WorldAffairs

WorldAffairs

By World Affairs Council of Northern California

WorldAffairs is dedicated to curating conversations across difference, on both global challenges and global solutions. We explore international affairs with the world’s most knowledgeable voices in politics, business, academia, media and technology. Each hour-long episode marries thought-provoking analysis from multiple perspectives to make complex issues relatable. Our expert hosts, former nuclear policy expert Philip Yun, and renowned journalists Ray Suarez and Markos Kounalakis, have only one goal: to inform and inspire listeners so they can become active participants in this great experiment of democracy. If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you. We want to hear from you! Please write to share your feedback at communications@worldaffairs.org or take a quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Episodes

How White Supremacy Fueled the Attack on the Capitol

For months, the domestic terrorist attack on the US Capitol was planned in plain sight on social media. So why weren’t we ready for it? This week, former FBI special agent Michael German explains why the bureau deprioritized the threat posed by white supremacists… and why the Department of Homeland Security says they pose “the most persistent and lethal threat to the homeland.” Then, historian Nell Irvin Painter breaks down how a legacy of racism in the United States brought us to this moment. Can we change our trajectory? She argues that the Black Lives Matter Movement of 2020 could bring lasting, positive change to this country.   Guests:  Nell Irvin Painter, American historian, artist, author of numerous books including The History of White People and Professor of American History Emerita at Princeton University Michael German, Brennan Center for Justice at NYC Law School, former FBI agent and author of Disrupt, Discredit, and Divide: How the New FBI Damages Democracy If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
16/01/2159m 1s

Strongmen From Mussolini to Trump

Historian Ruth Ben-Ghiat has spent her career documenting the stealth strategies authoritarian leaders use to gain power. In her new book, Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present, she outlines the “strongman playbook” used by authoritarian leaders including Donald Trump. She says that the January 6 insurgency by far-right extremists, meant to facilitate Trump’s self-coup, lays bare how much the 45th president has in common with autocrats like Benito Mussolini and Vladimir Putin. When President Trump incited his followers to storm the US Capitol, some were shocked, but Ben-Ghiat saw this coming. She joins Ray Suarez on the podcast to talk about last week’s events and warn us of what could come next. Guest: Ruth Ben-Ghiat, professor of history and Italian studies at New York University If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
09/01/2159m 1s

The Global Economy After COVID-19

As each country manages the pandemic differently, the already fragile global economy has been disrupted by broken supply chains and shifts in demand. Now we’re questioning the role of the government, the future of capitalism and changing our values. The choices we make now could change the world for decades. On this week’s episode, we revisit a conversation about the future of the global economy with James Manyika, Chairman and Director of the McKinsey Global Institute, Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor at Allianz, and Gillian Tett, Editor at Large at the Financial Times.    Guests:  James Manyika, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company; Chairman and Director, McKinsey Global Institute Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz  Gillian Tett, Chair of Editorial Board and Editor-at-Large, US, Financial Times   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
04/01/2159m 1s

Anand Giridharadas: Are Elites Really Making the World a Better Place?

With record unemployment, increasing income inequality and soaring poverty, it’s hard to escape the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic, but there is one group of people that have fared well. The world’s billionaires are 27% richer than they were last year. As of July, their wealth has soared to a record high of $10.2 trillion. In the absence of a strong social safety net --  these are the people our society turns to for help. But is this philanthropy model working?  For his 2018 book, Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World, Anand Giridharadas spent three years embedded with the donor class. He found that many of the same people who are trying to save the planet, are actually responsible for making it worse, but he’s hopeful that our society is poised to turn a corner after 2020. “And so I think about this year as being obviously just one of unendurable pain for so many people, of a tremendous amount of loss. You know, we're getting to the level of one in a thousand Americans no longer being with us at the end of this year because of COVID alone. And yet also I think there is a way in which we're going to look back on this moment as generating not 2020 hindsight, but 2020 foresight where we might look back on this year as the year that freed us of certain illusions and, and compelled us to, to choose a different way. And what I hope is we're going to come out of this time exuberant, joyful, ready to celebrate, ready to enjoy physical space together again, but also politically galvanized to build the next chapter of the American story, because this one, this story is done.This chapter is bankrupted itself. We have learned very clearly from this year. And from these years that we have not been living, right. We just have not been living right. Our society was designed wrong and the immense pain and the immense loss of this year only confirms that. And so my hope is that we come out of this with an appetite, well, to enjoy, to celebrate, to live again fully but also to transform this country.”   Guest:  Anand Giridharadas, Author and publisher of The.Ink Host: Markos Kounalakis, Visiting fellow, Hoover Institution    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
28/12/2059m 1s

We Have the Power to Stop World Hunger

When the World Food Program was awarded this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, executive director David Beasley warned that “famine is at humanity’s doorstep.”  He said that a “hunger pandemic,” worse than COVID-19, is a real possibility if the world does not address the problem. Hunger is not new, but the coronavirus pandemic and global recession has thrown millions of people into poverty. The good news is that there is enough food to feed everyone on earth; it’s just not always distributed fairly and affordably. Famines are man-made political problems and we have the power to end them. This week we’re looking at how to solve food insecurity around the world and right here in the United States. We’ll hear from nonprofit leaders working on the frontlines and a doctor in Yemen who treats malnourished children.    Guests:  Dr. Aida Alsadeeq, assistant professor at the University of Aden and former supervisor at the pediatric malnutrition ward at Aden's Al-Sadaqa Hospital  Skye Fitzgerald, Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker and director of The Hunger Ward Reverend Eugene Cho, President and CEO of Bread for the World and the Bread Institute Laura Melo, Country Director at United Nations World Food Programme - WFP, Guatemala   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
21/12/2059m 1s

Larry Brilliant and Peter Hotez: Vaccinating Our Way Out of the Pandemic

Now that the process is beginning for distribution of a vaccine for COVID-19  -- and another is close behind -- it seems as though ending the pandemic is finally in sight. But with the world’s wealthy countries hoarding billions of vaccine doses, the majority of people living in developing countries likely won’t get vaccinated in more than a year. Dr. Larry Brilliant, best known for eradicating Smallpox, says that’s a problem because the virus “will continue to ping pong back and forth among nations.” “We cannot solve the COVID problem nationally. This is really a time for global cooperation.” He and Dr. Peter Hotez, who is part of a team developing a low-cost COVID vaccine for global distribution, join Ray Suarez to discuss how we will be able to vaccinate our way out of the pandemic.   Guests:  Dr. Larry Brilliant, MD, PhD, epidemiologist and CEO of Pandefense  Dr. Peter Hotez,  MD, PhD, epidemiologist and author of Preventing the Next Pandemic: Vaccine Diplomacy in a Time of Anti-science   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
12/12/2059m 1s

Redefining Latino Identity

At 60 million people and counting, Latinos are the largest minority group in the United States. But if the 2020 election taught us anything, it’s that our political establishment does not understand this community, which is undergoing a transformation. Young Latinos across the country are redefining their identities, pushing boundaries, and awakening politically in powerful and surprising ways. Many of them are coming together in solidarity under the term "Latinx." Join co-host Ray Suarez and VICE's Paola Ramos for a conversation on how communities from New York to Texas and California are defining the controversial term "Latinx," and what it means to be Latino and American.   Guests:  Paola Ramos, journalist and author of  Finding Latinx: In search of The Voices Redefining Latino Identity Ray Suarez, co-host of WorldAffairs and author of Latino Americans: The 500 Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
07/12/2059m 0s

What Biden Can Do To Secure Our Climate Future

When Joe Biden ran for president, he pledged to make climate change a major priority. How will he make good on that promise and what are the consequences if he fails to act? On this week’s episode, we discuss climate policy with former California Governor Jerry Brown, oceanographer Sylvia Earle and former Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos, 2016 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Then, we visit Paradise, California, the site of the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state’s history.   Guests:  Jerry Brown, Governor of California (1975-1983 and 2011-2019) Sylvia Earle, Oceanographer and President & Chair of Mission Blue Sylvia Earle Alliance  Juan Manuel Santos, former President of Colombia & recipient of the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Emily Thomas, documentary filmmaker Harmony VonStockhausen, student   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
30/11/2059m 1s

How Alternative Media Hooked Us on Politics and Broke Our Democracy

A recent Politico poll found that 70% of Republican voters don’t believe the presidential election was free and fair, even though there is no evidence to support this claim. Historian Claire Bond Potter talks with Rachael Myrow about the rise of alternative media and pseudo news sites that continue to spread misinformation and are helping Donald Trump convince his base that the election was fraudulent. It was not.   Guest:  Claire Bond Potter, Professor of History and co-Executive Editor of Public Seminar at the New School   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
26/11/2028m 58s

Ambassador Nicholas Burns on Biden's Foreign Policy Challenges

Joe Biden will be President in two months. In the meantime, Donald Trump is doing everything he can to make that transition as difficult as possible. He has prevented the president-elect from receiving top secret intelligence briefings and made a flurry of decisions that could jeopardize our national security. Career diplomat Nicholas Burns and Ray Suarez discuss the implications - and how to rebuild America’s foreign service.   Guest:  R. Nicholas Burns, Former US Ambassador to NATO and Professor of diplomacy at the Harvard Kennedy School If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
23/11/2030m 38s

Biden’s Foreign Policy, with Ishaan Tharoor

When Joe Biden takes office, he’ll face challenges like no other president before him. From the pandemic, to our fragile democracy, a world in transition, and challenges exacerbated by climate change, the Biden Administration will have to approach  foreign policy very carefully. On this episode, co-host Ray Suarez talks with Washington Post columnist Ishaan Tharoor about these challenges and how the Biden Administration might tackle them.   Guests:  Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post Columnist   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
19/11/2032m 1s

Anne Applebaum: The Lure of Authoritarianism

Pulitzer Prize- winning historian Anne Applebaum is worried about authoritarianism in the US. Since the election, world leaders have congratulated President-Elect Biden on his decisive victory, and yet, President Trump has not conceded. He’s gone on a rampage to discredit the results and put his loyalists in charge. Applebaum joins producer Teresa Cotsirilos on the podcast to talk about the nature of authoritarianism and how fascist leaders come to power. Democracy is fragile and sometimes, she says, the best way to push back against populist authoritarianism is to not answer it directly.   Guest:  Anne Applebaum, Pulitzer-Prize winning historian, author of  Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism and staff writer at The Atlantic   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
16/11/2027m 18s

Does The Perfect Healthcare System Exist?

This year, the US is on track to spend $4 trillion on healthcare -- more than any other nation. Yet our healthcare system is famous for its dysfunction. What are we getting for our money? And how does our system stack up against those in other countries? This week, Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel joins co-host Ray Suarez to compare different healthcare systems around the world. Then, producer Teresa Cotsirilos and Radio New Zealand’s Indira Stewart explain how Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern managed to nearly eradicate the coronavirus from New Zealand and return the country to some sense of normalcy.   Guests:  Ezekiel J. Emanuel, MD, PhD, Vice Provost for Global Initiatives, University of Pennsylvania and author of Which Country Has The World’s Best Healthcare System? Indira Stewart, Radio New Zealand   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
09/11/2059m 1s

How Chileans Mobilized To Rewrite Their Constitution

On October 25, an overwhelming majority of Chileans voted to throw out their constitution, written during Augusto Pinochet’s brutal dictatorship. It started as a student protest at a high school and grew into a national movement. Now, the streets of Santiago are filled with jubilant celebration, music and fireworks. But soon, the hard work of writing the new charter will begin. Daniel Alarcón discusses his reporting from Chile with Ray Suarez.  Featuring: Daniel Alarcón, contributing writer at The New Yorker and Executive Producer of Radio Ambulante.  Ray Suarez, co-host of WorldAffairs & Washington reporter for Euronews Reading Material:  Chile at the Barricades, by Daniel Alarcón, The New Yorker If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
05/11/2014m 43s

A Democratic Uprising in Belarus

Fraudulent elections can lead to long term voter apathy and erode democratic institutions. Sometimes, they can fuel widespread protests, and in some countries, revolution. On this episode of the podcast, we examine how a rigged election in Belarus is fueling a democratic uprising. Election observer and University of Missouri political scientist Mary Stegmaier is our guide.   Featuring:  Mary Stegmaier,  Vice Provost for International Programs and Director of the International Center at the University of Missouri Teresa Cotsirilos, WorldAffairs producer   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to WorldAffairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
02/11/2025m 22s

How Elections are Stolen

Voter suppression. Allegations of fraud. Political violence. The whole world is watching the United States’ presidential election, and it feels like democracy itself is on the line. Political scientist and election observer Susan Hyde explains how politicians steal elections, what international observers can do to help, and what happens when voters demand a fair process.   Featuring:  Susan Hyde, professor of political science at UC Berkeley Teresa Cotsirilos, WorldAffairs producer   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to WorldAffairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
31/10/2019m 57s

By Building Roads, China Paves Way for World Domination

As tensions intensify between President Trump and Xi Jinping, China is pursuing its global ambitions through the “Belt and Road Initiative,” a massive global infrastructure project. In her new podcast, former NPR Beijing correspondent Mary Kay Magistad partners with local journalists on five continents to investigate the initiative’s impact. She joins journalist Shuang Li to explain how China tightens its hold on communities by building roads and pipelines around the world.   Guest:  Mary Kay Magistad, Creator & Host, “On China’s New Silk Road” and former East Asia correspondent for NPR, & for PRX's The World Shuang Li, Journalist and documentary filmmaker   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
29/10/2028m 34s

How the US-China Trade Wars Turned Into a Superpower Showdown

The US economy is floundering. Unemployment remains high and Congress is squabbling over a badly needed stimulus package. Meanwhile, China’s gotten its pandemic under control—and its economy is surging. In this episode, we look at China’s economic rise to power. Wall Street Journal correspondent Lingling Wei and her editor, Bob Davis, explain how US-China trade disputes are fueling a new Cold War.   Guests:  Lingling Wei, Reporter, The Wall Street Journal and co-author of "Superpower Showdown" Bob Davis, Senior editor at The Wall Street Journal and co-author of "Superpower Showdown"   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.​
26/10/2031m 27s

John O. Brennan: A Career at the CIA

Former CIA Director John O. Brennan worked at the agency under six different presidents, but he says he never served one quite like Donald Trump. In this episode, he talks with co-host Ray Suarez about Russian interference in US elections, America’s role in the global community, and what it’s really like to work at the CIA.   Guest:  John Brennan, Former Director, Central Intelligence Agency   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
22/10/2025m 17s

Going Undercover with Neo-Nazis

Since the attacks on September 11th, 2001, many Americans associate terrorism with the Middle East. But since 2001, more Americans have actually been killed by domestic terrorists than by any international groups. According to the Department of Homeland Security, white supremacists pose the deadliest terror threat to the United States, and a growing number of homegrown militia groups are mobilizing across the US. In this episode, we talk with former FBI agent Michael German, who argues that structural racism blinded the agency to the threat of white supremacy.   Guests:  Michael German, Brennan Center for Justice at NYC Law School and former FBI agent   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
19/10/2034m 6s

Big Tech and Democracy: What Went Wrong

As we spend time on social media, liking, clicking and scrolling, our behaviors are being monitored and sold.Corporations, governments, and advertisers are spending unprecedented sums of money to collect data about us. Social media algorithms are pushing us toward partisan and extremist views to keep us online as much as possible, and many major events happening around us, like protests and even acts of violence, are started in Facebook groups. How does this process affect democracy? Media Editor at BuzzFeed News Craig Silverman joins co-host Ray Suarez to talk about Facebook, fake news, and where we go from here.   Guest:  Craig Silverman, Media Editor at BuzzFeed News   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
15/10/2029m 14s

Is Google More Like A Country Than A Company?

Governments around the world are struggling to take power back from the world’s biggest tech companies. In the US, House Democrats want to overhaul antitrust laws and force Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google to break into smaller companies. These brands wield a remarkable amount of wealth and power, and Alexis Wichowski has coined a new term for them: “net-states,” or companies that operate as sovereign entities. She joins us for a conversation with Financial Times reporter Patrick McGee about this phenomenon and her new book Information Trade: How Big Tech Conquers Countries, Challenges Our Rights and Transforms Our World.   Guests:  Alexis Wichowski, Deputy Chief Technology Officer, City of New York; Professor, Columbia University Patrick McGee, San Francisco Correspondent, Financial Times   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
12/10/2028m 54s

Is the US Ready for a Post-COVID World Order?

The pandemic has seriously damaged the United States’ credibility abroad. Meanwhile, China is rising, climate change is getting worse, and an ongoing tech revolution is changing the world as we know it. How can the United States rebuild its global leadership in a world that’s changing this fast?  In this episode, Markos Kounalakis talks with academics Rebecca Lissner and Mira Rapp-Hooper, authors of An Open World: How America Can Win the Contest For 21st Century Order, about a new global strategy that could reposition the US in a post-COVID—and possibly post-Trump—world.   Guests: Rebecca Lissner, Assistant Professor, U.S. Naval War College, co-author of An Open World Mira Rapp‑Hooper, Senior Fellow at the Yale Law School’s China Center, co-author of An Open World   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
08/10/2014m 59s

Ben Rhodes on Missing America + Colin Dueck on Conservative Nationalism

With just a few weeks to go before the election, the whole world is holding its collective breath to see what will happen next. Global dynamics have shifted, and American leadership is not what it used to be. Since taking office, President Trump has dramatically changed the country’s priorities, and the US's pandemic response has lowered its global standing considerably. In this episode, we examine two very different ideas for what US Global leadership should look like. Ben Rhodes, a former Obama advisor and the co-host of Pod Save the World, and Colin Dueck, a professor at George Mason University and author of Age of Iron: On Conservative Nationalism talk with Ray Suarez about the foreign policy issues at stake this election.   Guests:  Ben Rhodes, former Deputy National Security Advisor for President Obama and host of Missing America Colin Dueck, Professor at George Mason University and author of Age of Iron: On Conservative Nationalism   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
05/10/2044m 38s

Demystifying Saudi Arabia

When Israel signed deals with two Gulf States earlier this month, Saudi Arabia was notably absent. The regional powerhouse recently opened its airspace to Israel for the very first time, but it still does not have any official diplomatic relations with them. In this episode, avid Rundell, former Chief of Mission at the American Embassy in Riyadh and author of Vision Or Mirage: Saudi Arabia at the Crossroads talks with NPR international correspondent Deborah Amos about the Kingdom, its political intrigues, and the crises it’s managing at home and abroad.   Guests:  Deb Amos, NPR correspondent @deborahamos  David Rundell, former Chief of Mission at the American Embassy in Riyadh and author of Vision Or Mirage: Saudi Arabia at the Crossroads   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
01/10/2028m 22s

A Big Deal, Not a Peace Deal

This month, Israel signed deals with two Gulf States on the White House South Lawn. They’re the first Arab-Israel agreements in 25 years, known as the “Abraham Accords,” and President Trump hailed them as a major foreign policy achievement. So why were the Palestinians missing from the agreements? In this episode, we take a closer look at these deals and how they will affect the peace process in the region.    Guests: Daniel Estrin, NPR Correspondent in Jerusalem @DanielEstrin Khaled Elgindy, Director of the Program on Palestinian - Israeli Affairs at the Middle East Institute and Author of Blind Spot: America and the Palestinians, From Balfour to Trump  @elgindy_If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
28/09/2031m 19s

Climate Resilience and the Next Generation of Activists

As climate change gets worse, it’s hard to imagine a world in which we achieve a fair and sustainable future, But there’s hope. Political leaders around the world are taking action. In this episode, we'll hear from activists and political leaders who discussed climate resiliency at World Affairs’ recent Global Philanthropy Forum. Environmentalist Wanjira Mathai talks to  former Irish President and UN Human Rights Commissioner Mary Robinson about climate resiliency in Africa, and their histories fighting for climate justice. Then we’ll hear from some of the next generation of activists, Vanessa Nakate from Kampala, Uganda and Isha Clarke from Oakland, California, who discuss what motivates them to continue the fight for justice with Jacqueline Patterson of the NAACP.   Guests:  Mary Robinson, Trinity College Dublin, Professor and Former President of Ireland Wanjira Mathai, World Resources Institute, Vice President and Regional Director for Africa @MathaiWanjira  Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the Environmental and Climate Justice Program, NAACP @JacquiPatt Isha Clarke, Youth vs Apocalypse, Co-Founder and Activist Vanessa Nakate, First Fridays for Future, Climate Activist @vanessa_vash   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
24/09/2037m 46s

Climate Change Is Getting Worse. Where Will You Go?

This week, we’re launching an ongoing series about our climate future. Climate change is making global inequality worse, hitting low income communities and communities of color harder than everyone else. Just look at California, where wildfires have burned to the edges of farm country and agricultural workers are still going to work, risking heat and smoke to pick our food. This is an essential workforce, mostly Latinx, that has spent decades fighting for better labor protections. In this episode, we hear from activists who are now raising concerns that 2020's wildfires, in the midst of a pandemic, are triggering unsafe working conditions. Fires and other natural disasters have also triggered a wave of climate refugees that will continue to grow. Environmental Justice Foundation’s Steve Trent and The Institute for Climate and Peace’s Maxine Burkett will also join us to talk about protecting human rights for climate refugees.   Guests:  Steve Trent, Environmental Justice Foundation, Executive Director @steventrent  Maxine Burke, The Institute for Climate and Peace, Co-Founder and Senior Advisor Zeke Guzman, President of Latinos Unidos Omar Paz, lead organizer for North Bay Jobs with Justice, @NorthBayJwJ David Hornung, Senior Safety Engineer with California’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) @CA_DIR   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
21/09/2021m 38s

Universal Basic Income, Pt. 2: From Stockton to Juneau

Universal Basic Income is an idea that has long been studied by economists as a way to ensure a basic standard of living for all people. Most of the studies have taken place outside the United States, but this year, in the city of Stockton, California, 125 residents have been receiving $500 payments every month for the past year as part of a UBI pilot program. On this episode of the podcast, Ray Suarez talks with Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs and Nobel prize-winning economist Abhijit Banerjee about the viability of a Universal Basic Income. Then, Teresa Cotsirilos takes us to Alaska, where every resident gets an annual dividend from the government.   Guests:  Michael Tubbs, Mayor of Stockton, California & founder of Mayors for a Guaranteed Income @MichaelDTubbs Abhijit Banerjee, Nobel Prize winning economist at MIT & co-author of Good Economics for Hard Times Rashah McChesney, Alaska's Energy Desk - Juneau, Alaska Public Media   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
17/09/2033m 13s

Universal Basic Income, Pt. 1: Does it Work?

What if we could lower COVID-19 rates all over the world with one program? It’s not a medical innovation, but an economic one. If all the world’s countries distribute a temporary basic income, could we slow the spread of the coronavirus? The idea was recently floated by United Nations Development Program, and it’s. In its report, UNDP says many people are too poor to shelter in place even when they are sick.  Staying home can be a choice between hunger and exposure to the coronavirus...and the consequences of their decisions affect us all. UNDP Administrator Achim Steiner makes the case for a temporary basic income that would enable nearly three billion of the world’s poorest people to stay home. The idea is built upon the concept of a Universal Basic Income (UBI), something economists have studied and debated for decades. Tech entrepreneurs like Andrew Yang are only making it more popular, something economists have studied for decades. Tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang ran for president on a promise of a $1,000 per month UBI for every American adult. He called it the Freedom Dividend. On this episode, we explore a Basic Income project in Kenya.   Guest:  Tavneet Suri, MIT Sloan School of Management & Editor in Chief of VoxDev @SuriTavneet   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
14/09/2026m 12s

From Oakland to Johannesburg: Can We Reform the Police?

The United States is three months into a mass movement against police violence. We are the midst of a  national conversation about the relationship between law enforcement and communities of color, but the fight over defining the problem of systemic racism, and how to fix it, is only intensifying. In the first half of this episode, Teresa Cotsirilos brings us the story of Jinho “The Piper” Ferreira, a hip-hop artist who lost a friend to police violence and still chose to join law enforcement. Next, we look at how South Africa has grappled with its legacy of white supremacy and police brutality. With the end of Apartheid in 1994, the police were supposed to be reformed, but a quarter-century later, South Africa is still struggling with this issue. Ray Suarez talks with Stan Henkeman, Executive Director of the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation in South Africa, and John Steinberg, Professor of African Studies at Oxford University, about policing in South Africa today.   Guests:  Stan Henkeman, Executive director of the Institute and Reconciliation in South Africa Jonny Steinberg, African Studies Professor, at Oxford University Jinho “The Piper” Ferriera, musician, actor and former Alameda County Sheriff’s Deputy If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
07/09/2059m 1s

Will Democratic Capitalism Survive?

As inequality rises around the world, some citizens are losing faith in the liberal democratic capitalism that emerged in the 20th century. Protests from the United States to Belarus share themes of resentment towards economic policies that are seen as inherently unfair. Stanford University’s Larry Diamond and Francis Fukuyama join Ray Suarez and Philip Yun to discuss what’s at stake for liberal democracy and the changing world order.   Guests:  Larry Diamond, Stanford University and author of Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency Francis Fukuyama, Stanford University and author of Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
31/08/2059m 1s

Why We Still Need to Talk About White Supremacy

It’s been three months since George Floyd was killed by a white police officer in Minnesota. The movement prompted an outpouring from lawmakers in Canada and Australia, and protests started in countries that share the United States’ colonial history. Now that the protests have started to slow down, how do we enact effective policies? The Black Lives Matter movement is calling to redirect police funding toward education and public services. Ideas that once seemed radical are now being discussed by politicians both on the local and federal levels. Historian Nell Irvin Painter and anthropologist Christen Smith join Ray Suarez to talk about the global Black Lives Matter movement, policing in the Western Hemisphere and why it’s important to understand the role white supremacy has played in building our institutions.    Nell Irvin Painter, American historian, artist, author of numerous books including The History of White People and Professor of American History Emerita at Princeton University Christen Smith, Associate Professor of Anthropology and African and African Diaspora Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, founder of Cite Black Women and author of Afro Paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
24/08/2059m 1s

Why Women Are The Secret To International Development

After the Rwandan genocide, 70 percent of the country’s surviving population were women. They propelled the country’s reconciliation process and fostered its economic development. Today, life expectancies in Rwanda have doubled… and its parliament is majority female. Karen Sherman has witnessed many of these changes. She’s the president of Akilah, a college in Rwanda that provides affordable higher education for women, and she has interviewed thousands of women in war-torn and transitional countries. She joins us on the podcast to talk about her memoir Brick by Brick: Building Hope and Opportunity for Women Survivors Everywhere that covers her experience in global development.   Guests:  Karen Sherman, President, Akilah Institute  Linda Calhoun, Executive Producer, Career Girls   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
20/08/2021m 34s

Africa Got Ready For COVID-19, Are We Too Late?

In the United States, the pandemic is getting worse than we ever could have imagined. Many of our political leaders underestimated the virus… And as they fumbled the country’s initial response, developing nations with far fewer resources got prepared. This week, we’re looking at Uganda and Rwanda, two countries who have fought pandemics before and were ready for this one. Both countries have lost very few people to the virus. How did they do it?   Guests: Stephen Asiimwe, Program Director, Global Health Collaborative, Uganda Agnes Binagwaho, Vice Chancellor at the University of Global Health Equity, former Minister of Health, Rwanda   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
17/08/2037m 36s

Communism vs. COVID-19

Vietnam may have limited resources to stop the spread of the coronavirus, but it’s made up for it with proactive policies and manpower. The country mobilized tens of thousands of military personnel, health care workers and ordinary citizens to fight COVID-19. This level of collective action requires a unified front, and though it was ultimately successful, Vietnam is still an authoritarian country that weathered a 20-year, famous civil war. There are plenty of Vietnamese people who, with good reason, don’t trust their government, and our guest on the podcast, Nguyen Qui Duc, is one of them. He’s a journalist and restaurant owner who joined us to describe his experience in Vietnam during a global pandemic.   Guest:  Duc Qui Nguyen, journalist and restaurant owner   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
13/08/2017m 19s

How Southeast Asia Flattened the COVID-19 Curve

With 5 million recorded COVID-19  infections and 160,000 deaths, the coronavirus has paralyzed the United States…the richest, most powerful country in the world. We know it was preventable because at the same time, some countries with far fewer resources have kept infection and death rates remarkably low. Even with its close proximity to China, where the pandemic started, parts of Southeast Asia have managed to control the coronavirus far better than the US and Europe. What are Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Myanmar doing that the rest of the world finds itself unable to do? In this episode, we hear from New York Times Southeast Asia Bureau Chief Hannah Beech, Country Director for the Partnership for Health Advancement in Vietnam Dr. Todd Pollock and Director of the Oxford University clinical research unit in Vietnam Guy Thwaites about the quick decision making that went into these countries’ successes. What can we learn from them?   Guests: Hannah Beech, NYTimes Southeast Asia Bureau Chief, based in Bangkok, Thailand @hkbeech Dr. Todd Pollock, Country Director for the Partnership for Health Advancement in Vietnam @toddmpollack Guy Thwaites, Professor of infectious diseases and the director of the Oxford University clinical research unit in Vietnam @ThwaitesGuy   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.  
10/08/2043m 18s

MS-13 and El Salvador's World of Violence

How did El Salvador become one of the most violent countries on earth? And what role did the United States play in creating the notorious MS-13 gang? In this episode, we revisit and update a program we recorded in January about the origins of El Salvador’s bloody gang war with journalist William Wheeler and Joanne Elgart Jennings. Wheeler spoke with gang members, frustrated reformers, crime investigators and government officials to better understand the violence in the country and what is driving Salvadorans northward. His book is: “State of War: MS-13 and El Salvador’s World of Violence.”    Guest:  William Wheeler, journalist and author of State of War: MS-13 and El Salvador’s World of Violence Moderator: Joanne Elgart Jennings, executive producer & co-host   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
03/08/2059m 1s

Putin's Russia and the War in Afghanistan

After nearly twenty years of conflict, the United States is, once again, attempting to extricate itself from Afghanistan. This year, the US and the Taliban signed an agreement that was intended to be a first step towards an intra-Afghan peace deal and US forces began withdrawing troops. But for the time being, the peace process remains tenuous, and Afghanistan is still being used by Russia and the US as proxy war. Over the past few years, Russia has tried to present itself as an ascendant global power, expanding its influence in Syria, Ukraine, as well as Afghanistan. But Putin's government is also grappling with a raging pandemic and an economic crisis. Markos Kounalakis recently discussed Russia's delicate political moment with Steven Pifer.  He was ambassador to Ukraine, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, and was a senior director for Russia and Eurasia at the National Security Council.   Guest: Steven Pifer, William J Perry Fellow at Stanford, nonresident Brookings fellow and former US Ambassador to Ukraine   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
30/07/2029m 21s

America’s Longest War

United States forces have been fighting in Afghanistan for almost twenty years, making it the longest war in American history. But for many Americans, the conflict only became top of mind again after hearing reports that a Russian military intelligence unit offered bounty money to the Taliban for killing US soldiers. In this episode, we take a closer look at how the war in Afghanistan has served as a proxy conflict between the US and Russia and how it fits into Russia’s global agenda. Former US Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry joins co-host Ray Suarez, followed by a conversation with Jennifer Glasse of Al Jazeera.   Guests:  Jennifer Glasse, Senior Managing Editor at the Americas at Al Jazeera Karl Eikenberry, former US Ambassador to Afghanistan, retired US Army Lieutenant General   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
27/07/2033m 46s

Why Hong Kong is Protesting Again

Protesters are back in the streets in Hong Kong to fight against a new security law that tightens the Chinese government’s  grip over the city. On this week’s episode, we look at how Hong Kong’s new security law will impact US-China relations, and what it means for the millions of people who live there. First, we’ll hear from Human Rights Watch’s China Director, Sophie Richardson, who argues that US-China relations are at their worst point since the Cold War. Will this new law make them worse? Next, an activist and artist from Hong Kong discusses the evolution of her city’s protest movement. Then, we revisit a conversation with journalist Mary Kay Magistad and professor Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a historian specializing in modern China. They unpack the history of Hong Kong and how the city got to where it is today.    Guests:  Mary Kay Magistad, former East Asia correspondent for NPR & Director of Audio Journalism at UC Berkeley Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Professor at UC Irvine and author of Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink Sophie Richardson, China Director at Human Rights Watch and author of China, Cambodia, and the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence Claire, artist and activist from Hong Kong If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
20/07/2059m 1s

Policing After Apartheid: Lessons From South Africa

The United States is in the midst of a national conversation about the role systemic racism plays in law enforcement, but police brutality is not just an American problem. In this episode, we look at how South Africa has grappled with its own legacy of white supremacy and police violence. Under Apartheid, South Africa’s white leaders used the police as an instrument of control, enforcing a web of laws that bound black lives. When liberation came with the end of Apartheid, the police were supposedly reformed. Now, a quarter-center later, has anything changed? Co-host Ray Suarez talks with Stan Henkeman, Executive Director of the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation in South Africa, and John Steinberg, Professor of African Studies at Oxford University, about South Africa’s cautionary tale of police reforms made after Apartheid.   Guests:  Stan Henkeman, Executive director of the Institute and Reconciliation in South Africa Jonny Steinberg, African Studies Professor, at Oxford University Credits: Philip Yun, President and CEO, WorldAffairs Ray Suarez, co-host, WorldAffairs Teresa Cotsirilos, producer, WorldAffairs Jarrod Sport, senior producer, WorldAffairs Joanne Elgart Jennings, executive producer, WorldAffairs   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.  
16/07/2029m 11s

Jinho’s Journey: Fighting Police Violence From the Inside

Black Lives Matter might be the largest social movement in American history. Last month, an estimated 15-25 million people took to the streets to protest police violence, launching a national conversation about the role systemic racism plays in law enforcement. In this episode, producer Teresa Cotsirilos tells the story of a man whose past experiences with the police drove him to fight for justice from the inside. Jinho Ferreira, also known as “The Piper,” discusses his childhood in West Oakland, his experiences working in law enforcement and what it means to be an artist in a moment of radical change. Guest:  Jinho Ferreira, artist, actor and former Alameda County Sheriff’s Deputy Credits: Teresa Cotsirilos, producer Jarrod Sport, senior producer Joanne Elgart Jennings, executive producer Philip Yun, President and CEO If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
11/07/2029m 57s

The Global Economy After COVID-19

Over the past few months, we’ve had to reimagine everything we do. From shopping, to eating and socializing, the ways we spend money have completely changed. And as each country manages the pandemic differently, the already fragile global economy has been disrupted by broken supply chains and shifts in demand. Now we’re questioning the role of the government, the future of capitalism and changing our values. The choices we make now could change the world for decades. On this week’s episode, we tackle these big issues and examine our new digital economy with James Manyika, Chairman and Director of the McKinsey Global Institute, Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor at Allianz, and Gillian Tett, Editor at Large at the Financial Times.     James Manyika, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company; Chairman and Director, McKinsey Global Institute   Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz   Gillian Tett, Chair of Editorial Board and Editor-at-Large, US, Financial Times   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
06/07/2059m 1s

Is the United Nations Still Relevant at 75?

