Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

By NPR

Six days a week, from Monday through Saturday, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. In participating regions on weekdays, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Episodes

A U.S. Marine's View From Kabul's Airport As the City Fell to the Taliban

One year ago, on August 15, 2021, the Taliban swept into power in Kabul. It's a day that many remember, as videos and images showed a chaotic scene at the Kabul airport, with thousands of Afghans desperately trying to flee the country. Lt. Col. Chris Richardella was one of the officers leading the U.S. Marine Corps at the airport when the Taliban took over. In a conversation with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly, he recounts what followed.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/08/2215m 30s

High profile grads and a yearning for respite have helped boost HBCU applications

At one point, over 90% of African Americans with a college degree obtained it from an HBCU. But in the decades following the legal dismantling of segregation, enrollment declined at HBCUs.Recently, some HBCUs have seen a significant rise in applications. The boost could be due to more funding, celebrity students, or famous HBCU grads like Vice President Kamala Harris. But informal conversations with Black students and their families point to something even more powerful: HBCUs are a safe and nurturing space to learn in a time of increasing anti-Black racism.Host Michel Martin speaks with Walter Kimbrough, the past president of two historically Black institutions - Philander Smith College and Dillard University - and the interim executive director of the Black Men's Research Institute at Morehouse College. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/08/2218m 29s

What Is The Status Of All Of Trump's Legal Woes?

Former President Donald Trump is dominating headlines yet again. Earlier this week, the FBI took several boxes of secret and top secret documents from Mar-a-Lago during a search of Trump's home. And on Friday, a federal judge unsealed the warrant for the search – plus a list of what was taken from the property. NPR's Carrie Johnson explains what the unsealed warrant reveals, and what comes next. But the news from Mar-a-Lago is just the latest in a litany of legal battles entangling the former president. From the civil and criminal cases in New York, to the Georgia election interference case and the Jan 6th DOJ investigation – it can be hard to keep track of it all. Barbara McQuade is a professor at University of Michigan Law School and a former U.S. attorney, she helps us understand where these cases stand.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/08/2212m 34s

What The Climate Package Means For A Warming Planet

Up until a few weeks ago, meaningful climate legislation was sidelined in the U.S. Senate. But after months of wrangling votes — and adding concessions to oil and gas companies — Democrats in the Senate have finally passed the Inflation Reduction Act. The bill includes more than $300 billion in climate investments — the highest amount ever allocated by the federal government to tackle climate change. This episode lays out what the bill does, what it doesn't, and tracks the ups and downs of the legislation as it wound its way through Congress.This episode also features reporting by NPR's Laura Benshoff looking at the ways the legislation incentivizes individuals to fight climate change in their everyday life.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/08/2214m 43s

From The Grassroots To The Top Of The Ticket, Election Denial Looms Large in GOP

In Republican politics, one of the biggest issues in the 2022 election is the 2020 election. In at least 8 states so far, Republicans have picked candidates for Secretary of State who deny the results of the last presidential election. This is despite the fact that not a shred of evidence calls President Biden's victory into question. If elected, they would become the chief elections officer in their states.In some of the same swing states where election deniers will be on the statewide ballot in November, there's another effort underway, backed by key figures in former President Trump's orbit. Cleta Mitchell, a lawyer who worked on Trump's effort to overturn the 2020 election, is working to mobilize an "army" of poll watchers.NPR's Tom Dreisbach reports on what he learned from leaked audio of one of her summits. This episode also features reporting from NPR's Miles Parks, who covers voting and election security.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/08/2214m 59s

How The U.S. Gave Away Cutting-Edge Technology To China

Researchers at an American national laboratory spent years developing cutting-edge vanadium redox flow batteries. But now, a Chinese company is making those batteries in a factory in northeastern China.An investigation from NPR's Laura Sullivan and Northwest News Network's Courtney Flatt shows how the U.S. federal government gave away American-made technology to China. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/08/2214m 54s

