottweiler”

The scandal brought about by the publication of the taped telephone conversation between Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles, and Charles’s failing marriage to Diana Princess of Wales, split the palace. It was the start of a love and hate divide between Diana and Britain’s new public enemy number one – Camilla – which would dominate the 1990s. In the second episode of this three-part series, Kay Burley explores the complicated love triangle involving Camilla, the future King Charles and Princess Diana. This period of Camilla’s life saw relentless media and public scrutiny, divorce, and a tragedy which attracted global attention.For more from Queen Camilla: For The Love Of Charles, listen to the full series here. Presenter: Kay Burley Producer: Soila Apparicio Assistant Producers: Alex Edden and Lily Thomas Sound Designer: James Bradshaw Promotion Producer: David Chipakupaku Executive Producer: Rob Mulhern Editor: Paul Stanworth Audio credits: ITV Charles: The Private Man, the Public Role
29/12/2320m 9s

Queen Camilla: For The Love of Charles - Episode One: The Tape

In 1989, somewhere in the English countryside, an amateur radio enthusiast stumbled across a private telephone conversation. The call, between the then Prince Charles and his secret lover, Camilla Parker Bowles, was recorded. Its illicit content – once revealed - would change the future of the Royal Family. In the first episode of this three-part series, Kay Burley takes us back to the start of Camilla’s story, as we explore her early years and first meetings with the future King Charles. The episode includes a reconstruction, voiced by actors, of some of the now infamous "Camillagate" tapes.For more from Queen Camilla: For The Love Of Charles, listen to the full series here.Presenter: Kay Burley Producer: Soila Apparicio Assistant Producers: Alex Edden and Lily Thomas Sound Designer: James Bradshaw Promotion Producer: David Chipakupaku Executive Producer: Rob Mulhern Editor: Paul Stanworth Audio credits: BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour ITV Camilla’s Country Life
28/12/2327m 22s

What 2023 has taught us about... the Royal Family

Sky News Daily host Niall Paterson looks back at the stories that defined the Royal Family in 2023 with our royal correspondent Laura Bundock and royal commentator Major-General Alastair Bruce. They discuss the coronation and reflect on the King's first year on the throne. Plus, Harry and Meghan, republican protests, and predictions for 2024. Also in this series, Niall has looked at the year in British politics, the economy, science and technology, and world affairs. Podcast producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotion producers: David Chipakupaku, Sydney Pead, and Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
22/12/2324m 13s

What 2023 has taught us about... science and technology

Sky News Daily host Niall Paterson looks back at the stories that defined science and technology in 2023 with science and technology editor Tom Clarke.They discuss the biggest tech story of the year – the spectacular rise of artificial intelligence.Plus, climate change, the space race, and an important scientific breakthrough.Also in this series, Niall will look at British politics, the economy, world affairs, and the Royal Family.Podcast producer: Alex Edden Promotion producers: David Chipakupaku, Sydney Pead, and Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Paul Stanworth
21/12/2321m 19s

What 2023 has taught us about... the economy

Sky News Daily host Niall Paterson looks back at the major economic, business and political stories of 2023 with our economics and data editor Ed Conway. They discuss whether Prime Minister Rishi Sunak and Chancellor Jeremy Hunt have managed to steady the ship after Liz Truss's disastrous Mini Budget of 2022. Plus the cost of living, the impact of migration, and the global economy. Also in this series, Niall will look at British politics, international affairs, science and tech, and the Royal Family. Podcast producer: Sydney Pead Promotion producers: David Chipakupaku and Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Paul Stanworth
20/12/2321m 51s

What 2023 has taught us about... politics

During the first week of January 2023, as a fairly new prime minister, Rishi Sunak made a speech to outline his top five priorities. As 2023 draws to a close, one of those priorities has started to dominate the Commons – and could become a significant threat to his leadership in 2024. The "stop the boats" policy is one of the big politics stories of the year, which host Niall Paterson picks over with political editor Beth Rigby. They also discuss how Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer has been setting himself up for a general election next year. Also in this series, Niall will look at international affairs, the economy, science and tech, and the Royal Family. Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Promotion producers: David Chipakupaku, Sydney Pead, and Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
19/12/2325m 6s

What 2023 has taught us about... world affairs

Sky News Daily host Niall Paterson looks back at the stories that defined international affairs in 2023 with our international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn, and defence and security analyst Professor Michael Clarke. They dive into the Israel-Hamas war and the defining moment that was October 7th on politics in the region, the movements made by Putin in Russia's war in Ukraine, how US President Biden looks against his likely election competition Donald Trump, and positive movement in China-US diplomacy. Also in this series, Niall will look at British politics, the economy, science and tech, and the Royal Family. Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Promotion producers: David Chipakupaku, Sydney Pead, and Jada-Kai Meosa JohnEditor: Philly Beaumont
18/12/2323m 36s

The billionaire demanding slavery reparations from Britain

An Irish billionaire is calling on the government to make payments to countries of the Caribbean to compensate for the suffering of slavery. Denis O'Brien is the founder of the Repair Campaign, which is working with Caribbean countries to develop reparations plans from Europe. "It is the single biggest issue in the Caribbean for the entire population," he told the Sky News Daily. On this episode, Kamali Melbourne sits down with Mr O'Brien to ask what needs to be done to ensure reparative justice is successful. Plus, Kamali speaks to Dr Angelique Nixon, of the University of the West Indies, about the ongoing impact of the slave trade's legacies on Caribbean communities, and Dr Cassandra Gooptar, from the University of Hull, who shares how she saw British institutions changing their outlook on the legacies of slavery following the Black Live Matter movement. Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer and additional production: Melissa Tutesigensi-Charles Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
17/12/2323m 43s

Prince Harry, phone hacking and the executives who knew

Prince Harry has claimed victory in a landmark court case against one of Britain’s biggest news publishers – the Mirror Group – with a High Court judge finding the company’s practice of phone hacking was “extensive” as well as its use of private investigators to illegally gather information to write stories for its newspapers.Justice Fancourt ruled that 15 out of a selection of 33 stories written about Harry by the paper were obtained through illegal breaches of privacy, and that senior executives at the company “turned a blind eye.” On the Sky News Daily, Sam Washington talks to Sky’s royal correspondent Laura Bundock and media management lawyer Jonathan Coad about what this ruling means for the Prince – as well as the media industry. Producer: Alex EddenInterviews producer: Melissa TutesigensiEditor: Philly Beaumont
15/12/2317m 34s

Ukraine and the US: Solutions to the aid stalemate

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has made his third trip to Washington DC in less than a year on a whistle-stop tour of the US and Europe, pleading his case for more aid, in particular American military aid. But the prospect of success seems increasingly in doubt as the package remains stalled in Congress and is facing pushback from Republicans who are arguing that more money needs to be spent on the US-Mexico border. This is a crucial moment for Ukraine following its failed counteroffensive against Russian forces. On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson talks to Sky's defence and security analyst, Professor Michael Clarke, about the stalemate and what happens next. Producer: Alex Edden Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
14/12/2318m 56s

COP28: Is this 'the beginning of the end' for fossil fuels?

There was a standing ovation as delegates at the COP28 international climate conference agreed an historic deal that included a commitment to transition "away" from fossil fuels. But the language in the deal was not as tough as climate campaigners would have liked, as it stopped short of a promise to phase it out completely. But the mention of fossil fuels itself - and in a host country rich in oil - is a big step forward. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to our science and technology editor Tom Clarke about how successful it has been and how effectively governments might put their climate agreements into practice. Senior podcast producer: Annie JoyceEditor: Philly Beaumont
13/12/2314m 57s

Rishi Sunak wins Rwanda vote. What happens now?

Rishi Sunak’s plan to “stop the boats” by sending some migrants to Rwanda has scraped through the House of Commons. The bill aims to address the issues raised by the Supreme Court, which ruled against the original plans last month. The vote on the bill, which will designate Rwanda as a safe country for asylum seekers, came after intense debate in the Commons which highlighted the deep fractures within the Conservative Party. Today on the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks with our chief political correspondent, Jon Craig, about what this means for the UK’s migration policy, and with the deputy editor of ConservativeHome, Henry Hill, about whether Rishi Sunak will be able to unite the warring Tory factions. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
12/12/2322m 24s

Rwanda and COVID: Rishi Sunak's toughest week yet

The prime minister has given his evidence to the COVID inquiry today, defending his Eat Out to Help Out scheme and telling of fears within the Treasury that the UK would not be able to fund the pandemic response. While at the inquiry, some of Rishi Sunak’s Tory colleagues have called on the PM to scrap his Rwanda bill, as it goes to the Commons tomorrow. On the Sky News Daily, Jonathan Samuels hosts our political editor Beth Rigby, who discusses the difficulties Sunak faces within his party over Rwanda. Plus, our political correspondent Tamara Cohen reports on the PM’s accounts at the COVID inquiry. Producer: Alex Edden Editor: Philly Beaumont
11/12/2320m 51s

Funding the BBC – if not the licence fee then what?

The government has announced that in 2024 the BBC licence fee will rise by £10.50. The fee, which had been frozen at £159 two years ago, was expected to rise in line with inflation but Culture Secretary Lucy Frazer has said the predicted increase of £15 would "absolutely" be too much. The government is also launching a review of the BBC's funding model.The governing body of the BBC has said the below-inflation rise will “have a significant impact on the wider creative sector across the UK”.So what would a new funding model look like, and what does this mean for the future of the BBC?On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson talks to Roger Mosey, former head of BBC Television News, and Alice Enders, director of research at Enders Analysis about what could come next. Producer: Alex Edden Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
08/12/2315m 42s

'Unite or die': Why the Tories can't stop fighting

Rishi Sunak has told Conservatives to "unite or die" over his Rwanda migration bill. The prime minister's plan to send migrants to the African country, where their asylum claims would be processed, is in turmoil following the resignation of immigration minister Robert Jenrick. He stood down after it was revealed the bill did not allow the government to override the international laws that have stopped the policy in its tracks. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson talks to our deputy political editor Sam Coates about the Tories’ infighting and whether they can overcome it. And Guto Harri, former Downing Street director of communications under Boris Johnson, tells Niall about the “insatiable appetite for self-harm” among Conservatives. Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
07/12/2321m 4s

Boris Johnson at the COVID Inquiry: part one

The former prime minister, Boris Johnson, has given almost five hours of evidence to the COVID inquiry today.He began by apologising for the pain and suffering of victims and their families during the pandemic and admitted that "unquestionably" mistakes were made by his government. But the King’s Counsel’s attempt to get square answers from him about vanished WhatsApp messages, the ‘toxic’ culture inside cabinet and the government’s stalled reaction time wasn’t so straight forward.Today, Sky’s political editor Beth Rigby joins Niall Paterson to unpack the first of two days of questioning in the search for answers about Boris Johnson’s leadership during the pandemic. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
06/12/2322m 52s

Will the Tories' latest plans to cut legal migration work?

Home Secretary James Cleverly is having a busy third week in his new job, just as his approval ratings among Tory supporters collapse, according to polling by ConservativeHome. He's announced new rules intended to bring down legal migration to the UK, including raising the salary needed to qualify for a skilled worker visa to £38,700, and overseas care workers will no longer be allowed to bring their partners and children. British people will also no longer be able to bring over their foreign-born spouses unless they earn £38,700. On the Sky News Daily with Niall Paterson, our political editor Beth Rigby and business correspondent Paul Kelso unpick the latest migration announcements. Plus, Nadra Ahmed, executive co-chairman of the National Care Association, joins Niall to discuss the potential impact on the care sector. Podcast producer: Soila ApparicioInterviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Wendy Parker
05/12/2322m 7s

What happens to the families of sex offenders?

Police forces make more than 850 arrests a month for online child sex offences in England and Wales. The majority of suspects are men who can have families living with them at the time of the offence. Thousands of children every year now have to deal with the vicarious shame and stigma that's associated with such a crime. Families have to move, and leave schools and jobs - the trauma of which can cause warzone equivalent post-traumatic stress.On the Sky News Daily, Sarah-Jane Mee speaks to our correspondent Katerina Vittozzi, who has spent time with Lincolnshire Police's paedophile online investigation team, exploring what is being done to support families of offenders. And Sarah-Jane is joined by Heather, not her real name, whose partner was convicted of online child sex offences and has now gone on to campaign for more support for non-offending family members. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Alex Edden Promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
04/12/2319m 33s

Bonus: ClimateCast - COP28: Breakthrough at Dubai climate conference

The King has urged world leaders assembled in Dubai to make the COP28 climate summit a "critical turning point" in the fight to tackle global warming. And there has already been a breakthrough with wealthy nations contributing nearly $300m to a 'loss and damage' fund compensating poorer countries for the effects of climate change. It has taken 32 years to agree so while it is an achievement, the real issue remains cutting fossil fuels. In oil-rich Dubai that is a thorny issue. It and other petrostates are still arguing that the world needs fossil fuels while it transitions to greener energy sources. Climatecast host Tom Heap is in Dubai finding out what COP28 might achieve.For more from CimateCast, click here to subscribe.Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse & Luke Denne Editor: Wendy Parker
02/12/2319m 39s

Israel-Hamas war: What happens now the ceasefire is over?

It took just minutes for Israeli airstrikes to resume on Gaza after a week-long truce between Israel and Hamas ended. Israel's military resumed combat operations after accusing Hamas of violating the temporary ceasefire. Despite an overnight effort from Egypt and Qatar to mediate a third extension of the truce, the deal fell apart with both warring sides blaming each other. Hamas accused Israel of rejecting the group's offers to release more hostages, while Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Hamas did not agree to free them. As the fighting resumes host Sally Lockwood discusses the next phase of the war with Middle East correspondent Alistair Bunkall and speaks to UNICEF spokesperson James Elder about the catastrophic impact continued fighting is having on Gaza's children.Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Sydney Pead Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
01/12/2313m 30s

‘Wish I’d acted earlier’: Matt Hancock’s defence at the COVID inquiry

Matt Hancock took the stand at the COVID inquiry for the first of two days of giving evidence on Thursday. In 2021, the then health secretary was forced to resign after he admitted he broke the government's own coronavirus guidance to pursue an affair with an aide. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson analyses what Mr Hancock said and the key questions he answered, with our political editor Beth Rigby. Producer: Soila Apparicio Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
30/11/2324m 39s

Royal race 'revelation': PR stunt or genuine mistake?

The sale of a new book about the Royal Family has been halted in the Netherlands after publishers of the Dutch translation of Omid Scobie's Endgame appeared to name a member of the Royal Family who allegedly questioned what colour skin the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's son would be born with. In the aftermath of Harry and Meghan's Oprah Winfrey interview in March 2021, where Meghan claimed a member of the family raised "concerns" about Archie's skin colour, Mr Scobie's book claims that Meghan wrote a letter to the King expressing concern about unconscious bias in the Royal Family. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson and our royal correspondent Laura Bundock unpick some of the book's claims and the error behind the book's recall in the Netherlands. Producer: Alex Edden Editor: Philly Beaumont
29/11/2318m 54s

Is war fatigue Ukraine's new enemy?