Seventy-five years ago, delegates from 50 countries met in San Francisco to sign the UN Charter. Initially, the purpose of the United Nations was to maintain peace and security through international cooperation and to essentially prevent another world war.  Today’s UN has 193 member countries and is facing a time of uncertainty and open disdain from US President Donald Trump, who has cut funding to the world body and declared, “The future does not belong to globalists. The future belongs to patriots.” On this week’s episode, we look at the UN’s achievements, its shortcomings and what the future holds for international cooperation with journalist James Traub. Then Ray Suarez talks with former Prime Minister of Canada The Rt. Hon Kim Campbell and former Foreign Minister of Mexico Jorge Castañeda about how the United States is viewed by its neighbors.    Jorge Castañeda, former Foreign Minister of Mexico and author of America Through Foreign Eyes The Hon Rt. Kim Campbell, Canada's 19th Prime Minister James Traub,  fellow at New York University’s Center on International Cooperation, author of The Best Intentions: Kofi Annan and the UN in the Era of American World Power and regular contributor to Foreign Affairs and the New York Times Magazine If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
29/06/2059m 1s

The Struggle To Test and Trace COVID-19

Some countries are using smartphones and facial recognition to track COVID-19 outbreaks, but here, in the US, we’re starting with simple phone calls. On this week’s episode, we take a closer look at contact tracing in California and what it might look like into the future. We also hear from San Francisco Bay Area activists about the risks of protesting during a pandemic and how to protect yourself and others. Dr. George Rutherford, Director of Prevention & Public Health at University of California at San Francisco Melissa Millsaps, Investigator at San Francisco City Attorney's Office Jon Jocobo, Latino Task Force for COVID-19 Cat Brooks,  Justice Teams Network and co-founder of the Anti-Police Terror Project If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
25/06/2024m 58s

National COVID-19 Testing: A Roadmap to Reopening?

Can we contain COVID-19 without a vaccine? Congress allocated $25 Billion for COVID-19 testing this year, but Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul M. Romer, says  that’s a fraction of what we need. On this week’s podcast, he and epidemiologist Dr. Jonathan Quick join co-host Ray Suarez to talk about what it would take to use testing and tracing to contain the virus safely reopen the US. Paul M. Romer, Co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economics and Professor at New York University Dr. Jonathan Quick, Managing Director, Pandemic Response at The Rockefeller Foundation and author of The End of Pandemics: The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
22/06/2034m 33s

White Supremacy, at Home and Abroad

The outrage of the last two weeks has made it clear that we are at a moment of national reckoning. The Black Lives Matter movement is calling to abolish the police and redirect police funding toward education and public services. Ideas that once seemed radical are now being discussed by politicians both on the local and federal level. On this week’s episode, historian Nell Irvin Painter and anthropologist Christen Smith join Ray Suarez to talk about the global Black Lives Matter movement, policing in the Western Hemisphere and why it’s important to understand the role white supremacy has played in building our institutions.  If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
15/06/2058m 23s

Fiona Hill: Full Interview

Fiona Hill was President Trump’s top Russia advisor on the National Security Council and testified during his impeachment hearings that Russia systematically attacked America’s democratic institutions in 2016. On this episode of the podcast, Hill says Russia is poised to meddle in the 2020 election and she says that America’s divisive politics make us vulnerable to a “hacking of the minds.”  In an expansive interview with Mina Kim, Hill talks about Vladimir Putin’s plans to hold onto power and how he stokes America’s political divisions to advance his causes. If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
09/06/2040m 44s

Fiona Hill and Putin’s People

The United States presidential election is only months away and intelligence officials warn that the risk of Russian interference in our political system is high. On this week’s episode, Fiona Hill, who was a top Russia advisor under three presidents, talks with KQED’s Mina Kim about how Vladimir Putin uses our internal divisions to his advantage. And co-host Ray Suarez discusses Putin’s rise to power and the nationwide vote on a constitutional amendment that would allow him to rule Russia for another 16 years with Reuters correspondent Catherine Belton. They also discuss her new book, Putin's People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took On the West.  If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
06/06/2059m 1s

Don't Be Evil: Has Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles -- and All of Us?

"Don’t be evil." It’s an iconic phrase that was written into Google’s code of conduct during the early days of the company. It conveyed a utopian vision for technology that would make the world better, safer and more prosperous. But twenty years later, has big tech lived up to its founding principles or has it lost its soul? Rana Foroohar, Global Business Columnist at The Financial Times and Global Economic Analyst at CNN, documents the bigger implications for how tech companies now operate.  In her conversation with World Affairs CEO, Philip Yun, Foroohar looks at the extent to which the FAANGs (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google) threaten democracies, livelihoods and our thinking.  If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
01/06/2059m 1s

Reimagining Capitalism in a World on Fire

Harvard Business School professor Rebecca Henderson talks with Markos Kounalakis about how to reimagine capitalism in a way that aligns with our moral and ethical values. Henderson says it’s not only possible, but it’s profitable to move beyond an obsessive focus on shareholder value to solve global problems like income inequality, climate change, and the coronavirus pandemic. How can capitalism drive systemic change worldwide? If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
26/05/2030m 24s

Leading in a Pandemic: How New Zealand eliminated COVID-19 while the United States is leaving people behind

What does it take to avoid the worst of the pandemic and allow a country to return to some sense of normalcy? Producer Teresa Cotsirilos and Radio New Zealand’s Indira Stewart explain how Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern managed to nearly eradicate the virus from New Zealand. And New York Times Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nicholas Kristof has been sheltering in place in his home town of Yamhill, Oregon. Already devastated by the opioid epidemic, working class communities like Yamhill are reeling as the pandemic exacerbates America’s inequities. To learn more about Yamhill, check out Kristoff and co-author Sheryl WuDunn’s book Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope. If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
23/05/2028m 21s

The Global Struggle to Reopen

When the novel coronavirus began to spread beyond China, we were told to stay home and flatten the curve. Many countries have been able to do that, to varying degrees, so what happens next? On this week’s episode, we’re taking a look at how governments around the world are struggling to re-open their economies. Timothy Martin, the Korea bureau chief at the Wall Street Journal, updates us on the latest outbreak in South Korea, a country being praised for how well it’s handled the pandemic. NPR reporters Joanna Kakissis and Rob Schmitz, explain how Germany and Greece may have avoided the worst of it, but are struggling to keep cases down during their reopenings. And former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, coronavirus advisor to former Vice President Joe Biden and  author of the new book, Fast Carbs, Slow Carbs, David Kessler, discusses lessons learned during the HIV/AIDS pandemic that could inform the search for  COVID-19 vaccines and drug treatments.   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
18/05/2058m 32s

Life Undercover in the CIA

At the age of 22, Amaryllis Fox was recruited to work for the CIA, making her one of the youngest female operators in the CIA’s history. After training, Fox was deployed to the Middle East where she infiltrated networks to disrupt acts of terrorism and stop illegal sales of arms and explosives. In her memoir, Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA, she emphasizes that her biggest strength was her ability to connect with terrorists on a personal level rather than through tough negotiations. Out of government for over 10 years, she is now a peace activist and a mother. Fox sat down with KQED journalist Mina Kim to share her fascinating story of her time in the clandestine world of spycraft and how her perspective about her work at the CIA has evolved since she left.   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
11/05/2059m 1s

North Korea, Russia and the Nuclear Threat

As we’ve learned from this pandemic, human beings can act quickly in the face of immediate danger. However, we’re not so good at taking action against slow-moving threats. The threat posed by nuclear weapons is now as high as it’s been since the Cold War. This week on WorldAffairs, we talk about North Korea with veteran aid worker Katharina Zellweger, Pulitzer-nominated journalist Jean Lee and North Korean defector Joseph Kim. We also discuss Russia and nuclear proliferation with Dr. Ernest Moniz, who served as Secretary of Energy in the Obama Administration. If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you. Host: Philip Yun Producer: Teresa Cotsirilos Senior producer: Jarrod Sport Executive producer: Joanne Elgart Jennings
02/05/2059m 1s

Undocumented and Essential

While many of us are able to shelter in place through the pandemic, immigrants are disproportionately on the front lines, working essential jobs such as nurses, EMTs, home health aides and doctors. About 27,000 of these healthcare workers are adult children of undocumented immigrants that are authorized to work under an Obama-era program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Their future hangs in the balance as they await a US Supreme Court ruling on whether the Trump administration can legally end the program. And, for the many foreign born health workers, who have legal documentation, their ability to send remittances to families in their home countries has been compromised by the pandemic. On this week’s episode, we hear from immigrant healthcare workers, journalists and representatives from non-profits who are fighting for workers’ rights.  If you appreciate this program and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to serve the public and high school students and connect them to critical global issues – engaging and informing them along the way.
27/04/2058m 35s

A Nurse's Journey

While many of us are able to shelter in place through the pandemic, immigrants are disproportionately on the front lines, working essential jobs such as nurses, EMTs, home health aides and doctors. For the many foreign born health workers, who have legal documentation, their ability to send remittances to families in their home countries has been compromised by the pandemic. On this week’s episode, we hear from: Rosalie Villanueva, nurse in Galveston, Texas Jason DeParle, New York Times Global Poverty Reporter and Author of A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves: One Family and Migration in the 21st Century Host: Ray Suarez Producer: Teresa Cotsirilos Senior producer: Jarrod Sport Executive producer: Joanne Elgart Jennings If you appreciate this program and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to serve the public and connect high school students  to critical global issues.
25/04/2014m 17s

Our Economic Future + The Truth about the Deep State

How will we navigate a historic global recession? On this week’s episode, Financial Times US editor-at-large Gillian Tett talks with Markos Kounalakis about how this economic breakdown might unfold in the next few months. Next, New Yorker executive editor David Rohde talks about his new book IN DEEP, which investigates whether there really is a “deep state” controlling parts of the US government. He examines whether President Trump’s belief in the “Deep State” impeded the administration’s Coronavirus response. And last, filmmaker Jun Stinson and founder of Futbolistas 4 Life, Dania Cabello, join us to share their story of uplifting a community of undocumented youth in Oakland through soccer. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
18/04/2058m 32s

Using a Pandemic to Consolidate Power

Around the world, governments are limiting freedoms by requiring people to stay home and prohibiting large gatherings. Though many of these actions are necessary, authoritarian regimes are using the pandemic as an excuse to abuse their power. In Egypt, for example, many citizens are encouraged to shelter in place, yet the realities of the outbreak are being censored. Also of concern is an economy that’s largely dependent on the informal sector, making social distancing a luxury. Now that large gatherings are prohibited in most countries, causing huge economic losses, cultural practices are also being disrupted. Will sports games continue without audiences? This week on WorldAffairs, we talk about how journalism, sports and religion persist through a global crisis. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
11/04/2058m 34s

Saudi Arabia: Mecca is empty + Oil is Cheap

Now that the global economy is mostly on hold, the demand for oil has dropped dramatically, destroying the market and threatening countries whose economies depend on selling it. Saudi Arabia and Russia have been engaged in an oil-price war to keep the markets in their favor. Saudi Arabia saw another economic loss when the kingdom decided to limit access to the holy cities of Mecca and Medina. Meanwhile, violence in some of the most at risk countries rages on. In Yemen, preventable diseases like cholera already threaten people with limited access to healthcare and basic necessities. Would a global ceasefire help war-torn countries like Yemen manage their coronavirus outbreaks? On this week’s episode, we talk with experts from around the world about Yemen, oil and Saudi Arabia. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
04/04/2058m 45s

Coronavirus Global Update + Virtual Art

On this week’s episode, we check in with correspondents and artists from around the world. Dr. Erica Ollmann Saphire was instrumental in organizing a global effort to defeat Ebola. Can her team do it again for COVID-19? Co-host Ray Suarez also talks with journalists in Italy and South Africa, who are watching their countries’ responses to the pandemic closely. And though it feels like the rest of the world has come to a complete stop, artists have found creative ways to collaborate and keep us entertained. Members of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra created a virtual performance of Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring, which was commissioned in 1942 in a world at war. And lastly, photojournalist Caroline Gutman talks about her new exhibit, the Rhythm of Indigo, which documents indigenous Miao communities in China working to preserve centuries-old handicraft traditions at risk of disappearing. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
30/03/2058m 37s

The Making of a Virtual Symphony + The Rhythm of Indigo

On this bonus episode, we get behind the scenes of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s virtual performance of Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring. It was the brainchild of Principal Double Bass Jeffrey Beecher.  Then we take you to the remote and mountainous villages of Guizhou Province, China, where indigenous Miao communities are working to preserve centuries-old handicraft traditions that are at risk of disappearing. Our guide is Caroline Gutman, photojournalist and co-founder of Nu Market. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
28/03/2011m 39s

Coronavirus: Were We Warned? + US - China Relations

Breaking news about novel coronavirus is dominating headlines, making the context we need to understand it more important than ever. This week, as the virus redefines every aspect of our lives, we’re turning to the experts to help us understand where we were before the news of COVID-19 hit and how we ended up where we are today. What can we learn from past pandemics? How will this change our relationship with China, where this all began? First, we have Dr. Peter Piot, Director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to discuss the Spanish flu, his experiences fighting the Ebola outbreak, including, what a resilient global health system looks like and what needs to happen to be prepared for a pandemic. Next, we hear from David M. Lampton, of the Stanford Spogli Freeman Institute, to discuss the complicated history behind the US - China relationship. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
20/03/2058m 32s

How Taiwan Contained Coronavirus + Global News

Taiwan is just 81 miles from mainland China, but it has managed to prevent an outbreak of the rapidly spreading COVID-19 disease. Stanford University’s Dr. Jason Wang explains how Taiwan acted quickly, aggressively and strategically to prevent the type of outbreaks and death rates we’re now seeing around the world. We also hear from William Yang, Taipei correspondent for Deutsche-Welle.   Today’s unrelenting coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic can feel overwhelming. Though it may seem like the world around us has come to a stop, major global events march on. Stories about U.S. airstrikes against an Iran-backed militia in Iraq and Vladimir Putin’s new plan to become president for life may not be front page news today, but they will inevitably demand our attention soon. This week on the podcast, Deb Amos, international correspondent for NPR and Michele Kelemen, NPR’s diplomatic correspondent, talk with Ray Suarez about the world’s most important stories that you might have missed.   We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
14/03/2058m 20s

Coronavirus: Bracing for a Global Pandemic

The World Health Organization is warning all countries to take the threat of a coronavirus global pandemic seriously as governments around the world are scrambling to effectively contain the spread of COVID-19. Local health officials worldwide are preparing for widespread outbreaks while encouraging citizens to remain calm. Financial markets are bracing for the worst as many schools and corporate offices are closing their doors. On this week’s episode, Ray Suarez talks with Larry Brilliant, a renowned epidemiologist, credited with playing a major role in eradicating smallpox, and Pulitzer Prize-winning global health journalist Laurie Garrett. We also get dispatches from Rafael Suarez in China, Christopher Livesay in Italy and Peter Kenyon, who recently returned from Iran. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
06/03/2056m 31s

MS-13 and El Salvador's World of Violence

How did El Salvador become one of the most violent countries on earth? And what role did the United States play in creating the notorious MS-13 gang? On this week’s episode, we explore the origins of El Salvador’s bloody gang war with journalist William Wheeler. Wheeler spoke with gang members, frustrated reformers, crime investigators and government officials to better understand the violence in the country and what is driving El Salvadorans northward and for his new book: “State of War: MS-13 and El Salvador’s World of Violence.” He is in conversation with World Affairs executive producer Joanne Elgart Jennings. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
03/03/2058m 27s

Syria’s "The Cave"

The deadly civil war in Syria has raged for almost a decade. For besieged civilians, accessing basic services, like health care, comes with extraordinary risks. In his Academy Award® nominated documentary film, The Cave, director Feras Fayyad reveals a world of hope and safety inside a subterranean hospital. The hospital’s director is 29-year-old Dr. Amani Ballour. In a patriarchal society, she is a force and an inspiration as she keeps the hospital running through air bombardments, chronic food shortages and the threat of chemical attacks. Ray Suarez talks with Fayyad and Ballour about the National Geographic film and the current situation in Syria. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
25/02/2035m 32s

Namaste Trump

US - India relations are back in the spotlight as President Trump travels to the world’s largest democracy. The visit comes as India faces the slowest economic growth since 2009 and social unrest against Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government, which has been pushing a Hindu nationalist agenda. Ray Suarez gets a debrief from Tanvi Madan, director of the India Project at The Brookings Institution and author of Fateful Triangle: How China Shaped U.S.-India Relations During the Cold War. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
22/02/2026m 23s

Hong Kong on the Brink

Are we witnessing the end of Hong Kong as we know it - or is this the biggest challenge yet to China’s authoritarian rule? This week on the podcast, we’re looking at what’s driving the protests in Hong Kong and why the demonstrations have persisted for so long. We walk through the history of Hong Kong, right up to today with: Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history at UC Irvine and author of Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink, and former East Asia Correspondent for NPR and PRI’s The World, Mary Kay Magistad. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
18/02/2059m 1s

WuDunn and Kristof’s Hope for Working Class America

American kids today are 55 percent more likely to die by the age of nineteen than children who grow up in other industrialized countries. Is the American dream an outdated one? Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn explore this question in their latest book, "Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope." It chronicles the lives of people Kristof grew up with in rural Oregon, where roughly a quarter of the children who rode the school bus with him, died in adulthood from drugs, alcohol, suicide or accidents. In conversation with KQED’s Mina Kim, Kristoff and WuDunn discuss why so many Americans are struggling with poverty, addiction and depression despite living in the wealthiest country in the world. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
11/02/2059m 1s

Ukraine Explained

One question at the heart of the impeachment case against Donald Trump is whether the president threatened to withhold US military assistance from Ukraine. In this episode, we explore why the US has been supporting Ukraine in Europe’s only active war and why Ukraine needs help defending itself against Russian aggression. John E. Herbst, Atlantic Council and former US Ambassador to Ukraine, Oxana Shevel, Tufts University, and Simon Ostrovsky, Filmmaker and Journalist at the PBS NewsHour, speak with Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
04/02/2058m 51s

Border Wars: The Stakes of the Trump Administration's Immigration Policy

President Trump made building a border wall between the US and Mexico a cornerstone of his 2016 presidential campaign. Since taking office, he has called for a travel ban on people from Muslim countries.  He has limited the rights of asylum seekers and presided over a family separation crisis at the southern border. New York Times journalists Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Michael Shear discuss the decisions and the ideologies shaping US immigration policy with  WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
28/01/2059m 1s

Is Liberal Capitalism at Risk of Failing in 2020?

Protests from Paris to Santiago share themes of resentment towards economic policies that are seen as inherently unfair. These very public demonstrations show how, in many countries, citizens are losing faith in free market democracy, which emerged triumphant over communism and fascism in the 20th century. As the new world order is being reshaped, which form of government and governance will be ascendant? Stanford University’s Larry Diamond and Francis Fukuyama join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss what’s at stake for liberal market democracy and the changing world order. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
21/01/2059m 1s

Iran - United States Tensions

The killing of Iran’s most important general by an American drone and a subsequent Iranian missile attack on US assets inside Iraq, threatened to bring the United States and Iran closer to war than at any time since the hostage crisis in 1979. The U.S and Iran may have taken a step back from the brink, but underlying tensions between the two nations remain. In this episode, we look at the circumstances that led to this escalation. And we get an overview of how recent events impact the balance of power in the Persian Gulf. What are the strategic implications for Iran, the Middle East and the World? Vali Nasr of Johns Hopkins University, Barbara Slavin of the Future of Iran Initiative at the Atlantic Council and NPR’s Jane Arraf join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to talk about what US actions mean for the Middle East and the rest of the world. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
14/01/2059m 1s

Don't Be Evil: Has Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles -- and All of Us?

"Don’t be evil." It’s an iconic phrase that was written into Google’s code of conduct during the early days of the company. It conveyed a utopian vision for technology that would make the world better, safer and more prosperous. But twenty years later, has big tech lived up to its founding principles or has it lost its soul? Rana Foroohar, Global Business Columnist at The Financial Times and Global Economic Analyst at CNN, documents the bigger implications for how tech companies now operate.  In her conversation with World Affairs CEO, Philip Yun, Foroohar looks at the extent to which the FAANGs (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google) threaten democracies, livelihoods and our thinking. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
07/01/2059m 1s

Bonus Episode: Meet World Affairs’ New CEO, Philip Yun

After 21 years as CEO and host of WorldAffairs, Jane Wales has moved on to join the Aspen Institute. In this bonus episode, Jane says farewell and sits down with Philip Yun, WorldAffairs’ new CEO, for a brief conversation about his vision for the future of WorldAffairs. While working on North Korea policy under President Clinton, he learned that context matters. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
06/01/206m 20s

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 3: Policy and Polity

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This is the third episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. Governments are accused of letting the social safety net disintegrate for the many while facilitating vast economic gains for the few. An ever-expanding wealth gap has reinforced these views. Jason Furman, economics professor at Harvard, and Gillian Tett, US managing editor for the Financial Times, discuss what role governments can play in forging solutions with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
31/12/1959m 1s

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 2: Corporate Interests: Shareholder or Stakeholder?

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This is the second episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective.  Since deregulation in the 1980’s, the only stakeholder that has mattered to business is the shareholder. Jay Coen Gilbert, co-founder of B-Lab, and Colin Mayer, professor at Oxford University and author of “Prosperity: Better Businesses Makes The Greater Good,” discuss why the corporate culture may be at an inflection point with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
24/12/1959m 1s

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 1: We, the People

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This week and for the following 2 weeks, we’re featuring a 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective.  What forces caused the social contract to break and more importantly, what can citizens do to rebuild it? Tom Nichols, professor at the Naval War College and author of The Death of Expertise, and Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media, discuss why the people matter in rebuilding social trust with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
17/12/1959m 1s

Ratcheting up the Pressure: Assessing the Risks of Trump's Iran Policy

In May 2018, President Trump withdrew the United States from the Iran nuclear deal, and re-imposed crippling economic sanctions against Tehran. Iran responded by restarting elements of its nuclear program and sponsoring militant attacks against US interests and allies in the Middle East. Trump claims he will keep the pressure on until Iran agrees to a better nuclear deal, while Iranian leaders insist they will not negotiate under duress. Colin Kahl, Steven C. Házy senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies' Center for International Security and Cooperation and former national security advisor to the vice president of the United States, speaks with WorldAffairs CEO Jane Wales about Trump's Iran strategy and how it risks igniting war with the country. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
10/12/1959m 1s

280 Characters or Less: Leadership and Governance in the Age of Social Media

Globally, social media is playing an increasingly important role in politics. Not only does it determine our political discussions, it has transformed the way politicians communicate with both the public and each other. On this week’s episode, we’re discussing leadership and governance in 280 characters or less with Matthias Lüfkens, founder of Twiplomacy, and Charlie Warzel, op-ed journalist for The New York Times. They're in conversation with Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution about the changed nature of political communication in the age of social media. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
03/12/1959m 1s

The Power of Protest

Protesters have flooded downtown Hong Kong over the last six months, winning concessions and even adding to their demands. Experts say protests like these have proliferated around the world in recent years. But can they lead to lasting change? On this week’s episode of WorldAffairs, Richard Youngs, senior fellow at Carnegie Europe and and the author of “Civic Activism Unleashed: New Hope or False Dawn for Democracy?,” discusses what the explosion of civic activism says about the state of citizen discontent with Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
26/11/1959m 1s

The Promise of Africa: How Foreign Investment Affects Self-Sufficiency

Africa is home to some of the fastest growing economies in the world. By 2050, it will have a population greater than China and up to a quarter of the world’s workforce. More than half of its population will be under 25 – presenting tremendous growth potential with the right opportunities in place and posing significant risks without them. Governments and businesses from all over the world are scrambling to have a strong footing in Africa by strengthening ties and making investments. In this week’s episode, we’ll consider what countries – from within and outside Africa – stand to gain the most and more critically, how Africans might actually benefit from this investment. Amaka Anku, head of the Africa practice at Eurasia Group, Alex Vines, head of the Africa Program and research director for Risk, Ethics, and Resilience at Chatham House, and Jonathan Ledgard, founder of Droneport and Linnaeus, make the case for the promise of Africa's future with WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
19/11/1959m 1s

Susan Rice Reflects: Life in the Situation Room

Susan Rice worked for the US State Department during some of the most challenging periods this country has ever faced, from Black Hawk Down in Somalia to the Iran Nuclear Deal. In her new book, “Tough Love, My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For,” she describes the family struggles, ancestral legacies, and personal experiences that led her to the White House and the United Nations. Susan Rice joins Jane Wales, Vice President at The Aspen Institute, to share her experiences, and offer her perspectives on today’s foreign policy challenges. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
12/11/1959m 1s

The Crisis in Syria: A Geopolitical Reshuffling of Power

The withdrawal of US troops from northern Syria has had grave repercussions for the security and stability of the entire region. The Turkish military has invaded northern Syria, killing dozens of Kurdish civilians and forcing over 200,000 Kurds to flee. In the absence of US troops, Russian and Syrian troops have rushed in to fill the power vacuum. Meanwhile, hundreds of ISIS fighters have escaped detention. Brett McGurk, distinguished lecturer at Stanford University and former special presidential envoy for the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, and David Phillips, director of peace-building and rights at Columbia University and former senior advisor to the US Department of State, make sense of the cascading impacts with WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
05/11/1959m 1s

A Life Undercover in the CIA

At the age of 22, Amaryllis Fox became one of the CIA’s youngest female officers. After training, she was deployed as a spy, under non-official cover, working throughout the Middle East to stop acts of extreme terrorism and the illegal sale of arms and explosives. Fox joins KQED's Mina Kim to share her story of life undercover and talk about her new career working to promote peace around the world. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
29/10/1959m 1s

US-China Relations: Reflections on a Gathering Storm

Escalating tensions between the US and China, driven by an ongoing trade war, technological competition and unrest in Hong Kong, may have long-term consequences for both countries along with the entire global economy. David Lampton, fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University and director of China Studies at Johns Hopkins University, joins WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis to discuss how Beijing and Washington could diffuse the disruptive tensions of this growing rivalry. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
22/10/1959m 1s

Betting the Farm: How Farm Subsidies are Killing Us (and How We Can Fix Them)

Every minute, an estimated one million dollars of public money is funneled toward farm subsidies around the world. Critics say these payouts pervert the economies of supply and demand, hide the true cost of foods and harm the health of both us and the planet. Jeremy Oppenheim, founder and managing partner of SYSTEMIQ, and Dr. Ann Thrupp, director of the California Food Is Medicine Coalition and founder of Down-to-Earth Innovations, join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss how subsidies impact food production around the world and how they might be redirected to sustainably feed a growing planet. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
15/10/1959m 1s

The Legacy of US Colonialism

While the US has moved away from the term “colony,” the legacy of its colonial rule endures. In this week’s episode, we’re talking about America’s covert history of expansion and how that has impacted the people who live in those places. Daniel Immerwahr, professor of history at Northwestern University and author of the book, How to Hide an Empire, A History of the Greater United States, and Ed Morales, journalist and author of the new book, Fantasy Island: Colonialism, Exploitation, and the Betrayal of Puerto Rico, join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss how Puerto Rico and other American territories navigate their complicated national identities. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
08/10/1959m 1s

Hong Kong Rising

What started in June as protests against a controversial extradition law has grown into something much larger and more formidable. On this week’s episode of WorldAffairs, David Rennie, columnist for the Economist, Illaria Maria Sala, a freelance journalist based in Hong Kong, and a Chinese reporter who has asked to remain anonymous join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss what the protests mean for Hong Kong, China, and the pro-democracy movement. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
01/10/1959m 1s

Saving American Democracy in an Authoritarian World

Democracy is in retreat worldwide. In his new book, "Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency," Larry Diamond argues that we are at a pivotal point where a new era of tyranny could upend the established order of liberal democracy. On this week’s episode, Diamond, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, joins WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis to discuss what it will take to save American democratic values abroad. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW  
24/09/1959m 1s

Avoiding the Resource Curse: Guyana’s Big Chance

Guyana is the latest country where a major oil discovery has been made. With ExxonMobil set to begin oil production next year, the small, impoverished nation is on the path to become one of the richest in the world. But with oil production brings risk. Next door Venezuela offers a cautionary tale of the “resource curse,” a spiral of political corruption and economic mismanagement that has driven commodity-rich nations into crisis.  But it doesn’t have to happen that way.  In some places natural resource production has brought much-needed development through education, infrastructure and economic diversification. What can Guyana learn from countries that have avoided the resource curse?
17/09/1959m 1s

Eco-Anxiety: Climate Change and Mental Health

A burning Amazon rainforest. Thinning ice sheets. Sea level rise. Wildfires in California. Thawing Arctic permafrost. It’s no surprise that many of us have anxiety about our planet’s future. The mental health impacts of climate change are increasing distress about the future while intensifying the trauma of natural disasters already happening. On this week’s episode of WorldAffairs, Caroline Hickman, Executive Committee member of the Climate Psychology Alliance and teaching fellow at the University of Bath joins WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss eco-anxiety in the age of climate change. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
10/09/1959m 1s

Globalization and Robotics: Will AI Cripple the Global Workforce?