The Course Of The War In Ukraine Hinges On The Fight For Kherson

All eyes are on Kherson. In Ukraine's first major offensive of the war, soldiers are pushing towards the city, trying to retake it from Russian troops. It's a transport hub and key river crossing, and reclaiming it would be a huge victory for Ukraine.NPR's Kat Lonsdorf brings us the story of Vitaly, a 22-year-old college student in Kherson. Since the city first fell, he has sent NPR voice memos detailing life under the Russian occupation. Now, he's decided he has to get out.And NPR's Brian Mann travels near the front lines with Ukrainian forces pushing towards Kherson. It's a vast stretch of half-abandoned villages and farms fields, old industrial sites and dense forests, where the exact point of contact between Russian and Ukrainian troops is often unclear day by day.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/08/2214m 34s

Palestinian pop singer Bashar Murad struggles for freedom and equality on two fronts

Bashar Murad's danceable riffs and live concerts and videos - filled with bubbles, enormous hats, and layers and layers of veils - have earned him the nickname "Palestinian Lady Gaga" from his fans. And much like Born This Way is an anthem of equality, Murad's songs challenge conservative social norms and push for LGBTQ rights while also challenging the Israeli occupation of the West Bank. Earlier this summer, Murad's concert in the West Bank city of Ramallah was cancelled under threats by anti-LGBTQ activists. As an outspoken proponent of LGBTQ rights, Murad is challenging both the external conflict Palestinians face with Israel and the internal conflicts imposed by a conservative society. This week, NPR's Daniel Estrin speaks with Bashar Murad about his music, his activism, and how anti-LGBTQ events that unfolded during the summer have added to the complexities that can come with being a voice for both the Palestinian and the LGBTQ communities.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/08/2218m 53s

As U.S. Declares Monkeypox A Public Health Emergency, What To Know About The Risks

This week the Biden administration declared the monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency. And as the number of cases in the U.S. continues to climb, there's a lot of confusion about the disease, how it spreads and who's most at-risk. NPR health correspondents Pien Huang and Michaeleen Doucleff join us to discuss the current outbreak. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/08/2213m 35s

The National Security Advisor's Very Busy Week

With House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan, the U.S. airstrike that killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri and Russia's ongoing war in Ukraine, there's a lot to talk about with National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan these days.He weighs in on all three in a sit-down interview with NPR.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/08/2212m 44s

Abortion Bans Have Consequences For Wanted Pregnancies, Too

Since the fall of Roe v. Wade, a dozen states have implemented laws banning or severely restricting abortion. Those laws have consequences for wanted pregnancies, too. NPR's Carrie Feibel brings us the story of a woman in Texas whose pregnancy took a sudden turn. Because of the state's abortion law, her case became a medical crisis. This episode also includes reporting from NPR's Sarah McCammon and Melissa BlockIn participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/08/2213m 48s

Al Qaeda Leader Killed In U.S. Drone Strike In Afghanistan

Ayman al-Zawahiri, the leader of Al Qaeda, was killed by a U.S. drone strike in Kabul, Afghanistan over the weekend. For years, al-Zawahiri was Osama Bin Laden's deputy — and was known as the mastermind behind the 9-11 attacks. NPR's Greg Myre and Diaa Hadid discuss the implications of al-Zawahiri's death for the U.S., Afghanistan, and America's decades-long war on terror.This episode also features reporting from NPR's Steve Inskeep.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/08/2213m 24s

Why We Will See More Devastating Floods Like The Ones In Kentucky

Dee Davis remembers watching his grandmother float by in a canoe during the 1957 flood that hit Whitesburg, Ky. The water crested at nearly 15 feet back then--a record that stood for over half a century, until it was obliterated last week.The water was more than six feet higher than the 1957 mark when floodwater destroyed the gauge.The flooding took out bridges and knocked houses off their foundations. It had claimed at least 35 lives as of Monday afternoon.And it was just the latest record-breaking flooding event to hit the U.S. this summer. NPR's Rebecca Hersher explains that climate change is making extreme floods more frequent. A warming atmosphere can hold more moisture, which means, when it rains, it rains harder.This episode also features reporting from NPR's Kirk Siegler, KJZZ's Michel Marizco and St. Louis Public Radio's Sarah Fentem.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/08/2210m 41s

Being An Abortion Doula In A Post-Roe World

You may have never heard the phrase abortion doula, but for years they have been working to support people navigating the process and experience of ending a pregnancy. With Roe overturned, depending on where you live, figuring out how to obtain an abortion has gotten much harder. This could make the role of abortion doulas more critical than ever --- and more risky.NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Vicki Bloom. She refers to herself as a full spectrum doula and provides a range of reproductive health support services, from helping clients create a birth plan, to being present at abortions, to providing information and emotional support. We discuss what a abortion doula does and how that role might change in a post-Roe world.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/07/2215m 15s