The world's attention has been turned to the Israel-Hamas conflict, resulting in the war in Ukraine falling further down the news agenda. Not only does this impact keeping pressure on Putin but in Ukraine, momentum for the war is also running low. Independent reporting suggests the country is facing a recruitment crisis, with just 1 in 4 men joining the army voluntarily. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson explores what this means for Ukraine’s defence against Russia with Dr Alexandra Walmsley, defence analyst at RUSI, and Sir David Manning, former UK permanent representative to NATO. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Editor: Wendy Parker
28/11/2320m 28s

The team helping the victims of revenge porn

The Revenge Porn Helpline has seen the number of phone calls it receives rise by nearly a third.It was set up when revenge porn was made a crime in 2015 – and this year alone, has handled more than 10,000 calls or reports online.The team in Devon has allowed our news cameras inside for the first time to see the work they do.On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood speaks to our home news correspondent Dan Whitehead about the scale of the problem, and Sophie Mortimer, Revenge Porn Helpline manager, gives us an insight into what her team is doing to support victims.If you have been a victim of revenge porn, you can contact the helpline on 0345 6000 459 or click here.Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Philly Beaumont
27/11/2322m 38s

Is the COVID inquiry missing the point?

The COVID inquiry is now into its second round of public hearings – examining how key decisions were made in Westminster as the coronavirus began to take hold around the world in early 2020. The evidence from those at the heart of Downing Street has certainly provided plenty of bombshell headlines but does the inquiry need to move quicker to make recommendations on how the country could be better prepared for the next pandemic?There is no specific timescale for how long the inquiry could last and it could be years before its final report is published.On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to our health correspondent Ashish Joshi about the lessons we've learned so far.Plus, what does it take to lead a public inquiry? Hugh Pennington, an emeritus professor of bacteriology at Aberdeen University, chaired a public inquiry about an E. coli outbreak in South Wales. He tells Niall what he makes of the COVID inquiry.Producer: Alex Edden Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
24/11/2320m 11s

‘Curious not furious’: How to negotiate with hostage takers

Qatar has announced key details of the planned pause in fighting and release of Israeli hostages held in Gaza by Hamas. In the first phase of the agreement, Hamas is due to release 50 hostages from Gaza and Israel will free 150 Palestinian prisoners. On today’s episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson sits down with James Alvarez, a hostage negotiator who’s worked in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Gaza itself, to talk about what it takes to negotiate with hostage takers. Plus, we hear from our Middle East correspondent, Alistair Bunkall, about the events that led up to this temporary truce. Producer: Sydney PeadInterviews producer: Melissa TutesigensiPromotions producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Philly Beaumont
23/11/2319m 49s

Autumn statement: What does it mean for you?

Chancellor Jeremy Hunt has revealed his autumn statement. Among the proposals National Insurance is to be cut by two percentage points, and NI payments for the self-employed have been abolished. There have also been increases to Universal Credit and the state pension. But the chancellor also announced new tougher measures for job seekers, saying those who fail to find work after 18 months of "intensive support" will be given mandatory work placements. Those who do not engage with the process for six months will lose their benefits altogether. On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson sits down with Ed Conway, our economics and data editor, and Sam Coates, our deputy political editor, to analyse the chancellor’s statement and what it means. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
22/11/2332m 40s

Nicola Bulley: What did the police get wrong?

Police who investigated the disappearance of Nicola Bulley from beside a riverbank have been heavily criticised in a damning report. Lancashire Police's decision to reveal the mother-of-two's mental health issues was condemned as "avoidable and unnecessary". The College of Policing's chief executive officer Andy Marsh said there was "substantial learning" for the Lancashire force. On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson is joined by former chief constable of Northumbria Police Sue Sim, who was the top officer at the force when gunman Raoul Moat shot his ex-girlfriend and killed her new lover, before shooting a police officer. She explains the criticisms and the difficulties when dealing with high-profile cases. Plus, Martin Brunt, our crime correspondent, details what the report says about Lancashire Police's investigation. Producer: Emma Rae WoodhouseInterview producer: Melissa TutesigensiPromotions producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Philly Beaumont
21/11/2321m 3s

Understanding what's happening at Gaza's al Shifa hospital

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has described al Shifa hospital in Gaza City as a "death zone" - it said there was a mass grave at the entrance and a "desperate situation" inside. A joint UN team led by the WHO assessed the hospital for one hour following its occupation by the Israeli military and as some patients and those seeking shelter there began to evacuate it. The team said they saw evidence of shelling and gunfire and observed a mass grave at the hospital's entrance. On the Sky News Daily, host Sarah-Jane Mee talks to our international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn and OSINT (Open Source Intelligence) editor Adam Parker to understand more about what's happening on the ground at the hospital and the challenges in reporting it. Producer: Emma Rae WoodhousePromotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa JohnEditor: Wendy Parker
20/11/2317m 36s

‘Feels like barbed wire’. Endometriosis: the condition with no cure

Endometriosis is a disease in which tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows outside the uterus, causing pain and affecting fertility. It is estimated to cost the UK economy £8.2bn a year in treatment, loss of work and healthcare costs. Up to 30% of women who have surgery for endometriosis experience a recurrence within five years, according to the National Institutes of Health. There is still no cure for the condition. On the Sky News Daily, host Sally Lockwood is joined by Charline Bou Mansour, a Sky News reporter who has endometriosis, and Andrew Horne, Professor of Gynaecology and Reproductive Sciences at Edinburgh University, to explore the search for a way to relieve, or even cure, endometriosis. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse, Alex Edden and Soila ApparicioPromotions Producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
17/11/2318m 34s

Deported killer: 'I'll help you find your mother's body'

On 29 December 1969, Alick McKay returned home from work to his house in Wimbledon, southwest London, to discover that his wife, Muriel, was not at home. The lights were on and the contents of her handbag strewn all around the stairs. Then he received a phone call. "We are Mafia M3. We are from America. We tried to get Rupert Murdoch's wife. We couldn't get her so we took yours instead. You have a million by Wednesday night or we will kill her." Muriel was never found, her body never recovered. Now, after more than fifty years, the man guilty of Muriel's murder tells her daughter he will lead her family to where her body was buried. In this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson sits down with our crime correspondent Martin Brunt to discuss the extraordinary bond killer Nizamodeen Hosein has formed with Muriel McKay's family in a final attempt to uncover her remains. Producer: Soila Apparicio Podcast promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
16/11/2319m 53s

Rishi, Rwanda, Suella and the Supreme Court: The fallout

The government's Rwanda plan, devised to tackle illegal migration, has been ruled unlawful by the Supreme Court, ending more than 18 months of legal battles in the UK. The prime minister has said he will introduce emergency legislation to make sure his Rwanda plan will work, and said "flights will be heading off in the spring as planned".On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Jayne Secker sits in for Niall. She’s joined by political editor Beth Rigby to unpick the fallout. Plus, Nicolas Rollason, the head of business immigration at Kingsley Napley, digs into the legal aspects of the case, and Madeleine Sumption, director of the Migration Observatory, joins Jayne to discuss the policy implications. Producer: Sydney Pead Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
15/11/2319m 24s

16 housing ministers in 13 years - has it stopped the job getting done?

There have been 16 housing ministers in the last 13 years of Conservative rule – seven of those in the last two years alone.With Lee Rowley taking over the housing brief after the prime minister’s latest reshuffle, on the Sky News Daily we’ll be exploring why there has been so many, and if any of them managed to make a difference to the housing crisis. Presenter Sally Lockwood is joined by Gurpreet Narwan, our political correspondent, on why there has been so much churn. Plus, Sally speaks to Lord Gavin Barwell, who was housing minister for a year under Theresa May, and Polly Neate, CEO of housing charity Shelter explains the challenges facing renters. Sky News Daily contacted the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities for a response to this episode. A spokesperson said:"We recently laid out an ambitious long-term plan for housing that includes speeding up the planning system, cutting bureaucracy, and reducing delays to ensure we deliver the homes that local communities want and need."We are already on track to deliver one million homes this Parliament, and we have announced £10 billion investment to deliver more of the right homes in the right places without concreting over the countryside."Our Renters Reform Bill will deliver a fairer private rented sector, abolishing Section 21 'no fault' evictions so that all tenants have greater security in their homes and are empowered to challenge poor practice without worrying about retaliatory eviction."Producer: Alex Edden Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editors: Wendy Parker and Paul Stanworth
14/11/2320m 10s

Rishi Sunak and David Cameron: Inspiration or desperation?

David Cameron is back in government as the new Foreign Secretary. Whilst many commentators had predicted that Suella Braverman would be sacked as Home Secretary, none predicted that the former Prime Minister would be walking down Downing Street into a new job and a place in the House of Lords. On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood looks over Rishi Sunak’s reshuffle with political editor Beth Rigby.She’s also joined by former Tory MP, and cabinet minister during Mr Cameron's government, Anna Soubry, and deputy editor of Conservative Home, Henry Hill – to analyse if Mr Sunak has laid the foundations for his best chance at election victory – or is looking like a leader who might be out of ideas. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse, Soila Apparicio Interviews Producer: Melissa TutesegensiPromotions Producer: David ChipakupakuEditors: Wendy Parker, Paul Stanworth
13/11/2324m 15s

‘I always felt unsafe’: The alleged abuse at top drama schools

Sky News has spoken to more than 50 people who say they have witnessed or been on the receiving end of sexual misconduct and harassment within leading drama schools across the UK. Students have described their training as being "indoctrinated into this cult-like bubble, and the expectation was to say yes to everything". On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by correspondent Ashna Hurynag, who has been investigating these allegations. She shares more about her reporting, plus intimacy coordinator Robbie Taylor Hunt describes how to properly teach consent and intimacy in acting. This podcast contains descriptions of sexual misconduct and harassment. Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Additional reporting: Luke Engelen Editor: Wendy Parker
10/11/2320m 49s

Has Suella Braverman gone too far this time?

Home Secretary Suella Braverman has come under fire for making controversial statements about Israel-Hamas war protests in the UK. In the Times she described pro-Palestinian protesters as "hate marchers". She also likened the protests to scenes from the past in Northern Ireland, prompting politicians there to accuse her of “deliberately stoking division”. Ms Braverman has also publicly slated the Metropolitan Police, which is allowing a pro-Palestinian march to go ahead on Armistice Day. She said the force was guilty of "double standards" and favouring left-wing protesters over those on the right of politics. So, how do the Conservatives solve a problem like Suella? The Sky New Daily’s Niall Paterson is joined by David Blevins, our senior Ireland correspondent, to find out why her comments haven’t gone down well there. Plus, Sir Peter Fahy, former chief constable of Greater Manchester Police, explains how the home secretary's comments are a serious breach of operational independence. And our deputy political editor Sam Coates looks at the fallout in Downing Street. Producer: Alex EddenInterviews Producer: Melissa TutesigensiPromotions Producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Paul Stanworth
09/11/2320m 54s

Pro-Palestinian protests, poppies, and the police

'Free Palestine' has been painted across Rochdale’s Cenotaph ahead of Remembrance Sunday and is now being guarded by police support officers. It comes as a planned pro-Palestinian protest on Armistice Day in London on Saturday is to go ahead. Met Commissioner Sir Mark Rowley and Prime Minister Rishi Sunak met on Wednesday to discuss how the protest will be policed. Mr Sunak said afterwards: “It is because that sacrifice is so immense, that Saturday’s planned protest is not just disrespectful but offends our heartfelt gratitude to the memory of those who gave so much so that we may live in freedom and peace today."On this episode of the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson explores the balance between protecting the right to protest with Carol Turner, vice-chair for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, one of the protest's organising groups, and respecting war commemorations with Philip Ingram, a former colonel in the British Army, now a security analyst. Plus, Danny Shaw, commentator on policing, crime and justice, joins Niall on the legalities of the protest. Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
08/11/2322m 3s

King’s Speech: Dividing lines for the general election?

The King has set out the government’s policies for the coming year in the first King's Speech for 70 years. It was also the first since Rishi Sunak became prime minister and will probably be the last before the next general election. Of the bills set out in the speech, it could be the law and order measures and ones on the environment which the Conservatives might hope provide the clearest dividing lines between themselves and Labour ahead of the election. On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson speaks to political editor Beth Rigby for her assessment of the King's Speech and what it tells us about how the next election will be fought. Producer: Emma Rae WoodhouseEditor: Wendy Parker
07/11/2320m 37s

What is Israel’s next move in its war against Hamas?

Israel's military objective in the war against Hamas, constantly repeated by its politicians and commanders, has become a national mantra: "Hamas must be destroyed."But with Israeli forces targeting Gaza City and the number of people killed in the enclave more than 10,000, according to the Hamas-led health ministry, there's mounting international pressure on Israel to at least pause its military operations.So what will Israel do next?On the Sky News Daily host Sarah-Jane Mee speaks to security and defence editor Deborah Haynes, who was one of the few Western journalists who the Israeli army took to their frontlines in Gaza.Plus, military analyst Sean Bell speaks about what victory against Hamas would look like for Israel.Producer: Alex EddenInterviews producer: Melissa TutesigensiEditor: Wendy Parker
06/11/2319m 8s

What's Russia doing when the world is not looking?

As the world's attention turns to the Israel-Hamas war, Russia is ramping up its offensive on Ukraine. President Putin is seizing the opportunity of less attention, while Kyiv fears the West will stop providing aid as the war slips down the news agenda. On the Sky News Daily, host Leah Boleto is joined by defence and security analyst Professor Michael Clarke, with Melinda Haring, non-resident senior fellow at Atlantic Council's Eurasia Centre to discuss what is happening in Russia and Ukraine, while the world isn't looking. Producer: Alex EddenInterviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi​​​​​​​Editor: Wendy Parker
03/11/2319m 46s

Just how risky is artificial intelligence?

Bletchley Park - the once top-secret home of the World War Two codebreakers, including Alan Turing - has this week hosted Rishi Sunak’s UK AI safety summit. It could help position Britain as a world leader on AI regulation, as governments seek to take back control over how the technology is developed and used, to prevent abuse. On the Sky News Daily, presenter Sally Lockwood looks at the risks and concerns AI poses, speaking to Professor Stuart Russell, a member of the World Economic Forum's Global AI Council. Plus, what was the point of Sunak's AI summit? Technology correspondent Arthi Nachiappan joins Sally from Bletchley to unpick the PM’s ambitions. Producer: Soila ApparicioInterviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi​​​​​​​Editor: Wendy Parker
02/11/2319m 0s

“The end of a chapter”: Stuart Ramsay on Gaza

The Gaza Strip; just 25 miles long and but only seven and a half wide at its broadest point. It’s a sliver of land sandwiched between the Mediterranean and Israel is home to two million people – or at least it was until war between Hamas and Israel broke out. On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson is joined by our chief correspondent Stuart Ramsay and senior foreign producer Dominique van Heerden on the Israel-Gaza border to paint a picture of how Gaza has changed over their years spent reporting in Palestine. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
01/11/2323m 18s

What did we learn from Dominic Cummings at the COVID inquiry?

