FT News Briefing

FT News Briefing

By Financial Times

A rundown of the most important global business stories you need to know for the coming day, from the newsroom of the Financial Times. Available every weekday morning.

Episodes

SME’s lose big, UK GDP woes, remembering Sumner Redstone

Small and medium-sized US companies suffered a wipeout in profits in the second quarter amid the Covid-19 crisis, Lyft reported a 61 per cent drop in revenue in the same quarter but says it is seeing signs of a recovery, and Cisco warned of an even bigger drop-off in sales than it has experienced so far during the crisis. Plus, the FT’s Gavin Jackson reports on the UK’s latest GDP data. Then, we look back at the life of media mogul Sumner Redstone.Lyft clings to signs of recovery after pandemic dents revenuehttps://www.ft.com/content/938ea146-2699-4c2d-8511-e634d2d003f8?edit=trueCisco sales warning raises spectre of broad IT spending declinehttps://www.ft.com/content/f737c60e-d632-4eda-9e41-b181c3b5ca04?Coronavirus makes for a brutal quarter for smaller US companieshttps://www.ft.com/content/83d0c41f-be54-48e3-89fe-e78cda5f319cUK economy suffers worst slump in Europe in second quarterhttps://www.ft.com/content/c8b172e2-8f70-4118-9e81-423e9a4b6839Sumner Redstone, media mogul, 1923-2020https://www.ft.com/content/2414b9e4-5ef3-4e46-a760-9592f162e914  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/08/208m 58s

Biden chooses Kamala Harris as VP candidate, questions on Kodak loan, Russia’s Covid-19 vaccine

Democrat Joe Biden has named Kamala Harris as his vice-presidential running mate, an Eastman Kodak board member donated $116m in company shares to an Orthodox Jewish congregation just before the stock price collapsed, and McDonald’s is suing its former chief executive, Steve Easterbrook, over sexual conduct allegations. Plus, Russia has become the first country to grant regulatory approval to a vaccine against Covid-19. The FT’s Henry Foy explains what this means for the global race to treat coronavirus. Joe Biden names Kamala Harris as his running matehttps://www.ft.com/content/6b975742-3200-4a5c-902c-e6303f55da03McDonald’s gets tough with former chief over fresh sexual conduct claimshttps://www.ft.com/content/99718ee2-152f-4749-b8d7-db8065a20a39Kodak board member donated $116m in shares to charityhttps://www.ft.com/content/6e7494c4-56cd-4121-8027-ecfc9586958cRussia to start mass use of its Covid-19 vaccine in coming weekshttps://www.ft.com/content/219b973f-c50a-4071-994f-cc4592d43e1b  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/08/2010m 30s

Uber and Lyft told to reclassify drivers, Goldman vs Fed, Sweden’s pandemic

A judge in California has ordered Uber and Lyft to reclassify their drivers as employees, and the Federal Reserve has turned down Goldman Sachs’ request for less onerous treatment after the results of its annual stress test. Plus, the FT’s Richard Milne explains why any labelling of Sweden’s approach to coronavirus might be an oversimplification. Uber and Lyft told to treat drivers as employees in Californiahttps://www.ft.com/content/051a319c-e599-4975-90ea-40211b6a1417Fed denies Goldman’s appeal against stress test resultshttps://www.ft.com/content/ba208f8d-a388-4fe5-a01b-2cb030bb9a03Sweden’s pandemic no longer stands outhttps://www.ft.com/content/7acfc5b8-d96f-455b-9f36-b70dc850428f?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/08/2010m 1s

Deals resurgence, aid to Beirut, internal pushback at Nike

A series of blockbuster deals has led a resurgence in M&A activity since the start of July, and international donors agreed to fund €250m in emergency aid for Beirut after a chemical explosion devastated Lebanon’s capital. Plus, the FT’s US sports business correspondent, Sara Germano, explains why a group of employees at Nike have asked management to publicly acknowledge the company’s own internal shortcomings on equality before promoting the ideal to consumers. Megadeals lead M&A revival as big companies bulk upft.com/content/59378fea-79a9-4684-ae03-a41798a6245c?Future of Lebanon and entire region at stake, warns Macronhttps://www.ft.com/content/c44ff8e3-1715-499f-8d0e-6774a3d6b8aaBlack employees at Nike object to company’s new adhttps://www.ft.com/content/e8b4a2e3-e0cf-467a-890b-b64db664778a  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/08/2010m 43s

Uber Eats fails to offset ride-sharing collapse, Quicken Loans IPO, Microsoft bids for all of TikTok

A surge in Uber’s food delivery business was unable to offset a 75 per cent drop in global ride-sharing, Quicken Loans stock jumped 20 per cent in its first day of trading on Thursday, and an FT analysis of data made public by  the Trump administration makes it difficult to discern whether the US Paycheck Protection Program was effective at saving jobs. Plus, the FT’s deputy Beijing bureau chief, Yuan Yang, explains why Microsoft’s position in China might give it an advantage in its takeover talks for TikTok. Appetite for Uber Eats fails to offset ride-sharing collapsehttps://www.ft.com/content/0f0cd5f1-f88d-44e1-8b6a-7b50e48118aaQuicken Loans IPO: mortgage pioneer cashes in a big winhttps://www.ft.com/content/4f7e583a-3327-42fd-80cc-81bde2339a9bHow many jobs were saved by the US small business bailout?https://www.ft.com/content/fd288b21-3391-4881-95a3-6b860c007ec0TikTok deal tests Microsoft’s decades of China experiencehttps://www.ft.com/content/b02d5324-07e6-48ac-b658-b8c400d9b4fc  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/08/209m 40s

US lawmakers probe loan to Kodak, Zynga earnings, Biden spending

US lawmakers have launched an investigation into a $765m loan by the US government to Eastman Kodak, and two companies, Zynga and Etsy, reported strong quarterly earnings amid the pandemic. Plus, the FT’s Washington correspondent, Lauren Fedor, has some updates on how the campaign of presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is doing. House Democrats probe $765m government loan to Kodakft.com/content/e4ab02ba-f8f7-4ca9-b881-9400ee612e18?Zynga earnings boosted by lockdown gaming habitshttps://www.ft.com/content/dfee19e3-1084-4d53-b522-99b6595281e7?Joe Biden aims to outspend Donald Trump on TV ads ahead of US electionhttps://www.ft.com/content/012896c0-71ee-4081-a3a5-8b1ca864b214  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/08/209m 36s

Beirut explosion, ETF gold spree, UK tax authority takes on General Electric

Dozens are dead and thousands injured after an explosion rocked Beirut, an income hit at Disney’s theme park has caused a knock on the company’s profits in the latest quarter, and an exchange traded fund holds more gold than some central banks. Plus, the FT’s Tabby Kinder explains why the UK tax authority, HM Revenue & Customs, is going after General Electric on fraud allegations.Beirut rocked by massive explosionhttps://www.ft.com/content/efb1426f-a80f-4b38-99c1-67a7a0823c4aETF becomes one of world’s biggest gold owners as investors flock inft.com/content/5316a714-6aa9-4919-ab29-96fab47cf2d4Disney plans a digital debut for ‘Mulan’https://www.ft.com/content/e39b07a9-edde-4dd3-9356-31bb11cd39e2Why the UK tax authority is accusing General Electric of a $1bn fraud https://www.ft.com/content/02a6fa1b-8b62-4e1e-9100-fe620c8ec96c  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/08/208m 55s

Trump reverses on TikTok, WTO candidates on judicial system, oil earnings

US President Donald Trump reversed course and dropped his opposition to Microsoft’s bid for TikTok, two leading candidates to head the World Trade Organization say US legal criticisms over dispute resolution are valid, and foreign aid groups combatting the coronavirus pandemic in North Korea have been forced to borrow money from its government. Plus, the FT's senior energy correspondent, Anjli Raval, tells us how oil companies are surviving the pandemic shock. Register for the Energy Source talk, “Profit and Power in the Energy Industry” https://live.ft.com/Events/2020/Profit-and-Power-in-the-Energy-Industry?segmentId=b52e1504-1d03-48a4-76bc-38fb50ada64b&utm_us=JJYAAPTrump drops opposition to Microsoft bid for TikTokhttp://ft.com/content/a1162b60-977d-400c-9758-edc4aa006f72?Leading WTO candidates back US bid for dispute system reforms  ft.com/content/f4830e2b-df7b-474a-8104-6336992ca193Aid groups borrow money from N. Korea in coronavirus fightft.com/content/057ec3d5-77ba-4db3-a1cc-1b2e60617094?edit=trueShell and Total escape underlying losses on strong oil tradinghttps://www.ft.com/content/5df3596c-6b42-4270-85c4-c10834e80975  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/08/208m 27s

US vows action on Chinese tech, William Spriggs on US labour market

The Trump administration has vowed to “take action” against Chinese software companies that it perceives as a risk to security. Plus, William Spriggs, a professor of economics at Howard University and chief economist of the AFL-CIO, explains how the pandemic is changing the US labour market. US to widen action against Chinese tech groups beyond TikTokhttps://www.ft.com/content/2eb1859f-ea08-4c7e-9bdd-a6712389a389The Rachman Review: US economist William Spriggs on scars of the pandemichttps://www.ft.com/content/f80f8629-a84f-4ed8-abc2-bcf12cc92095  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/08/2011m 1s

US big tech companies report colossal earnings, US GDP down, companies cling to share buybacks

Facebook, Amazon, and Apple all reported stellar revenue increases in the latest quarter. The FT’s Richard Waters will explain what that means in the context of Wednesday’s US congressional big tech antitrust hearings. Then, FT US markets reporter Colby Smith will explain investor reaction to the worst contraction in the US economy in postwar history. Plus, corporate America is still clinging on to share buybacks despite the global recession.  Register for the Energy Source talk, “Profit and Power in the Energy Industry” https://live.ft.com/Events/2020/Profit-and-Power-in-the-Energy-Industry?segmentId=b52e1504-1d03-48a4-76bc-38fb50ada64b&utm_us=JJYAAPApple revenues defy expectations despite store closureshttps://www.ft.com/content/20d1ef26-2bf4-4900-85b2-08ef7c6d1ae1US economy suffers sharpest postwar contraction in second quarterhttps://www.ft.com/content/3ff15dc7-be90-4676-8121-5a868016c4bbUS companies cling to share buybacks despite collapse in profitsft.com/content/1c924be0-5bc0-4eba-a088-b98b13080c04?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/07/2010m 21s

Big tech hearings, Qualcomm-Huawei deal, 1MDB scandal

American lawmakers grill the chief executives of four US tech groups over unfair competition accusations, Qualcomm shares soared to a record high after the California chipmaker announced a royalty deal with Huawei on Wednesday, and the Federal Reserve extends measures to deal with the risk of an international shortage of dollars. Plus the FT’s opinion and analysis editor, Brooke Masters, explains how Goldman Sachs walked away from the 1MDB scandal relatively unscathed. Big Tech bosses told they have ‘too much power’https://www.ft.com/content/7c291a12-b87c-42a6-bd35-be961693c3e7Qualcomm shares surge on Huawei deal and 5G progresshttps://www.ft.com/content/0d266436-3377-49bb-867b-266939240685Fed warns virus resurgence threatens economic recoveryhttps://www.ft.com/content/938a5387-778d-4f9e-8aed-53d2a332c7af Goldman has done it again with its Malaysia dealhttps://www.ft.com/content/03d5f3c8-3d0c-4afb-b3c5-3c5ed1c7cfe6  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/07/2010m 22s

Big tech antitrust hearings, Moderna prices vaccine, Fed extends emergency lending

Moderna is pitching its coronavirus vaccine at about $50 to $60 per course, the Federal Reserve has announced that it will extend emergency lending facilities, the European Central Bank has called on eurozone banks to continue to freeze dividend payments and Europe is bracing for another surge in coronavirus cases. Plus, the heads of Amazon, Apple, Alphabet and Facebook are set to appear together before Congress for the first time. The FT’s Lauren Fedor will explain what might come out of this hearing.Big tech goes to Washington https://www.ft.com/content/3e26d31f-9cff-4b3b-a971-02e16996c190Moderna pitches virus vaccine at around $50-$60 per coursehttps://www.ft.com/content/405c0d07-d15a-4f5b-8a77-3c2fbd5d4c1cEurope battles to contain surge in Covid-19 casesft.com/content/bcddc297-b7f2-444d-908f-54e8ce6f4f98?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/07/207m 35s

Investors fear US virus toll, MLB virus scare, European bank earnings

Senate Republicans unveiled a White House-backed plan for $1tn in new stimulus that would cut emergency unemployment benefits by two-thirds, the dollar weakened to a two-year low on Monday as coronavirus flare-ups weighed on investor confidence and Major League Baseball contends with a fresh coronavirus outbreak. Plus, the FT’s banking editor, Stephen Morris, will explain what lies ahead for European banks when it comes to loan losses and dividends. Republicans unveil $1tn stimulus plan cutting jobless benefitshttps://www.ft.com/content/3c6d86e9-93b4-41af-9803-046940cedf99?Dollar sinks to two-year low on concern over US virus tollhttps://www.ft.com/content/9d9fa97c-154f-46fb-affd-51f45a0de08aUS baseball league postpones games after outbreak hits Miami team https://www.ft.com/content/12b00810-5b8c-4df0-b22d-cabe898770a3Banks across Europe braced for further heavy loan-loss chargeshttps://www.ft.com/content/d42d735a-9aa3-454e-955a-3e0b22eda03d  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/07/2010m 24s

Republicans to unveil US stimulus offer, coronavirus curbs European travel, Brexit talks

Republicans are set to unveil their proposals for a fresh round of stimulus today, US oil companies have increased production following the price crash earlier in the year, and a surge in coronavirus cases have forced countries to curb European travel. Plus, the FT’s political editor, George Parker, will have an update on the progress  of future relationship talks between the UK and EU. Republicans prepare to unveil latest US stimulus offerft.com/content/3ced1ea5-6070-46ee-a946-dc18ad212bf7US oil production wells up after Covid price crashhttps://www.ft.com/content/9552bb8b-c23a-458d-b476-bbbbe4163bd2Infection surges force countries to curb European travelhttps://www.ft.com/content/584ee262-d539-40ca-b145-e42865f2bc6bMichel Barnier warns ‘no progress’ made on key issues in Brexit talkshttps://www.ft.com/content/14e6c44f-5573-46c1-8f4c-224747562c42  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/07/2010m 28s

Goldman seeks capital relief, Intel delays launch of next generation chips, US jobs recovery stalls

Goldman Sachs is pointing to its strong second quarter results in a pitch to the Federal Reserve for relief on its capital requirements, Intel shares dropped after the company said it was pushing back the launch of its next generation of chips, and as US lawmakers wrangle over the next economic stimulus package the US jobs recovery appears to be stalling. Plus, the search for oil can cost hundreds of millions of dollars. The FT’s senior energy correspondent, Anjli Raval, explains why the industry is scaling back. Goldman touts ‘countercyclical’ trading in pitch for capital reliefft.com/content/91b19416-6f3b-4e67-a309-857a61c6d494?US labour market recovery appears to stall amid stimulus talkshttps://www.ft.com/content/c9290574-ceef-4638-baf1-d27323992129Intel warns of delays to next generation chipsft.com/content/29e02e4f-df7f-49d7-8f94-00a5af481909?The last frontier: oil industry scales back explorationhttps://www.ft.com/content/85afd43a-cb3d-4e82-88b7-1f3a77dc2acb  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/07/208m 33s

Tesla profit milestone, US vs China, ex-Wirecard CEO rearrested

Tesla reported its fourth consecutive quarterly net profit on Wednesday, the fissure between the US and China continues to deepen with Washington ordering Beijing to shut its consulate in Houston over spying concerns, a group of US tech investors has launched an ambitious plan to buy TikTok from its Chinese parent company, ByteDance, and Wirecard’s former chief executive has been rearrested and accused of committing a long-running fraud.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/07/208m 56s

UK-US trade talks, Trump warns of virus worsening, Latin American debt concerns

The British government has abandoned hopes of reaching a US-UK trade deal ahead of this autumn’s American presidential election, and Donald Trump told reporters the pandemic in the US will “get worse before it gets better”. Plus, the FT’s Latin America editor, Michael Stott, will explain why the region might be headed for another debt crisis.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/07/208m 50s

EU leaders close in on recovery fund deal, Testing crunch warning, US economic rebound halted

EU leaders are closing in on a deal for a landmark coronavirus recovery package, the largest laboratory company in the US, Quest Diagnostics, has warned it will be impossible to increase coronavirus testing capacity in the event of a second wave in the autumn, and European banks are facing as much as €800bn in loan losses over the next three years as a result of the coronavirus crisis. Plus, the FT’s James Politi will explain why the US economic recovery from coronavirus was so short-lived and whether it will gather pace again.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/07/2010m 14s

Deadlock on EU recovery fund, Argentina’s plea to creditors, TikTok trouble

EU leaders spent the weekend locked in marathon summit talks over Europe’s proposed €750bn response to the coronavirus pandemic, and Albert Fernández, Argentina’s president, has made an impassioned appeal for the world to accept that he cannot budge from his final offer to restructure $65bn of foreign debt. Plus, the US is considering an effective ban on TikTok, the popular social media platform. The FT’s Beijing Bureau chief, Yuan Yang, will explain.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/07/2010m 19s

US considers blacklist for TikTok, Netflix pandemic surge wanes, FBI investigates Twitter hack

The US is considering putting TikTok on a blacklist that would effectively prevent Americans from using the popular video app, Netflix warns investors that its pandemic related growth spurt is waning, and the FBI and New York state launch investigations into Wednesday’s unprecedented hack of Twitter. Plus, the FT’s Dan Dombey explains how Spain is still struggling with its coronavirus recovery, and why so much of the country’s future hinges on the proposed EU recovery fund.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/07/209m 51s

Twitter accounts hacked, US vs Nord Stream 2, Apple victorious in EU battle over Irish back taxes

Twitter experienced an unprecedented hack on Wednesday when bitcoin scammers sent a series of tweets from hundreds of accounts, Opec and Russia move to start unwinding the record oil supply cuts agreed earlier this year, and the US has threatened to impose sanctions on any companies helping Russia to build the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline. Plus, the EU’s second-highest court rejected a European Commission order for Apple to pay back more than 14 billion euros in taxes to Ireland. The FT’s Javier Espinoza will have more on what this means for the EU as it tries to crack down on low-tax countries.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/07/208m 27s

US steps up sanctioning powers against China, Moderna vaccine early results, US banks braced for loan losses

President Donald Trump signed legislation on Tuesday that gives his administration more power to impose sanctions on Chinese officials, the Trump administration reversed its rule that international students would have to return home if they are attending universities with online-only classes, Moderna’s potential Covid-19 vaccine produced immune responses in patients in the early stage trial, and technology groups are refusing a data sharing proposal with Hong Kong regulators. Plus, the FT’s US banking editor, Laura Noonan, examines why three of America’s biggest banks set aside a combined $28bn for current and future loan losses.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/07/207m 50s

EU to go after low-tax countries, California rolls back reopening plans, European summer tourism

Brussels is planning to pursue low-tax member states over their advantageous corporate tax regimes, California is rolling back its reopening effort due to a surge in Covid-19 cases, and US technology groups and a group of state attorneys-general are joining the battle against a Trump administration rule that requires foreign students to return home if universities move to online-only courses. Plus, the FT’s leisure industries reporter Alice Hancock will explain what is becoming of the businesses reliant on European summer tourism in light of the pandemic.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/07/208m 21s

UK to curb Huawei’s 5G role, WeWork says it’s on track for profits in 2021, OCC warning

Boris Johnson is set to unveil plans this week to phase Huawei out of the UK’s 5G mobile phone networks, WeWork’s executive chairman tells the Financial Times that the company is on track to have positive cash flow in 2021, and the new head of the US Office of the Comptroller of the Currency warns banks about using coronavirus as cover to shut branches or to win permanent concessions from regulators. Plus, the FT’s US banking editor, Laura Noonan, tells us what to expect when Wall Street banks report quarterly earnings this week.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/07/209m 39s

Banks and the Hong Kong autonomy act, Wirecard’s Jan Marsalek, Boohoo scrutiny

US and European banks in Hong Kong are conducting emergency audits of their clients to identify officials and corporates that could face possible US sanctions over the new national security law, the FT reports that Wirecard executive Jan Marsalek touted secret documents about the use of a Russian chemical weapon in the UK as he bragged of ties to intelligence services to ingratiate himself with London traders, and coronavirus has spurred a global bicycle shortage. Plus, the FT’s consumer industries reporter Patricia Nilsson will explain how allegations of worker mistreatment brought on an investigation of online retailer Boohoo.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/07/209m 30s

Interview with Christine Lagarde, UK business reacts to Sunak’s plan, US hits 3m Covid-19 cases

In an interview with the FT, European Central Bank president Christine Lagarde said that “women are the first victims” of events such as a pandemic and discussed the steps towards recovery. Plus, UK business leaders say that millions of jobs in some of the hardest hit sectors are still at risk despite chancellor Rishi Sunak’s £30bn jobs plan, and the US hits 3m confirmed coronavirus cases.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/07/209m 10s

Trump withdrawing from WHO, Italian mafia bonds, US offshore wind power

The US has begun the process of leaving the World Health Organization, the FT reports that international investors bought bonds backed by the crime proceeds of Italy’s most powerful mafia group, and US investment in offshore wind power is predicted to rise to a level that nearly matches spending on offshore oil drilling this decade. Plus, the FT’s Claire Bushey will explain how coronavirus has triggered a conversation on the treatment and compensation of low-wage workers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/07/209m 27s

Social media groups block HK authorities, PPP loans, day trading dangers

Facebook, Google and Twitter have all said they would temporarily block Hong Kong’s authorities from accessing user data despite threats from the government, the US claims its small business bailout programme has kept 51.1 million people in work during the pandemic, and foreign students at US universities and schools will no longer be eligible to stay in the country if their courses move fully online due to coronavirus. Plus, the FT’s Eric Platt will report on the dangers associated with day trading.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/07/2011m 2s

Repairing the social and economic damage brought by the pandemic

Covid-19 has been a global shock. But will it be a transformative one? In this special edition of the FT News Briefing, the FT’s chief economics commentator, Martin Wolf, explains why the global free market era might soon be coming to an end for western democracies, and why he thinks politics, society and the economy should now revolve around the idea of citizenship. Read Martin Wolf’s essay at FT.com/BigRead.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/07/209m 27s

UK wants final say on Virgin-O2 deal, retail goes digital in pandemic, US jobs

The UK’s Competition and Markets Authority is set to ask Brussels for full control over the review of the proposed £31bn merger between Virgin Media and O2, US consumers are expected to spend $710bn online in 2020, and American Airlines says it could have over 20,000 front-line employees more than it needs this autumn to operate its reduced flying schedule. Plus, the unemployment rate for black Americans remained higher in June than for all other groups. Economist Valerie Wilson explains why black workers are being disproportionately affected by coronavirus and what policy measures might help.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/07/208m 46s

July 4 virus spread concerns, EU looks into Google Fitbit deal, Hong Kong under new national security law

US public health experts are warning of a heightened risk of coronavirus transmission during US Independence Day celebrations, EU regulators are asking more questions about Google’s proposed $2.1bn takeover of fitness tracker Fitbit, and the FT’s  James Kynge explains how China’s national security law affects both Hong Kongers and foreigners living in the territory. Plus, the FT’s Judith Evans explains why consumers are changing their attitudes towards single-use plastic in the pandemic.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/07/2010m 29s

Dealmaking down, UK business warns on Brexit trade talks, Wirecard’s real business