In Canada, The Pope Delivers An Apology To Indigenous Peoples

This week, Pope Francis has been in Canada, on what he calls a "Pilgrimage of Penance". He's been going around the country to apologize for the Catholic Church's role in Canada's residential school system. These schools – funded by the Canadian government and administered by the Catholic Church – were aimed at erasing the culture and language of indigenous people. The apology from Pope Francis this week comes after years of allegations detailing abuse and neglect at these residential boarding schools. Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission was established in 2008 to document what happened at these schools – and the lasting trauma that has followed. Stephanie Scott is a member of the Anishinaabe from Roseau River First Nation. She's executive director of the National Center for Truth and Reconciliation – and has been part of a years-long effort to gather the testimony of survivors. She shares with us the mixed feelings about the Pope's apology, and the work that still has to be done towards reconciliation.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/07/2213m 51s

How To Protect Yourself From The BA.5 Omicron Subvariant

The BA.5 variant is the most dominant strain of COVID-19 in the country, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It's highly transmissible and it's driving up COVID cases and hospitalizations. This week NPR learned that the Biden administration may scrap plans to let more younger adults get second COVID-19 boosters this summer. Instead, officials are trying to speed up availability of the next generation of boosters in the fall — boosters that specifically target the new subvariant. We talk to Dr. Robert Wachter, the chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, about the administration's booster strategy and how people can protect themselves in the midst of the latest surge. This episode also features reporting from NPR's Rob Stein.A heads up to listeners: we recorded this episode Thursday afternoon, before the Biden administration announced that it will hold off on offering boosters for people under 50 this summer.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/07/2212m 36s

What We Lost When Hotels Stopped Being Housing

Residential hotels used to play a huge role in the American housing landscape, providing flexible accommodation for anyone who needed it, from the rich and famous to the barely scraping by. Slate staff writer Henry Grabar argues that a return of extended-stay hotels could help solve some of today's housing market dysfunction.KNKX's Will James reports on what happened after tenants of a residential hotel in Tacoma, Wash., were forced out—into a housing market with very few affordable options.You can read his entire series on the Merkle Hotel here, and Henry Grabar's article on extended stay hotels here.This episode also features reporting on the US housing shortage from NPR's Chris Arnold.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/07/2214m 56s

The Long And Winding Journey Of The James Webb Space Telescope

The James Webb Space Telescope has captured images of the universe that have stunned both scientists and the public. But for more than twenty years before its launch, the mission faced multiple delays, cost overruns, technical difficulties and threats from Congress to kill it altogether.We'll speak with some of the leaders of the Webb telescope mission who fought to keep it alive — and hear from astronomers whose work is now changed forever by its images.This episode also features reporting from NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/07/2212m 48s

With Inflation Soaring, The Fed Weighs Another Interest Rate Hike

Food, gas, rent — prices are climbing across the board. As inflation hit a 40-year high last month, millions of Americans are adjusting their spending and looking for ways to stretch their budgets. The Federal Reserve is taking action, too. Policy makers are meeting this week to consider whether and how much to raise interest rates in an effort to curb inflation. We talk to NPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley and business correspondent David Gura. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/07/2213m 46s

Do Police Officers View Themselves Differently As Public Perception of Them Changes?

This week dozens of family members of victims of the Uvalde Texas school shooting showed up at the town's first school board meeting since a gunman killed 19 students and two teachers in May.The atmosphere became tense and emotional as families confronted board members, demanding assurances that students and staff would be safe in the coming school year.The school board meeting followed the release of surveillance footage from the day of the shooting and an investigative report released by the Texas House of Representatives.The investigation found that a total of 376 local, state, and federal officers converged on the scene. But due to "systemic failures and egregiously poor decision making" on the part of the police, more than an hour passed before anyone confronted the gunman. Many Americans feel that the police stand between order and chaos. Yet the massive failure by law enforcement in Uvalde may change how the public views police and how police view themselves.NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Seth Stoughton, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/07/2216m 18s