Boris Johnson's former chief adviser Dominic Cummings has appeared at the UK COVID-19 Inquiry, where he criticised the way the government worked in the early months of the pandemic. Mr Cummings said it was "crackers" there was no plan for shielding or protecting care homes if the virus was not brought under control. On the Sky News Daily, presenter Belle Donati is joined by our deputy political editor Sam Coates and Emma Norris, deputy director at the Institute for Government, to pick apart Mr Cummings's evidence to the inquiry. Producer: Alex Edden Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Editor: Wendy Parker
31/10/2320m 0s

The one about Friends star Matthew Perry’s legacy

The death of the actor who played Chandler Bing in US sitcom Friends has left those who knew and loved him “heartbroken”. Matthew Perry, who had previously spoken about his battle with addiction, was found dead at his LA home at the weekend. On this Sky News Daily, our arts and entertainment correspondent Katie Spencer speaks to Lindsay Posner – who directed Perry's play The End of Longing – and to comedian, podcaster and Friends fan, Vix Leyton about their memories of the 54-year-old and how they think he will be remembered. Podcast producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
30/10/2316m 9s

Down the drain: What caused Britain’s sewage problem?

The Environment Secretary Therese Coffey has told Sky News the repeated release of illegal sewage outflows is a "scandal" as she signals that customers may need to be prepared to pay more for an improved system. Our economics and data editor Ed Conway has investigated the scale of the sewage crisis. On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto talks to Ed about his findings, which show that - far from being a failure of the system - raw sewage is released into Britain's waterways by design. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
27/10/2321m 58s

Qatar’s role in hostage negotiations | Grieving fathers call for peace

As Israeli families await news of loved ones who were taken hostage during the attacks by Hamas on 7 October, two men from different sides of the conflict share their story of grief, an unexpected friendship and forgiveness. On the Sky News Daily, Belle Donati is joined by Rami Elhanan, an Israeli Peace Advocate and Bassam Aramin, a Palestinian Peace Advocate – after they were brought together nearly two decades ago following the loss of their daughters.Rami’s teenage daughter was killed by a suicide bomber during a shopping trip, while Bassam’s 10-year-old girl was shot by border police outside her school. Plus, Belle speaks to Sky’s international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn about his exclusive interview with Qatari’s senior hostage negotiator who says that he’s hopeful all the civilian hostages could be released if there is a pause in the bombing of Gaza. Podcast producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Wendy Parker
26/10/2324m 42s

A year of Rishi Sunak – but what about the next 12 months?

A year after Rishi Sunak became prime minister, has he convinced the public of his competence and of his electability? Sophy Ridge from Sky News’ Politics Hub programme takes over from Niall Paterson for this episode. She discusses Sunak’s record with Katy Balls, political editor at the Spectator, and Rachel Cunliffe, associate political editor at the New Statesman. Then, Andrew Lansley, who ran Tory national election campaigns including in 1992, joins Sophy to discuss what the PM might be able to learn from the 1992 election campaign – and whether Jeremy Hunt is or isn’t part of the plan. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Paul Stanworth
25/10/2322m 14s

Should pregnant women still be in prison?

As the Sentencing Council in England and Wales examines the potential impact of being pregnant and giving birth in prison, the Sky News Daily podcast hears from women who’ve been through the experience.With Niall Paterson on half-term, Sarah-Jane Mee, who presents Sky News’ UK Tonight show, takes over for this episode.She speaks to Dr Laura Abbott - a midwife and researcher at the University of Hertfordshire - about her research into the dangers of giving birth in prison and Sky News home editor Jason Farrell joins her to discuss his report into the “frightening”, “isolating” and “humiliating” experience of three prisoners during pregnancy. Podcast producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Sydney PeadSenior podcast producer: Annie JoyceInterviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Editor: Paul Stanworth
24/10/2319m 31s

What the law says about protesters chanting "jihad"

The word "jihad" - chanted during a pro-Palestinian rally in London over the weekend - has led to questions about whether laws governing hate crime need reform. The word can be interpreted in different ways; for some, it means struggle or effort in Arabic, but it has also been taken to refer to holy war. And the police made no arrests in this case. The "jihad" chants were made at a side rally by members of the Islamist group Hizb ut-Tahrir which is banned in many countries including some majority Muslim ones. There are now questions about why the group has not been banned here as the Home Secretary Suella Braveman and Met Police chief Sir Mark Rowley met earlier. On this Sky News Daily Tom Cheshire explores the word "jihad", and where the law stands with people using it, with our crime correspondent Martin Brunt. Plus, Tom is joined by journalist Duncan Gardham, who writes about terrorism and extremism and tells us more about the Hizb ut-Tahrir group. Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Wendy Parker
23/10/2317m 56s

Labour's by-election wins | Biden's case for Israel-Ukraine funding

Labour's hopes ahead of the next general election have been bolstered after historic wins in the Tamworth and Mid Bedfordshire by-elections.The double victory saw huge Conservative majorities overturned, with more than a 20 percent swing away from the Tories in both constituencies. Meanwhile, US President Joe Biden has used a rare Oval Office address to urge Americans to remember the country's role as "a beacon to the world" as he seeks Congress support for a $100bn aid package to Israel and Ukraine. Niall Paterson speaks to chief political correspondent Jon Craig to discuss if the national mood of Britain can be read from the results of the latest by-elections. He's also joined by Sky's defence and security analyst Michael Clarke to talk about the influence of an increased US military presence in the Middle East, and what might be the impact for Israel and Ukraine if the cash isn't approved.Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Sydney Pead Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
20/10/2321m 22s

The Israeli ground invasion into Gaza: When and how?

Britain’s prime minister says the UK stands with Israel in its “darkest hour” as he met his Israeli counterpart, Benjamin Netanyahu. Rishi Sunak arrived in the country a day after US president Joe Biden apparently gave his backing privately for an Israeli ground invasion into Gaza in response to the deadly Hamas attacks on 7 October. On the Sky News Daily, Belle Donati explores what that could be like with former royal marine Rob Taylor, who runs a company training British and American soldiers in close combat, and former British military intelligence colonel Philip Ingram. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
19/10/2317m 56s

Gaza hospital blast: The battle to own the narrative

The Anglican-run al Ahli hospital in northern Gaza was bombed on Tuesday evening, claiming 500 lives, according to the Palestinian health ministry. Both sides in the Israel-Hamas war have blamed the other. It comes as US President Joe Biden lands in Israel to discuss the conflict. He appeared to back the Israeli military account that the blast was not caused by them. On the Sky News Daily, host Belle Donati hears from General Sir Simon Mayall, former senior adviser for the Middle East at the Ministry of Defence, to understand the military outlook on the ground in Israel and the wider region. Belle also speaks to Lishay Lavi whose husband Omri Miran was kidnapped from kibbutz Nahal Oz and taken to the Gaza Strip on 7 October. Plus, our Middle East correspondent Ali Bunkall updates us on the al Ahli hospital bombing and Biden's visit. Senior Producer: Annie Joyce Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Editor: Paul Stanworth
18/10/2323m 5s

What do by-elections tell you about the state of politics?

There has been a wave of by-elections in recent months across the country - and Sky’s chief political correspondent Jon Craig has been to most of them. In fact this Thursday sees Jon covering his 40th count for Sky News. He’s in Nadine Dorries' old seat of Mid Bedfordshire which could see the vote split 3 ways between the Conservatives, Labour and the Lib Dems.On the same day, another seat held by the Conservatives – Tamworth – is up for grabs following Chris Pincher’s resignation over groping allegations.But what if anything do by-elections results tell us about potential general election outcomes? On a bonus episode of the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson talks to Jon Craig about that, and his highlights of covering by-elections for so many years. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
18/10/2319m 18s

How to negotiate with Hamas | Biden in Israel

Hostage-taking has long been a feature of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The latest – 199 people, as confirmed by the Israeli military, taken by Hamas include foreign nationals, elderly and children. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood speaks to one of the world's most experienced kidnap for ransom negotiators and author Scott Walker about what life might be like for hostages inside Gaza and efforts to get them back. Plus, Ali Bunkall explains what impact Joe Biden's visit to Israel will have on the conflict. Podcast producer: Soila ApparicioInterviews producer: Melissa TutesigensiPromotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa JohnEditor: Wendy Parker
17/10/2319m 39s

Voice notes from Palestinians | What might happen to the 199 hostages

More than a week on since the Hamas attack that shocked Israelis and others around the world, thousands of Palestinians caught up in the conflict remain stuck in Gaza at its southern border with Egypt – as the threat of an Israeli ground invasion into northern Gaza looms. On the Sky News Daily podcast, Sally Lockwood speaks to former Gaza correspondent Nicole Johnston about who controls the Rafah crossing and the people inside Gaza she’s in contact with as we hear voicenotes from some of them. Plus, our security and defence editor Deborah Haynes talks about ongoing diplomatic efforts as Britons are among the 199 people taken hostage by Hamas. Podcast producer: Emma-Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
16/10/2319m 52s

Gaza deadline: What happens next? | Antisemitism concerns in UK

Israel gave more than a million people living in northern Gaza 24 hours to leave their homes ahead of an expected Israeli ground offensive in response to Hamas attacks. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood speaks to our Middle East correspondent Alistair Bunkall about the deadline given to Gazans and Shaina Low, from the Norwegian Refugee Council, who talks about their team in Gaza. Plus, Sally is joined by our communities correspondent Becky Johnson to discuss concerns about antisemitism in the UK as some Jewish schools here decided to close on Friday due to safety concerns. Becky was also invited to Friday prayers as the British Muslim community in Birmingham shared their worries with her too. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
13/10/2323m 12s

Blinken backs Israel | Criminals could go free as prisons fill up

The United States has re-affirmed its support for Israel in the wake of the brutal attacks by Hamas, sending its most senior diplomat Antony Blinken to Tel Aviv.It’s his first stop on a tour of the Middle East, in an effort by the US to stop the conflict spreading. Mr Blinken indicated the US will back Israel’s bid to destroy the militant group but warned it must “take every possible precaution to avoid harming civilians.”Today, on Sky News Daily Tom Cheshire speaks with international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn from Jerusalem, about how big a threat escalation in the region is.Plus, Sky News home editor Jason Farrell and former prison governor Vanessa Frake-Harris look at the crisis in prisons, after news judges will now delay sending convicted criminals to overcrowded jails. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Sydney Pead Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
12/10/2320m 52s

What is Hamas, and what’s happening in Gaza?

Israel’s response to the brutal attacks by Hamas has been swift and devastating. The two million people who live in Gaza are now under a siege - they are quickly running out of food and water. The one power station has shut down meaning an end to electricity supplies. Hamas has been ruling Gaza as a one-party state since 2007 and Israel has made it clear that it intends to wipe the group out. Today on the podcast, Sky News data and forensic correspondent Tom Cheshire discusses the scale of the humanitarian disaster in Gaza, and Middle East Correspondent Alistair Bunkall tells us more about Hamas and what comes next, as Israel prepares a ground offensive. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
11/10/2319m 38s

Starmer: Was that the next PM? | Israel’s retaliation

It started with a security breach covered in glitter, but in a major speech today Sir Keir Starmer unveiled his plan for Britain ahead of the next general election. The Labour leader declared his party would be “the healers, the modernisers, the builders,” promising to “turn our backs on never-ending Tory decline with a decade of national renewal”. But can he pull it off? On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined in Liverpool by our deputy political editor Sam Coates, where they analyse what the Labour leader had to say. Plus, Niall talks to Professor Michael Clarke, Sky’s defence and security analyst, about Israeli retaliations in Gaza. Senior podcast producer: Annie JoycePodcast producer: Sydney Pead Interviews producer: Melissa TutesigensiPromotion producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Paul Stanworth
10/10/2323m 3s

Israel-Hamas War: Explaining what’s happened and what might happen next

On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our Middle East Correspondent Alistair Bunkall to take a closer look at the Israel-Hamas war – including the Israeli reaction to the weekend’s attack and what it may do next.Alistair reports on the hundreds who’ve lost their lives so far and the questions being asked about Israeli intelligence.Plus, our deputy political editor Sam Coates on how the conflict is being discussed at the Labour Party conference in Liverpool.Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Alex Edden Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
09/10/2325m 44s

Labour’s by-election win and the road to the next election

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said his newest MP “blew the doors off” as Michael Shanks won the Rutherglen and Hamilton West by-election with a swing of 20%.It was triggered after former SNP MP Margaret Ferrier was removed from her seat after breaking COVID guidelines. The win could have implications for the next general election. If the swing was repeated across Scotland it would see a rise in the number of Labour MPs from just 2 to over 40 and so a big boost to Sir Keir Starmer’s bid to enter 10 Downing Street. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our Scotland correspondent Connor Gillies and Sky’s election analyst Michael Thrasher to dig into the result and look at how it may influence the political landscape in the run up to a general election next year. Podcast producer: Alex EddenInterviews producer: Melissa TutesigensiPromotion producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Wendy Parker*Tell us what you think of Sky News podcasts: https://news.sky.com/podcastsurvey
06/10/2319m 45s

Smoking ban plan - will England kick the habit?

The prime minister wants to stop younger generations from taking up smoking – by making it illegal for anyone born after 2005 to ever be able to buy them. Rishi Sunak’s plan – announced in his Tory conference speech on Wednesday – is similar to measures already introduced in New Zealand, aimed at tackling health problems related to smoking. But critics argue people should have the freedom to choose – not the state.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson explores the debate – both from a health and political perspective - as he’s joined by Deborah Arnott, from the public health charity ASH (Action on Smoking and Health), the Conservative peer and former health minister Lord Bethell and our deputy political editor Sam Coates. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Wendy Parker *Tell us what you think of Sky News podcasts: https://news.sky.com/podcastsurvey
05/10/2320m 14s

Long-term, can Rishi Sunak make it a brighter future?

The prime minister closed the Conservative Party conference with a speech setting out his pitch for the next election, promising to reform A-levels, support the health service and crack down on smoking. He also finally confirmed that the HS2 link from Birmingham to Manchester is being scrapped and committed to spend the money instead on transport projects in the North.On the Sky News Daily with Niall Paterson, our deputy political editor Sam Coates discusses what impact the speech will have and also looks back at the conference and what it has revealed about the Tory party. Plus, from inside the conference hall, Niall grabs Justice Secretary Alex Chalk, Minister of State for Northern Ireland Steve Baker, Transport Secretary Mark Harper, Foreign Secretary James Cleverly, and Claire Coutinho, secretary of state for energy security and net zero. *Tell us what you think of Sky News podcasts: https://news.sky.com/podcastsurveyProducer: Soila Apparicio Senior producer: Annie Joyce Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editors: Wendy Parker and Paul Stanworth
04/10/2324m 44s

Conservative conference: Who's up for an election?