Coronavirus has brought an end to one of the longest waves in mergers and acquisitions history, more than 100 UK company chiefs, entrepreneurs and business groups have written to Boris Johnson warning about the economic damage of a no-deal Brexit, and the FT has revealed that German payments company Wirecard relied on a small number of customers for the majority of its genuine sales according to an internal document. Plus, the FT’s Hannah Murphy looks at whether the advertising revolt against social media and hate speech policy will have a lasting effect.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/07/209m 13s

Wall Street banks net record fees, Johnson channels FDR, remdesivir cost

Wall Street investment banks brought in a record amount of fees for fundraisings in the first six months of 2020 amid coronavirus, UK prime minister Boris Johnson plans to announce £5bn of infrastructure projects today, and Gilead Sciences has said it will charge governments $2,340 for a 5-day course of its coronavirus treatment, remdesivir. Plus, the FT’s Primrose Riordan explains why investors, economists, and analysts are growing concerned over China’s national security law in Hong Kong.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/06/209m 35s

Chesapeake files for bankruptcy, Facebook ad boycott, Singapore’s new corporate structure

American shale pioneer Chesapeake Energy has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, and dozens of brands are cancelling advertising on Facebook over the social media company’s handling of hate speech.  Plus, Singapore is luring hedge funds and investors away from other low tax jurisdictions with a new corporate structure. The FT’s Stefania Palma explains how the country is trying to make itself Asia’s leading financial centre.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/06/2010m 11s

Wirecard insolvency, Brussels to probe German regulator, Federal Reserve bans buybacks

Wirecard filed for insolvency on Thursday, days after the German payments group revealed a multiyear fraud that led to the arrest of its former chief executive. The FT’s Dan McCrum has been following Wirecard for the past five years and will upack the company’s current position. Plus, the Federal Reserve has capped dividends and banned share buybacks by big US banks in an attempt to strengthen the financial system in the pandemic.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/06/2011m 11s

New Covid-19 cases hit US record, airlines tap debt markets, Bayer settlement

Global markets dropped on Wednesday as rising Covid-19 cases  fuelled fears that the virus could derail an economic recovery, US airlines increased the size of their debt and equity fundraisings this week to nearly $10bn after receiving a warm welcome from investors, and Bayer will pay up to $10.9bn to settle a wave of lawsuits over the potential carcinogenic effects of its herbicide product Roundup. Plus, the FT’s currencies correspondent, Eva Szalay, explains why analysts at Bank of America say the British pound is an emerging-market currency in all but name.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/06/209m 15s

Ex-Wirecard CEO arrested, Trump scales back environmental rules, the new bond monarch

Wirecard’s founder Markus Braun was arrested on suspicion of false accounting and market manipulation, and the Trump administration has eased Obama-era environmental rules during the pandemic. Plus, the FT’s global finance correspondent, Robin Wigglesworth, will explain why some investors say the Federal Reserve and other central banks have in practice nationalised the bond market with their coronavirus measures.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/06/2010m 12s

Trump expands US immigration restrictions, Apple pivots away from Intel, inside Wirecard

Donald Trump is set to extend a suspension of immigration into the US imposed in response to the coronavirus pandemic, and Apple is planning to transition away from Intel chips to an in-house design for processors. Plus, last week Wirecard warned that €1.9bn was missing from its accounts. It confirms reporting by the Financial Times, which has been investigating fraud suspicions at the German payments group. The FT’s investigations editor, Paul Murphy, will unpack the difficulties in reporting the story and the eventual downfall of the company.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/06/2010m 10s

Brexit optimism, coronavirus hits Senegal oil projects, targeting black unemployment in the US

Boris Johnson will hammer out a new plan with senior ministers this week aimed at unblocking talks on Britain’s future relationship with the EU, and the delay of oil and gas projects in Senegal signals the aftershocks from the coronavirus crisis are even hurting economies that have avoided the worst of the pandemic itself. Plus, some economists have suggested the Federal Reserve could target the black unemployment rate in its monetary policy as a means of addressing income inequality in the US. One such advocate, Janelle Jones of the Groundwork Collaborative, unpacks her proposal.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/06/209m 27s

The inside story of a disgraced drugmaker

Executives from drugmaker Insys were the first from the pharmaceutical sector to be handed prison time for their role in America’s opioid epidemic earlier this year. The FT and the PBS series Frontline have investigated why the warning signs around the company were ignored for so long. FT pharmaceutical correspondent Hannah Kuchler tells Marc Filippino what they uncovered.Read the story at ft.com/insys.The PBS Frontline documentary, Opioids, Inc. is available for streaming online at PBS.org beginning Friday June 19, and will premiere on American PBS stations on Tuesday, June 23. For more information visit: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/opioids-inc/.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/06/2012m 10s

US backs out of tech tax talks, PE’s spending spree, Hertz halts share sale

The US has suspended talks with European countries on a new global tax framework for technology companies, private equity groups in the US have been on a spending spree despite worldwide lockdowns due to the pandemic, and the bankrupt car rental company Hertz halted its controversial $500m share sale. Plus, the FT’s Seoul bureau chief Edward White explains how Donald Trump’s transactional approach to foreign policy is affecting America’s relationships with Asian countries.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/06/209m 31s

Global stocks stay optimistic on central banks, Royalty Pharma IPO, US police reform

Wall Street rallied on expectations of new aid for the US economy from the federal government and central bank, while Royalty Pharma pulled off the biggest US listing of 2020. Plus, protesters are calling to defund police departments in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Alex Vitale, a sociology professor at Brooklyn College, explains what this might look like in practice.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/06/2010m 35s

LGBTQ rights at work, EU unemployment, oil’s transition to cleaner energy

The US Supreme Court ruled on Monday that LGBTQ workers are protected by federal civil rights laws in a landmark anti-discrimination decision, and Europe’s young workers are among the hardest hit by a frozen labour market. Plus, the FT’s senior energy correspondent, Anjli Raval, explains why coronavirus has big oil companies, such as BP, pivoting towards clean energy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/06/2010m 53s

SoftBank financing, White House on unemployment benefits, French industry

SoftBank has quietly poured more than $500m into Credit Suisse investment funds that in turn made big bets on the debt of struggling start-ups backed by the Vision Fund, the White House is opposed to extending coronavirus-related federal unemployment payments because it believes the measure created a “disincentive” to work, and China is bracing for a second wave of coronavirus. Plus, the FT’s David Keohane reports on France’s efforts to save its aerospace industry.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/06/209m 24s

Investors fear new Covid-19 wave, UK in border check U-turn, HSBC pressure

Investors in US and European equities were rattled on Thursday after the Federal Reserve’s dire assessment of the US economy and fresh concerns of an uptick in coronavirus cases, and the British government has abandoned its plan to introduce full border checks with the EU on January 1. Plus, the FT’s banking editor, Stephen Morris, unpacks the pressure HSBC is under after backing China’s Hong Kong national security law.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/06/209m 49s

Fed predicts no rate increase until 2022, Brazil vs Covid-19, Bumper CEO stock awards

First, the FT’s Colby Smith explains why the Federal Reserve is predicting that it would keep interest rates close to zero until at least the end of 2022. Then, the FT’s Brazil bureau chief Bryan Harris examines how the country is handling the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, the FT’s US business editor, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson explains how company leaders have been awarded generous stock options that could more than make up for their temporary pandemic-related pay cuts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/06/2010m 43s

Brexit and the EU’s recovery, Vroom’s strong IPO, Fed’s forecast

EU member states are urging Brussels to account for the shock of a hard Brexit in its coronavirus recovery plans, a former Goldman Sachs banker has avoided prison time for his role in a global insider trading ring, and US online car sales company Vroom more than doubled its price on the first day of trading as investors showed strong demand for newly listed stocks.  Plus, the Federal Reserve is releasing its first economic forecast in six months. The FT’s James Politi explains what the US central bank could signal about the next stage of their recession response.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/06/209m 5s

US stocks surge despite gloomy forecast, US police reform bill, oil industry’s cautious optimism

The US stock market has erased all of its losses from 2020, the World Bank has forecast that emerging economies will shrink for the first time in 60 years, and US Congressional Democrats have responded to protests against police brutality by proposing a bill to reform police practices. Plus, the FT’s Anjli Raval will explain the cautiously optimistic moves from the oil market.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/06/2010m 44s

Black Lives Matter protests go global, doubts over US jobs data

US civil rights groups have received a surge of corporate donations since Minneapolis police killed George Floyd, the head of Fidelity International has warned that asset managers will struggle to provide enough cash to keep businesses afloat, and global trade is under threat with up to 400,000 crew stranded either at sea or at home due to Covid-19. Plus, the FT’s James Politi explains why the US Bureau of Labor Statistics is having a hard time pinning down the country’s actual unemployment rate.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/06/209m 21s

Grantham sells stocks, ECB buys bonds, ESG vows in a pandemic

Veteran market strategist Jeremy Grantham has cut back his holdings in global stocks. The FT’s Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson recounts his conversation with the Boston fund manager. And, Frankfurt bureau chief Martin Arnold walks through the latest moves from the European Central Bank. Plus, the FT’s Attracta Mooney explains why wealth managers believe that investment with a sustainable focus will likely grow beyond the coronavirus pandemic.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/06/2011m 36s

Pentagon chief breaks with Trump, hydroxychloroquine, Warner Music IPO

US defence secretary Mark Esper breaks with Donald Trump on sending the army to clamp down on protests, and his predecessor James Mattis joins the president’s critics. The  FT’s Katrina Manson explains why the rift is so significant. Plus, a study casts doubt on whether taking hydroxychloroquine is an effective treatment for Covid-19, and Warner Music scored the biggest US IPO of 2020 on Wednesday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/06/208m 52s

Companies react to protests, fear of Covid spike, Zoom’s surge

Many companies and chief executives have expressed solidarity with protests over the police killings of George Floyd and other black men and women. The FT’s Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson explains what is different this time round. Plus, public health experts fear the demonstrations will hasten the spread of Covid-19, and Zoom has emerged as one of the biggest corporate winners from the pandemic.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/06/209m 56s

Trump vows to deploy military to US streets

President Donald Trump threatened to send US soldiers on to American streets to tackle the most widespread unrest the country has seen in decades, following the killing of George Floyd by police. Meanwhile, Mark Zuckerberg is facing a backlash within Facebook over his stance on controversial posts by the US president related to the protests.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/06/209m 44s

US protestors demonstrate against police violence, EU recovery, US pensions

Protests swept across US cities over the weekend as demonstrators responded to the death of George Floyd, another black man who died by police brutality. The FT’s Claire Bushey and Lauren Fedor explain what has been happening at the local and federal levels. Plus, the European Union budget commissioner is calling on member states to back new taxes to help fund the coronavirus recovery, and how seven US public pension plans risk running out of money by 2028. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or go to https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/06/208m 54s

Trump’s social media order, UK opens door to Hong Kong residents, AstraZeneca’s transformation

Donald Trump said he had ordered a wide-ranging review of the law that grants social media companies immunity from legal action for content on their platforms, and the UK government has opened a path to citizenship for more than 300,000 Hong Kong residents in response to China's security crackdown. Plus, the FT’s industry editor, Peggy Hollinger, unpacks the turnround that propelled pharmaceutical group AstraZeneca to the industry’s front ranks.To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or go to https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/05/2010m 49s

Pressure on Hong Kong finance, Boeing’s resumes 737 Max production, EU’s €750bn plan

Boeing said it will resume production of the troubled 737 Max, just hours after announcing plans to dismiss  more than 12,000 US workers. Meanwhile, Brussels has unveiled a plan to borrow €750bn to bankroll recovery efforts after the coronavirus crisis. Now it faces a critical few weeks for corralling member states to back the plan. Plus, the US will no longer consider Hong Kong autonomous from China. The FT’s US managing editor, Peter Spiegel, explains what this could mean for the global financial hub. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or go to https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/05/208m 57s

Investors eye recovery, $1tn in corporate borrowing, SpaceX test flight

Hopes of a quick economic recovery gave global stocks a lift on Tuesday. The FT’s Philip Stafford explains whether that optimism can be sustained. Then, a look at the highly rated companies, including ­Disney, Apple and ExxonMobil, that have borrowed a trillion dollars in the first five months of this year. Plus, Elon Musk’s SpaceX will send two Nasa astronauts to space today. The FT’s West Coast Editor, Richard Waters, will explain what this means for commercial ambitions in the final frontier. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or go to https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/05/2010m 10s

Japan’s birth rate, contact tracing in India

Japanese couples are putting off parenthood over coronavirus concerns. The FT’s Tokyo correspondent, Kana Inagaki, explains what this means for a country already suffering from population decline. Plus, countries around the world are aiming to roll out contact-tracing apps as they seek to reopen economies. The FT’s South Asia correspondent, Stephanie Findlay, reports on India’s mandatory system.   Update: India’s contact-tracing policy has been loosened since our interview with Stephanie Findlay was recorded. Since then, India has issued clarifications saying that the Aarogya Setu app is not mandatory for plane travel, but passengers will have to fill out a declaration form when boarding a plane.To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or follow this link: https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/05/208m 35s

Beijing’s legal force on Hong Kong, US retail, the future of higher education

The Chinese government is preparing to impose national security legislation on Hong Kong, and sales surged at the US retailers deemed “essential” by local authorities in the first quarter. Plus, the business of higher education is under threat because of coronavirus. The FT’s Andrew Jack explains.To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or follow this link: https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/05/2011m 16s

CDC director warns of second coronavirus flare-up, threat to mortgage-backed bonds

Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that the rapid spread of coronavirus in the southern hemisphere suggests it is likely to flare up in the US later this year. Then, the biggest shopping mall in America has fallen behind on mortgage payments that help underpin the $500bn mortgage-backed bond market. Plus, the FT’s Stephanie Findlay will explain how India’s pharma and chemical groups are jostling to take business from China.To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or follow this link: https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/05/2010m 34s

Facebook unveils online shopping venture, EU recovery fund, SoftBank’s future

Facebook has unveiled a shopping service that puts it in direct competition with Amazon and eBay, and a €500bn EU recovery fund put forward by Germany and France is facing some resistance. Plus, SoftBank announced a record $13bn annual loss earlier this week. The FT’s Tokyo correspondent, Kana Inagaki, explains what is next for founder Masayoshi Son. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or follow this link: https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/05/2010m 5s

Moderna vaccine trial pleases investors, EBITDAC backlash, Huawei sanctions

Positive results from the first US Covid-19 trial raised investors’ hopes of an economic rebound, Chinese self-driving car start-ups have been accelerating pilot projects as US rivals sit idle, and bond investors have hit out at the growing trend of companies reporting “earnings before coronavirus”. Plus, the FT’s Kiran Stacey explains what the latest US sanctions against Huawei mean for the Chinese telecoms company’s survival. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid or follow this link: https://www.ft.com/newsletter-signup/coronavirus?segmentId=9f398053-342f-c623-b5b3-1506d651696f.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/05/2010m 47s

Powell on US recovery, Nomura to boost private market focus, Taiwan travel scheme

Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell has warned that the US economy may not “fully recover” until the end of 2021, Japan’s oldest brokerage firm, Nomura, is poised to unveil a new strategic focus on private markets, and the Taiwanese government and Stanford University are preparing a quarantine and testing regime for foreign travellers. Plus, the FT’s June Yoon explains how the hopeful era for South Korea’s film industry has been disrupted by the pandemic. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/05/2010m 7s

The race for a vaccine, the story behind EBITDAC, BoE’s Bailey

The hunt for a coronavirus vaccine is central to global efforts to restart economies. The FT’s US coronavirus correspondent, David Crow, explains how nationalism could slow the fight against the pandemic. Plus, some companies are presenting a new customised metric they are calling ebitdac: earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, amortisation — and coronavirus. The FT’s markets reporter, Nikou Asgari, looks into whether it will stick. Then, the governor of the Bank of England, Andrew Bailey on the central bank’s response to the crisis.To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.You can watch the full Andrew Bailey interview from The FT’s Global Boardroom event here.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/05/209m 45s

Jay Powell calls for more fiscal stimulus, BMW’s dividend plan, CLO vulnerability

Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell said on Wednesday that additional fiscal stimulus may be “worth it” to shield the US economy from long-term economic damage due to the pandemic, meanwhile, OECD secretary-general Angel Gurría warned that rising debt levels would “come back to haunt us”. Plus, BMW is facing criticism for plans to make a dividend payout to shareholders despite requesting subsidies from the German government. Then, collateralised loan obligations, or CLOs, have boomed over the past decade. The FT’s capital markets correspondent, Rob Smith, explains why they could be vulnerable during the recession.  To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid. You can watch the full Angel Gurría interview from The FT’s Global Boardroom event here.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/05/208m 43s

Global economic outlook worsening, dealmaking in the pandemic, looming EM debt crisis

The global economic outlook is still worsening, according to IMF managing director Kristalina Georgieva. Plus, the FT’s corporate finance and deals editor, Arash Massoudi, reports on the latest deal to collapse amid the pandemic and the FT’s Colby Smith explains why the looming emerging markets debt crisis is expected to be messy.To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/05/2010m 0s

Flaw in mass testing, BP chief weighs in on oil, rental car groups under pressure

The head of an Italian biotech company that sells Covid-19 diagnostic and antibody tests told the FT that demand far exceeded supply as countries put mass testing at the centre of plans to ease lockdowns, BP’s new chief executive, Bernard Looney, said the coronavirus hit to crude consumption was likely to endure beyond the pandemic, and, as coronavirus takes a devastating toll on senior living homes, investors are being forced to recognise they are more than mere landlords. Plus, the FT’s motor industry correspondent, Peter Campbell, explains why fewer bookings is not the only reason rental car companies are hurting. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/05/2010m 27s

UK airlines seek government aid, WeWork rent, renewable energy defies market turmoil

UK airlines demanded “urgent additional government support” on Sunday warning that Boris Johnson’s plans to introduce a 14-day quarantine for people arriving in the UK by air will exacerbate the crisis facing the sector. Plus, US businesses resuming operations after coronavirus lockdowns are confronting uncertain legal terrain over whether they are required to pay workers for time spent on health checks, and WeWork’s move to skip rent payments and renegotiate hundreds of its leases is rippling into the commercial mortgage market. Then, renewable energy is one of the few sectors that has managed to weather the devastating effects of coronavirus, with new deals and new records being struck, even while the rest of the world has been grappling with the pandemic. The FT’s environment and clean energy correspondent, Leslie Hook, explains. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.--You might also be interested in a three-day digital conference hosted by the Financial Times. On 12-14 May, the FT will gather the most senior global decision makers and leading minds in policy, business, tech and finance for three days of online conversations with our top journalists – it's also free to join. Find out more at: https://globalboardroom.ft.com/.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/05/208m 55s

Food delivery boosts Uber sales, US jobs preview, the fashion industry under lockdown

Uber reported stronger than expected first-quarter revenues on Thursday thanks to a surge in food delivery;  India’s richest man, Mukesh Ambani, has sold a stake in his digital services group Reliance Jio for a third time in three weeks. Plus, we will look at what to expect from the US jobs report for April. Then, without runways or retail, how is the fashion industry faring under lockdown? The FT’s fashion editor, Lauren Indvik, will explain.  To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.--You might also be interested in a three-day digital conference hosted by the Financial Times. On 12-14 May, the FT will gather the most senior global decision makers and leading minds in policy, business, tech and finance for three days of online conversations with our top journalists – it's also free to join. Find out more at: https://globalboardroom.ft.com/   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/05/2010m 37s

US-China trade, ECB to resist pressure from German court, Airbnb’s outlook

Donald Trump is weighing up more aggressive economic measures against China, The European Central Bank is expected to resist recent pressure from Germany’s constitutional court over its bond-buying programme, and first-quarter results from Lyft showed promising signals for the company’s target of profitability until the disruption of the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, Airbnb was expected to make its stock market debut this year. The FT’s San Francisco correspondent, Dave Lee, will tell us how it is thinking about the future as the travel industry deals with the upheaval from the virus.To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/05/208m 11s

Disney’s $1.4bn hit, Beyond Meat boost, ECB called to justify bond-buying programme

Disney estimates that the coronavirus crisis wiped as much as $1.4bn from its quarterly operating profit, while Beyond Meat gears up for the price of its plant-based burgers to compete directly with real beef at the supermarket, and Germany’s constitutional court has called on the European Central Bank to justify its bond-buying programme. Plus, the FT’s global business columnist, Rana Foroohar, argues that economists will have to abandon their traditional way of thinking to deal with problems posed by the pandemic. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/05/2010m 44s

Aviation industry under pressure, Argentina’s debt deadline, why Silicon Valley is surviving the ad crash

The aviation industry took another hit from the coronavirus crisis on Monday as GE cut 10,000 aerospace jobs, and Argentina debt holders doubled down on their opposition to the government’s plan to restructure its debt. Plus, as the coronavirus pandemic rages on, advertising costs are being cut from many corporate budgets. The FT’s Tim Bradshaw explains why Silicon Valley is surviving the ad crash. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/05/209m 49s

Banks get ready for bad loans, losses at Berkshire Hathaway, BlackRock’s influence

US and European banks are on track to book more than $50bn of charges on souring loans in the first quarter. Plus, the FT’s Eric Platt reports on Berkshire Hathaway’s annual general meeting, where Warren Buffett was the star of the show, and the FT’s deputy editor, Patrick Jenkins, explains how BlackRock’s small consultancy division came to have a growing influence on a number of governments. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/05/208m 37s

Amazon Covid-19 costs, Boeing taps bond market, UK recruits fruit pickers

Amazon has warned that coronavirus measures could cost at least $4bn in the next quarter and wipe out any gain from a jump in sales during the pandemic, and Boeing has tapped the bond market for $25bn to help weather a cash drain this year. Plus, the FT’s Judith Evans reports on a crisis building in the UK fruit farming industry. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/05/209m 47s

Fed’s ‘medium-term’ warning, Microsoft growth, Barclays loan provisions

The Federal Reserve has warned of lasting “medium-term” economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. The FT’s James Politi unpacks the central bank’s outlook. Plus, the White House praised Gilead’s remdesivir as a coronavirus treatment drug after the release of the findings from a new study, and Microsoft posted strong results in the latest quarter thanks to a jump in its cloud-related business. Then, the FT’s Stephen Morris reports on how Barclays fared in the first quarter as the bank announced  a sharp increase in provisions for bad loans.To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/04/2010m 11s

Alphabet’s signs of recovery, Trump’s meat plant order, measuring inflation

Google’s internet search business stabilised in April after a sharp downturn at the end of last month, Fitch has downgraded Italy’s credit rating to a single notch above junk, and US President Donald Trump orders meat-processing plants to remain open in the wake of coronavirus-related closures. Plus, the FT’s economics correspondent, Delphine Strauss, explains why statisticians  are having such a hard time measuring inflation during the global pandemic.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/04/2010m 14s

European bank earnings, coronavirus threat to call centres

US oil prices fell sharply on Monday after the world’s largest oil-backed exchange traded fund began offloading all of its short-term contracts, and investors in European banks are braced for significant loan-loss provisions as the sector reports quarterly earnings this week. Plus, the FT’s John Reed will explain why the Philippines’ coronavirus lockdown is causing pain for the country’s vast outsourcing sector. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/04/209m 44s

Covid-19 death toll, gap between financial markets and economy, Berlin’s reopening

An FT analysis found that the death toll from coronavirus may be almost 60 per cent higher than reported in official counts, and analysts are scrambling for explanations on the divergence between the flying stock market and the grim global economic picture. Plus, the FT’s Berlin bureau chief, Guy Chazan, explains how Berlin is fairing since the city’s shops reopened last week. To get free access to the FT’s Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for 30 days, visit ft.com/newsbriefingcovid.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/04/2010m 27s

Germany backs EU recovery fund, Gilead drug flops, Rana Foroohar on US austerity

Germany is prepared to make a substantial financial contribution to help relaunch eurozone economies after the coronavirus pandemic, and the World Health Organization accidentally published documents yesterday showing that a potential antiviral drug for the coronavirus flopped in its first randomised clinical trial. Plus, the FT’s global business columnist, Rana Foroohar, argues that the economic ramifications of the coronavirus crisis will produce a new age of US austerity.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/04/209m 20s