The January 6th Committee Rests Its Case For Now, And Eyes Turn to Merrick Garland

This week the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol wrapped up its first set of public hearings. The final hearing focused on former President Trump's actions - or lack of action - as rioters breached the Capitol.As the hearings continue, the Department of Justice is conducting its own investigation. And Attorney General Merrick Garland is under pressure from the left to bring criminal charges against Trump.We spoke to former federal prosecutor Andrew Weissmann about the evidence that the House Select Committee has presented and what the attorney general may be considering. Weissmann was a senior prosecutor on Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/07/2214m 21s

Climate Change And Record Breaking Heat Around The World

Record high temperatures have wreaked havoc around the world this week. In Southern England, railway tracks bent from the heat. In China, the roof tiles on a museum melted. In Texas, heat and a dry spell have caused nearly 200 water main breaks over the past month.And extreme heat puts lives at risk, too. It's more deadly than tornadoes, hurricanes, and all other weather events combined.Extreme temperatures, and the attendant misery, are connected to global warming, which is driven by human activity and accelerating.Reporters from around the globe talk about what they're seeing and how governments are responding. NPR's Rebecca Hersher, who reports on climate science and policy from the US, NPR's John Ruwitch in Shanghai and Willem Marx in London.This episode also features reporting from NPR's Franco Ordoñez.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/07/2213m 50s

How To Talk To Kids About Abortion

Talking about abortion can be difficult even among adults. So how do you talk to kids about it? We asked listeners to send us their questions — and brought together two experts to answer them. Reena B. Patel, a parenting expert and licensed educational psychologist in San Diego, California, and Dr. Elise Berlan, a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist in Columbus, Ohio, join us to talk about ways to broach the conversation around abortion with kids of all ages.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/07/2213m 31s

He Tracked Down Nazi War Criminals. Now He's Investigating Atrocities In Ukraine

How serious is the U.S. about investigating Russian war crimes in Ukraine? They put Eli Rosenbaum on the case. He's best known for directing the Department of Justice special investigations unit which tracked down Nazis who had gone into hiding after World War II.He lays out the challenges of conducting an investigation in the midst of an ongoing war.This episode also features reporting from NPR's Jason Beaubien and Brian Mann on Russian airstrikes that killed Ukrainian civilians.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/07/2210m 31s

As States Ban Abortion, Demand For Contraceptives Is Rising

Interest in birth control and emergency contraception has surged since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the right to abortion. But safe and reliable birth control isn't always easy to access. Now the FDA is considering whether to make birth control pills available without a prescription. If approved, it would be the first over-the-counter oral contraceptive in the U.S. We also hear from NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce about the most popular form of contraception for women in the U.S. - permanent contraception, colloquially known as "getting your tubes tied" - and why barriers to access leave many requests for this procedure unfulfilled. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/07/2211m 49s

In A Divided America, Can The January 6 Hearing Change Hearts And Minds?

The televised probe into the mob attack on the Capitol has dropped plenty of bombshells as insider testimonies pull back the curtain on the efforts of former President Donald Trump and his allies to hold onto power after he lost his reelection bid. But at Tuesday's hearing, one of the most compelling witnesses was not a former staffer or official but Stephen Ayers. A staunch believer in Trump, Ayers came to D.C. on Trump's command and stormed the Capitol. After his arrest, he looked at the facts about the 2020 election and realized he was fed and had believed a lie.Polls, studies and surveys warn that Americans are deeply and bitterly divided by politics. Can the January 6 hearing help close that partisan gap? We speak with Didi Kuo, Associate Director for Research at Stanford University's Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/07/2217m 44s

As Monkeypox Cases Climb, U.S. Officials Increase Testing and Order More Vaccine Doses

Public health experts know what it takes to get a disease outbreak under control - widespread testing and treatment, and vaccines made available to communities most at risk. But in the last two months of the Monkeypox outbreak, the response has not met the need. And there's been criticism that the missteps look a lot like the start of the coronavirus pandemic.Now, with more than 1,400 confirmed cases in the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more help is on the way. Testing capacity is increasing along with vaccine doses.NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks to CDC Director Rochelle Walensky about the federal government's response to Monkeypox and whether it's enough to contain the outbreak.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/07/2210m 44s

They Don't Trust Election Officials, So They're Doing Their Own Door-To-Door Audit