Rishi Sunak has claimed a general election is "not what the country wants" but insists he is unafraid of going to the polls. On the Sky News Daily with Niall Paterson, our political editor Beth Rigby talks about her morning interview with the prime minister. And Niall sits down with Katie Perrior, former director of communications at 10 Downing Street for Theresa May, and William Hague's former special adviser Chris White to discuss the election chances of the Tory Party. *Tell us what you think of Sky News podcasts: https://news.sky.com/podcastsurveyProducers: Soila Apparicio and Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
03/10/2325m 19s

Conservative conference: Tax, Truss, and HS2

Chancellor Jeremy Hunt held firm on tax cuts, despite growing pressure from his colleagues at the Conservative Party conference on Monday. "The plan is working and now we must see it through," he said in his keynote speech. The idea of a tax cut is dividing Tories – with former prime minister Liz Truss calling for the chancellor to "axe the tax". Hunt spoke as news broke that the northern leg of HS2 will be scrapped between Birmingham and Manchester. On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson is joined by our economics and data editor Ed Conway, and deputy political editor Sam Coates to analyse the chancellor's speech, Truss's calls for tax cuts, and HS2Tell us what you think of Sky News podcasts: https://news.sky.com/podcastsurveyProducers: Soila Apparicio and Emma Rae WoodhousePromotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
02/10/2327m 33s

'Psychological torture': The row over never-ending prison sentences

Thousands of prisoners remain incarcerated on open-ended prison sentences under a now defunct scheme, known as IPP sentencing. The no-maximum prison sentences, some of which were given to offenders of low-level crimes, have been compared to ‘psychological torture’. On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson speaks to Anthony Hipkiss who was in prison for 16 years despite only being sentenced to 15 months. He tells us how the strict licensing rules he has to live under for 10 years means he can’t even stay overnight at his partner’s. Plus, Ian Acheson, former prison governor speaks about how to fix a system of justice that keeps people indefinitely – even when they’re not a threat to society. While we've got you... please take a few moments to let us know your thoughts on our podcasts and your listening preferences by filling in a short survey - click here. Producer: Alex Edden Podcast promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Editor: Wendy Parker
29/09/2321m 18s

HS2: Is the UK bad at big infrastructure projects?

When it was first given the go-ahead back in 2012, Britain's new high-speed rail line connecting the south, the Midlands and the north of England was predicted to cost £32.7bn. Now, after delays and inflation fuelled by Brexit, Covid and the invasion of Ukraine, this figure is closer to £100bn. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has also avoided answering questions on whether the Birmingham to Manchester leg of the route will go ahead, leaving the future of the project shrouded in uncertainty. So why was the initial cost estimate so different to what the final number will be? On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson sits down with our business correspondent Paul Kelso to discuss the problems with the way the UK plans major infrastructure projects and asks whether any of these projects ever come close to what they are predicted to cost. While we've got you... please take a few moments to let us know your thoughts on our podcasts and your listening preferences by filling in a short survey - click here. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Podcast promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Archive researcher: Simon Windsor Editor: Paul Stanworth
28/09/2321m 50s

Consumption rooms: How much of a solution for Scotland’s drug problem?

Scotland will be home to the UK’s first so-called ‘consumption rooms’ where drug users will be able to get their fix more safely. Recent stats showed that despite a fall this year, Scotland still has the highest number of drugs-related deaths per million population in Europe. Now, plans have been approved for a £2.3 million facility at Hunter Street Health Centre in Glasgow – despite opposition from Westminster. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our Scotland correspondent Connor Gillies who talks about the unit itself and reaction to it. Plus, Niall speaks to Andrew Cowan, whose son Daniel died after taking a fatal drug concoction, and Annemarie Ward, from the charity Faces and Voices of Recovery UK. While we've got you... please take a few moments to let us know your thoughts on our podcasts and your listening preferences by filling in a short survey - click here. Podcast producer: Alex Edden Interviews producer: Melissa TutesigensiPodcast promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
27/09/2322m 3s

Should we be taking the Liberal Democrats seriously?

The Liberal Democrats conference in Bournemouth saw leader Sir Ed Davey hinting that his party would be prepared to do a post-election deal with Labour to prevent the Conservatives from forming a government. Of the 91 seats in which the Lib Dems finished second in 2019, 80 are held by Conservatives. After recent by-election victories, could the Lib Dems be looking like kingmakers once more? To answer this question, Niall Paterson is joined by Sky News deputy political editor Sam Coates who has been at the conference. And Liberal Democrat MP Sarah Dyke looks ahead to the next election after her big by-election win in Somerton and Frome. Plus, Carol Vorderman talks about her message to the Lib Dem conference, where she called for electoral reform and tactical voting. While we've got you... please take a few moments to let us know your thoughts on our podcasts and your listening preferences by filling in a short survey - click here. Podcast producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Podcast promotion producer: Jada-Kai Meosa John Editor: Wendy Parker
26/09/2329m 34s

'I just want a normal life': How do we end rough sleeping?

Ian Harrison is 33 and has spent his adult life on the streets. He's among more than an estimated 270,000 homeless people in England. Sky News has been following Ian's journey as a government promise - to end rough sleeping by next year - looks in serious doubt. It was a target set by the Conservatives in their 2019 election manifesto - but a report by the Kerslake Commission is warning it will be missed, blaming "chronic and unresolved" issues in the housing system as it reports a 26% rise in rough sleeping compared with last year. The commission was set up in 2021 to learn lessons from the response to homelessness during the COVID pandemic - the same year, an estimated 741 homeless people died in England and Wales. Most were men and drugs, alcohol and suicide were the likely related causes. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood speaks to our producer Sarah O'Connell, who first met Ian when he was a teenager, to find out about the challenges he has faced over the years. Plus, Sally is joined by Emma Haddad, chief executive of the homelessness charity St Mungo's - the secretariat of the Kerslake Commission, as they discuss the wider problems and what they think is needed to end rough sleeping.While we've got you... please take a few moments to let us know your thoughts on our podcasts and your listening preferences by filling in a short survey - click here. Podcast producers: Soila Apparicio and Alex Edden Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
25/09/2316m 53s

What’s the future for kids’ TV?

It seems everything is moving online these days, so it’s perhaps no surprise that kids TV is too. CITV, ITV’s children’s channel, is no longer; it’s moving to the company’s streaming service, ITVx. Its BBC equivalent, CBBC, is expected to also be online-only in the next few years. Many children now, though, just go to YouTube to watch their shows.But with an ongoing decrease in funding for kids’ TV and the move to the less regulated streaming platforms there are concerns about the impact the quality of programmes and online safety.On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson explores the issue with former Blue Peter presenter Konnie Huq, and Jon Hancock, who’s company Three Arrows Media makes shows for Sky Kids and BBC Childrens.If you like your arts and entertainment, why not subscribe to the Backstage podcast?And, if you're a parent, you can find Sky's ad-free, 24-hour Sky Kids channel on Sky Q, Stream, Glass, and NOW.Podcast producer: David Chipakupaku Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Wendy Parker
22/09/2324m 43s

Beyond the pomp: What is the true state of UK relations with France?

The King and Queen are on a state visit to France this week, which includes stops in Paris and Bordeaux. The three-day trip would have been Charles’ first royal visit abroad as King back in March – but it was delayed due to the violent protests taking place over President Emmanuel Macron’s pension reforms. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by François-Joseph Schichan, former French diplomat and political adviser to the French ambassador in the UK, to explore how our closest ally views both the King and the UK’s current politics. Plus, former Labour foreign secretary Dame Margaret Beckett takes us through her assessment of the current strength of Anglo-French relations.Producer: Soila Apparicio Senior Producer: Annie Joyce Interview Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotion Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
21/09/2318m 36s

Sunak’s new Net Zero policy: Are the Tories turning a lighter shade of green?

The reaction - to a move by Rishi Sunak to delay the government’s green policies – has been mixed to say the least, with opposition parties slamming the prime minister’s leadership as “weak” and the decision “damaging” for the climate. As net zero sceptics cheered there was criticism from some in the car industry and the more environmentally minded Conservative politicians. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our science correspondent Thomas Moore and Politico’s UK editor Jack Blanchard for their analysis and a deeper look at what it all means politically, as well as for voters, industry and climate change. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
20/09/2321m 41s

Crypto casinos: the new 'Wild West' hooking gamblers

Sky News has uncovered how online streamers may be breaking UK gambling laws by promoting crypto casinos - and there are questions over whether the casinos are doing enough to monitor this. Crypto casinos are similar to 'normal' online casinos, offering virtual versions of popular games like slot machines. The difference is they use digital currencies: players convert pounds, euros and dollars into virtual cash such as Bitcoin to gamble with. This type of casino is illegal in the UK, with the Gambling Commission taking a hardline stance against any operator that accepts cryptocurrency as a direct method of payment. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood explores crypto casinos with our investigative reporter Sanya Burgess, and what harms they could cause.Podcast producer: Soila ApparicioPromotions producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Wendy Parker
19/09/2317m 55s

Russell Brand investigation: Hear from one of the team behind it

Actor and comedian Russell Brand has been accused of rape, sexual assault and emotional abuse in a joint investigation by The Times, The Sunday Times and Channel 4 Dispatches. Brand says he "absolutely" denies the allegations. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Head of Investigations at The Times, Paul Morgan-Bentley, about the allegations Brand faces and the latest on the investigation. Plus, Alice Enders, head of research at Enders Analysis, discusses if the entertainment industry is being held accountable for protecting women in the workplace. A warning that on this podcast we discuss the details of the sexual assault and rape claims. *While we've got you...please take a few moments to let us know your thoughts on our podcasts and your listening preferences by filling in a short survey - Click herePodcast producer: Alex Edden and Emma-Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Adam Jay
18/09/2324m 32s

‘Dam of death’: How a Libyan city was washed away

Rescuers are calling for more body bags to be sent to a Libyan city hit by catastrophic flooding - as fears of waterborne diseases grow.More than 11,300 people are known to have died - and this could reach up to 20,000, with a further 10,100 missing.Meanwhile, attempts to coordinate humanitarian aid have been hampered by Libya's fractured government - caused by years of political instability and civil unrest.Today on Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks with Sky News Africa correspondent Yousra Elbagir from the port city of Derna, which was devastated when two dams collapsed, unleashing a tsunami that washed entire city blocks into the Mediterranean Sea.Sky News special correspondent Alex Crawford also joins Niall from Derna, as rescue teams scramble to find survivors in the rubble.This podcast contains graphic descriptions.*While we've got you...please take a few moments to let us know your thoughts on our podcasts and your listening preferences by filling in a short survey. Click herePodcast Producer: Soila ApparicioPromotions Producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Adam Jay
15/09/2320m 24s

UK economy: Making sense of the numbers with Ed Conway

Important figures on employment, wages, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) have been released this week; all tell a story about how the UK economy is performing. The Sky News Daily's Niall Paterson sits down with our economics and data editor Ed Conway to find out what the numbers mean. Podcast Producer: Soila Apparicio Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Adam Jay
14/09/2320m 12s

The spike in school suspensions

Every day more than 3000 pupils miss school because they have been suspended. It’s a record number that has shot up since the pandemic, especially for girls, who are being sent home at twice the national rate.It’s raised concerns these suspended students are slipping through the cracks, but leading teachers say a national shortage of alternative forms of education is putting unprecedented demand on the system. Today’s Sky News Daily episode features Nick Martin on his investigation into this growing educational crisis, a head teacher trying to provide a new path for troubled children and a mother who fears her child will get left behind.Podcast Producer: Alex Edden Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Editor: Wendy Parker
13/09/2321m 3s

Putin and Kim Jong Un meet, but why?

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has crossed the border into Russia for a meeting with President Vladimir Putin. This is the first time since 2019 that Kim has left North Korea – and a lot has changed since then. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson sits down with security and defence analyst Professor Michael Clarke and Sky’s Moscow correspondent Diana Magnay to unpick what each leader is looking to gain from this meeting, plus how their alliance will impact global security. Producer: Alex Edden Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
12/09/2323m 11s

Should we be worried about the new COVID variant?

The emergence of a new COVID variant, BA.2.8, has pushed forward the winter vaccination programme, with the rollout starting on Monday in England for older adult care home residents and immunosuppressed people. All over-65s will be offered the jab during the next few weeks. The other nations are also beginning their vaccination programmes this month. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Professor Susan Hopkins, chief medical adviser at the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), to discuss the new variant, and the importance of getting vulnerable people vaccinated. Plus, our chief correspondent Stuart Ramsey talks to Niall from the epicentre of the earthquake in Morocco, which has killed 2,500 people so far. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Soila ApparicioInterviews Producer: Melissa TutesigensiPromotions Producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Wendy Parker
11/09/2319m 47s

One year of King Charles: What has he achieved?

It's been one year since King Charles took to the throne following the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II.In this episode of the Sky News Daily podcast, royal correspondent Laura Bundock takes to the presenter chair to reflect on the first year of King Charles's reign.She is joined by the broadcaster Jonathan Dimbleby, a close friend of the King, plus historian Sir Anthony Seldon, the headmaster of Epsom College.Producer: Alex Edden Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
08/09/2322m 25s

Prisoner manhunt: How was a terror suspect able to escape?

Terror suspect Daniel Khalife's escape from HMP Wandsworth – believed to be by strapping himself underneath a delivery lorry - led to a police manhunt involving all 43 forces in England and Wales. The 21-year-old ex-soldier was on remand charged with collecting information which might be useful to an enemy, understood to be Iran. The justice secretary, Alex Chalk, has told MPs that an independent investigation will take place, while suggestions have been made that cuts to the Prison Service and overcrowded conditions at Wandsworth prison are partly to blame. But what does his escape tell us about the state of the prison system in England? On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson speaks to David Shipley, a former inmate at HMP Wandsworth, and Professor John Podmore, an ex-prison governor and inspector, about what's wrong with Wandsworth prison and others across the country? Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
07/09/2320m 14s

Could my council go bust?

Birmingham City Council, Europe's largest local authority, has effectively declared bankruptcy, confirming in a statement that all new spending except for protecting vulnerable people and statutory services, must stop immediately.But how does a council go bust?On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our politics and business correspondent Mhari Aurora, as well as Iain Murray from the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy, who explains how a council can run out of money. Plus, Sarah Hayward shares her experiences working as part Slough Council's senior leadership team, a role she came into a year after its recovery from bankruptcy. Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews Producer: Melissa Tutesigensi Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
06/09/2318m 25s

The Chinese economy is faltering – should the rest of the world worry?