ECB to accept ‘fallen angel’ bonds as collateral, Covid-19 legal protections

The European Central Bank has changed its rules to accept bonds that lose their investment grade credit rating during the coronavirus crisis as collateral, oil prices rebounded on Wednesday after Donald Trump stoked Middle East tensions, and US business groups are calling on the federal government to shield companies from litigation if workers are exposed to the virus. Plus, the FT’s Moscow bureau chief, Henry Foy, explains why Vladimir Putin’s regime is leaning on tycoons to help the state in troubled times.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/04/2010m 27s

Oil market turmoil, Netflix adds 16m subscribers, future of aerospace

Global oil markets remained under intense pressure on Tuesday with the price of US crude oil for June delivery nearly halving and Brent dropping below $20 per barrel for the first time in 18 years. Meanwhile, the White House and congressional leaders agreed to a new coronavirus stimulus package which includes funds to replenish the small business rescue fund, and Netflix has emerged as one of the few corporate winners of the pandemic after adding more than twice as many subscribers as it had forecast last quarter. Plus, the FT’s industry editor, Peggy Hollinger, explains how the aerospace industry is being forced to adapt to a dramatic decline in air travel due to coronavirus.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/04/2010m 24s

US oil prices plummet, Singapore oil trader scandal

Yesterday, US oil prices crashed into negative territory for the first time in history. The FT’s US energy editor, Derek Brower, explains why and what is next for producers. Then, the FT’s natural resources editor, Neil Hume, explains how Singapore oil trader Hin Leong Trading suffered $800m in losses that were not reflected in its financial statements. Plus, the Trump administration is facing backlash over the terms of its small business loan programme, and more than 1m people were enrolled in the UK’s flagship staff furlough scheme during its first day in operation.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/04/2010m 36s

Small business aid deal, ECB bad bank idea, emerging market debt

The Trump administration is closing in on a deal with Congress to provide another $300bn to coronavirus-hit small businesses. Then, the FT’s US economics editor, Brendan Greeley, explains how state budgets are coping without their normal tax revenue. Plus, the European Central Bank has held high-level talks about creating a eurozone bad bank for non-performing loans, and investors have pushed back on pleas by the G20 group of big economies to allow emerging markets to pause their debt repayments.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/04/208m 39s

Trump’s reopening plan, coronavirus drug report, Macron on EU solidarity

President Donald Trump backed away from threats to force a quick reopening of the US economy by unveiling guidelines for states, and US stock market futures rose 3 per cent late on Thursday after a report suggested a Gilead coronavirus drug had shown positive results in a clinical trial. Then, in an interview with the FT, French president Emmanuel Macron warned of the collapse of the EU as a “political project” unless richer states help economies such as Italy recover from the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, the FT’s Middle East editor, Andrew England, explains how Gulf sovereign wealth funds are mobilising to buy assets whose valuations have been hit hard by the outbreak.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/04/2011m 37s

Eurozone debt, US economic data, China cuts key lending rate

The coronavirus crisis is propelling Eurozone government debt towards 100 per cent of gross domestic product, three major US banks reported a total $12.8bn of charges in the first quarter for loan losses and warned there could be more to come, and data from all corners of the US economy published on Wednesday suggest the hit from coronavirus lockdowns has been deeper than feared. Plus, the FT’s Hudson Lockett explains why China’s central bank cut one of its most important lending rates to a record low.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/04/2010m 7s

Airline aid, banks braced for credit loss, grim IMF outlook

The US Treasury Department has reached an agreement with US airlines that paves the way for a $25bn bailout for the industry. Plus, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo increased loan-loss provisions by $10bn from last year to prepare for the impact of the pandemic. Then, the IMF said on Tuesday that the coronavirus crisis will leave lasting scars on the global economy. The FT’s economics editor, Chris Giles, explains how the damage could continue long after lockdowns are lifted.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/04/2010m 35s

VC funding in China, Amazon jobs, oil under pressure

New figures show that venture capital funding in China rebounded in March after the country’s coronavirus outbreak, and Amazon has announced plans to hire 75,000 extra workers after hiring 100,000 new staff to handle coronavirus-induced demand. Plus, Anjli Raval explains why oil traders have doubts about the US-backed Opec deal to cut supply, and Rana Forhoohar argues that WeWork’s struggles illustrate what is to come in real estate markets in a post-coronavirus world. You can find Rana’s columns at FT.com/rana-foroohar  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/04/2010m 29s

Inside Wuhan’s liberation, Japan on lockdown

The coronavirus’ place of origin, Wuhan, has emerged from the world’s largest mass quarantine. Meanwhile, Japan is gambling that it can control the spread of coronavirus without a full lockdown. The FT’s correspondents on the ground in China and Japan, Don Weinland and Robin Harding, look at the differing stages these two places are at when it comes to the pandemic and the road ahead.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/04/209m 2s

Wall St worries, Europe funding, Singapore relapse

Wall Street banks are warning investors to brace for a new wave of stock market declines despite the recent relief rally, and eurozone finance ministers will reconvene today to work toward a deal on emergency lending to tackle the Covid-19 outbreak. The FT’s Mehreen Khan will explain the dispute between the Netherlands and Italy over the terms. Plus, Stefania Palma in Singapore explains how the country is handling its third wave of coronavirus infections.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/04/209m 53s

US stimulus, WeWork v SoftBank, Carnival bonds

The Trump administration is in talks with Congress to secure an additional $250bn to fund loans for small businesses hit by the coronavirus pandemic, and a special committee of WeWork board members issued a legal challenge on Tuesday over SoftBank’s withdrawal from a $3bn deal. Plus, the FT’s capital market’s correspondent Rob Smith explains how Carnival Corporation managed to persuade investors to put their money into the ailing cruise company.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/04/2010m 24s

Investors gain hope, Italy isolated, Rana Foroohar

US stocks and global equities surged on Monday as investors took heart from signs that the coronavirus outbreak may be stabilising in some of the worst-affected countries. Plus, with a death count of more than 16,000 people and its economy on course to suffer the deepest recession in its modern history, Italy is wrestling with a lack of assistance from its European neighbours. The FT’s Miles Johnson explains that Italians are feeling betrayed by how some countries are responding to their plight..  Plus, the FT’s global business columnist, Rana Foroohar argues that private and public - but mostly private - sectors need to invest in broadband improvements as lockdowns cause internet usage to rise.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/04/2010m 24s

Covid-19 on emerging markets, possible oil tariffs

Emerging markets are scrambling to keep their economies afloat as the coronavirus pandemic deepens. The FT’s David Pilling will have more. Plus, America’s biggest banks will defend their plans to continue paying dividends in submissions to regulators today, and oil producers push back against the price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/04/2010m 35s

Oil price war, vaccines, banks on stimulus

Oil soared nearly 50 per cent at one point on Thursday in its biggest ever one-day rally after US president Donald Trump stoked hopes of a supply cut deal, German biotech groups are urging regulators to ease restrictions when it comes to testing a coronavirus vaccine, and bankers are raising doubts about whether the US government’s small business loan programme will begin today, as scheduled. Plus, banks were admonished over their role in causing the 2008 financial crisis. The FT’s David Crow explains how banks can rehabilitate themselves in the coronavirus crisis by distributing unprecedented amounts of stimulus.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/04/209m 38s

EU rescue fund, coronavirus hits rents

France is pushing for a common EU fund to help Europe through the coronavirus crisis. The FT’s Paris bureau chief, Victor Mallet, explains what the plan entails. Then, the rapid spread of the outbreak has pushed commercial landlords and their tenants to breaking point. FT property reporter George Hammond unpacks the brewing conflict between landlords and the tenants that are unable to pay rent. Plus, Amazon has said it is urgently investigating claims of “subhuman” conditions at a Philippines call centre, and SoftBank has pulled out of a $3bn purchase of WeWork stock.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/04/2011m 11s

Gillian Tett on Fed dollar scheme, Covid-19 testing

The FT’s Gillian Tett unpacks the Federal Reserve’s latest move to meet the global demand for dollars, and science editor Clive Cookson explains how different countries are handling coronavirus testing and how the private sector could step in. Plus, Donald Trump is set to suspend some tariffs for 90 days as he tries blunt the economic damage from the pandemic, the UK’s six biggest banks have bowed to pressure from Britain’s top financial regulator to suspend dividend payments, and as coronavirus reaches the developing world, a record 85 countries have approached the IMF for short-term relief in recent weeks.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/04/2010m 6s

Amazon during Covid-19, Rana on corporate interests

Amazon has pitched itself as an essential business to provide those sheltering in place with needed products. The FT’s Dave Lee reports on how the e-commerce group could emerge as a hero if deliveries remain on track, but only if it does so without pushing employees to take excessive health risks. Meanwhile, insurers are tightening the terms of their business coverage to make sure anything related to the pandemic is explicitly excluded. Plus, Rana Foroohar argues that 50 years of US policy in favour of private sector interests have come home to roost as the economy copes with coronavirus.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/03/2010m 43s

The ventilator challenge, stimulus questions

Manufacturers are working to produce the ventilators needed to help severely ill coronavirus patients breathe. The question is whether those inexperienced in the field can overcome the logistical and regulatory hurdles in time to deliver the life-saving machines. Plus, US companies have questions about how to access the $454bn of government funds set aside in the $2tn stimulus legislation, and Italy’s shadow workers are left out of the country’s safety net.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/03/208m 42s

Market relief rally, ECB flexes, WeWork cash burn

US stocks were up for a third straight day after the Senate agreed to a $2.2tn stimulus package Wednesday. The bill comes as a report on Thursday showed that a record 3.3m Americans filed for unemployment last week from the coronavirus shutdown. Plus, the European Central Bank is giving itself a tremendous amount of flexibility in its plan to buy €750bn in additional bonds to contain the fallout from the virus. And, WeWork burnt through $1.4bn last quarter, almost all the cash injection its principal backer SoftBank had most recently provided.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/03/2010m 0s

Stimulus haggle, James Kynge on China, US oil talks

The US Senate has approved fiscal stimulus legislation worth $2tn after a week of intense negotiations, Ford suffers the biggest credit rating downgrade since 2005, and the FT’s James Kynge tells us how China could become an example of growth while the rest of the world deals with the coronavirus crisis. Plus, the US has raised the pressure on Saudi Arabia to end its oil price war with Russia as the shale industry faces a collapse.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/03/2010m 29s

Dash for cash, shutdown debate, Softbank talks

As traditional capital markets seize up, businesses are turning to emergency sources of funding. An FT analysis shows that more than 130 companies drew at least $124bn from their lenders in the past three weeks. Plus, Europe is facing a dilemma over whether to allow certain businesses to operate or shut the economy entirely to slow the spread of the coronavirus, and SoftBank explored an attempt to take the conglomerate private before deciding to sell some of its assets this week.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/03/207m 27s

Wall Street awaits fiscal stimulus deal from Washington

The Federal Reserve announced a plan to buy corporate debt and unlimited amounts of government debt on Monday. But investors on Wall Street continue to wait for fiscal stimulus from the US government.  Plus, The FT’s global business columnist, Rana Foroohar, argues that, when a bailout plan is agreed, small businesses and individuals should be first in line for the help.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/03/208m 59s

US stimulus setback, tracking Covid-19 indicators

US lawmakers argue over a fiscal stimulus legislation worth nearly $2tn to help America weather the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, it could be weeks before official data reveals the full impact of the outbreak on the global economy. FT data journalists have compiled a set of alternative measures of economic activity, from restaurant bookings to traffic patterns, to give an early indication of what to expect. And, Occidental Petroleum chief executive Vicki Hollub looks set to keep her job as the embattled oil producer finalises a truce with activist investor Carl Icahn.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/03/208m 28s

Friday, March 20

Republicans in the US Senate have introduced legislation to inject more than $1tn of fiscal stimulus into the economy as it grapples with the coronavirus outbreak. Sir Paul Tucker, the former deputy governor of the Bank of England and current chair of the Systemic Risk Council, says it’s time for policymakers and bankers to prepare for a wartime setting if conditions deteriorate. Plus, the only US drugmaker that makes a potential treatment for the coronavirus raised the price nearly 100 per cent in January as the outbreak wreaked havoc in China.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/03/2010m 56s

Thursday, March 19

The European Central Bank will buy an additional €750bn in bonds in response to the economic and financial upheaval caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Gillian Tett and Anjli Raval explain the dramatic market swings in markets that preceded the ECB’s emergency move. Plus, we will look at the bottlenecks in the healthcare supply chain as demand grows for testing and critical care equipment.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/03/2010m 39s

Wednesday, March 18

Western governments pledged trillions of dollars in stimulus measures to limit the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic on Tuesday. The FT’s global business columnist Rana Foroohar explains what it could mean for Wall Street and Main Street. Plus, Impossible Foods raises $500m in a round that will help the US-plant based burger group to see through the economic upheaval caused by the current crisis, and Joe Biden solidifies his status as the frontrunner to take on Donald Trump in November.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/03/207m 56s

Tuesday, March 17

Governments in all large western economies took drastic measures to limit public movement on Monday in an urgent effort to arrest the spreading coronavirus pandemic while US stocks plunged despite a set of emergency measures laid out by the Federal Reserve on Sunday. Plus, an analysis by the Financial Times finds that the UK and the US have key weaknesses in their healthcare systems which could trigger a collapse if put to the test by the outbreak.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/03/209m 4s

Monday, March 16

The Federal Reserve cut interest rates to zero and joined forces with other central banks in a bid to prevent a severe economic downturn caused by the coronavirus outbreak. The FT’s Gillian Tett unpacks the sweeping measures. Plus, the rapid spread of the coronavirus and the ensuing travel restrictions have led to one of the worst months on record for the airport industry, and French industrials group Air Liquide is asking would-be buyers of its hand sanitiser unit to offer a higher sum in the wake of the outbreak.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/03/208m 18s

Friday, March 13

US stocks fell almost 10 per cent in their worst day since the 1987 market crash despite emergency action by the Federal Reserve. Meanwhile, following the US ban on travellers from Europe, airlines are demanding immediate government action to alleviate the industry’s deepening crisis. Plus, companies took on vast amounts of debt in the era of low interest rates. The FT’s US business editor, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, explains the risk this debt poses now. We want to hear from you. Please go to FT.com/briefingsurvey, and fill out our survey for a chance to win a pair of Bose headphones.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/03/209m 2s

Thursday, March 12

The Trump administration will suspend non-US citizens travelling from Europe for the next 30 days to reduce the spread of the coronavirus in America. This announcement came on the same day the World Health Organization labelled the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic for the first time, and the blue-chip Dow Jones Industrial Average tipped into bear market territory. Plus, Boeing lost close to a fifth of its market value on after news that it had tapped the full amount of a $13.8bn loan to deal with the financial effects of the coronavirus. Then, we will look at what to expect from Christine Lagarde and the European Central Bank today, now that the Federal Reserve and the Bank of England have made emergency rate cuts. We want to hear from you. Please go to FT.com/briefingsurvey, and fill out our survey for a chance to win a pair of Bose headphones.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/03/2010m 28s

Wednesday, March 11

Joe Biden cemented his lead as the frontrunner in the Democratic presidential race, winning several states including the battleground of Michigan. Plus, airlines cancel flights, withdraw earnings guidance and implement austerity measures to cope with the travel slump caused by the coronavirus outbreak, and the head of the International Energy Agency warns Russia and Saudi Arabia risk hurting efforts to stop the spread of coronavirus if they insist on continuing an oil price war. Then, the FT’s Chris Giles explains how the UK budget, to be unveiled today, is expected to set some money aside to deal with the outbreak. We want to hear from you. Please go to FT.com/briefingsurvey, and fill out our survey for a chance to win a pair of Bose headphones.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/03/209m 43s

Tuesday, March 10

A crash in the price of oil rocked financial markets that were already reeling from the effects of the coronavirus. Meanwhile, Italy extended its quarantine to the entire country, two of the world’s largest medical research foundations are teaming up with a Mastercard-backed charity to commit $125m in “seed funding” to develop treatments for Covid-19, and US president Donald Trump says his administration will propose a relief package today to reduce the negative economic effects of the outbreak. Plus, EU leaders have vowed to work with Turkey to prevent renewed tensions at their shared border and revive a 2016 migration deal. And, the FT’s Derek Brower will explain how the oil price war has left US shale producers hanging on for survival.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/03/2010m 5s

Monday, March 9

Saudi Arabia has launched an aggressive oil price war after Russia refused to join production cuts with Opec, Italy locks down a huge swath of its wealthy northern area that is home to 16m people in order to contain the spread of coronavirus, and Citigroup confirmed that it is severing nearly two-thirds of the platforms it uses for currency trading as part of an effort to cut costs. Plus, Turkey is threatening to allow migrants to flow into Europe unless it gets more funding from the European Union. The FT’s Mehreen Khan and Laura Pitel explain the human tug-of-war.  We want to hear from you! Please go to FT.com/briefingsurvey, and fill out our survey for a chance to win a pair of Bose QuietComfort Noise Cancelling headphones.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/03/2011m 6s

Friday, March 6

US stocks dropped as Treasury yields touched records lows on Thursday and bank share price falls led the way, struggling Chinese ride-hailing group Didi Chuxing is suffering a further blow due to the coronavirus, and ExxonMobil says it will avoid a “beauty match” on carbon emissions as rivals set out targets. Plus, the world’s biggest oil traders slashed global demand forecasts with growth falling to the weakest levels since the financial crisis. The FT’s Anjli Raval explains how this adds pressure on Opec to cut output.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/03/209m 57s

Thursday, March 5

US stocks recovered more than 4 per cent on Wednesday, a day after the Federal Reserve cut interest rates by 50 basis points and spooked investors, Rupert Murdoch’s youngest son, James, is making a seven-figure investment in start-ups aimed at combating fake news, and the US is ready to invest $5bn in Ethiopia in an effort to counter China’s influence in one of Africa’s fastest-growing economies. Plus, banks are gearing up in the event that the coronavirus outbreak forces traders to work offsite. The FT’s Laura Noonan explains why it is not as simple as bringing home your laptop.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/03/2010m 26s

Wednesday, March 4

Joe Biden emerged as a major contender in Super Tuesday voting, despite Bernie Sanders winning in California. Meanwhile, the Federal Reserve failed to ease recession fears on Tuesday when it made an emergency interest rate cut. The FT’s Gillian Tett explains why. Plus, Tesla short sellers have reaped $2.8bn as US stocks tumbled, and Airbus is reviewing its 2020 delivery targets as the global spread of coronavirus hits demand from airlines.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/03/208m 36s

Tuesday, March 3

US stocks ended a seven-day losing streak on Monday on expectations that central banks will soften the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak and driverless car company Waymo raises $2.3bn from a group of outside investors. Plus, the FT’s George Parker explains the expectations of both the United Kingdom and the European Union as their trade talks begin.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/03/209m 13s

Monday, March 2

Disruptions caused by the coronavirus are driving the global economy closer to a recession and triggering calls for fiscal and monetary intervention, activist hedge fund Elliott Management is pushing for big changes at Twitter after taking a $1bn stake, and the US state of Wyoming is in talks to buy millions of acres of land from Occidental Petroleum. Plus, if Bernie Sanders is elected US president, his policies have the potential to radically change the US financial system. The FT’s Robert Armstrong explains how Wall Street is weighing up the idea of a socialist in the White House.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/03/209m 25s

Friday, February 28

US equities closed in correction territory on Thursday on coronavirus concerns, while Saudi Arabia is asking its Opec allies to agree to a substantial cut in oil production to deal with crippling demand. Plus, a report from Beijing on how China is trying to get its factories back to work, and the FT’s Gillian Tett unpacks how the outbreak is affecting the global economy.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/02/209m 49s

Thursday, February 27

Donald Trump sought to defuse criticism of his handling of the coronavirus and predicted stock markets would be booming again, while investors are betting that central banks will respond to the financial fallout from the outbreak with stimulus, and Microsoft has warned that supply chain disruption due to the virus will cause the company to miss its revenue guidance for its Windows and Surface products. Plus, Walmart is exploring the sale of a stake in the UK supermarket chain Asda.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/02/209m 14s

Wednesday, February 26

A fresh wave of selling pressure rippled across global markets on Tuesday as public health officials warned Americans to prepare for the spread of the coronavirus, Bob Iger has stepped down as chief executive of Walt Disney a year after extending his contract, and Virgin Galactic shares fall after the space tourism company reports that losses widened in the fourth quarter. Plus, there has been a wave of leadership change at European banks in the past few months. The FT’s David Crow explains why the lenders are scrambling to find a new generation of chief executives.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/02/2012m 3s

Tuesday, February 25

Global stocks had their worst day in two years on Monday as new coronavirus cases outside China dashed hopes that the outbreak had been contained, US energy stocks are now underperforming the main US stock market index by the biggest margin since 1941, disgraced film producer Harvey Weinstein was found guilty by a jury in New York of sex crimes including rape, and HP announced a $16bn buyback plan as it claims to be engaging with printer rival Xerox in deal talks.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/02/2010m 18s

Monday, February 24

Barclays is preparing to start a search for a new chief executive to replace Jes Staley, European buyout firm CVC Capital Partners is plotting an ambitious reshaping of one of the world’s most popular sports - rugby, and Italy has imposed a strict quarantine across at least 10 towns to contain the largest outbreak of coronavirus outside of Asia.  Plus, the FT’s Benjamin Parkin previews Donald Trump’s visit to India.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/02/209m 41s

Friday, February 21

EU leaders are deadlocked over how to finance the bloc’s next multi-annual budget, a judge handed down a 40 year sentence to Roger Stone on Thursday, saying the Republican political operative was prosecuted for covering up for President Donald Trump, and the luxury industry faces its biggest threat since the 2008 financial crisis with the coronavirus outbreak. Plus, wealthy Arab states have been pouring money into football as part of their effort to diversify the oil-dependent economies. But that money has caught the attention of one of football’s main governing bodies. The FT’s sports correspondent, Murad Ahmed, explains.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/02/2010m 0s

Thursday, February 20

UBS names Ralph Hamers from ING as its next chief executive, Boeing asks for a $100m a year tax break from Washington state to be suspended in order to avert retaliatory tariffs this summer, and the UN has teamed up with a New York start-up to develop technology that will attempt to gauge how people living in war zones feel about peace negotiations. Plus, billionaire Michael Bloomberg has made up for his late entry into the Democratic presidential race with an advertising spending spree of nearly half a billion dollars. The FT’s Brooke Fox and Anna Nicolaou report on the strategy that has caught the other campaigns off-guard.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/02/209m 16s

Wednesday, February 19

The EU’s richest states have dug in their heels over the region’s budget as European Council president Charles Michel seeks to ease the blow of spending cuts on poorer countries, Donald Trump extended clemency to several high-profile white-collar criminals on Tuesday, including former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich and financier Michael Milken, and US asset manager Franklin Templeton has agreed to buy rival Legg Mason for $6.5bn including debt. Plus, the FT’s David Crow reports on HSBC’s radical plan to downsize.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/02/209m 12s

Tuesday, February 18

Apple has warned that disruption in China from the coronavirus will cause its revenues to fall short in the current quarter, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has announced a $10bn fund to help fight climate change following intense criticism over the e-commerce group’s own environmental impact, and a start-up touted as the “Uber of dry cleaning” collapsed into administration on Friday, wiping out all of its investors, including British businessman Michael Spencer. Plus, the EU has rejected Facebook’s latest vision of how online content should be regulated. The FT’s Javier Espinoza reports on chief executive Mark Zuckerberg’s day in Brussels.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/02/208m 35s

