Life's Little Mysteries

Life's Little Mysteries

By Live Science & Audioboom

The Science Podcast From Live Science The world can be a pretty mysterious place and we at Live Science love to ask and answer questions about mysteries big and small: about ancient civilizations, our planet and our solar system, the plants and animals that live alongside us, our bodies and how they work, and the technologies that we use every day. Join us on this exciting voyage of discovery and downright weirdness as we solve… Life’s Little Mysteries.

Episodes

30: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - May 29th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the fourteenth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on May 28th (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/coronavirus-update-52120/270014501041950/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/have-questions-about-covid-19-live-science-health-reporter-nicoletta-lanese-is-h/974275116377403/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/coronavirus-update-52120/270014501041950/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
29/05/2039m 40s

29: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - May 22nd

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the thirteenth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on May 22nd and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/coronavirus-update-52120/270014501041950/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
22/05/2042m 58s

28: Mysterious Nightmares

Can you turn off a nightmare? Our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy take a step into the subconscious to unpick this week’s mystery.  Below you can find links to further reading on the topic discussed in this episode. Mystery: Can you ‘turn off’ a nightmare?  (https://www.livescience.com/turn-off-nightmares.html) Nightmares affect everyone, but not everybody remembers what they dream about  Some medications like beta blockers are linked with frequent nightmares INTERVIEW with Dr. Deirdre Barrett, a Harvard dream researcher and author of “The Committee of Sleep” Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
18/05/2043m 49s

27: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - May 15th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the twelfth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on May 14th and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/coronavirus-update-51420/550244812345536/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
14/05/2051m 28s

26: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - May 8th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the eleventh in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on May 7th and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/have-questions-about-covid-19-live-science-health-reporter-nicoletta-lanese-is-h/917233555388568/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
08/05/2037m 26s

25: Mysterious Spiders

Are Daddy Longlegs really the most venomous spiders in the world? Our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy delve into the mysterious world of spiders.  Below you can find links to further reading on the topic discussed in this episode.   Mystery: Are Daddy Longlegs Really the Most Venomous Spiders In the World? (https://www.livescience.com/33625-daddy-longlegs-spiders-poisonous.html) There are 6,000-10,000 species of Daddy Longlegs  They live worldwide with the most diversity occurring in Southeast Asia INTERVIEW with Kimberley Hickok, reference editor for Live Science and for our sister site, Space.com: You're Not Seeing Things, These Spider Butts Look Like Faces (https://www.livescience.com/peacock-spider-butts-look-like-faces.html) Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
04/05/2033m 14s

24: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - May 1st

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the tenth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on April 30th and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/coronavirus-update-43020/594574034743850/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
01/05/2043m 54s

23: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - April 24th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the ninth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on April 23rd and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/have-questions-about-covid-19-live-science-health-reporter-nicoletta-lanese-is-d/677398636351957/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/521886482097660/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
24/04/2041m 30s

22: Mysterious Brains

Are big brains smarter? We humans like to think we’re pretty smart - but does brain size really make a difference? Our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy pick away at the mysteries of grey matter.  Below you can find links to further reading on the topic discussed in this episode.  Mystery: Are Big Brains Smarter? (https://www.livescience.com/32142-are-big-brains-smarter.html)   The human brain on average weighs  2.7 pounds  An elephant brain weighs 10.5 pounds, but that’s only 1/10 of 1% of its body weight  Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Sponsor The Great Courses Plus  (https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/lp/t1/freemo?utm_source=Audio&utm_medium=Podcast&utm_campaign=1000825)   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
20/04/2026m 2s

21: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - April 17th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the eighth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on April 16th (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/521886482097660/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/coronavirus-update-41620/251804399203072/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/521886482097660/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
17/04/2035m 43s

19: Mysterious Black Holes

Black Holes are awesome but why are their names so boring? Our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy deep dive into the mysteries of black holes.  Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Black Holes Are Awesome. Why Are Their Names Usually So Boring? (https://www.livescience.com/65223-black-hole-names.html) For any space object's name to be officially recognized by astronomers around the world, needs approval by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) NEWS UPDATE with  Tia Ghose, Assistant Managing Editor at Live Science on The Biggest Black Hole Findings of 2019 (https://www.livescience.com/biggest-black-hole-findings-2019.html)   Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) Sponsor  The Great Courses Plus (https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/lp/t1/freemo?utm_source=Audio&utm_medium=Podcast&utm_campaign=1000825)   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
13/04/2030m 52s