China's economy has slipped into deflation as consumer prices declined in July for the first time in more than two years.Ballooning local government debt, weak import and exports, challenges in the housing market, and growing youth unemployment are all contributing to the country's downturn. On the Sky News Daily Dominic Waghorn speaks to our Asia correspondent Helen-Ann Smith about why China's economy is running out of steam. Plus, George Magnus, economist and associate at Oxford University's China Centre talks about the potential impacts for the global economy ahead of the G20 summit.Podcast producers: Emma-Rae Woodhouse, Sydney Pead and Soila Apparicio Podcast promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
05/09/2318m 50s

Concrete crisis and the Gillian Keegan rant

MPs returned to Westminster after their summer break, but the same can't be said for thousands of children expected in classrooms for the Autumn term – due to the crumbling concrete crisis. More than 100 schools stayed shut on Monday due to safety fears about reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete - or RAAC – while the education secretary Gillian Keegan was caught on camera complaining about not being thanked for doing a "f***ing good job" over it all. On the Sky News Daily, Rob Powell speaks to Adrian Tagg, Building Surveying lead at the University of Reading about how far the crisis may spread. Plus, Sky's Sophy Ridge joins Rob to talk about the political fallout of the RAAC crisis, Labour's reshuffle and the possibility of a new by-election, as her new show The Politics Hub begins on Monday evening. Podcast producer: Emma-Rae WoodhouseInterviews producer: Alex EddenPodcast promotion producer: David ChipakupakuSenior podcast producer: Annie Joyce​​​​​​​Editor: Wendy Parker
04/09/2320m 34s

"Evil" but "a people person" - Saddam Hussein according to the soldier who guarded him

It's been 20 years since the Iraq war and the capture of dictator Saddam Hussein.Once Saddam was found, he was kept prisoner in his palace with 12 US soldiers guarding him. Saddam proved to be great company and the troops developed a strong friendship with him - they would play chess with him, exercise with him, and talk about their lives.One soldier, Specialist Adam Rogerson, has spoken to the Sky News Daily podcast about his very personal experience guarding Saddam Hussein until his death.Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Producer: Tom Gillespie Podcast promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editors: Paul Stanworth and Wendy Parker
01/09/2319m 37s

UK's new defence secretary and what it means for Ukraine

Former transport and energy secretary Grant Shapps has been named as the new head of the Ministry of Defence after Ben Wallace stood down from the role on Thursday morning. Mr Wallace had overseen one of the biggest international responses to the war in Ukraine - with the UK behind only the US in terms of support since the war began, having committed £4.6bn in military assistance. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn and military analyst Professor Michael Clarke to discuss the significance of Mr Shapps' new role given the ongoing war in Ukraine, as well as turning their attention to the use of drone technology on the battlefield. Podcast producer: Emma-Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Alex Edden Podcast promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
31/08/2321m 13s

#SeAcabó: How the World Cup kiss sparked Spain's MeToo moment

Since their World Cup victory, the Spanish team's success has been overshadowed by Spanish football president Luis Rubiales non-consensually kissing player Jenni Hermoso. Hermoso described the actions of Rubiales as an "impulse-driven, sexist out-of-place act without any consent". Rubiales denies this and says it was "spontaneous" and "mutual". The kiss has caused a backlash across football and in Spain, where protesters have called for action "to demand a sport free of sexist violence". On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to football commentator and founding member of Women in Football, Jacqui Oatley about how far the treatment and representation of women in the sport has come, and how far it still has to go. Plus, Spanish journalist Maria Ramírez on why the kiss has sparked its own hashtag #SeAcabó and a MeToo moment that reaches far beyond football. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Interviews producer: Alex Edden Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
30/08/2322m 9s

Air travel chaos: Could it happen again?

The travel plans of hundreds of thousands of people were thrown into chaos on one of the busiest days of the year for airports, as the UK's air traffic control systems suffered a "technical fault". UK airports are still struggling to recover from the hours-long failure of processing flight plans – with warnings delays could last for days. Downing Street has ruled out a cyberattack, but there is speculation that an incorrect flight plan filed by a French airline could be to blame. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson looks at what went wrong and if a similar problem could happen again. His guests are former air traffic controller Michele Robson, who was stuck at Jersey airport yesterday, and travel editor for The Independent, Simon Calder. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Emma-Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Alex Edden Podcast promotions producer: David Chipakupaku ​​​​​​​Editor: Paul Stanworth
29/08/2318m 11s

The Mafia’s most wanted man

One of the biggest mafia trials in Italian history is expected to deliver its verdict in the coming weeks. Prosecutors have asked for sentences totalling more than 4,000 years in jail for hundreds of alleged ‘Ndrangheta collaborators. One prosecutor of the ‘Ndrangheta, Nicola Gratteri, cannot travel without a heavy police escort, nor see his children for more than a few hours every couple of months. On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson is joined by our Europe correspondent Siobhan Robbins, who has visited the court where hundreds of ‘Ndrangheta collaborators will be tried, to hear more about what it takes to put this powerful mafia behind bars. Producer: Soila ApparicioPromotions Producer: Jim FarthingEditor: Wendy Parker
25/08/2315m 13s

Prigozhin "dead", what next for Putin and Ukraine?

Russians have been paying tribute to Yevgeny Prigozhin after it was reported the Wagner leader was among ten people who died when a private jet crashed near Moscow on Wednesday.President Putin has praised his former ally as a “talented businessman” who worked “with good results” in Russia and across Africa, but also said he had “made serious mistakes in his life”. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson takes a deep dive into what it means for President Putin’s hold on power, the war in Ukraine and whether it’s the end of the Wagner group. Niall is joined by our international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn and military analyst Sean Bell. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
24/08/2320m 29s

Prigozhin crash: Military analyst Sean Bell on what the footage tells us

Russian aviation authorities say Wagner boss Yevgeny Prigozhin was among ten people killed in a plane crash near Moscow on Wednesday. Earlier this summer, the mercenary group leader led a short-lived mutiny against Russia’s top brass. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by military analyst Sean Bell as they examine what we can glean from footage of the private jet falling to the ground, reaction to the crash, and Prigozhin’s relationship with President Vladimir Putin. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Editor: Paul Stanworth
24/08/2310m 34s

Fukushima nuclear plant: Is flushing out wastewater safe?

Japan is due to start releasing treated radioactive water from Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, despite opposition from neighbouring countries. A 9 magnitude earthquake hit Japan's east coast in 2011, killing 18,000 people and displacing a further 150,000 from an exclusion zone around the plant. Some 1.34 million tonnes of water - enough to fill 500 Olympic-size pools - have been stored in tanks since a tsunami destroyed the plant, but space is now running out. The water will be released over a 30-year period after being filtered and diluted. On the Sky News Daily with Niall Paterson, our Asia correspondent Helen-Ann Smith describes the mood in neighbouring countries opposing the water release. Plus, Jim Smith, professor of environmental science at the University of Portsmouth dispels concerns about the levels of radiation, insisting there is no need to worry. Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews Producer: Alex Edden Editor: Philly Beaumont
23/08/2320m 2s

Scotland's drug epidemic - would decriminalisation solve it?

New data published on the rate of drug deaths in Scotland show they have decreased, after decades of constant rises, but the number is still higher than the rest of Europe. Just over 1,000 people in Scotland died as a result of drug misuse in 2022, the lowest number since 2017. On the Sky News Daily with Niall Paterson, our Scotland correspondent Connor Gillies combs through the latest figures, while Professor Catriona Matheson, an expert in substance misuse from the University of Stirling, describes possible solutions to reducing deaths further, including decriminalisation. Plus, Trainspotting author Irvine Welsh details the impact of drug misuse in Scotland. Senior Podcast Producer: Annie Joyce Podcast Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews Producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
22/08/2320m 52s

Lucy Letby: Should the guilty be forced to face their victims in court?

Britain's worst child serial killer Lucy Letby will spend the rest of her life in prison. But the former neonatal nurse refused to appear in court to hear either the victim statements or the judge hand down a whole-life sentence. One of the baby victims' mothers has called Letby's defiance a "final act of wickedness from a coward". On the Sky News Daily, Sky News‘ home editor Jason Farrell discusses if defendants should be forced to face their victims in court. He speaks to legal commentator Joshua Rozenberg and Farah Naz, the aunt of Zara Aleena who was murdered in 2022. Farah Naz was forced to give her victim statement to an empty dock when her niece's killer refused to appear. Podcast producer: Rosie GillottInterviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
21/08/2317m 27s

Britain's most prolific child killer: Nurse Lucy Letby found guilty

Lucy Letby has been found guilty of murdering seven babies while working on a neonatal unit at the Countess of Chester Hospital between June 2015 and June 2016. The 33-year-old nurse was also convicted of seven counts of attempted murder following a trial that lasted nine months.Families of her victims sobbed and comforted each other in court as the jury delivered their verdicts over several days. On the Sky News Daily, we hear from some of the relatives as host Niall Paterson is joined by our correspondent Katerina Vittozzi, who has been following the trial at Manchester Crown Court. Podcast producers: Rosie Gillott and Soila Apparicio Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth and Wendy Parker
18/08/2333m 29s

Is Sarina Wiegman the manager who'll win a World Cup for England?

With six wins and a place in the World Cup final under their belt, the Lionesses have a fighting chance of bringing football home for England. But who is the woman at the helm? Manager Sarina Wiegman took over as Lionesses manager in 2020 and is the first non-Brit to lead the team, originally from the Netherlands. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Rob Harris, our sports correspondent, to talk about Wiegman's career history, and Jeanet van der Laan, the England manager’s former Ter Leede and Netherlands teammate to hear what she's like on and off the pitch. Podcast producers: Rosie Gillott and Emma-Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
17/08/2317m 15s

A-levels: Is the uni intake of 2023 'the unluckiest year'?

Students waiting for their A-level results this year are the "unluckiest cohort" in recent years, according to one education expert. Pandemic disruption, rising grade boundaries, and a larger than average number of people applying for university places have all placed pressure on A-level grades. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Grace Brookes, who picks up her A-level results on Thursday, about the challenges she's faced since the pandemic. The vice-chancellor of Sheffield Hallam University Chris Husbands explains the pressures on universities themselves, and Professor of Social Mobility, Lee Elliot Major explains why he believes the 2023 intake are the unluckiest in a generation. Annie Joyce - senior podcast producer Rosie Gillott – podcast producer Alex Edden – interviews producer David Chipakupaku – podcast promotion producer Paul Stanworth - editor
16/08/2320m 38s

Looking for answers – The Hawaii wildfires

The deadliest wildfires to hit the US in over a century have turned vast swathes of the island of Maui to ash and taken the lives of at least 99 people. The governor of Hawaii, Josh Green, has warned that the number killed will rise as only 25% of the affected area has been searched so far. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson hears from our US correspondent Martha Kelner, who is in Maui, about the devastation she's seen there and the questions being asked by locals about a sophisticated warning system that failed to alert them to the imminent danger. Podcast producer: Emma-Rae Woodhouse Social Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
15/08/2320m 38s

What 'small boats week' tells us about migration policy

It was billed as 'small boats week' – a series of government announcements designed to show progress on the issue of cross channel migration. But the reality of the last seven days has got in the way. The 30 or so migrants who had been moved on to a housing barge off Dorset had to be moved out after Legionella was found onboard and Thursday also saw the highest daily number of people crossing the channel this year On the Sky News Daily, Rob Powell asks Peter Walsh, from the Migration Observatory, if migration policies impact people's decisions to travel to the UK, and he speaks to fellow political correspondent Amanda Akass about why the Government has picked ending small boats crossings as one of its five pledges ahead of the next election. Podcast producers: Rosie Gillott and Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Alex Edden Podcast promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
14/08/2322m 17s

Why is Britain still obsessed with the Great Train Robbery 60 years on?

This month marks the 60th anniversary of the Great Train Robbery, one of Britain's most notorious crimes, which involved the hijack of a London-bound Royal Mail train and the theft of millions of pounds. Bruce Reynolds planned the robbery with a 15-strong gang of thieves, crooks and conspirers, becoming one of the most notorious criminals in British history. Bruce's son said he never realised his father was a criminal. On the Sky News Daily, presenter Sally Lockwood is joined by Nick Reynolds, the son of Bruce, to hear about growing up on the run, and our crime correspondent Martin Brunt, to explore why we're so fascinated by the Great Train Robbery 60 years later. Producers: Rosie Gillott, Soila Apparicio, Alex Edden Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
11/08/2322m 21s

World Cup: Will the ambition of equal pay be realised?

Football’s world governing body FIFA wants pay and prize money for men and women to be the same by the next tournaments. But how it gets there is a little less clear. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood is joined from Australia by our sport correspondent Rob Harris and Lioness Lucy Staniforth, who was on standby for the World Cup squad. They discuss the financial disparities in the sport, as well as reaction to the tournament so far and – of course – England's chances of World Cup success ahead of their quarter-final match against Colombia on Saturday. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Alex Edden Promotion producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
10/08/2318m 2s

Hollywood strikes: Are writers right about AI?

