Tech Tent

Tech Tent

By BBC World Service

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

Episodes

Wikipedia’s editing war

Can the online encyclopaedia be impartial in a world of hotly-contested narratives? Plus, is Apple struggling to innovate? And the privacy implications of Facebook’s smart sunglasses. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.
17/09/2124m 29s

El Salvador's Bitcoin experiment

El Salvador becomes the first country to adopt Bitcoin as legal tender. Cryptocurrency fans celebrate, but will Salvadorans benefit? Rory Cellan-Jones speaks to Alex Gladstein from the Human Rights Foundation, who says Bitcoin can help give citizens of poorer countries more economic freedom. Also on the programme, Facebook's algorithm is accused of perpetuating gender stereotypes in the way it shows job adverts to men and women. Naomi Hirst from the campaign group Global Witness explains. And what will a world powered by artificial intelligence look like in 20 years' time? AI pioneer Kai-Fu Lee paints a picture of life in 2041. (Photo: A woman buys in a store that accepts bitcoins in El Zonte, La Libertad, El Salvador. Credit: Getty Images)
10/09/2124m 4s

China's video games ban

China announces plans to restrict children to just three hours of video games a week. How will gamers cope and what does it mean for China's booming video games industry? We speak to Rui Ma, China tech watcher and host of the Tech Buzz China podcast, and to games industry analyst Lisa Cosmas Hanson from Niko Partners. Plus the battle over the video game streaming market hots up, with major streaming stars switching from Twitch to YouTube. Can YouTube ever challenge Twitch's dominance? Louise Shorthouse from Ampere Analysis explains. And the BBC's cyber security correspondent Joe Tidy tells us about the strange case of a fake Banksy NFT, and why one collector paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for it. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC technology reporter Jane Wakefield. (Photo: A gamer yawns during an esports tournament in Shanghai, China. Credit: Getty Images)
03/09/2124m 0s

AI: Reality and hype

Is language-based artificial intelligence as capable as it seems? We visit a theatre production that places the GPT-3 algorithm at its heart. Plus, why attempts at using AI to help diagnose and treat Covid-19 don’t yet appear to have yielded significant results. And how sensors and AI might help provide better care for vulnerable people in their own homes. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.
27/08/2124m 3s

Fears over Afghan biometric data

Human rights activists say that the Taliban could use databases compiled by the previous government and coalition forces to target citizens. Plus, why is there a flurry of investment in undersea internet cables. And the amazing stories behind some emoji characters. Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with BBC tech reporter Chris Vallance. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Representation of a fingerprint scan, Credit: Getty Images).
20/08/2123m 58s

Removing carbon from the air

Can tech to capture and store carbon prevent a climate catastrophe? Plus how cyber criminals can now check whether their planned cryptocurrency transfers will raise suspicions. And is there any significant market for folding phones? Presented by Joe Tidy, with BBC Click tech reporter Jen Copestake. Produced by Jat Gill.
13/08/2123m 44s

China cracks down on online games

A state-run media outlet brands online games ‘electronic drugs’ and calls for more curbs on the industry. Plus, the AI that’s claimed to speed up insurance claims following extreme weather events. And could machine learning make recruitment fairer? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a young woman with large headphones looking at her smartphone, Credit: Getty Images).
06/08/2123m 52s

Intel’s road ahead

Pat Gelsinger, the CEO of Intel, outlines his plan to regain the lead in silicon chips. Plus, the US tech giants report bumper quarterly profits. Will regulators be taking note? And is the battle against online terrorist propaganda being won? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a silicon chip with a road vanishing into the distance, Credit: Getty Images).
30/07/2123m 53s

Fresh questions over Pegasus spyware

How the Pegasus software from Israel’s NSO Group has kept ahead of smartphone makers’ attempts to block it. Plus, can Zoom’s new app features keep people video-conferencing post-pandemic, or has everyone had enough of virtual meetings? And the AI designed to help wine producers take more risks with what they make. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.
23/07/2123m 56s

Football and online hate

England’s black players received a wave of racist abuse after the team lost to Italy in the European Championship final. What could the social platforms do to end such behaviour? Plus websites associated with the hacker group REvil go offline. And why an old Super Mario 64 video game cartridge sold for $1.5m at auction. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and BBC cybersecurity reporter Joe Tidy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: England footballer Marcus Rashford, Credit: PA).
16/07/2123m 52s

Have apps helped tackle the pandemic?

Did exposure and contact tracing apps live up to the hopes for them? Plus, how ransomware-as-a-service is becoming a serious cyber threat. And new laws in the US could give people access to the information and parts they need to repair, rather than replace, their devices. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Chris Vallance and Cody Godwin. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Hands of people at a picnic with their phones and face masks, Credit: Getty Images).
09/07/2123m 47s

Should robots look like humans?

SoftBank pauses production of the Pepper service robot with no date for when it will resume. Does it suggest a lack of appetite for humanoid devices? Plus, Mobile World Congress is back in hybrid form. Does the online / in-person attendance model work for big tech events? Plus, why the system of internet addresses is preventing many people from getting online. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of the Pepper robot, Credit: Reuters).
02/07/2123m 38s

Antivirus pioneer John McAfee found dead

The colourful and controversial entrepreneur created an entire industry with his early antivirus software. But he was now facing extradition from Spain to the US on tax charges. Plus, gamers say no to Facebook’s attempt to put ads in virtual reality titles. And has a year of meeting and hanging out virtually whetted people’s appetites for a metaverse? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of John McAfee, Credit: Getty Images).
25/06/2123m 36s

Web creator to sell source code as an NFT

Sir Tim Berners-Lee surprises observers by using the latest tech craze to raise funds for charity. Plus, we visit the Founders Forum ClimateTech Summit to hear entrepreneurs’ ideas for tackling the environmental emergency. And will wearable health devices one day be replaced by implanted sensors? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with senior BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Sir Tim Berners-Lee with NFT graphics, Credit: Getty Images).
18/06/2124m 14s

Tech victories for law enforcement

The FBI recovers Bitcoins paid in the Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack, and separately, tricks organised crime suspects into using a messaging app they could monitor. Plus leading researcher Prof. Kate Crawford argues that AI is neither artificial, nor intelligent. And we hear about the chat-bot based gadget for recording your audio biography. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of the FBI logo and person wearing a jacket with the initials. Credit: Getty Images).
11/06/2123m 57s

Huawei pins hopes on HarmonyOS

The Chinese giant launches its own smartphone and connected device operating system after the US blocked access to key Google Android tech. Will China be a big enough market for it to become established? Plus, how machine learning is helping to improve the monitoring of Parkinson’s Disease symptoms. And the debate over plans by the National Health Service in England to open patients’ local medical records to researchers and planners. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Huawei smart watch running HarmonyOS with the company logo behind it, Credit: Huawei)
06/06/2123m 50s

Can bitcoin mining ever be green?