20: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - April 10th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the seventh in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on April 9th and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/521886482097660/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
10/04/2043m 44s

18: Mysterious Animal Superpowers

How do animals breathe underwater? How long do Tardigrades live - and what's the biggest animal that a snake can swallow? All these animal superpower related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.    Mystery #1:  How Do Animals Breathe Underwater? (https://www.livescience.com/64260-breathing-underwater-aquaman.html)  The world's water dwellers have evolved several methods for accessing oxygen in water  Jellyfish absorb the oxygen in water directly through their skin    Interview with Nick Caruso of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Tech, co author of the spectacularly gross book Believe It Or Snot: The Definitive Field Guide to Earth's Slimy Creatures   Mystery #2: How Long Do Tardigrades Live? (https://www.livescience.com/62720-tardigrade-lifespan.html) Tardigrades are microscopic organisms that are impossibly cute!  They are the toughest, most indestructible creatures on Earth   NEWS UPDATE with Live Science reporter, Nicoletta Lanese on Game Over: These Monkeys Just Crushed Humans on a Computer Game (https://www.livescience.com/monkeys-outsmart-humans.html) Mystery #3: What's The Biggest Animal That a Snake Can Swallow? (https://www.livescience.com/biggest-animal-snakes-swallow.html) A common belief is that snakes are able to unhinge or dislocate their jaws  In 2018, a Burmese python in Florida that weighed about 32 lbs. (14 kg) swallowed a young white-tailed deer weighing 35 lbs.   Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/)   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
06/04/2040m 56s

17: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - April 3rd

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the sixth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on April 2nd and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/coronavirus-update-4220/210494890282084/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
03/04/2039m 11s

16: Mysterious Aliens

How do Scientists search for extraterrestrial life? If we discover aliens, what's our protocol for making contact? And if we do find them..will ET look like us? All these extraterrestrial related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: How Do Scientists Search for Extraterrestrial Life? (https://www.livescience.com/59153-how-to-search-for-extraterrestrial-life.html) Astronomers use sophisticated equipment to listen farther and peer deeper into the universe than ever before For an alien-seeking scientist, "life" means any living form including microbes on distant exoplanet    Mystery #2: If We Discover Aliens, What's Our Protocol for Making Contact? (https://www.livescience.com/19360-humans-discover-aliens.html) Life could theoretically exist on Mars, or on Europa, a moon of Jupiter,  The first reported flying saucer sighting was in 1947,    Interview with  Seth Shostak, a senior astronomer and Institute Fellow with the SETI Institute on the story: Is It Time To Rethink How We Search for Alien Life? (https://www.livescience.com/59547-future-con-rethinking-aliens.html)   NEWS UPDATE with Live Science reporter Stephanie Pappas: Could E.T. Have Bugged a Space Rock to Listen In on Earthlings? (https://www.livescience.com/alien-life-bugged-space-rock-co-orbitals.html)   Mystery #3: Will ET Look Like Us? (https://www.livescience.com/19283-aliens.html) Depictions of Aliens in popular culture have often been very humanlike in their appearance  In England references to little green men or children dates back to the 12th century green children of Woolpit.   Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Sponsors The Great Courses Plus (http://thegreatcoursesplus.com/llm)   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
30/03/2051m 42s

15: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - March 27th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the fifth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage  This episode was recorded on March 26th and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live. (https://www.facebook.com/30478646760/videos/540331386620220/) new updates are livestreamed on Facebook every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET. You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
27/03/2039m 17s