It’s been 100 days since Hollywood writers went on strike over concerns artificial intelligence (AI) will take their jobs - as well as disputes over working conditions and claims of dwindling pay. The looming cloud of AI hangs over all industries, but are writers and actors right to be worried about being stripped of their creativity? On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood is joined by Lisa Holdsworth – a TV and theatre writer, and chair of the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain – as well as Dr Alex Connock, senior fellow at the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School, to talk about how AI is reshaping their industry. She’s also joined by Sky’s arts and entertainment reporter Jayson Mansaray to discuss whether a happy ending is in sight for the strikers. Podcast producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Alex Edden Digital Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
09/08/2322m 19s

The Niger coup and how it will impact global security

Niger had been a lone bastion of democracy in West Africa while neighbouring countries were taken over by the military - but it is now also in a crisis following July's coup. The man responsible for protecting President Mohamed Bazoum, who was elected in 2021, has overthrown him - and there could be far-reaching security implications. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood is joined by our Africa correspondent Yousra Elbagir, who looks at why the coup has the support of many people in Niger. Plus, defence and security analyst Professor Michael Clarke examines what the crisis means for counter-terrorism efforts in Africa. Senior podcast producer - Annie JoyceInterviews producer: Alex EddenPodcast promotion producer - David Chipakupaku Editor - Wendy Parker
08/08/2320m 2s

'Useless white male pilots': The RAF discrimination claims

The Royal Air Force has admitted to discriminating against white male candidates in a hiring policy aimed at increasing diversity. In a Sky News exclusive, security and defence editor Deborah Haynes has discovered none of those involved in creating the policy have been held accountable. On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto speaks to Deborah about the impact the decisions have had on the men's lives, and whether anyone has been held accountable. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Social promotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa-John Editor: Wendy Parker
07/08/2319m 6s

Dirty Work: Episode Three - Life Sentence

In this episode, Sahar Zand goes back to speak to Brian Glendinning about his experience in Iraqi jail, and the harrowing impact of his unforeseen arrest. But Brian, compared to some people, is still lucky.For dissidents and opposition figures around the world, the Red Notice is the latest tool for transnational repression by autocratic governments. These people often end up in prison indefinitely, or extradited to the countries they had long fled for safety. With expert analysis from Rhys Davies and Ben Keith - authors of Red Notice Monitor - we take a look at the worst case scenarios for being on the wrong end of a Red Notice.Sahar meets Zeynure and her three children. They are Uyghur exiles living in Istanbul. Zeynure’s husband, Idris Hasan, has been in prison in Morocco for two years facing extradition to China. Uyghur activists like Idris are increasingly at risk of Red Notices, experts tell us, as China has increased its use of Interpol as a tool of transnational repression. Sahar talks to Idris, who says this Red Notice has been a death sentence. A potential return to China is “worse than death.”Plus, Alicia Kearns, the Conservative MP who chairs the UK Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Select Committee, tells Dirty Work about the committee’s “grave concerns” over how the system works. She calls on the Home Office to find a way to inform British nationals if they’re the subject of a malicious red notice.WARNING: This episode contains strong language. Presenter: Sahar Zand Producer: Heidi Pett Senior producer: Sarah Burke Sound designer: James Bradshow Editor: Paul Stanworth
05/08/2342m 12s

Lockdown children: The long-term damage for a generation

COVID lockdowns may seem a distant memory with everyday life very much back to the pre-pandemic norms. But for children, it seems we may only just be getting a sense of the emotional and behavioural impacts those couple of years have had.Researchers at University College London and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) this week published a joint study - the first of its kind - looking at the emotional, social and behavioural impacts on kids. Meanwhile, the children's commissioner for England examined NHS data suggesting a big rise in young people being treated for eating disorders.On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto speaks to Sarah Cattan from the IFS, and England's former children's commissioner Anne Longfield about the scale of the problem. Plus, Rhys Barfoot, who works for the charity Family Action helping families across the country with financial and mental health issues, offers advice to parents and young people.Senior podcast producer - Annie Joyce Podcast producer – Rosie Gillott Interviews producer – Alex Edden Podcast promotion producer – Jim Farthing Editor – Wendy Parker
04/08/2317m 47s

Interest rates up - focus on savers and renters

The Bank of England has increased its base rate of interest by a quarter of a percentage point to 5.25% - which is lower than some economists had predicted. On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto speaks to our business correspondent Gurpreet Narwan about the decision to raise interest rates for the 14th time in a row. Plus, Sky's data and forensics journalist Daniel Dunford explains why renters could be the hardest hit by rate rises, and Tilly Smith, from campaign group Generation Rent, on its call for the government to offer more support to people renting. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Interviews producer: Alex Edden Podcast promotion producer: Jim Farthing Editor: Paul Stanworth
03/08/2322m 16s

Campaigns and court appearances: How could Donald Trump's 2024 play out?

Donald Trump has been criminally charged with trying to ‘defraud the United States’ over the 2021 riots at the US Capitol. It’s the most serious legal threat facing the former president, as he attempts to return to the White House in 2024. But it’s by no means the only one – Trump now faces 78 charges across three criminal cases, but still remains frontrunner to become his party’s nominee for next year’s presidential election. On Sky News Daily Niall Paterson is joined by US correspondent James Matthews to discuss how the trials and potential convictions alter the landscape of the Republican presidential race, and the Republican Party overall. Podcast producer: Emma Rae WoodhouseInterviews producer: Alex EddenPodcast promotions producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Paul Stanworth
02/08/2318m 50s

Will Labour allow 'wedge issues' to define the next election?

A general election is still a long way away, but Prime Minister Rishi Sunak appears to already be laying out the Conservative attack lines, focusing on so-called ‘wedge issues’ that could divide the Labour Party. Labour are sitting 17 points ahead in the polls but are facing criticism for seeming to roll back on green policies. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Andrew Fisher, former Labour director of policy under Jeremy Corbyn and John McTernan, former political secretary to Tony Blair, to discuss the different approached Labour could take. Plus, Sky’s Chief political correspondent Jon Craig looks back to the last time Labour seemed to be on the brink of a landslide victory.Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Digital promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Wendy Parker
01/08/2321m 52s

Zelenskyy warns war is coming to Russia - as Putin teases path to 'peace'.

President Zelenskyy has said war is coming to Russia after suspected Ukrainian drones hit skyscrapers in a wealthy Moscow neighbourhood. President Putin suggested an African initiative could be a basis for peace talks, but not while Ukrainian forces were on the offensive. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by military analyst Sean Bell and Dr Alex Vines, director of the Africa Programme at Chatham House, about the Ukrainian counteroffensive and the role African nations could have in any peace negotiations. Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer David Chipakupaku – podcast promotion producerSimon Windsor - archive researcherWendy Parker - editor
31/07/2320m 10s

Dirty Work: Episode Two - Hijacked

Sky News has a new podcast series called Dirty Work - investigating Interpol red notices, which allow police forces to flag their most wanted persons at international borders around the world. In episode two, reporter Sahar Zand continues to follow Brian Glendinning's story - whose Interpol Red Notice raises significant questions about how the system works. Sahar also speaks to Interpol Secretary General Jurgen Stock, who has given a rare interview talking about why it was his priority to reform a system that had let so many people down.Presenter: Sahar Zand Producer: Heidi PettSenior Producer: Sarah BurkeSound Designer: James Bradshaw Editor: Paul Stanworth
29/07/2340m 36s

'This is how I die': British fighter tortured by pro-Russian forces in Ukraine

British man Aiden Aslin joined the Ukrainian marines in 2018, but following the Russian invasion in February 2022, he was called up to the frontline in Mariupol. After two months of resistance at the city's steelworks, Aiden and his battalion ran out of supplies. Aiden was part of the mass surrender of over 1,000 Ukrainian troops. Singled out for his British passport, Aiden was brutally interrogated, turned into a propaganda tool, tried by a kangaroo court and then sentenced to death. Aiden was held in Russian captivity for six months, before being released last year in a prisoner of war exchange negotiated by the Saudi authorities. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson sits down with Aiden Aslin to hear his story. Producers: Soila Apparicio, Alex Edden, Rosie Gillott Promotions producers: David Chipakupaku, Jim FarthingEditor: Wendy Parker
28/07/2319m 26s

Is climate change scepticism hotting up?

Multiple climate reports have been published this week all saying a similar thing: that the UK and wider world are experiencing record temperatures, that humanity is "inducing" climate change and that, unless we cut emissions, things are just going to get even hotter.There are still some people however who believe it’s all hot air; that media coverage of climate stories is “fear mongering” and “manipulating”. But is it the science under scrutiny, or perhaps the path to net zero itself? On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by our climate change reporter Victoria Seabrook, editor and director of Carbon Brief Leo Hickman, and James Woudhuysen, visiting professor of forecasting and innovation at London South Bank University, to find out why, despite the science, climate scepticism is getting louder. Annie Joyce - senior podcast producerAlex Edden - interviews producer David Chipakupaku - podcast promotions producer Dave Terris - editor
27/07/2326m 18s

Strip searches in police custody and fallout to Nigel Farage's row with Coutts

Police at a station in Greater Manchester have been accused of unnecessary and invasive strip searches of women, without explanation, behind cell doors. Sky News has spoken to three women, one of whom was detained for 41 hours and also alleges she was sexually assaulted whilst in custody. A spokesperson for Greater Manchester Police said "there is currently no evidence to suggest any GMP employees have misconducted themselves or committed a criminal offence." On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson talks to our home editor Jason Farrell about the story. Plus, following Nigel Farage being dropped by the exclusive bank Coutts, which led to an apology from the BBC and NatWest's boss resigning, Niall sits down with our business correspondent Paul Kelso to hear about the fallout. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse, Rosie Gillott, Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Alex Edden Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Paul Stanworth
26/07/2325m 1s

Saving cinema: Why chains can't just rely on blockbusters and bad weather

Barbie and Oppenheimer have put the smiles back on the cinema chains after the difficult years during the pandemic, but could the glow soon wear off? For the first time in 60 years Hollywood actors and writers are on strike at the same time, so what impact will this have on the films we will see and the cinemas that show them? On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson is joined by our entertainment reporter and Backstage podcast host Claire Gregory to explain the box office success, and VUE International cinemas founder and CEO Timothy Richards on how to keep the momentum going. Annie Joyce - senior podcast producer David Chipakupaku – podcast promotion producer Wendy Parker - editor
25/07/2317m 33s

Rhodes on fire and is the UK cooling on net zero policies?

Evacuation orders due to wildfires on the Greek island have seen tens of thousands of residents and tourists fleeing the flames. And while wildfires in the region aren’t uncommon, scientists say climate change is increasing the intensity of heatwaves which can trigger fires. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to our Europe correspondent in Rhodes, Siobhan Robbins and Rhodes resident Micah Greaves, who tells us how dependent the island is on tourism. Plus, Niall is joined by Robert Colvile, director of the Centre for Policy Studies and former Tory advisor, to discuss if net zero policies can still be vote winners as the row continues over ULEZ expansion in London. Rosie Gillott - podcast producer David Chipakupaku – podcast promotion producer Wendy Parker - editor
24/07/2320m 35s

Dirty Work: Episode One - Russian Roulette

Sky News has a new podcast series called Dirty Work which we wanted to share with Daily listeners in our feed.Reporter Sahar Zand has been investigating Interpol red notices - which allow police forces to flag their most wanted persons at international borders around the world. On this episode, we hear from some of those people caught up in the system - who have faced detention, imprisonment, and extradition, with devastating and life-changing consequences.WARNING: This podcast contains strong language. Presenter: Sahar Zand Producers: Heidi Pett and Anne-Marie Bullock Senior Producer: Sarah BurkeSound Designer: James Bradshaw Editor: Paul Stanworth
22/07/2335m 4s

Getting ready for an election: What three by-elections can tell us

The Conservatives suffered two heavy defeats in a night of three by-elections, but narrowly held on to former PM Boris Johnson's old Uxbridge seat. Labour made history by overturning a 20,137 majority to take the North Yorkshire seat of Selby and Ainsty. The Lib Dems took Somerton and Frome in a victory Sir Ed Davey said showed his party was "firmly back in the West Country". On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by political editor Beth Rigby and elections analyst Dr Hannah Bunting to break down the votes from each of the constituencies, and to look ahead to what this can tell us about the next general election. Rosie Gillott - podcast producer Wendy Parker - editor
21/07/2325m 36s

Investigating Interpol

Niall Paterson welcomes the team behind a new Sky News podcast onto the Daily. Reporter Sahar Zand and producer Heidi Pett have been investigating Interpol red notices for the series “Dirty Work”. They’ve heard from people caught up in a system which allows police forces to flag their most wanted persons at international borders around the world. In some cases, those people are detained, imprisoned, and extradited, with devastating consequences. They’ve also head from the Interpol Secretary General who says the organization is doing everything it can to protect innocent people from being wrongly targeted.You can also listen to the new Sky News podcast Dirty Work: The Misuse of Interpol Red Notices here.Since this episode was recorded, we wish to clarify that there is currently an average of around 11,000 Red Notices published per year. In 2021, the number of red notices issued was 10,776. The total number of red notices and diffusions issued that year was 23,716. Diffusions are where a country makes the same request directly to another country. We also wish to clarify that Interpol does have a mechanism for the suspension of member countries, which is set out in its “Rules on the Processing of Data”. Soila Apparicio – podcast producer Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer Jada-Kai Meosa John – podcast promotion producer Paul Stanworth – editor
20/07/2317m 43s

Is Russia’s invasion of Ukraine ‘doomed’?

Senior Ukrainian military officials believe Russia is planning a massive attack in the northeastern Kharkiv region, in a bid to draw Ukraine's efforts away from its counteroffensive. It comes as the boss of MI6, Sir Richard Moore, suggested the invasion was “doomed”. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson sits down with our international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn and security and defence analyst Professor Michael Clarke to unpick the military offensive and counteroffensive. Plus, they discuss the news that a US soldier is being held in North Korea after crossing the border from South Korea without authorisation, as confirmed by the US military. Producer: Rosie GillottPromotions producer: Jada-Kai Meosa JohnEditor: Paul Stanworth
19/07/2317m 35s

Heatwaves happen - but why so many at once?

Temperatures across Europe soared to over 44C this week, with the heatwave expected to continue and reach record highs. Hot weather has also been recorded in China and the USA, but why are so many places so hot at the same time? On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Sky's climate and energy correspondent Hannah Thomas-Peter who is in Sardinia, one of the hottest places in Europe, about the heatwave there. Plus, our science and technology editor Tom Clarke on what's causing extreme weather across the globe. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Editor: Paul Stanworth
18/07/2319m 6s

Stuart Ramsay in Myanmar: What leaders don't want the world to see

Sky’s chief correspondent Stuart Ramsay and his team have witnessed the deadly realities of a civil war, which Myanmar’s leaders claim isn’t happening. Few Western journalists get into the southeast Asian country, previously known as Burma – but our news crew spent a month undercover deep in the jungle with resistance fighters, medics and volunteers – not far from where the fighting is taking place. On this Sky News Daily, Kimberley Leonard is joined by Stuart, to share his firsthand account from a place where reports of mass killings, thousands of arrests and human rights abuses, have been widely condemned. Annie Joyce - senior podcast producer David Chipakupaku – podcast promotion producer Paul Stanworth - editor
17/07/2319m 39s

The knee injury keeping players out of the FIFA Women's World Cup

As the Women's World Cup kicks off in Australia and New Zealand, up to 30 players won't be playing due to the same knee injury. Star players, including England's Beth Mead and captain Leah Williamson, are all suffering from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries that threaten their careers in the game. And women are 3.5 times more likely to suffer this type of injury compared to their male counterparts. On the Sky News Daily, Kimberley Leonard is joined by data and forensics correspondent Tom Cheshire and producer Maz Poynter who've been investigating why female players are more likely to sustain these injuries, and sports medicine specialist Dr Kate Jackson explains what teams and coaches are doing to try to prevent future injuries. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Interview producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
14/07/2315m 29s

Westminster Accounts: What are MPs doing with your cash?

A Sky News investigation has found Northern Research Group (NRG) MPs received political donations from a private donor to help them with campaigning - weeks after they authorised thousands of pounds of taxpayer funded expenses to be spent on the NRG. It raises questions about whether MPs authorised public funding to be spent on the NRG because they knew they would be rewarded with a campaign donation. As a result of the investigation, the parliamentary expenses watchdog IPSA has announced an investigation. On the Sky News Daily, host Kimberley Leonard is joined by our deputy politics editor Sam Coates to uncover his investigation and findings, and what issues it raises for parliamentary funding. Producer: Soila ApparicioPromotions producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Paul Stanworth
13/07/2313m 51s

Huw Edwards named but should the last few days have been different?