The cryptocurrency business tries to boost its green credentials with the formation of a 'Bitcoin Mining Council' and the help of Elon Musk. Will it make a difference? Jaime Leverton, boss of Hut 8 Mining, and finance writer Frances Coppola discuss. Plus a BBC investigation finds the Chinese trying out technology that claims to sense your mood, and airplane engine maker Rolls Royce let us into its factory to look at how data is powering its business. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield.
28/05/2124m 6s

Estonia’s digital society and the pandemic

President of Estonia Kersti Kaljulaid discusses how the wide availability of online government services helped citizens during the lockdown. Plus, how Google hopes a tie-up with Samsung will give its WearOS smartwatch platform a boost. And has Apple compromised too much in its dealings with China? (Image: Estonia’s President Kersti Kaljulaid, Credit: Getty Images).
21/05/2124m 6s

Ransomware hackers disable key oil pipeline

Has the threat to infrastructure from hackers demanding money been underestimated? Plus, a Facebook moderator tells the Irish Parliament of the toll the work is taking on her mental health. And we chat to an engineer trying to develop affordable autonomous driving tech for Indian cities. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC cybersecurity reporter Joe Tidy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Valve representing an oil pipeline, with cryptocurrency tokens. Credit: Getty Images).
14/05/2124m 4s

Trump question comes back to Facebook

The platform’s external Oversight Board says Facebook was right to suspend Donald Trump’s account after the January riot in Washington DC, but wrong to do it indefinitely and without enough explanation. It says Facebook itself must now rule on whether to reinstate or ban permanently Mr Trump. Plus, how personalised music playlists might help reduce anxiety and pain in medical patients. And the robots are coming … to solve your crossword puzzles. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with senior BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: President Donald Trump next to a Facebook logo, Credit: Getty Images).
07/05/2123m 36s

Is Apple iOS 14.5 hurting advertisers?

Apple’s long-awaited iPhone software update arrives with new features to block trackers. What effect is it having so far? Plus, how a machine learning startup aims to help doctors detect lung cancer earlier. And former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown warns of a global digital divide. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.
30/04/2123m 6s

The big noise in social media

Facebook and Reddit follow Clubhouse into social audio. Does the idea have lasting appeal? Plus, home-made jet suit builder Richard Browning on what’s next for his creation. And why England’s former Children’s Commissioner is taking legal action against TikTok. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech editor Leo Kelion. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a woman listening to audio on headphones, Credit: Getty Images).
23/04/2123m 57s

The global workforce

Tech founder Phil Libin tells us why he’s doing away with offices for good and no longer advertising jobs with a location. Plus, is China reigning in its tech giants after Alibaba is given a $2bn fine for market abuse. And the AI tech that helps people with impaired speech interact with voice-activated devices. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with senior BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a woman working behind a laptop computer, Credit: Getty Images).
16/04/2123m 26s

Ad cookies facing the crunch

How Apple and Google’s privacy clampdown will bring upheaval to online advertising. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.
09/04/2123m 36s

The future of computing

The CEO of ARM on why its new chips focus on security and artificial intelligence. Plus we hear about two exciting projects to bring quantum computing out of the lab. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: ARM chief executive Simon Segars, credit: Getty Images).
02/04/2123m 6s

Why Intel will make chips for its rivals

The tech giant says it aims to rebalance world chip supply from Asia to the US and Europe. Plus, what can President Biden do about hackers backed by Russia and China? And is crowdtasking the next part of the gig economy to face calls for better workers’ rights? Presented by Joe Tidy, with BBC tech reporter Cristina Criddle. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger, Credit: Getty Images).
26/03/2123m 28s

Uber’s u-turn on drivers

The ride-hailing giant says it will pay UK drivers a minimum wage and other benefits. Will other gig-economy firms be forced to follow suit? Plus how cryptocurrency is a craze in India but faces a government ban. And why using email could make workers “more stupid” through the day. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.
19/03/2123m 36s

The $69m digital artwork

How the boom in 'non-fungible tokens' helped one artist become a multimillionaire. Mike Winkelmann - also known as Beeple - explains why his art has sold for $69m at auction despite being freely available to download. Also on the programme: A global security breach of Microsoft's email software hits thousands of businesses. We hear from the BBC's cybersecurity specialist Joe Tidy on why so-called 'zero-day' vulnerabilities are so scary. And Onyinye Ough from the organisation Step Up Nigeria tells us how virtual reality is being used to fight corruption in the West African country. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. (Picture credit: Christie's/ Getty Images)
12/03/2123m 37s

The new “space race” for chips

A close look at how the latest silicon chips are made, what they’re used for, and why they represent “the new space race” at the heart of US-China rivalry. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech editor Leo Kelion. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Illustration with the flags of China and the USA behind a silicon chip, Credit: Getty Images).
05/03/2123m 45s

Who blinked - Facebook or Australia?

Facebook and the Australian government reach a compromise over a new law requiring tech giants to pay publishers for news content. Is it a model for other countries to follow? Plus, how water-soluble circuit boards might help reduce e-waste. And have internet influencers been saviours of many businesses during lockdown? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.
26/02/2124m 8s

Facebook blocks Australia’s news

The social giant takes down news content ahead of a new law that would force it to pay media publishers. Plus, are digital vaccine certificates or passports essential for a return to normal life or a bad idea that could entrench inequality? And yet more evidence that the global auto industry is racing to electric vehicles. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Credit: Getty Images).
19/02/2124m 5s

Bitcoin’s energy cost

The buzz around the cryptocurrency grows after Elon Musk’s Tesla reveals it has bought $1.5bn worth of Bitcoin. But what’s its impact on global energy use? Plus how people in China have been using the Clubhouse audio social app to discuss usually banned topics. And new figures on the performance of the Covid-19 contact tracing app used in England and Wales. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Representation of a Bitcoin plugged into a power outlet. Credit: Getty Images).
12/02/2124m 4s

A tale of two ecommerce giants

Jeff Bezos's Amazon and Jack Ma's Alibaba report bumper profits, but both online shopping giants face challenges. Rory Cellan-Jones speaks to the BBC's Asia business correspondent Karishma Vaswani about Jack Ma's run-in with Chinese regulators, while BBC technology reporter Jane Wakefield assess the impact of Jeff Bezos's decision to step away from day-to-day running of Amazon. Plus we hear from Eliot Higgins, founder of online investigators Bellingcat, about how the internet has changed intelligence gathering. And Leo Kelion speaks to social networking pioneer Michael Birch about his plans to relaunch the social network platform Bebo. (Photo: Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and Alibaba’s Jack Ma, Credit: EPA/ Reuters)
05/02/2124m 5s