Monday, February 17

The head of SoftBank’s $100bn Vision Fund has lined up billions of dollars of outside investment for a new hedge fund-style vehicle, Goldman Sachs and a research boutique have constructed a “synthetic” way for investors to bet more cheaply against Chinese stocks, and Samsung has begun flying electronic components for its latest Galaxy phones from China to its factories in Vietnam as it grapples with sweeping supply chain disruptions caused by coronavirus. Plus, parts of the Middle East and Africa have some of the world’s youngest populations as well as its highest rates of youth unemployment. The FT’s Adrienne Klasa reports on the demographic pressures experts warn will only increase.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/02/209m 3s

Friday, February 14

US attorney-general William Barr publicly rebuked Donald Trump, saying the president’s tweets about ongoing criminal cases had made it “impossible” to do his job, while the US Senate voted to limit Mr Trump’s military authority in Iran. Plus, US prosecutors accuse Huawei of stealing technology from several American companies and Amazon wins its request to temporarily block a $10bn US defence contract awarded to Microsoft. Plus, Sajid Javid abruptly quit as UK chancellor on Thursday after a brutal power struggle with prime minister Boris Johnson. The FT’s Robert Shrimsley explains what happened.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/02/2010m 22s

Thursday, February 13

Democrats in the US House of Representatives call on attorney-general William Barr to testify over claims of political influence in a case involving a friend of the president, Berkshire Hathaway vice-chairman Charlie Munger shares his pessimistic view of the future, and Europe’s largest telecoms conference has been forced to cancel this year’s event over fears of the spread of coronavirus. Plus, the US Department of Justice is backing Qualcomm as the chipmaker appeals against an antitrust fine from the Federal Trade Commission. The FT’s Kadhim Shubber explains how this complicates the relationship between the US regulators.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/02/2010m 27s

Wednesday, February 12

US senator Bernie Sanders declared victory in the New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary on Tuesday night, ride-sharing service Lyft disappointed investors who were looking for signs of an end to the losses, and electric scooter companies operating in Germany are braced for a setback on the streets as authorities push for a regulatory crackdown. Plus, the FT’s Hannah Kuchler explains why investors are bidding up companies that are working to alleviate the effects of the coronavirus.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/02/209m 7s

Tuesday, February 11

A federal judge is poised to approve T-Mobile’s takeover of Sprint, according to sources briefed on the matter, Donald Trump has put forward a budget proposal that slashes key planks of the US social safety net while preserving his tax cut, and the woman who was long seen as Angela Merkel’s successor, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, said she would not run for German chancellor. Plus, nearly 150m Americans were compromised in the 2017 Equifax data breach. The FT’s Kadhim Shubber reports on why the US has blamed China.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/02/209m 25s

Monday, February 10

Google has been accused of unfairly promoting its own holiday rental search by more than 30 of its rivals, France’s Covéa is in exclusive talks to buy the Agnelli-owned PartnerRe for $9bn, and the result of Ireland’s general election was tied three ways on Sunday night. Plus, the FT’s San Francisco correspondent, Dave Lee, explains a new pilot programme from Airbnb after a series of shootings at its rentals.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/02/209m 54s

Friday, February 7

Uber shares traded higher after hours on Thursday after the ride-hailing company promised profitability in the final quarter of this year, officials in London and Washington told the FT that Donald Trump vented in “apoplectic” fury at Boris Johnson over Britain’s decision to allow China’s Huawei a role in its 5G mobile networks, and activist hedge fund Elliott Management has built a stake worth $2.5bn in SoftBank Group and is pressing for changes. Plus, the FT’s Tom Hancock has been quarantined after reporting on the coronavirus in Wuhan. He explains how a crackdown on information about the virus in Wuhan allowed the disease to spread more widely.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/02/209m 0s

Thursday, February 6

Donald Trump was acquitted on impeachment charges by the Senate on Wednesday, HSBC has decided to hold off on naming a permanent chief executive until after it unveils a strategy shake-up, and Chinese energy executives are projecting a 25 per cent fall in the country’s oil consumption this month due the effects of the coronavirus on demand. Plus, the FT’s Anna Nicolaou explains Spotify’s push into podcasts and what it means for the streaming giant’s music business.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/02/2010m 14s

Wednesday, February 5

US president Donald Trump claimed “incredible results in boosting the US economy in a State of the Union address to Congress and Pete Buttigieg took a narrow lead in the Iowa Democratic presidential caucuses based on partial results.Plus, sources tell the FT that New York Stock Exchange owner Intercontinental Exchange had held takeover talks with eBay, a top US executive at SoftBank’s $100bn Vision Fund is leaving after expressing concerns about “issues” at the technology conglomerate and Ford shares fell almost 10 per cent on Tuesday as it delivered a disappointing 2020 outlook.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/02/2010m 12s

Tuesday, February 4

Opec and its allies are preparing emergency cuts to oil production after the economic fallout of the coronavirus pushed the price of crude into a bear market on Monday, the pace of revenue growth at Google parent Alphabet slowed more sharply than expected in the final quarter of last year, and the German government has drafted a bill to clamp down on anti-competitive behaviour from the likes of Google and Amazon. Plus, results out of the Iowa caucus were delayed Monday night as the state Democratic party cited “quality control” issues. The FT’s Lauren Fedor reports.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/02/207m 22s

Monday, February 3

UK prime minister Boris Johnson is expected to set out his vision for future relations with the EU in a speech today, Beijing is poised to pump extra cash into China’s financial system as part of a way to shield the economy from the effects of the deadly coronavirus outbreak, and American voters in Iowa will kick off the US Democratic presidential primary race. Plus, the FT’s Patrick McGee explains why Germany fears being left behind by Silicon Valley and Big Tech.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/02/209m 53s

Friday, January 31

IBM has named Arvind Krishna as the new chief executive to take over from Ginni Rometty, Amazon’s one-day shipping delivered a bumper holiday sales season, and the World Health Organization has declared an international emergency over the new coronavirus epidemic. Plus, as the UK prepares to leave the European Union tonight, the FT’s George Parker says the British population is split between a state of vindication and of sadness.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/01/208m 54s

Thursday, January 30

Shares in Facebook dropped by more than 7 per cent on Wednesday after the company posted the slowest pace of growth since 2012. Plus scientists race to develop a vaccine for the deadly coronavirus, the Federal Reserve leaves its main policy rate unchanged, and Tesla and Microsoft post better than expected quarterly revenues. Then, Claire Bushey reports on Boeing’s first annual loss in more than 20 years.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/01/208m 12s

Wednesday, January 29

Apple recorded new records for both revenue and income for the holiday sales period, Starbucks has closed more than half of its 4,300 outlets in China over the coronavirus, Senate Republican leaders put pressure on colleagues to block witnesses in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, and Mr Trump unveiled his long-delayed Middle East peace plan. Plus, Goldman Sachs chief executive David Solomon is taking a gamble on consumer banking. The FT’s Laura Noonan reports on the bank’s overhaul, and what has led to its first-ever investor day.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/01/2010m 27s

Tuesday, January 28

Airbus is on the brink of settling a bribery and corruption probe with regulators in the UK, France and the US, Boris Johnson feels increasing heat over Huawei’s role in the UK mobile phone network, and Donald Trump’s lawyers tried to shift the focus of his Senate impeachment trial away from revelations from former national security adviser John Bolton. Plus, global equity markets and oil prices fell sharply on Monday over concerns that the Coronavirus would slow China’s economic growth. The FT’s Tom Hancock reports from Wuhan, the city at the centre of the outbreak.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/01/209m 7s

Monday, January 27

An internal probe showed that Deutsche Bank paid $1.1m to secure the wealth management business of a senior Saudi royal, Beijing has warned that the spread of the deadly coronavirus is expected to accelerate, and the Trump administration has warned that it would “react” with possible punitive measures against the EU for a carbon tax plan. Plus, more than three years after the Brexit referendum, the UK will leave the EU this week. The FT’s George Parker breaks down how the relationship might look after the separation.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/01/209m 31s

Friday, January 24

A powerful rebound in Intel’s data centre division drove a stronger than expected recovery in the final quarter of 2019, former Wells Fargo chief executive John Stumpf has agreed to pay $17.5m as part of a settlement with US regulators over the bank’s fake accounts scandal, and the European Central Bank begins its first strategic review in 16 years. Plus, the founder of the opioid maker Insys has been sentenced to five-and-a-half years in prison. The FT’s Hannah Kuchler explains what this means for other US pharmaceutical executives.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/01/209m 33s

Thursday, January 23

Chinese authorities have shut down Wuhan transport networks in its efforts to contain the outbreak of a deadly Sars-like virus. Plus, the stock market value of Tesla topped $100bn for the first time on Wednesday, and Boeing’s new chief executive, David Calhoun, insists the 737 Max will fly again. Plus, the FT’s Tim Bradshaw takes a look at the competitive market for food delivery apps, and which companies are fighting to take your order.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/01/2010m 37s

Wednesday, January 22

The US Senate rejected Democratic bids to subpoena documents on the first day of the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, a slowdown in the US continues to weigh on Netflix’s subscriber growth, and the UK is set to go ahead with plans to introduce a new digital tax against US companies despite the threat of tariffs. Plus, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has been implicated in a hack involving Jeff Bezos’s phone, Boeing has told customers and suppliers that the 737 Max will now stay grounded until the middle of 2020, and US health officials have confirmed the first US case of the Sars-like coronavirus.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/01/209m 31s

Tuesday, January 21

The US Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump begins today. Republican Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell proposed rules on Monday evening that outraged Democrats. Plus, lawyers for Huawei’s Meng Wanzhou told a Canadian courtroom that the US extradition case against the executive amounted to “fiction”, France signals a breakthrough in talks to resolve a spat over digital taxes with the US, and the UK could be fined or lose preferential access to the European market if it violates the terms of a future relationship deal with the EU.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/01/209m 32s

Monday, January 20

US government-funded technology companies have recorded an increase in the use of circumvention software in Iran in recent weeks, the UK’s pledge to diverge from EU rules after Brexit has provoked alarm in Brussels, and a successful emergency escape simulation puts SpaceX on track for a launch with Nasa astronauts. Plus, the FT’s Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson explains how climate change and Big Tech will drive the agenda at this year’s World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/01/208m 56s

Friday, January 17

Investors catapulted Alphabet’s stock market value above $1tn for the first time on Thursday, Comcast’s NBCUniversal unveils a new streaming service that will be free to many customers, and Italy’s collapsing birth rate raises alarm bells. Plus, a non-partisan government watchdog said the White House violated the law by withholding US military aid to Ukraine last year. The FT’s Kadhim Shubber explains what this means for Donald Trump’s impeachment trial.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/01/208m 23s

Thursday, January 16

The US and China have signed an agreement to pause the trade war that has weighed on the global economy for nearly two years, flying taxi start-up Joby Aviation secures $590m in a new funding round led by Toyota, and legal costs from the 1MDB bribery scandal hit Goldman Sachs earnings. Plus, the FT’s Lionel Barber shares the highlights from his exclusive interview with German chancellor Angela Merkel.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/01/208m 41s

Wednesday, January 15

The US House of Representatives will vote today on sending articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, Boeing has ceded the crown as the world’s biggest plane maker to rival Airbus, and investment in UK-based tech start-ups exceeded £10bn for the first time last year. Plus, JPMorgan Chase kicked off the Wall Street earnings season by posting a record profit. The FT’s Rob Armstrong will unpack the figures.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/01/208m 12s

Tuesday, January 14

The UK government is trying to claw back some of the £10m paid to trade organisations to prepare for a no-deal Brexit, US officials have presented the UK with new intelligence challenging the claim that Britain would be able to mitigate the risks of adopting Huawei technology in its 5G network, and the US Treasury department has dropped the designation of China as a currency manipulator. Plus, tonight, six Democratic hopefuls will take part in the final US presidential primary debate before the crucial Iowa caucuses. The FT’s Lauren Fedor reports on how the candidates are doing in the 2020 race for the White House.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/01/209m 55s

Monday, January 13

Nissan executives have accelerated secret contingency planning for a potential split from Renault, the head of MI5 says he has “no reason to think” that the UK’s intelligence-sharing relationship with the US would be hit if Britain adopted Huawei technology in its 5G mobile phone network, and JAB Holdings-owned Panera Bread is set to reduce the proportion of meat-based items on its menu by a third. Plus, the crisis at Boeing has deepened after the release of damning internal messages. The FT’s Claire Bushey reports on what it means for the company as the new chief executive, David Calhoun, begins today.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/01/208m 24s

Friday, January 10

The US House of Representatives votes in favour of limiting president Donald Trump’s military powers against Iran, Western intelligence officials believe a plane that crashed in Iran killing 176 people was mistakenly brought down by an Iranian missile, and Britain is preparing to activate a new post-Brexit sanctions regime. Plus, the FT’s Patrick McGee breaks down both the outlandish and realistic ideas that came out of this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/01/209m 16s

Thursday, January 9

Donald Trump backs away from military action against Iran, European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen visits London in her first meeting with UK prime minister Boris Johnson, and Jeffrey Katzenberg and Meg Whitman promote their new mobile video start-up, Quibi. Plus, the FT’s Chloe Cornish reports on Carlos Ghosn’s first press conference since his escape from Japan.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/01/209m 59s

Wednesday, January 8

Iran fires more than a dozen missiles at bases in Iraq hosting American troops in retaliation for the US killing of Qassem Soleimani. Plus, Bank of England governor Mark Carney says central banks are running low on ammunition to fight a recession, Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó reclaims his post as the head of congress, Boeing recommends simulator training for 737 Max pilots, and US Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell says Republicans have the votes to move ahead with Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. Then, Josh Chaffin reports on the Green Beret ex-con who allegedly helped Carlos Ghosn escape Japan.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/01/209m 42s

Tuesday, January 7

The top US military official denied that America would be pulling troops out of Iraq, blaming a leaked “draft” letter indicating otherwise. Plus, Donald Trump’s former national security adviser, John Bolton, said he is willing to testify in the president’s Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed, and disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein faces new sexual assault charges in Los Angeles as he prepares for the start of a criminal trial in Manhattan.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/01/207m 45s

Monday, January 6

France warns the US about the repercussions of imposing tariffs in response to the digital services tax on the likes of Google and Amazon, Boris Johnson is expected to pressure the European Commission to fast-track Brexit-related trade talks, and Spain is one step closer to its first coalition government in modern times after a parliamentary vote on Sunday. Plus, the FT’s Katrina Manson reports on the fallout from the US assassination of Qassem Soleimani.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/01/209m 17s

Friday, January 3

US regulators unveil long-awaited restrictions on some flavoured e-cigarettes, Bernie Sanders notched up the biggest quarterly money haul so far of any Democratic US presidential candidate and Brussels is preparing a fresh push to create an EU-wide tax on plastic waste. Plus, the FT’s David Sheppard highlights what investors will be watching in the oil markets in 2020.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/01/2010m 1s

Thursday, January 2

Lebanon pressed for Carlos Ghosn’s return one week before the former Nissan chairman escaped from Tokyo and Google Health has created a system that can identify breast cancer more accurately than radiologists. Plus, the FT’s Robin Harding explains why employees are gaining more power in Japan’s changing labour market.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/01/209m 33s

Tuesday, December 31

Private equity groups spent more on deals this year than at any time since the financial crisis, investors gear up for the final day of share trading in 2019, and former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn leaves Japan, where he was on house arrest, for Beirut. Plus, the FT’s companies editor, Tom Braithwaite, breaks down the year in IPOs.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/12/199m 16s

Monday, December 30

Fraudsters are milking companies of tens of billions of dollars a year with fake responses to online ads, new documents reveal that WeWork will have to pay $17m for some executives’ golden parachutes, and the number of small businesses being created in France has surged this year. Plus, why Warren Buffett says companies cannot be moral arbiters.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/12/199m 16s

Friday, December 20

Andrew Bailey has been selected as the new governor of the Bank of England, Democrats and Republicans trade barbs over tactics in the delay to President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial and Uber’s former chief executive, Travis Kalanick, has sold the majority of his stake in the company. Plus the FT’s US markets editor, Jennifer Ablan, explains why investors have piled into some of the riskiest US debt as the year draws to a close.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/12/196m 56s

Thursday, December 19

The Bank of England admits that high-speed traders have been able to listen in on market-sensitive press conferences, the man who came to be a symbol of corporate corruption is granted an early release from his 25-year sentence, and the challenge faced by European carmakers from electric vehicles sees Fiat Chrysler and PSA strike a deal to create the fourth-largest automaker in the world. Plus, the US House of Representatives voted to impeach president Donald Trump. The FT’s US managing editor, Peter Spiegel, explains what this means for the upcoming Senate trial.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/12/199m 3s

Wednesday, December 18

FedEx cuts its annual earnings guidance for the second time in three months, a new report shows that Royal Dutch Shell paid no corporate income tax in the UK in 2018 and Sterling surrendered its post-election gains on Tuesday after Boris Johnson signalled he will try to push legislation that could cause a “cliff-edge” Brexit next year. Plus, like other countries in central Europe, Poland is facing a labour shortage. The FT’s James Shotter explains how some Polish manufacturers are replacing these workers.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/12/198m 12s

Tuesday, December 17

Global stocks hit fresh record highs on Monday as the US and China hit pause on the long-running trade war, while Mexico and the US resolve a row over the enforcement of labour provisions in the USMCA trade pact, Netflix reveals how quickly it is growing outside of the US and Boeing plans to temporarily suspend production of the 737 Max in January. Plus, the FT’s Kiran Stacey explains why US technology companies are pushing back on a call from the Trump administration to cut Huawei out of their supply chains.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/12/198m 19s

Monday, December 16

A deal to implement the new USMCA trade agreement was under threat after Mexico said it did not agree to certain provisions, Apple will face a shareholder vote next year calling for the iPhone maker to publicly commit to respecting freedom of expression as a human right and Boris Johnson plans to pour billions of pounds into the midlands and north of England after his election win. Plus, the FT’s Leslie Hook explains why UN climate delegates in Madrid could not reach a deal on the last article of the Paris climate accord.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/12/199m 49s

Friday, December 13

Boris Johnson declared a powerful mandate for Brexit after a crushing UK election victory. The FT’s Sebastian Payne breaks down the results. Plus, the US House of Representatives judiciary committee pushes a critical vote on the impeachment process into Friday, and the US and China were closing in on a limited trade deal on Thursday night.Follow live updates on the UK election at FT.com/ukelection.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/12/199m 47s

Thursday, December 12

The Federal Reserve leaves its policy rate unchanged and indicates that it has no plans to make changes through 2020, and the climate summit in Madrid could stall over the question of how to create a global carbon trading market. Plus, new findings show the US Federal Aviation Administration failed to ground Boeing’s fleet of 737 Max aircraft even after its analysis showed the plane was more accident-prone than most aircraft, Israel faces its third election in a year, and Harvey Weinstein reaches a tentative $45m settlement with a group of women who accused him of sexual assault. Then, the FT’s Michael Peel explains how Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi went from human rights icon to a leader defending allegations of genocide.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/12/199m 16s

Wednesday, December 11

UK prime minister Boris Johnson makes a final plea to voters in the “most important election in a lifetime”, Saudi Arabia renews its push for a $2tn valuation for Saudi Aramco, Democrats in the US House of Representatives unveil two articles of impeachment against president Donald Trump and trade negotiators from the US, Canada and Mexico sign changes to the USMCA trade pact. Plus, the FT’s Alan Beattie explains why European countries are turning to green trade policy and why some critics say it has more to do with protectionism than the planet.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/12/198m 58s

Tuesday, December 10

Donald Trump says “a lot of strides” have been made on the USMCA trade deal, Morgan Stanley is cutting around 1,500 jobs worldwide, Amazon claims it was denied a $10bn US defence contract because of pressure from the president and SoftBank has agreed to sell its nearly 50 per cent stake in Wag back to the dog walking company. Plus, Paul Volcker has died at the age of 92. The FT’s Gillian Tett looks back on the life and legacy of the former Federal Reserve board chairman.     See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/12/199m 56s

Monday, December 9

Beijing orders all government offices and public institutions to remove foreign computer equipment and software within three years, the FBI is treating a US naval base shooting as an apparent terrorist attack, even though the White House is not and UK officials are questioning Boris Johnson’s claims that Britain will make a clean break with the EU in December in 2020. Plus, the FT’s Laura Hughes lays out Northern Ireland’s role in the UK general election in the days leading up to the vote.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/12/199m 9s

Friday, December 6

Dark money has made it way into political advertising in the UK general election, buyout group CVC Capital Partners holds talks with Fifa and Real Madrid about creating new global football tournaments and Speaker of the US House of Representatives, Uber releases its first-ever safety report and Nancy Pelosi, instructs fellow Democrats to draw up articles of impeachment against Donald Trump. Plus, the FT’s Anjli Raval breaks down Saudi Aramco’s $25.6bn IPO as Opec leaders meet in Vienna.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/12/199m 50s

Thursday, December 5

Former World Bank president Robert Zoellick delivers a public rebuke of Donald Trump’s China policy, Boris Johnson vows not to involve Huawei in Britain’s 5G telecommunications networks if it compromises the country’s ability to work with security allies and the owners of the New York Mets are in talks to sell up to 80 per cent of the baseball club to hedge fund manager Steven Cohen. Plus, Saudi Arabia is pushing Opec to announce a deeper oil production cut.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/12/197m 1s

Wednesday, December 4

Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin step back from their day-to-day roles at Alphabet, US senator Kamala Harris drops out of the 2020 presidential race and the 70th-anniversary summit of Nato begins on a fractious note.  Plus, US House Democrats have accused Donald Trump of abusing his office for political gain. The FT’s Peter Spiegel unpacks the report that will pave the way for articles of impeachment and a trial in the Senate.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/12/199m 33s

Tuesday, December 3

The Trump administration is on a tariff blitz, proposing levies on goods from France, the EU, Brazil and Argentina. In the UK, the Conservative party braces for what could be the most perilous week of the election campaign, and Sweden backs away from negative rates despite a weakening economy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/12/198m 41s

Monday, December 2

The Federal Reserve is considering letting inflation run above its 2 per cent target, UK politicians play a blame game after Friday’s tragedy at London Bridge and the EU’s ambitious new commission is likely to be overshadowed by a festering row over the budget. Plus, we will look at what Brussels is doing to retool industrial policy.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/12/198m 57s

Friday, November 29

US political parties develop new technology that will access voters through the phone contacts of their supporters, OECD data shows the European Union is hit hard by the global trade slowdown and premium economy class overtakes business on several airline carriers as the most profitable seats. Plus, the latest on Japan South Korea tensions. The FT’s Edward White explains why South Korean forced labour victims are being lobbied to drop their claims for reparations.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/11/199m 1s

Thursday, November 28

US President Donald Trump signs two bills supporting Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protesters, Christine Lagarde pushes for climate change to be part of a strategic review of the European Central Bank’s purpose and assets under management at Fisher Investments hit a record high of $115bn at the end of October despite lewd remarks by its founder, Ken Fisher. Plus, India’s growth numbers are due out Friday. The FT’s Benjamin Parkin explains what is behind the country’s deepening economic slowdown.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/11/199m 31s

Wednesday, November 27

Xerox said it would take its proposal for a $33bn takeover of HP directly to the personal computer maker’s shareholders, Nasdaq’s listings business is on course to eclipse that of bitter rival the New York Stock Exchange this year and Manchester City’s owner has agreed to sell a $500m stake to private equity firm Silver Lake in a deal that breaks a record in sports valuations. Plus, the FT’s Leslie Hook explains why China’s commitment to renewable energy has lagged in recent years, and why it’s causing alarm ahead of the annual UN climate talks.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/11/199m 46s