14: Mysterious Moon

Why is it so hard to land on the moon? How much trash is on the moon? And how many humans could the world support? All these moon related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: Why Is It So Hard to Land on the Moon? (https://www.livescience.com/why-is-it-so-hard-to-land-on-moon.html) Recent moon missions by Israel and India were unsuccessful and their landers crashed during entry During Apollo missions, human eyes and reflexes helped make for successful landings  Interview with Ariel Deutsch, a Phd candidate at Brown University in Rhode Island and a NASA graduate fellow    Mystery #2: How Many Humans Could the Moon Support? (https://www.livescience.com/how-many-humans-could-live-moon.html) The moon is our closest celestial body Temperatures swing from super hot 273 F (134 C) to bone-chilling  NEWS UPDATE with Mike Wall, senior writer for Space.com: Chinese moon rover peers beneath surface of mysterious lunar far side (https://www.livescience.com/china-change-4-moon-far-side-subsurface.html)   Mystery #3: How Much Trash Is on the Moon? (https://www.livescience.com/61911-trash-on-moon.html) Humans first started sending spacecraft to the moon in the 1960s The are reported to be every day items such as pairs of boots and  - specifically -  2 golf balls on the moon  Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) . Sponsors: The Great Courses Plus (https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/lp/t1/freemo?utm_source=Audio&utm_medium=Podcast&utm_campaign=1000711) Blinkist  (http://blinkist.com/llm)   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
23/03/2056m 52s

13: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - March 20th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the fourth in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on March 19th and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live.  (https://www.facebook.com/30478646760/videos/527549101471956/) You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
20/03/2037m 30s

12: Mysteries of Poop

Why does coffee make you poop? Why do some animals eat their own poop? And just how much do you poop in your lifetime? All these poop related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: Why Does Coffee Make You Poop? (https://www.livescience.com/45465-why-does-coffee-make-you-poop.html) Research from the 1990s found that when some people drink coffee they experience a response in the gastrointestinal system just minutes later Interview with Metin Eren, assistant professor at Kent State University in Ohio, and co-director of the University's Eren Laboratory of Experimental Archaeology: What a Waste! Frozen Poop Knives Are Crappy Cutters (https://www.livescience.com/frozen-poop-knife.html)   Mystery #2: Why Do Some Animals Eat Their Own Poop? (https://www.livescience.com/59601-why-do-animals-eat-poop.html) This is called coprophagia and common in the animal kingdom  For many animals it helps them digest more nutrients  NEWS UPDATE with Live Science staff writer Yasemin Saplakoglu:  New coronavirus may spread through poop (https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-covid-19-spread-through-feces.html)   Mystery #3: How Much Do You Poop in Your Lifetime? (https://www.livescience.com/61966-how-much-you-poop-in-lifetime.html) The number can vary due to age, dietary habits, exercise and other factors  On average both men and women move their bowels about once a day and produce about 14 to 17 ounces of feces    Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
16/03/2042m 56s

11: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - March 13th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the third in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on March 13th and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live.  (https://www.facebook.com/30478646760/videos/527549101471956/) You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
13/03/2032m 8s

10: Mysterious Flat-Earthers

How do we know that the Earth is round? What would happen if the Earth was really flat -  and why don’t we fall off the planet? All these Earth, Space and conspiracy theory related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: How do we know the Earth is round? (https://www.livescience.com/61050-kids-can-prove-earth-round.html) Scientists have been explaining how we know the Earth is round for more than 2,000 years Who can forget the iconic "Blue marble" Earth photo taken December 7, 1972, from a distance of over 18,000 miles from the surface by the crew of the Apollo 17 spacecraft traveling to the Moon Interview with Jan-Willem van Prooijen, Associate Professor in Social and Organizational Psychology, Vrije University Amsterdam on the psychology behind why people believe in conspiracy theories.    Mystery #2: How do Flat-Earthers explain lunar eclipses (https://www.livescience.com/64565-flat-earthers-explain-lunar-eclipses.html) , equinoxes (https://www.livescience.com/63648-flat-earth-explanation-for-the-equinox.html) and why we don't fall off the planet (https://www.livescience.com/62454-flat-earthers-explain-pac-man-effect.html) ? A lunar eclipse happens when the Earth's shadow blocks the sun's light, which otherwise reflects off the moon. While Flat Earthers believe our planet is flat, they agree that the sun and moon are spherical  NEWS UPDATE with Brandon Specktor, Senior Writer at Live Science on the sad news that ‘Mad’ Mike Hughes Dies In Rocket Crash  (https://www.livescience.com/mad-mike-hughes-dies-rocket-crash.html)   Mystery #3: What If the Earth Was Flat? (https://www.livescience.com/what-if-flat-earth.html) There would be no atmosphere, because gravity is what keeps the Earth in place There would also be no Moon because it is linked to Earth by gravity   Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Sponsors  The Great Courses (http://thegreatcourses.com/LLM)   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/2051m 23s

9: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - March 6th

Mindy and Jeanna introduce the second in a series of special reports from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on March 6th and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live.  (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/637374037048766/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos) You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/2025m 55s