By 2030, up to 800 million global workers may lose their jobs to automation. Technological advancement in an ever-globalized economy is changing both service-sector and professional jobs at a staggering pace. How can governments help workers remain vital to the global economy? Richard Baldwin, author of the new book, The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work, is in conversation with WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
03/09/1959m 1s

The Remains of ISIS

While the Islamic State no longer has any territory in the Middle East, its ability to recruit soldiers and engage in violence remains. In fact, its newly decentralized nature may make it even more effective in carrying out terrorist attacks. On this week's episode, Ali Soufan, former FBI special agent and author of “The Anatomy of Terror: From the Death of Bin Laden to the Rise of the Islamic State,” and Robin Wright, contributing writer to The New Yorker and fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, discuss the future of ISIS and the fate of tens of thousands of captured fighters and their families with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
27/08/1958m 37s

Winners Take All: How Philanthropists Hoard Progress

Today’s elites are some of the more socially concerned individuals in history. But do their philanthropic missions really make a difference, or do they perpetuate the system of inequality they’ve profited from? Anand Giridharadas, author of the new book “Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World,” talks with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about how philanthropists are preserving the very structures at the root of societal inequity. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
20/08/1958m 55s

Gun Violence: A Global Perspective

Recent tragic events in Gilroy, El Paso and Dayton have forced a painful reckoning amongst Americans across the country as kitchen table conversations turn to the issue of gun violence. While mass shootings have also happened in characteristically peaceful societies like Canada, Norway and New Zealand, those governments, unlike in the US, have been swift and decisive in enacting meaningful gun control. The question is: how do we do that here? New York Times columnist Max Fisher and Chelsea Parsons, vice president of gun violence prevention at the Center for American Progress, share their global perspectives on gun violence with Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
13/08/1959m 1s

Surveillance Capitalism: How Silicon Valley Profits from Tracking Us

In the modern age of Facebook, Google, and smart devices, most of us are under 24-hour surveillance. These data points are collected by large tech companies and are in turn sold to and used by governments and businesses alike to influence our behavior. On this week’s episode, Dr. Shoshana Zuboff discusses her new book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, which explores what can be done to protect democracy and free thought against these new threats. She is in conversation with Jim Fruchterman, founder and CEO of Tech Matters. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
06/08/1959m 1s

Ratcheting up the Pressure: Assessing the Risks of Trump's Iran Policy

In May 2018, President Trump withdrew the United States from the Iran nuclear deal, and re-imposed crippling economic sanctions against Tehran. Iran responded by restarting elements of its nuclear program and sponsoring militant attacks against US interests and allies in the Middle East. Trump claims he will keep the pressure on until Iran agrees to a better nuclear deal, while Iranian leaders insist they will not negotiate under duress. Colin Kahl, Steven C. Házy senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies' Center for International Security and Cooperation and former national security advisor to the vice president of the United States, speaks with WorldAffairs CEO Jane Wales about Trump's Iran strategy and how it risks igniting war with the country. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
30/07/1959m 1s

What Comes Next? How the World's Most Violent Places Recover

The most violent places today are not at war. Eighty-three percent of all violent deaths occur outside of conflict zones, and in 2015, more people died violently in Brazil than in Syria’s civil war. Yet multiple places which were once engulfed in violence and instability have recovered and have since formed stable democracies. Rachel Kleinfeld, senior fellow at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and author of  "A Savage Order: How the World’s Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security", joins Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, in conversation about how violent and weak states transform into stable ones. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
23/07/1959m 1s

Facebook’s Libra and the Future of Money

Facebook’s recent announcement that it would be launching Libra, its own blockchain cryptocurrency, in 2020 has provoked a message of caution from regulators and central bankers around the world. Many worry that the social media giant's 2-billion-strong user base could allow it to upend the current global banking system, a system that depends on trust and transparency. Not exactly characteristics that come to mind with Facebook’s recent history. Is the world ready for a widespread digital currency with no government to back it? On this week’s episode, New York Times reporter Nathaniel Popper and Angela Walch, professor of law at St. Mary’s School of Law, discuss the future of money with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
16/07/1959m 1s

The Great Arctic Game

Global warming is causing the Arctic Circle to heat up twice as fast as the rest of the planet. A melting Arctic opens up both new opportunities but also new risks. A power play between rival nations — China, Russia and the US — has emerged, putting security at the forefront of strategic goals. On this week’s episode, Sherri Goodman, a senior fellow at the Wilson Center’s Polar Initiative, and Malte Humpert, founder and senior fellow at the Arctic Institute, consider the geopolitical consequences of a rapidly melting Arctic with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW  
09/07/1959m 1s

The Myths and Realities of Leadership with General Stanley McChrystal

What role has leadership played in history's greatest achievements? General Stanley McChrystal served in the US Army for 34 years, and rose in rank to become four-star general in command of all American and coalition forces in Afghanistan. He joins World Affairs CEO Jane Wales in conversation about effective leadership in a world of waning American influence abroad. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
02/07/1959m 1s

Understanding the Leadership of Kim Jong Un

Since becoming the supreme leader of North Korea in 2011, Kim Jong Un has solidified his power base at home, clearing out his father’s top advisors and expanding the nation’s nuclear program. While he’s often characterized by his odd behavior, he has successfully maintained domestic dictatorial rule while also exerting international pressure to establish state legitimacy. Anna Fifield, Beijing bureauchief for The Washington Post and author of “The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Jong Un”, talks with Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about how a better understanding of North Korea’s leader might lead to improved relations with the closed-off nation. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
25/06/1959m 1s

The Power of Protest

Protesters flooded downtown Hong Kong over the weekend, winning concessions and even adding to their demands. Experts say protests like these have proliferated around the world in recent years. But can they lead to lasting change? On this week’s episode of WorldAffairs, Richard Youngs, senior fellow at Carnegie Europe and and the author of “Civic Activism Unleashed: New Hope or False Dawn for Democracy?,” discusses what the explosion of civic activism says about the state of citizen discontent with Co-Host Ray Suarez.  We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
18/06/1959m 1s

The Remains of ISIS

While the Islamic State no longer has any territory in the Middle East, its ability to recruit soldiers and engage in violence remains. In fact, its newly decentralized nature may make it even more effective in carrying out terrorist attacks. On this week's episode, Ali Soufan, former FBI special agent and author of “The Anatomy of Terror: From the Death of Bin Laden to the Rise of the Islamic State,” and Robin Wright, contributing writer to The New Yorker and fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, discuss the future of ISIS and the fate of tens of thousands of captured fighters and their families with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
11/06/1959m 1s

A Technological Brave New World

Rapid, sweeping changes in modern life are imposing new challenges upon society — but are also creating new opportunities. According to New York Times columnist Tom Friedman, these developments put a premium on “learning faster, and governing and operating smarter,” across the globe. He discusses the implications of this rapid transformational change for society with James Manyika, Chairman and Director of the McKinsey Global Institute. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
04/06/1959m 1s

Cooler Heads in Crisis: Why American Diplomacy Matters Today

What role can diplomacy play in an era of global authoritarianism, nationalism, and populism? Ambassador William Burns retired from the US Foreign Service in 2014, after a 33-year diplomatic career. He is only the second serving career diplomat in history to become Deputy Secretary of State. He joins World Affairs CEO Jane Wales in conversation about effective American leadership in a world of waning American influence abroad. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
28/05/1959m 1s

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 3: Policy and Polity

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This is the third episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. Governments are accused of letting the social safety net disintegrate for the many while facilitating vast economic gains for the few. An ever-expanding wealth gap has reinforced these views. Jason Furman, economics professor at Harvard, and Gillian Tett, US managing editor for the Financial Times, discuss what role governments can play in forging solutions with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
21/05/1959m 1s

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 2: Corporate Interests: Shareholder or Stakeholder?

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This is the second episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective.  Since deregulation in the 1980’s, the only stakeholder that has mattered to business is the shareholder. Jay Coen Gilbert, co-founder of B-Lab, and Colin Mayer, professor at Oxford University and author of “Prosperity: Better Businesses Makes The Greater Good,” discuss why the corporate culture may be at an inflection point with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
14/05/1959m 1s

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 1: We, the People

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This week and for the following 2 weeks, we’re featuring a 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective.  What forces caused the social contract to break and more importantly, what can citizens do to rebuild it? Tom Nichols, professor at the Naval War College and author of The Death of Expertise, and Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media, discuss why the people matter in rebuilding social trust with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
07/05/1959m 1s

Rebuilding the Social Contract: Series Tease

There is a wide consensus in liberal democracies around the world that the social contract is broken. How do we fix it? Beginning May 7th, this 3-part series explores the origins of the problem as well as solutions from the perspective of citizens, business and government.
06/05/191m 39s

Putin's World: Russia’s Return to the World Stage

Over the last decade, Russia has re-emerged as a powerful global player. In this week’s episode, we’re considering how President Vladimir Putin reinvigorated Russia's influence on the global stage and the potential impact of his future ambitions. Angela Stent,director of the center for Eurasian, Russian and East European studies at Georgetown University and author of the new book “Putin’s World: Russia Against the West and With the Rest,” discusses what Russian resurgence means for the world with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
30/04/1959m 1s

Left Behind: US Foreign Policy & Middle America’s Middle Class

While the US foreign policy establishment is heavily influenced by views from the coastal middle class, the perspectives of the Midwestern middle class have largely gone unheard. Repairing that disconnect is at the heart of a new project aimed at starting a dialog that leads to better foreign policy, better engagement and better opportunity for those living in what has been derisively referred to as “flyover country.” Salman Ahmed, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Edward Hill, professor of public policy and public finance at Ohio State University, discuss how policymakers can make US foreign policy work better for Middle America’s middle class with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
23/04/1959m 1s

Life on the Border: Mitigating a Legacy of Immigration Policy Failure

At the southern border, the rhetoric and emotion surrounding the issue of immigration have stood in the way of comprehensive reform. Where policy has fallen short, international, national and local nonprofit organizations have stepped in to provide vital, life-saving services. On this week’s episode, we’re taking a sobering look at the realities of what happens to migrants when they reach the border. Joining us are civil society leaders working to lessen the trauma for migrants and asylum seekers fleeing violent crime and political persecution. Lee Gelernt, Deputy Director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project, Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children, Maria Moreno, Principal of the Las Americas Newcomer School, and Jonathan Ryan, CEO and President of RAICES, are in conversation with Neal Keny-Guyer, CEO of MercyCorps. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
16/04/1959m 1s

280 Characters or Less: Leadership and Governance in the Age of Social Media

Globally, social media is playing an increasingly important role in politics. Not only does it determine our political discussions, it has transformed the way politicians communicate with both the public and each other. On this week’s episode, we’re discussing leadership and governance in 280 characters or less with Matthias Lüfkens, founder of Twiplomacy, and Charlie Warzel, op-ed journalist for The New York Times. They're in conversation with Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution about the changed nature of political communication in the age of social media. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
09/04/1959m 1s

We Want to Negotiate: The Secret World of Kidnapping, Hostages and Ransom

While some nations are willing to pay ransom to terrorists in order to free hostages, the US and Britain do not negotiate. As a result, a high number of American and British hostages have been killed. Should the US and Britain rethink their strategies? Joel Simon, author of the new book “We Want to Negotiate: The Secret World of Kidnapping, Hostages and Ransom,“ talks with Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about the conflicts and consequences in negotiating with terrorists and paying ransom. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW  
02/04/1959m 1s

Shoshana Zuboff: Surveillance Capitalism: How Silicon Valley Profits from Tracking Us

In the modern age of Facebook, Google, and smart devices, most of us are under 24-hour surveillance. These data points are collected by large tech companies and are in turn sold to and used by governments and businesses alike to influence our behavior. On this week’s episode, Dr. Shoshana Zuboff discusses her new book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, which explores what can be done to protect democracy and free thought against these new threats. She is in conversation with Jim Fruchterman, founder and CEO of Tech Matters. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
26/03/1959m 1s

Susan Lund and Laura Tyson: Globalization in Transition: High-Skilled Labor is Now the Holy Grail

While trade wars have been dominating headlines, globalization’s impact on labor has gone largely unnoticed. Global trade now favors more knowledge-intensive labor over low-cost, unskilled labor. How will this affect the future of work? Laura Tyson, distinguished professor and faculty director of the Institute for Business & Social Impact at the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, and Susan Lund, partner and leader of the McKinsey Global Institute, discuss why globalized economies are in transition with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
19/03/1959m 1s

Anna Grzymala-Busse and Jason Wittenberg: The End of the Current World Order: Eroding Democracies and Rising Nationalism

In recent years, Hungary and Poland have become havens for alt-right movements that target human rights groups, feminists, and pro-immigration activists. But this rise of authoritarianism is not confined to Eastern Europe, and it has become a global phenomenon. In this week’s episode, we explore the forces fueling the erosion of democracies worldwide. Anna Grzymala-Busse, international studies professor at Stanford University andsenior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, and Jason Wittenberg, political science professor at University of California, Berkeley, discuss the future of liberal democracies with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
12/03/1959m 1s

Richard Baldwin: Globalization and Robotics: Will AI Cripple the Global Workforce?

By 2030, up to 800 million global workers may lose their jobs to automation. Technological advancement in an ever-globalized economy is changing both service-sector and professional jobs at a staggering pace. How can governments help workers remain vital to the global economy? Richard Baldwin, author of the new book, The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work, is in conversation with WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
05/03/1959m 1s

Steven Cook: Mohammad Bin Salman's Controversial Leadership: Reassessing the US-Saudi Relationship

Despite decades of autocratic rule, Saudi Arabia has historically been a close ally to the US. This has been especially true under the Trump administration, which saw the transition of power to Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, also known as MBS. Initially lauded as a social reformer, MBS’ international standing has since fallen as a result of arbitrary arrests, the proxy-war in Yemen, and the murder of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Steven Cook, senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, joins WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez to discuss whether the US should reassess its ties to the Kingdom’s ruler. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
26/02/1959m 1s

Judy Dempsey and Stéphane Gerson: France’s Yellow Vests and the Future of Europe

The three-month-old yellow vest movement in France is the largest protest the country has seen in decades. While protesters hail from diverse backgrounds, what they do share is a deep resentment towards both their government and their nation’s elites. And here the French are not alone. The Italian and British governments have also been feeling the backlash as yellow vest-inspired protests continue to spread. Does the yellow vest movement represent an inflection point for the future of Europe? Carnegie Europe’s Judy Dempsey and New York University’s Stephane Gerson share their insights with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
19/02/1959m 1s

Moisés Naím: A Country on the Brink: Venezuela and a Contested Presidency

On January 23rd, millions of Venezuelans took to the streets in support of Juan Guiado, the president of the National Assembly, as he swore himself in as interim president. While Guiado has the support of many foreign governments, including the United States, President Nicolas Maduro insists that he is the rightful leader. How did Venezuela get to its current economic and political crisis? What happens next? Venezuelan columnist Moisés Naím discusses the future of the country with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
12/02/1959m 1s

Robert Kagan: The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World

As democracy declines around the globe and geopolitical competition grows, US sentiment increasingly appears to favor going it alone. But if we abandoned our long-term global commitments, what would happen to the current world order? Robert Kagan, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and author, The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World, discusses the future of American foreign policy with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
05/02/1959m 1s

The Price of Journalism: Jason Rezaian's 544 Days in an Iranian Prison

In July 2014, Washington Post Tehran bureau Chief Jason Rezaian was arrested by Iranian police and accused of spying for America. What he initially thought was a political stunt became an eighteen-month prison stint with impossibly high diplomatic stakes. Jason Rezaian joins WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez to share his story, as told in his compelling new book, Prisoner: My 544 Days in an Iranian Prison. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
29/01/1959m 1s

Olaf Groth and Fei-Fei Li: A Force for Good or Evil? Artificial Intelligence and Human-Centered Design

Artificial intelligence (AI) brings boundless possibilities. It can now drive our cars, diagnose our diseases, and even help us tackle climate change. But AI can also divide societies and drive nations to conflict. As we cede more of our fundamental decisions to machines, how do we ensure AI is designed with our best interests in mind? Fei-Fei Li, Co-director of the Stanford Human-Centered AI Institute and co-founder of the non-profit AI4ALL, and Olaf Groth, founder of Cambrian AI and co-author of the new book, Solomon’s Code: Humanity in a World of Thinking Machines, discuss how our relationship with AI is central to the future of humanity with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
22/01/1959m 1s

Daniel Ziblatt: Is Democracy in Danger?

This program is a re-air from 2018. In today’s reality, democracy no longer ends with a revolution or military coup, but with a gradual erosion of political norms. As a growing number of countries are chipping away at liberally democratic values, are these institutions safe from elected, authoritarian leaders? Daniel Ziblatt, professor at Harvard University and co-author of How Democracies Die, discusses the future of liberal democracies with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
15/01/1959m 1s

Jonathan Foley and Peter Knights: Life in the Wild: Preserving the Globe's Endangered Species

In the last fifty years, a doubling of the world’s population has contributed to substantial habitat loss and large-scale species extinction. What can we do, as individuals and societies, to fight back against environmental degradation and animal endangerment? In this week’s episode, Jonathan Foley, Senior Scholar at the California Academy of Sciences, and Peter Knights, Executive Director at WildAid, discuss how to curb climate change and the illegal wildlife trade with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
08/01/1959m 1s

Fintan O’Toole: Brexit: The Politics of Pain

This program is a re-air from earlier in 2018. On December 12, British Prime Minister Theresa May faced a vote of no confidence in Parliament. May survived the test, but the lack of a Brexit deal still plagues her administration. The critical issue: how to avoid creating a hard border between The Republic of Ireland, remaining in the EU, and North Ireland, part of the UK. In this week’s episode, Fintan O’Toole, journalist for the Irish Times, talks about the high-stakes issues involved and shares his thoughts on a possible way forward with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
01/01/1959m 1s

Admiral James Stavridis and Richard Fontaine: Extended Missions: The American Military Abroad

This extended program is a re-air from earlier in 2018. The conflict in Afghanistan reached its 17th anniversary in October, and US involvement in Iraq will be 15 years. Americans are aware of these wars, but what about the almost 200,000 other US military personnel stationed around the world in over 130 countries? Where are American forces and what explains the large military footprint? Admiral James Stavridis, former NATO Supreme Allied Commander and Dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, and Richard Fontaine, President of the Center for a New American Security, discuss the value of the American military abroad with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
25/12/1859m 1s

Foreign Policy in the Era of Populism: Trump's America and Bolsonaro's Brazil

According to Stephen Walt, Professor of International Affairs at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, the past three decades of US foreign policy have led to unnecessary wars, tragic death and failed diplomacy. He shares his insights with Jane Wales, World Affairs CEO, about how to reorient US foreign policy and restore global trust. Next, WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez will turn to the recent election of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, the newest member of a growing club of right-wing, populist leaders around the world. He'll speak to Brazil experts Paolo Sotero and Peter Hakim about the future of the country and its foreign relations policy under the new president. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
18/12/1859m 1s

Yukon Huang: US–China Trade War: A Battle for Economic Supremacy?

In international trade, many experts believe that China has not played by the rules. But tit-for-tat tariffs, while justified, harm American consumers and producers. Is the tension between the US and China simply about trade, or is it a battle for global economic supremacy? Yukon Huang is in conversation with WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
11/12/1859m 1s

Reid Hoffman: Blitzscaling: From Startup to Global Giant

Why do an estimated 90% of startups fail? And what separates those that get disrupted and disappear from the startups that become successful global enterprises? On this week’s episode, we’re unlocking the secrets to these questions with Reid Hoffman, co-founder of LinkedIn and Greylock Partner. He is in conversation with James Manyika, director of the McKinsey Global Institute. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
04/12/1859m 1s

Keith Humphreys and German Lopez: A Global Epidemic: The Consequences of the Opioid Crisis

The overuse of legal painkillers and the rise of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid which is easy to produce and transport across borders, has created a global opioid crisis. What do governments need to do to curb supply and combat addiction? Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University, and German Lopez, senior correspondent at VOX, discuss the consequences of a global drug market flooded by opioids with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
27/11/1859m 1s

John Carlin: Blended Threats: When Cyberattacks Inspire Terrorism

Cyberattacks against governments and private companies have skyrocketed in both volume and impact. From election interference to the Sony studio hacking, cyberattacks can now be "blended" to inflict even more widespread damage, including inspiring acts of terrorism. In this week’s episode we’ll discuss the new types of cyber threats and the ways in which governments and corporate leaders are responding. John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the US Department of Justice’s National Security Division, talks about the high-stakes risks with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
20/11/1859m 1s

Putting Policy Over Politics: A Conversation with Ambassador Susan Rice

As the US midterm elections play out in early November, politics are everywhere, but national security policy should be distinguishable from politics, according to Dr. Susan Rice, the National Security Advisor to President Obama and US Ambassador to the United Nations. It is well documented that Americans are ever more divided: along party, ideological, socio-economic and cultural lines; by geographic, demographic, racial and religious differences. Indeed, Rice suggests that the most significant, long-term threat to our security may be our domestic political polarization. How can our national security interests be separated from the politics of the day? What are the most important national security policy objectives today and how can they be achieved? Ambassador Rice is in conversation with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
13/11/1859m 1s

Daniel Ziblatt: Is Democracy in Danger?

In today’s reality, democracy no longer ends with a revolution or military coup, but with a gradual erosion of political norms. As a growing number of countries are chipping away at liberally democratic values, are these institutions safe from elected, authoritarian leaders? Daniel Ziblatt, professor at Harvard University and co-author of How Democracies Die, discusses the future of liberal democracies with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW  
06/11/1859m 1s

Anand Giridharadas: Winners Take All: How Philanthropists Hoard Progress

Today’s elites are some of the more socially concerned individuals in history. But do their philanthropic missions really make a difference, or do they perpetuate the system of inequality they’ve profited from? Anand Giridharadas, author of the new book “Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World,” talks with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about how philanthropists are preserving the very structures at the root of societal inequity. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
30/10/1859m 1s

Nicholas Burns: The Crisis in US Global Leadership and Diplomacy

Chief among the trends threatening global peace and stability is the weakening of the US leadership role around the world. As the US withdraws from international accords and President Trump criticizes allies, the rest of the world is left to pick up the pieces. In this week’s episode, Nicholas Burns, former US ambassador and professor at Harvard Kennedy School, discusses how traditional American diplomacy can help ease today's global tensions. He is in conversation with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
23/10/1859m 1s

Fintan O'Toole: Brexit: The Politics of Pain

Over the past weeks, British Prime Minister Theresa May and EU leaders have been embroiled in a detail of the Brexit negotiations that was all but ignored since the referendum first passed. The critical question: how to avoid creating a hard border between Ireland, remaining in the EU, and North Ireland, part of the UK, the site of so much violence and upheaval a mere 20 years ago. In this week’s episode, Fintan O’Toole, journalist for the Irish Times, talks about the high-stakes issues involved and shares his thoughts on a possible way forward with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
16/10/1859m 1s

Jeffrey Sachs: America First: The Legacy of American Exceptionalism

American exceptionalism has long been a tenet of US foreign policy. Today, it’s taken the form of an isolationist, “America first” approach. In this week’s episode, world renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs shares his perspectives on how a century of exceptionalism has created false justification for countless wars while leading to an increasingly polarized, unjust world. Sachs argues that in order to meet the global challenges we face, America must adopt an internationalist view, one that “embraces global cooperation, international law and aspirations for global prosperity.” He discusses his new book “A New Foreign Policy: Beyond American Exceptionalism” with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
09/10/1859m 1s

Climate Change, Part 3B: Youth Activism and the Fight for Climate Solutions

In the third part of a 3-part series on climate change, we focus on long-term, sustainable solutions. May Boeve, executive director at 350.org, and Nana Firman, Muslim outreach director at Greenfaith, discuss how the next generation of grassroots activists are combatting climate change with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
05/10/1827m 52s

Climate Change, Part 3A: Al Gore: Beginning a Sustainability Revolution

In the third part of a 3-part series on climate change, we focus on long-term, sustainable solutions. While many have a grim outlook on the climate crisis, former Vice President Al Gore tells a different story. He argues that we are now in the early stages of a sustainability revolution, and he shares his vision with Laura Tyson, professor at the University of California, Berkeley. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
02/10/1830m 14s

Climate Change, Part 2B: Erik Solheim: Engaging Forgotten Communities: The Role of the Developing World on Climate Solutions

In the second part of a 3-part series on climate change, we examine communities that are often left out of the conversation: the developing world. In the second half of the program, Erik Solheim, executive director of the UN Environment Program, talks with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour, about how climate change is impacting communities around the world. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
28/09/1826m 15s

Climate Change, Part 2A: Mary Robinson and Musimbi Kanyoro: Engaging Women Leaders to Combat Climate Change

In the second part of a 3-part series on climate change, we examine communities that are often left out of the conversation: women. As the primary caregivers and the providers of food, fuel and water in much of the Global South, women are especially vulnerable to the challenges climate change presents. Mary Robinson, president of the Mary Robinson Foundation, and Musimbi Kanyoro, president and CEO of the Global Fund for Women, speak about the human rights aspect of climate change with Heather Grady, vice president of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
25/09/1832m 9s

Climate Change, Part 1: Displacement, Conflict, and Populism: The Geopolitical Impact of Climate Change

In the first part of a 3-part series on climate change, we look at the connection between global warming and world refugee flows. Climate change could displace as many as one billion people by 2050, according to the UN. In countries like the US, where both the status of refugees and the validity of climate change are hotly contested issues, what will that mean for climate change refugees? In conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour, is a panel of digital media experts, including, Tom Friedman, New York Times Columnist, Kevin Rudd, former Prime Minister of Australia, Luis Alberto Moreno, President of the Inter-American Development Bank, and Heidi Cullen, Director of Communications at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
19/09/1859m 9s

Joshua Keating: The Future of International Statehood

Joshua Keating, staff writer at Slate, talks with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about his new book, Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood. The book explores the global quest for self-determination, challenging historical boundaries and the very notion of a nation state. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
14/09/1817m 32s

Kofi Annan's Leadership Legacy

On August 18th, former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan passed away at the age of 80. In one of his final on-stage conversations he joined World Affairs CEO Jane Wales to talk about his legacy of global leadership, and lessons learned in his mission to create a more stable, peaceful world. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
11/09/1840m 0s

Admiral James Stavridis and Richard Fontaine: Extended Missions: The American Military Abroad

The conflict in Afghanistan reaches its 17th anniversary in October, and US involvement in Iraq will be 15 years. Americans are aware of these wars, but what about the almost 200,000 other US military personnel stationed around the world in over 130 countries? Where are American forces and what explains the large military footprint? Admiral James Stavridis, former NATO Supreme Allied Commander and Dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, and Richard Fontaine, President of the Center for a New American Security, discuss the value of the American military abroad with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
28/08/1827m 52s

Peter Piot: Preparing for the Next Global Epidemic

It’s been 100 years since the Spanish flu killed millions worldwide. While we’ve made medical and technological progress in the century since, the world remains vulnerable to mass disease. In this week’s episode, we’ll discuss how greater mobility, population pressures and climate change increase the risk of global epidemics. Peter Piot, Director of Global Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, talks with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about the importance of effective outbreak preparedness. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW    
21/08/1826m 7s

Elizabeth Economy and John Pomfret: As US Leadership in Global Affairs Recedes, is China Stepping in to Fill the Void?

As the US continues to abdicate its leadership role in global affairs, China’s international influence continues to grow – diplomatically, economically and politically. Will it, can it, fill the void? And how will its role on the world stage influence domestic policy? Elizabeth Economy, senior fellow and director for Asia studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, and John Pomfret, former Washington Post bureau chief in Beijing, and author of “The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: America and China, 1776 to the Present”, discuss the ramifications of America's absence in global leadership with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
14/08/1823m 47s

The Third Digital Revolution: Fabrication

Over the past fifty years, we have experienced two fundamental digital revolutions, one in computing and one in communication. Today, we’re entering a third digital revolution, that of fabrication. From medical advancements to weapon design, in this hour, we’ll discuss what widespread digital fabrication could mean for the future. In conversation with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales are brothers Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, Professor, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Alan Gershenfeld, Co-Founder and President, E-Line Media, and Neil Gershenfeld, Director, Center for Atoms and Bits, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW  
07/08/1859m 1s

Tyler Cowen and Gillian Tett: Trade Wars: US, China, and Europe, Who Has the Most to Lose?

In recent weeks, searing rhetoric from President Trump has pushed our trading relations with both Europe and with China onto center stage. In the case of China, an escalating trade war has begun, and with Europe, President Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker first clashed before agreeing in principle to work toward lowering barriers to commerce. Is Trump simply solving problems of his own making or is this part of a smart negotiating strategy that will ultimately benefit American consumers, producers and farmers? Can trade wars actually be won? Tyler Cowen, Holbert L. Harris chair of economics at George Mason University, and Gillian Tett, US managing editor for the Financial Times, discuss the ramifications of Trump's trade policy with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
31/07/1859m 0s

Digital Media: Combatting Threats in the Era of Fake News

Digital and social media have upended not only the news industry, but entire notions of governance and leadership. In this week’s episode, we’ll consider how the rise of digital media has impacted public life and the ethical innovations needed in order to capture the benefits and mitigate harm. In conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour, is a panel of digital media experts, including, Jennifer Cobb, Director of United for News, Eileen Donahoe, Executive Director of the Global Digital Policy Incubator at Stanford University, Tristan Harris, Co-founder of the Center for Humane Technology, and Gerald Ryle, Director of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
24/07/1858m 59s

David Sanger: Preparing for the New Battlefield: Living in the Age of Cyberweapons

The increased use of cyberweapons is changing geopolitics. Cyberattacks now occur on a daily basis, by states and non-state actors alike, large and small. On the receiving end, governments are challenged by the anonymity and asymmetry of these attacks. In this week’s episode we’ll consider how, and if, we can develop foreign policy doctrines to deal with this new reality. David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for The New York Times, talks with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about how the US can protect itself in the age of cyberweapons. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
17/07/1859m 1s

North Korea and the Syrian Refugee Crisis: Where Do We Stand and What Solutions are Possible?

On June 12th, President Donald Trump met with Kim Jong-un in Singapore. Despite widespread international news coverage, the state of US-North Korea relations is still shrouded in mystery. In the first part of this week’s episode, Victor Cha, senior adviser and Korea chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, discusses what was achieved in the meeting and what to expect going forward.   In the second part of the program, World Affairs CEO Jane Wales talks with Lina Sergie Attar, co-founder and CEO of the Karam Foundation, and Chelsea Handler, celebrated comedian, talk show host and activist, about the need for humanitarian and philanthropic intervention for Syrian refugees.   We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
10/07/1859m 1s

Michael McFaul: A New Era of Failed US-Russia Relations: A Contentious Backdrop in the Lead Up to the Summit

The White House recently announced that President Trump plans to hold his first formal summit with President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, Finland on July 16th. The meeting will take place against a contentious backdrop that includes Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election, widespread diplomatic expulsions on both sides, continued Russian support of military offensives in Syria and the ongoing investigation into possible ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. How did we get here and is there a way forward? World Affairs CEO Jane Wales is in conversation with former US ambassador to Russia and author of “From Hot War to Cold Peace” Michael McFaul. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
03/07/1859m 1s

Arturo Sarukhan and Andrew Selee: Elections in Mexico: What a New President Could Mean for US–Mexico Relations

The Mexican national elections will take place on July 1st. A new president could transform Mexico and, in turn, reset North American political and economic relationships. In this week’s episode, we’ll discuss what’s at stake in the elections, from immigration, to NAFTA, to energy production, and what it could mean for US–Mexico relations. Arturo Sarukhan, the former Mexican Ambassador to the U.S., and Andrew Selee, Director of the Migration Policy Institute and author of Vanishing Frontiers: The Forces Driving Mexico and the United States Together, are in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS Newshour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
26/06/1859m 1s

Ehud Barak and Marwan Muasher: Is Peace Possible? Where the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Stands after Jerusalem

Following President Trump's relocation of the US Embassy to Jerusalem - timed to coincide with Israel's 70th anniversary - tensions along the border in Gaza have flared. Although a ceasefire between Hamas and the Israeli Defense Forces was reached on May 30, recent developments in the ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians have enduring consequences for both the Middle East and the international community at large. In this week’s episode, we’ll delve into the obstacles to peace and consider potential paths forward. World Affairs CEO Jane Wales talks with Ehud Barak, former Israeli prime minister and minister of defense, and Marwan Muasher, former Jordanian minister of foreign affairs and deputy prime minister. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
19/06/1859m 1s

Scott Sagan: The North Korean Crisis: Avoiding the Cliffs After Meeting at the Summit

In the first summit between American and North Korean leaders, President Donald Trump is scheduled to meet with Kim Jong Un in Singapore on June 12th. The stakes -- and tension -- could not be any higher, but the meeting is shrouded in uncertainty. In this week’s episode, we’ll discuss how American diplomacy towards North Korea has evolved through different administrations and the potential outcomes of the meeting. What incentives does each leader have, and what’s at stake for each country, to continue the negotiations and make a deal? World Affairs CEO talks with Scott Sagan, Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Senior Fellow at Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
12/06/1859m 1s

Heather Grabbe and Charles Lichfield: Unraveling of the EU: The Populist Wave Gains Strength Across Europe

As populist governments across Europe sweep into power, the future of the European Union is anything but certain. Italy's newly formed government joins Hungary's and Poland's in the flouting of Europe's traditional liberal democratic values. At the same time, they are also forming what some see as dangerous alliances with historic enemies such as Russia. Most unsettling to global markets is talk of the possibility that some will vote to abandon the Euro. Will Europe's biggest experiment since the end of World War II survive? Heather Grabbe, executive director at Open Society, and Charles Lichfield, a European and Euroasian affairs specialist with Eurasia Group, are in conversation with Ray Suarez, former senior correspondent for PBS' NewsHour.  We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
05/06/1859m 1s

Restoring Dignity: The Case of the Rohingya

In what many are calling genocide, over half a million Rohingya, Myanmar’s dispossessed Muslim minority, have been driven from their homes since August of 2017. Most have flooded into Bangladesh in search of safety from brutal killings and sexual violence. The pace of new arrivals has made this the fastest growing refugee crisis in the world, potentially overwhelming the capacity of the inadvertent host government. Panelists, Muhammad Musa, Executive Director, BRAC, Aerlyn Pfeil, Board Member, Médecins sans Frontières, and Nirmala Rao, Vice Chancellor, Asian University for Women, share how they are bringing safety and sustenance to the stateless Rohingya. They are in discussion with Iain Levine, Program Director, Human Rights Watch. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW  
29/05/1859m 1s

Richard Clarke and Ray Rothrock: Building Digital Resilience: Planning For and Recovering From the Next Cyber Attack

Cybercrime and cyberwarfare are both on the rise. From businesses large and small to national governments, the question is not if they will experience a cyberattack, but when, how much damage will be done and how long the recovery process will be. In this week’s episode, we discuss the cybersecurity landscape and how businesses and governments can most effectively work together to mitigate risks. Joining World Affairs CEO Jane Wales are digital security experts Ray Rothrock, CEO of RedSeal and author of “Digital Resilience,” and Richard Clarke, former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counterterrorism and most recently, author of “Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes.” We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
22/05/1859m 1s

Robert Malley: Fallout from the Iran Nuclear Deal and Untangling the Crisis in Yemen

On May 8, 2018, President Trump announced that the United States was withdrawing from the Iran nuclear deal, dismantling Obama’s signature foreign policy agreement. Robert Malley, president and CEO of the International Crisis Group and one of the US negotiators who helped forge the deal in 2015, offers his insight into what Trump's withdrawal means for US-Middle East relations. Malley also zooms out on the region to discuss how complex conflicts like the war in Yemen and the Rohingya refugee crisis are impacting international affairs more broadly. He is in conversation with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
15/05/1859m 1s

Joseph Coughlin and Andrew Scott: An Aging World: Why Longevity Matters in the 21st Century

Across the world, low birth rates coupled with increased life expectancies are creating myriad challenges for governments, businesses and individuals alike. This demographic shift is not only transforming economies, but the way we live our lives. In this week’s episode, we’ll consider why, and how, things like work environments, education systems, and the concept of "old age" itself need to be rethought to account for longer lifetimes. Joseph Coughlin, founder and director of MIT’s AgeLab and author of "The Longevity Economy,” and Andrew Scott, deputy dean and professor of economics at London Business School, and co-author of "The 100 Year Life," are in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
08/05/1859m 1s

Yascha Mounk: The Pendulum Swings Right: The Rise of Populism

During recent elections, we saw populist far-right parties gain momentum in Europe and the US. The message from leaders in this political movement was clear: mass migration is threatening economies as well as cultural values and the establishment is doing very little to serve and protect citizens. Is this the beginning of an era which will see the far-right gain more power? To what extent are individual rights and independent institutions under siege? Yascha Mounk, a lecturer on government at Harvard University, talks with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about the rise of populism and far-right politics and the growing uncertainty of liberal democracies. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
01/05/1859m 1s

Thomas Fingar: Understanding China’s One Belt, One Road Initiative

China is heavily investing in two global trade routes: a 21st Century Maritime Silk Road stretching from Southern China across the Indian Ocean to connect Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Africa to the Mediterranean; and a land-based Silk Road Economic Belt connecting Western China to Europe via Central Asia. Establishing these transcontinental trade routes will likely cost over one trillion dollars and will cover 65% of the world's population. How likely is China to succeed in achieving these grand investment goals, and how would this proposed project impact global trade? Dr. Thomas Fingar, a Shorenstein APARC fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, discusses China's audacious vision for their "One Belt, One Road" project with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW  
24/04/1859m 1s