Robert Downey Jr. on backing green tech

The Iron Man star tells us how he wants to help tackle the climate crisis. Plus, how small investors on a Reddit forum took on Wall Street and won - for now at least. And have your shopping habits changed in the last year? A retail expert tells us how the pandemic has shown which brands have managed to adapt to the online revolution. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Robert Downey Jr. against a pink and yellow gradient background, Credit: Getty Images).
29/01/2123m 56s

Biden’s plan for big tech

Will the new US President bring a new era in relations with the tech giants? Plus, as schools remain closed in many places, how online learning is helping educate children. And why a global semiconductor shortage is hitting carmakers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with senior BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: President Joe Biden against a pink/ yellow gradient background, Credit: Getty Images).
22/01/2124m 15s

Amazon gives Parler the boot

The social platform favoured by Donald Trump supporters loses its online home after Amazon Web Services withdraws its cloud hosting. Plus, how the pandemic has fired the imagination of gadget-makers exhibiting at CES. And why the tech behind apps to help women track their menstrual cycles is leaving many users disappointed. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech team Chris Fox, Leo Kelion, and Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Composite image of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and the Parler logo. Credit: BBC).
15/01/2123m 56s

Facebook and Twitter block Trump

Social giants act after the President praises supporters who broke into the US Congress building. Plus, how Singapore’s Covid-19 contact tracing data may be accessed by police despite earlier assurances it would only be used to control the pandemic. And we look ahead to next week’s CES, the biggest annual tech event. Can it deliver in a virtual format? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Donald Trump rallies supporters to march on the US Capitol to protest against the certification of the election result. Credit: Getty Images).
08/01/2123m 45s

Tech Trends for 2021

Rory Cellan-Jones and guests on how tech will shape the coming twelve months. Featuring BT innovation researcher Dr Nicola Millard, and BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. With contributions from remote working consultant Dave Coplin, futurist Peter Schwartz, and Kate Bevan, editor of Which? Computing. Produced by Jat Gill. Image: Stock photo of a woman runner checking and logging health data. Credit: Getty Images.
01/01/2123m 6s

Tech Quiz of the Year 2020

Test your knowledge of the year’s biggest tech stories with Rory Cellan-Jones and the Tech Tent team. With BBC tech reporters Chris Fox, Zoe Kleinman, David Molloy, and Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. Image: Stock photo of a man sitting outdoors in front of a festive background, listening to earphones. Credit: Getty Images.
25/12/2024m 22s

Hackers breach US government

Key government agencies are among thousands of organisations believed to have been hit using compromised network software from SolarWinds. Plus Facebook goes to war with Apple over its plans to restrict the targeting of iPhone users by advertisers. And the man whose school photograph became a viral meme without him knowing it. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.
18/12/2024m 5s

Will Facebook be broken up?

US regulators launch lawsuits accusing the giant of buying rivals to stifle competition. Plus, does Uber’s sale of its autonomous driving division indicate a roadblock for driverless tech? And why a paper by leading AI ethics researcher Dr Timnit Gebru has caused a storm at her employer Google. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC cybersecurity reporter Joe Tidy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, October 2019. Credit: REUTERS/ Erin Scott/ File Photo).
11/12/2024m 4s

Life after Covid

Will a digital means of showing you’ve been immunised be the passport to living normal everyday life? Plus, what does China’s new law banning the export of goods deemed important for national security mean for Western tech giants? And we attend Web Summit - virtually - to consider whether the future of giant conferences is online. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A health worker processes a sample for a Covid test in New Delhi, India. Credit: EPA/ RAJAT GUPTA).
04/12/2023m 57s

Tesla’s $500bn valuation

Does the electric car pioneer’s technology justify its stock value exceeding that of the major traditional carmakers combined? Plus, will Apple’s new M1 silicon chips end the decades-long dominance of Intel and Microsoft in computing? And have you received an Amazon delivery you didn’t order? We find out what’s going on. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Tesla Model 3 cars at the company’s Shanghai factory, Credit: REUTERS/ Aly Song/ File Photo).
27/11/2023m 56s

Electric cars in the fast lane

The UK government says new petrol and diesel-powered cars will be banned by 2030. Will developments in battery tech deliver electric vehicles for the mass-market? Plus how Kenya is looking to wind energy to bring cleaner power to off-grid communities. And has the pandemic permanently changed how we look at screen-time? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Electric Mini Cooper charging on a central London street, Credit: BBC).
20/11/2024m 23s

Will Biden go after Facebook?

Facebook faces more criticism for its handling of misinformation around the US election, this time by members of Joe Biden's team. Could the next US president lead a crackdown on the social media giant? We speak to Siva Vaidhyanathan, professor of media studies at the University of Virginia and author of Antisocial Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy. Also on the show: Apple launches a range of new laptops, but it's the chips inside them that are causing a stir. We ask Raspberry Pi creator Eben Upton if it's the end of the road for endlessly faster processors. Plus Hyperloop makes some headlines with a high-speed test in the desert, but is it really going to revolutionise transport systems around the world? Railway engineer and writer Gareth Dennis has his say. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. (Photo: Cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg outside the US Capitol, Credit: Getty Images)
13/11/2023m 59s

Social giants label Trump’s posts

Facebook and Twitter warn President Trump’s post-election remarks may be misleading. Plus, what a verbal battle between chatbots tells us about machine learning. And the plan to beam 5G connectivity from hydrogen-powered drones. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC reporters Jane Wakefield and Marianna Spring. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters about the 2020 presidential election at the White House in Washington DC, Credit: Carlos Barria/ Reuters).
06/11/2023m 6s

Senators accuse big tech of bias

US politicians clash over how social media firms will moderate content in future. Plus, how inkjet printing tech could help ramp-up Covid-19 testing and research. And a solar-powered solution to a shortage of medical oxygen in developing countries. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters James Clayton, Leo Kelion, and Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies remotely to the US Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, Credit: EPA/ Greg Nash/ POOL).
30/10/2023m 6s

Election stakes for US tech

What changes will a new Presidential term bring for the tech we use? Plus, how TikTok may be influential in the vote, despite paid political ads being banned. And what the social platforms are doing to try to stem disinformation ahead of polling day. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC reporters James Clayton, Sophia Smith Galer, and Marianna Spring. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Combination of images showing Donald Trump and Joe Biden at the first Presidential debate, Credit: Jim Watson/ Saul Loeb/ AFP/ Getty Images).
23/10/2023m 5s

iPhone 12 goes 5G

Apple pushes 5G as a key selling point of its new iPhone 12. But is it useful anywhere right now? We get the view from South Korea, where 5G has been available for 18 months, and from Ghana where the previous 4G network is just rolling out. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Illustration of the iPhone 12, Credit: Apple/ EPA).
16/10/2023m 7s