8: Mysterious Dinosaurs

Are Birds Dinosaurs? What were the world's biggest and smallest dinosaurs? and Is It Possible to Clone a Dinosaur? All these prehistoric related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: Are Birds Dinosaurs? (https://www.livescience.com/are-birds-dinosaurs.html) Ancestors of modern birds were theropod dinosaurs  The earliest birds are reported to share  much in common with their theropod relatives, including feathers and egg-laying  Interview with  Dr. Holly Woodward on her article:  6-Foot-Tall T. Rex Skeletons Not a New Pygmy Species, Just Teenagers (https://www.livescience.com/t-rex-teenagers-identified.html) .   Mystery #2:  What were the world's biggest (https://www.livescience.com/34278-worlds-largest-dinosaur.html) and smallest (https://www.livescience.com/32394-what-is-the-smallest-dinosaur.html) dinosaurs? Weight estimates of The Argentinosaurus - a type of titanosaur - range from 77 tons (70 metric tons) up to 110 tons (100 metric tons) The Micropachycephalosaurus, a thick-headed plant-eater, measured 2 feet (70 cm) in length Guest editor report with Live Science’s associate editor, Laura Geggel: Reaper of death,' newfound cousin of T. rex, discovered in Canada (https://www.livescience.com/t-rex-tyrannosaur-new-cousin.html)     Mystery #3: Is It Possible to Clone a Dinosaur? (https://www.livescience.com/54574-can-we-clone-dinosaurs.html) Another long-gone animal that some scientists have thought about “bringing back” through cloning is the woolly mammoth  Conservationists argue that resources should be spent on currently threatened or endangered animals Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Sponsors  The Great Courses (http://thegreatcourses.com/LLM)     Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/201h 5m

7: Coronavirus: A Life's Little Mysteries Special Report - February 28th

Your questions answered..  Mindy and Jeanna interrupt our usual schedule to bring you a special report from Life's Little Mysteries with Live Science health reporter Nicoletta Lanese, who is at the forefront of Live Science’s coronavirus coverage.  This episode was recorded on February 27 and features Nicoletta's weekly coronavirus update and Q&A on Facebook Live (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/videos/764843837258983/?__xts__[0]=68.ARCrp6BRi2fvno9Dyg2XmhXUJ7CI6TFnZjwEkTBTHITEZL-R1Pk8ivgJFvDGKroTMnbAWDSnUfz0txKGII-4IM_wNxni_MkguiFb7t81Y8dDZuXmVMTCeteb4I6St5_PqHM96ow2trWPvTcIZmKlw1wEPPHtWIHcnwDJChEzrTxOGo9heTUIKAWE3CIRgWNV6bnwjL2ANM-RABD4_KUQmqn7siN5ykKsanh_FLa_DqHdOCLDrnsYeJVD7rcf_3vucd5LcMqUgV8vA7tCclpgMjcRNO_PpG8pbIyRH4f-09e_NfFiHpLtb4sMHCRnup_2PaS0Kpj7h3tFUrVLI3oUyiy0&__xts__[1]=68.ARCX9inbLhdmfxrCPRL9QNZbXpk14uIm_MikY1Jf-tw-G3yO3NtVw5QgFD5ywnIKeUfbfU28AeMzY8md7vr5FWBVxKx_wcTpvY-y5TEtF8hH9x0_LI7jIGg4rWz-7YdqhFvp0dbg4ItDq3DRvmUkNhE6iZKLV83MED8PpVk3J1XBxhQGrAKFvmPErjPm0bQMmPH9F8jVznk4LqcOXAQ2T6DMWp0IGgjHZ5jA5o0jGHJXxrkFo7wwJ_-v-ZKzXkqJwSg5Io41b26Be_H_jSDbJgSzDO0_mSXoIITXRzmcu6cIC9ARc9RqrqPa2o8oBpiWSbVgS1lWViAgZuIufCHEL6Ym&__tn__=-R) .  You can find all the Live Science coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19 on our website, at https://www.livescience.com/topics/coronavirus. If you have questions about coronavirus or COVID-19, you can post them on our Live Science forums (https://forums.livescience.com/) and on Facebook.  Nicoletta will host our next coronavirus Q&A on March 2 at 12pm ET.  Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/2028m 42s