Your vote is secret. But the fact that you voted in an election is typically public record.So some people who falsely believe the 2020 election was stolen have tried to audit the results themselves by going door to door in neighborhoods across the country.NPR's Miles Parks and Colorado Public Radio's Bente Birkeland report on this canvassing effort. It's part of a controversial movement to galvanize everyday Americans to try to uncover voter fraud in their own communities. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/07/2211m 24s

What We Learned From This Week's Jan. 6 Hearing — And What Questions Still Remain

In a tweet sent on December 19, 2021, former President Trump issued what Democrats now say was a "clarion call" to his supporters. "Big protest in D.C. on January 6th," he wrote. "Be there, will be wild!" This week, in a hearing of the House committee investigating the January 6th attack on the Capitol, we learned more about what happened in the days and weeks after the President sent that tweet — and the tense moments in the White House just hours before. Maryland Congressman Jamie Raskin, a member of the House committee investigating January 6th, tells NPR that next week's primetime hearing — the final scheduled hearing of the committee — will unravel minute-by-minute events at the Capitol and present an account of what President Trump was doing during that time. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/07/2213m 51s

As New Variant Surges, Officials Warn More Will Follow Without Global Vax Effort

A new omicron subvariant is now the most dominant strain of COVID-19 in the U.S. It's called BA.5 — and it appears to evade neutralizing antibodies, making it easier for fully-vaccinated people to become infected or those who recently had COVID to get re-infected. Dr. Ayoade Alakija, co-chair of the African Union's Africa Vaccine Delivery Alliance, warns that more variants will follow unless global vaccine efforts get more aggressive. Atul Gawande, head of global health for the U.S. Agency for International Development, says Congress needs to authorize a new round of spending to help get vaccines to countries where many people still have not been vaccinated. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/07/2214m 3s

The Other Gun Deaths

Mass shooting deaths represent just a fraction of people killed by gun violence in America, and more than half of all gun deaths are suicides. The numbers are staggering: in 2020, the most recent year with available data, 45,000 people in America were killed by guns. This episode, a few of the people touched by that violence share their stories. If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, or contact the Crisis Text Line: text HELLO to 741741. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/07/2212m 47s

What Will It Take To Get Brittney Griner Out Of Detention In Russia?

When the Women's NBA All-Star Game gets underway this weekend, the league will be missing one of its superstars, Brittney Griner.The two-time Olympic gold medalist and star center for the Phoenix Mercury has been detained in Russia on drug smuggling charges since February.This week, Griner pleaded guilty to the drug charges, saying she did not intend to break the law. If convicted, she could face a maximum penalty of up to ten years in a Russian prison. The country's prison system is known for some of the harshest conditions in the world. Her supporters have called on President Joe Biden to step up efforts to bring her home. But negotiating with Russia, about anything, is seldom easy.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/07/2215m 44s

The Supreme Court just had its most conservative term in nine decades

A wave of decisions by the Supreme Court's conservative majority has lead to criticism that the court is more politicized than it used to be. Now there's data to support that claim. Researchers with The Supreme Court Database — which is run by legal scholars from multiple universities — have shown that the court produced more conservative decisions this term than at any time since 1931.NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg joined Jamal Greene, a Constitutional law professor from Columbia University, and Tom Goldstein, the founder of SCOTUSBlog, to talk about the implications of the decisions from the term.
08/07/2213m 43s

The Stolen Election Lie Keeps Spreading, Here Are Some Of The People Responsible

Donald Trump's lie that the election was stolen from him continues to spread. That's, in large part, because of a group of people crisscrossing the country, spreading false claims about voter fraud. NPR's Investigations team used social media and news reports to track four key figures in the movement: MyPillow CEO and longtime Trump supporter Mike Lindell, former U.S. Army Captain Seth Keshel, former high school math and science teacher Douglas Frank, and former law professor David Clements. NPR's Miles Parks explains their findings. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/07/2212m 20s

Your Vaccine Questions Answered

COVID vaccines are available to children as young as six months old. Still, plenty of parents and caretakers have questions before they get their children the jab. NPR Health Correspondent Rob Stein and Dr. Nia Heard-Garris, a pediatrician at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, answer some of those questions from listeners. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/07/2212m 52s