Tuesday, November 26

Companies unleash a wave of global takeovers, agreeing to more than $70bn in deals, famed investor Bill Gross warns that US stock and bond markets are set for a tougher time in 2020, a judge rules that Donald Trump cannot stop his most senior advisers testifying to Congress and revised official data show that Mexico’s economy has entered a technical recession. Plus, Uber has been stripped of its London licence. The FT’s Tim Bradshaw explains what it means for the ride-sharing company.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/11/199m 33s

Monday, November 25

Pro-democracy candidates take more than half of seats in Hong Kong’s local council elections amid record voter turnout, UK prime minister Boris Johnson launches a low-risk Conservative manifesto and Michael Bloomberg officially announces he is running for US president. Plus, LVMH is set to buy Tiffany & Co for $16.7bn. The FT’s Eric Platt breaks down the latest offer.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/11/198m 26s

Friday, November 22

Politicians and privacy campaigners call for Google’s $2.1bn deal for Fitbit to be blocked, Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu will be hit by prosecutors on bribery, fraud and breach of trust charges, and a subsidiary of China’s largest construction group has suspended work on one of the nation’s tallest skyscrapers. Plus, the FT’s Eric Platt explains why Charles Schwab is ready to put down $25bn to acquire TD Ameritrade.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/11/198m 46s

Thursday, November 21

The US ambassador to the EU, Gordon Sondland, turns against Donald Trump in an explosive impeachment testimony, Saudi Arabia marginalises global banks in the final stage of Saudi Aramco’s flotation process and GM sues rival Fiat Chrysler, claiming FCA bribed officials of the UAW union during bargaining talks with GM. Plus, the FT’s Alistair Gray explains why Walmart is thriving once again.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/11/1910m 9s

Wednesday, November 20

Boris Johnson narrowly beats rival Jeremy Corbyn in a high-stakes televised duel, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman, a current White House official, testifies that Donald Trump made an ‘improper” demand in a July 25 phone call with the Ukrainian president, and the US National Transportation Safety Board says the main cause of a fatal accident involving a self-driving Uber was the back-up driver’s “failure” to monitor the road. Plus, the FT’s Anna Gross breaks down why the Brazilian president’s decision to allow sugarcane cultivation has become another roadblock in the way for a landmark trade deal between the EU and South America.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/11/1910m 0s

Tuesday, November 19

Alibaba is set to raise up to $13.4bn in a secondary listing in Hong Kong even as violence in the financial centre intensifies. Many see the IPO as a critical test of confidence in both Hong Kong and Beijing. Next, Coty buys a controlling stake in Kylie Jenner’s cosmetics company and UK prime minister Boris Johnson shelves a proposed cut to corporation tax at the CBI’s annual conference on Monday.  Plus, Facebook declared that it had shut down 5.4bn fake accounts in the first nine months of this year. The FT’s Lex deputy editor, Elaine Moore, dives into the social network’s fake accounts problem.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/11/199m 40s

Monday, November 18

Saudi Aramco scales back the initial public offering of its state oil giant, Nancy Pelosi, the Speaker of the US House of Representatives, says she will “make sure” President Donald Trump does not “intimidate” the whistleblower who sparked the impeachment inquiry, UK prime minister Boris Johnson is expected to pledge to reduce business rates and provide a series of tax breaks worth about £1bn a year and HP’s board of directors unanimously rejects a $22-a-share bid from rival Xerox. Plus, the FT’s Archie Hall explains why some yield-starved investors are piling into income share agreements with students looking to finance higher education.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/11/199m 28s

Friday, November 15

The US and China are struggling to complete a ‘phase one’ deal to halt their trade war, former Goldman Sachs chief executive Lloyd Blankfein takes aim at US Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, saying that “maybe tribalism is just in her DNA” and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos is fighting back against the Trump administration award of the $10bn Jedi military contract to Microsoft. Plus, the FT’s Madhumita Murgia reports on Google’s plan to lock down advertisers’ access to personal user data.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/11/199m 51s

Thursday, November 14

WeWork said its losses more than doubled to $1.3bn in the third quarter of 2019, researchers say a smartphone app developed by the Home Office for EU citizens has serious vulnerabilities, Google is talking to US banks about offering checking accounts to its customers and outgoing European Council president Donald Tusk takes aim at Brexiters “longing for the Empire”. Plus, the FT’s Peter Spiegel analyses the first day of public impeachment hearings on the Trump administration’s dealings with Ukraine.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/11/199m 44s

Wednesday, November 13

Some popular UK health websites are sharing people’s sensitive data to ad-targeting giants such as Google, Amazon and Facebook, and US president Donald Trump threatens to escalate the trade war with China if no truce is reached. Plus,Tesla has plans to bring its first European production site to Berlin and Spain’s Socialist party strikes a deal with the radical leftwing Podemos party in what could be the country’s first modern coalition government. Plus, Germany is on the brink of a recession, but the country’s services business and consumer spending are thriving. The FT’s Martin Arnold explains.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/11/198m 27s

Tuesday, November 12

Sources tell the FT that US private equity firm Cerberus has lost faith in Deutsche Bank’s chairman Paul Achleitner and is pushing for him to be replaced, WeWork has held talks with T-Mobile US boss John Legere to become its new chief executive and KKR woos Walgreens with a $70bn buyout proposal. Plus, the FT’s political editor George Parker unpacks how the UK elections have unravelled and what to expect next.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/11/198m 12s

Monday, November 11

Christine Lagarde is expected to face calls for an overhaul of how the European Central Bank decides monetary policy, Apple has piled on more than $400bn of market capitalisation so far this year, Bolivia’s socialist President Evo Morales has stepped down after almost 14 years in power and elections in Spain failed to break the country’s political impasse. Plus, the FT’s Anna Nicolaou explains why teens and media executives, alike, are taking note of TikTok.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/11/199m 5s

Introducing FT Politics: UK Election Countdown

We have another FT podcast to share. With FT Politics: UK Election Countdown, you can keep up with the twists and turns of the December 12 poll.The first week of the election did not go to plan for the Conservatives, as their campaign was beset by gaffes and mistakes. Can Boris Johnson get back on track? Is Labour pleased with how its campaign is going? Plus, the politics team delves into the new fiscal rules pledged by both parties and what the spending splurge means.You can find FT Politics: UK Election Countdown wherever you listen to podcasts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/11/1931m 42s

Friday, November 8

Bankers for Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering have dangled the possibility of bonus payouts that could take the company’s annual dividend past $100bn and Disney’s costs climb as it gets ready to debut its new streaming service. Meanwhile, billionaire and former mayor of New York City Michael Bloomberg has taken his first official steps to run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020, US stocks closed at record highs on Thursday following reports that Washington and Beijing agreed to remove some trade tariffs in phases and the Bank of England has given its clearest signal yet that it will be prepared to cut interest rates if the UK economy slows further. Plus, Spain will head to the polls on Sunday for the fourth time in as many years. The FT’s Daniel Dombey explains the political deadlock, and what to expect from the upcoming election.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/11/198m 39s

Thursday, November 7

Airbnb is being valued at up to $42bn by investors buying indirect stakes ahead of an IPO next year and the US Department of Justice has charged two former Twitter employees with using the platform to spy for the Saudi government. Meanwhile, SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son admits turning a “blind eye” to governance lapses at WeWork, Uber shares hit a new low on Wednesday following the end of the early investors’ lock-up period and Xerox launches a bid to acquire its much larger rival HP for more than $30bn, including debt. Plus, the French government has pledged to “take back control” of its immigration policy. The FT’s Victor Mallet explains why the crackdown is coming now.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/11/199m 9s

Wednesday, November 6

Donald Trump’s envoy to the EU acknowledges Ukraine aid was linked to a probe into Joe Biden, Ikea and H&M resist retail disruption by investing hundreds of millions of euros into venture capital investments and Germany’s finance minister, Olaf Scholz, offers hope of a breakthrough in plans to create a full eurozone banking union. Plus, an FT investigation shows that air pollution on the London Underground is as much as 10 times above health guidelines.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/11/199m 33s

Tuesday, November 5

Uber’s rising revenue fails to stem a large loss in the third quarter and SoftBank tightens governance at companies it backs following the near collapse of WeWork. Meanwhile, Trump administration officials debate whether to remove some existing tariffs on Chinese goods to seal a partial deal, UK MPs vote in favor of Lindsay Hoyle as the next Speaker of the House of Commons, and a second senior executive leaves McDonald’s after the chief executive was fired over a relationship with an employee. Plus, are Americans better off financially than they were four years ago? A new FT-Peterson poll has some interesting answers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/11/198m 47s

Monday, November 4

The whistleblower who sparked the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump agrees to answer questions by House Republicans, Saudi Aramco launches its long-awaited IPO, regulators call on Deutsche Bank’s Christian Sewing to give up his dual role as chief executive and investment bank head, and McDonald’s sacks its chief executive over a relationship the fast-food giant said is a violation of company policy. Plus, Facebook, Google and other big technology companies are facing several US investigations into their corporate power. The FT’s Kiran Stacey looks at which investigations the industry should worry about.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/11/199m 17s

Friday, November 1

The US House of Representatives votes to begin a new public phase in the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump, Adam Neumann’s former chief of staff accuses WeWork and its co-founder of discriminating against women, Shares in Pinterest fall after the company reported third-quarter revenues below expectations and Altria writes down the value of its investment in Juul by $4.5bn. Plus, the FT’s David Crow explains why European banks have run out of options to protect profits.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/11/199m 13s

Thursday, October 31

The US Department of Justice strikes a deal with the Malaysian financier at the centre of the 1MDB scandal, Apple posts quarterly earnings showing strong accessory sales even as smartphone and Mac sales declined, and new documents reveal that Boeing pushed to limit expensive pilot training for its 737 Max jet. Plus, the Federal Reserve cut interest rates for the third time this year. The FT’s Jennifer Ablan explains what this signals about the central bank’s outlook for the US economy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/10/197m 47s

Wednesday, October 30

British MPs set a general election for December 12, the owner of French carmaker Peugeot is in merger talks with rival Fiat Chrysler Automobiles to create a company worth more than $47bn, and US senators lash out at Boeing chief executive Dennis Muilenburg in his first appearance before Congress since the two fatal crashes of its 737 max jet. Plus, the FT’s Mehul Srivastava reports on a WhatsApp hack that led to the targeting of 100 journalists and dissidents.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/10/1910m 29s

Tuesday, October 29

Alphabet revenues were hit by rising costs in the third quarter despite a strong performance by Google’s ad business, and UK prime minister Boris Johnson will push ahead with another attempt to set a December general election. Plus, the FT reports that TikTok parent company ByteDance is planning to go public in Hong Kong next year, Beyond Meat posts its first quarterly profit since going public and the US House of Representatives will vote to formalise its impeachment inquiry. Then, Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic made its trading debut on Monday, becoming the first space tourism company to launch on to public markets.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/10/199m 6s

Monday, October 28

Alberto Fernández defeats Mauricio Macri to become the next president of Argentina, Lloyds Banking Group failed to pass on the wills of thousands of deceased customers to their families and President Donald Trump announces that Isis Leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, was killed by US special forces. Plus, the FT’s San Francisco correspondent Patrick McGee explains how Uber is trying to become the west’s first super-app.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/10/198m 9s

Friday, October 25

Amazon shares dropped as much as 9 per cent in after-hours trading on Thursday after the company reported lower profits than a year ago, Boris Johnson makes a fresh push for a UK general election, the European Central Bank keeps rates on hold at president Mario Draghi’s last policy meeting and Paris overtakes Berlin in tech start-up activity. Plus, leftwing populists are poised to retake power in Argentine elections on Sunday. The FT’s Colby Smith explains what this could mean for the country’s debtholders.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/10/198m 50s

Thursday, October 24

Tesla shares soar 20 per cent in after-hours trade after posting a net profit in the third quarter, and Donald Trump says he will remove sanctions imposed on Turkey a day ahead of a Nato defence ministers meeting. Plus, WeWork plans to axe 4,000 jobs, European Council president Donald Tusk is trying to persuade leaders to back a Brexit delay and Boris Johnson’s government and party are split on whether to push for a general election. Then, the FT’s Washington correspondent, Kiran Stacey, unpacks Mark Zuckerberg’s defence of the Libra digital currency project.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/10/199m 32s

Wednesday, October 23

British MPs back Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal in principle, but derail his attempt to take the UK out of the EU by October 31, and US commerce secretary Wilbur Ross floats new talks with the EU as an alternative to imposing car tariffs next month. Plus, the top US diplomat in Kiev says Donald Trump withheld Ukraine aid over a request to investigate political rivals, Turkey and Russia agree to the removal of Kurdish fighters from a buffer zone in north-east Syria, the Chinese government is drawing up a plan to replace Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, and Snapchat’s parent company says it expects to hit its target of turning a profit by the end of the year. Then, FT industry editor Peggy Hollinger tells us what Boeing has to do to regain trust as it tries to get its 737 Max plane back in the air.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/10/199m 10s

Tuesday, October 22

Justin Trudeau’s Liberal party was set for a minority government win in Canada’s general election, SoftBank floats a $9.5bn proposal to take control of WeWork, Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu abandons attempts to build a governing coalition, researchers at IBM claim that Google is wrong to say it is the first to achieve “quantum supremacy” and three drug distributors, as well as two pharmaceutical companies, sketch out a $48bn proposal to settle lawsuits related to the US opioid epidemic.     See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/10/197m 42s

Monday, October 21

Boris Johnson makes a new attempt to win parliament’s backing for his Brexit deal on Monday, UK officials say a Russian cyberattack unit “masqueraded” as Iranian hackers to lead attacks against 35 countries and Standard Chartered chief executive Bill Winters is planning to accept a voluntary pay cut in response to a dispute over his pension allowance. Plus, Canadians will go to the polls in a general election today. FT contributor Jason Kirby reports on what is at stake for prime minister Justin Trudeau.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/10/199m 1s

Friday, October 18

Boris Johnson attempts to secure parliamentary support for his Brexit deal, Saudi Aramco postpones the launch of its long-awaited initial public offering and Facebook reveals a project to prevent minors from being exploited on its platforms. Plus, Turkey agrees to pause its military incursion in Syria as the US pledges to ease sanctions, and Mick Mulvaney, acting White House chief of staff, makes an admission regarding Donald Trump’s July phone call to Ukraine. With Lauren Fedor, FT Washington correspondent.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/10/199m 26s

Thursday, October 17

Brexit negotiators wrangle over the terms of a deal ahead of the start of Thursday’s EU summit, Netflix missed its forecast for new subscribers for the second straight quarter, thousands of Hong Kong’s wealthy residents are opening bank accounts in Singapore and other financial centres as they try to protect themselves against the territory’s unrest, IBM came up short of Wall Street’s revenue expectations in the latest quarter, the US House of Representatives voted to condemn president Donald Trump over his move to withdraw troops from Syria and American shoppers curbed their spending last month according to weak Commerce Department data.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/10/197m 4s

Wednesday, October 16

The US House of Representatives passed an act voicing strong support for Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters, and Boris Johnson was on Tuesday night locked in a race against time to secure a Brexit deal. Plus, the IMF slashes global growth forecasts, Rudy Giuliani refuses to comply with a congressional subpoena that is part of the impeachment inquiry investigating Donald Trump, and the price of WeWork’s bonds dropped to new lows on Tuesday. Then, the FT’s Laura Noonan tells us why some bankers are still optimistic about the IPO market, even after WeWork’s failed attempt to go public.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/10/199m 0s

Tuesday, October 15

Donald Trump imposes sanctions against Turkish officials, hopes fade for a Brexit deal at a European summit this week, Facebook admits doubts about its digital currency, Libra, as regulatory hurdles loom and African swine fever drives up European pork prices. Plus, the FT’s James Politi explains why the US-China trade truce reached last week is still fragile.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/10/198m 4s

Monday, October 14

UK prime minister Boris Johnson gears up for what could be a historic week for Brexit ahead of the EU leaders’ summit, US banks enter the earnings season with the Federal Reserve in rate-cutting mode and the FT’s Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson explains how in Levi Strauss’s rebirth as a public company, it still manages to meet its ‘profits through principles’ mission.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/10/199m 50s

Friday, October 11

Sterling had its biggest day since March on Thursday amid hopes for a Brexit deal, James Murdoch’s new holding company has agreed to buy a minority stake in Vice Media and the US and China are aiming to reach a trade war truce as early as this week. Plus, the FT’s Frankfurt bureau chief Martin Arnold explains how the European Central Bank’s divide over quantitative easing is affecting the global economy.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/10/199m 46s

Thursday, October 10

US senators will propose sanctions on Turkey after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan launched an offensive in north-east Syria, EU leaders issue an ultimatum to UK prime minister Boris Johnson ahead of crucial Brexit talks with his Irish counterpart Leo Varadkar and leaked documents show the European Central Bank decided to restart its bond-buying programme last month over the objections of its own officials. Plus, the FT’s Kadhim Shubber explains what options are still on the table for US Congressional Democrats after the White House said it would not cooperate in an impeachment inquiry.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/10/199m 23s

Wednesday, October 9

US stocks staged a late-session sell-off on Tuesday after the Trump administration ratcheted up pressure on China ahead of trade talks after it imposed visa restrictions on individuals, at least 50 conservative UK MPs threaten to revolt against a general election manifesto that pledges to pursue a no-deal Brexit, and the White House has declared that it will not co-operate with the inquiry into an impeachment of Donald Trump. Plus, the FT’s Kiran Stacey explains how the US standoff with China now sees it encouraging investment in Huawei rivals in Europe.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/10/1910m 9s

Tuesday, October 8

Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing says it will not proceed with its £32bn offer for the London Stock Exchange Group, the president of the World Bank warns that global growth could fall short of the 2.6 per cent rate it predicted in June and fallout from the protracted strike by General Motors workers has seen the total number of temporary suspensions mount to almost 60,000. Plus, Donald Trump clears Turkey to launch an operation against US-backed Kurds in Syria. The FT’s Laura Pitel explains what this means for the region.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/10/198m 57s

Monday, October 7

HSBC embarks on a cost-cutting drive that threatens up to 10,000 jobs, 2020 presidential hopeful Joe Biden accuses US president Donald Trump of spreading “flat-out lies”, and a post-Brexit trade deal with the US could “severely limit” Britain’s ability to negotiate an equivalent agreement with the EU, according to a leaked government paper. Plus, the FT’s Sarah Neville explains how Novo Nordisk tries to balance rising prices when it comes to insulin products with giving back to the diabetic community.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/10/199m 22s

Friday, October 4

Donald Trump urges China to investigate former US vice president Joe Biden and the FT’s Washington bureau chief Demetri Sevastopulo explains how Mr Biden is handling the Ukrainegate fallout. Plus, the UK and the US agree to a deal where police and intelligence agencies are to be given expedited access to the electronic communications of terror and crime suspects, and PayPal is on the verge of quitting Facebook’s Libra cryptocurrency project.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/10/198m 44s

Thursday, October 3

Global stocks fell heavily on Wednesday, with the UK market having its worst day in more than three years, while the Trump administration will move to impose tariffs on a wide range of imports from the EU later this month after prevailing in a WTO case over illegal aircraft subsidies, and Donald Trump says he will co-operate with congressional subpoenas related to the impeachment inquiry engulfing his presidency. Plus, the FT’s Sebastian Payne dissects Boris Johnson’s UK Conservative party conference speech and the prime minister’s new Brexit plan.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/10/199m 4s

Wednesday, October 2

The US manufacturing sector contracted for the second consecutive month in September, falling to its lowest level since the recession, Charles Schwab escalates a war among stock-trading platforms by scrapping its fees, and a US appeals court rules that states can set their own standards over so-called “net neutrality”. Plus, the FT’s Sam Jones explains the deepening Credit Suisse spy scandal.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/10/199m 22s

Tuesday, October 1

US Republican Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell said he would hold a trial in the Senate if the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump, European central bankers put pressure on politicians to put limits on the mortgage market as house prices heat up, and WeWork has formally withdrawn its plan for an initial public offering. Plus, the FT’s Anjli Raval explains how oil companies such as Royal Dutch Shell are facing a dilemma as they try to move toward clean energy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/10/199m 9s

Monday, September 30

Global dealmaking eases to the slowest pace in more than two years and more than 400,000 German car owners sign up to a landmark collective lawsuit against Volkswagen over emissions test cheating. Plus, the FT’s George Parker reports from the UK Conservative party conference in Manchester and we hear from a protester in Hong Kong, five years after the territory’s last major pro-democracy campaign.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/09/198m 34s

Friday, September 27

The White House faced accusations of a cover-up on Thursday after the publication of a whistleblower complaint, Peloton traded below the company’s float price after the fitness equipment company went public on Thursday and Hollywood talent agency owner Endeavor shelved its plans to list. Plus, the FT’s Mehreen Khan explains what a decision by Europe’s highest court means for search engines and the “right to be forgotten” online.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/09/199m 52s

Thursday, September 26

A memo from the White House reveals that US president Donald Trump asked Ukraine president Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former vice-president Joe Biden and his son and UK prime minister Boris Johnson paves the way for an acrimonious “people versus parliament” general election. Plus, fitness equipment start-up Peloton will seek an $8.2bn valuation when its shares begin trading on Thursday and Germany’s representative on the European Central Bank’s executive board quits over loose monetary policy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/09/198m 26s

Wednesday, September 25

House Democrats have launched impeachment proceedings against US president Donald Trump and Adam Neumann has been pushed out as chief executive of WeWork following the dramatic collapse of its initial public offering. Plus, the FT’s chief foreign affairs commentator, Gideon Rachman, sets out what is next for Boris Johnson and British politics following the Supreme Court’s rebuke of the prime minister’s suspension of parliament.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/09/199m 52s

Tuesday, September 24

UK prime minister Boris Johnson calls for a new deal with Iran, Netflix sees its shares erase all gains for 2019 while Barclays analysts question if its valuation was too high, and Thomas Cook’s management faces a UK government-backed inquiry after the collapse of the travel group. Plus, the FT’s car industry correspondent Peter Campbell explains what a recent settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission means for Carlos Ghosn and Nissan.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/09/199m 4s

Monday, September 23

SoftBank moves to oust Adam Neumann as the chief executive of WeWork, US president Donald Trump and Indian prime minister Narendra Modi perform a double act at a rally of nearly 50,000 Indian-Americans in Texas and Jeremy Corbyn calls rumours he could soon step down as Labour leader “wishful thinking” during the party’s annual conference. Plus, world leaders will gather in New York City this week for the UN General Assembly and the UN climate summit. The FT’s Gillian Tett tells us what to expect.Sign up for the FT's Moral Money email newsletter at ft.com/moralmoney.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/09/198m 10s

Friday, September 20

Saudi Arabia is pressuring wealthy families to buy in to the initial public offering of state oil giant Saudi Aramco, the Federal Reserve intervened in the US money markets for the third day in a row on Thursday and promised it would so again today, Sterling climbed back over the $1.25 mark on Thursday after European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker said a Brexit deal was possible, and companies are racing to burnish their green credentials ahead of today’s global climate protest. Plus, the FT’s Anna Nicolaou tells us why Netflix is starting to look vulnerable.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/09/199m 44s

Thursday, September 19

Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau apologises for wearing brownface makeup at a private school party after Time magazine published a yearbook photo from 2001, Cisco chief executive Chuck Robbins dismisses fears of a breakdown in global supply chains, saying he expects Washington and Beijing to reach a deal ending their trade war, KPMG UK plans to cut hundreds of staff in a wave of cost-cutting, and shares in FedEx tumbled on Wednesday, a day after the company reported its weakest sales growth in a decade. Plus, the Federal Reserve cut US interest rates by a quarter point on Wednesday. Our US economics editor, Brendan Greeley, unpacks the move.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/09/199m 10s