Niall Ferguson: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook

Are we truly living in the first "Networked Age"? Niall Ferguson, Senior Fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, argues that social networks are nothing new, and actually have been fundamental in shaping history. With over 2 billion Facebook users, what lessons can be learned by examining social networks of the past? How can "new" networks create social change, impact businesses, and influence policy? Ferguson talks networks and power with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
17/04/1859m 1s

Global Erosion of Trust, Part 3: Daniel Fried and Alina Polyakova: Responding to Russia's Intervention in Democracy

With so many forces undermining democratic institutions worldwide, we wanted a chance to take a step back and provide some perspective. Russian interference in elections here and in Europe, the rise in fake news and a decline in citizen trust worldwide all pose a danger. In this third of a three part series, we focus on Russia's assault on global democracy. Daniel Fried, former ambassador to Poland and distinguished fellow at the Atlantic Council, and Alina Polyakova, David M. Rubenstein foreign policy fellow at the Brookings Institution, are in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
10/04/1859m 1s

Global Erosion of Trust, Part 2: Janine Zacharia and Roger McNamee: Fake News and Facebook

With so many forces undermining democratic institutions worldwide, we wanted a chance to take a step back and provide some perspective. Russian interference in elections here and in Europe, the rise in fake news and a decline in citizen trust worldwide pose a danger. In this second of a three part series, we look at the role of social media and the ways in which it was exploited for the purpose of sowing distrust. Janine Zacharia, former Jerusalem bureau chief and Middle East correspondent for The Washington Post, and Roger McNamee, managing director at Elevation Partners and an early stage investor in Google and Facebook, are in conversation with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
03/04/1858m 55s

Global Erosion of Trust, Part 1: Jennifer Kavanagh and Tom Nichols: The End of Authority

With so many forces undermining democratic institutions worldwide, we wanted a chance to take a step back and provide some perspective. Russian interference in elections here and in Europe, the rise in fake news and a decline in citizen trust worldwide all pose a danger. In this first of a three part series, we focus on the global erosion of trust. Jennifer Kavanagh, political scientist at the RAND Corporation and co-author of “Truth Decay”, and Tom Nichols, professor at the US Naval War college and author of “The Death of Expertise,” are in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
26/03/1859m 1s

Rob Malley and Rory Carroll: Venezuela and the Global Hotspots to Watch in 2018

In our first segment, we look at critical areas of conflict around the world, and identify options world leaders have to address them. Rob Malley, CEO of the International Crisis Group, seeks to prevent global crises before they turn deadly, or to help resolve conflicts once they do. He is in conversation with Markos Kounalakis, Visiting Fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. In the second half, Guardian reporter Rory Carroll shares his perspective on how the once wealthy, oil-rich nation of Venezuela devolved into its current state of economic chaos, first under President Hugo Chavez and now under President Nicolás Maduro. He speaks with Jonathan Visbal, chairman of World Affairs. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
20/03/1859m 1s

William Cohan and David Wessel: 10 Years Later: Lessons from the Collapse of Bear Stearns

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the collapse of Bear Stearns, the first of several large investment banks on Wall Street to fall in 2008. Its eventual sale at $10 a share to JP Morgan (down from $159 a year earlier) set off a spiraling loss of confidence that eventually led to the global financial crisis. Ten years later we unpack the forces that led to Bear Stearns’ downfall. What lessons have we learned and are we at risk of another global financial catastrophe? William Cohan, former investment banker and author of “House of Cards” – a chronicle of the Bear Sterns collapse, and David Wessel, senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution, are in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS Newshour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
13/03/1859m 1s

Robert Reich and Greg Ip: US Budget Priorities

With tax cuts, trade tariffs, and military spending grabbing headlines, the recently passed budget and its impact on American society – the wealthy, the poor, and everyone in-between – is President Trump's policy in action. Budgets are not just about dollars and cents, they're also about values, so what does Trump's 2018 budget say about the priorities of the White House, and what does it mean for America's future? Robert Reich, former Secretary of Labor in the Clinton Administration, and Greg Ip, chief economics commentator for the Wall Street Journal, are in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS Newshour. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
06/03/1859m 1s

Ambassador Dennis Ross: Closing Conflicts: Prospects for Negotiations in the Middle East

The Middle East has been a key focus of American foreign policy for the last three decades, and the events of 2017 ensure it will remain an area of focus. Between volatile proxy wars in Yemen and Syria, a declaration to move the US Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem and new protests in Iran, entrenched conflicts transformed and created new flashpoints over the course of the year. As the lead negotiator for peace processes in the Middle East under Presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton, Ambassador Dennis Ross skillfully brokered agreements between Israel and Palestine, digging into the messiest relationships in the region. How do the conflicts in the Middle East today compare to the situation under other administrations? What is the next stop on the long road to peace? Join us as Ambassador Ross shares his extensive diplomatic experience and discusses the Trump administration’s foreign policy in the Middle East. SPEAKER: Dennis Ross Davidson Distinguished Fellow, Washington Institute for Near East Policy MODERATOR: Jane Wales CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute For more information please visit: http://worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1800 We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
27/02/1859m 1s

Ali Noorani and Ray Suarez: The DACA Deadline and Immigration Reform

The immigration debate has roared to the front of Washington, D.C.’s and the country’s agenda. At stake is the fate of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, scheduled to expire on March 5th. That issue has been tied to increased border security, a possible wall on our southern border, the family reunification policy and a lower cap on refugee resettlement. As DACA hangs in the balance, what is the future for comprehensive immigration reform? Ali Noorani, Executive Director of the National Immigration Forum, is in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for the PBS Newshour. This is Ray Suarez's maiden interview with World Affairs. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
20/02/1859m 1s

The Intangible Economy

Capital has changed and capitalism is changing as a result. For the first time in history, businesses are investing more in things you can neither see nor touch – so-called intangible capital – than in traditional physical assets like buildings, machines, computers or vehicles. Intangible capital, such as R&D, design, software, brands and organisational capabilities, have different economic properties from traditional assets. As a result, the rise of the intangible economy is changing the economy and society in important and non-obvious ways. This new intangible economy helps explain a range of big puzzles and problems: why productivity is stagnating, why inequality is rising, why populism is on the rise. It also helps managers, investors and policymakers understand what to do about it. Jonathan Haskel, economics professor at Imperial College Business School, and Stian Westlake, policy adviser to the Minister of State in the Department of Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy at the University of Cambridge, have written a new book, "Capitalism without Capital." They will discuss this new economic trend and what it means for the future. SPEAKERS Jonathan Haskel Professor of Economics, Imperial College Business School, Imperial College London Stian Westlake Policy Adviser to the Minister of State, Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy, Center for Science and Policy, University of Cambridge MODERATOR: Jane Wales CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
13/02/1859m 1s

Responding to North Korea: South Korea’s Olympic Olive Branch and US Cyberwarfare Options

In a symbolic breakthrough, North and South Korean teams will march together under a single unified flag during opening ceremonies at the Winter Olympic Games. Does this rare show of unity signify a substantial thaw in diplomatic relations on the Korean Peninsula? How might this impact growing international tensions related to North Korea’s nuclear weapons program? Gi-Wook Shin, Director of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, and Kathleen Stephens, Former US Ambassador to South Korea, discuss the precarious relationship between the two Koreas. In the second part of this episode, World Affairs' CEO Jane Wales talks with David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for The New York Times, about how the US might turn to cyberwarfare to contain the threat of a nuclear North Korea.   SPEAKERS Gi-Wook Shin Director of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center Kathleen Stephens Former US Ambassador to South Korea MODERATOR: Jane Wales CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute For more information about this event please visit: http://worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1795 We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
06/02/1859m 17s

Stewart Patrick: The Trump Administration's Foreign Policy: Back to the Future?

In his first year in office, President Donald Trump has broken with decades of US foreign policy orthodoxies and injected tremendous uncertainty into a world already in flux. What is behind the Administration’s ‘America First’ doctrine, and what does it signal for the future of US global leadership and international cooperation? Stewart Patrick, the James H. Binger senior fellow in global governance and director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations, will discuss the importance of sovereignty in US politics and how the United States can retain its constitutional independence while cooperating with others to dampen the risks of globalization. Patrick's latest book "The Sovereignty Wars: Reconciling America with the World," offers a clear-eyed framing of the sovereignty debate in terms of what is actually at stake, when it's appropriate to make bargains and how to go about doing so. SPEAKER: Stewart Patrick Council on Foreign Relations MODERATOR: Jane Wales CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute For more information please visit: http://worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1792 We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
30/01/1859m 13s

David Sanger and Janine Zacharia: From North Korea to Jerusalem: Inside President Trump's Foreign Policy

From North Korea to Jerusalem, President Trump is facing unprecedented foreign policy changes -- some arguably of his own making, some not. Trump's diplomacy is under the microscope as tensions rise in the Middle East and Asia, so where do we go from here? In this special program, World Affairs' CEO Jane Wales talks with Janine Zacharia, former Jerusalem Bureau Chief of The Washington Post, and also David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for The New York Times. Can Trump pivot away from searing rhetoric and instead work toward strengthening diplomacy abroad? We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
23/01/1859m 13s

Yukon Huang: Debunking Myths About China's Economy

China’s rapid growth and transition towards a more market-oriented economic system have encouraged spectators to predict massive changes to the Chinese political and social system. However, while growth is slowing, the economy remains sound and the Chinese Communist Party emerged from the 19th Party Congress with its strongest leader in years. What makes experts forecast again and again that China is on the verge of collapse? Yukon Huang, former Country Director for China at the World Bank, cuts through the myths and joins us to discuss his new book, "Cracking the China Conundrum: Why Conventional Economic Wisdom is Wrong." His in-depth analysis explores the varied dynamics at play in China’s economic growth today and sheds light on why so many China watchers have gotten it wrong. SPEAKER: Yukon Huang Senior Fellow, Asia Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace MODERATOR: N. Bruce Pickering Vice President of Global Programs, Asia Society and Executive Director, Asia Society Northern California, Asia Society We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
18/01/1859m 8s

Strive Masiyiwa and Jeff Raikes: AGRA and Food Security in Africa

Food security is one of Africa's most pressing issues. Globally, 800 million people are undernourished, with 281 million coming from sub-Saharan Africa. Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) is working to mitigate poverty and hunger by supporting local farmers. Two pioneers of this initiative, Strive Masiyiwa, Founder and Executive Chairman of Econet, and Jeff Raikes, former Chief Executive Officer of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, discuss how AGRA is tailoring solutions for African partners. They're in conversation with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
09/01/1859m 12s

GPF17: Trust, Identity Politics and the Media

Essential to a free and functioning democracy is an independent press, a crucial civil society actor that holds government to account and provides citizens access to the impartial information they need to make informed judgments, reason together, exercise their rights and responsibilities, and engage in collective action. In times of crisis, the media fulfills the vital role of alerting the public to danger and connecting citizens to rescue efforts, as Ushahidi has done in Kenya. Or, it can alert the international community to human rights abuses as does Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently. But, the very capabilities that allow the media to alert and inform, also allow it to sow division – as it did in Rwanda leading up to and during the genocide-- by spreading untruths, and, through “dog whistles,” targeting ethnic groups and inciting violence against them. This panel will focus on two topics: the role of media as a vehicle for advancing or undermining social cohesion, and the use of media to innovate, organize and deepen understanding, enabling positive collective action. * Abdalaziz Alhamza, Co-Founder, Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently * Uzodinma Iweala, CEO and Editor-in-Chief, Ventures Africa; Author, Beasts of No Nation; Producer, Waiting for Hassana (moderator) * Ben Rattray, Founder and CEO, Change.org * Malika Saada Saar, Senior Counsel on Civil and Human Rights, Google
19/12/1759m 0s

Ambassador Wendy Sherman: Diplomacy with North Korea? Foreign Policy Under President Trump

This week’s episode offers an in-depth perspective of foreign policy under Trump, with a focus on US - North Korea relations. What is the strategic calculus for both countries and how can some degree of calm be restored? In the first half of the show, you’ll hear from Ambassador Wendy Sherman. Ambassador Wendy Sherman served as the US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. In this position, she led the team from the United States and five other countries in negotiating the Iran nuclear weapons deal. Under the Clinton administration, she served as Advisor to the President and Secretary of State and North Korea Policy Coordinator. From Jerusalem to North Korea, President Trump has demonstrated again and again a willingness to break with established diplomatic strategy and forge a new path. In our conversation, Sherman discusses the current state of foreign policy under the Trump administration, with a focus on the current diplomatic calculus with North Korea. The second half features Orville Schell and Philip W. Yun. They discuss whether the US and North Korea can pivot from searing rhetoric, and instead work toward strengthening diplomacy. This interview was previously aired in August. SPEAKERS Wendy Sherman, Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director, Center on US-China Relations, Asia Society Philip W. Yun, Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer, Ploughshares Fund MODERATOR: Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute
12/12/1759m 0s

Remarks by His Excellency Anatoly Antonov, Russian Ambassador to the US

His Excellency Anatoly Antonov was recently appointed by President Putin to serve as the Russian Ambassador to the United States. A career diplomat, he has served for more than thirty years in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In 2004, he was the Director of the Department for Security and Disarmament. Ambassador Antonov was formerly the Deputy Minister of Defense and, before his recent appointment, held the position of Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs. Please join us for this special event to hear Ambassador Anatoly Antonov discuss the importance of diplomacy and Russia’s role in the world. SPEAKER: Anatoly Antonov Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United States, Russian Federation MODERATOR: David Holloway Raymond A. Spruance Professor of International History, Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow Freeman Spogli Institute, Stanford University For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1783
08/12/1759m 1s

Richard Heydarian: Philippines Under Duterte

President Trump will meet with President Duterte during his first visit to the Philippines next month. What can be expected for the future of US-Philippine relations? Although the two countries have historically been strong allies, the elections of Trump and Duterte, as well as policy shifts in both nations, have raised questions about the stability of the relationship. The Philippines has benefited from significant US military aid for several decades. Recently both training and intelligence sharing were especially helpful as Philippine armed forces fought to regain control of Marawi following terrorist attacks by ISIS affiliates. While military aid is considered a symbol of the continued alliance between the two countries, Duterte’s renewed economic and political relations with China are causing tension. Is the Philippines looking to pivot toward China for a stronger alliance and veer away from the US, therefore shifting the strategic balance in the region? As for Filipinos as home, how are they impacted by the rise of a populist leader, one who is focused on fighting corruption and targeting drug offenders? What do these tactics reveal about Duterte as a leader? What issues can Trump and Duterte come together on and where might they disagree? Richard Heydarian, a Filipino academic and columnist, will join us for a discussion on the Philippines under Duterte and his latest book "The Rise of Duterte: A Populist Revolt Against Elite Democracy." SPEAKER: Richard Heydarian Resident Political Analyst, GMA Network MODERATOR: Maria Ortuoste Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, California State University East Bay For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1777
01/12/1759m 1s

Fixing American Foreign Policy: A Conversation with Ambassador Samantha Power

Less than a year into the new Trump administration, the US appears to be shifting away from key, longstanding foreign policies as well as from established allies. The president’s recent speeches to NATO members and at the G20 signal a departure from previous administrations on myriad issues, including human rights, climate change, and resolving civil conflicts. These global challenges often require leadership and collective action by major actors in the international community, yet the US is uncertain whether these issues are worth the investment. There is deep concern among many nations and former US officials who are perplexed by this strategic direction. Is the US forging a new path, going it alone and leaving behind ongoing conflicts and unresolved humanitarian crises? Will the US maintain its alliances and continue to engage with the international community? On the anniversary of Donald Trump's election, Samantha Power, former US ambassador to the United Nations and current professor of practice at Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Law, will join World Affairs CEO Jane Wales for a discussion on the state of US Foreign Policy, and challenge the assumptions behind the Trump administration’s strategic direction. How can we make America good again, and where might we go from here? This event is made possible through a generous grant from the Stanley S. Langendorf Foundation in the name of Richard and Judith Guggenhime, and brings world-renowned experts to the Bay Area. SPEAKER: Samantha Power Former United States Ambassador, United States Mission to the United Nations MODERATOR: Jane Wales CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute
16/11/1759m 0s

James Stavridis and Sebastian Junger: The Frontlines of War

This week’s episode will feature two unique perspectives from the frontlines of international war. In the first half of the show, you’ll hear from Retired US Admiral James Stavridis. Admiral Stavridis was the Supreme Allied Commander for NATO from 2009 to 2013, and he led NATO’s Operation Unified Protector during the 2011 military intervention in Libya. In this talk, Stavridis discusses the US' role in a complex, quickly shifting international landscape. And now to the second half of our program, featuring combat journalist Sebastian Junger. In his newest project, “Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS”, Junger documents the civil war by telling the stories of Syrians living through the chaos and rise of extremism, and who later attempt to escape the violence. Jung discusses his motivation for the project, and he reveals the inside story of the film.
07/11/1759m 1s

GPF17: Race, Justice and Legitimacy in America

Equal access to justice and equal protection under the law are critical elements of our liberal democracy. Yet, in practice, in the US young men of color are more likely than their white counterparts to be picked up for, locked up for, and prosecuted for suspected criminal offenses. If they cannot gain pre-trial release, these young men remain in jail while awaiting prosecution. The jury is more likely to find these men guilty, and the prosecutor is more likely to ask for a stiff sentence, which the judge is more likely to impose. Once incarcerated, these young men may not be protected from mental and physical harm. Once released, they can be denied housing, jobs, credit and even the ability to vote. Their families will have been impoverished by the costs associated with trials, imprisonment and lost earning capacity. This pattern of bias – whether unconscious or not – has served to delegitimize our system of justice in the eyes of a growing number of Americans. Can philanthropy and civil society advance the reforms needed for our justice system to regain the trust of all Americans? Can we realize the vital goal of equal justice for all? Introduction: Adam Foss, President, Prosecutor Impact Panel Discussion * Carroll Bogert, President, The Marshall Project * Adam Foss, President, Prosecutor Impact (moderator) * Glenn E. Martin, Founder and President, JustLeadershipUSA For more information about this event please visit: https://www.philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2017/
23/10/1759m 1s

Nicole Perlroth: The Cyberthreat

In 2012, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned that the United States was facing the possibility of a "cyber" Pearl Harbor and was increasingly vulnerable to foreign computer hackers who could dismantle the nation's power grid, transportation system, financial networks and government. Since then, we have seen Iran attack US financial institutions and gain control of a New York dam. ISIS has released a kill list complete with stolen US federal employee information. Russia has attacked our democratic system through a combination of cyber theft and massive botnets used to propagate fake news. And North Korea is alleged to be behind a series of attacks including Sony Entertainment and culminating in the global WannaCry ransomware attack in May. Why have we been unable to defend against these attacks? What is being done to prevent and protect us from potential future threats? The “WannaCry” attack and most recent “Petya” attack have caused damage on a global scale, and have even taken lives. Further, it appears such attacks have made use of stolen NSA cyber weapons previously distributed on the dark web and available for sale. Nicole Perlroth, cyber security reporter for The New York Times, will discuss these attacks and what to expect for the future of cyber warfare. SPEAKER: Nicole Perlroth Reporter, The New York Times MODERATOR: Kim Zetter Author, Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1749
16/10/1759m 1s

GPF17: Trust, Justice and the Conflict Continuum

If pluralism is essential to free and functioning societies, it is also the sine qua non of liberal democracy, and essential to the legitimacy – and sustainability – of the state. But when states fail to meet the needs of their citizens and collapse into violent conflict, what is the role of the international community and global civil society? Where does responsibility lie? We will explore interventions along the conflict continuum as well as global norms that assign responsibility. Will citizens trust their government, if access to health, education, jobs and even justice is uneven? And when governance fails, how can human security be assured? This conversation will focus on governments and the governed, with particular attention to access to justice and examples of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict reconciliation. Throughout, the role of race, gender, religious affiliation and ethnicity will be explored. Robert Malley, incoming Vice President for Policy, International Crisis Group (moderator) David Miliband, President and CEO, International Rescue Committee John Prendergast, Founding Director, Enough Project Yifat Susskind, Executive Director, MADRE David Tolbert, President, International Center for Transitional Justice Robin Wright, Senior Fellow, The US Institute of Peace and the Woodrow Wilson Center For more information about this event please visit: https://philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2017/
10/10/1759m 1s

Trita Parsi: Inside the Iran Agreement: The Art of the Deal

President Trump once pledged to “tear up” the Iran nuclear agreement. Now, the world watches to see the fate of an agreement considered by some to be a pivotal victory in American foreign policy, and by others as a mistake. Trita Parsi, the preeminent Middle East foreign policy expert who advised the Obama White House throughout the Iran talks, takes us behind the scenes to examine the negotiations. Was a better deal to be had in 2015? What have been the benefits gained, or disasters averted, under the deal? Parsi provides a nuanced and thoughtful view of the agreement designed to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. Will the Iran deal survive the Trump Presidency? If the agreement can be viewed as a down-payment on improved US-Iranian relations, has that now been squandered by the sabre-rattling that followed? What are the options and consequences of a renegotiation and, without the support of an international coalition, does an effort to renegotiate have the impact of removing the US from a position of influence on this important subject? What is the benefit where each side abides by the letter of an agreement, but does not act in the spirit of the agreement? SPEAKER: Trita Parsi President, National Iranian American Council MODERATOR: Neil Joeck Research Scholar, Institute for International Studies, University of California, Berkeley For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1747
06/10/1759m 1s

GPF17: Jim Yong Kim and Luis Alberto Moreno in Conversation

Jim Yong Kim, President, World Bank Group, in conversation with Jane Wales, Founder, Global Philanthropy Forum. Luis Alberto Moreno, President, Inter-American Development Bank. For more information about this event: https://www.philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2017/agenda/
03/10/1759m 1s

Life as a Refugee - South Sudan in Focus

Imagine if you had no choice but to flee your country. Where would you go? How would you cope? What would you need to rebuild your life in exile? These are the questions that three million South Sudanese have had to ask themselves in the face an unrelenting civil war, famine, violence and persecution. And as conflicts across the globe have forced millions to flee their homes, the international debate on refugee policy rages on. How does South Sudan fit into this broader narrative, and what lessons can be learned from its citizens cast into uncertain exile? Join World Affairs as we examine this pressing global issue from both policy and human perspectives. Gabriel Akim, spokesperson for Rebuild South Sudan, Diana Essex-Lettieri, Deputy Director of Asylum Access, and Valentino Achak Deng, co-founder of the Valentino Achak Deng Foundation, will call upon their unique expertise and personal experience to shed light on what it means to be displaced from war-torn South Sudan. As part of our "Engage" series, this event features a post-discussion Q&A, when you will have the chance to participate directly with the speaker and gain incredible insights that you won't get anywhere else. SPEAKERS Valentino Achak Deng Co-founder, Valentino Achak Deng Foundation Gabriel Akim Advisor, Rebuild South Sudan Diana Essex-Lettieri Deputy Director, Asylum Access MODERATOR: Jane Wales CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1743
29/09/1759m 1s

Vladimir Ashurkov: Russia’s Opposition Politics: Alexei Navalny for President

In 2018, Russia will hold its presidential election, and few are likely to oppose the current president, Vladimir Putin. One of the potential challengers gaining momentum is Alexei Navalny, a central figure in the pro-democracy movement. Since 2011, this small but passionate opposition group has captured the attention of many disaffected Russians angered by corruption, economic disparity and the restriction of civil liberties. What can Russia's pro-democracy movement do to break through a culture of systemic corruption to win the election? What can the opposition do to build support among all Russians? Vladimir Ashurkov, executive director of the Anti-Corruption Foundation and close colleague of Alexei Navalny, will provide insight into the pro-democracy campaign, recent protests in Moscow and the many challenges facing the opposition movement. SPEAKER: Vladimir Ashurkov Executive Director, Anti-Corruption Foundation MODERATOR: Carla Thorson Senior Vice President, Programs, World Affairs For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1744
26/09/1759m 1s

Rick Wartzman: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs: Prospects for the American Dream?

The American dream used to be founded on the goal of finding a good, stable job to spend the majority of one’s career — but this is no longer the norm. Over the last seventy years, the standard employer-employee relationship has drastically changed. Companies no longer offer the same level of job security, regular pay increases, guaranteed pensions, robust health benefits and other social benefits as they did in the past. This shift in the corporate social contract has taken a toll on loyalty on both sides. Senior Advisor and former Executive Director at the Drucker Institute, Rick Wartzman, discusses his recent book "The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America," which chronicles the erosion of the relationship between major American businesses and their workers. Have these new workplace practices decreased morale and productivity? How can America revitalize its middle class? What is the new American Dream? SPEAKER: Rick Wartzman Senior Advisor and Former Executive Director, The Drucker Institute MODERATOR: John Sepulvado Host of The California Report, KQED Public Radio For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1739
22/09/1759m 0s

GPF17: Building the Capacity for Trust: The Child

The first five years of a child’s life are a period of intense creativity, invention and growth. During this period, children rely on those around them to provide for their physical, cognitive and socio-emotional development needs to ensure their capacity to trust and become resilient adults. Distressingly, nearly 200 million children globally may not reach their developmental potential due to the effects of unhealthy environment and paucity of educational opportunities. Many of these children also live in stressful circumstances – caused by poverty, abandonment or violent conflict – and so face additional challenges in learning to trust. This session will investigate the factors impacting early childhood development and learn which interventions can prevent, mitigate or address the potentially lasting effects of toxic stress. If –as Nelson Mandela said –“there is no keener revelation of society’s soul than the way it treats its children,” then surely the legitimacy of a state rests at least in part on whether it meets its obligations to the young. Randa Grob-Zakhary, Global Head of Education, Porticus Peter Laugharn, President and CEO, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation (moderator) Carolyn Miles, President and CEO, Save the Children Deogratias Niyonkiza, Founder and CEO, Village Health Works   For more information about this event please visit: https://www.philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2017/
20/09/1759m 1s

Orville Schell and Philip W. Yun: The Threat of a Nuclear North Korea

The current crisis between the US and North Korea has escalated with both sides firing off heated exchanges following North Korea’s missile tests and threats extending as far as Guam. While North Korea has tested missiles in the past, the US is on alert as Kim Jong-un accelerates the drive for nuclear capabilities which could bolster the survival of his regime. President Trump is now faced with his biggest challenge since coming into office, and it is one which is alarming from both a humanitarian and economic perspective as South Korea and China urge more dialogue and less military exercises. Can the US and North Korea pivot from searing rhetoric and work toward strengthening diplomacy? To what extent is China willing to help in terms of diplomacy and deterrence? Is the Korean Peninsula less safe with a nuclearized North Korea? SPEAKERS Orville Schell Arthur Ross Director, Center on US-China Relations, Asia Society Philip W. Yun Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer, Ploughshares Fund MODERATOR: Jane Wales CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1758
29/08/171h 7m

US, Iran, Saudi Arabia: A New Diplomatic Calculus?

President Trump’s first visit to the Middle East demonstrated a notable shift in US policy toward the region. In a marked departure from the policies of the Obama administration, the president not only embraced the Sunni Arab states, but signed a $110 billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia, and stated that he will not lecture the Kingdom or other Arab autocracies on human rights issues. He also initiated a review of the Iranian nuclear deal, gave greater military emphasis to US actions in the area, and called for states in the region to isolate Iran. Meanwhile, elections in Iran have given President Rouhani a broader mandate to open Iran’s economy further. How will President Trump’s policies and actions impact America’s relations with Saudi Arabia, the nuclear deal with Iran and the prospect of ending arduous conflicts as seen in Syria and Yemen? Will this further increase tensions, or is there potential for renewed diplomatic cooperation between the US, Saudi Arabia and Iran? Banafsheh Keynoush, a geopolitical and communications consultant, Jessica Tuchman Mathews, distinguished fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Ambassador Hossein Mousavian, Middle East security expert at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, will discuss the US - Iran - Saudi Arabia nexus and whether we are destined for renewed diplomacy or conflict in the Middle East. SPEAKERS Seyed Hossein Mousavian Middle East Security and Nuclear Policy Specialist, Program on Science and Global Security, Princeton University Banafsheh Keynoush Foreign Affairs Scholar and Author, "Saudi Arabia and Iran: Friends or Foes?" Fred H. Lawson Senior Fellow, Centre for Syrian Studies, University of St. Andrews MODERATOR: Jessica Tuchman Mathews Distinguished Fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1737
04/08/1759m 1s

Arlie Hochschild: Strangers in their Own Land: Living in "Red" America Today

What drives voters to the election booth? Dr. Arlie Hochschild, UC Berkeley sociologist and author of New York Times best seller “Strangers in their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right,” embarked on a journey to the Deep South to explore this very question. What she found were lives damaged by lost jobs, poor wages and an elusive American dream. As she connected and became friends with the people she met, she was surprised to discover that their values mirrored the liberal values she grew up with, including a desire for community, the importance of family and hopes for their children. She came to appreciate how strongly emotions, including years of anger and frustration, drive political preference for many far-right voters. What role did “emotion in politics” play in the results of the 2016 election? What feelings motivate Trump supporters and Tea Partiers to support these movements? Why do citizens who would seem to benefit most from “liberal” government programs detest the party that passed them? Dr. Hochschild will share her observations and the stories of those who have felt like strangers in their own land. SPEAKER Arlie Hochschild Professor Emerita, Sociology, UC Berkeley MODERATOR: John Sepulvado Host of The California Report, KQED Public Radio For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1727
01/08/1759m 1s

The US and China: Destined for Conflict? A Conversation with Graham Allison

What can the rise of Japan and Germany in the last century - or the rise of Athens 2,000 years earlier - tell us about the risks facing the US and China today? Is a US-China war inevitable? Graham Allison, among the most astute geostrategic observers of his generation, terms this “Thucydides’s Trap.” He takes us back to the Peloponnesian war to remind us of the timeless insights of the historian Thucydides: When a rising power rivals a ruling power, danger is near. In fact, in 12 of the 16 occasions this global power pattern has repeated, the outcome was war. With this view to history, the existential challenge of our era is not violent Islamic extremists or a resurgent Russia; it is the impact of China’s ascendance on the international order. According to Allison, "Never before in history has a nation risen so far, so fast." Even Chinese President Xi Jinping has urged that the world “work together to avoid the Thucydides trap… Our aim is to foster a new model of major country relations.” But is being aware of danger enough to avoid it? While the West seeks to encircle and constrain, China demonstrates, with aggressive naval exercises in disputed seas, that it will demand the respect due a major power in its own region and the world. Can the world escape the perilous prophecy of Athens and Sparta? Graham Allison, director of Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School and advisor to every secretary of defense from Reagan to Obama, shares insights from his career, and outlines the painful steps both China and the US must take to avoid disaster. SPEAKER: Graham Allison Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University MODERATOR: Michael M. Nacht Thomas and Alison Schneider Professor of Public Policy; Interim Director, Center for Studies in Higher Education, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1732
17/07/1759m 1s

Jack Shenker: Uprising in Egypt: The People's Fight for Freedom

In 2011, Cairo's Tahrir Square commanded the attention of the world as the Egyptian people demanded their freedom. At the time, President Barack Obama famously declared: “Egyptians have inspired us, they have changed the world.” But, half a decade later, is this the whole story? The Arab World's most populous nation remains as volatile as ever and thoroughly enmeshed with a broader moment of political turbulence that is unfolding across the globe. In his new book, "The Egyptians: A Radical Story," former Egypt Correspondent for the Guardian, Jack Shenker, examines the roots of Egypt’s revolution, arguing for a much more nuanced, and far-reaching view of the forces that are reshaping the region. Egypt’s revolutionary turmoil has never just been about Mubarak, or his successors, or elections, says Shenker. It is not merely a civil war between Islamists and secularists, nor a fight between backwardness and modernity. Underlying it all, the unrest is about economically marginalized citizens muscling their way onto the political stage to demand sovereignty over domains previously closed to them: factories and urban streets, the houses they live in, the food they eat and the water they drink. The real story is more complicated and, ultimately, more hopeful. Speaker Jack Shenker is an author and journalist, and Former Egypt Correspondent for the Guardian. The conversation is moderated by David D. Arnold is President of The Asia Foundation. For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1683
12/07/1759m 1s

Daniel Franklin: Technology and the Future: A Vision of Our Lives in 2050

Our lives in 2050 will be vastly different than today. Rapidly advancing technology is changing everything from food production to health care, energy output, manufacturing and the military balance. Innovations already in development include brain-computer interfaces, vat-grown cruelty-free meat, knitted cars and guided bullets among many others. Technology which once seemed like science fiction is now reality - and even old news - where can we possibly go from here? The Executive Editor of The Economist, Daniel Franklin, explores how technology will shape the future in his recent book, Megatech: Technology in 2050. His insights are based on extensive interviews with distinguished scientists, industry leaders, academics and acclaimed science-fiction authors who are at the forefront of the most exceptional inventions and sinister trends. Where will technology be in 2050, and how will it affect the way we live? What does this mean for the job market and how we perform our work? In what ways can we prepare for the opportunities — as well as the dangers — that await? Speaker Daniel Franklin is Executive Editor at The Economist. He is in conversation with Quentin Hardy, Head of Editorial at Google Cloud. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1699
06/07/1759m 1s

UK Elections: Earning a Stronger Place at the Table?

In April – shortly after triggering article 50 of the Lisbon treaty which started the process of withdrawing from the European Union – British Prime Minister Theresa May called for a snap general election to be held in June. There is no turning back on Brexit, but a strong win by the Conservative Party would give May a stronger mandate in executing it as she sees fit. May hopes to increase her majority in Parliament as she strives to negotiate a good deal for Britain, and local election results and polls indicate that this is a likely outcome. The UK vote comes in the wake of the French elections, where pro-EU Emmanuel Macron won with 65% of the vote. One of his first public statements was to warn the UK to expect “tough” Brexit negotiations. Regardless of how the deal is cut, it will redefine the political and economic relationships between the EU and Britain, as well as the US, that form the bedrock of the Western alliance. What is the future of the European Union, and how will the upcoming UK elections influence it? How will this impact the transatlantic US-UK relationship? Colin Brown, chairman of the British-American Business Council and Christophe Crombez, senior research scholar at Stanford’s The Europe Center and professor at KU Leuven in Belgium, will discuss prospects for Brexit, the European Union and international trade negotiations. As part of our "Engage" series, this event features a post-discussion Q&A, when you will have the chance to participate directly with the speaker and gain incredible insights that you won't get anywhere else. SPEAKERS Colin Brown Chairman, British-American Business Council Christophe Crombez Senior Research Scholar at Stanford’s The Europe Center and Professor at KU Leuven in Belgium MODERATOR: Kausik Rajgopal Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1734
27/06/1759m 0s

Fake News: A Real Problem?