There had been days of widespread speculation and increasing pressure on the suspended BBC presenter to reveal his identity but now, Huw Edwards’ wife has issued a statement on his behalf. Vicky Flind told the PA news agency that her husband is suffering from serious mental health issues and is currently receiving care in hospital. Shortly before the revelation, the Met Police said there was “no information” to suggest a criminal offence had taken place following claims surrounding the star – including that he had paid a teenager for explicit photos. On this Sky News Daily, Kimberley Leonard is she’s joined by Jake Kanter - Deadline's investigations editor and former media editor at The Times. Emma-Rae Woodhouse – podcast producer Alex Edden – interviews producer Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer Paul Stanworth – editor
12/07/2315m 34s

The Ukraine foreign fighters come home, and pressure on BBC presenter

More allegations about the unnamed BBC presenter have been published by The Sun, claiming that the star broke COVID rules to meet a 23-year-old. Now that the Metropolitan Police have asked the BBC to pause internal inquiries into suspended presenter, we ask if there has been a mood shift in the way this story should have been reported. On the Sky News Daily with Kimberley Leonard, from outside the BBC’s New Broadcasting House, arts and entertainment correspondent Katy Spencer explains the latest allegations and how the story could progress. Plus, in Ukraine, our international correspondent John Sparks has interviewed two foreign volunteers who have been fighting in the army as foreign fighters for the past 17 months, including Rhys Byrne, codename 'Rambo', a spirited 28-year-old from Dublin. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
12/07/2324m 14s

BBC presenter: New claims as boss Tim Davie faces questions

The unnamed BBC presenter at the centre of claims involving sexually explicit photos is now facing allegations from a second young person – that he sent them threatening messages after contact on a dating app. Earlier, the BBC's director-general Tim Davie faced questions from journalists, as the corporation's Annual Report was delivered days after The Sun first broke their original story. On the Sky News Daily, Kimberley Leonard explores the latest developments with our reporter Sadiya Chowdhury, Sky’s home editor Jason Farrell and Jake Kanter - Deadline's investigations editor and former media editor at The Times. Podcast producer: Rosie GillottSenior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
11/07/2318m 47s

Extra episode: BBC presenter claims - new details emerge

On an extra Sky News Daily, Kimberley Leonard discusses new developments to the accusations that a BBC presenter paid a teenager thousands of pounds for explicit photos. Lawyers acting for the young person said the original story in the Sun was “totally wrong” and claims made by their mother were “rubbish”. The Sun said it has seen evidence to support the concerns. The newspaper also quoted the individual's mother and stepfather as saying "we stand by our account".Kimberley is joined by media lawyer Matthew Gill. Producer: Rosie GillottPromotion producer: David ChipakupakuEditor: Paul Stanworth
10/07/237m 7s

BBC presenter claims: Questions over trust and transparency

The BBC is under fire over its handling of accusations that a high-profile presenter paid a teenager thousands of pounds for sexually explicit photographs. The unnamed presenter was suspended over the weekend, but the teenager's mother claims the corporation was first made aware of allegations in May. Dame Caroline Dinenage, who chairs the Culture, Media and Sport committee, said she was concerned the corporation had taken a "very long time" to investigate the claims. On the Sky News Daily, Kimberley Leonard is joined by our home editor Jason Farrell and former BBC presenter Roger Bolton to explore what we know, and don't know, so far about the latest scandal to hit the BBC. Senior podcast producer: Annie Joyce Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
10/07/2319m 1s

Mortgages are going up, why aren’t savings?

Heads of the UK’s biggest banks have been summoned by the UK's financial watchdog over concerns interest rates on savings are too low. Higher Bank of England interest rates have led banks to put up mortgage costs , but savings rates are not rising as fast – a situation the Chancellor, Jeremy Hunt has said ‘needs resolving’. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood is joined by Sky’s business correspondent Paul Kelso, and Danni Hewson, Head of Financial Analysis at AJ Bell to find out what the rate disparity means for you, and if anything is likely to change any time soon. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
10/07/2321m 45s

Zuckerberg v Musk: Will Threads 'kill' Twitter?

Meta launched its new microblogging app Threads on Thursday, with boss Mark Zuckerberg reporting 10 million sign ups in the first seven hours.But can the tech company, which also owns Instagram and WhatsApp, capitalise on recent changes at Twitter by owner Elon Musk which have alienated many of its users and advertisers? Not content with a battle on socials, Meta's multi-billionaire owner also seemingly agreed to a cage fight challenge from his rival – though no date has yet been set for that. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood takes a closer look at how Threads measures up against Twitter with tech commentator and journalist Chris Stokel-Walker. Plus, Sally discusses the rivalry between Zuckerberg and Musk with Ben Little, associate professor of cultural politics at the University of East Anglia, who co-authored the book 'New Patriarchs of Digital Capitalism: Celebrity Tech Founders and Networks of Power'. Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer Alex Edden – interviews producer David Chipakupaku – podcast promotion producer Paul Stanworth - editor
07/07/2319m 48s

Could AI make this podcast?

As artificial intelligence becomes more and more advanced, fears are growing about companies replacing human staff with computers. Businesses from energy providers to car makers are already using AI, but are there some jobs it can’t do? Sky’s science and technology editor, Tom Clarke, has tested if AI could do his job by creating an AI news reporter. On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood is joined by Tom and YouTuber and coder Kris Fagerlie to find out how they built the AI reporter. Plus, she speaks to Carl Benedikt Frey, associate professor of AI & Work at Oxford’s Internet Institute, about how advancements in AI technology could change the types of tasks we do at work. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Paul Stanworth
06/07/2324m 30s

NHS at 75: What’s the story for maternity services?

On 5 July 1948, the NHS was born, promising post-War Britons health support from cradle to grave, free at the point of delivery. Seventy-five years later, and the service is constantly under pressure, and questions are being asked about how sustainable its future is.In this episode of the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood spends time with staff, patients, and newborns on the maternity unit at Whittington Hospital, in North London.She examines how services have evolved over the last 75 years for the Service, the pressures on staff as they try to cope after lockdown - and the future for one of Britian's most cherished creations.Producer: Emma WoodhouseInterviews producer: Alex EddenEditor: Paul StanworthPromotions producer: David Chipakupaku
05/07/2326m 37s

Why has a teenager’s death triggered riots in France?

A week after police shot dead a 17-year-old boy of Algerian descent, named as Nahel Merzouk, as he drove away from a traffic stop, riots continue across France. The officer who shot Nahel has been charged with voluntary homicide and his lawyer says he is "devastated". The teen's death has revived grievances about policing and racial profiling in France's suburbs. Some 3,000 people have been arrested so far and the mayor of Paris suburb L'Hay-les-Roses, Vincent Jeanbrun’s home was ram-raided by a burning car as his family slept over the weekend. On the Sky News Daily, host Sally Lockwood hears from our Europe correspondent Adam Parsons in Paris who has been covering this story since the riots kicked off. And Jean Beaman, who has studied and written about state violence in France, explains the deeper-rooted racism still present across society. Producer: Soila ApparicioInterviews producer: Alex EddenPromotions producer: David Chipakupaku
04/07/2316m 1s

Narendra Modi: Why India's leader is being courted by the West

Narendra Modi has been doing the rounds on the international stage – most recently meeting US president Joe Biden in Washington, where he received a 21-gun salute during his visit. India's prime minister is also currently negotiating a free trade deal with the UK, after securing one with Australia last year. But India's prime minister has been criticised at home for censorship, concerns about the country's human rights record and embracing far right nationalism. So, why is the West courting Narendra Modi? On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson takes a deep dive to explore the man himself, his power and his country as he is joined by our India reporter Neville Lazarus and professor Kate Sullivan de Estrada, who is director of the contemporary South Asian studies programme at the University of Oxford. Annie Joyce – senior podcast producerSydney Pead - podcast producerSimon Windsor - archive researcher Danielle Weekes-Chilufya – editor
03/07/2314m 27s

Sex, Lies and Police spies: The Met’s undercover police scandal

The first report from a seven-year inquiry into undercover policing in England and Wales has been published, finding that undercover policing deployments were unjustified and would have been "brought to a rapid end" if the public had known what was going on. First commissioned in 2015 by then Home Secretary Theresa May, the investigation is aiming to discover the truth about undercover policing over the past 50 years and provide recommendations for the future. On the Sky News Daily with Niall Paterson, our Home Editor Jason Farrell explains the history of ‘spycops’ that led to the inquiry, and Kate Wilson, an environmental activist who was deceived into a two-year intimate relationship by an undercover police officer in 2003, talks about her experience. Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Danielle Weekes-Chilufya
30/06/2319m 16s

Sewage, leaks and hosepipe bans: Should our water companies be nationalised?

The revelation that ministers are considering bringing Thames Water into temporary public ownership has reopened the fierce debate over the privatisation of the country's water industry. It comes after the sudden resignation of Thames Water’s chief executive and Sky’s exclusive report into government contingency plans for the firm’s potential collapse. On Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson speaks to business correspondent Paul Kelso about how Britain’s biggest water company came to be on the brink of collapse and the chairman and founder of River Action, Charles Watson, about whether decades of problems with sewage, leaks and supply could lead to the renationalisation of water firms. Producer: Emma Rae WoodhouseInterviews producer: Alex EddenEditor: Danielle Weekes-Chilufya
29/06/2319m 51s

COVID Inquiry: Why were we not prepared for a pandemic?

The COVID inquiry has started, with the first part looking into how resilient and prepared the country was for a pandemic. Former Conservative prime minister David Cameron, ex-chancellor George Osbourne, health secretary during COVID Matt Hancock and the UK government's chief medical adviser Chris Whitty have given evidence so far. On this Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson is joined by our health correspondent Ashish Joshi to summarise what's been said so far, and Dr Chaand Nagpaul, former chair of the BMA UK Council from 2017-22 - who represented the medical profession during the pandemic - explores how prepared, or ill-prepared, the UK was for COVID. Producer: Soila Apparicio Assistant producer: Amy Lakin Editor: Danielle Weekes-Chilufya
28/06/2317m 38s

Wagner mutiny: What’s next for the war and Putin’s Russia?

President Putin's hold on power in Russia has been shaken following a brief mutiny over the weekend led by Yevgeny Prigozhin, the boss of the private military group Wagner. An apparent deal between Putin and Prigozhin has the Wagner leader now exiled to Belarus. Joining host Niall Paterson on the Sky News Daily, our correspondent Diana Magnay, in Moscow, describes the feeling within the country on how close Prigozhin's army came. Plus, international affairs editor Dominic Waghorn, in Ukraine, analyses the impact of the mutiny on the war. Producers: Emma Rae Woodhouse and Soila Apparicio Editor: Dave Terris
27/06/2320m 24s

Roe v Wade one year on

Saturday 24 June marks a year since the US Supreme Court overturned the Roe v Wade ruling, ending a federal right to abortion access. In 14 states, most abortions are now banned, with no exception for rape or incest in nearly all those states.The overturning was highly controversial with more than 100 global health organisations including the British Medical Association describing it as a "catastrophic blow to the lives of millions of women, girls and pregnant people".On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson is joined by our US correspondent Marth Kelner to explore the impact of Roe v Wade's overturning in Tennessee, and the important role it plays in the abortion debate.Podcast Producers: Sydney Pead, Rosie Gillott and Sarah GoughAssistant Producer: Amy Lakin Editor: Adam Jay
26/06/2321m 48s

The tragedy of the Titan submersible and the dangers of diving down to the Titanic

Search and rescue efforts to locate a missing submersible with five passengers inside has become a recovery mission after the US Coast Guard determined there was “a catastrophic loss of the pressure chamber” following finding debris in the search area in the North Atlantic ocean. The deep-sea vessel, called Titan, lost contact with the surface on its way down to view the Titanic shipwreck, a voyage that has become increasingly popular among wealthy tourists.But more than five years ago, industry bodies raised concerns about the safety of the vessel with the company that designed it, warning its "experimental approach" to the expedition could have "catastrophic" outcomes.Today on the Sky News Daily, international correspondent John Sparks reports from the centre of the recovery operation effort in Newfoundland, and Rear Admiral Dr Chris Parry offers an insight into the largely unregulated industry of underwater submersive vehicles.Podcast producers: Soila Apparacio and Sydney Pead Editor: Adam Jay
23/06/2315m 46s

Windrush: Sir Trevor Phillips assesses the impact 75 years on

On 22 June 1948, HMT Empire Windrush arrived in the UK. The ship carried 1,027 passengers and two stowaways on a voyage from Jamaica to London. Of these, more than 800 passengers gave their last country of residence as somewhere in the Caribbean. On arrival in the UK, however, people were often met with racism, a lack of acknowledgement of their professional skills and very different living conditions. The Windrush's arrival has become symbolic of the generation of Commonwealth citizens who came to live in Britain between 1948 and 1973. Some 75 years on, broadcaster Sir Trevor Phillips sits down with Sky News Daily host Niall Paterson to explore the impact and influence of the Windrush generation on British life and culture. You can watch Windrush and Us with Trevor Phillips on Sky News's YouTube channel. Podcast producer: Soila Apparicio Podcast promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Adam Jay
22/06/2320m 17s

The far-right is on the rise in Germany, but could it go mainstream across Europe?

Right-wing extremism is the greatest danger to democracy in Germany, according to the country’s domestic intelligence agency. The Alternative for Germany Party, Germany’s main far-right party, now attracts a third of voters in the east of the country and the nation is home to over 38,000 registered right-wing extremists. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Siobhan Robbins, Sky’s Europe Correspondent who has spoken to members as well as victims of the far-right in Germany. We also hear from Julia Ebner, a senior research fellow at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue and author of Going Mainstream, on how far-right ideas seep into mainstream politics. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Assisitant podcast producer: Amy Lakin Interviews producer: Alex Edden Promotions producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Adam Jay
21/06/2320m 45s

What will 6% mortgages do to the housing market?