US Congress slams big tech

Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Apple are compared to oil barons by US lawmakers. But the firms insist they are not monopolies and they operate in a competitive market. Plus, Facebook takes further action to ban content relating to the QAnon conspiracy theory across its platforms. And the opportunities for women whose jobs have been hit by the pandemic to retrain as programmers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Congresswoman Val Demings, (D-FL), questions tech leaders during a hearing of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law on "Online Platforms and Market Power", Credit: Graeme Jennings/Pool via REUTERS).
09/10/2023m 5s

A Pixel for the times

Google pushes affordability and 5G for its flagship Pixel 5 mobile handset. But can it compete in a crowded middle-market? Plus, has quantum computing reached a point at which it is genuinely useful for businesses? And the push-back against China-led plans to replace the internet’s underlying protocols. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Press photo of a woman using the Pixel 5 smartphone, Credit: Google).
02/10/2023m 5s

How misinformation spreads

Rory Cellan-Jones examines how misinformation spreads across online platforms. Plus, why Tesla’s Elon Musk is promising a $25,000 fully autonomous electric car. And former Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, co-chair of Facebook’s new oversight board, on how the body will handle controversies relating to the US election. With BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Anti coronavirus-lockdown protest in Trafalgar Square, London, August 2020. Credit: Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images).
25/09/2023m 5s

The TikTok saga hots up

After shunning Microsoft, will a deal with Oracle work? The BBC's Asia business correspondent Karishma Vaswani joins Rory Cellan-Jones and Jane Wakefield in the tent to discuss what the US and China want out of a deal for TikTok. Plus: An earthquake in the computer chip industry - why selling chip designer Arm to US firm Nvidia is proving controversial. And as Facebook launches a new VR headset and PlayStation and Xbox go head to head, what is the future of gaming? Keza MacDonald, the Guardian's video games editor, discusses. (Photo: TikTok logo displayed on a phone screen, Credit: Getty Images)
18/09/2024m 8s

Berlin’s tech bounceback

Rory Cellan-Jones visits the German capital Berlin to see how the tech sector is faring post-lockdown. Plus how TikTok has been struggling to remove a disturbing suicide video. And we discover the games tech being used to create virtual art galleries. With BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: An employee wearing a face mask sets up smartphones at the IFA tech fair in Berlin, Sept 2020. Credit: Michele Tantussi/ Reuters).
11/09/2023m 5s

Tech and working life

Rory Cellan-Jones explores how tech firms are influencing the way people work and what changes might lie ahead in the months and years to come. Plus, why has the internet evolved as it has and is it too late to reclaim it from big tech firms for the common good? And, has the Covid-19 pandemic boosted the gig-economy? With BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: An employee working at an Amazon fulfilment centre in India, Credit: REUTERS/ Abhishek N. Chinnappa/ File Photo).
07/09/2023m 6s

Facebook News gets bigger

Should publishers welcome or fear the tech giant’s plan to expand its news feature. Plus how some women have received unwelcome advances in a game of Scrabble. And why Britain’s Second World War codebreaking centre Bletchley Park, one of the most important sites in computing history and now a museum, faces a funding crisis. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a man riding on public transport holding up and looking closely at his smartphone, Credit: Nico De Pasquale Photography/ Getty Images).
28/08/2023m 5s

Students marked down by algorithm

How students in England took to the streets to challenge their exam grades. Plus, the battle between Epic Games, the company behind Fortnite, and Apple moves up a level. And we ask a commercial pilot how the latest Microsoft Flight Simulator compares to real flying. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Jane Wakefield and David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A-Level students protest outside 10 Downing St. in London over their automated exam grades, Credit: EPA).
21/08/2023m 5s

Legal victory over facial recognition

The use of facial recognition in public by a UK police force was unlawful, says the Court of Appeal. Plus how a new global policy network aims to help reign in the power of big technology firms. And China’s Xinhua dictionary gains a raft of tech terms. Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with BBC reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a British police officer standing in front of a crowd. Credit: Getty Images).
14/08/2023m 5s

The future for TikTok in the United States

Why the popular video app faces being bought out or banned in the US. Chris Fox is joined by the BBC's North America technology reporter James Clayton to discuss the history of the app and why Donald Trump appears determined to ban it. Alex Stamos, former chief security officer at Facebook, discusses whether TikTok is really a security concern. Eva Galperin, director of cybersecurity at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, explains why banning an app is tough to do. Vishal Shah from Instagram touts his TikTok alternative 'Reels' - one of the platforms hoping to attract TikTok users. (Photo: TikTok logo, Credit: Getty Images)
07/08/2024m 4s

Big tech facing a break-up?

The leaders of Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon are grilled by US lawmakers over abuse of market power. Is more regulation or a break-up of their firms on the cards? Plus, Garmin is the latest high-profile victim of a cyberattack. And we meet the woman responsible for Google’s undersea cables. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC North America tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill.
31/07/2023m 6s

The new AI tool creating a buzz

GPT-3 is a tool whose predecessor was dubbed “too dangerous to release”. We find out why the new version is creating a hot debate in the tech world. Plus, why a popular mobile game in China has been pulled because of some morse code in a song. And many people have had to get used to videoconferencing during the past few months. Are meetings in virtual reality the next step? Please note that since this episode was recorded the Congressional hearing mentioned in the show has been postponed. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock image representing a human brain against a tech-related background, Credit: Getty Images).
24/07/2023m 5s

The great Twitter hack

Hackers take over accounts belonging to famous names including Joe Biden and Barack Obama after breaching Twitter’s security. Plus, the UK bans telecoms firms from buying new equipment from the Chinese giant Huawei. And we find out about robots with a sensitive touch. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Jane Wakefield and Joe Tidy. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A night shot of the Twitter HQ in San Francisco, Credit: JOSH EDELSON/ AFP/ Getty Images).
17/07/2023m 5s

TikTok caught in US-China tussle

The hit video sharing platform quits operating in Hong Kong as the US considers a ban. Plus, is the threat from “deep fakes” overblown? And has the lockdown made video calling seem less awkward than it used to be? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Close-up of the TikTok icon on a smartphone screen. Credit: Reuters/ Dado Ruvic).
10/07/2023m 5s