6: Mysteries of Eating and Drinking

Is it safe to drink blood? (https://www.livescience.com/15899-drinking-blood-safe.html) What would happen if you ate an entire Trinidad Moruga Scorpion Chili Pepper (https://www.livescience.com/34187-trinidad-moruga-scorpion-chili-pepper.html) ? And why do delicious french fries taste so bad when they’re cold? All these food and drink related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They're Cold? (https://www.livescience.com/56355-cold-french-fries-taste.html)   Interview with Denise Tieman of the Plant Innovation Center at University of Florida in Gainesville, discusses her research aimed at creating a more flavorful tomato.    Mystery #2: What If You Eat an Entire Trinidad Moruga Scorpion Chili Pepper? (https://www.livescience.com/34187-trinidad-moruga-scorpion-chili-pepper.html) Chili peppers have their very own rating scale: the Scoville scale, which indicates amount of capsaicin is present..and how hot they are!  A Ghost pepper is among hottest and has 1 million Scoville units! Guest editor report with Live Science senior writer, Rachel Rettner: How a Piece of Popcorn Stuck in a Man's Teeth Led to Open-Heart Surgery (https://www.livescience.com/popcorn-teeth-heart-infection.html)   Mystery #3: Is It Safe to Drink Blood? (https://www.livescience.com/15899-drinking-blood-safe.html) Blood drinking or eating congealed blood, usually combined with meat, is common in cultures around the world  Drinking cattle blood is part of the traditional Maasai diet in Kenya and Tanzania   Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/2051m 48s

5: Mysterious Volcanoes

How do scientists know when a volcano is about to erupt? What would happen if Yellowstone’s supervolcano erupted? And what would happen if every volcano on earth erupted at once? All these questions (and a whole lot more)are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: How Do Scientists Know a Volcano Is About to Erupt? (https://www.livescience.com/8809-scientists-volcano-erupt.html) Warning signs can begin weeks or months before an eruption Some of the many signs a volcanologist will look for include seismographic detection of earthquakes and tremors and analyzing cracking patterns in the ground in close proximity to the volcano  Guest editor report with space.com reporter Chelsea Gohd: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs. Then, a volcano helped life flourish. (https://www.livescience.com/asteroid-killed-dinosaurs-volcanic-eruption-life.html)   Mystery #2: What Would Happen If Yellowstone's Supervolcano Erupted? (https://www.livescience.com/20714-yellowstone-supervolcano-eruption.html) Yellowstone National Park is made up of three overlapping calderas  Calderas are bowl-shaped craters that were formed after three giant eruptions occured 2.1 million, 1.3 million and 640,000 years ago.  Interview with volcanologist Dr. Jessica Ball, you can find out more about her work on her blog, Magma Cum Laude (https://blogs.agu.org/magmacumlaude/) , and by following her on Twitter (https://twitter.com/tuff_cookie) ,  Mystery #3: What If Every Volcano on Earth Erupted at Once? (https://www.livescience.com/49305-what-if-all-volcanoes-erupted.html) Worldwide 1,500 potentially active volcanoes, around 500 of which have erupted during recorded human history.   That number excluded the amount of volcanoes on the seafloor.    Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/2052m 27s

4: Mysterious Dogs

How did dogs get to be dogs? What do our four legged friends dream about? And - most importantly - are dogs really smiling at us when we think they are? All these questions (and a whole lot more)are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.     Mystery #1: How Did Dogs Get to Be Dogs? (https://www.livescience.com/8405-dogs-dogs.html) Dogs diverged from wolves — Canis lupus — at least 20,000 and perhaps as long as 40,000 years ago A 14,700-year-old jawbone is the oldest undisputed fossil from a domesticated dog (Canis lupus familiaris)   Mystery #2: What Do Dogs Dream About? (https://www.livescience.com/53743-dog-dreams.html)   In 1977, scientists studied 6 pointer dogs, studied electrical brain activity for 24 hours: They spent 44% of time awake; 21% drowsy; 12% in REM sleep; and 23% in the deepest stage of non-REM sleep (slow-wave sleep).  For whatever reason, the size of the dog may determine the size of the dream. Smaller dogs have more frequent but shorter dream periods; large dogs have less frequent but longer dreams.  Guest editor report with Rafi Letzer: Tibetan Mastiffs Bred with Mountain Wolves to Survive at Super-High Altitudes (https://www.livescience.com/tibetan-mastiff-wolf-genes.html)     Mystery #3:  Are Dogs Really Smiling at Us? (https://www.livescience.com/65506-are-dogs-smiling.html) We have a special bond with our dogs and when  humans and dogs stare into each other's eyes, both experience a rise in levels of oxytocin Very few other animals in the world actually make eye contact with humans     Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/2044m 44s