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has ruled out help for homeowners after the average fixed two-year mortgage rate hit 6% for the first time this year. More than 400,000 people will see their existing fixed deals end between July and September, meaning they could face significant rises to their monthly bills. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson hears from one homeowner whose mortgage is about to go up by £600-800 a month and asks our business correspondent Gurpreet Narwan, why rates have risen again now. Plus, Gráinne Gilmore, from property consultancy Cluttons, explains why rising rates could mean more houses on the market than people wanting to buy them. Podcast producer: Emma-Rae Woodhouse Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Adam Jay
20/06/2321m 21s

Sky’s Diana Magnay on reporting from Putin’s Russia

In a speech made to a business forum in St Petersburg, President Vladimir Putin denied Russia is isolated from the rest of the world. But as foreign companies withdraw and many Russian journalists flee the country, it's getting harder to find out what’s going on inside one of the world's most powerful nations. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Sky’s Moscow correspondent, Diana Magnay, to discuss how Russia has changed in the decade since she first began reporting there, and what it’s like to work as a journalist inside an increasingly isolated authoritarian state.Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Editor: Paul Stanworth
19/06/2319m 26s

The ‘ghost children’ problem: why so many are still missing school

Since the pandemic, hundreds of thousands of children in England haven't returned to school. They’re known as “ghost children,” and in the first term of this year, more than 125,000 children were out of school more than in school, a figure that’s doubled since the pandemic. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Nick Martin, Sky’s People and Politics Correspondent who has been investigating what is stopping students from returning to class, and Conservative MP Flick Drummond to discuss how to stop children from falling through the cracks.Producers: Sydney Pead and Soila Apparicio Editor: Paul Stanworth
16/06/2319m 57s

Boris Johnson report: Brutal, damning, but can he really say ‘vindictive’?

Boris Johnson lied to parliament over Partygate allegations, according to a report from MPs. The House of Commons Privileges Committee recommended a 90-day suspension, but as the former prime minister has already resigned as an MP, the Commons could now vote for his right to enter the Parliamentary estate to be revoked. Mr Johnson has called the findings “a lie” and described the report as a "political assassination". On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Sky’s political editor Beth Rigby to discuss the report and look at what’s next for the former Prime Minister. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Editor: Paul Stanworth
15/06/2315m 4s

The challenges of getting to a net zero world

Sand, salt, iron, copper, oil and lithium - six materials we couldn't do without. But is it possible to fulfil our sustainability goals in building renewables and batteries without their exploitation? Our economics and data editor Ed Conway sits down with Daily podcast host Niall Paterson to talk about his latest book, Material World: A Substantial Story of Our Past and Future, and discuss the reality of the move to net zero on our resources, the impact of geopolitical tensions in China, and where the UK stands as a post-industrial economy. Producer: Soila Apparicio Digital Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Paul Stanworth
15/06/2317m 23s

Toxic workplace culture and what to do about it

After a string of high-profile accusations about toxic cultures in workplaces, the Sky News Daily hears from a Harvard professor credited with turning around problems at Uber. Frances Frei, the senior vice-president of leadership and strategy at the company, explains how she made siginifcant changes in a matter of months to address an environment rife with claims of sexism.Host Kimberley Leonard also asks legal trainer Neha Lugg about why bad behaviour in the workplace is coming under a new level of scrutiny.Podcast producer: Sydney Pead Interviews producer: Alex Edden Editor: Philly Beaumont
14/06/2317m 4s

Johnson, Sturgeon and Trump: Former leaders and the latest fallouts

Niall Paterson speaks to Sky News correspondents on a day of big political stories – with Boris Johnson’s decision to stand down as an MP on Friday still causing a wave of activity in Westminster.Our chief political correspondent Jon Craig explains how Mr Johnson’s shock resignation could impact the next general election. It wasn’t just Mr Johnson making headlines though. Our Scotland correspondent Connor Gillies explains what happens next following Nicola Sturgeon’s arrest. The former SNP leader insists she’s innocent after being held over the weekend as part of an investigation into the party’s finances. Plus, US correspondent Mark Stone talks about how damaging Donald Trump’s indictment could be for his 2024 presidential ambitions. Rosie Gillott – podcast producer Paul Stanworth – editor
13/06/2326m 25s

Boris Johnson goes. How do Rishi Sunak and the Tories react?

Sky News political correspondent Rob Powell and chief political correspondent Jon Craig discuss the fallout from Boris Johnson’s decision to step down as an MP. He’s forced one of three by-elections after close Conservative colleagues Nadine Dorries and Nigel Adams also decided to leave the Commons immediately. Rob and Jon consider how Rishi Sunak and his party will react to the prospect of the by-elections and what this moment could mean for uniting – or further dividing – the Conservative benches. They also discuss the report from the Commons Privileges Committee which might have been the catalyst for the former PM’s resignation. Producer - David ChipakupakuEditor - Paul Stanworth
12/06/2322m 7s

Is the Nova Kakhovka dam breach the most significant moment in the war so far?

Thousands of people have been evacuated after a dam in the Russian-occupied Kherson region of Ukraine was breached on Tuesday. International intelligence organisations believe it is most likely the dam was deliberately targeted by Russian forces in an attempt to delay Ukraine’s expected counteroffensive. NATO’s secretary general has said the move demonstrates Russia’s brutality. But Moscow denies being responsible for the damage to the dam. It insists Ukraine is to blame. On the Sky News Daily, Kimberley Leonard is joined by our international correspondent John Sparks, and Sean Bell, military analyst and former Air Vice-Marshal, to discuss the implications of the dam breach for the course of the war.
09/06/2317m 21s

Harry v Daily Mirror publisher: Day three and what happens next

Prince Harry has finished making his case to a High Court judge after another day of cross-examination by Andrew Green, the KC representing the Daily Mirror’s publishers. On the Sky News Daily, Kimberley Leonard is joined by our royal correspondent Laura Bundock, media lawyer Jonathan Coad and Sky reporter Sarah Hajibagheri, who has spent the day reporting from inside court. The Duke of Sussex became the first senior royal to take the witness box for more than 130 years this week, as he claims information in stories that featured across their titles were obtained illegally. Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer Sydney Pead – podcast producer Paul Stanworth - editor
07/06/2320m 0s

Harry v Daily Mirror publisher: What happened on day two?

Prince Harry has given evidence for the first time at the High Court in his legal battle against Mirror Group Newspapers. The Duke of Sussex set out his case in a 55-page document, blaming the tabloid press for "inciting hatred and harassment" in his private life, and casting him as a "playboy prince" and a "thicko". He also faced cross-examination from the newspaper's lawyer who questioned the prince's claims that information in the stories were obtained illegally. On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto is joined by Sky's royal correspondent, Laura Bundock, outside the court in central London to go through the events of the day. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott and Sydney Pead Editor: Paul Stanworth
06/06/2314m 40s

Harry v Daily Mirror publisher: What happened on day one?

The Duke of Sussex has been accused of wasting the High Court's time on the opening day of his case against Mirror Group Newspapers. Prince Harry did not appear in court on Monday for the start of the trial in which he is accusing the newspapers' journalists of using unlawful methods to gather information about him, including phone hacking. On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto is joined by Sky's royal correspondent, Laura Bundock, and media lawyer Jonathan Coad, outside the court in central London to go through the events of the day. Senior podcast producer: Annie JoycePodcast producer: Sydney PeadEditor: Philly Beaumont
05/06/2314m 10s

The secret Iranian Russian arms deal

Sky News has seen a document which – if real - appears to be the first hard evidence that Iran has sold ammunition to Russia for its war in Ukraine. An informed security source has told our security and defence editor Deborah Haynes that they believe the purported arms contract is authentic, although we have not yet been able to verify this.On the Sky News Daily, Kamali Melbourne speaks to Deborah about what’s in the document and reaction to it – including from Britain's Foreign Secretary, Ukraine’s prime minister and the Ukrainian ambassador to London.Plus, they look at what more we can learn about Russia’s relationship with Iran and, what it means for the war in Ukraine and the wider world. Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer Philly Beaumont - editor
05/06/2319m 38s

Greedflation: are businesses profiteering from the cost of living crisis?

As food inflation rises to 19.2%, its highest rate in 42 years, the European Central Bank has suggested that it could be down to, in part, businesses profiteering from the cost of living crisis by increasing their prices for larger margins, a term known as 'greedflation'. But what is the data behind the suggestion? On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood is joined by our economics and data editor Ed Conway, who helps to shed light on what greedflation is and how this term came about. He also shares data Sky News has calculated that breaks down what supermarkets spend their profits on. Producer: Soila Apparicio Junior Producer: Amy Lakin Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
02/06/2316m 11s

'I'm scared': What it's like to be LGBTQ+ in a country where you could be killed

New anti-LGBTQ+ laws have been passed in Uganda, expanding on rules which already criminalised same-sex acts and carried a maximum penalty of life imprisonment. The new anti-homosexuality law now makes "aggravated homosexuality" - which is defined as sexual relations involving people infected with HIV, as well as with those under 18, and other categories of vulnerable people - punishable with prison sentences of up to 14 years. On the Sky News Daily, Kamali Melbourne speaks to Jay Mulucha, a human rights activist and executive director of Fem Alliance Uganda, who tells us what it's like to be LGBTQ+ in Uganda and to Ashwanee Budoo-Scholtz, Deputy Director of the Africa Division at Human Rights Watch, about the history of these laws. Producer: Soila Apparicio Junior Producer: Amy Lakin Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
01/06/2317m 20s

Migrant crisis: The people found at sea

Sky News has been on board one of the biggest-ever migrant rescue missions on the Mediterranean Sea. More than 600 people were spotted by rescue forces crammed on to an abandoned and overloaded fishing boat. The passengers left Libya, heading for Italy, but were abandoned by the captain after food and water started running out. The crossing is one of the most dangerous, with at least a thousand deaths already this year. Many of the survivors were seriously ill, injured and dehydrated. On the Sky News Daily, Liz Bates is joined by Sky's Europe correspondent Adam Parsons who witnessed the rescue operation and Sky's political correspondent Ali Fortescue to discuss how the issue of migration is shaping European politics. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Editor: Philly Beaumont
31/05/2318m 48s

Student loans in England: is the degree still value for money?

Changes to student finance this September will see future graduates paying back their university debts earlier and for longer than any generation before them.Some analysts say the changes which include 10 extra years on the life of the loan and a lower income when repayments start could see some graduates paying almost double over the course of their working lives. So, if you’re paying more for longer, is a degree still worth the cost?On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto is joined by money expert Greg Marsh, and social mobility professor Lee Elliot Major to discuss how the debt is changing and options young people have.And ahead of her exams, sixth form student Thea Roland talks about her future university plans.Producer: Sydney PeadEditor: Philly Beaumont
30/05/2316m 45s

Net migration: What it means for the UK

Net migration to the UK rose to 606,000 in the 12 months to December 2022, the highest number for a calendar year on record - despite a Tory 2019 manifesto commitment to "bring overall numbers down". The figures, published by the Office for National Statistics, show that most people arriving to the UK last year were non-EU nationals. The body attributed a "unique year" for migration to "world events" including the war in Ukraine and unrest in Hong Kong. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson breaks down the numbers with Sky’s data and forensics correspondent Tom Cheshire and picks through the fallout in Westminster with political correspondent Ali Fortescue. Plus, Madeleine Sumption, Director of the Migration Observatory at Oxford University, explains how what the government says actually impacts the number of people that come to the UK. Podcast Producer: Rosie Gillott Editor: Philly Beaumont
26/05/2322m 25s

Ron DeSantis: The Republican rival who could trump Trump

There had been months of speculation, but Ron DeSantis has now officially launched his bid for the White House - filing a declaration of candidacy with the US federal electoral commission. He has been described as Trump 2.0 and has pitched himself as the more "credible" choice for the Republican nomination who could face Democrat incumbent Joe Biden in next year's US presidential election race. But who is Ron DeSantis? And can he rival Donald Trump? On the Sky News Daily, Sally Lockwood is joined by our US correspondent Mark Stone in Florida and state government reporter for the Tampa Bay Times, Kirby Wilson, as they dive into DeSantis’ backstory and his politics – including his response to COVID and feud with Disney. Plus, they look at what a DeSantis White House would mean for the American people.Annie Joyce - senior podcast producer Nelly Stefanova - archive researcherPhilly Beaumont - editor
25/05/2320m 25s

How 'fake' families are smuggled into the UK on skilled worker visas

Criminal gangs are exploiting Britain's need to fill jobs by using the skilled worker visa system as a route to traffic people into the country. Under the scheme, someone who has been offered a job in the UK is allowed to bring dependents with them, but Sky News has learned about several cases of abuse of the system. On the Sky News Daily Niall Paterson is joined by our communities correspondent Lisa Holland and producer Nick Stylianou who have uncovered the story to explain how 'fake' families are smuggled in. Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont
24/05/2323m 15s

Suella Braverman and the speeding ticket row

Home Secretary Suella Braverman has been accused of breaking the ministerial code of conduct by asking civil servants to arrange a private speed-awareness course after she was caught speeding in 2022. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson asks Tim Durrant from the Institute for Government what breaking the ministerial code actually means and speaks to Sky’s political correspondent Rob Powell about the political reasons this story may have broken now. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Editor: Philly Beaumont
23/05/2321m 22s

Trophy hunting: The row about conservation and colonialism

Earlier this year, MPs voted to stop trophy hunters bringing back the body parts of endangered animals – such as rhino horns - into Britain. However, not everyone agrees with a blanket ban. Some conservationists and local community leaders in parts of Africa warn it unintentionally risks reversing their efforts to grow populations of animals including elephants, lions and the critically endangered black rhino. They also worry bans like this could undermine the livelihoods of people in these rural areas. On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto speaks to Jens Ulrik Høgh, who has hunted in Africa dozens of times, and conservationist Maxi Pia Louis, who talks about what communities in Namibia are doing to protect species and their relationship with hunting groups. Plus, Leah is joined by wildlife expert Professor Amy Dickman, from the University of Oxford, to discuss what evidence there is that trophy hunting supports conservation – and we hear from Henry Smith, the MP who put forward the import ban which is currently going through the House of Lords. Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer Philly Beaumont – editor
22/05/2321m 47s

Could AI really take your job?

As BT announce they’re expecting to cut up to 10,000 jobs in the next decade due to advances in Artificial Intelligence, concerns remain over the country's readiness to deal with the new and surprisingly rapid evolution of AI. So how worried should we really be that AI could be coming for all our jobs? And what are our rights when it comes to AI in the office. On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto is joined by Sky’s business correspondent Paul Kelso who has been speaking to firms already integrating AI into their workforce, and Mary Towers, employment rights expert from the Trade Union Congress, talks about what rights we have already, and what more needs to be done. Podcast producer: Rosie Gillott Editor: Philly Beaumont
19/05/2320m 8s

What is happening to the Uyghurs in China?

Western journalists have been inside Xinjiang, China's largest region in the northwest of the country for the first time since COVID restrictions were lifted. The province is home to the native Uyghurs - a mostly Muslim community of around 12 million people. They've lived in the area for several hundred years.Human rights groups as well as the UK and US governments have accused China of committing genocide against Uyghurs in the region. The United Nations also said in 2018 that they believe China had detained around one million of the minority group in camps against their will. On the Sky News Daily, Leah Boleto speaks to Helen-Ann Smith, Sky’s Asia Correspondent, who recently visited some of these camps and to Sky’s Tom Cheshire, who was covering the region for us for nearly five years and is now our data and forensics correspondent. Annie Joyce – senior podcast producer Paul Stanworth - editor
18/05/2323m 46s