Big advertisers boycott Facebook

Marketers express unease about Facebook’s handling of hate speech. Plus, how Singapore is introducing wearable dongles to help log and trace people who might have Covid-19. And the simulation company aiming to help redesign cities fit for a post-pandemic world. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A smartphone showing the website of the “StopHateForProfit” campaign, Credit: EPA/ SASCHA STEINBACH).
03/07/2023m 6s

Apple ditches Intel chips

The tech giant tells developers future Macs will use Apple-designed chips as found in the iPad and iPhone. Plus, as shops reopen after lockdowns, how can tech make physical shopping safer and more pleasant? And CEO of Slack, Stewart Butterfield, talks to us about communication between businesses, and how President Trump’s ban on work visas will hurt Silicon Valley. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC North America tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Apple CEO Tim Cook gives the keynote address at the 2020 Worldwide Developers’ Conference WWDC, Credit: EPA/ BROOKS KRAFT/ APPLE).
26/06/2023m 4s

Developers take on Apple over app store rules

As Apple prepares for its annual developers conference (WWDC 2020), it comes under fire for what many see as anti-competitive practices. Developer David Heinemeier Hansson of Basecamp tells us why he’s angry about Apple's rates. We get the latest in contact tracing apps from Professor Stephen Farrell of Trinity College, Dublin, who has been researching the effectiveness of Bluetooth and German journalist Anna Noryskiewicz talks about the launch of a tracing app in Germany. And we go to India to hear about the digital divide being experienced by school children with Nishant Baghel of the Pratham Education Foundation in Mumbai. Presented by Rory Cellan Jones with help from BBC Technology Reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Clare Williamson. (Image: Apple's app store, screen shot. Credit:BBC)
19/06/2022m 58s

Facial recognition pulled from police

IBM, Amazon, and Microsoft stop providing controversial facial recognition tools for law enforcement. Do they need to go further and bin the technology for other customers? Plus, how young activists are using the latest online techniques to amplify the Black Lives Matter message. And, what’s the oldest gadget you have lying around your house, and do you still use it? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo representing a facial recognition algorithm scanning an African man’s face. The tech is known to be less accurate when used to scan faces with darker skin, leading to the possibility of discrimination. Credit: Getty Images).
12/06/2023m 7s

Zuckerberg faces staff revolt

Facebook staff strike out at a decision by their boss not to moderate Donald Trump’s postings, despite Twitter having done so. How are long-running tensions between India and China affecting the way Indians see Chinese technology? And why philanthropist and Microsoft founder Bill Gates has become a target for outlandish conspiracy theories about Coronavirus. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Mark Zuckerberg talking about free expression at Georgetown University in 2019, Credit: ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/ AFP/ Getty Images)
05/06/2023m 6s

Twitter tweaks Trump’s tweets

US President Donald Trump signs an order that could strip social media firms of legal protections after Twitter adds warnings to his tweets. Plus, despite predictions, artificial intelligence has not replaced radiologists. We find out why humans plus AI are seen as more effective in cancer screening than software alone. And will the Covid-19 pandemic give online learning a boost as schools and universities consider a “socially-distanced” future? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Donald Trump in the Oval Office as he signs an order aimed at social media companies, Credit: Jonathan Ernst/ Reuters).
29/05/2023m 6s

Facebook’s remote working shift

What happens in Silicon Valley often sets a trend for the wider world. So will the tech giant’s new policy change how people at other firms work? Plus, millions of people have found extra time on their hands during lockdown. What have they been doing online during that period? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a woman wearing a headset working from home. Credit: Getty Images).
22/05/2023m 6s

Fighting Covid-19 with data

Is South Korea’s success so far in fighting the coronavirus down to data and tracing technology? Or is tech only part of the picture, and should other countries seek to replicated their approach? Plus, the artificial intelligence tool that aims to make synthesized voices sound emotional. And do people still believe in the promise of technology to make life better? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A man and woman wearing face masks talk outside a bookstore in Seoul, South Korea, Credit: Getty Images).
15/05/2023m 6s

Smarter workplaces after lockdown ends

How tech will help to get people back to work safely. Plus, the UK’s Covid-19 contact tracking app begins trials. And how to get started making hardware projects at home including an automated cocktail mixer. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Man in a suit looking at his smartphone in front of a modern building. Credit: Getty Images).
08/05/2023m 5s

Tech firms boosted by Covid-19

In contrast to many businesses, will the tech giants emerge stronger from the crisis? Plus, the Eurovision song contest is off this year but we find out about a music competition to create a Eurovision-style hit using artificial intelligence. And in another of our series on using tech during the lockdown for new skills and hobbies, we look at podcasting. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters David Molloy and Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A customer wearing a face mask tries out the latest iPhone SE at an Apple store in Hangzhou, China. Credit: Getty Images).
01/05/2023m 5s

Influencers feel the pinch

How social media influencers are earning less in lockdown and rethinking what they do. Plus, is it realistic to expect technology to provide an answer to ending social distancing measures? And we get some tips on producing music at home. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a young woman with pink dyed hair applying makeup towards the camera. Credit: Getty Images).
24/04/2023m 6s

Tech skills for the lockdown

Are you using the lockdown to pick up new tech skills? We meet a family learning coding. Plus, billions of people around the world remain unconnected to the internet. How will this make it harder to deal with the pandemic? And, Facebook says it will alert its users when they like or share a post that contains falsehoods about Covid-19. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a young girl using a laptop to program small robots on the table in front of her, Credit: Getty Images).
17/04/2023m 6s

WhatsApp and YouTube act on Covid conspiracies

The social media giants take steps to remove falsehoods linking Covid-19 to 5G tech. Plus, how will China’s tech sector fare now that its cities are emerging from lockdown. And, are drones useful in maintaining “social distancing”? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Cristina Criddle and David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.
10/04/2023m 6s

Privacy in a pandemic

Should we trade some privacy to end a lock-down earlier with the help of technology? Plus, how volunteers with 3D printers are coming to the aid of coronavirus medics needing face shields. And are computer scientists designing artificially intelligent machines in the wrong way? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.
03/04/2023m 5s

Hand over your virus data

How much data are we all prepared to share in the battle to beat the coronavirus? Rory Cellan-Jones speaks to Milo Ho-Hsuan Hsieh, a Taiwanese journalist who saw his phone tracked by the government after he was asked to self-isolate following a trip abroad. Jeni Tennison of the Open Data Institute says there are ways of sharing personal data more transparently and fairly, even in the midst of a pandemic. Lexi Sydow from App Annie, which monitors what apps get downloaded and where, tells us what millions of us stuck at home are doing on our phones. And one of the world’s leading AI experts Professor Stuart Russell tells us why artificial intelligence my not be about to ride to the rescue. The BBC's Jane Wakefield runs down the latest technology news.
27/03/2023m 25s

Coronavirus: Can the internet cope?