Wednesday, September 18

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York announces plans to inject another $75bn into the US financial system to alleviate funding pressures in short-term lending markets, researchers find that smart TVs are leaking sensitive user data to companies including Netflix and Google and Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu fails to clinch an outright majority for his Likud party in Tuesday’s general election. Plus, the FT’s chief economics commentator, Martin Wolf, says economies are not delivering for most citizens. He tells us what corporations can do to fix the damage. FT.com is free to read today for #FTOpenDay. You can read all of the stories linked below without hitting the paywall. Take a look at the stories we covered in today’s briefing: Fed plans second intervention to ease funding squeezehttps://www.ft.com/content/2c11a972-d941-11e9-8f9b-77216ebe1f17Benjamin Netanyahu left vulnerable by inconclusive Israel electionhttps://www.ft.com/content/828ac962-d984-11e9-8f9b-77216ebe1f17Smart TVs sending sensitive data to Netflix and Facebookhttp://ft.com/content/23ab2f68-d957-11e9-8f9b-77216ebe1f17Martin Wolf: why rentier capitalism is damaging liberal democracyhttps://www.ft.com/content/5a8ab27e-d470-11e9-8367-807ebd53ab77Marc's suggested reads: WeWork’s Adam Neumann admits to being ‘humbled’ https://www.ft.com/content/7d543f5a-d94d-11e9-8f9b-77216ebe1f17 My daughter, the footballer: sexism and the beautiful gamehttps://www.ft.com/content/16f35962-e288-11e6-9645-c9357a75844aGlobal cities begin to shrink as inner areas empty outhttps://www.ft.com/content/c88b4c54-b925-11e9-96bd-8e884d3ea203Russia’s role in producing the taxman of the futurehttps://www.ft.com/content/38967766-aec8-11e9-8030-530adfa879c2  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/09/1910m 23s

Tuesday, September 17

WeWork postponed its initial public offering on Monday night after struggling to drum up investor interest, US president Donald Trump says he has struck an “initial” deal on tariff barriers with Japan, EU chiefs say that UK prime minister Boris Johnson brought no fresh proposals to the table during Monday’s Brexit talks in Luxembourg and billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates says the world is “nowhere near” hitting the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Plus, the FT’s Peter Wells explains how the attack on Saudi Arabia’s major crude processing plant over the weekend will have an effect on the global economy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/09/199m 29s

Monday, September 16

Saudi Arabia faces weeks without full crude production capacity after an attack on the world’s most important oil facility, China’s formerly acquisitive companies have become net sellers of global assets this year for the first time in a decade, thousands of General Motors workers are set to strike after talks broke down over pay and healthcare benefits at the company’s US factories and Brexit secretary Steve Barclay said that Britain could stay in a standstill transition deal with the EU until the end of 2022. Plus, the FT’s Mehul Srivastava tells us what is at stake Israel’s second election of the year.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/09/198m 25s

Friday, September 13

WeWork’s executives, investors and advisers are discussing curbing the voting power of co-founder Adam Neumann, Speaker of the UK House of Commons John Bercow warns prime minister Boris Johnson that he will allow parliament to do whatever it takes to avoid a no-deal Brexit, British Airways cancels flights on September 27 because of a planned pilot strike, dentistry company SmileDirectClub sees price shares tumble in its public market debut and Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing is prepared to sweeten the terms of its £32bn offer for the London Stock Exchange Group. Plus, the FT’s Frankfurt editor Martin Arnold explains how the European Central Bank’s historic package of rate cuts and economic stimulus will affect the eurozone economy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/09/199m 3s

Thursday, September 12

Purdue Pharma and its controlling Sackler family members strike a preliminary deal with several US states and local governments to resolve legal claims stemming from the opioid crisis, the FT reports that the Pentagon is compiling a list of companies with ties to the Chinese military and the UK government releases the controversial “Operation Yellowhammer” document that outlines the potential damage from a no-deal Brexit. Plus, the FT’s Philip Stafford explains why investors have given a cold shoulder to Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing's £32bn bid for the London Stock Exchange.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/09/199m 27s

Wednesday, September 11

Apple unveils the iPhone 11 and undercuts streaming rivals Netflix and Disney with a $4.99-a-month price tag for its TV+ service, and Uber cuts more than 400 engineering and product jobs in the second round of lay-offs since its May stock market listing. Plus, exercise start-up Peloton is eyeing a valuation of up to $8.2bn in its initial public offering and Margrethe Vestager holds on to a beefed-up competition role in the new European Commission. Also, the FT’s US managing editor, Peter Spiegel, unpacks the firing of US national security adviser John Bolton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/09/199m 19s

Tuesday, September 10

Softbank, the biggest outside shareholder in WeWork, is urging the lossmaking property group to shelve its hotly anticipated initial public offering, attorneys-general from 50 US states and territories launch an investigation into Google’s dominance in online search and advertising and UK prime minister Boris Johnson loses a second attempt to hold a snap election to break Britain’s Brexit impasse. Plus, the FT’s Nicholas Megaw explains how the mis-selling of payment protection insurance caused a £50bn British banking scandal.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/09/199m 21s

Monday, September 9

A study found that nearly 40 per cent of worldwide foreign direct investment is used as a vehicle for financial engineering to minimise companies’ tax liabilities, and British Airways cancelled about 50 mostly UK-bound flights on Sunday as the airline braces for a two-day pilot strike. Plus, exports from China fell in August as the country’s trade dispute with the US took a heavier than expected toll on the manufacturing sector and Saudi Arabia has removed energy minister Khalid al-Falih, one of the most powerful figures in the global oil industry. Also, the FT’s Jim Pickard previews the week ahead in UK politics and what it could mean for Brexit.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/09/198m 36s

Friday, September 6

UK Labour MPs appear set to reject Boris Johnson’s push for a snap election and US Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin moves to return Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to private ownership. Plus, WeWork expects to be valued at less than half of the $47bn figure reached in its last round of funding from Japan’s SoftBank and news that the US and China will resume trade negotiations sent Wall Street equities higher on Thursday. Also, the FT’s Shanghai correspondent, Tom Hancock, explains why China’s tech groups, including Alibaba, have poured money into physical retail and how that bet worked out for them.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/09/199m 52s

Thursday, September 5

Boris Johnson suffered two major defeats on Wednesday as MPs backed legislation to stop a no-deal Brexit and then blocked the prime minister’s attempt to call an election to regain the initiative on Brexit. Plus, workplace chat app Slack posted strong revenue growth and predicted bigger losses during its debut results since going public, Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam withdrew the controversial extradition bill that sparked three months of protests, Apple returned to the bond market for the first time since 2017 and YouTube and its parent company, Google, agreed to pay $170m to US regulators after being accused of violating children’s privacy. Also, the FT’s Madhumita Murgia explains how Google has been accused of secretly feeding personal data to advertisers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/09/199m 14s

Wednesday, September 4

UK Conservative rebels inflict a Commons defeat on prime minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit policy, leaving Britain on the brink of a general election. Plus, Italy’s Five Star Movement votes heavily in favour of a coalition with a centre-left rival, Walmart introduces new restrictions on sales of ammunition a month after a mass shooting occurred at one of its stores, and the US manufacturing sector contracts for the first time since 2016 amid global trade tensions and fears of slowing domestic growth.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/09/197m 58s

Tuesday, September 3

UK prime minister Boris Johnson threatens to call an October 14 general election if rebel Tory MPs join forces with Labour today, Germany’s export-dependent economy is suffering from a Brexit shock as a potential recession looms and the long-running merger talks between Allen & Overy and O’Melveny & Myers collapse. Plus, the FT’s Hannah Kuchler goes into the history of Verily, the health organisation spun out of Google’s secretive research facility.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/09/198m 32s

Monday, September 2

In a Labor Day special episode, as Philip Morris International enters into merger talks with Altria, we take a look at the evolution of the tobacco industry.  Plus, the World Bank estimates that in 2019, some 270m migrants globally will send a combined $689bn back home. We take a look at remittances and the way they are affecting economies.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/09/1910m 7s

Friday, August 30

US companies are unlikely to heed Donald Trump’s call to ditch their investments in China, Argentina’s request for more time to pay $101bn of debts meets a cool reception from the country’s creditors, and UK prime minister Boris Johnson is sending his chief Brexit negotiator to meet with EU counterparts to hammer out a revised exit deal. Plus, the FT’s James Politi walks us through the legacy Christine Lagarde leaves at the IMF and what it might say about her future as the incoming president of the European Central Bank.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/08/198m 45s

Thursday, August 29

Italy appears to be heading towards a new government after the far-right is sidelined and two parties say they have reached a tentative coalition deal, Apple apologises for listening to the audio of recorded Siri conversations and Japan’s biggest internet auction site has banned trading in ivory. Plus, the FT’s Jim Pickard explains UK prime minister Boris Johnson’s move to suspend parliament and what happens next.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/08/197m 38s

Wednesday, August 28

Opioid maker Purdue Pharma and members of the controlling Sackler family have offered to settle thousands of lawsuits against the company for $10bn-$12bn, Phillip Morris International is in talks to merge with Altria in a deal that would create the world’s largest tobacco group, UK opposition parties agree to pursue legislation to prevent a no-deal Brexit, the Federal Reserve is forced to re-assert that “political considerations play absolutely no role” in policymaking and Amazon and Microsoft go unchallenged in a $10bn Pentagon cloud computing contract. Plus, the FT’s global finance correspondent Robin Wigglesworth explains why investors are concerned that the world economy is succumbing to “Japanification”.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/08/199m 36s

Tuesday, August 27

Drugmakers could decide to settle thousands of claims against them over the opioid crisis after a $572m court order against Johnson & Johnson, President Trump says China is seeking talks on a deal to end the ongoing trade war between the two countries and New York-based hedge fund manager, Autonomy Capital, saw its fund lose more than 16 per cent in the first two weeks of August as a result of Argentina’s financial market meltdown. Plus, the FT’s Brazil bureau chief Bryan Harris talks about a backlash against Brazilian business over the Amazon rainforest fires.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/08/1910m 4s

Monday, August 26

In a Summer Bank Holiday special episode, we look at Wall Street’s pressure on private prisons and why some of the top global cities are shrinking.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/08/199m 10s

Friday, August 23

A harbinger of a recession, the yield on the two-year Treasury bill rose above that of the benchmark 10-year note again on Thursday as the world’s central bankers convened in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Plus, intensifying regulatory scrutiny of Facebook’s Libra digital currency has spooked some of the project’s early backers, and Brazil’s environment minister says the solution to illegal logging in the Amazon is to “monetise” it. Then, the FT’s Victor Mallet previews what might come out of this weekend’s G7 summit.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/08/199m 9s

Thursday, August 22

European Commission officials tell the FT they are planning news rules that will give EU citizens explicit rights over the use of their facial recognition data, the IMF backs the scrapping of a longstanding age restriction, clearing the way for Kristalina Georgieva to take the top spot, President Emmanuel Macron of France scraps the tradition of a joint final communiqué at the G7 summit and minutes from the Federal Reserve’s July meeting reveal a split among officials over the July interest rate cut. Plus, the FT’s US economics editor, Brendan Greeley, tells us what the world’s monetary policymakers will be discussing in Jackson Hole, Wyoming this weekend.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/08/197m 45s

Wednesday, August 21

US president Donald Trump considers tax cuts to stimulate the economy and Italian prime minister Giuseppe Conte resigns. Also, US regulators rewrite the Volcker rule, Facebook launches a new privacy tool pilot and Walmart sues Tesla over solar panel fires. Plus, the FT’s Seb Payne unpacks the stand-off between Boris Johnson and European Council president Donald Tusk over Britain’s withdrawal agreement from the EU.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/08/198m 36s

Tuesday, August 20

Apple commits more than $6bn for original shows and movies ahead of the launch of its new video streaming service and UK prime minister Boris Johnson intensifies his efforts to jettison the Irish border backstop from the Brexit withdrawal agreement. Also, Facebook and Twitter move to curb Chinese state-backed disinformation campaigns that target pro-democracy Hong Kong protesters, the Trump administration gives Huawei a temporary reprieve, the US trade commission head says it would be difficult to break up Facebook and court papers reveal that Jeffrey Epstein signed a will two days before he died. Plus, the FT’s Richard Henderson explains why the group of top US executives comprising the Business Roundtable are ditching “shareholder primacy”.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/08/198m 27s

Monday, August 19

A body advising the European Central Bank warns that European banks and other financial institutions need to speed up their preparations for the phasing out of a key interest rate benchmark, top White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow says there is no recession coming, Donald Trump casts doubt on any Huawei reprieve and Hong Kong protesters rally in defiance of Beijing. Plus, the FT’s Madhumita Murgia explains how facial recognition software is creeping into security cameras in parts of London.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/08/199m 3s

Friday, August 16

Gibraltar releases an Iranian tanker after a court sets aside a last-minute legal bid from the US to seize the vessel and Walmart raises its outlook for the US market while government data show unexpectedly strong retail sales for July in the country. Plus, the yield on 30-year US government bonds falls below 2 per cent for the first time on Thursday, China’s paramilitary police converge in a stadium near the Hong Kong border and Israel bars two US congresswomen from entering the country. Also, the FT’s Patrick McGee tests out the Apple Card, which will be rolled out to US users later this month.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/08/197m 53s

Thursday, August 15

US equities fell 3 per cent on Wednesday on fears of slowing global growth, while bond markets signalled the chances of a mounting recession and WeWork unveiled its prospectus for a $3bn-$4bn initial public offering. Plus, UK Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn sets out a proposal for a temporary government that would help delay Brexit, Canada’s ethics watchdog says Justin Trudeau violated conflict-of-interest law and PayPal targets growing demand from India’s mobile users.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/08/199m 19s

Wednesday, August 14

US stocks and China’s currency rallied sharply on Tuesday after Washington announced a delay to some additional tariffs on Chinese imports, hundreds of flights out of Hong Kong are cancelled for the second day in a row after protesters clash with police, CBS and Viacom agree on an all-stock merger and Facebook has halted the “human review” of recorded voice messages. Plus, the FT’s Tim Bradshaw explains plans that SoftBank’s Masayoshi Son has in store for the group’s second Vision Fund.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/08/199m 12s

Tuesday, August 13

Investors see the odds of an Argentine debt default soaring after opposition candidate Alberto Fernández’s victory in primary elections, the US yield curve flattened to levels not seen since before the financial crisis and consulting group KPMG ousted the head of its UK financial services unit after an investigation into his conduct involving messages sent on WhatsApp. Plus, the FT’s senior energy correspondent, Anjli Raval, unpacks Saudi Aramco’s first-ever earnings call in the lead up to its expected initial public offering.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/08/1910m 9s

Monday, August 12

Global investment banks are shedding almost 30,000 jobs as the outlook for the sector deteriorates, BlackRock buys an $870m stake in Authentic Brands, which owns the brand rights to Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley and British workers travelling to the EU will be unable to carry out even basic business tasks after a no-deal Brexit unless they navigate a complex web of work permits. Plus, money manager and accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein was found dead in a New York jail cell on Saturday. The FT’s Kadhim Shubber explains what this might mean for the alleged victims.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/08/199m 21s

Friday, August 9

Uber posts a $5.2 billion loss as costs from its initial public offering hit earnings, Italy’s prime minister Giuseppe Conte asks for parliament to be recalled so he can hold a vote of confidence and US stocks notched their biggest jump in two months on Thursday after upbeat Chinese data soothed investors’ nerves. Also, Broadcom agrees a deal to acquire Symantec’s enterprise security business for $10.7bn, Kraft Heinz takes another $1.2bn in writedowns, UK prime minister Boris Johnson eyes an election in the days after Brexit and sources tell the FT that at least nine senior figures have been removed from their posts at Turkey’s central bank. Plus, the FT’s US mergers and acquisitions correspondent, Eric Platt, tells us about WeWork’s corporate structure revamp as it prepares to go public.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/08/1910m 47s

Thursday, August 8

US stocks closed in positive territory on Wednesday as investors pushed back against deepening concerns over global growth, and the Trump administration is cracking down on Huawei and other Chinese companies seen as security threats. Plus, Broadcom revives talks with Symantec, Russia’s state-owned oil company becomes the last major supplier of petrol to Venezuela, US secretary of state Mike Pompeo said America would be ready to sign a new trade deal with the UK after it leaves the EU and Lyft raises its 2019 financial forecasts. Also, the FT’s Richard Waters tells us about the San Francisco-based research group pursuing the Holy Grail of artificial intelligence.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/08/1911m 4s

Wednesday, August 7

Disney shares fall as the company misses earnings estimates in its most recent quarter, Facebook sues two app developers for advertising fraud and Match Group raises earnings guidance for 2019 after a strong boost to Tinder subscribers in the second quarter. Plus, the FT’s US economics editor, Brendan Greely, explains why the Trump administration has few tools to weaken the dollar.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/08/198m 39s

Tuesday, August 6

US Treasury labels China a currency manipulator, Hong Kong’s first general strike in more than 50 years brings the city to a standstill, US president Donald Trump condemns white supremacy after two separate mass shootings and luxury department store chain Barneys New York prepares to file for bankruptcy.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/08/197m 59s

Monday, August 5

At least 29 people were killed in two separate shootings in the US over the weekend, Washington identifies Chinese tankers carrying Iranian oil and US retailers warn that new tariffs threaten to accelerate lay-offs across the industry. Plus, the FT’s Michael Stott explains the political standoff fuelling an economic collapse in Venezuela.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/08/199m 49s

Friday, August 2

US President Donald Trump says the US will place a 10 per cent tariff on $300bn of additional Chinese goods, growth in corporate share buybacks starts to cool, Pinterest shares surge after the social media network raises its full year forecasts and Bank of England forecasts show a one-in-three chance that the UK economy will shrink at the start of next year.  Plus, George Parker recaps Boris Johnson’s first week as Prime Minister of the UK and the possibility of a no-deal Brexit.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/08/198m 5s

Thursday, August 1

The Federal Reserve cuts US interest rates by a quarter point, the Trump administration imposes sanctions on Iran’s foreign minister, UniCredit and Ford launch investigations into whether their data were caught up in the Capital One security breach and Qualcomm warns of “continued weakness in China”. Plus, Mexico narrowly avoided a recession in the second quarter. The FT’s Jude Webber explains what it means for the country’s president Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his promise to spur growth.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/08/199m 56s

Wednesday, July 31

The Federal Reserve is expected to announce the first cut in US interest rates since the global financial crisis, Apple delivers upbeat guidance for the rest of 2019 despite shrinking iPhone sales and new data shows that investors have flooded into Saudi stocks this year. Plus, Chris Giles, the FT’s economics editor, explains how Russia is using technology to record and tax real-time transactions.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/07/1910m 3s

Tuesday, July 30

Uber eliminates 400 marketing jobs in a corporate reorganisation, Citigroup plans to axe hundreds of jobs in its global markets division and new data reveal more than 2,000 Chinese-made security cameras deemed a threat to national security remain in place in US government buildings. Plus, Pfizer reaches a deal to combine its Upjohn unit with generics drugmaker Mylan, Beyond Meat announces a stock sale and Sterling tumbles to its lowest level in two and a half years on Monday as market fears of a no-deal Brexit grow.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/07/199m 26s

Monday, July 29

The UK chancellor of the exchequer, Sajid Javid, plans to announce more than £1bn in increased funding for a no-deal Brexit, Deutsche Bank investigates whether confidential client data was compromised after it failed to deactivate dozens of accounts of fired staff, US President Donald Trump moves to replace Dan Coats as US director of national intelligence and some foreign car manufacturers in China are operating at a fraction of their potential output. Plus, the FT’s Arash Massoudi explains what the London Stock Exchange is looking to achieve with a potential takeover of financial market data provider Refinitiv.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/07/199m 11s

Friday, July 26

A rebound in Google’s advertising business propels revenues higher, Amazon’s move to one-day shipping reinvigorated revenue growth in the second quarter while costs increased, the European Union's chief Brexit negotiator calls UK prime minister Boris Johnson’s terms for talks on Brexit “unacceptable” and the European Central Bank signals that it will cut rates and embark on a fresh round of asset purchases. Plus, the FT’s Jude Webber explains why Latin America’s missing middle economy is affecting its contribution to global growth.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/07/1910m 13s

Thursday, July 25

Former special counsel Robert Mueller warns of Russian interference in the 2020 US election during a day of hearings in Washington, Facebook reveals that the US Federal Trade Commission has launched a formal antitrust investigation into the company, Tesla posts deeper than expected losses as its profit margins fall and UK prime minister Boris Johnson vows to deliver Brexit in 99 days.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/07/198m 18s

Wednesday, July 24

Boris Johnson wins the UK Conservative party leadership race to become prime minister, the US Department of Justice announces a broad investigation into Big Tech’s market power, American officials are preparing a trip to China before the end of July in a bid to reignite trade talks, Snapchat’s parent company exceeds revenue estimates and boosts user numbers in the second quarter and WeWork aims to publicly list its shares as early as September.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/07/196m 53s

Tuesday, July 23

The White House and Democratic leaders reach an agreement to raise the US’s $22tn borrowing limit which takes it beyond the next election, Donald Trump promises major US technology companies that his administration will process their application to supply Huawei quickly, Washington issues sanctions against one of China’s largest state-backed oil companies for transporting Iranian crude oil and Starbucks takes a stake in Eatsa, a San Francisco-based restaurant tech company. Plus, Boris Johnson is widely expected to become the leader of the UK Conservative party on Tuesday. The FT’s political editor George Parker previews what is ahead for Britain with Boris Johnson as prime minister.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/07/199m 34s

Monday, July 22

Hong Kong protesters escalate demonstrations by targeting Chinese government offices,  UK defence minister Tobias Ellwood rejects claims that the government could have stopped Iranian forces from capturing a British-flagged tanker, early exit polls indicate that Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky’s party of neophyte politicians have won Sunday’s snap parliamentary election and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s ruling coalition wins a clear majority in Japan’s upper house. Plus, the FT’s Gideon Long explains how Colombia is positioning itself as a major producer of cannabis as medical marijuana becomes more popular.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/07/199m 32s

Friday, July 19

President Donald Trump says the US navy has shot down an Iranian drone after it threatened an American warship, Boeing says it will take a $4.9bn after-tax charge in the second quarter related to the grounding of the 737 Max jet and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York president stokes expectations of an aggressive half-point cut in US interest rates this month. Plus, WeWork founder Adam Neumann has sold his shares, Microsoft’s cloud business fuels growth as the software company tops earnings forecasts and 2019 is shaping to be a record-setting year for private equity deals.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/07/198m 19s

Thursday, July 18

Netflix falls short of its own forecasts for new subscribers, G7 finance ministers struggle to reach a compromise on how to tax Big Tech and US President Donald Trump expels Turkey from the US-led F-35 fighter jet programme. Plus, the FT’s Gregory Meyer explains how signs of a slowing US economy are starting to show up on the nation’s railways.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/07/196m 59s

Wednesday, July 17

Lower rates squeeze US bank lending margins, Ursula von der Leyen narrowly secures parliamentary backing for her appointment as European Commission president and United Airlines raises its outlook for the full year despite the financial impact of the grounding of the carrier’s 737 Max fleet. Plus, the FT’s Kiran Stacey reports on Big Tech’s day in Washington.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/07/197m 6s

Tuesday, July 16

Democratic congresswomen call Donald Trump’s attacks a “distraction” after the US president doubles down on his statement, US Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin says Facebook has “a lot of work to do” before the Trump administration will let it proceed with its planned cryptocurrency and money manager Jeffrey Epstein discloses his assets in a court filing after being charged with the sex trafficking of underage girls. Plus, the FT’s Ahmed Al Omran explains how Saudi Arabia is reviving its efforts to  draw dissidents home.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/07/199m 40s

Monday, July 15

The acting IMF chief, David Lipton, backs new monetary stimulus by the world’s top central banks, Warner Music buys First Night Records and equity investors brace for the second successive drop in US quarterly profits. Plus, US banks are set to report second-quarter results this week. The FT’s Robert Armstrong explains what investors will be watching.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/07/197m 10s