3: Mysterious Cats

Why do cats like boxes? Why do they wiggle their butts before they pounce and does cat nip really make cats high? All these questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: Why Do Cats Like Boxes? (https://www.livescience.com/45461-why-do-cats-like-boxes.html) A 2014 study in the journal Applied Animal Behavior Science (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0168159114002366) with shelter cats with and without hiding boxes to see if boxes could reduce stress When cats are just lying around not expending energy, their ideal temperature is 86 to 100 degrees F (30 to 38 degrees C), according to a study published in 2016 in the Scientific World Journal (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5059607/) Mystery #2: Why Do Cats Wiggle Their Butts Before They Pounce? (https://www.livescience.com/64950-why-cats-wiggle-butts-before-pouncing.html)   Guest editor report with Laura Gegel: Inside Ancient Egyptian Cat Mummy, Archaeologists Find the Remains of 3 Cats (https://www.livescience.com/ancient-cat-mummy-multiple-cats.html)     Mystery #3: Does Catnip Really Make Cats 'High'? (https://www.livescience.com/does-catnip-get-cats-high.html) Its scientific name is Nepeta cataria. And it belongs to the mint family Lamiaceae Most cats — or maybe even all — are affected by catnip to some degree   Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) . Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/2037m 28s

2: Mysterious Oceans

Why is the sea salty? Could Earth’s oceans ever boil away? And just how much whale pee is in the ocean? All these questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy. Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode. Mystery #1: Why is the Ocean salty? (https://www.livescience.com/32139-why-are-oceans-salty.html) Oceans on the young Earth were probably only slightly salty (https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/riversnotsalty.html) , but over time the mineral deposits became more concentrated, causing varying degrees of saltiness.  Osmoconformers (https://ci.coastal.edu/~sgilman/778AnimalAdapt.htm) - animal's "environment" on the inside matches its environment on the outside. Osmoregulators (https://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/water-h2o-life/life-in-water/surviving-in-salt-water) - have body structures that filter or secrete excess salt.  Mystery #2: Could Earth’s oceans ever boil away? (https://www.livescience.com/64822-could-oceans-boil-away.html) It’s an almost unimaginable amount of water: The US Geological Survey estimated more than 300 million cubic miles of it (https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/wherewater.html) . Guest editor report: Underwater Volcano Creates Bubbles More Than a Quarter-Mile Across (https://www.livescience.com/giant-bubbles-underwater-volcano.html) . Mystery #3: How much of the ocean is whale pee… and worse! (https://www.livescience.com/55189-how-much-of-ocean-is-whale-pee.html) A study published in 2003 found some numbers: the sei whale expels 166 gallons (627 litres) of urine a day.  The fin whale expels 257 gallons (974 litres) a day (https://oceana.org/blog/special-ingredient-ocean-health-animal-pee-and-lots-it) ! Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) . Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
11/03/2048m 28s

1: Introducing... Life's Little Mysteries

Join Mindy Weisberger and Jeanna Bryner as they guide you on an exciting voyage of discovery and downright weirdness in a quest to solve… Life’s Little Mysteries. Have you ever wondered why the sea is salty, why we hiccup, or even why cats wiggle their butts before they pounce? Then this is the science podcast for you. Subscribe now and don't forget to join in the conversation by asking your own questions about this mysterious world we live in on our forums at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) . Visit our main site at www.livescience.com (https://www.livescience.com/) and follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LiveScience Sponsors The Great Courses Plus (https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/lp/t1/freemo?utm_source=Audio&utm_medium=Podcast&utm_campaign=1000711) Blinkist (https://www.blinkist.com/nc/partners/lifes-little-mysteries) Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) Apollo 11: That's One Small Step for (a) Man by NASA (https://soundcloud.com/nasa) is licensed under a  Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) Apollo 13: Houston, We've Had a Problem by NASA (https://soundcloud.com/nasa) is licensed under a  Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) .
11/03/202m 33s
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