According to recent studies by Pew Research, consumers are now just as likely to get their news from social media as from traditional news websites. And while some Americans are confident in their abilities to detect "fake news," two-thirds feel some confusion about navigating the facts in current issues and events. What obligations do government and media have to filter fake news, and what steps have already been taken to prevent these stories from gaining undue attention? What is the future of journalism in this post-facts era? How can we know what is credible and what is not? Joaquin Alvarado, CEO of the Center for Investigative Reporting, will share his thoughts about reporting in a time when our country is being confronted by an unprecedented assault on basic facts. SPEAKERS Joaquin Alvarado CEO, Center for Investigative Reporting Janine Zacharia Former Jerusalem Bureau Chief and Middle East Correspondent, The Washington Post MODERATOR: Edward Wasserman Dean, Graduate School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1724
15/06/1759m 0s

Gideon Rachman: Asia's Rise and America's Decline: From Obama to Trump and Beyond

Is American influence in Asia and around the world set to decline? In the years following the global financial crisis, the US has increasing ceded its leadership in the world, while China has rushed in to fill the gap left behind. Based on the inward-looking economic nationalism of the Trump administration, some say this trend is poised to accelerate. Gideon Rachman, chief foreign affairs columnist for the Financial Times, terms this phenomenon “Easternization” - the tectonic shift of the world’s center of gravity from West to East, and from the US to China. Though obscured by the headlines of the day, in the not-so-distant future we may come to view this, as Rachman does, as the momentous transformation of the young century. How is the growing wealth of Asian nations transforming the international balance of power? Will Trump’s temperament lead to war or peace with Asian nations? After striving for years to be a part of Europe, is Russia now returning to its Asian roots? How would a shift to the East shape all of our lives? This event is co-organized with the Mechanics Institute. SPEAKER: Gideon Rachman Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator, Financial Times MODERATOR: Carla Thorson Senior Vice President, Programs, World Affairs For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1714
06/06/1759m 1s

US Development Aid: What Does the Future Hold?

In November, the international community watched as Americans elected Donald Trump the next President, leaving many with unanswered questions about what lies ahead for international development. The United States government is currently the biggest foreign aid donor in the world. Washington’s actions also influence how much other governments contribute to global efforts to eliminate poverty, reduce hunger, empower women and local actors, and increase access to education and healthcare. Trump said little about his stance on international aid throughout his campaign. Republicans have supported foreign aid in the past because it contributes to national security at home, which is also one of Trump’s biggest priorities. However, if his nationalist ideologies and “Make America First” rhetoric are any indicators of future actions, foreign aid — despite representing less than 1% of the national budget — may be on the chopping block. What progress has been made, and what hope is there for the world’s most vulnerable people? Dana Hyde, the CEO of the Millennium Challenge Corporation, and Richard Leach, the President and CEO of World Food Program USA, will share insights about major achievements in recent years and shifting priorities for the future. Dana Hyde, Chief Executive Director of the Millennium Challenge Corporation, and Richard Leach, President and CEO of the World Food Program USA, are in conversation. The discussion is moderated by Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1674
31/05/1759m 1s

Edward Alden: Failure to Adjust: Americans Left Behind in the Global Economy

The US Presidential elections were a wake-up call to many that millions of Americans are angry and want drastic change. While our new global economy has benefited many, they feel that they have been left behind – losing their livelihoods and income to companies abroad. As a nation, we need to do something about these issues, although Trump’s promises and actions to pull out of international trade deals may not be the only or best solution. The problem, according to Council on Foreign Relations’ Edward Alden, is not globalization itself, but the failure of domestic policies to address its associated challenges. US policymakers have long recognized the challenges that Americans would face in the new global economy, but mainly looked the other way. In his book, Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy, Alden explains why support for free trade is disappearing, and how to improve the situation for citizens whose lives have been negatively impacted by it. What can we do to minimize these impacts, and how can we build a workforce that is adaptable and resilient to rapidly changing global markets? What potential federal policies would develop more internationally competitive industries and improve the overall American economy? Speaker Edward Alden is the Bernard L. Schwartz Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. The conversation is moderated by Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1713
23/05/1759m 1s

The Big Stick: A Conversation with Dr. Eliot Cohen about the Use of Force

Theodore Roosevelt once famously said, "Speak softly and carry a big stick," in reference to his stance on foreign policy. Today, many Americans - wary of waging another war and maintaining a military presence abroad - question this approach. But given the threats posed in today’s increasingly dangerous and nuclearized world, can the US afford to shy away from hard power? Can diplomacy be divorced from military power? Would deploying forces and strengthening our naval or military presence to thwart Russian hostilities, irrational regimes and China’s transgressions in the South China Sea serve to weaken America’s interests and security? Dr. Eliot Cohen, a former senior advisor to George W. Bush, professor at Johns Hopkins University and renowned political commentator, will make the case that hard power remains essential for American foreign policy. Sharing insights from his recent book, "The Big Stick: The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force," Dr. Cohen will provide a nuanced argument for the use of force in the service of American security and ideals. Speaker Eliot Cohen is the Robert E. Osgood Professor of the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University. The moderator for this discussion is Stephen Krasner, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Hoover Institution, Stanford University; and Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences at the School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1702
18/05/1759m 0s

North Korea: On the Verge?

North Korea has threatened the United States with a “merciless” nuclear attack. While not a new threat, they may soon be capable of actually making good on that promise. North Korean dictator, Kim Jong-un, has recently been pushing to develop a missile capable of hitting the US, as witnessed by a series of tests. The likely target? California. Meanwhile, escalating military tensions in the region have further isolated the nation both politically and economically, setting the stage for long-standing internal human rights abuses to worsen. Situations involving political prison camps, unresolved disappearances and the abduction of Japanese and South Koreans are all cause for concern. Add to that savory list, power struggles within the family itself. According to Malaysian authorities, Kim Jong-un's half-brother was recently murdered with chemical weapons in an airport in Kuala Lumpur, further escalating tensions. How serious is the risk of a North Korean nuclear attack? How will Trump’s reaction and willingness to work with our allies in the region influence the situation? And what obligation, if any, does the international community have to intervene on any and all fronts? Experts Philip Yun, Director of the Ploughshares Fund, and Daniel Sneider, Associate Director for Research at Stanford’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, will share their insights. SPEAKERS Daniel Sneider Associate Director for Research, Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University Philip W. Yun Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer, Ploughshares Fund MODERATOR: Neil Joeck Research Scholar, Institute for International Studies, University of California, Berkeley For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1708
09/05/1759m 1s

US-Russia Relations: Illusions vs. Reality

Tension in US-Russia relations is at its highest level since the end of the Cold War. Russia’s 2012 invasion of Ukraine and Putin’s military intervention in support of the Assad regime in Syria — along with the unprecedented Russian interference in the 2016 US election — have fanned these flames. President Trump insists that he will prioritize healing the relationship and that Moscow can be an important partner in the fight against terrorism and other issues. However the recent use of chemical weapons in Syria followed by a US retaliatory airstrike against the Russian-backed Assad regime have raised the stakes and the risk of greater use of force. What can be done to avoid accidental or unintended military confrontation in the Middle East or in Europe? Will Russia’s interference in our domestic politics have lasting repercussions? In what ways can we collaborate with Russia on fighting the risk of nuclear terrorism and the spread of weapons of mass destruction? Will Trump’s approach lead to stronger US-Russia cooperation, or is the relationship too broken to fix? Andrew Weiss, Vice President for Studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, will share his perspectives on the future of US-Russia relations as well as key policy recommendations to manage the bilateral relationship, drawn from a two-year, high-level, and bipartisan task force on U.S. policy toward Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia. The task force was convened jointly by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Chicago Council for International Affairs. Speaker Andrew Weiss is Vice President for Studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.   The conversation is moderated by Carla Thorson, Senior Vice President of Programs at World Affairs.   For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1716  
01/05/1759m 1s

Energy Policy and Trump: Hope for California and Our Planet?

The United States is a leader in environmental policy, with California at the forefront as a global hub for clean energy technology and investments. With Trump as President, many environmentalists fear this will change. Trump has vowed to bring back coal jobs, withdraw from the Paris Agreement, and reduce clean energy spending — not to mention calling climate change a “hoax” and selecting climate change deniers to head the EPA and Energy Department. Californian officials and other international leaders have spoken out and pledged for continued environmental progress, regardless of what happens in Washington. What specific protections can state governments such as California put in place? Are market forces and technology strong enough that current trends towards clean energy will continue despite any potential policy decisions? If the US were to pull out of the Paris Agreement, would other countries continue to hold up their end of the bargain? Hal Harvey, the CEO of Energy Innovation: Policy and Technology LLC, and Severin Borenstein, E.T. Grether Professor of Business Administration and Public Policy at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, will evaluate the ramifications of potential policy decisions that Trump could make. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1681
25/04/1759m 1s

The Battle for Aleppo: Achieving Accountability for Syrian War Crimes

The Syrian war has left an estimated 470,000 dead, with 4.8 million international refugees and 6.6 million people internally displaced. As peace efforts falter, the world cries out for the respect of human rights and international humanitarian law, seeking accountability for their infringement. Recent attention has focused on the siege of Aleppo, where intense aerial bombardment by Syrian and Russian forces destroyed all medical care infrastructure, wiped out marketplaces and bakeries and led to thousands of civilian deaths. Unlawful killings remain a hallmark of this blood-soaked conflict. Humanitarian access is blocked. What can be done? This panel discussion will examine the findings of the the UN Commission of Inquiry on the Syrian Arab Republic special report examining the violations that took place in Aleppo city since late 2015, and debate its impact on any future accountability for victims of the conflict's many crimes. This event is co-organized by World Affairs and the Center for Justice and Accountability SPEAKERS Sareta Ashraph former Chief Analyst, UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Scott Gilmore Staff Attorney, Center for Justice and Accountability Stephen Rapp Former Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes, U.S. Department of State MODERATOR: Beth Van Schaack Leah Kaplan Visiting Professor in Human Rights, Stanford Law School For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1685
11/04/1759m 1s

President Trump and the Future of US—Asia Relations: A View from the West Coast

Join Asia Society, The Asia Foundation, Commonwealth Club, and World Affairs for a unique dialogue featuring the leaders of four of the Bay Area’s most prestigious public affairs and non-profit organizations, who will look at the presidency of Donald J. Trump and what it will mean for America’s relationship with Asia and the world. Held within the first 100 days of the Trump Administration, the dialogue will examine more closely a persistent divide between California and the Bay Area, and the rest of the country, on the future direction of this nation. The dialogue will examine how the Bay Area, and the state more broadly, views America’s relationship with Asia, as well its place in the world on global issues such as trade, security and climate change. What are some of the primary issues of importance to the Bay Area—politically, economically, culturally—as it relates to US-Asia relations and are they similar or different from the rest of the country? Has the state and the region evolved differently from the rest of the country in how they perceive America’s relationship with Asia and the world, and if so, why? World Affairs seeks to explore problems and expand opportunities at the intersection of international policy, philanthropy and enterprise — where solutions to hard problems lie. Every day, we convene thought leaders, change makers and engaged citizens to share ideas, learn from each other and engage in conversations that matter. Founded in 1947, following the San Francisco conference that established the United Nations, World Affairs remains one of the most vibrant global affairs organizations in the United States. SPEAKERS David D. Arnold President, The Asia Foundation Dr. Gloria C. Duffy President and CEO, The Commonwealth Club of California N. Bruce Pickering Vice President of Global Programs, Asia Society and Executive Director, Asia Society Northern California, Asia Society Jane Wales CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute MODERATOR: Mina Kim PM Anchor and Forum Friday Host, KQED For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1691
04/04/1759m 1s

Intelligence Wars: A Discussion with General Michael Hayden

General Michael Hayden is the only person ever to lead both the CIA and NSA. For 10 years, he was a key player in some of the most important events in the history of American national security. Now, at a time of ominous new threats and political change, General Hayden will share an insider’s perspective of America's intelligence wars. What role did US intelligence play in the wake of terrorist threats, a major war and the technological revolution? What was the transformation of the NSA after 9/11? Why did the NSA begin the controversial terrorist surveillance program that included the collection of domestic phone records? What else was set in motion during this period that formed the backdrop for the infamous Snowden revelations in 2013? General Hayden is a retired United States Air Force four-star general, former director of the NSA, principal deputy director of National Intelligence, and director of the CIA. His recent book, "Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror," is a behind-the-scenes account of his experiences within our national intelligence operations. His goals for writing it are simple: No apologies. No excuses. Just what happened. Speaker General Michael Hayden is the Former Director of the NSA and CIA. Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum, and Vice President, The Aspen Institute, moderates the discussion. For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1692
29/03/1759m 1s

President Trump and Executive Power

In the first months of the new administration, multiple questions have arisen about President Donald Trump’s approach to executive power. Join us for a discussion that will focus on the White House’s policy on immigration. We will discuss the law and policy of the executive order suspending immigration from seven majority Muslim nations under the Immigration and Naturalization Act and the US Constitution. Does the president have the authority to build a wall along the US-Mexico border and tax Mexican imports or currency transfers to pay for it? What can the president do in the absence of legislative action and when and where does the judiciary step in? Has President Trump gone too far or simply not framed the orders correctly? Daniel Farber, Peter Schuck, and John Yoo, three of the nation’s leading legal scholars, respond to these questions and more, illuminating the limits of the executive power. As part of our "Engage" series, this event features a post-discussion Q&A, when you will have the chance to participate directly with the speaker and gain incredible insights that you won't get anywhere else. SPEAKERS Daniel Farber Sho Sato Professor of Law, University of California at Berkeley School of Law Peter Schuck Visiting Professor of Law, University of California at Berkeley School of Law John Yoo Emanuel S. Heller Professor of Law, University of California at Berkeley School of Law MODERATOR: Jeffrey L. Bleich CEO, Dentons Diplomatic Services and Chair, Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1700
23/03/1759m 1s

Kevin Rudd: Asia’s Rise in a Year of Uncertainty

Join Asia Society Northern California and World Affairs for a dialogue with The Honorable Kevin Rudd, President of the Asia Society Policy Institute and former Prime Minister of Australia, who will look at some of the critical issues facing the Asia-Pacific region today and the challenges likely to emerge in the coming years. While Asia is home to some of the world’s fastest growing economies and a young, dynamic population, the region is also confronted with a number of issues that threaten to stymie the region’s rise. Growing nationalism, enduring security flashpoints in the Korean peninsula and the South China Sea, an ascendant China, and climate change are just some of the factors that will demand attention and action in the coming years. The election of Donald Trump as the new U.S. President adds unpredictability to the region given his campaign promises to upend America’s role in the alliance infrastructure that underpins security, economic, and political relationships in the region and the world. Co-Chairman of the ASNC Advisory Board and Chairman Emeritus of Silicon Valley Bank Ken Wilcox will moderate the dialogue.
14/03/1759m 0s

Interesting Times: A Conversation with Ambassador Chas Freeman

There is a new world order. This isn't the 20th century anymore: shifting coalitions, changing spheres of influence, evolving economic and political powers. A friend one minute; a foe another. To address these challenges, the next US president must reconsider our statecraft and diplomacy. Career Ambassador and renowned expert on US-China and Middle East relations, Chas W. Freeman, will call upon his decades of experience to discuss how US foreign policy must change to suit today’s increasingly competitive and disorderly world. How can the US better navigate its complex relationship with China? What lessons can be learned from our failed interventions in the Middle East, and what steps can be taken to remedy those diplomatic and military errors? How should the US respond to the Arab uprisings and the deteriorating order in the Middle East? Is Israel a strategic asset or liability for the US? Ambassador Chas Freeman is well-positioned to respond to these questions. During his three decades as an American diplomat, he has served as the US Ambassador to Saudi Arabia; negotiated with Fidel Castro and other state leaders; translated for President Nixon during his breakthrough visit to Beijing; and served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. Freeman is one of America’s most distinguished diplomats. Providing frank, but graciously rendered observations, he will challenge us to think critically about US foreign policy - how we have erred in the past, and how we might do things differently in the future. Speaker Chas W. Freeman is Senior Fellow of the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University, and Chairman of the Board, Committee for the Republic Moderator Jane Wales is CEO of World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum, and Vice President of The Aspen Institute. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1686
07/03/1759m 1s

Countering ISIL

The news each week is filled with increasingly horrific stories of the effects of violent extremism and ISIL-led and ISIL-inspired attacks in Iraq, Syria and around the world. We will make a a clear-eyed assessment of the challenge of violent extremism, including recruitment and radicalization, and the current state of the conflict and discuss how the US and our partners might respond in 2017 and beyond. How are the US defense, intelligence, diplomatic, and development agencies working to prevent the rise of violent extremism and counter ISIL? What consensus for our strategies and tactics exists among US allies and partners? What role should the multilateral organizations, including the UN, NATO and others play in the year ahead? How is ISIL able to convince young vulnerable populations across the globe to join them? How do we work with our local communities and in communities in Europe and other regions to identify signs of radicalization to violence and prevent it? How is the US and our partners working to leverage the technology sector, social media platforms and counter-messaging efforts to counter ISIL’s use of the internet for self-promotion and recruitment? Rukmini Callimachi, Foreign Correspondent covering extremism, The New York Times Michael Ortiz, Deputy Coordinator for Countering Violent Extremism, Bureau of Counterterrorism, US Department of State Moderator: Martha Crenshaw, Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University For more information please visit: https://www.worldaffairs.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=792
28/02/1759m 1s

Alexandra Wolfe: Inside Silicon Valley

Head west. Start up. Get rich. The Silicon Valley mythos describes a steady stream of young, idealistic startup founders who have made it big. No longer content on joining the next “unicorn” (the unprofitable startup with a billion dollar valuation), entrepreneurs now chase the goal of the “deca-corn” - the 10 billion dollar startup. But what about the rest of those many unknown entrepreneurs battling to make it to the top? Alexandra Wolfe, staff reporter for the Wall Street Journal and author of Valley of the Gods, takes us on a journey into the unique Silicon Valley culture, turning her relentless gaze and unflinching wit on the life and times of the startup bubble. What makes these Silicon Valley entrepreneurs tick? How do these young up-and-comers balance Silicon Valley’s endless optimism with its lofty expectations? Who are these men and women of Silicon Valley, whose hubris and ambition are changing the world? Speaker Alexandra Wolfe is an author and Staff Reporter at the Wall Street Journal. The conversation is moderated by Brad Stone, Senior Executive Editor for Technology at Bloomberg News. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1673
22/02/1759m 1s

Dan Slater: Wolf Boys: A Journey into the World of a Mexican Drug Cartel

Take an extraordinary journey through the criminal underworld of the Mexican drug cartels and the dark heart of the US-Mexican drug wars. Los Zetas, the infamous Mexican drug cartel, has taken gang brutality to unprecedented levels. United States and Mexican law enforcement agencies accuse Los Zetas of hundreds of deaths and laundering millions of dollars. As blood has spilled on both sides of the US-Mexican border, the cartels have increasingly turned to children as their foot soldiers - for trafficking, kidnapping, and even murder. Journalist Dan Slater has spent years researching this phenomena as it has played out in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, and just across the border in its sister city, Laredo, Texas - border towns that are a prime battleground for control of lucrative US drug smuggling routes. Sharing insights from his book, "Wolf Boys", Slater will respond to the questions: Who are the casualties when cartels go to war? Why did the cartels begin this sinister recruitment of children, and how did two American teens get caught up in the violence? What can be done to break this vicious cycle? Speaker Dan Slater is author of Wolf Boys. The discussion is moderated by Andrew Becker, Reporter, The Center for Investigative Reporting. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1632
14/02/1759m 1s

Richard N. Haass: A World in Disarray

Disorder is on the rise: in the Middle East, in Europe, across Asia and even on the home front. It is not merely that the players in the international arena have changed, but the rules of the game itself have changed too. Old approaches to world affairs are now rendered obsolete. Richard Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations and author of the upcoming book, A World in Disarray, will provide a compelling diagnosis of the most pressing global challenges today and his prescription for a renewed American foreign policy to address these challenges. In the age of non-state actors re-writing traditional rules of diplomacy, the US, while still an indispensable nation, must also recognize that once-great powers are losing their sway. The old global order has shifted, but the US - through its relationships with China, Russia and in the Middle East - can help forge a new order for this twenty-first century world. Calling upon his years of experience working as an analyst and in the highest levels of government, Haass will provide a lucid and incisive analysis: what is the state of the world; how did it become a world of disarray; and what can we do about it? Speaker Richard N. Haass is President of the Council on Foreign Relations. The conversation is moderated by Kori Schake, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University. For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1678
10/02/1759m 0s

Steven Koltai: Peace through Entrepreneurship?

Violent, extremist movements have continued to build around the world, and diplomacy and military power have failed to stem the tide. Why have the past responses to these crises fallen short? Steven Koltai argues that terrorist groups are fueled less by ideology, and more by a lack of attractive economic prospects for the young men who join the fray. If joblessness is an important root cause of extremist movements, then good jobs and economic growth may provide security where past responses have failed. Have traditional approaches to development adequately invested in entrepreneurship as a means of creating economic opportunities in the developing world? What lessons from the US startup culture can be translated to these volatile markets? Steven Koltai's new book, "Peace through Entrepreneurship" builds a case for a renewed emphasis on entrepreneurship in US foreign policy. Speaker Steven Koltai is an author and guest scholar at the Brookings Institution. The conversation is moderated by Charles Slaughter, Founder and CEO, Living Goods. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1634
31/01/1759m 1s

Fred Hochberg and Rana Foroohar: American Business and Protecting a US Competitive Advantage

Fred Hochberg, Chairman and President of the Export-Import bank of the US, makes the case that the US is leading the way in a globalized economy. By focusing 90% of the bank’s attention on small businesses, Hochberg argues that his bank is creating greater opportunity while reducing risk. In contrast, Rana Foroohar, Assistant Managing Editor at TIME, sees a murkier future.  According to Foroohar what few of us realize is how the misguided financial practices and philosophies that nearly toppled the global financial system in 2008 have come to infiltrate all American businesses, putting us on a collision course for another cataclysmic meltdown.
25/01/1759m 1s

Senator George Mitchell and Alon Sachar: Negotiating a Solution in Israel and Palestine

This week, World Affairs CEO Jane Wales is in conversation with Senator George Mitchell, former Senate Majority Leader and Special Envoy for Middle East Peace and Alon Sachar, lawyer and former advisor to Senator Mitchell. The two recently co-authored the book, “A Path to Peace: A Brief History of Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations and a Way Forward in the Middle East.”  As a new administration takes over, are there new avenues for diplomatic solutions in the Middle East?
17/01/1759m 1s

Larry Diamond and Francis Fukuyama: Is Democracy in Crisis? The Rise of the Right

In this special episode, we feature two conversations from WorldAffairs 2016. In the first half of the program, Stanford's Larry Diamond and Francis Fukuyama discuss whether global democracy is in crisis. In the second half of the program, Frances Burwell and Holger Stark talk about the rise of Right-leaning populism in Europe and the United States. For more information on conversations from WorldAffairs 2016, please visit: https://www.worldaffairs.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=792
12/01/1759m 1s

Jonathan Tepperman: Fixing the Impossible: Innovative Solutions for a World in Decline

All around us, we see intractable challenges - problems which have defied solutions for years, even decades: Immigration reform, economic stagnation, inequality, political gridlock, corruption, civil war and terrorism. These are the issues elections are fought over, and it has become commonplace to conclude there are no solutions. Jonathan Tepperman, Managing Editor of Foreign Affairs magazine, has traveled the world conducting more than 100 interviews, and he has reached a different conclusion: The solutions are out there. As he explains in his recent book, "The Fix: How Nations Survive and Thrive in a World in Decline," innovative approaches have been tried and tested, in democracies near and far, which may offer hope and hold insights for policy responses in the United States. Is there cause for optimism? If tried and tested policy solutions are available around us, why do the solutions appear to spread so much more slowly than the problems themselves? How does a news culture which overlooks positive stories affect our determination and focus to pursue these solutions? Among a sea of cynics, is there a data-driven case for optimism today? Speaker Jonathan Tepperman is Managing Editor of Foreign Affairs. The discussion is moderated by Annie Maxwell, President of the Skoll Global Threats Fund. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1643
05/01/1759m 1s

21st Century Development: Lessons from Silicon Valley to End Poverty

International development actors are taking cues from Silicon Valley’s boom to improve their ability to better serve the world’s most disadvantaged, transforming development in the 21st century. Technology, science and innovation are key to discovering new solutions to long-standing problems. Cutting-edge data techniques can help us measure the impact of interventions, continually improving services and scaling proven solutions to reach hundreds of millions of people. Leading technology firms are also major philanthropists, providing both financial resources and technical expertise to support development innovations. By partnering together, alongside other non-traditional stakeholders, we can achieve what human progress has only now made possible — the end of extreme poverty by 2030. How can development interventions become more adaptive and transparent? In what ways could shifting the culture of the way development organizations do business make them more responsive to beneficiary needs? How can we include local innovators and their contextual knowledge? Join us on for a discussion with Ann Mei Chang, Chief Innovation Officer and Executive Director of the Global Development Lab, a new entity within USAID at the forefront of these breakthrough solutions, and Jacquelline Fuller, the Director of Google.org, which provides over $100 million yearly to support innovators using technology for humanity. Speakers Ann Mei Chang is the Chief Innovation Officer and Executive Director of the US Global Development Lab at USAID and Jacquelline Fuller is the Director of Google.org. The conversation is moderated by Scott Wu, Partner and Head of Investments, Omidyar Network. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1649
20/12/1659m 1s

Jeffrey E. Garten: Globalization and the Next Administration

Globalization has been one of the most influential economic forces of the last century. The Internet has connected the world in ways that would have been unfathomable just a few years ago, China and other emerging nations’ economic fluctuations have impacted international markets, and terrorism has caused the biggest refugee flows in decades. It is no secret that many issues related to globalization such as trade, immigration, and climate change were at the forefront of the recent US elections. What policy decisions related to globalization will our new president face when he enters office next year? What immediate actions should the next administration take? Jeffrey Garten, who served in the Nixon, Ford, Carter and Clinton administrations and is also dean emeritus at the Yale School of Management, will share his views. Through the riveting stories of ten extraordinary visionaries, Jeffrey Garten's new book, "From Silk to Silicon: The Story of Globalization Through Ten Extraordinary Lives" explores how globalization has changed world history and continues to shape our lives. Speaker Jeffrey E. Garten is Dean Emeritus of Yale School of Management, and Author of "From Silk to Silicon: The Story of Globalization Through Ten Extraordinary Lives". The conversation is moderated by Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1659
13/12/1659m 1s

Is the US-Iran Deal Unraveling?

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) — the Iran deal — is perhaps the most important negotiated arrangement thus far in the 21st century. Iran’s capacity to construct a nuclear weapon has been stopped for 15 years and perhaps longer. It has not yet led to greater cooperation with Iran in the region, domestically on human rights and more democratic governance, and it has created problems for the governments of Israel, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States. Why? What are the prospects for the future for the next US president. Hadi Ghaemi, Executive Director, International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran Suzanne Maloney, Deputy Director, Foreign Policy Program, The Brookings Institution Thomas Pickering, Vice Chairman of Hills & Company, former Under Secretary of State for Policy and Career Ambassador Moderator: Greg Dobbs, former Foreign Correspondent, ABC News
06/12/1659m 1s

Partnering for a Peaceful Solution to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the most complex and polarizing conflicts in modern history. Nearly seventy years after the foundation of Israel and fifty years since the beginning of the occupation of Gaza and the West Bank territories, the struggle between the two sides seems to be almost as far from a resolution as when it first began. How can Israeli and Palestinian leaders move toward a sustainable peace? Is a two-state solution the answer? Can the US and the international community help to bridge gaps and bring the two sides together? Join us for a conversation about the prospects for achieving peace and why it matters so much to the US and the world. Maen Rashid Areikat, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, The General Delegation of the Palestine Liberation Organization to the United States, and Jeremy Ben-Ami Founder & President, J Street, are in discussion. The conversation is moderated by Janine Zacharia, Former Jerusalem Bureau Chief and Middle East Correspondent, The Washington Post. For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1601
29/11/1659m 1s

Vladimir Putin and Russia—A Renewed Enemy?

Russia and President Putin are a renewed source of concern in US foreign policy. From the perspective of the NATO alliance and potential challenges along Russia’s western and southern borders, to the clashes and compromises in addressing the ongoing crisis in Syria, to growing evidence of Russian cyberattacks within the United States, the next president faces a Russian leader with an agenda and expectations on the world stage.  What are the strategic key strategic challenges and is there an endgame for US-Russia relations? Masha Gessen, Russian American Journalist and Author Kathryn Stoner, Senior Fellow, Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, Stanford University Moderator: Robert English, Associate Professor of International Relations, University of Southern California
22/11/1659m 1s

Anne-Marie Slaughter and Henry Paulson: US Leadership: Where Do We Go from Here?