Friday, July 12

President Donald Trump issues an executive order to collect all information in US government databases about who is an American citizen, Boeing says the head of its 737 programme will retire at the end of this year and we take a look at China’s economy ahead of the release of its second-quarter growth figures. Plus, Hannah Kuchler explains why some drugmakers are braced for an opioid crisis reckoning.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/07/197m 53s

Thursday, July 11

The Trump administration launches an investigation into French plans to bring in a special tax targeting big tech companies and Amazon Music becomes the fastest-growing streaming service. Plus, Federal Reserve chairman Jay Powell cemented the case for an interest rate cut in his testimony to US Congress. The FT’s James Politi explains.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/07/198m 44s

Wednesday, July 10

Mexico’s finance minister, Carlos Urzúa, resigns over differences with President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Levi Strauss shares slip after IPO costs weigh on its second quarter earnings and Boris Johnson dodges questions about Brexit and US relations in a UK Conservative party leadership debate. Plus, the FT’s Joe Rennison tells us about a new menace popping up in the leveraged loan market.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/07/1910m 17s

Tuesday, July 9

Chinese venture capital investment in US biotech falls as Washington tightens scrutiny of funding from overseas, German chemicals group BASF cuts its full-year forecast and warns that second-quarter profits would almost halve and Deutsche Bank begins the culling of 18,000 jobs, with whole teams of equity traders being dismissed. Plus, the FT’s US legal and enforcement correspondent, Kadhim Shubber, explains the sex trafficking charges against money manager Jeffrey Epstein.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/07/1910m 23s

Monday, July 8

Iran says it will breach the curbs on uranium enrichment levels set under the 2015 nuclear agreement with major powers, Greece’s traditional centre-right party is set to regain power after a sweeping general election victory and a survey of fund managers shows that investors are buckling up for a global recession. Plus, Deutsche Bank has unveiled plans to overhaul the struggling German lender. The FT’s European banking correspondent, Stephen Morris, breaks down the details.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/07/199m 19s

Friday, July 5

British Marines and Gibraltar police seize a tanker suspected of carrying Iranian oil to Syria, the Womens’ World Cup reaches its finale, but will the expected winners take up their invitation to the White House? Who are the main contenders to replace Christine Lagarde as IMF chief? Plus, chief features writer Henry Mance on the pressure US space agency Nasa is under to put astronauts back on the moon by 2024  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/07/1911m 7s

Thursday, July 4

US stocks closed at record highs on Wednesday alongside a bond rally as investors anticipated looser monetary policies from central banks, Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei predicts the next battle with the US will be over the Chinese telecom company’s push into the internet of things and Boeing pledges to commit $100m to help address the needs of families affected by two deadly crashes of its 737 Max jet. Plus, the FT’s Frankfurt bureau chief, Claire Jones, explains what Christine Lagarde is set to inherit at the European Central Bank.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/07/198m 57s

Wednesday, July 3

European leaders agree to back Christine Lagarde as president of the European Central Bank and Ursula von der Leyen as president of the European Commission, Tesla reports record production and delivery figures for its latest quarter, the Trump administration abandons its efforts to include a citizenship question in the 2020 census and President Donald Trump says he will nominate Fed critic Judy Shelton and St Louis Fed official Christopher Waller to the board of the Federal Reserve. Plus, the FT’s Richard Henderson explains a radical shift taking place in capital markets.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/07/199m 44s

Tuesday, July 2

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam condemns protesters who stormed and occupied the Legislative Council, the US economic expansion becomes the longest in recent history and Iran’s oil minister warns that the future of Opec is in jeopardy from the growing influence of Russia and Saudi Arabia. Plus, some questions about office provider WeWork as it prepares to hit the public markets this year. The FT’s US business editor, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, spoke with founder Adam Neumann about the group’s $47bn valuation and his plans for the company’s future.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/07/1910m 14s

Monday, July 1

US president Donald Trump signals that nuclear talks with North Korea will resume, after meeting with Kim Jong Un on Sunday, the US and China ease trade tensions at the G20 summit, but commentators wonder how long the effects will last, Angela Merkel’s compromise plan to fill the EU’s top positions runs into a wall of opposition and HSBC launches a lobbying effort to convince the Chinese government that it is not responsible for the arrest of Huawei’s finance director.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/07/198m 10s

Friday, June 28

The Federal Reserve singles out Credit Suisse in its annual stress tests, Nike reports higher sales and profit margins in its latest quarter, designer Jony Ive will leave Apple at the end of this year and Russian president Vladimir Putin says liberalism has ‘become obsolete’. Plus, the FT’s US managing editor, Peter Spiegel, previews the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/06/199m 48s

Thursday, June 27

Boeing faces another setback in its attempt to get the 737 Max back in the air, activist investor Carl Icahn is preparing a campaign to oust four of Occidental Petroleum’s board members and private equity deal-making hits its highest level since the lead-up to the global financial crisis. Plus, the FT’s corporate finance and deals editor, Arash Massoudi, explains what led to AbbVie’s $63bn acquisition of Botox-maker Allergan.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/06/199m 7s

Wednesday, June 26

Fed chairman Jay Powell warns that risks to global growth have increased in recent weeks, AbbVie investors give the US drugmaker a resounding thumbs down on its bid to buy Botox-maker Allergan and FedEx warns that a slower global economy and trade uncertainty will continue to drag on its business in 2020. Plus, the FT’s banking editor, David Crow, explains how a host of digital upstarts could challenge HSBC’s dominance in Hong Kong.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/06/199m 46s

Tuesday, June 25

Boris Jonson’s tax cut proposals could cost as much as £20bn a year, according to a new report; Instagram’s Adam Mosseri tells the FT that “window-shopping” will become a core part of the photo-sharing app’s future; and US President Donald Trump signs an executive order to hit Iran with new sanctions.  Plus, the FT’s Turkey correspondent, Laura Pitel, explains what’s next for Turkey and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan following the opposition’s triumph in Istanbul’s repeat mayoral election.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/06/1911m 1s

Monday, June 24

Washington plans to impose fresh sanctions on Tehran and warns that Iran should not mistake US “prudence for weakness”, Ericsson’s head of US business says the UK’s plan to shut Huawei out of parts of its 5G network makes little technical sense and the US Federal Reserve quizzes Deutsche Bank over its “bad bank” plans. Plus, the FT’s clean energy and environment correspondent, Leslie Hook, explains why the world’s top 500 companies are set to miss the climate goals outlined in the 2015 Paris agreement.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/06/199m 42s

Friday, June 21

President Donald Trump played down the significance of Iran shooting down a US drone over the Gulf, saying he found it “hard to believe” the move was intentional; Slack lands on Wall Street with a $20bn valuation and Boris Johnson will face Jeremy Hunt in the UK Conservative party leadership race. Plus, Judith Evans, the FT’s property correspondent, explains why the global real estate boom could be drawing to a close.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/06/198m 43s

Thursday, June 20

Pressure mounts on the US and China to ease trade tensions at next week’s G20 summit, Deutsche Bank is under criminal investigation in the US in connection with alleged failures to comply with anti-money laundering laws and Nissan agrees on a truce with Renault in their governance dispute ahead of the Japanese carmaker’s pivotal shareholder meeting next week. Plus, the Federal Reserve held US interest rates steady, but put investors on notice for a future cut. The FT’s US markets editor, Robin Wigglesworth, explains.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/06/198m 24s

Wednesday, June 19

Facebook’s plan to launch a new global digital currency raises questions from banks and regulators, the FT reports that several of Renault and Nissan’s joint business functions are being quietly unwound and the latest round of voting by Conservative MPs trims the UK party’s leadership race down to five candidates. Plus, the FT’s West Coast Editor Richard Waters explains what Slack has in store for investors as the cloud-based communications platform prepares to go public on Thursday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/06/1910m 35s

Tuesday, June 18

Qatar’s sovereign wealth fund is looking to ramp up its investment plans in North America and Asia, the biggest European private equity groups are rushing to raise new mega funds and Pfizer agrees to pay $11.4bn for Array BioPharma in an effort to boost its cancer treatment portfolio. Plus, the FT’s Washington bureau chief Demetri Sevastopulo explains what Iran’s threat to breach nuclear deal terms means for its relationship with the US, as President Donald Trump orders 1,000 more troops to the Middle East.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/06/198m 55s

Monday, June 17

Sources tell the FT that Deutsche Bank is preparing a deep overhaul of its trading operations as it shifts away from investment banking, the US Chamber of Commerce calls for the Trump administration to end its trade war with China and Hong Kong protesters demand the resignation of chief executive Carrie Lam over a controversial extradition bill. Plus, the FT’s Robin Wigglesworth explains how some hedge funds are using artificial intelligence to copy the best parts of human traders with none of the frailties.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/06/199m 2s

Friday, June 14

Crude oil prices surge as tensions rise in the Middle East, Brussels says Russian sources mounted a “sustained” disinformation effort to influence last month’s EU parliament elections and the focus in the UK leadership stakes moves to the second round after Boris Johnson emerged well ahead in the first party vote in the contest to become Britain’s next prime minister. Plus, the FT’s Siona Jenkins explains why 2019 will be a pivotal year for women’s football.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/06/199m 13s

Thursday, June 13

Hong Kong’s chief executive has vowed to push ahead with an extradition bill that has sparked violence in the territory, UK party leadership frontrunner Boris Johnson says Britain would only leave the EU without a deal as “a last resort” and US President Donald Trump says Poland will build a facility to host 1,000 American troops. Plus, FT capital markets reporter Joe Rennison explains why US homeowners are rushing to refinance their mortgages.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/06/198m 42s

Wednesday, June 12

Elon Musk predicts a “record quarter” for Tesla, Royal Dutch Shell scales back its ride-hailing plans in London and the British government is eyeing new powers to enable it to block companies from listing on the London Stock Exchange on national security grounds. Plus, the FT’s retail correspondent Jonathan Eley explains the rift between Arcadia and its creditors, and how today’s meeting between them might play out.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/06/199m 52s

Tuesday, June 11

New powers given to Europe’s banking watchdog to fight the flow of dirty money are falling short, talks to create the US’s first national data privacy law have ground to a halt and Nissan’s CEO wants to make peace with its French partner, Renault. Plus, the FT’s natural resources reporter Gregory Meyer explains how the unprecedented amounts of rain are affecting the US farming industry.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/06/199m 26s

Monday, June 10

United Technologies and Raytheon agree to an all-share merger to create a $120bn aerospace and defence giant, French carmaker Renault tells Japanese partner Nissan that it will block its plan to change its corporate governance and Deutsche Bank finds “serious” failings in payments screening. Plus, FT UK political correspondent Laura Hughes talks about the 11 candidates vying for 10 Downing St now that Theresa May has stepped down as Conservative party leader.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/06/198m 59s

Friday, June 7

Beyond Meat expects sales to double in 2019, Mexico and the US continue talks over tariffs that Donald Trump indicated could start next week, and Mario Draghi prepares to cut rates and embark on a fresh round of bond purchases before he leaves the European Central Bank in October. Plus, we take a look at the business of broadcast news. At the FT’s Future of News conference in New York, our news editor Matt Garrahan talks to Susan Zirinsky, president of CBS News, Noah Oppenheim, president of NBC News, and James Goldston, president of ABC News.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/06/1911m 10s

Thursday, June 6

Fiat Chrysler has withdrawn its proposal for a €33bn merger with Renault, International Monetary Fund chief Chrstine Lagarde warns that the rising tariffs between the US and China are “self-inflicted wounds” on the global recovery, and YouTube bans supremacist content from its website as it steps up its crackdown on hate speech. Plus, FT reporter Camilla Hodgson talks about people-finding websites and why information on them keeps reappearing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/06/199m 13s

Wednesday, June 5

Donald Trump’s pick for the World Bank’s new president, David Malpass, laments the global trade slowdown, Donald Trump predicts that US tariffs against Mexico will go ahead next week and the board of French car company Renault stalls a decision regarding a €33bn merger with Fiat Chrysler. Plus, the FT’s US economics editor Sam Fleming explains why the Federal Reserve is considering the need for a rate cut.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/06/199m 17s

Tuesday, June 4

The biggest names in tech come under pressure as US regulators prepare for antitrust probes, Apple turns towards services and privacy at its annual developers conference and US president Donald Trump turns to the political part of his UK trip after a state banquet with the Queen. Plus, the FT’s trade editor James Politi take us behind the sharp rise in trade tensions between the US and Mexico, and what lies ahead.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/06/198m 48s

Monday, June 3

Donald Trump embarks on his first state visit to the UK by testing the countries’ special relationship, Blackstone strikes the largest private real estate deal in history and US technology companies are re-examining their supply chains to identify Chinese groups that may be targeted in the US-China trade war. Plus, the FT’s Global Technology correspondent Tim Bradshaw previews what’s likely to come out of Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference this week.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/06/199m 17s

Friday, May 31

Uber says it has seen an easing of the fierce competition that blew out its losses in the first quarter, President Donald Trump will threaten to curb intel sharing will Britain if it allows Huawei to build part of the country’s 5G mobile network, and from Canada Goose to Gap it has been a bad week for retailers.  Plus, the FT’s North American correspondent Patti Waldmeir explains why the return of service of Boeing’s 737 Max jet could depend on pilot training.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/05/1910m 1s

Thursday, May 30

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu plunges Israel into repeat elections instead of allowing his rival a chance to form the next government, Democrats are split on whether to pursue the impeachment of US president Donald Trump after special counsel Robert Mueller’s public statement and two female partners at KPMG have left the accounting firm in the UK over its handling of bullying claims against a senior male partner. Plus, the FT’s UK political editor George Parker explains why more Conservatives are now taking a hard line on a no-deal Brexit and what it means for the upcoming leadership race.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/05/199m 20s

Wednesday, May 29

In an interview with the FT, the UK health secretary and pro-business Conservative leadership candidate blasts rival Boris Johnson, Spain’s Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez and his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron are joining forces to block a German conservative from taking the European Commission presidency, and the mounting US-China trade war has led investors to raise bets that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates as the economy slows. Plus, the FT’s corporate finance and deals editor Arash Massoudi explains the significance of the talks between Fiat Chrysler and Renault and the seismic shift it would cause in the automaking industry.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/05/198m 59s

Tuesday, May 28

The success of the Brexit party in European elections ramps up pressure on Britain to leave the EU without a deal, Aviva is preparing a big shake-up of its UK business and Disney’s live action remake of the 1992 animated classic ‘Aladdin’ grabbed the top spot at the US box office over the holiday weekend. Plus, the FT’s pharma correspondent Hannah Kuchler reports that technology companies are betting that their insights into human behaviour can help opioid addicts recover.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/05/198m 53s

Monday, May 27

An alliance of pro-EU parties largely held their ground in Sunday’s European elections, Fiat Chrysler and Renault are in talks that could extend to a full merger, and the most valuable unicorn in the world, ByteDance, wants to make smartphones. Plus, the FT’s Brazil correspondent Andres Schipani tells how the country has changed since Jair Bolsonaro became president.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/05/199m 3s

Friday, May 24

Donald Trump says that Huawei could be included in a trade deal with Beijing, Facebook says it took down a record 2.2bn fake accounts in the first three months of this year and JPMorgan Chase drops its client Purdue Pharma, the OxyContin maker, which has been accused in thousands of lawsuits of fuelling the US opioid crisis. Plus, the FT’s Eric Platt explains how three Wall St banks, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase, dominate advising on tech IPOs, and why that grip might be under threat after Uber’s listing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/05/199m 24s

Thursday, May 23

Conservative MPs expect UK Prime Minister Theresa May to resign or be forced out of office within days, sources tell the FT that Tyson Foods, the largest US meat packer, is in talks over a multi-billion dollar investment in Kazakhstan beef production as a back door into China and a US judge rejects President Donald Trump’s efforts to quash subpoenas of his bank records.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/05/198m 28s

Wednesday, May 22

UK Prime Minister Theresa May offers Labour a deal that includes the possibility of a second EU referendum, Europe’s aviation safety agency sets out strict conditions before it will allow Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft back into the skies and shares in three of the US’s biggest department store chains, Nordstrom, Kohl’s and JC Penney, fell on Tuesday after the companies reported quarterly results short of forecasts. Plus the FT’s Shanghai correspondent Tom Hancock explains why Chinese film producers are facing a funding crunch.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/05/199m 31s

Tuesday, May 21

Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell tempers fears over a corporate debt meltdown, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban steps up the campaign for the country’s Fidesz party in the days leading up to the European parliamentary elections and the UK’s financial watchdog says the number of crypto and forex fraud claims has more than tripled in the past financial year.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/05/199m 47s

Monday, May 20

US intelligence chiefs have held a series of classified briefings with American companies and other groups to warn them of the dangers of doing business in China, a small group of US farm operators have received more than half the money from a federal bailout designed to offset the cost of US trade battles and India exit polls point to a clear election victory for prime minister Narendra Modi. Plus, the FT’s Brussels bureau chief, Alex Barker, explains why Europe’s centrist parties might be in trouble in this week’s parliament elections.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/05/198m 59s

Friday, May 17

Shares in the image sharing platform Pinterest tumble as much as 19 percent after the company’s first earnings report since going public, Starbucks’ China rival Luckin Coffee raises $561m in its IPO gaining a valuation of $4bn and UK Prime Minister Theresa May tells her MPs she will set out a timetable for her resignation and the election of a new leader. Plus, the FT’s Australia and Pacific correspondent Jamie Smyth explains why there’s so much bad blood in Australia and what it means for Saturday’s Federal election.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/05/199m 33s

Thursday, May 16

US President Donald Trump issues an executive order effectively banning telecoms companies from using equipment manufactured by China’s Huawei, Cisco systems is slashing its manufacturing in China in anticipation of higher import tariffs levied in the US and office space group WeWork tries to rein in losses before a possible IPO. Plus, the FT’s Paris Bureau Chief Victor Mallet explains what the European Parliament could have in store for France’s president Emmanuel Macron and why his vision for a united Europe might be in jeopardy.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/05/199m 9s

Wednesday, May 15

Intel reveals a vulnerability in its chips that could let hackers steal data, Wall Street recovers as trade war fears ease, a dispute between the US and Mexico sours the market for fruits and vegetables, and UK Prime Minister Theresa May challenges Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn to make up his mind on her Brexit compromise plan. Plus, the FT’s Buenos Aires correspondent, Benedict Mander, explains how the IMF’s $56bn bailout is playing out in Argentina.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/05/1910m 21s

Tuesday, May 14

The heightened trade war with China hands US stocks their biggest one-day drop in months, Uber shares lose more than a tenth of their value in the ride-hailing app’s second day of trading and a California court orders Bayer to pay more than $2bn in damages to a pair of cancer patients who claimed that their non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma was caused by the German group’s weedkiller, RoundUp. Plus, the FT’s pharmaceutical and biotech reporter, Hannah Kuchler, explains why a lawsuit backed by 44 US states alleges that some generic drugmakers, including Teva and Pfizer, have been fixing prices of more than 100 drugs.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/05/199m 28s

Monday, May 13

Donald Trump’s top economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, raises the prospect of a face-to-face encounter between the US president and China’s Xi Jinping, three influential advisory groups encourage Volkswagen shareholders to vote against the stewardship of all but one member of the German automaker’s board at the annual meeting on Tuesday and Boeing expects “far reaching” changes to the way aircraft are certified safe across the global aviation industry. Plus, the FT’s private equity correspondent in London Javier Espinoza explains why private equity firms have shunned the UK for Europe.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/05/199m 24s

Friday, May 10

US President Donald Trump breaks the silence on escalating tensions with North Korea, US-China trade talks kick off in DC and a London-based boutique advisory firm stands to make $27m in fees for its work on Barbados’s $7bn debt restructuring. Plus, the FT’s Shannon Bond sets the stage for Uber’s New York Stock Exchange debut.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/05/198m 27s

Thursday, May 9

The US has imposed new sanctions on Iran’s metal sectors after Iran said it would cease to comply with parts of the 2015 nuclear deal, Disney writes down $353m from its stake in Vice Media and Tokyo prosecutors relied on a laptop acquired in Lebanon to help build a case against former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn. Plus, the FT’s US managing editor Peter Spiegel explains what happened on Wednesday regarding the White House, the Mueller report and the US attorney general being held in contempt of Congress.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/05/198m 30s

Wednesday, May 8

Global equities suffered one of their biggest declines of the year on fears about a US-China trade war, Lyft shares slip even further below their $72 IPO price after the company said warns about slowing revenue growth and Google unveils plans for a smart display that would use facial recognition to make personalised recommendations. Plus, the FT’s Gregory Meyer tells us about the super weeds that are causing new trouble for Bayer and its blockbuster herbicide, Roundup.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/05/199m 9s

Tuesday, May 7

Senior US officials accuse China of backtracking on its pledges in negotiations to end the trade war, Anadarko Petroleum’s board of directors backs Occidental Petroleum’s $55bn bid, and former Goldman Sachs banker Roger Ng is released under house arrest on $20m bail by a US court over the 1MDB case. Plus, the FT’s Alistair Gray explains the serious accounting problems that have forced Kraft Heinz to restate nearly three years of earnings.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/05/199m 37s

Monday, May 6

US president Donald Trump threatens to raise tariffs on all Chinese imports to 25 per cent, Occidental Petroleum adds more cash to the structure of its $55bn offer to buy Anadarko Petroleum and the European Union prepares to launch a formal antitrust investigation into Apple. Plus, the FT’s economics editor Chris Giles explains why the global economy looks stronger than the “delicate moment” the IMF had expected this spring.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/05/198m 15s

Friday, May 3

Investors flock back to a complex debt-derivatives product blamed for amplifying losses in the financial crisis, thousands of US screenwriters take on their private equity-backed agents, and the billionaire founder of drugmaker Insys is among those found guilty of bribing doctors to prescribe an addictive painkiller. Plus, the FT’s banking editor David Crow explains what is next for Barclays after activist investor Edward Bramson suffered a heavy defeat in his bid for a seat on the investment bank’s board.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/05/198m 2s

Thursday, May 2

The Federal Reserve rules out immediate rate moves, vegan start-up Beyond Meat raises $240.6m from an initial public offering, and US attorney-general William Barr hits back at criticism of his handling of Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. Plus, the FT’s political editor George Parker explains why Boris Johnson looms large over the Brexit endgame.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/05/199m 41s

Wednesday, May 1

Apple forecasts an improvement in depressed iPhone sales, Donald Trump drops a central demand from trade negotiations with China in order to end a long-running tariff dispute and Crown Prince Naruhito becomes Japan’s first modern monarch. Plus, the FT’s Gideon Long explains what Juan Guaidó’s call for an uprising in Venezuela means for the country and Nicolás Maduro.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/05/198m 9s

Tuesday, April 30

Google’s advertising revenue slows more than expected, The We Company joins the list of highly valued private companies eyeing a public listing and a group of shipping industry executives call for a speed limit on commercial vessels to cut emissions. Plus, the FT’s US industry and energy editor Ed Crooks explains what Occidental Petroleum’s $55bn bid for Anadarko Petroleum means for the companies and the US oil and gas industry.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/04/198m 51s

Monday, April 29

Spain’s socialist party has won big in the country’s third general election in four years, US and UK airlines are bracing for a profit hit in the wake of the grounding of Boeing’s 737 Max jet and Deutsche Bank chairman Paul Achleitner says the investment bank doesn’t need a fundamental strategic overhaul. Plus, the FT’s Mark Vandevelde talks about his latest profile of Colony Capital chief executive Tom Barrack and the real estate investor’s performance record.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/04/197m 4s

Friday, April 26

Uber lowers the price range at which it will pitch shares to investors, Amazon wants to cut shipping times to one day for its Prime members and the collapse of merger talks puts Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank in uncomfortable positions. Plus, the FT’s Ian Mount explains why a polarised Spain could face months of coalition talks following a general election this weekend.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/04/197m 47s