What impact will the coronavirus pandemic have on the infrastructure of the internet? Zoe Kleinman speaks to David Belson from the Internet Society, and to Lisa Forte from Red Goat Cyber Security about the security implications for companies of having so many remote workers. Dhanaraj Thakur from the Web Foundation explains how the current health crisis exposes the billions of people who still live without internet access, while the BBC’s Kinjal Pandya Wagh in Delhi tells us how mobile phones are being used to spread information about the virus in India. The BBC’s Chris Fox rounds up the latest tech news.
20/03/2022m 59s

Apps helping to track coronavirus

How governments are using apps and citizens' phone data to try to contain the pandemic. Plus, the robots helping to disinfect hospital wards using ultraviolet light. And Steven Levy, author of the new book "Facebook - the inside story" talks to us about Mark Zuckerberg's management of the social network. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Ingrid Lunden from TechCrunch. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A man wearing a facemask to protect against the COVID-19 coronavirus browses his smartphone on a Beijing street as he rides a shared bicycle. Credit: NICOLAS ASFOURI/ AFP via Getty Images).
13/03/2023m 3s

YouTube and conspiracy theories

Users are seeing fewer conspiracy theories in their YouTube recommendations, a new study suggests. But the material is still available on the platform. Plus, what Amazon knows about you if you have a Ring connected doorbell. And how Silicon Valley thinks there's money in wellness at work. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Shona Ghosh, UK tech editor at Business Insider. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Abstract video wall representing online streaming, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus).
06/03/2023m 3s

Conspiracy theories rage online over coronavirus

Is social media likely to help or hinder efforts to contain the outbreak? We hear about the lessons from past epidemics. Plus, is the tech business reaching "peak capitalism" and is there a future for it based on values other than making money? And why people keep choosing bad passwords. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A visitor tries to sanitise hands before being allowed into a state hospital at Yaba in Lagos, Nigeria, February 2020. Credit: PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/ AFP via Getty Images).
28/02/2023m 6s

US tells the UK to think again on Huawei 5G

America's top cyber-security official tells us that the US is still working to get Britain to change its mind and drop Huawei tech from its 5G networks. Plus Apple warns of iPhone shortages ahead because of the Coronavirus. And how AI can help hospitals recruit the right nurses. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy, and special guest Marina Koytcheva, technology market analyst at CCS Insight. Produced by Jat Gill.
24/02/2023m 56s

Coronavirus stops MWC tech show

The mobile industry’s biggest annual event is called off over fears of attendees spreading the infection. But Samsung, which held its own launch event this week, revealed a new attempt at a phone with a folding screen. Plus, we visit Startup Grind Global to discover the latest ideas looking for Silicon Valley investors’ money. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox, and special guest Rachael Myrow, senior tech editor at Californian broadcaster KQED. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: An Asian worker wearing a face-mask stands outside the venue for Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona after the fair was cancelled, Credit: David Zorrakino/ Europa Press via Getty Images)
14/02/2023m 47s

Is Silicon Valley still top for tech?

Rory Cellan-Jones asks whether California is still the best home for tech startups. He speaks to a video games executive, a venture capitalist, a gig-economy driver, a social entrepreneur, and the Dean of Stanford University’s Medical School to get their view. And Rachael Myrow, senior tech editor from Californian radio station KQED gives her take on whether Silicon Valley is still on top. Produced by Jat Gill.
07/02/2023m 0s

UK gives Huawei the OK

The Chinese tech giant will be allowed a limited role in Britain's 5G telecoms network. Plus, how Estonia wants to lure British tech talent after "Brexit". And is it becoming easier to do e-commerce in Africa? Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Raquel de Condado Marques, telecoms research analyst at IDC. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: A 5G handset showing fast download speeds at a Huawei store in China, Credit: Getty Images).
31/01/2024m 8s

Tech's battle for the classroom

Jane Wakefield checks out the latest educational tech at the Bett 2020 show in London and talks to Apple and Google about how they think technology can prepare students for the jobs of tomorrow. Plus she finds out what role robots can play in teaching. And is always-connected technology making you stressed and burnt-out? If so, we hear some tips that might help. With BBC tech reporter Chris Fox. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Jane Wakefield with the Ohbot robot head, Credit: BBC).
24/01/2024m 3s

Microsoft vows to go 'carbon negative'

The tech giant behind Windows and Office promises to remove all the carbon it has emitted since it was founded in 1975. Plus, is tracking for digital ads out of control? And we hear about a new BBC podcast in which teenagers interview technology pioneers. Presented by Jane Wakefield, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox, and special guest Catherine Stihler, chief executive of the non-profit Open Knowledge Foundation. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a plant stem growing out of a circuit board, Credit: Getty Images).
17/01/2023m 1s

CES 2020

Zoe Kleinman, Chris Fox, and Cody Godwin report from the giant annual CES event in Las Vegas on the latest tech that you might soon be buying. Zoe takes a ride in a Russian driverless car, and tastes a plant-based alternative to pork meat. Chris meets Samsung's new robot for the home, and Cody tries out a circular mobile phone. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Char Siu Buns made from meat-alternative Impossible Pork are sampled during a press event for CES 2020, Credit: David Becker/ Getty Images).
10/01/2023m 32s

Tech to watch in 2020

Rory Cellan-Jones and special guests look ahead to the technology trends they expect to see in 2020 and discuss ideas for a better internet in the coming year. Plus they’ll preview the gigantic annual CES tech event in Las Vegas. With BBC Online tech editor Leo Kelion, and guests Catherine Miller from Doteveryone and Tom Standage from The Economist. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Stock photo of a service robot helping a man check-in at an airport, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus).
03/01/2023m 52s

Taking stock of tech

Rory Cellan-Jones and the BBC Online tech team give their assessment of the current state of tech in several important areas. They’ll be looking at technology ranging from smart cities to artificial intelligence, and from gaming to tech aimed specifically at women. With BBC reporters Chris Fox, Leo Kelion, Zoe Kleinman, and Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill. (Image: Young woman using smart bus stop display in Barcelona, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus).
27/12/1923m 47s

Tech quiz of the year 2019

How well do you know your tech? We test Chris Fox, Zoe Kleinman, Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield’s knowledge of the top technology stories of 2019. And please do play along with them and test yourself against our teams. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones. (Image: Woman sitting in front of a Christmas tree, listening to headphones, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus).
20/12/1922m 41s