In this special episode we feature two conversations from WorldAffairs 2016, Day One: The World that Awaits.   US Leadership: Where Do We Go from Here? Anne-Marie Slaughter, President and CEO, New America Foundation In conversation with Jane Wales, President and CEO, World Affairs   Global Economy Today: Can the US and China Work Together? Henry M. Paulson Jr., Chairman, Paulson Institute, and 74th US Secretary of the Treasury In conversation with Anja Manuel, Cofounder and Managing Partner, RiceHadleyGates LLC
08/11/1659m 1s

Frank G. Klotz: After the Prague Agenda: The Future of US Nuclear Security Policy

In a 2009 speech in Prague, President Obama set out an ambitious agenda: committing to reducing the role of nuclear weapons, strengthening nuclear nonproliferation efforts and preventing nuclear terrorism. Seven years later, the world is fundamentally different than it was when President Obama embarked on what became known as the "Prague Agenda." As the Obama presidency enters its final months, we ask: What has been accomplished in preventing the threat of nuclear terrorism? What challenges remain? Join World Affairs for a conversation with Lt. General Frank G. Klotz, the Department of Energy's Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration, about the state of global nuclear security in a rapidly changing world. Speaker Frank G. Klotz is the Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration. Zachary Davis, Senior Fellow, Center for Global Security Research, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1625
01/11/1659m 1s

People on the Move: Meeting the Needs of the Displaced

In this special episode, we feature three conversations from speakers at our 2016 Global Philanthropy Forum conference.  Antony Blinken, United States Deputy Secretary of State, Elias Bou Saab, Minister of Education and Higher Education of Lebanon, and Alexander Betts, Leopold W. Muller Professor of Forced Migration and International Affairs and Director of the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford, discuss the Syrian refugee crisis and how government, enterprise, and civil society can bring solutions to the issue. For more information about these programs please visit: https://www.philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2016/
26/10/1659m 0s

Valentino Achak Deng: South Sudan: Five Years Later

South Sudan is the world’s youngest nation. Tragically, the euphoria of liberation following its independence in 2011 was soon undermined by deep-seated political, ethnic and geographical tensions. For the past 3 years, this power struggle has played out as a full-scale civil war in the country. Over 2 million South Sudanese are internally displaced, and over half of its 11 million population is facing famine. This discussion reflects on important questions facing South Sudan 5 years after gaining its independence. Is there hope for peace and stability in South Sudan? What role will the international community play in bridging ethnic tensions in the country? What is the future for the UN South Sudanese peacekeeping mission that is opposed by the very government it aims to support? Can the UN impose peace on a reluctant nation? What is the role of youth and the diaspora in paving the way to sustainable peace? Valentino Achak Deng, prominent South Sudanese advocate, will be joined by acclaimed author Dave Eggers in a conversation on these important issues. As a boy, Valentino fled Sudan during its civil war and spent nine years as a refugee in Ethiopia and Kenya before eventually resettling in Atlanta. In collaboration with author Dave Eggers, his experience was memorialized in the acclaimed novel, "What Is the What." Valentino Achak Deng, Co-founder, Valentino Achak Deng Foundation, speaks with author Dave Eggers. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1642
20/10/1659m 1s

Joby Warrick: ISIS: Understanding its Origins and Rise

ISIS surged to international prominence following its audacious prison camp raids in 2013 in Iraq, freeing more than 500 Iraqi insurgents. ISIS has since carried out increasingly bold attacks in Syria and beyond, cementing its reputation as a group more violent and ruthless than any that came before it. No longer an insurgency, ISIS’ focus is to establish its own rule on conquered territory, and declare a worldwide caliphate. Of course the roots of ISIS trace deeper, and are much more intertwined with the interventions of the West than they first appear. Today’s ISIS jihadists are the "children of Zarqawi," General Michael Flynn would later warn Congress, referring to Abu Musab Zarqawi, the once-obscure jihadist who led Al Qaeda in Iraq and laid ISIS’ philosophical foundations. How did Abu Musab Zarqawi, a “small-time thug,” rise to such world-changing prominence? How did ISIS emerge so forcefully from the chaos, and power struggles, of competing jihadist groups? Did the efforts of the West to crack down on Al Qaeda, inadvertently fuel the growth of ISIS ten years later? Pulitzer Prize winner Joby Warrick, a reporter with The Washington Post since 1996, will address these issues in a conversation at World Affairs about the birth of ISIS. His latest book, “Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS,” pursues a thoughtful reflection on the origins the most notorious terror group in the world today. As part of our "Engage" series, this event features a post-discussion Q&A, when you will have the chance to participate directly with the speaker and gain incredible insights that you won't get anywhere else. Speaker Joby Warrick is Author and Reporter at The Washington Post. The conversation is moderated by Kori Schake, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1636
12/10/1659m 1s

Finding the Next Patient Zero: The Global Virome Project

The frequency of epidemics is increasing, driven by surging populations, environmental change and globalized trade and travel. The SARS, pandemic influenza, MERS, Ebola and Zika virus outbreaks illustrate that the world is ill-prepared to deal with a large-scale viral pandemic. Experts have so far identified only a tiny proportion of viral threats, and few of these viruses have had vaccines or other counter-measures developed. Over the coming century we will witness spillover from a pool of over one million "unknown" viruses into human populations. The Global Virome Project is a global initiative to identify and characterize every significant viral threat circulating in the world. Only by identifying these potential threats can the world begin to prepare for the next great outbreak. In conversation with Jonna Mazet, Dennis Carroll and Nathan Wolfe, three experts from the Global Virome Project, this program will explore the extent of the viral threat to human populations and what can be done to stop it. The panel features: Dennis Carroll, Director, Global Health Security and Development Unit, US Agency for International Development (USAID), Jonna Mazet, Executive Director, One Health Institute, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, and Nathan Wolfe, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Metabiota. The conversation is moderated by Larry Brilliant, Chair, Skoll Global Threats Fund. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1629
04/10/1659m 1s

Meeting the Immediate and Long-term Needs of the Displaced

According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), in 2014 there were nearly 60 million refugees and IDPs worldwide — the highest number since World War II. What is the social sector’s role in meeting the immediate needs of the most vulnerable while at the same time, creating long-term strategies for ensuring the security and well-being of those forced to flee their homes? JEANNE BOURGAULT CEO, Internews @InternewsJeanne DEOGRATIAS NIYIZONKIZA Founder and CEO, Village Health Works @VHW AMY RAO Founder and CEO, Integrated Archive Systems @11thhourproject MODERATOR: SASHA CHANOFF Founder and Executive Director, RefugePoint @sashachanoff For more information about this conference please visit: https://philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2016/
27/09/1659m 1s

Mark Danner: The Forever War

When President George W. Bush declared the war on terror after September 11, 2001, the United States was plunged into a global conflict with no clear objectives. Today, nearly fifteen years later, there is still no end in sight. In addition to the war’s original enemy, Al Qaeda, the US is in conflict with other jihadist and terrorist organizations, including ISIS. What has the investment of resources by the United States and its allies achieved in this ever widening conflict? Why has the United States, the most formidable military force in the world, so far failed to defeat its enemies? What freedoms have Americans sacrificed in the name of this endless war? Join World Affairs and Mark Danner, author of “Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War,” for a conversation about how the United States found itself on a “permanent war footing” and what that means for our role in the world. Speaker Mark Danner is a Former Staff Writer at The New Yorker, and Professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley. Nancy A. Jarvis, Attorney, Farrand Cooper, P.C., moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1628
20/09/1659m 1s

Filling the Gaps in Humanitarian Aid

Over the past fifteen years, the demand for humanitarian aid has increased dramatically. The world currently spends $25 billion to provide assistance to 125 million people, and according to a UN High-Level Panel on Humanitarian Financing, another $15 billion is required to adequately meet the needs of those affected by violent conflict, natural disaster, demographic shifts and rapid urbanization, among other circumstances. As a result, the humanitarian sector is undergoing a period of self-reflection with the first-ever World Humanitarian Summit to be held in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2016. What has been learned and where is the sector heading? What is the role of public, private and social sector actors in filling the gaps in aid? And what is the unique role of philanthropy in both addressing the root causes of humanitarian crises and increasing the pool of available resources? GUY CAVE Managing Director, Geneva Global @GuyCave2 HADEEL IBRAHIM Executive Director, Mo Ibrahim Foundation @Mo_IbrahimFdn LONA STOLL Acting Deputy Director for the Global Development Lab at USAID @lonastoll MODERATOR: PETER LAUGHARN President and CEO, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation @peter_laugharn For more information about this conference please visit: https://philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2016/
13/09/1659m 1s

The Jobs Challenge

People in fast growing economies are experiencing social and economic mobility for the first time, joining the middle class. Producers and makers are finding new markets for their commodities or wares, entrepreneurs are better able to access capital and customers, and job seekers are better able to connect with potential employers. Networks and knowledge are not only enabling economic growth and opportunity, but they are changing the very nature of work. Yet the “jobs challenge” remains so long as there is a short supply of the skills required for the jobs that await. What models exist for closing the skills gap? Moreover, how might employers better signal the skills they seek, and job seekers convey the skills they’ve attained, sometimes in non-traditional ways? How might each leverage networks to connect to one another? KARAN CHOPRA Co-founder and Partner, Opportunity@Work @karchopra JOSHUA OIGARA CEO, KCB Group @JoshuaOigara SHAI RESHEF President and Founder, University of the People @ShaiReshef MODERATOR: AN-ME CHUNG, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Mozilla Foundation @anmechung For more information about this conference please visit: https://philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2016/
06/09/1659m 1s

Carne Ross: A Global Solution to Climate Change?

The adoption of the Paris climate agreement in December 2015 sent a powerful signal about the global consensus over the urgent need to address climate change. Although the agreement was more ambitious than expected, it is still not enough. Now the world must continue to embrace the spirit of Paris and race towards not only implementation of the agreement, but also increasingly bold ideas for the future. One country whose very existence depends on this is the low-lying Marshall Islands, a tiny atoll nation located in the middle of the Pacific. The Marshall Islands spearheaded the 'High Ambition Coalition' of countries that has been credited with securing the most ambitious elements of the Paris agreement. Former British diplomat Carne Ross is the Founder and Executive Director of Independent Diplomat - the world's first non-profit diplomatic advisory group - which has worked closely with the Republic of the Marshall Islands in the years leading up to Paris and now on its role with the High Ambition Coalition. Independent Diplomat helps to level the diplomatic playing field between the world's richest countries, which are often the most egregious polluters, and states like the Marshall Islands, which are both the world's most vulnerable states to the devastating effects of climate change and among the least likely to be heard at international negotiations. How did a country of only 60,000 people become one of the most influential states at the UN climate talks? What's next for climate diplomacy and the High Ambition Coalition? What lessons can the success of the Paris Agreement teach us about global diplomacy more broadly? How can private and non-profit organizations like Independent Diplomat influence international relations, peace and world security? Join World Affairs and Carne Ross for a conversation that will answer these and other pressing questions about the global solutions to climate change. Speaker Carne Ross is Executive Director of Independent Diplomat. Aimee Barnes, Partner, Allotrope Partners, moderates the conversation. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1617
30/08/1659m 1s

Justice in an Unjust World

How are international war criminals brought to justice? Since the Nuremberg trials following World War II, international bodies like the International Criminal Court (ICC) have fought to prosecute war criminals for egregious abuses of human rights. From South America to Russia and from Rwanda to Kosovo, scores of war criminals have been prosecuted for their misdeeds. But how can war criminals be held accountable if they can't be found? What happens when alleged war criminals or terrorists are being shielded from prosecution by states? How has human rights prosecution evolved since the early days of the ICC? Join us for a discussion with human rights experts Eric Stover, Alexa Koenig and Victor Peskin about the evolution of war crimes prosecution and what still needs to be done to protect victims of human rights abuses. Speakers include: Alexa Koenig, Executive Director, Human Rights Center, Berkeley Law, University of California, Victor Peskin, Associate Professor, School of Politics and Global Studies, Arizona State University, and Eric Stover, Faculty Director, Human Rights Center, University of California Berkeley. Rebecca Westerfield, Founding Member and Former Director, Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services (JAMS), moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1598
23/08/1659m 1s

Anja Manuel: India and China: This Century's Rising Powers

China and India have proven themselves indispensable in the first decade of the twenty-first century, which has been a remarkable period of economic growth and increased connectivity for both countries. Policy initiatives like the US Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that promote trade in these emerging markets provide exciting new opportunities for entrepreneurs around the globe to expand and develop their businesses and connect with potential consumers. However, in an increasingly competitive global marketplace, can the US continue to lead in both the political and economic spheres? How should the US engage with India and China in the future? Join World Affairs for a conversation with Anja Manuel, co-founder and principal of RiceHadleyGates, LLC, who will offer insights into how the US should work with China and India to face the twenty-first century's global challenges. Speaker Anja Manuel is Co-Founder and Principal at RiceHadleyGates LLC. Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs Council and Global Philanthropy Forum and Vice President, The Aspen Institute, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1615
16/08/1659m 1s

Michelle Nunn: Planning for the Road Ahead: CARE for Syrian Refugees

With no end in sight to the conflict in Syria, CARE USA is one of the leading international nonprofit organizations spearheading relief efforts in overflowing refugee camps across the Middle East. As an organization that recognizes the importance of empowering women and girls as a way to end poverty and gender inequality around the world, CARE USA focuses on ensuring women and girls live with dignity and security. As violence continues in war-torn Syria, and millions more girls and women are disenfranchised and displaced, how can organizations such as CARE USA provide these refugees the resources to build a brighter future? Join World Affairs and Michelle Nunn, President and CEO of CARE USA, for a discussion about the organization's involvement in relief efforts across the Middle East and the fight for women's empowerment taking place even in such dire circumstances as overcrowded, under-resourced refugee camps. Speaker Michelle Nunn is President and CEO of CARE USA. Linda J. Calhoun, Executive Producer, Career Girls, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1618
09/08/1659m 1s

Nancy Okail: The Arab Spring, Five Years On

Five years after the Arab Spring, the Middle East is faced with a civil war in Syria, the rise of the self-proclaimed Islamic State, violent insurgencies and a refugee crisis. Egypt, hailed in the West as an ally in the fight against terrorism, is far from where many hoped it would be when Egyptians took to the streets on January 25, 2011. Since the Arab Spring, international policymakers have prioritized security and stability over personal freedom and democracy which has led to a regression in rights and freedoms, growing public disengagement and increased radicalization in the region. Join us for a discussion with Dr. Nancy Okail, Executive Director of the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy, who will offer insights into Egypt’s tenuous approach to stability, the renewed crackdown on rights and freedoms and the role US and EU policymakers can play in restoring democracy and the rule of law in Egypt. Speaker Nancy Okail is the Executive Director of The Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy David D. Arnold, President of The Asia Foundation, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1596
02/08/1659m 1s

Rana Foroohar: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business

Eight years on from the biggest market meltdown since the Great Depression, the key lessons of the crisis of 2008 still remain unlearned—and our financial system is just as vulnerable as ever. Many of us know that our government failed to fix the banking system after the subprime mortgage crisis. But what few of us realize is how the misguided financial practices and philosophies that nearly toppled the global financial system have come to infiltrate ALL American businesses, putting us on a collision course for another cataclysmic meltdown. Join us for lunch and conversation with Rana Foroohar, "Time" assistant managing editor and economic columnist, and Tim O'Reilly of O'Reilly Media Inc. Speaker Rana Foroohar is Assistant Managing Editor of TIME. Tim O'Reilly, Founder and CEO, O'Reilly Media, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1611
26/07/1659m 1s

Carlos Alzugaray Treto: The View from Havana: The New US-Cuba Relationship

How much has really changed in the US's relationship with Cuba? Following President Obama's historic restoration of diplomatic relations with Cuba in December 2014, many hoped the agreement would offer opportunities for economic growth and cultural exchange, while others hoped it would lead to political change within Cuba. Has the reality of the renewed relationship lived up to expectations on either side? How do Cubans see the future of US-Cuba relations? Join us for a conversation with former Cuban representative to the European Union Carlos Alzugaray. He will share insights into this historic moment and what the US can expect from restored ties with Cuba. Speaker Carlos Alzugaray Treto is the Former Ambassador of Cuba to the European Union for the Independent Political Analyst. Cynthia Gorney, Professor Emeritus, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1599
19/07/1659m 1s

Adam Segal: States, Spies and War in the Digital Age

In the Information Age, modern society has gone digital. Computer technology has revolutionized nearly every aspect of our world, including international warfare. Where geopolitical power once depended solely on military might and regional diplomacy, cyberwarfare provides new tools for political influence and conflict. As cyberspace expands across borders, new state and non-state actors engage in acts of virtual aggression and use social media to control mainstream narratives. What does this new source of power mean for international foreign relations and how can the US negotiate its superpower status to gain control over this virtual battleground? Are US defenses prepared for global cyber terrorism threats? How can civilian populations be protected from cyber threats, given our reliance on the Internet and computer technology? How will Internet governance and surveillance affect user privacy? Join us for a conversation on these questions and more with Adam Segal, the Maurice R. Greenberg Senior Fellow for China Studies and Director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations. His book "The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age" describes the increasingly contentious geopolitics of cyberspace. Speaker Adam Segal is the Maurice R. Greenberg Senior Fellow for China Studies and Director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program for the Council on Foreign Relations. Raj Shah, Managing Partner of Defense Innovation Unit Experimental, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1612
12/07/1659m 1s

Robert F. Worth: Turmoil in the Middle East

Five years after the Arab Spring, how much has really changed in the power and governance structures of many Middle Eastern states? From Egypt to Yemen, countries once home to democratic grassroots revolutions now struggle to control political conflict and civil war. The general optimism that stemmed from Tahrir Square in 2011 has given way in many cases to sectarianism and conflict. Why did so many states fail to bring about peaceful democratic change? What are the consequences for the citizens of these states? How have the aftereffects of the Arab Spring contributed to the rise of terrorist organizations like ISIS? Journalist Robert Worth will examine the outcomes of the Arab Spring throughout the region and consider their implications for the future of the Middle East. Speaker Robert F. Worth is a Contributor to The New York Times Magazine. The discussion is moderated by Carla Thorson, Senior Vice President of Programs, the World Affairs Council. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1583
28/06/1659m 1s

Parag Khanna: Connectivity for the New World Order

Conventional wisdom says that the world is getting smaller. Thanks to advances in transportation, energy and communications, people all over the world are connected to each other like never before. Previously isolated nations are now accessible to the outside world and nations' economies are now dependent on those of other nations. What does this connectivity mean for the future? Will wars be fought more over supply chains than territory? Will increased connectivity make trade routes and power grids more important than borders? Join us for a discussion with global strategist Parag Khanna, who will offer insights into the new challenges and opportunities of our connected world. Speaker Parag Khanna is the Senior Research Fellow, Centre on Asia and Globalisation, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. Sean Randolph, Senior Director, Bay Area Council Economic Institute, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1593
21/06/1659m 1s

His Excellency Hamdullah Mohib: Afghanistan: A Transformation in Progress

Afghanistan has seen much development in recent years, influenced in no small part by the presence of the US military since 2001. With the election of President Ghani and the formation of the National Unity Government in 2015, Afghanistan entered a new era of reform termed 'the transformation decade.' While great strides have been made in education, civil rights, economic development and many other areas, there is still more work to be done in achieving self-reliance for the country. Against the backdrop of military, political and economic transitions, what steps are being taken to achieve a sustainable peace for Afghanistan and the region? Join us for a discussion with His Excellency Hamdullah Mohib, Ambassador of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United States, and the Honorable Karl Eikenberry, former US ambassador to Afghanistan and Trustee of The Asia Foundation, on the state of Afghanistan's security, politics, the reform agenda and future challenges to peace and development. His Excellency Hamdullah Mohib, Ambassador Extraordinary & Plenipotentiary, Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, speaks. The conversation is moderated by Karl W. Eikenberry, Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow, Director of the US-Asia Security Initiative, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1608
14/06/1659m 1s

Hrair Balian: The Prospects for Peace or War in Syria

Can Syria ever achieve peace? Over the past five years, the Syrian conflict has grown to become the center of a global humanitarian crisis, overwhelming many of its neighbors in the Middle East, as well as several countries in Europe. There are nearly five million refugees who have been directly affected by violence within Syria, three quarters of whom are women and children. Although many in the international community are working to find a peaceful solution, other states are actively prolonging the violence. In the face of such conflicting agendas, is a diplomatic resolution possible? Who will lead this resolution? Can Syria survive as a viable state? And what have we learned from the Syrian peace talks thus far? Join us for a conversation about the challenges of reaching peace in Syria and what the global community can do to help. Speaker Hrair Balian is Director of the Conflict Resolution Program for The Carter Center. The discussion is moderated by Katie J. Zoglin, Senior Deputy City Attorney at the San Jose City Attorney's Office. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1594
07/06/1659m 1s

Cihan Tuğal: Is Islamic Liberalism Dead in Turkey?

Turkey has long served as the gateway between East and West. Many Western governments count on Turkey to serve as a democratic ally in an unstable region. President of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the AKP have been praised for creating a liberal Islamic government in the Middle East. More recently, however, the so-called Turkish model looks to be failing. Why did such a promising government model fail to inspire democratic regimes among Turkey's neighbors? Is the Arab Spring to blame for the demise of the Turkish model? Is it possible for a government to effectively blend Islamic principles with democratic practices? Join us for a conversation about the prospects of creating a liberal democracy in the Middle East and why it matters for the region and the world. Speaker Cihan Tuğal is Associate Professor for the of Department of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. Jeffrey Scott Collins, Vice President of Communications at After School, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1597
31/05/1659m 1s

Yanis Varoufakis: Greece and The Future of the Eurozone

No country in Europe has been hit harder by the 2008 global economic crisis and subsequent downturn than Greece. After years of polarizing austerity measures and fears of a Greek exit from the Eurozone, the country is slowly emerging from an extended period of economic instability. The Greek recovery, however, is far from over. Yanis Varoufakis served as Greek finance minister from January through July 2015 and opposed the EU’s third and final bailout agreement for Greece. He will discuss how the Greek economy is faring today and how the Eurozone crisis affected the rest of the global economy. What lessons have been learned about the risks and benefits of a shared economic system? How can we protect those most vulnerable to economic shocks from another economic crisis? Speaker Yanis Varoufakis is Former Greek Finance Minister, and Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Athens. For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1586
24/05/1659m 1s

Antony Blinken and Nancy Lindborg: Exploring Cross-sector Solutions for Syria

Today, one out of every 120 people in the world is displaced from their homes. Once of the areas where the global refugee crisis is most acute is the Middle East, where the Syrian conflict has grown to become the center of a global humanitarian crisis, overwhelming many of its neighbors in the Middle East, as well as several countries in Europe. There are nearly five million refugees who have been directly affected by violence within Syria, three quarters of whom are women and children. How are individuals and organizations from the public, private and philanthropic sectors are working to provide both short- and long-term support for refugees?     Speakers:   Antony Blinken, Deputy Secretary of State, United States Department of State   Nancy Lindborg, President, United States Institute of Peace     Moderator:   Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs Council and Global Philanthropy Forum
17/05/1659m 1s

Connected Health Care: Have We Reached an Inflection Point?

From remote sensing devices to telemedicine to wearables, information technologies and connected devices are transforming the way doctors and patients interact and communicate. Is increased connectivity translating into increased health care access, better patient outcomes and lower health care costs as envisioned? How will these innovations impact access to health care in the developing world? Are we at an inflection point for connectivity to really change health care delivery around the world?   SPEAKERS Ram Fish, Founder and CEO, 19Labs Adam Pellegrini, Divisional Vice President, Digital Health, Walgreens Aenor Sawyer, Associate Director of Strategic Relations, Center for Digital Health Innovation, University of California San Francisco   MODERATOR: Adam Satariano, Technology Reporter, Bloomberg News   For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1548
10/05/1659m 1s

Ginger Thompson: Narco-Terrorism: Terrorists in the Drug Trade?

After 9/11, the Drug Enforcement Administration reframed itsmission, warning that terrorists had gotten into the illegal drugtrade to finance their attacks. From al Qaeda and the Taliban toHezbollah and the FARC, the agency has pursued drug traffickingcharges in association with many terrorist groups. While the twomay be related in some regions, such as Colombia and Afghanistan,questions have arisen around the scope of narco-terrorism.How effective is the DEA’s work on narco-terrorism in thwartingterrorist activities? What other strategies could be used againstgroups like ISIS, whose funding comes from oil revenues and taxes,not drug trafficking? Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter GingerThompson recently investigated dozens of narco-terrorism cases,raising questions about whether the DEA is actually stoppingthreats or staging them.Speaker Ginger Thompson is Senior Reporter at ProPublica.Cynthia Gorney, Professor Emeritus, Berkeley Graduate School ofJournalism, University of California, Berkeley, moderates thediscussion.For more information about this event please visit:http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1575
03/05/1659m 1s

Understanding Islam: Moving Beyond Extremism

What comes to mind when you think of Islam? Current headlines often focus on ISIS and Islamic fundamentalism, or power struggles between Sunni and Shia. But perpetrators of violence make up only a tiny minority of the world’s over 1.5 billion Muslims. Why do some see Islam as a religion that promotes violence or oppression? How can we change this narrative and better understand the peaceful faith of the majority? If current trends continue, Islam will catch up to and then eclipse Christianity in the coming half century. As the world’s Muslim population continues to grow, will we move towards greater understanding and acceptance? Join us for a conversation about this widespread and multifaceted religion. Speakers Karima Bennoune, Professor of International Law at the UC Davis School of Law, and Farhana Khera, President and Executive Director of Muslim Advocates, are in discussion. Sara Abbasi, Founding Board Member of Developments in Literacy, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1576
28/04/1659m 1s

Climate Change Through the Lens of Food Security

From the water-barren fields of African farmers to rice paddies in Bangladesh, droughts and floods caused by climate change disrupt food production, distribution and consumption on a growing scale. What actions can be taken at the local, national and transnational level to ensure that growing populations are able feed themselves and generations to come while adapting to gradual or even rapid changes in the climate? Speakers: Josette Lewis Associate Director, World Food Center, UC Davis David Lobell Deputy Director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment; Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University David Waskow Director, International Climate Initiative, World Resources Institute Moderator: Maximilian Auffhammer George Pardee Jr. Professor of International Sustainable Development, University of California, Berkeley For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1543
26/04/1659m 1s

Fred Kaplan: Cyberwar: The Digital Battlefield

Today’s battlefields are not clearly defined. On the ground, we see drawn out campaigns and militants living and fighting among civilians. Warfare has become more autonomous, with the use of unmanned drones. It has also moved into the digital realm. In recent years, concerns about cyberattacks have grown and hackers have joined terrorists on the list of global threats. But this situation is not new – we have been fighting cyberwars for decades. From the Gulf War to conflicts in Serbia and Iraq, warfare has entered a digital battlefield.What does war look like in the digital age? How has the United States integrated cyberwar into its national security strategy? What do we know about other countries' cyber programs and the potential risks they pose? Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Fred Kaplan will examine the history of cyberwar and consider its implications for future conflicts.Kaplan is the author, most recently, of "Dark Territory: The Secret History of Cyber War" (Simon & Schuster, March 2016).Speaker Fred Kaplan is the National Security Columnist for Slate.Herbert Lin is the Senior Research Scholar for Cyber Policy and Security, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1572
19/04/1659m 1s

Alec Ross: The Industries of the Future

Our world is changing rapidly. New technologies and other innovations impact almost every aspect of our lives. And this trend is only accelerating. In the coming decade, advances in fields such as robotics, cybersecurity and genomics will reshape much of the global economic landscape. What opportunities will these changes present? How will they affect the jobs of tomorrow, and how will we adapt to the changing nature of work? Will the world’s rising nations keep pace with Silicon Valley in creating their own innovation hotspots? Leading innovation expert Alec Ross will explain what’s next for the world – the advances and stumbling blocks that will emerge in the next ten years, and how we can navigate them. Speaker Alec Ross is Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Johns Hopkins University. Brad Stone, Senior Writer, Bloomberg Businessweek, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1569
11/04/1659m 1s

Nisid Hajari: India and Pakistan: Challenges for Regional Stability

From border disputes to foreign wars to the Taliban, many forces are at play in destabilizing South Asia. And the simmering conflicts of today have not emerged out of thin air. Much can be traced back through the region's fraught history.Relations between India and Pakistan have been marred by tension and conflict since they became sovereign states nearly 70 years ago. The two countries have been unable to sustain constructive engagement, and their disputes remain a major cause of regional instability - and even global concern.What lessons can be learned from the past in order to foster increased security and cooperation in the region? How can India and Pakistan overcome the legacy of Partition and find ways to manage shared challenges, from disaster relief to counterterrorism? Nisid Hajari, author of the recently published "Midnight’s Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India’s Partition," will share insights into this complex relationship and its implications for regional security.Speaker Nisid Hajari is Asia Editor at Bloomberg View.Jonathan Karp, Executive Director of the Asia Society Southern California, moderates the conversation.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1560
04/04/1659m 1s

Moon Shots: Can audacious challenges inspire a greater society?

Why did we propel ourselves millions miles from the Earth to the Moon? What did the audacious achievement mean for society? What is it about big ideas and bold visions that compel us to courageously face uncertainty and risk failure? How do daunting challenges provoke us to find novel, game-changing solutions to the world's largest problems and opportunities? These questions consume creative problem-solvers who are attempting to discover, develop, and deploy the next great "moon shots" for the 21st century. In this episode of our World Affairs podcast, you'll hear from Andreas Raptopoulos, Co-founder and CEO of Matternet, and Anthony James, Distinguished Professor of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics at the University of California at Irvine, two men who are using moon shot thinking to innovate, improve, and inspire.
29/03/1618m 22s

Ben Rawlence: City of Thorns: Life in a Refugee Camp

Refugee camps spring up around the world in response to the needs of displaced populations. Always intended to be temporary, these camps often become long term homes for their residents. From the outside, they're seen as a humanitarian crisis by aid workers and a security challenge by host governments. What does life look like for those who call a refugee camp home? Journalist Ben Rawlence spent years documenting life in Dadaab, a group of refugee camps in northern Kenya. The camps make up a small city of almost half a million people, mostly Somalis who fled civil war and violence. How does this population address the challenges of education, employment, healthcare and meeting other basic needs? Why has this camp, and others like it, become a more permanent settlement for so many? Rawlence will share the stories of a few of Dadaab’s citizens, exploring both individual lives and the wider political forces that have kept them from returning home. Speaker Ben Rawlence is an author and journalist. Karen Ferguson, Executive Director, Northern California, International Rescue Committee, moderates the conversation. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1551
22/03/1659m 1s

Taylor Owen: From Bitcoin to WikiLeaks: Shaping the World in the Digital Age

From WikiLeaks and Edward Snowden to Bitcoin and the Arab Spring, digital technologies have taken on a powerful role in global politics. These technologies are disrupting the power of traditional institutions – governments, businesses, international organizations – and giving new actors the ability to shape international affairs. Who are these non-state actors and how do they influence politics and events around the world, for good and for ill? How does digital technology challenge our existing institutions and norms, and what can governments and businesses do to maintain security and rule of law? Dr. Owen will consider these questions and discuss the new frontier of international affairs in the digital age. Speaker Taylor Owen is Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Global Affairs, University of British Columbia, and a Senior Fellow at the Columbia Journalism School. Quentin Hardy, Deputy Technology Editor of The New York Times, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1500
15/03/1659m 1s

Remarks by Leon Panetta, Former Secretary of Defense

Please join the World Affairs Council and the Marines' Memorial Association for a conversation between Jane Wales, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council and Leon Panetta, former Secretary of Defense and Director of the CIA. Mr. Panetta, an Army Veteran, served in the Obama administration as Director of the CIA from 2009 to 2011 and as Secretary of Defense from 2011 to 2013. He was a member of the US House of Representatives from 1977 to 1993, served as Director of the Office of Management and Budget from 1993 to 1994 and as President Clinton’s Chief of Staff from 1994 to 1997. He is the founder of the Panetta Institute for Public Policy and served as a professor of public policy at Santa Clara University. This program is part of the George Shultz Lecture Series. Speaker of Leon E. Panetta is the 23rd United States Secretary of Defense and Chairman of the Panetta Institute for Public Policy. Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs Council and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1571
08/03/1659m 1s

Steven Radelet: The Transformation of the Developing World

From the headlines, it seems like most developing countries are fighting an uphill battle against poverty, disease and violence. In reality, the picture is more positive. Over the last two decades, great progress has been made in the fight against global poverty. More than 700 million people have been lifted out of extreme poverty, six million fewer children die every year from disease, tens of millions more girls are in school, millions more people have access to clean water and democracy has become the norm in developing countries around the world.Many factors paved the way for this transformation – globalization, the end of the Cold War, the development of new technologies. And in order to maintain this trend, we’ll need to address other global challenges, from climate change and resource demand to poor governance and demographic pressures. Steven Radelet will discuss how we’ve reduced poverty, increased incomes, improved health, curbed violence and spread democracy – and how to ensure the improvements continue.Speaker Steven Radelet is Director of the Global Human Development Program for the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs Council and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute, moderates the discussion.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1559
01/03/1659m 1s

Micah Zenko: Strategy — How To Think Like The Enemy

Red teaming: it’s a practice as old as the Devil’s Advocate, the sixteenth-century Catholic official charged with discrediting candidates for sainthood. Today red teams—groups of fearless skeptics and friendly saboteurs—are used widely in both the public and private sectors. Red teaming helps pinpoint institutional weaknesses and anticipate potential threats ahead of the next Special Forces raid, malicious cyberattack, or corporate merger. But not all red teams are created equal; indeed, some cause more damage than they avert. Using them effectively just may be the greatest challenge for organizations in the twenty-first century. In Red Team, security expert Micah Zenko draws on the little-known case studies and unprecedented access to elite red teamers to reveal the best practices, common pitfalls, and winning strategies of these modern-day Devil’s Advocates. Red Team shows how any competitive group can succeed by thinking like the enemy. Speaker Micah Zenko is a Fellow for Conflict Prevention at the Council on Foreign Relations. Jonathan Tepperman, Managing Editor of Foreign Affairs, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1533
23/02/1659m 0s

Five Years In: Reflections on the Syrian Refugee Crisis

The plight of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees has long drawn international concern. Aid organizations rally to support displaced populations and governments debate policies for dealing with those who arrive on their borders. In the last year, the global refugee crisis reached endemic proportions. The civil war in Syria continues to force people from their homes, as does instability elsewhere in the Middle East, and in Africa and Latin America. The number of forcibly displaced people has reached its highest levels since World War II, and as the root causes of this displacement continue we’ll likely see the numbers continue to rise. At World Affairs, we have convened many voices on this topic in the past few years. Here, we share insights from seven individuals who have joined us to discuss the global crisis of refugees. In this episode, you’ll hear from Filippo Grandi, the newly appointed United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; David Miliband, president and CEO of the International Rescue Committee; Vali Nasr, Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies; Ban Ki-Moon, Secretary General of the United Nations; Yves Daccord, Director-General of the International Committee of the Red Cross; Elisa Massimino, president and CEO of Human Rights First; and Nancy Lindborg, president of the United States Institute of Peace.
18/02/1621m 10s

Globalization's Risks and Rewards

Globalization has shrunk our world dramatically, allowing people, products and ideas to connect at speeds and on a scale previously unimaginable. These connections have provided new economic opportunities for many individuals and businesses, as international trade has increased and jobs have reached new markets. However, the opportunities have not reached all people equally. Some of the jobs that have emerged in the developing world are the result of outsourcing, tipping opportunity from one community to another instead of creating new opportunities for all. Globalization has also put certain vulnerable populations at greater risk, as we see with underpaid and under-protected employees and individuals trafficked into forced labor. What can be done to bring the benefits of globalization to these individuals? What hurdles do we face in the process, and how can the political, private and philanthropic sectors work together to overcome them?   SPEAKERS Arvind Ganesan Director, Business and Human Rights, Human Rights Watch   Paula Goldman Senior Director, Global Lead for Impact Investing, Omidyar Network   Paul Rice President and CEO, Fair Trade USA   MODERATOR: Matthew Bishop Globalisation Editor, The Economist
17/02/1659m 1s

Meera Subramanian: India’s Natural World in Crisis

Over a billion people live in India – roughly one in every five on earth inhabiting two percent of the world’s landmass. This massive population has taken a toll, pushing the country’s environment and its infrastructure to the brink. Rivers are polluted beyond use and groundwater reserves are fast diminishing. Farmers struggle to fill the plates of their families and countrymen. Millions live in poverty, with the gap between the rich and poor growing more and more acute. These challenges that India faces today may soon become the reality for other parts of the world as well, as the global population continues to rise and a changing climate places strains on global agriculture, infrastructure, governance and other systems. How are individuals and communities working to combat these challenges? What can the rest of the world learn from India’s current predicament, and could these lessons help lead the planet to a more sustainable and prosperous future? Journalist Meera Subramanian travelled the country and spoke with individuals determined to revive India’s natural world. She will share these stories and offer insights into the present and future of India’s environment. Speaker Meera Subramanian is a Journalist and Author. Linda Calhoun, Executive Producer at Career Girls, moderates the conversation. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1527
09/02/1659m 1s

Our Lives Online: US vs EU

In today’s digital world, more and more of our lives are moving online, raising concerns about the privacy of the vast quantities of information that now exist in cyberspace. In recent years, much debate has emerged about the tradeoff between individual privacy and national security, and the US and EU provide an interesting comparison of how governments have balanced these aims. In the European Union, privacy is protected as a fundamental right, contributing to much stricter regulations on data collection than seen in the US. Last spring, the European Court of Justice ruled that EU citizens have the ‘right to be forgotten’ online, a regulation that would quickly run up against first amendment arguments in the United States. The US lacks similar overarching laws for data protection, as has become very apparent as vast government surveillance has been brought to light. How do policies differ in America and Europe, and what can the two countries learn from each other? How can individuals better understand their rights and limit the amount of personal data being collected? And how much privacy are we willing to give up in exchange for national security? Giovanni Buttarelli, European Data Protection Supervisor, and Cindy Cohn, Executive Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation, are in discussion. The conversation is moderated by Paul Schwartz, Jefferson E. Peyser Professor, UC Berkeley School of Law; Senior Advisor, Paul Hastings LLP. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1506
02/02/1659m 1s