Thursday, April 25

Electric car company Tesla reveals that it plunged back into the red after a $702m net loss this quarter, Facebook sets aside $3bn for what would be the largest civil fine ever imposed by the Federal Trade Commission and Amazon looks to international markets as it tries to continue to grow. Plus, the FT’s banking editor in London, David Crow, explains why European banks are bracing for more pain.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/04/199m 7s

Wednesday, April 24

The S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite set new records, Twitter chief executive Jack Dorsey meets with US president Donald Trump and European industrial chief Carl-Henric Svanberg pledges to bring back jobs from China. Plus, the FT’s Kadhim Shubber explains why Democrats are split when it comes to the possibility of impeaching the president.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/04/199m 14s

Tuesday, April 23

Democrats order Don McGahn, the former White House counsel, to appear before Congress, Elon Musk says Tesla will produce driverless taxis by 2020, Barclays is expected to cut bonuses for its investment bankers and Theresa May resumes cross-party negotiations on Brexit after the Easter break. Plus, the FT’s Ed Crooks explains the US decision to end sanctions waivers on Iranian oil imports.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/04/1910m 26s

Monday, April 22

Comedian Volodymyr Zelensky is set to become Ukraine’s next president, London climate protesters demand to talk with mayor Sadiq Khan, and China delays the roll out of a controversial measure that would restrict foreign companies from taking certain data out of the country. Plus, FT reporter Adam Samson explains why Turkey’s currency  has come under such scrutiny lately.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/04/197m 56s

Thursday, April 18

Huawei promises a $600 5G smart phone, Pinterest and Zoom price shares in their initial public offerings ahead of market debuts on Thursday and Uber’s self-driving car unit eyes a $7.3bn valuation. Plus, US soyabean exports to China rise for the first time in nine months. The FT’s Gregory  Meyer explains what that means for trade between the two countries.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/04/197m 10s

Wednesday, April 17

Apple and chipmaker Qualcomm sign a peace deal to end all litigation between the two companies, Netflix’s subscriber outlook disappoints and Boeing faces an investor backlash. Plus, the FT’s Richard Henderson tells us why BlackRock chief executive Larry Fink says markets are poised for a ‘melt-up’.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/04/198m 57s

Tuesday, April 16

Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris is ravaged by fire, an environmental activist protest brings London to a standstill, Goldman Sachs delays an eagerly anticipated strategic update as its core businesses struggle and new analysis reveals a widening pay gap between US chief executives and their employees. Plus, the FT’s media correspondent Anna Nicolaou explains how Netflix is changing the way TV production is paid for.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/04/199m 2s

Monday, April 15

Germany's telecoms regulator says Huawei can stay in the 5G network race, the European Central Bank faces stimulus pressure over a falling inflation outlook and the FT reports that Purdue Pharma, the makers of Oxycontin, tried to buy Reckitt Benckiser's addiction treatment business. Plus, the FT's Camilla Hodgson sets up the $30bn legal battle between Apple and Qualcomm that will play out in a San Diego court on Monday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/04/197m 48s

Friday, April 12

The US sets out its case against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, Uber reveals its pitch to investors ahead of its highly anticipated initial public offering and Brussels paves the way for the start of trade talks with Washington. Plus, Wall Street banks will report their first-quarter results over the next week. The FT’s Rob Armstrong explains what investors will be looking out for.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/04/196m 39s

Thursday, April 11

Brexit’s date has been moved to the end of October, Lyft shares hit a new low as Uber’s IPO looms and the Federal Reserve puts markets on notice. Plus, the FT’s South Asia bureau chief Amy Kazmin explains what is at stake in India’s general election, which kicks off today.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/04/199m 37s

Wednesday, April 10

Prime Minister Theresa May heads to Brussels to ask fellow European leaders for an extension on Britain leaving the EU, the FT reports that AT&T has had talks about selling HBO Europe to pay down its $170bn debt load and shares in Levi Strauss jump after the denim maker reports its first quarterly earnings results in more than three decades. Plus, the FT’s Shannon Bond talks about the hurdles Uber is facing as it prepares its highly-anticipated initial public offering.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/04/198m 7s

Tuesday, April 9

A proposal by the Federal Reserve could force large foreign banks in the US to hold more liquid assets, Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan says the Swiss drugmaker is limiting its spending on takeovers and the scrapbooking website Pinterest files to go public with the intention of raising $1.3bn from investors. Plus, we talk to the FT’s Israel correspondent Mehul Srivastiva about today’s parliamentary elections.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/04/197m 32s

Monday, April 8

Warren Buffett, the largest shareholder at Wells Fargo, calls on the US bank to look outside Wall Street for a new chief executive, Saudi Aramco attracts nearly $30 billion for an upcoming international bond sale and Kirstjen Nielsen, the US secretary of homeland security, resigns from her post. Plus, the FT’s political editor George Parker talks about the upcoming week in British politics ahead of the EU's emergency Brexit summit.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/04/198m 27s

Friday, April 5

Talks between Prime Minister Theresa May and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn have slowed ahead of a crucial European Union summit, a federal judge says the Securities and Exchange Commission and Elon Musk, Tesla chief executive, must resolve a Twitter dispute outside of court and the price of oil tops $70 a barrel for the first time since November. Plus, the FT’s James Politi tells us why the US and China have pushed back the timing of a possible trade deal.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/04/199m 0s

Thursday, April 4

Theresa May and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn kick off negotiations on the future of Brexit, UniCredit prepares a rival multibillion-euro bid to take control of Commerzbank and Facebook user data has been exposed via Amazon cloud computing servers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/04/197m 17s

Wednesday, April 3

Theresa May agrees to talk with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn about a softer Brexit deal. Next, despite pressure from both Democrats and Republicans US drug prices continue to soar. Then, the world’s top energy organisation is under fire for a plan critics are calling “too fossil friendly”.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/04/198m 17s

Tuesday, April 2

British MPs have rejected every single proposal to find a way forward for Brexit. So how can the UK break the deadlock? And the long-awaited initial public offering of ride-hailing app Lyft shifts into reverse on only its second day of trading.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/04/198m 25s

Monday, April 1

With Theresa May's Brexit plan in left in tatters on Friday, the British government spent the weekend trying to find a way out of the impasse. Today, MPs will likely try to take control of the House of Commons agenda again in an attempt to find a majority for a different way of leaving the European Union. We look ahead at the week in Westminster.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/04/195m 33s

Friday, March 29

Swedbank feels the heat over money laundering accusations, Turkey burns through a third of its foreign currency reserves in an effort to contain the weakness of the lira, and, German businesses brace for no-deal Brexit  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/03/1910m 9s

Thursday, March 28

We report on a series of votes in parliament to gauge MPs views on different Brexit scenarios. Another Nordic bank is caught up in a money-laundering scandal.  Plus, Gideon Rachman and colleagues discuss whether Israel's long serving prime minister can overcome corruption allegations and renewed violence from Gaza to win a fifth term in office  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/03/1910m 3s

Wednesday, March 27

Renault and Nissan patch up their alliance and plan a further acquisition to bulk up the business, a leading Eurosceptic says he has decided after all to back Theresa May’s deal on Brexit, and we learn more about former Uber chief Travis Kalanick’s new global venture. Plus, why European investors are becoming concerned about rising levels of banker pay.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/03/198m 14s

Tuesday, March 26

Members of UK Parliament vote to seize control of the Brexit process, Apple brings out Hollywood’s biggest names to unveil a renewed push into digital services and McDonald’s makes another investment in its restaurant technology. Plus, the FT’s motor industry correspondent Peter Campbell explains why Volvo’s chief executive is warning about self-driving cars.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/03/199m 9s

Monday, March 25

Theresa May fends off a challenge to her leadership ahead of a high-stakes week for Brexit, Robert Mueller’s report on Russian meddling in the 2016 election finds no collusion and Uber is expected to sign a $3.1bn deal for a Dubai-rival. Plus, the FT’s global technology correspondent Tim Bradshaw explains what to expect from Apple’s big bet on television.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/03/199m 36s

Friday, March 22

EU leaders give Theresa May a short Brexit extension, Spotify enters high-stakes licensing talks with music rights owners and US stocks get a boost from the technology sector. Plus, the FT’s Robin Wigglesworth reports from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange as the American jeans maker Levi Strauss goes public.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/03/198m 52s

Thursday, March 21

UK Prime Minister Theresa May makes a big gamble that risks a no-deal Brexit, the Federal Reserve signals it will hold rates steady all year as economic growth slows, Levi Strauss returns to the stock market with a $6.6bn valuation and retailer Williams Sonoma delivers an unusually rosy outlook for the year.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/03/1910m 32s

Wednesday, March 20

EU leaders tell the UK government there are no guarantees Brexit can be delayed, Google overhauls how it displays certain search results in Europe to avoid more trouble, another round of US-China trade talks are scheduled for next week in Beijing and FedEx shows the effects of a weakening global economy. Plus, the FT’s Kadhim Shubber explains the latest in the fight between Tesla chief executive Elon Musk and the US Securities and Exchange Commission.     See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/03/199m 40s

Tuesday, March 19

The Speaker of the House of Commons delivers a fresh blow to Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal hopes, the $43bn Worldpay deal piles pressure on rivals for more tie-ups and US farmers are being cut out of the Japanese market. Plus, the FT's Shannon Bond explains how ride-hailing company Lyft plans to pitch investors before its upcoming IPO.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/03/199m 3s

Monday, March 18

UK Prime Minister Theresa May pins Brexit deal hopes on last-minute talks with the Democratic Unionist Party, French President Emmanuel Macron is under renewed pressure after looters smashed scores of shops and set fire to a restaurant in Paris and adverse weather and deadly bacteria cause Italian olive oil prices to surge. Plus, the FT’s Olaf Storbeck explains the merger talks between Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/03/199m 52s

Friday, March 15

Two top Facebook executives are set to leave the social network, Google faces yet another fine from Brussels and the US Senate votes to block President Donald Trump’s declaration of an emergency at the Mexican border. Plus, the FT's editorial director and UK political commentator Robert Shrimsley will wrap up this big week in Brexit, and tell us what to expect in the coming weeks.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/03/199m 25s

Thursday, March 14

British MPs have to decide on a way forward on Brexit, the US bows to international pressure on the safety of the Boeing 737 Max plane and former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort faces indictments in New York that could forestall a presidential pardon on his federal sentence. Plus, the FT’s Brussel's reporter Rochelle Toplensky explains why Spotify filed an antitrust complaint against Apple.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/03/199m 12s

Wednesday, March 13

Prime Minister Theresa May's latest Brexit deal fails in parliament, Royal Dutch Shell says it’s aiming to become the largest electricity company in the world by the 2030s and the FBI charges prominent financiers and celebrities for using cash bribes to bypass the admissions process at prominent American colleges. Plus, the FT’s Anjli Raval explains how BP lobbied against US methane rules despite its green public stance.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/03/1910m 27s

Tuesday, March 12

UK Prime Minister Theresa May secures a revised Brexit deal ahead of a crucial Commons vote, easyJet is stockpiling parts for its aircraft in Europe in case of a no-deal Brexit, US executives and officials threaten to stay away from Russia’s economic forum and US President Donald Trump’s proposed budget sets up another potential government shutdown. Plus, the FT’s Patti Waldmeir explains what two recent 737 Max 8 aircraft crashes mean for Boeing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/03/199m 54s

Monday, March 11

The Bank of England tightens liquidity buffers before Brexit, top UBS executives accuse the bank of using maternity leave as a reason for cutting women's bonuses and Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi plan to establish a new leadership structure for their alliance. Plus, the FT’s George Parker explains what to expect this week on Brexit.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/03/199m 6s

Friday, March 8

Donald Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort is sentenced to nearly 4 years in prison, Airbus all but rules out paying back millions in outstanding loans for development of the A380 superjumbo, Facebook’s pivots to privacy raises questions about its business model and a new report shows the gender wealth gap could take two centuries to close. Plus, the FT’s Richard Waters explains how the business software apps many of us use every day are helping tech stocks make a comeback.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/03/1910m 7s

Thursday, March 7

New research shows China’s economy is 12 per cent smaller than official figures say it is, US financial regulators move to relax Obama-era financial rules and wealthy investors looking to settle in the UK will face stricter regulations if they want a so-called golden visa. Then the FT’s Aime Williams explains the scandal plaguing Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/03/198m 9s

Wednesday, March 6

Italy prepares to sign on to China’s contentious Belt and Road Initiative, JPMorgan Chase says it will no longer provide banking services to private prisons and former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg decides not to run for US president in 2020. Plus, the FT’s Kiran Stacey deciphers the move by Chinese tech company Huawei to sue the US government.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/03/198m 21s

Tuesday, March 5

Cloud software giant Salesforce issues a disappointing earnings forecast for the current quarter, French President Emmanuel Macron calls for a new European 'renaissance' and the UK’s department for international trade cancels its regular meetings with business leaders after media leaks. Plus, the FT’s Aliya Ram explains new research that shows two-fifths of Europe’s artificial intelligence start-ups don’t actually use any artificial intelligence programs in their products.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/03/197m 56s

Monday, March 4

The US discusses emergency aid for Venezuela if Nicolas Maduro’s regime falls, Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou sues Canadian border officers over her arrest and the head of the US oil refinery trade group attacks the idea of a carbon tax. Plus, the FT’s Mehul Srivastava explains the accusations of bribery against Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu - and what affect his possible indictment might have on Israel’s upcoming election.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/03/1910m 1s

Friday, March 1

Tesla chief executive Elon Musk announces a price cut to $35,000 for the Model 3, retailer Gap reveals plans to split itself in two, HBO’s Richard Plepler quits in the wake of the AT&T takeover, and Israel’s attorney general intends to indict prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu on corruption charges. Then the FT’s Hannah Kuchler tells us about the US biotech startup that’s raising money for research into ending genetic diseases.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/03/198m 20s

Thursday, February 28

The world’s largest sovereign wealth fund cuts its €1bn stake in Volkswagen almost in half, the UK Labour party formally comes out in favour of a second Brexit referendum and Russian hackers step up their campaign to disrupt the EU’s next elections. Plus, the FT’s Kadhim Shubber explains the biggest takeaways from the testimony of US President Donald Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/02/199m 33s

Wednesday, February 27

The FT uncovers that several Chinese officials committed plagiarism in their university theses, WW - the company formerly known as Weight Watchers - reports a drop in subscribers and profit forecasts and JPMorgan Chase president Daniel Pinto warns of a fall in trading revenue. Plus, the FT’s Sam Fleming explains the big takeaways from Federal Reserve Chairman Jay Powell’s testimony before the US Congress.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/02/199m 30s

Tuesday, February 26

The UK’s opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn opens the door to a new referendum on Brexit, US vice-president Mike Pence travels to Latin America to support opposition leader Juan Guaidó and Tesla chief Elon Musk lands in legal trouble again after tweeting potentially-market moving information. Plus, the FT’s Anna Nicolaou explains what this year’s Academy Awards signal about broader business trends in the film industry.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/02/199m 19s

Monday, February 25

US President Donald Trump delays the increase in tariffs on imported Chinese goods, UK Prime Minister Theresa May delays her Brexit deal vote in Parliament and ExxonMobil tries to prevent an investor proposal that would set targets for the company’s greenhouse gas emissions. Plus, the FT’s Gideon Long brings us the latest from the Venezuelan/Colombian border.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/02/199m 28s

Friday, February 22

Eurosceptic MPs warn they’ll try to end the UK government if Prime Minister Theresa May delays Brexit, Kraft Heinz shares dive after the food group reveals an SEC subpoena over its accounting policies and the Big Four accounting firms’ stranglehold over major car companies is under threat. Plus, the FT’s Sam Fleming explains how Federal Reserve policymakers are rethinking their economic strategy.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/02/198m 50s

Thursday, February 21

Food giant Kraft Heinz is looking to gobble up its competitors, Volkswagen chief executive Herbert Diess says US tariffs are the biggest worry for the industry and the Federal Reserve minutes of its latest meeting reassure investors. Plus, the FT’s Nathalie Thomas explains why environmentalists and energy businesses are confused by the UK government’s approach to hydrofracking.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/02/199m 15s

Wednesday, February 20

A former North Korean diplomat gives US President Donald Trump a warning, the consulting firm McKinsey reaches a $15m settlement over allegations of conflicts of interest and Prime Minister Theresa May once again heads to Brussels to try to rescue her Brexit plan. Plus, the FT’s Jude Webber explains why the Mexican fight against drug cartels is far from over.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/02/198m 25s

Tuesday, February 19

US President Donald Trump threatens the Venezuelan military over its support for Nicolas Maduro, more splits among pro-EU politicians over Brexit and property developers play the Chinese market by buying up the debts of their rivals. Plus, the FT’s Emiko Terazono explains why fears of climate change may soon bring more regulations to the agricultural sector.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/02/198m 54s

Monday, February 18

The US push to ban Chinese company Huawei from allies' telecoms networks is dealt a blow by British intelligence conclusions, UK MPs propose a regulator to police content on social media sites and tensions grow between Berlin and London over a key Saudi defense contract. Plus, the FT's Michael Peel explains the big takeaways from this weekend's Munich Security conference.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/02/198m 42s

Friday, February 15

The US government will be funded, but the president plans to declare a national emergency in order to build his wall along the US-Mexico border, US chipmaker Nvidia provides a better than expected outlook despite slower China demand and Prime Minister Theresa May suffers yet another defeat on her Brexit plans in the House of Commons. Plus, as Amazon announces it won't build its second headquarters in New York City, the FT's Lindsay Fortado, a Queens resident, takes us to the neighbourhood to hear how the locals feel about the decision.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/02/198m 22s

Thursday, February 14

Top shareholders in Deutsche Bank demand deeper cuts to its US investment bank arm, Delta and EasyJet join forces with Italy’s state-backed railway company to bid for Alitalia and Airbus is set to announce the end of an era for the world’s largest passenger jet. Plus, the FT’s Victor Mallet explains the flare in tensions between the French and Japanese nationalists in the Renault and Nissan car alliance after Carlos Ghosn’s arrest.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/02/198m 39s

Wednesday, February 13

Chief Brexit negotiator Olly Robbins has suggested that Theresa May is bluffing over Britain's EU exit, Donald Trump opens the door to extending trade talks with China and more than 7m Americans are now 90 days behind on their car payments. Plus, the FT’s Madhumita Murgia explains what researchers are doing to try to mitigate the bias in data and computer algorithms.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/02/199m 42s

Tuesday, February 12

Virgin looks to expand in the US, Theresa May is expected to ask MPs for more time to overhaul her Brexit deal and Merck releases trial data showing its drug Keytruda can help cut patients' risk of dying from kidney cancer in half. Plus, the FT's Ian Mount tells us what to expect as the Spanish Supreme Court trial of 12 Catalan separatists begins today in Madrid.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/02/197m 58s

Monday, February 11

The IMF's new chief economist backs the Fed on interest rates, Japanese business takes a hit from the Chinese slowdown and trade disputes and US companies sound the alarm over mounting Brexit risks. Plus, the FT's Madhumita Murgia explains how an investigation into Facebook's data collection might change how big tech companies are regulated around the world.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/02/198m 29s

Friday, February 8

US legislators move forward with a bill to prosecute Opec member countries for fixing oil prices, US President Trump rules out another meeting with Chinese President Xi before tariffs are set to increase in March and Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos accuses National Enquirer-owner American Media of extortion. Plus, the FT's Chris Giles explains why the Bank of England is the latest central bank to make a dovish U-turn.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/02/199m 48s

Thursday, February 7

The British government admits it cannot guarantee trade deals between the UK and other non-EU countries will be ready before Brexit, two more executives leave Facebook's PR team and Middle Eastern investors retreat from western property deals. Plus, the FT's James Politi gives us the background on US President Donald Trump's nominee for World Bank president, David Malpass.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/02/198m 0s

Wednesday, February 6

Snap stems its user declines and claws back losses, Apple gets a new boss for its retail stores and the US becomes the biggest supplier of oil to the UK for the first time since the Suez crisis. Plus, the FT’s Gregory Meyer explains how US soyabean farmers have been caught in the middle of the trade war with China, and what grain processor Archer Daniels Midland predicts for the year ahead.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/02/199m 49s

Tuesday, February 5

Alphabet spending spree spooks investors, Theresa May heads to Belfast to find a solution for the Irish backstop and a new study finds that some venture capitalists lose out by ignoring women. Plus, the FT's Robin Wigglesworth takes us through investing legend Bill Gross's career, after news that Mr Gross would retire from Janus Henderson.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/02/198m 57s

Monday, February 4

Prime Minister Theresa May says she is still committed to renegotiating her Brexit deal, delivery company Hermes strikes a deal with a trade union in what could be the first of its kind in the gig economy and US first quarter earnings are set for their first decline in three years. Plus, the FT's Miles Johnson explains the trouble facing Italy's economy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/02/197m 34s

Friday, February 1

Amazon delivers record profits but sees a slower growth ahead, US-China trade talks wrap up without a solid deal and new research from the UK's Low Pay Commission shows that a raise in the minimum wage hasn't resulted in the widespread adoption of automation some had expected. Plus, the FT's Ed Crooks explains how GE is making its way out of crisis mode.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/02/198m 57s

Thursday, January 31

Tesla loses its finance chief and issues a warning for the coming year, Facebook beats forecasts for revenue and earnings and cosmetics group Avon faces another round of lay-offs. Plus, the FT's Michael Mackenzie explains the big takeaways from the Federal Reserve's first policy-setting meeting of 2019.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/01/197m 38s

Wednesday, January 30

Parliament votes to send Theresa May's Brexit deal back to Brussels, Apple tries to strike an upbeat tone despite the continued fall in iPhone sales while luxury goods group LVMH is not feeling the pain from the Chinese slowdown just yet. Plus, the FT's Andres Schipani takes us to Brazil, where a recent dam collapse at an iron ore mining facility has killed at least 84 people.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/01/1910m 16s

Tuesday, January 29

New signs that China's flagging economy is taking its toll on global business, the US unveils criminal charges against Huawei and Theresa May bids to amend the so-called Irish backstop in her Brexit deal. Plus, the FT's Tim Bradshaw tells us what to look for as Apple releases its latest results today.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/01/198m 43s

Monday, January 28

The US lifts sanctions on the businesses once controlled by Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska, Beijing's envoy to the EU accuses the countries of discrimination against Huawei and Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó urges Theresa May not to send money to President Nicolás Maduro. Plus, the FT's Laura Pitel on how Turkey is allowing people to essentially buy citizenship in an attempt to right the economy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/01/198m 22s

Friday, January 25

Intel falls victim to weakening demand for iPhones, Starbucks doubles down with new coffee shop openings in China and George Soros gives a searing speech in Davos attacking Chinese President Xi Jinping. Plus, the FT's Chris Giles takes us along on his ride with a truck driver through the Eurotunnel to see exactly how Brexit might affect trade.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/01/199m 27s

Thursday, January 24

China blocks Microsoft's Bing search engine, Ford struggles with the global overhaul of its business and billionaire Ken Griffin purchases the most expensive home ever sold in the US. Plus, the FT's JP Rathbone tells us why world leaders are not recognising Nicolas Maduro as the legitimate president of Venezuela.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/01/197m 21s

Wednesday, January 23

The Trump administration turns down an offer from China for preparatory trade talks, IBM records annual revenue growth for the first time since 2011 and pressure mounts on Tory Eurosceptics and the Democratic Unionist party to back Theresa May's Brexit deal. Plus, the FT's Lindsay Fortado tells us why two activist hedge funds have taken an interest in eBay.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/01/197m 44s

Tuesday, January 22

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ken Griffin's vote of confidence in London’s high end property market, a new candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, China’s slowing growth rate, and what’s happening at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/01/1910m 27s
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