Post-Roe America: A Chaotic Patchwork Of Litigation

Trigger bans. Restraining orders. State and local disputes. New fights about old laws. After Roe, states are awash in abortion-related legal challenges. Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer tells NPR 'there's a lot of confusion,' and 'it's a terribly anxious time.' The chaos has trickled down from state courts to individual abortion care providers, where staff and patients have been struggling to adjust to rapidly-changing legal realities. NPR's Sarah McCammon visited one provider in Shreveport, Louisiana. The shifting legal realities could make accessing abortion care difficult for members of the military who are stationed in certain states. NPR's Brian Mann spoke to women in the military about their concerns. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/07/2212m 30s

Songs Of The Summer In A Time Of Protest

It may be too soon to crown the "song of the summer". NPR Music's Stephen Thompson says there's no one quality that the songs that carry that title have... it's a collective feeling, a shared vibe.For so many Americans on this July 4th, songs of the summer and songs of protest feel one and the same.NPR's Ann Powers is a music critic, and Shana Redmond is a professor at Columbia University, and the author of "Anthem: Social Movements And The Sound Of Solidarity In The African Diaspora." They explain the role of protest music in this moment. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/07/2210m 1s

Criminal Prosecution Of Pregnancy Loss Expected To Increase Post-Roe

In states across the country, long before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, pregnant people were already being criminally charged, convicted, and imprisoned for loss of pregnancy. Advocates for reproductive rights say this is because laws created to protect pregnant people from violence and abuse are being used to prosecute people whose pregnancies end prematurely. We speak with Dana Sussman of National Advocates for Pregnant Women about how the prosecution of pregnancy loss could look in the country's new, post-Roe era. The organization documents and provides legal defenses in cases involving pregnant people charged with pregnancy-related crimes. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/07/2216m 31s

Summer Travel Is Chaos Right Now. Here's Some Reasons Why

As many countries have loosened their COVID-19 restrictions and reopened their borders, the demand for travel is high. Meanwhile, there are hundreds of flights getting canceled and delayed on a daily basis across the globe. A shortage in airline staff, especially pilots, is a big reason why. Pilots took to the picket lines this week to protest this shortage. They are also frustrated by stalled contract negotiations and strained pilot schedules.NPR's Ari Shapiro spoke to Captain Casey Murray from Southwest Airlines Pilots Association about what has caused this shortage.Airline companies are having to get creative in their efforts to recruit, hire and retain pilots. NPR's David Schaper reports about how one major airline opened its own flight school. Additional reporting in this episode came from Amanda Andrews at George Public Broadcasting.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/07/2213m 21s

The Global Struggle For LGBTQI+ Rights

While the last few decades have shown major progress when it comes to LGBTQ+ rights globally, queer people have had to continue to fight for them. During Pride month there have been several high-profile instances of violence targeted at queer people. These events are stark reminders that the struggle for equal rights and safety for LGBTQ+ people continues. NPR's Ari Shapiro spoke with three high-level diplomats assigned to LGBTQ+ issues – the U.S.'s Jessica Stern, Italy's Fabrizio Petri and Argentina's Alba Rueda – about whether life is improving for queer people globally.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/06/2212m 41s

What We've Learned From A Month Of January 6th Committee Hearings

Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony before the January 6th committee landed with a bang. The surprise hearing on Tuesday, featuring this aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, was the most powerful evidence to date in the case that House investigators have been building through hours of public hearings.NPR Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro and NPR National Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson walk through the case the committee has built so far, its implications for a potential criminal prosecution of former president Donald Trump and the impact it might have on an extremely polarized American public.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/06/2214m 5s

Pell Grants In Prison: A New Effort To Fund Degrees For People Behind Bars

There are 1.5 million people in state and federal prisons in the United States. Very few of them get a chance to earn a bachelor degree. That's due to a decades-old ban on the use of federal money to help people in prison pay for college classes. But that's about to change. Starting with the 2023-2024 school year, people in prison will be eligible to receive Pell grants in the amount of nearly $7,000 per year. Experts say this change will mean a chance at higher education for hundreds of thousands who are academically eligible. NPR's Elissa Nadworny reports on what the change means, and tells the story of a man who earned the type of degree that will soon be available to many more people. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/06/2212m 46s