World Affairs: Best of 2015

As we trace the ongoing impact of 2015's emergent global issues in 2016, many stories jump out from speakers featured at World Affairs. In this episode of our podcast, you'll hear reflections from 22 world-class experts (including Ban Ki-moon, Thomas Friedman and Christine Fair). Join us in 2016 for more conversations that matter at worldaffairs.org. The retrospective features: General Lloyd J. Austin III, Commander, United States Central CommandCindy Cohn, Executive Director, Electronic Frontier FoundationYves Daccord, Director-General, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)Christine Fair, Assistant Professor, Security Studies Program, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown UniversityNazila Fathi, journalist, translator and commentatorDr. Jonathan Foley, Executive Director and William R. and Gretchen B. Kimball Chair, California Academy of SciencesThomas Friedman, author and journalist, The New York TimesJason Furman, Chairman, White House Council of Economic AdvisersReid Hoffman, Co-Founder, LinkedIn; Partner, Greylock PartnersWalter Isaacson, President and CEO, The Aspen InstituteAnnie Jacobsen, investigative journalist and authorJoseph Kim, North Korean Defector; authorBan Ki-moon, Secretary-General, United NationsNancy Lindborg, President, United States Institute of Peace (USIP)Abbas Milani, Hamid and Christina Moghadam Director of Iranian Studies, Stanford UniversityDr. Vali Nasr, Dean, The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)Ilya Ponomarev, Member, Russian State DumaCongressman Adam Schiff, California's 28th Congressional DistrictEric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, AlphabetChris Woods, investigative journalist and authorJanine Zacharia, former Jerusalem bureau chief, The Washington Post; visiting lecturer, Stanford
28/01/1629m 59s

William McCants: The ISIS Apocalypse

The Islamic State is one of the most lethal and successful jihadist groups in modern history, surpassing even al-Qaeda. Thousands of its followers have marched across Syria and Iraq, subjugating millions, enslaving women, beheading captives and daring anyone to stop them. Thousands more have spread terror beyond the Middle East under the Islamic State's black flag. How did the Islamic State attract so many followers and conquer so much land? By being more ruthless, more apocalyptic and more devoted to state-building than its competitors. The shrewd leaders of the Islamic State combined two of the most powerful yet contradictory ideas in Islam - the return of the Islamic Empire and the end of the world - into a mission and a message that shapes its strategy and inspires its army of zealous fighters. They have defied conventional thinking about how to wage wars and win recruits. Even if the Islamic State is defeated, jihadist terrorism will never be the same. William McCants discusses how religious fervor, strategic calculation and doomsday prophecy shaped the Islamic State's past and foreshadow its future. Speaker William McCants is Fellow for the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1555
26/01/1659m 1s

Kevin Rudd and Orville Schell: The UN Climate Summit and the Future of US-China Collaboration

The United States and China must play a central role in any meaningful global effort to address climate change. While both countries have recently revamped their commitments to jointly reduce carbon emissions and invest in a cleaner energy future, the challenge of catalyzing these commitments into concrete actions remains daunting. With this year’s landmark UN climate summit in Paris seeking to create an effective new climate regime, are the commitments made by the United States and China enough to strengthen the global push to confront the climate change challenge? Join the Asia Society, in partnership with the World Affairs Council of Northern California, as we host The Honorable Kevin Rudd, President of the Asia Society Policy Institute, for a dialogue that looks critically at the current state of climate change collaboration between the United States and China. Days after returning from the UN climate summit, Mr. Rudd will reflect on his experience while attending the deliberations in Paris and share his insights into the future of the US-China partnership on climate change. Joining Rudd in the conversation will be Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director of Asia Society’s Center on US-China Relations, who will likewise have just returned from Paris with new impressions about the trajectory of global climate change responses, and the role of the US and China within them. Speakers Kevin Rudd, President, Asia Society Policy Institute; Former Prime Minister of Australia, and Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director, Center on US-China Relations, Asia Society, are in conversation with N. Bruce Pickering, Vice President, Global Programs and Executive Director, Northern California. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1556
19/01/1659m 1s

BUSINESS FORUM | Mobile and Broadband Affordability

Affordability is one of the key barriers in expanding broadband and mobile around the world, with both the cost of connected devices and of digital services being prohibitively high for many of the unconnected. Nearly 4.2 billion people, many of whom represent the poor around the world, are being left behind in the technology revolution and cut off from the potential economic, social and civic benefits of the internet. This program on mobile and wireless affordability will discuss how existing internet supply chain and infrastructure can be harnessed for greater affordability and what projects have proven successful in lowering broadband costs and how these can be scaled. We'd like to thank our sponsoring partner: Vodafone Americas Foundation. SPEAKERS Sonia JorgeExecutive Director, Alliance for Affordable Internet Mark SummerCo-founder and CEO, EveryLayer Amy TuckerCo-founder and Chief Impact Officer, Sparrow Ryan WallaceSenior Manager, Connectivity Deployments Team, Facebook MODERATOR: Patrick RyanStrategy and Operations Principal, Google For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1531
12/01/1659m 1s

The World's Changing Diet

As populations gravitate to large cities throughout the world and are absorbed into the middle class, there are corresponding significant shifts in lifestyle; one of these is diet. While access to new food sources can certainly lead to a healthier lifestyle, it just as easily can cause serious health issues. Many of these communities and nations are ill-equipped to handle the exponential rise of certain illnesses traceable in part to diet and nutrition. Take for example the rate of Type II diabetes worldwide; it has almost doubled in the past decade. Much of this increase occurred in the Middle East, where affluence is directly correlated with changes in diet. Similar epidemics of obesity and hypertension, previously unheard of in certain parts of the world, are also on the rise. This discussion will focus not only on the causes of these illnesses in unexpected places, but also on prevention. Speakers: Jason Beaubien, Global Health and Development Correspondent, NPR Gitanjali SinghResearch Assistant Professor, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University Christopher GardnerDirector of Nutrition Studies, Stanford Prevention Research Center; Professor of Medicine, Stanford University Bruce Y. Lee, Director, Global Obesity Prevention Center, Johns Hopkins; Bloomberg School of Public Health For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1546
06/01/1659m 1s

Annie Jacobsen: Inside DARPA: The Pentagon's Brain

The internet, GPS, voice recognition programs like Siri – many of the technologies that we use today were developed with national security in mind. These inventions and many others began as projects of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Defense Department’s secretive military research agency. For more than fifty years, DARPA has held to a singular and enduring mission: to make pivotal investments in breakthrough technologies for national security. The genesis of that mission and of DARPA itself dates to the Cold War and the launch of Sputnik in 1957, and a commitment by the United States that it would be the initiator and not the victim of strategic technological surprises. Working with innovators inside and outside of government, DARPA has repeatedly delivered on that mission, transforming revolutionary concepts and even seeming impossibilities into practical capabilities. The ultimate results have included not only game-changing military capabilities such as precision weapons and stealth technology, but also major innovations in modern civilian society. How do they do it? What makes this military organization such fertile ground for invention? What technologies with useful daily applications have failed to enter into civilian use? Can Silicon Valley learn from DARPA, or vice versa? Drawing on extensive interviews, declassified memos and inside sources, investigative journalist Annie Jacobsen will share insights into this top-secret organization. Speaker Annie Jacobsen is an Investigative Journalist and Author. The conversation is moderated by Andrew Becker, Reporter, The Center for Investigative Reporting. For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1386
22/12/1559m 1s

Eric Schmidt and Walter Isaacson: Technology and Innovation in Focus

This week’s episode focuses on Technology and Innovation and comes in two parts. In the first half hour, we will highlight the future and where the next great innovations are likely to come from, in a conversation with Eric Schmidt of Alphabet and Tom Kalil of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. In the second half of this episode, we will look to the past and what has made the great innovators of Silicon Valley. This is an excerpt from a conversation between Walter Isaacson of the Aspen Institute and Jane Wales of the World Affairs Council. Speakers: Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman of Alphabet Tom Kalil, Deputy Director of Technology and Innovation at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Walter Isaacson, President and CEO of the Aspen Institute Jane Wales, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council
16/12/1559m 0s

Sharon Abraham-Weiss: Human Rights in Israel: Safeguarding the Future

Israel is one of the most diverse societies in the world, often described as a mosaic. While Israelis and Arabs struggle to find lasting peace, social divides are only widening following last summer’s conflict with Hamas in Gaza. One of the largest obstacles to protecting vulnerable populations affected in both Israel and the Occupied Territories is clear policy that will expand and secure human rights. How can Israelis and Palestinians foster a culture of human rights and bring about real change in Israel across all sectors of society? The Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI) is Israel’s largest and oldest human rights organization, dealing with the entire spectrum of rights and civil liberties issues in Israel and the Occupied Territories. Through precedent-setting legal work, human rights education, public outreach and international advocacy, ACRI has contributed significantly to the protection and enforcement of human rights in Israel and the Occupied Territories. As Executive Director of ACRI, Sharon Abraham-Weiss takes head on some of Israel’s most challenging issues. The conversation is moderated by Chimène Keitner, Professor of Law at the UC Hastings College of the Law. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1517
08/12/1559m 1s

Working Together to Combat Climate Change

As sea levels rise, winters become harsher and crop patterns are disturbed. All eyes look towards Paris and the UN climate change conference to see if the international community can make meaningful progress towards curbing emissions. While the role of states in negotiating a treaty can be expected, what roles do philanthropy and the private sector play in creating state agendas and implementing change? This discussion will focus on the current state of the environment, what we can expect from upcoming negotiations and how we can work across sectors to implement solutions. Speakers Guillermo Castilleja, Chief Program Officer, Environmental Conservation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, David G. Victor, Professor of International Relations, School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego, and Sissel Waage, Director, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, BSR, are in discussion. Alicia Seiger, Deputy Director, Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, Stanford University, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1547
01/12/1559m 1s

Tom Friedman: Global Forces Breaking All the Trends

We are facing a unique and interesting time with the confluence of fundamental disruptive trends that are shaping our world. The dramatic transition witnessed since the beginning of the 21st century has been brought about by the convergence of the following: the shifting locus of economic activity and dynamism to emerging markets like China; the acceleration in the scope, scale, and economic impact of technology; changing world demographics; and global connectivity through trade and cross border flows in capital, people and information. Virtually every market in every sector has been or will be affected by the growing impacts of these trends whose multiplier effects stand to radically change long-standing expectations. In the midst of this era of disruption is opportunity. Those who are agile, forward thinking and optimistic will harness the power of disruption and thrive. Join us for a conversation about the four global forces breaking all the trends. Speaker Thomas Friedman is a Foreign Affairs Columnist at The New York Times. He is in conversation with James M. Manyika, Senior Partner and Director of McKinsey & Company, and Director of the McKinsey Global Institute. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1523
24/11/1559m 1s

Nancy Lindborg: Building Peace in a Fragile World

Recently appointed President of the United States Institute of Peace, Nancy Lindborg, will discuss the global challenge of fragility and conflict, including a vision for the way forward. Ms. Lindborg’s talk comes on the heels of the United Nations General Assembly in New York, the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, and Ms. Lindborg’s travel to USIP projects on the ground. Ms. Lindborg’s remarks will reflect these recent events and a lifetime of working in the world’s most fragile regions at a time when the global humanitarian system is at a breaking point, with record numbers of people forcibly displaced globally.The United States Institute of Peace was established by Congress in 1984 as an independent, nonpartisan institution to increase the nation’s capacity to manage international conflict without violence. USIP staff and partners work in some of the world’s most fragile regions including Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Middle East and North Africa.Speaker Nancy Lindborg is President of the United States Institute of Peace.Janes Wales, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council, moderates the conversation.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1514
17/11/1559m 1s

David O'Sullivan: EU-US Global Leadership in 2015

Whether it be the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), the historic nuclear deal with Iran, or the upcoming climate negotiations in Paris, the European Union and the United States are increasingly called upon to demonstrate global leadership. As EU Ambassador to the United States, David O’Sullivan plays a key role in transatlantic relations, working with all 28 EU member states in Washington, DC to coordinate and present the EU position in the United States. Ambassador O’Sullivan will discuss policy priorities and major challenges facing the EU and the United States in 2015, including ensuring a sustainable economic recovery, dealing with emerging threats, and working to promote democracy, human rights and good governance around the world. Jane Wales, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council, moderates the discussion. This is a program of the World Affairs Councils of America in partnership with the Delegation of the European Union to the United States. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1521
30/10/151h 5m

Internet of Things: Impacting Climate Change

Energy efficiency is one of the easiest and most cost effective ways to curb carbon emissions, not to mention beneficial for businesses and consumers alike in terms of cost reduction. But behaviors are hard to change. Leveraging the internet and connected smart devices may be the key to incorporating energy efficient technologies and practices into everyday life, and significantly curbing carbon emissions. In developing countries, where the biggest opportunities to elevate energy productivity exist, energy efficient technologies are poised to make huge inroads. What does the future hold for the internet of things and its impact on energy usage and ultimately reducing carbon emissions? Speaker Dora Hsu, Chief Platform Officer, SmartThings, is in discussion with Michael Soucie, Head of Consumer Product Partnerships, Nest Labs. Adam Satariano, Technology Reporter, Bloomberg News, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1541
30/10/151h 2m

Issues On My Mind | Inequality: Technology, Jobs and a Shrinking Middle Class

Upward mobility and the resulting growth of the middle class have long been the promise of the American dream, inspiring many to come to our shores. But technology-driven globalization, while creating great wealth and lifting many from poverty, has also left many behind. High growth economies like China, India and Nigeria are experiencing disparities that have implications for stability. And, in the US, inequality in income is the highest it has been since 1928. How can technology innovation be matched by social innovation? What will be the future of work in high and low growth economies? And how can the current and future workforce prepare for the jobs that await? These are the questions that are on the minds of some of our country’s leading technologists, including LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman. The World Affairs Council has invited Hoffman and fellow innovators to explore these questions and report out to those gathering here at WorldAffairs 2015. Speakers Reid Hoffman, Founder of LinkedIn and Greylock PartnersJames Manyika, McKinsey Global InstituteByron Auguste, Co-founder, Opportunity@WorkZoe Baird, President, Markle FoundationModerator: Jane Wales, CEO, World Affairs Council and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1540  
30/10/151h 0m

Setting the Stage to Combat Future Epidemics

Experts say the next epidemic will not be a question of 'if' it will happen, but rather 'when.' With that in mind and looking at the recent catastrophic Ebola outbreak in West Africa, what are the lessons learned from this tragedy and what needs to be done to ensure it does not happen again? Governments in the affected countries played key roles in both stopping the spread of Ebola and failing to respond properly. How can troubled governments best react to epidemics? What role do the business and philanthropic communities have in the prevention of – or reaction to – an outbreak? Julie Gerberding, Executive Vice President, Population Health, Merck & Co., Inc., is in discussion with Joia Mukherjee, Chief Medical Officer, Partners in Health. The conversation is moderated by Eva Harris, Faculty Director, Center for Global Public Health; Professor of Infectious Disease, University of California, Berkeley. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1538
30/10/151h 2m

Living on a Shrinking Planet: Opportunities for a Sustainable Future

The world is growing smaller in more ways than one – while the global population increases, covering more and more of the planet, the amount of livable, arable land diminishes in the face of a changing climate. How can we meet the needs of nine billion people while protecting the natural resources necessary for growth and prosperity? We will focus on this delicate balance and discuss ways to ensure a sustainable future, starting with our own backyard, in California. Speaker Jonathan Foley is Executive Director and William R. and Gretchen B. Kimball Chair of the California Academy of Sciences. Scott Shafer, Host and Reporter, The California Report; Senior Correspondent, KQED NEWSROOM, KQED, moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1537
30/10/151h 2m

Robert Gates and Michele Flourney: Confronting Global Crisis with Bipartisanship

This week’s episode focuses on US foreign policy and national security. The United States is currently facing many foreign policy and national security challenges: ISIS continues to threaten security and regional stability, the Syrian civil war looks no closer to resolution and is now creating a refugee crisis that extends well into the European Union; and the United States’ nascent nuclear deal with Iran still faces many hurdles. Amidst all of this, the candidates are gearing up for the US presidential election next year. World Affairs' CEO Jane Wales sat down with former US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates to get his take on this complex situation. After speaking with Secretary Gates, she continued the discussion of US foreign policy and national security with Michele Flournoy, co-founder and CEO of the Center for a New American Security.
12/10/1559m 1s

Congressman Adam Schiff: Iran, ISIS and Other Challenges: A View From the House Intelligence Committee

Whether it be drawing down from two foreign wars, the advancement of ISIS in the Middle East or the recent nuclear deal with Iran, the United States is facing numerous foreign policy challenges. As a Congressman representing California for eight terms, Adam Schiff has worked closely on many of the top security issues facing the United States. He has been a leader on national security and foreign policy efforts in Congress while serving as the ranking member on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and as a member of the Benghazi Select Committee. Schiff will discuss his work in Congress to strengthen American diplomacy and reform intelligence efforts along with his thoughts on the Iran deal and what the United States needs to do to meet future foreign policy objectives.   Speaker Adam Schiff is the Representative of the 28th Congressional District of California of the United States House of Representatives.   Anja Manuel, Partner at RiceHadleyGates LLC, will moderate the discussion.   For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1505
04/09/1559m 1s

Daniel A. Bell: Is Chinese Democracy Inevitable?

Many see China’s economic rise and growing middle class as precursors to democratization, as was the case for its neighbors in South Korea and Taiwan. This transition has not yet materialized, and some would argue that it won’t – and shouldn’t.Is Chinese democracy inevitable? Professor Daniel Bell believes it is not, and supports many aspects of the Chinese political system, in which top leaders are selected based on merit and electoral democracy functions at the local level. While a transition to full democracy may not be necessary, many problems remain, including corruption, lack of transparency and repression of freedoms of speech and the press. Can these issues be addressed within China’s current political structure? How can reforms be instituted in certain areas without the system collapsing entirely? And what can other nations learn from the strengths of Chinese political meritocracy?Speaker Daniel A. Bell is the Chair Professor of the Schwarzman Scholars Program at Tsinghua University.The discussion will be moderated by Dale R. Walker,Member of the Board of Directors for Beneficial State Bank, and Trustee of the World Affairs Council.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1501
03/09/151h 0m

Securing a Vulnerable Internet: A multi-sector approach to protecting data

Around the world, the Internet is a tool that enables economic development, government accountability and personal freedoms; the free flow of information is at the Internet’s core. But despite its rapid growth, approximately five billion people lack access to the internet, and the protections when it comes to surveillance and privacy are inadequate. As the great connecting infrastructure of the day, the Internet is also vulnerable to exploitation and the undermining of the very positive advancements it makes possible. This special episode features "Leveraging the Disruptive Power of the Internet", a plenary discussion from the Global Philanthropy Forum Conference 2015. The conversation explores issues of equity, of access, of safety and security when it comes to the Internet and information and communication technology more broadly. We also bring you an exclusive interview with Catherine Novelli, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment at the US Department of State. Under Secretary Novelli discusses cybersecurity, trade, Internet governance and freedom and data privacy.
27/08/1559m 1s

Access to Water: What's it like to worry about every drop?

Access to water has been declared an international human right, but it may be increasingly difficult to enforce. This episode explores how countries around the world are coping with the growing demand and greater environmental challenges that impact water supply. What happens when systems put into place to protect the environment obstruct our ability to access a basic human necessity? What does it mean when you have to choose between drinking, planting, or washing?
04/08/1520m 2s

Alexa Clay: The Informal Economy: Lessons from Pirates, Hackers and Dissidents

Innovation and entrepreneurship often conjure images of Silicon Valley and startups growing out of garages. But this sort of creativity is found all over the world, with innovators operating in black markets and informal economies and developing original solutions to many and diverse challenges. What does innovation look like at the margins of business and society? What lessons can we learn from the practices of hackers, pirates, gang members and dissidents, and how can we apply these ideas to formal markets? Alexa Clay will share stories of the underground innovators that make up what she calls the Misfit Economy.Speaker Alexa Clay is Co-founder of the League of Intrapreneurs.Jason Rissman, Managing Director of OpenIDEO, moderates the discussion.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1486
30/07/151h 3m

Feeding the Next Billion

In September, UN member states will vote on the Sustainable Development Goals, which, if approved, will come into effect in January 2016. The second of these 17 goals calls for ending hunger and achieving food security. This is an ambitious target to hit by 2030 — in the world today, about one in nine people do not have enough to eat.As the global population continues its rapid growth, this problem seems likely to grow as well. By 2050, the world will have 2 billion more mouths to feed, many of whom will be born in rice-producing and -consuming countries. Today, about two-thirds of the world’s hungry live in Asia, where water-intensive rice is a staple crop, raising questions about the role of climate change and water scarcity in the food security equation. How can we increase production while protecting the environment and its limited resources? To what extent will genetic engineering or a change in diets be necessary to achieve this goal? How can we ensure food security for a planet of nine billion?Speaker Josette Lewis, Associate Director of the World Food Center at UC Davis, and Robert Stewart Zeigler, Director General of the International Rice Research Institute, will be in discussion.Andrew Donohue, Senior Editor at Reveal, moderates the conversation.For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1491
29/07/1559m 1s

Remarks by General Stanley McChrystal, US Army (Ret.)

What if you could combine the adaptability, agility and cohesion of a small team with the power and resources of a giant organization?When General Stanley McChrystal took command of the Joint Special Operations Task Force in 2003, he quickly realized that conventional military leadership approaches were failing. Al Qaeda in Iraq was a decentralized network that could move quickly, strike ruthlessly and seemingly vanish into the local population. The allied forces had a huge advantage in numbers, equipment and training—but none of that seemed to matter.To defeat Al Qaeda in Iraq, McChrystal and his colleagues discarded a century of conventional wisdom and remade the task force, in the midst of a grueling war, into something new: a network that combined transparent communication with decentralized decision-making authority. The walls between silos were torn down. Leaders looked at the best practices of the smallest units and found ways to extend them to thousands of people on three continents, using technology to establish a oneness that would have been impossible even a decade or two earlier. The task force became a “team of teams”—faster, flatter, more flexible—and beat back Al Qaeda.McChrystal will discuss the challenges he and his team faced in Iraq and how they have be relevant to businesses, nonprofits and other organizations. He argues that the team of teams' strategy has worked everywhere from hospital emergency rooms to NASA and has the potential to transform organizations large and small.Speaker Stanley McChrystal, US Army General (Ret.) and Co-founder and Partner, McChrystal Group, is in conversation with Joseph H. Felter, US Army Colonel (Ret.) and Board Member of the Marines' Memorial Association. For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1487
21/07/151h 0m

Timothy Reif: The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Impacts on the US Economy

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade agreement being negotiated among 12 countries, including the US, has sparked a heated debate about trade agreements with many proponents and detractors speaking out about the potential economic impact of the TPP on the US economy. Some key areas in the agreement include: intellectual property rights, telecommunications, state-owned enterprises, investment, labor and environmental standards. Attention has also been focused on the negotiating process and the role of Congress in setting negotiating objectives and interacting with the executive branch in the implementation of those objectives.Join us for a discussion about the projected near and longer-term economic and other benefits of the TPP, and why the TPP has become the centerpiece of President Obama’s global trade agenda.Speaker Timothy Reif is General Counsel of Office of the United States Trade Representative.Lionel C. Johnson, President of the Pacific Pension Institute, moderates the discussion.For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1490
21/07/1559m 1s

Peter Gleick: Not a Drop to Drink: Dealing with Drought

In 2010, the UN passed a resolution recognizing access to water as a basic human right. The realization of this right is becoming increasingly difficult, as climate change disrupts rainfall and the growing global population places greater demands on this limited resource.In the face of the current drought, California is seeking ways to cut back on water usage and find alternate sources to meet domestic, agricultural and other demands. And this isn't an isolated incident – countries around the world are facing similar challenges and looking for solutions of their own. In Brazil, a country that has one-eighth of the world’s fresh water, Sao Paolo is facing a critical water shortage, with water reserves dropping below 10 percent. India is struggling to meet the needs of its rapidly growing population and address pollution that makes much of the available water unsafe for use. Israel has built five desalinization plants since 2005, which provide about 80 percent of the country’s water for domestic use – but some worry about the environmental consequences of this solution. Australia, the driest inhabited continent on earth, has turned to desalination plants as well, with mixed results. How can countries adapt, and what solutions are already being implemented successfully? What role should governments, businesses and individuals play in addressing this challenge? As water scarcity becomes more common, how can we ensure that the right to water is met?Speaker Peter Gleick is the President and Co-Founder of the Pacific Institute.Craig Miller, Science Editor at KQED, moderates the discussion.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1485
16/07/1559m 1s

The New Africa: Technology and Business on an Emerging Continent

People around the world will interact with Africa very differently over the coming decades. They will be more likely to trade stocks in Ghana, work for companies doing business on the continent and learn the names of African tech moguls and billionaires. The old narrative of an Africa disconnected from the global economy and mired in conflict is rapidly fading as the continent transforms itself into a global powerhouse. Pushing this transformation is a wave of modernization, technological innovations and a growing pool of talented Africans changing their countries not only from within but also from abroad. What impact will Silicon Valley have on the tech boom in Africa? How should policy makers and business leaders view these changes throughout the continent?  This panel discussion will feature expert researchers and entrepreneurs with deep connections to Africa and its business community. Jake Bright and Aubrey Hruby will offer a nuanced and data-rich analysis to a complex continent while reconciling its challenges with rapid progress. Entrepreneur Chris Folayan will discuss his work developing new platforms to bring e-commerce to Nigeria and other nations.The conversation is moderated by Quentin Hardy, Deputy Technology Editor at The New York Times.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1488
09/07/1559m 1s

The United Nations at 70: A Conversation with Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s visit highlights the 70th anniversary of the founding of the UN, part of a larger trip to the Bay Area to commemorate the San Francisco Conference, where the charter establishing the UN was signed in 1945. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1481  
29/06/1551m 32s

Sheila Smith: Japan's China Challenge

The rise of China has put many countries around the world on notice. Some may see it as an exciting shift in the world order, and others may approach it with caution. However, no country feels China's rise more deeply than Japan. Dr. Sheila Smith, an expert on Japanese and regional politics, will discuss how Japan’s relationship with a rising China influences Japanese domestic and foreign policy. Whether it be conflicts in the East China Sea, managing a volatile North Korea or strategies of island defense, Smith will explore the policy issues testing the Japanese government as it tries to navigate this storied and often complex relationship.Speaker Sheila Smith is Senior Fellow for Japan Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.The discussion is moderated by Jeffrey Bleich, former United States Ambassador to Australia.For more information about this visit please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1479
26/06/151h 6m

Yves Daccord: Responding to Crises: Remarks by the Director-General of the Red Cross

In the face of armed conflicts and natural disasters, civilians must cope not only with the immediate violence and destruction but also with displacement, disrupted economic and political systems and the disintegration of public services. As with the ongoing conflict in Syria or the devastating earthquake in Nepal, many of those effected by crises depend on the support of international agencies to meet basic needs.The International Committee of the Red Cross has been providing these critical services for over 150 years. Today, they are working to reconnect family members separated by the earthquake in Nepal, provide urgent medical care in Yemen and distribute food and water in Syria, among many other efforts. How does this assistance vary to meet the needs of crises around the world? What are the most pressing needs, and the greatest obstacles in providing them? How has the ICRC evolved to address the myriad challenges facing the world today, and what is the outlook for the future?Speaker Yves Daccord is the Director-General of the International Committee of the Red Cross.Moderator Nancy A. Jarvis is an Attorney at Farrand Cooper, P.C.For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1473
24/06/151h 0m

Joseph Kim: Escaping from North Korea: A Defector's Story

When famine struck North Korea in the 1990s, Joseph Kim was five years old. In the years that followed, the Great Famine killed millions, including Joseph’s father. His mother and sister disappeared, seeking to escape to China, and Joseph was left to survive alone and homeless. After years living on the streets and, for a time, in a detention center and labor camp, Joseph fled to China as well. Through the kindness of strangers, he eventually found his way to the United States.Joseph will share his story of suffering and survival – his experiences in North Korea, his long and difficult journey to the United States and his life here today as a student, an author and a refugee.This program is presented in partnership with the Asia Society of Northern California.Speaker Joseph Kim is a North Korean Defector; Author, "Under the Same Sky"The discussion is moderated by Daniel Sneider, Associate Director for Research of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1467
17/06/151h 0m

Robert D. Putnam: America's Opportunity Gap

America has long been seen as a land of opportunity where, through hard work and perseverance, an individual can achieve prosperity and success. This is the American dream. Today, however, this ideal seems harder to realize, as income inequality grows and social mobility appears to have slowed.In addition to income inequality, Professor Robert Putnam suggests that there is also a growing inequality of opportunity. For many children in lower income families, systemic obstacles – economic, social and political – become insurmountable and prevent social mobility and the realization of the American dream. What has caused this trend away from equal opportunity in the US? How can we address the crisis of inequality and shorten the opportunity gap? Professor Putnam will delve into this complex problem and its multifaceted solution, which he says begins with a commitment to invest in other people’s children.Speaker Robert D. Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government of Harvard University.The discussion will be moderated by Larry Kramer, President, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1476
11/06/1559m 1s

Elisa Massimino: Extremism Threatening European Democracy

In recent months, a resurgence of extremist, ultranationalist and antisemitic violence has shaken many cities in Europe. Coupled with the growth of right-wing political parties, this outbreak of violence - and the environment that enables it - threatens to corrode the fundamental values of the European Union from within. Discrimination against Jews, Roma, immigrant populations and the LGBT community has emerged not only among the civilian population, but in the political sphere as well. A year ago in the European Parliament elections, voters in half of the European Union’s 28 countries elected representatives from far-right parties whose leaders have expressed antisemitic, xenophobic, racist, homophobic, anti-Muslim or anti-Roma sentiments. Human Rights First President and CEO Elisa Massimino will discuss how the rise of extremism in Europe is threatening liberal democracy and the human rights and security of minority communities, endangering the transatlantic trade agreement and making it more difficult for Europe to address the growing migration crisis. Speaker Elisa Massimino is the President and CEO of Human Rights First. Katerina Linos, Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law moderates the discussion. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1470
08/06/151h 1m

Ilya Ponomarev: Dissent in Putin’s Russia

Last year, Russia surprised the world by seizing control of Crimea. When the Russian parliament voted on this military action, there was only one dissenting voice – Ilya Ponomarev. Now, living in the United States, barred from returning home, Ponomarev has continued his political participation in absentia.In Putin’s Russia, acting in opposition to the government can be a risky choice. In 2012, two members of a punk band called Pussy Riot were arrested for their performance in a Moscow cathedral. Anti-corruption blogger Alexei Navalny was placed under house arrest in 2013. And in March, opposition leader Boris Nemtsov was fatally shot just outside the walls of the Kremlin. How long can this government maintain control by silencing these voices of opposition? Can military action in Eastern Ukraine and elsewhere succeed in drawing attention away from mounting economic and political challenges? With elections scheduled for next year, what is the future of Putin’s government? And what is the future of relations between Russia and the United States?Speaker Ilya Ponomarev is a member of the Russian State Duma.The conversation will be moderated by Edward W. Walker, Executive Director, Program in Eurasian and East European Studies, University of California, Berkeley.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1460
21/05/151h 2m

Rebuilding in Nepal

Last month, a massive earthquake hit Nepal. While this event had been predicted for years, it still caught many unaware and unprepared. Thousands lost their lives, and many thousands more lost homes, loved ones and livelihoods. With the quake and its aftershocks behind us, attention has now turned to the challenges of rebuilding. How are NGOs and other organizations addressing both the physical reconstruction and the provision of necessary services such as clean water, sanitation and healthcare? How did the Nepalese government prepare for and respond to this long-predicted disaster, and where did they fall short? How does this earthquake and the international response compare to similar events, such as Haiti’s 2010 crisis? And what can we lessons can we take away to help limit the losses next time? Speakers Elizabeth Hausler, Founder and CEO of Build Change, Birger Stamperdahl, President and CEO of Give2Asia, and Norbu Tenzing, Vice President of the American Himalayan Foundation, will hold a panel discussion. David D. Arnold, President of the Asia Foundation, will moderate the conversation. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1471
14/05/151h 3m

Infectious Diseases: What factors are at play during disease outbreaks?

In this pilot episode of the World Affairs podcast we are looking at diseases: how they are spread, how they are contained, how they are cured. We reached out to learn more about how recent disease outbreaks have affected those in our community and what health professionals are doing to prevent the next deadly pandemic on local and global scales. In this episode you'll hear from Alex Karolyi, a Bay Area dad who had a trip planned to Disneyland that coincided with a recent measles outbreak; Adam Crawley, an epidemiologist and research associate at the Skoll Global Threats Fund; Peter Robertson, former Vice Chairman at Chevron, and now an Independent Energy Advisor with Deloitte; and Larry Brilliant, who took part in the World Health Organization's smallpox eradication program, and is now Senior Advisor for the Skoll Global Threats Fund.
11/05/1512m 41s

Chris Woods: America's Secret Drone Wars

Drones have become a regular, if controversial, part of US military operations. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, in Libya and against ISIS, these unmanned crafts are frequently put to use against specific targets, while keeping US soldiers out of the line of fire.However, the strikes that hit the headlines are only one part of the story. According to investigative journalist Chris Woods, a secret war has been underway for years, with drones in the air over Somalia, Pakistan, Yemen and others, searching for militant and terrorist targets. How have armed drones changed the face of modern warfare? What are the implications for US foreign policy decisions? And how does the drone program affect America’s reputation abroad?Speaker Chris Woods is an investigative journalist. He will be in conversation with Andrew Becker, reporter at The Center for Investigative Reporting.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1456
07/05/151h 5m

Syrian Civil War: What are the impacts of displacement on Syrian lives?