YouTube's plan to stop harassment

The video-sharing giant will block clips that "maliciously insult someone" based on race, gender identity or sexuality. Plus, what does the British general election tell us about the effectiveness of paid-for social media campaigning? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox, and special guest Chris Stokel-Walker, author of "YouTubers". (Image: Stock photo of a young man in a lonely corridor looking worried by something on his smartphone, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images).
13/12/1923m 3s

China pushes facial recognition

Mobile phone buyers in China are made to provide facial recognition data when they get a new plan. But are Chinese citizens comfortable with the rapid rollout of such tech? Plus, how advances in machine learning could help patients with Parkinson's Disease manage their symptoms better. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Stephanie Hare, technology researcher. (Image: Customers buy food via facial recognition system In Hangzhou, China, Credit: Getty Images).
06/12/1923m 4s

TikTok restores teen's viral video

The Chinese-owned platform is forced to back down after removing a US teenager's viral video highlighting China's treatment of Uighur Muslims. Plus, we chat to Kenyan startup Kwara, which is trying to stop people without access to bank lending falling into the hands of loan sharks. And the charity Scope reveals that many websites and apps remain inaccessible to people with disabilities. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech correspondent Mark Ward, and special guest Alison Griswold, tech reporter at Quartz. (Image: US teenager Feroza Aziz whose viral video was removed and then reinstated by TikTok, Credit: BBC).
29/11/1924m 7s

Ford Mustang goes electric

Does an electric model of the iconic muscle-car signal the future for the motor industry? Plus, the founder of Wikipedia Jimmy Wales tells us why he thinks his new social network can lure people away from Facebook and Twitter. And the head of Google Cloud AI talks to us about solving the "black box" problem. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox, and special guest Kate Bevan, the editor of Which? Computing. (Image: The unveiling of the Ford Mustang Mach-E, Credit: EPA/ RINGO CHIU).
22/11/1923m 4s

Facebook battles harmful posts

New figures suggest the tech giant is removing a growing amount of banned content. Is Facebook getting better at finding it or is it losing control of the problem? Plus, we chat to Eben Upton, creator of the Raspberry Pi, who has been given a Lovie lifetime achievement award for the affordable computer's success. And Damian Bradfield, author of "The Trust Manifesto", tells us why he thinks trust between tech firms and their users has broken down. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman and special guest Jeni Tennison from the Open Data Institute. (Image: Stock photo of a teenager looking disturbed at something on her smartphone, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus).
15/11/1923m 4s

Can Ireland reshape big tech?

How Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner could change the way big tech firms operate. Plus why Dublin is a favoured place for startups. And economists and comedians gather in the city of Kilkenny for the tenth annual Kilkenomics festival where cryptocurrency is one of the topics on the agenda. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield and special guests Peter Antonioni from UCL and the journalist Jamie Bartlett, presenter of the hit podcast “The Missing Cryptoqueen”. (Image: Ireland's Data Protection Commissioner Helen Dixon outside her office in Dublin, Credit: Rory Cellan-Jones/ BBC).
08/11/1923m 45s

The power of online political ads

Why is Twitter banning political ads when Facebook insists it will keep on carrying them? Plus, some tech products aimed at women have been called "femtech". Does the label help or hinder inclusivity? DeepMind's AlphaStar artificial intelligence has reached the top league of one of the most popular esport video games Starcraft 2. We talk to a top player of the game who has competed against it. And why the co-founder of Netflix is not worried by Apple's new streaming TV service. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC North America tech reporter Dave Lee, and special guest Debbie Forster, co-founder of the Tech Talent Charter and member of the Institute of Coding's diversity board. (Image: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg leaving a meeting with Irish politicians to discuss social media and transparency in political advertising, Credit: Getty Images).
01/11/1924m 30s

Indian call centre scam shut down

We follow Indian cyber police in the city of Kolkata as they raid a call centre suspected of scamming people in the US and UK. Plus, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg defends the Libra digital currency project. And how robots could help more patients in India's hospitals receive the surgery they need. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC reporter Szu Ping Chan, and special guest Izabella Kaminska from the Financial Times. (Image: Stock photo of a man entering banking details into his computer, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus).
25/10/1923m 4s

Google Pixel 4 boasts radar

The latest handset from Google introduces a new way to control a phone without touching it. Is it actually useful, or an interesting gimmick? And the company's hardware chief Rick Osterloh tells us why he would warn a house-guest about the presence of smart devices. Plus, Nir Eyal, author of the new book "Indistractable" shares his strategies to help us all be less distracted by our gadgets. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Charlotte Gee from the MIT Technology Review. (Image: The new Google Pixel 4 smartphone displayed during a Google launch event in New York City, Credit: REUTERS/ Eduardo Munoz).
18/10/1923m 3s

US and China battle over tech

In a week of rising tension between US and China over trade we hear how some of China's biggest tech firms are caught in the cross-fire. And Rory Cellan-Jones asks why Apple has decided to take down a Hong Kong mapping app? As Ada Lovelace Day spreads around the world to celebrate women in science and tech, the BBC's Zoe Kleinman asks its founder whether conditions have actually improved since the movement was first launched a decade ago? And Rory asks UNICEF why it is getting into the controversial world of cryptocurrency? Rory is joined by technology writer Jamillah Knowles and by Mark Ward from the BBC tech desk (Picture:A woman holds her mobile phone as a group of masked protesters run past in the Diamond Hill station in the Kowloon district of Hong Kong on October 7, 2019. CREDIT: PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images)
11/10/1923m 5s

The rise and rise of TikTok

Why the Chinese video-sharing app seems to have Facebook worried. Plus, a leading AI researcher in Ghana tells us why algorithms used in Africa but trained on data from elsewhere could make biased decisions. And how a common definition of online abuse could help to tackle it more effectively. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Parmy Olson, tech reporter from the Wall Street Journal. (Image: Stock photo of a woman on a beach making a smartphone video with her dog, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus).
04/10/1924m 14s

Amazon reveals Alexa glasses

The tech giant takes its Alexa smart assistant out of the home. Plus, are neural interfaces the next big thing in how we control computers? And, the Facebook-backed Libra digital currency has met with opposition from governments. Can the project get back on track? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox, and special guest, Caroline Carruthers, business author and data consultant. (Image: Eyeglass frames with voice-activated digital assistant Alexa at Amazon's headquarters in Seattle, Credit: Glenn Chapman/ AFP/ Getty Images).
27/09/1923m 4s

Huawei - life after Google?