The war in Syria, now in its fifth year, has created a refugee crisis. Almost 4 million Syrians have fled the country, and another 7.6 million have been displaced within Syria. In total, this conflict has forced half of the country’s population from their homes. In this episode of WorldAffairs, we’re sharing two perspectives—the analytic and the personal—on this complex issue. First, we’ll hear from three experts who either observe or make policy: Filippo Grandi of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine refugees, David Miliband, president of the International Rescue Committee, and Vali Nasr, Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. In the second half of the program, we’ll hear stories from those who see and feel the human dimension of this crisis: among them are Anisa Abeytia, from the NorCal Syrian American Council, Feras Alhlou, a volunteer and advocate and Christine Lemonda, from the International Rescue Committee. For more information about our new podcast programs please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/podcast
17/04/1523m 43s

Abbas M. Milani and Janine Zacharia: Israel, Iran and the US: A Complex Triangle

How can we understand the intricate web of agendas and interests between the US, Israel and Iran? Nuclear negotiations between Iran and the US are ongoing, as Israel continues to voice its concerns over the possibility of a nuclear armed neighbor. In Israel’s March 17 election, Prime Minister Netanyahu was re-elected to a fourth term in office, and his party now faces the delicate task of forming a coalition government. Add to the mix Netanyahu’s controversial appearance before US Congress and Republican senators’ recent letter to Tehran, and the questions are only magnified.How might Netanyahu’s re-election, and the composition of the new government, impact Israel’s domestic and foreign policy decisions? Can the US come to an agreement with Iran without harming its longstanding friendship with Israel? What might an agreement mean for Iran politically and economically? In light of the overall instability in the Middle East, how do Israel on the one hand, and Iran on the other, think about their regional positions? Finally, what does the future look like for the complex ties between these three nations?Speakers Abbas M. Milani, Research Fellow and Co-Director, Iran Democracy Project, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and Janine Zacharia, Carlos Kelly McClatchy Visiting Lecturer, Department of Communications, Stanford University, will be in discussion.Jane Wales, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council, will moderate the conversation.For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1450
02/04/151h 6m

Fazle Hasan Abed: An Anti-Poverty Toolkit

Poverty is often thought of as an economic issue, to be addressed through loans and other financial services. However, this is only one piece of the larger puzzle. Poor health can keep an individual from work or a natural disaster may destroy homes, crops and other resources. Lack of education limits opportunities for employment and higher wages. In order for the poor to escape poverty, they require the tools to fight it across all fronts. BRAC (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee), a development organization focused on alleviating poverty, therefore works with communities on a wide range of initiatives, from agriculture and food security to education and gender equality, in order to provide all the necessary tools for growth.How does promoting gender equality, education and human rights aid in the fight to end poverty? BRAC’s founder, Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, will share his insights on poverty alleviation and the power of education, as well as BRAC’s growth and evolution over the past 40 years.Sir Fazle has received several national and international awards for his achievements in leading BRAC, including the David Rockefeller Bridging Leadership Award (2008), Inaugural Clinton Global Citizen Award (2007) and Gates Award for Global Health (2004). The British crown knighted him in recognition of his services to reducing poverty in Bangladesh and internationally.Speaker Fazle Hasan Abed is the Founder and Chairperson of BRAC.Catherine Muther, President of the Three Guineas Fund, moderates the discussion.For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1438
01/04/151h 4m

Digital Currencies

Digital currency platforms have the potential to disrupt the global financial infrastructure and change the way that people and institutions exchange value. With the ability to transfer funds instantly to anywhere in the world by anyone, digital currencies hold the promise of providing financial inclusion to those underserved or unserved by the traditional financial institutions, and transforming the global financial ecosystem. Please join us for a discussion of the future of digital currencies, and the opportunities and challenges ahead.Speakers Brian Armstrong, Founder and CEO, Coinbase, Joyce Kim, Executive Director, Stellar.org, and Elizabeth Stark, Founder, StartBitcoin.org, participate in the panel discussion.Cory Johnson, Anchor and Editor-At-Large, Bloomberg Television, moderates the conversation.For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1442
27/03/151h 5m

Sean McFate: Shadow Wars: The World of Military Contracting

Throughout Africa, Latin America and the Middle East, the United States employs private military contractors to carry out its objectives. While US firms dominate the market, warlords and militias have restyled themselves as private security companies in places like Afghanistan and Somalia. These private entities have become an integral part of the United States' defense strategy — the US can no longer go to war without contractors.How does military contracting actually operate? What does the proliferation of private forces suggest about the future of war and international relations? Sean McFate, a former paratrooper in the US Army and previous employee of a military contractor, will discuss these questions and share his unique perspective on this growing industry.This event is presented in partnership with the Marines' Memorial Association.Speaker Sean McFate is Assistant Professor at the National Defense University, and Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council.The conversation will be moderated by Christopher Starling, Director of Military and Veteran Affairs, Marines’ Memorial Club.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1425
25/03/1557m 40s

Gernot Wagner: Climate Shock: Seeking Insurance Against a Warming Planet

Climate change has long been a topic that inspires concern, but little action. While signs of its impact have slowly increased, it seems not to pose an imminent enough threat to initiate a global attempt to slow its progress. However, if we wait for the threat to become imminent, it may be too late to respond.According to Gernot Wagner, lead senior economist at the Environmental Defense Fund, we should begin thinking about responding to climate change in the same way we think about our health or car insurance - as a way of managing potential risk. Wagner will share his insights on the political and economic barriers to preemptive action, the economic consequences of a hotter planet and the extreme responses, such as geoengineering, that will likely come from waiting too long to act.Speaker Gernot Wagner is a Lead Senior Economist at the Environmental Defense Fund.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1424
18/03/151h 2m

Vali R. Nasr: Opportunities and Uncertainties in the Middle East

The Middle East faces many and diverse challenges. Nuclear talks with Iran move slowly, with deadlines repeatedly pushed back. The Islamic State retains its hold on large swaths of Iraq and Syria and the rise of extremism threatens regional and international stability. Oil prices have fallen, impacting economies across the region and the world. The recent succession in Saudi Arabia raises questions about the outlook for this key US ally. With all of these factors in play, the outlook for 2015 is indeed uncertain.Vali Nasr, Middle East expert and former senior advisor to the US special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, Ambassador Richard Holbrooke, will discuss these challenges and how they could impact international stability and security.This event is presented in partnership with the Marines' Memorial Association.Speaker Vali R. Nasr is the Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.The discussion will be moderated by Anja Lucia Manuel, Partner at RiceHadleyGates LLC.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1427
17/03/1559m 6s

The Power of Words: Global Illiteracy and the Campaign to End It

Around the world, nearly 800 million people are illiterate. That means one out of every 10 people would have a hard time reading this sentence. While global literacy rates improved over the last 25 years, progress has since stalled, especially for women and girls. And this isn’t only a developing world problem – 32 million Americans can’t read and write.Today, literacy is as complex as it is powerful. What it means to be literate in different contexts is changing rapidly as digital skills become increasingly important and technology grows more sophisticated and more available. These advances create new and exciting opportunities to tackle basic literacy challenges, and produce new literacy challenges in their own right.Educators and organizations all over the world are working hard in their communities to understand and address these issues. Literacy organizations such as Room to Read and Reading Partners are facing these challenges head-on whether in India, South Africa or right here in San Francisco. And Project Literacy, a major new campaign convened by Pearson in partnership with GOOD Magazine and others, seeks to make significant and sustainable advances in literacy over the next five years so that by 2030, no child will be born at risk of poor literacy.Join us for this panel discussion to learn more about the scale of global illiteracy, the dimensions of the crisis as it breaks down along gender and class lines and the opportunities for intervention.Speakers Erin Ganju, CEO and Co-Founder, Room to Read, Kate James, Chief Corporate Affairs Officer, Pearson, and Michael Lombardo, CEO, Reading Partners, will be in discussion.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1433
13/03/1559m 48s

Christine Fair: Pakistan, the Taliban and Regional Security

Pakistan faces many security challenges, both within and along its borders. The Taliban maintains a stronghold along the border with Afghanistan; the conflict with India over control of Kashmir has worsened in recent months; and in December Pakistan suffered the deadliest terrorist attack in its history when Pakistani Taliban attacked a school in Peshawar, killing over 100 students.However, some positive signs of change have emerged. The Pakistani army has ramped up efforts to combat the Taliban and other militants. Relations with Afghanistan have improved since Ashraf Ghani was elected president, promising greater security cooperation along the border. And US Secretary of State John Kerry is working to help India and Pakistan mend relations. Will these efforts be enough to ensure future stability? Pakistan expert Christine Fair will discuss Pakistan’s security concerns and the outlook for this complex region.Speaker Christine Fair is Assistant Professor of Security Studies Program for the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1422
05/03/151h 1m

Jason Furman: US Economic Outlook in 2015

Jason Furman has served as the chairman of President Obama's Council of Economic Advisers since August of 2013. In this role, he is charged with offering the president objective economic advice on the formulation of both domestic and international economic policy. Furman will discuss trends shaping the US economy, opportunities for future economic growth and public policy considerations to ensure that growth is sustainable and shared.Speaker Jason Furman is the Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers.The conversation is moderated by James M. Manyika, Senior Partner and Director, McKinsey & Company; Director, McKinsey Global Institute.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1398
26/02/1557m 7s

Thomas de Waal: Armenia, Turkey and the World: 100 Years After the Genocide

Nearly a century has passed since the Armenian Genocide, but the repercussions of the event still shape relations between Armenia and Turkey, as well as US policy in the region.The most recent round of discussions on normalizing Armenian-Turkish relations broke down in 2010. The two nations have not established diplomatic relations, their border remains closed and Armenians still seek formal recognition of the genocide from the Turkish government. On the international stage, the US seeks a stronger ally in Armenia to help advance its policies in the region. Neighboring both Turkey and Iran, and with close ties to Russia, Armenia has great geostrategic significance for the US. Improved relations between Armenia and Turkey would also advance US interests, as it could lead to greater stability in the region as a whole.Thomas de Waal, an expert on the politics and conflicts of the South Caucasus, will discuss how the Armenian Genocide has shaped contemporary politics both within the region and beyond.Speaker Thomas de Waal is a Senior Associate for the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.Keith David Watenpaugh, Director, Human Rights Initiative, University of California, Davis, will moderate the discussion.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1396
20/02/1559m 13s

Mark Entwistle: Cuba Opening: A New Era of US-Cuba Relations

Cuba and the US are rekindling relations, after more than 50 years of Cold War inspired isolation. Obama announced in December that the US would reestablish diplomatic ties, open an embassy in Havana and lift further restrictions on travel, commerce and communications. While the embargo will remain in effect without action by Congress, and concerns remain about prospects for human rights and democracy in Cuba, Obama's executive order marks a historic change in US-Cuban relations.These developments came after months of secret negotiations, facilitated by the Canadian government. The former Canadian Ambassador to Cuba, Mark Entwistle, will share his perspective on the negotiations, their outcome and what to expect going forward.Speaker Mark Entwistle is the Former Ambassador of Canada to Cuba, and Founding Partner of Acasta Capital.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1415
06/02/151h 1m

Nazila Fathi: The Struggle for Modern Iran: A Journalist’s Story

Following the 1979 Revolution, many Iranians hoped to see democracy emerge in their country. Instead, theocracy filled the political vacuum, stifling political discourse and restricting the freedom of Iranian citizens. Much has changed in the intervening years - the middle class is growing, more women are attending college and a moderate president has taken office. However, broader political change still seems distant. The Supreme Leader remains the highest authority and internet censorship and restrictions on freedom of the press continue. Iran appears to be on the path towards reform, but it may a long journey.Born in Iran shortly before the 1979 Revolution, Nazila Fathi spent two decades as an Iranian correspondent for the New York Times. She fled the country in 2009, fearing for the safety of her family after defying a ban on media coverage of the Green Revolution. Fathi will share her firsthand experiences of Iran's transformation and her thoughts on where the country is headed.Nazila Fathi, Journalist, Translator and Commentator, will speak.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1395
30/01/151h 4m

Chad Broughton: From Boom to Bust: The True Cost of Globalization

In today’s shifting global economy countries must often make rapid transitions to meet the increased demands of globalization. In the midst of this, it is easy for everyday citizens to ignore or forget what these transitions involve, where they take place and who is most affected by them. Chad Broughton will examine these global effects and specifically the US – Mexico relationship through the lens of industrial manufacturing in two North American towns. As thousands of jobs have migrated from the United States to Mexico, Broughton argues that what truly matters in debating the consequences of the shift is not just politics or policy implications, but also who is affected and where these changes take place. Broughton will share the voices of those who have borne the heaviest burdens of recent economic upheavals by putting a human face to the constant cycle of global manufacturing and looking at the true cost of globalization.Chad Broughton, Senior Lecturer, Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago, will be in conversation.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1397
21/01/1557m 57s

Remarks by General Lloyd J. Austin, CENTCOM Commander

The Middle East is a complex strategic question for the United States due to its evolving and unpredictable nature. What is the plan for Syria and Iraq? How much of a threat to our national security is ISIS? What about Iran? What will happen in Afghanistan as the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) reduces its footprint?General Lloyd J. Austin, Commander of the US Central Command, will share his insights on US military operations in the Middle East and future security concerns for the region.Speaker Lloyd J Austin is the Commander of the United States Central Command.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1402
13/01/1554m 40s

Microfinance: Meeting Needs With More Than Just Loans

The vast majority of the world's poor lack access to formal financial services. Faced with small incomes and little or no support from banks or other financial institutions, individuals struggle to save enough money to have a significant impact on their lives.For more than four decades, the microfinance sector has provided small loans to help support the self-help efforts of micro-entrepreneurs. While these loans are powerful tools, when taken alone, they are not nearly enough to help the poor climb out of poverty.Microfinance clients need other services, such as a safe place to save money, access to health services, financial education and other tools to help them make meaningful and sustainable progress out of poverty. As the digital and mobile landscapes continue to evolve, the microfinance sector is poised to innovate and serve more clients with a wider range of tools and services than ever before.How are microfinance organizations serving their clients with an appropriate mix of services that help them escape poverty for good? How can disruptive technologies like mobile banking assist in this mission? What advances have we seen in this field and what challenges lie on the horizon?The panel of speakers includes Alex Counts, President and CEO, Grameen Foundation, Steve Hollingworth, President, Freedom from Hunger, and Mary Ellen Iskenderian, President and CEO, Women's World Banking.Maya Chorengel, Co-Founder, Elevar Equity, will moderate the discussion.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1392
08/01/151h 0m

The Real Risks of Ebola

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa, with more than 13,000 reported cases and nearly 5,000 deaths so far, has laid bare the world’s inability to mount a rapid response to an infectious disease crisis. Emerging in a part of the world with weak governments and collapsing health systems, the disease has unleashed a massive humanitarian and economic crisis. In recent weeks, good news has begun to emerge: the World Health Organization declared Nigeria and Senegal Ebola-free last month and recently announced a decline in new cases in Liberia. Panic over cases in the United States has begun to subside.Now, as the media wave of Ebola coverage begins to crest and the international aid machine at last grinds toward a response, it’s time to turn to the larger message of the outbreaks. Is Ebola a litmus test for poor health systems, demographic change and environmental degradation? What does this crisis tell us about culture, security and governance in a globalized world? Are we able, and willing, to respond to an epidemic of this scale? This panel discussion includes two veterans from the front lines of fighting infectious disease in Africa. Dr. Alex Coutinho, director of Uganda’s Infectious Diseases Institute from 2007-2014, has led first response efforts again Ebola outbreaks. Jane Coyne, on the board of Médecins Sans Frontières USA, managed many on the ground emergency relief efforts in Africa for more than a decade. They will be joined by an Ebola survivor who will share his unique perspective on the outbreak.Speakers Alex Coutinho, Chair, Board of Directors, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative; former Executive Director, Infectious Diseases Institute, Jane Coyne, Director of Operations, We Care Solar; Member, Board of Directors, Médecins Sans Frontières USA, and Ebola survior and Infectious Diseases Specialist Ian Crozier will be in discussion. The discussion will be moderated by Gavin Yamey, Lead, Evidence to Policy Initiative, UCSF Global Health Group.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/28
09/12/141h 0m

The Innovators: In Conversation with Walter Isaacson

Walter Isaacson discusses the personalities who created the computer and the Internet. What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail? Isaacson shares stories about the innovators who helped contribute to the current digital revolution and how they fostered innovation, creativity and teamwork to succeed. Walter Isaacson is President and CEO of the Aspen Institute. He is in conversation with Jane Wales, President and Chief Executive Officer, World Affairs Council. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1389
05/12/1458m 8s

Peter Kornbluh: Cuba: Ending the Embargo?

Is it time to update US policy towards Cuba? Peter Kornbluh, Director, Cuba and Chile Documentation Projects, National Security Archive will share insights on negotiation attempts and the importance of mending relations between the two countries.Speaker Peter Kornbluh is the Director of Cuba and Chile Documentation Projects at the National Security Archive.Elizabeth Farnsworth, Special Correspondent, The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, will moderate the conversation.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1375
14/11/141h 2m

Eric Posner: Twilight of Human Rights Law

Despite countless international treaties, why has the world failed to address human rights violations? International law expert Eric Posner will discuss some of the reasons and what can be done to change it.Speaker Eric Posner is the Kirkland and Ellis Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago.The discussion is moderated by John Wilson, Partner, Shearman & Sterling.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1373
07/11/141h 1m

David Rothkopf: National Insecurity: America in the 21st Century

The American public has grown wary of foreign involvement and uncertain about the United States' place in the world today. This uncertainty has arisen from disillusionment with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the financial crisis, dysfunction in Washington and other real or perceived threats to the US's global dominance. How should the US adapt to the rapidly changing world? How involved should the US be in foreign conflicts and what can be done to address problems at home? How does America’s leadership ultimately impact these decisions? Rothkopf argues that, while the US has shown remarkable resilience, progress is often impeded by the human flaws of our leaders, the mismanagement of our system and an unwillingness to learn from the past. He will discuss how the country arrived in its current situation and what can be done to restore American leadership in the future.Speaker David Rothkopf is the CEO and Editor of FP Group.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1376
06/11/141h 4m

In Pursuit of Prosperity: US Foreign Policy in an Era of Resource Scarcity

In this age of globalization, it is clear that America's prosperity and security depends on that of our political and economic partners. Yet, today we see mounting evidence that our partners' stability is threatened by global environmental change. Increasing pressure on limited resources is disrupting global supply chains, causing social instability, destabilizing regional relations and expanding illegal trade. Join this group of top policy leaders, security experts and change makers who will discuss why environmental sustainability must become a central tenet of US foreign policy in order to protect our national security and promote global prosperity.Speakers Richard L. Engel, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Strategic Futures Group, National Intelligence Council, David Reed, Senior Vice President of Policy, World Wildlife Fund, and Amy Luers, Director of Climate Change, Skoll Global Threats Fund, are in conversation with Jane Wales, President and Chief Executive Officer, World Affairs Council.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1360
30/10/1458m 6s

Franklin Foer: 100 Years of Politics and Culture in America

To mark a century of The New Republic, editor Franklin Foer will join us for a discussion on the pivotal issues of modern America. Highlighting seminal contributions to the magazine, Foer’s Insurrections of the Mind is an exploration of such topics as America’s role in the world, the rise and fall of communism, the economy, terrorism, and technology, not to mention race, civil rights and the women’s movement. As political discussions increase in the lead up to the midterm elections, these issues remain just as important today as they were throughout the past century. Insurrections of the Mind, an anthology of the magazine's most seminal articles, celebrates a cultural, political and intellectual institution that has stood the test of time. Select contributors include Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Philip Roth, Michael Lewis, Zadie Smith, William Faulkner, Ralph Ellison, Langston Hughes, John Updike and Margaret Talbot.Speaker Franklin Foer is the Editor of The New Republic.The discussion will be moderated by William Drummond, Professor, Graduate School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1363
30/10/141h 2m

Awards Dinner 2014 - Honoring John Donahoe, President and CEO of eBay

The World Affairs Council and its Global Philanthropy Forum recognizes eBay and PayPal CEO John Donahoe and the company he leads for its commitment to creating economic opportunity and fostering an inclusive global economy, including its pioneering role in creating the peer-to-peer economy. The evening celebrates and gathers entrepreneurs and innovators who are further advancing this movement worldwide.eBay and Paypal are global commerce platforms whose success is tied to their purpose – connecting more people with more opportunity while making a positive social impact. A Bay Area innovation with global reach, eBay and PayPal helped spark a movement. Today the continuously evolving peer-to-peer economy enables individuals to participate in local and global economies, without the requirements of start-up capital or proximity to physical markets. A new entrepreneurial class is being built. Where there was a will, there is now a way.Speaker John Donahoe is the President and CEO of eBay, Inc.The conversation is moderated by Jane Wales, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1365
28/10/1432m 54s

Richard Olson: The US–Pakistan Relationship: What Does the Future Hold?

US Ambassador to Pakistan Richard Olson will discuss the US-Pakistan relationship as it is, and what it could become. Weathering setbacks over the years, the relationship has proven itself resilient. Ambassador Olson will explain why it is in our national interest to continue to engage with Pakistan and why this will require more than a transactional or single-issue relationship with Pakistan.Speaker Richard Olson is the US Ambassador to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, Embassy of the United States of America.The conversation will be moderated by Anja Lucia Manuel, Partner, RiceHadleyGates LLC.For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1358
16/10/141h 1m

A Path Appears: A Conversation with Nicholas Kristof

Even now, in the twenty-first century, intractable problems remain: poor early-childhood education, sex trafficking, inner-city violence, poverty and malnutrition, homelessness and many others. What can be done in the face of such enormous challenges? Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nicholas Kristof suggests that new, innovative approaches to philanthropy could offer answers, allowing individuals and organizations to make a difference in the world. At the end of the day what matters most is the impact on the ground.Kristof has lived on four continents, reported on six and traveled to 150 countries, reporting on global health, poverty, education, gender inequality and much more. He will share stories from his experiences on the ground and discuss the art and science of giving.Speaker Nicholas Kristof is a columnist at The New York Times.The discussion will be moderated by Jane Wales, President and Chief Executive Officer, World Affairs Council.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1351
08/10/141h 0m

Nicholas B. Dirks & Sebastian Thrun: Online Education: Preparing the Labor Force

Access to online education has the potential to democratize education and skill advancement around the world. In what ways and for whom has online education been most successful so far? What are the platform's limitations and where are the gaps? Please join us for a discussion of online education’s potential role in preparing a global labor force for the knowledge economy of the 21st century.The discussion features Nicholas B. Dirks, Chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, and Sebastian Thrun, Co-Founder and CEO of Udacity.Quentin Hardy, Deputy Technology Editor of The New York Times, moderates the conversation. For more information please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1328
03/10/141h 12m

Eric Schlosser: America’s Nuclear Arsenal: Illusion of Safety?

A nuclear blast -- are we at risk? Eric Schlosser, investigative journalist and author of Fast Food Nation, has now taken an in-depth look at America’s nuclear arsenal and the multitude of mistakes associated with the management and protection of this powerful and important asset. With the Cold War declared over for nearly 25 years, talk of nuclear weapons is generally relegated to the halls of policy think tanks and academic institutions. Schlosser would like to see this change, arguing that the nuclear threat is still very real – exacerbated by mismanagement and aging infrastructure of the US arsenal – and most Americans are either unaware or dismiss the possibility of any potential danger. Over six years Schlosser investigated the state of the nuclear arsenal and he reveals how the combination of human fallibility and technological complexity still poses a grave threat to mankind.Speaker Eric Schlosser is Author of Fast Food Nation and Command and Control.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1343
30/09/1458m 52s

Mathew Burrows: Alternative Futures: The World in 2030

Geopolitical, economic and technological changes are transforming our world. In 15 years, the global landscape will likely look very different than it does today. While we cannot with certainty predict the future, hypotheses abound. The National Intelligence Council lays out several such hypotheses in their new report, “Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds.” The report suggests four major trends that will shape the world over the coming decades: individual empowerment, diffusion of power among nations, demographic shifts and natural resource challenges. The question that remains is: where will these trends lead?Mathew Burrows, the principal author of “Global Trends 2030,” will discuss the factors that are transforming the world, predictions of potential outcomes and how we can influence the course of events.Speaker Mathew J. Burrows is the Director of Strategic Foresight Initiative at the Atlantic Council.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1330
29/09/141h 6m

Big Data and Genomics: Revolutionizing the Diagnosis and Treatment of Disease

Next-generation genomics can be described as the combination of sequencing technologies and big data analytics. The potential impact of this disruptive technology in health care will be primarily realized through extending and enhancing lives through faster disease detection, more precise diagnoses, new drugs, and more tailored disease treatments. The technical challenges inherent in genetic engineering technology are great but may be less formidable than the social, ethical, and regulatory concerns it may generate. Please join us for a discussion of the possibilities and the challenges of next-generation genomics and implications for health care worldwide.The panel of speakers include Timothy Behrens, Senior Director, Human Genetics, Genentech, Francis deSouza, President, Illumina Corporation, Robert L. Nussbaum, Chief, Department of Medicine & UCSF Institute for Human Genetics, UCSF.The discussion is moderated by Michael Chui, Partner, McKinsey Global Institute.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1298
19/09/141h 6m

Ramita Navai: In the Shadows of Modern Tehran

Governments that impose repressive policies on their populations often must contend with citizens that are intent on doing exactly what is not allowed. In Tehran, the largest city in Iran, the situation is no different. Ramita Navai witnessed this first hand as an undercover journalist reporting the stories of city dwellers attempting to conduct their personal lives under a watchful government eye. What is revealed is a Tehran so riddled with social, political, sexual and religious contradictions that in order to survive in the city, many must learn to lie. Navai will discuss the startling realities of living behind a veil of necessary falsehoods while giving a backstreet glimpse of modern Tehran.Speaker Ramita Navai is a journalist and author.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1338
18/09/141h 2m

Anthony Zinni: Before the First Shots are Fired

After four decades of military service and countless experiences with military intervention, retired four-star General Tony Zinni is well aware that wars are not always decided on the battlefield. Political decisions, intelligence estimates, strategies (or the lack thereof) and many other non-battlefield components have crucial significance in the outcome of war. Few Americans realize how many essential pieces have to fall in to place to execute a successful campaign. What triggers lead the US to use military force and how may these triggers be changing due to emerging global issues? How can the US learn from past successes and failures to achieve greater success in the future? General Zinni will analyze past military experiences and discuss what must be done to make the process of going to war more clear-eyed, and ultimately, successful. This program is presented in partnership with the Marines' Memorial Association.Speaker Anthony Zinni is the Former Commander of US Central Command.The discussion will be led by Jane Wales, President and Chief Executive Officer, World Affairs Council.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1325
16/09/141h 2m

Khalid Malik: Reducing Vulnerability: UN Human Development Report

The 2014 Human Development Report highlights the need for both promoting people's choices and protecting human development achievements. Although almost everyone is likely to feel vulnerable at some point in life, some individuals and groups are systematically worse off. Longer life spans and demographic transitions are having wide ranging effects on economies, societies and living arrangements. According to the report, vulnerability remains a major obstacle to human development and unless it is systematically addressed by changing policies and social norms, progress will be neither equitable nor sustainable.The Human Development Reports have been commissioned and published by UNDP since 1990 as an intellectually independent, empirically grounded analysis of development issues, trends, progress and policies. The report's ultimate goal is to help advance human development, therefore it places as much emphasis on health, education, gender equity and the expansion human freedoms and abilities as on economic growth.Khalid Malik, director of the UN Human Development Report, will share key findings of the new report, as well as discuss why a human development approach is incomplete unless it incorporates vulnerability and resilience into the analysis.This program is presented in partnership with the Global Philanthropy Forum.Speaker Khalid Malik is the Director of the Human Development Report Office at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).The discussion will be moderated by William H. Draper, General Partner, Draper Richards.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1327
20/08/1457m 30s

Janine Zacharia: Israel vs. Hamas: The Gaza Conflict and What Comes Next

After a period of relative quiet, Israel and Hamas found themselves in a summer rocket war that put the global spotlight once again on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Thousands of rockets and missiles were fired. The Israeli military destroyed an underground tunnel network built by Hamas. Gaza is in shambles. More than 1,800 Palestinians and 60 Israelis are dead. The United States leveled some of its toughest criticism at Israel ever for the killing of Palestinian civilians. What happens now? With decades of troubled history on both sides and a rising death toll, the possibility of a long-term peace agreement seems even further out of reach. Janine Zacharia, former Jerusalem bureau chief of The Washington Post, now a visiting lecturer at Stanford, will share her insights on why this conflict erupted now, explore what the sides hoped to gain (and what they did or didn’t achieve) and what it all means for the future of peace negotiations and the alliance between Israel and the United States.Speaker Janine Zacharia is the Carlos Kelly McClatchy Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Communications at Stanford University.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1337
20/08/141h 3m

Eric Liu: The Chinese American Dream

Just as China has experienced a remarkable economic ascent, Chinese Americans too are modern exemplars of the “American Dream,” going from servitude to success in 150 years. While this achievement is impressive for so many Chinese immigrant families, not all are living that dream. Despite the tales of success, some still feel left behind, others feel anxiety with China’s economic rise, while still others continue to struggle with the idea of what it means to be an American. As the founder and CEO of Citizen University, Eric Liu explores the complexities of American identity and seeks to revitalize the idea of citizenship in the United States. Liu will touch upon what it means to be a Chinese American in this grand moment for China and the United States and how each generation throughout America’s kaleidoscope of migration and acculturation has changed this country. For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1315
31/07/1458m 38s

Modi's India: Thinking About the Future

In May, India completed the largest democratic election the world has ever seen. Over the course of five weeks, more than 800 million people turned out to cast their votes. The election of Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) came as a surprise to many, especially since the incumbent Congress Party has held power for the majority of India's democratic history.The overwhelming support for the BJP may be a sign of changing priorities among voters. Rather than voting along religious, caste and other identity lines as has historically been the case, Indians voted for Modi's promise of economic reform and growth. However, religion remains a strong influence in Indian politics. Only 9% of Muslims voted for the BJP, which may reflect lingering concerns over the 2002 ethnic riots that took place in Gujarat while Modi was chief minister of the state.What does India's new leadership mean for the country's economic and foreign policy outlook? What are the implications of lingering religious and ethnic tensions in this vast democracy?The panel of speakers include: Pradeep Chhibber, Professor and Indo-American Community Chair in India Studies, University of California, Berkeley, Thomas Blom Hansen, Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor of South Asian Studies, Professor of Anthropology and Director, Center for South Asia, Stanford University, and Sunder Ramaswamy, President and Frederick C. Dirks Professor of International Economics, Monterey Institute of International Studies.The panel discussion will be moderated by David Arnold, President, Asia Foundation.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1314
24/07/141h 1m

Mustafa Akyol: Turkey at the Crossroads

On the boundary between East and West, Turkey's democracy has thrived by balancing its Islamic heritage with a modern secular state. However, recent protests and increasing authoritarian actions taken by Prime Minister Erdogan's government have observers questioning Turkey's current political leadership. The loss of over 300 miners in the country's biggest industrial disaster and the recent corruption allegations leveled against Erdogan adds fuel to existing tensions between the government and Turkey's citizens. Turkish political commentator and author Mustafa Akyol will discuss recent developments in Turkey and explain what they mean for the broader Muslim world.Speaker Mustafa Akyol is a Turkish political commentator and author.The conversation will be moderated by Jeffrey Scott Collins, Senior Counsel, International Policy, Chevron.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1316
17/07/141h 3m

Donald Steinberg: High Tech Tools for Global Development

Successful international development requires the integration of many different elements, from improving education and healthcare to addressing inequality and increasing government accountability. Each of these elements presents unique challenges and requires multi-faceted solutions. Looking at the example of poverty, as President Obama said in his State of the Union address last year, eradication will come from "connecting more people to the global economy and empowering women; giving our young and brightest minds new opportunities to serve; helping communities to feed, power and educate themselves; saving the world's children from preventable deaths; and realizing the promise of an AIDS-free generation." In the face of such complex problems, what more can be done to address global development challenges? Modern technologies like crowd sourcing, datapaloozas and hack-a-thons may prove to be useful tools. Ambassador Steinberg, former deputy administrator at USAID, will discuss the shifting landscape and the implications of these changes for the way we approach global education and development.Speaker Donald Steinberg is President and CEO of World Learning.The conversation will be moderated by Ruth Levine, Director, Global Development and Population Program, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1318
16/07/1458m 37s

Remarks by NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen

Political, economic and security ties have long united Europe and the United States, with NATO as an essential element of that relationship. Beyond the Euro-Atlantic area, NATO is working with partners across the globe, including in the Asia-Pacific, to build our common security and support the stable, rules-based international order on which we have come to rely. The stability of our international system cannot be taken for granted; with its recent aggression against Ukraine, Russia has demonstrated blatant disregard for the international rule book. NATO's Secretary General, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, will set out how the US and Europe, working through an outward-looking NATO, can continue to lead by example and safeguard the order on which our security and prosperity depend.This program is presented in partnership with the Commonwealth Club of California and the Marines' Memorial Association.Speaker Anders Fogh Rasmussen is Secretary General of NATO.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1320
11/07/141h 1m

UC President Janet Napolitano: Global Challenges for California

California is changing and the University of California is changing along with it. As president of a world class institution with a public mandate and a global mission, Janet Napolitano has launched initiatives to ensure that the university will thrive in the 21st century and to make public education in California affordable and accessible. She will discuss strategies to enhance community college transfers; boost the transfer of UC's cutting-edge research to market; improve services for student veterans; and leverage the University's capabilities to address food-related challenges in California, the nation and around the world.She will also discuss efforts she has launched which are focused on environmental sustainability and her project to achieve carbon neutrality across the UC system by 2025.Speaker Janet Napolitano is President of the University of California.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/events/event/1303
10/07/1457m 32s

A Conversation with The Honorable David Miliband

As the new president of the International Rescue Committee, David Miliband has taken on the challenge of the largest refugee crisis in recent history. Having previously served as UK Foreign Secretary, he is well versed on the international policy issues affecting refugees around the world.Miliband addresses the range of issues for refugees around the world, including immediate concerns in Syria, Iraq and South Sudan.For more information about this event please visit: http://www.worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1322
02/07/141h 1m