Chinese tech company Huawei has unveiled its latest innovative smartphone, but can it be a hit in the West when it has not got Google's popular apps on it? Also today, Rory Cellan-Jones explores the use of artificial intelligence in healthcare - there has been a lot of hype but is it finally helping to generate new treatments? And the president of Microsoft tells us why he is worried about facial recognition technology. Joining Rory on the show are BBC technology reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest technology analyst and commentator Stephanie Hare. (Photo: Enthusiasts and the media get their hands on Huawei's latest smartphone at its launch in Munich, Germany, 2019. Credit: Christof Stache/AFP/Getty Images)
20/09/1923m 0s

Has gig-working had its day?

California gave birth to the "gig economy" - working for app-driven services such as ride-hailing and food-delivery. But now the state has drafted a law to make “gig workers” employees and give them more rights. Is it the end for this way of working? Plus, will Apple's iPhone maintain its loyal following without 5G? And we visit Europe's largest data centre to consider our thirst for cloud storage. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Dominic Sunnebo, Director of Consumer Insights at market research firm Kantar. (Image: Ridesharing drivers protest for better rights outside the Uber HQ in San Francisco, California. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
13/09/1923m 5s

Who cares about facial recognition?

Two new surveys suggest cautious public attitudes in the US and UK towards the tech. Plus, the autumn mobile device launch season is upon us. We check out the news from the IFA electronics show in Berlin and look forward to the wave of new handsets set to be released in the coming weeks. And, would you report to your employer a colleague who you suspected was stealing company data? Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guests Stuart Miles from Pocket-lint and Marta Pinto from research firm IDC. (Image: Stock photo of a woman using facial recognition on a smartphone, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus).
06/09/1923m 4s

Tech's trade war

Is the trade dispute between the US and China hurting both nations' tech industry? Artificial intelligence (AI) and 5G telecoms are key sectors in which the superpowers are vying to be the leader. Special guests Calum Chace, author of "Surviving AI", and Emily Taylor, CEO of Oxford Information Labs, join Chris Fox to examine the effects of the trade dispute between Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping. (Image: Composite image of Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping, Credit: Reuters).
30/08/1923m 3s

What Facebook knows about you

The social giant will reveal what it knows about your internet activity off of its platform. Will its users appreciate the transparency or be horrified? Plus, Twitter and Google take down accounts indicating co-ordinated posting relating to the Hong Kong protests. How has that gone down in China? And, 3D printing was meant to democratise manufacturing. It hasn't quite worked out like that, but we see one example of a 3D printed consumer product - a new type of bike helmet. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Isobel Asher Hamilton from Business Insider. (Image: Stock photo of a couple on a sofa making an online purchase on a tablet computer, Credit: Hispanolistic/ Getty Images).
23/08/1923m 5s

Are you being watched?

How privately-operated facial recognition in public places threatens privacy, according to campaigners. Plus, why is the shared-office firm WeWork valued at $47bn when it lost $1.6bn last year and has no idea when or whether it will ever deliver a profit. And how the kids' comic The Beano developed its digital strategy. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and Madhumita Murgia, European technology correspondent at the Financial Times. (Image: Stock image of a security camera against a skyscraper background, Credit: Getty Images Plus).
16/08/1923m 5s

8chan searches for new home

Key service providers kick the controversial message board, which has been used to celebrate mass shootings, off the mainstream internet. In what form might it resurface? Plus "warshipping" is one of the latest threats to corporate security presented at the annual Black Hat hackers' conference. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Chris Fox and Dave Lee, and special guests Kate Bevan, editor of Which? Computing, and Poppy Gustafsson, co-CEO of Darktrace. (Image: Stock photo of a bundle of unplugged network cables, Credit: Getty Images Plus).
09/08/1923m 4s

New rules for robots

Should a robot be allowed to react if it is attacked by a person? A new blueprint for robot makers aims to set out how machines should behave. Plus the UK Parliament committee scrutinising Facebook demands an explanation after reports the company knew about the misuse of its data by a political consultancy earlier than it had claimed. Presented by Jane Wakefiled, with BBC Online tech editor Leo Kelion, and special guest Annabelle Timsit from the Quartz website. (Image: Stock photo of man shaking hands with a robot, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images Plus)
02/08/1923m 3s

Facebook's five billion dollar bill

The social network reaches a record settlement with regulators over users' data privacy. Will it change how Facebook operates? Plus, is opposition to using facial recognition technology in public places growing? And, we get a rare glimpse into the online activities of Russia's intelligence agencies. Presented by Chris Fox, with BBC North America tech reporter Dave Lee, and special guest technology researcher Stephanie Hare. (Image: Person trying the Facebook Portal device during the F8 2019 developers conference, Credit:Justin Sullivan /Getty Images).
26/07/1923m 6s

Celebrating games

How Dundee in Scotland gave birth to Grand Theft Auto and has remained a hub of games design ever since. We visit the V&A design museum’s exhibition on gaming, plus we get one young developer’s tips on getting into the games business. And we track down one of the original team that worked on GTA. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.
19/07/1922m 58s

Alexa dispenses medical advice

Are privacy fears over Alexa's new ability to offer medical advice from the UK's National Health Service justified? Plus, how super-car maker Aston Martin thinks it can persuade its customers to swap the roar of a V12 engine for the near-silence of electric propulsion. And we hear about the disturbing rise of "stalkerware" apps. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Fox, and special guest Charlotte Jee from the MIT Tech Review. (Image: An Amazon Echo smart speaker on a coffee table alongside an ear thermometer and some pills, Credit: Andrew Matthews/ PA Wire).
12/07/1923m 5s

Jony Ive quits Apple

The man behind the design of the iPhone and iMac, Sir Jony Ive, leaves Apple to set up his own business. We assess his impact on the design of tech products. Plus, we talk to telecoms equipment giant Nokia on why it thinks it can beat its Chinese rival Huawei in 5G. And we find out where robots are likely to have the most effect in the coming years. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Kate Bevan, editor of Which? Computing. (Image: Sir Jony Ive (Left) with Apple CEO Tim Cook, inspecting new iPhones at a product launch, Credit: Justin Sullivan/ Getty Images).
28/06/1923m 8s

Deepfake or art: who decides?

Rory Cellan-Jones talks to the artist who has created a "deepfake" Mark Zuckerberg to put Facebook on the spot over privacy. Also in the programme, Rory gets behind the hype over artificial intelligence and talks with the head of Moonshots at Google X, Astro Teller, about whether AI is finally becoming mainstream. And in a busy week for London's tech scene, Rory visits the Founders Forum to hear from the Europeans who want to impose tighter controls on the giant American technology companies. Special guest throughout the programme is Tabitha Goldstaub who runs the CogX festival of Artificial Intelligence. (Image: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the opening keynote introducing new Facebook, Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram privacy features at the Facebook F8 Conference on April 30, 2019. Credit: AMY OSBORNE/AFP/Getty Images)
14/06/1923m 6s
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