On Gun Control, Two Big Steps In Opposite Directions

Congress and the Supreme Court took big steps in opposite directions last week, in the country's long standing debate on whether and how to regulate guns.Congress passed the first major federal gun legislation in decades, with bipartisan support. President Biden signed it into law on Saturday.Meanwhile, on Thursday, the Supreme Court issued a 6-3 opinion striking down a major gun control law in New York. The sweeping ruling puts many other gun regulations in states across the country, on shaky ground.Daniel Webster, whose research focuses on policies intended to reduce gun violence, explains the real world impact he anticipates after these changes. Webster is Co-Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence Solutions.This episode features reporting from NPR's Nina Totenberg.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/06/2212m 56s

Does HBO's 'The Wire' still hold up after 20 years?

Omar Little, Jimmy McNulty, Stringer Bell, Snot Boogie. If you recognize these names, you are probably a fan of the HBO series The Wire. This month marks 20 years since the series premiere. It ran for five seasons, following the lives of the cops, criminals, political players, and everyday folks caught up in Baltimore's often futile war on drugs. Many argue that The Wire is the best television show ever created and has earned praise for its realistic, humanizing, multi-dimensional portrayal of Black characters. But 20 years on, the conversation about policing in Black communities has changed. The deaths of Freddie Gray, George Floyd, and many others after encounters with police and the rise of the Black Lives Matter Movement have brought about more public scrutiny, debate, and criticism of the police. As social commentary, is The Wire still relevant? We speak with NPR TV critic Eric Deggans and Ronda Racha Penrice, editor of the essay collection, Cracking The Wire During Black Lives Matter.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/06/2220m 34s

Roe v. Wade Is Overturned

On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court officially reversed Roe v. Wade, declaring that the constitutional right to abortion no longer exists. For nearly 50 years, Americans have had a constitutional right to an abortion. We're about to find out what the country looks like without one. The court's ruling doesn't mean a nationwide ban– it allows states to do what they want. NPR's Nina Totenberg walks us through the ruling, and NPR's Sarah McCammon discusses the states where "trigger bans," or laws passed in anticipation of the Supreme Court's action, are already in place.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/06/2213m 24s

The Rental Market Is Wild Right Now

Listed rents are up 15% nationwide, and as much as 30% in some cities. At the same time, inflation and rising interest rates are pricing many buyers out of the housing market — increasing the pressure to rent. NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports that competition is so intense, some people find themselves in bidding wars. The red-hot rental market could mean that more people face the threat of eviction at a time when most pandemic-era protections have disappeared. Carl Gershenson, Project Director of the Eviction Lab at Princeton University, explains how being evicted makes it all the more harder to find a new place to live. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/06/2215m 9s

The Foreign Fighters Who've Gone To Ukraine

Two American citizens who'd traveled to Ukraine to join the fight against Russia have reportedly been captured by pro-Russian forces. The State Department says it's "closely monitoring" the situation and has urged Americans not to travel to the country, noting the risk and danger. But still, thousands of foreign fighters have journeyed there.NPR's Ryan Lucas met some of them — a group of Americans and Brits who have formed a unit that is fighting in the east. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/06/2214m 9s

Meet The Man Who Helped Build The Court That May Overturn Roe

As soon as Thursday, the Supreme Court could rule on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization. A leaked draft opinion in that case showed a majority of justices agreeing to overturn Roe v. Wade, which would end the constitutional right to an abortion. However the court rules, this moment is the culmination of a decades-long effort by conservative activists around the country. One man in particular has played an outsized role in that effort: Leonard Leo, Co-Chairman of the Federalist Society. He's devoted his career to getting conservatives appointed to the country's most powerful courts.We look at how he came to have so much sway.In this episode, you'll hear excerpts from the interview NPR's Deirdre Walsh conducted with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/06/2213m 0s

Teachers Reflect on a Tough School Year: 'It's Been Very Stressful'

After two years of pandemic disruptions, this school year was supposed to be better. But for many teachers, it was harder than ever. Teachers say they are stressed and burned out. Many are considering leaving their jobs sooner than planned.We speak to three teachers about the past school year and their concerns about the future.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/06/2213m 12s

Warning Vulnerable Populations About Monkeypox Without Stigmatizing Them

Many of the people affected by the current global monkeypox outbreak are reported to be men who identify as gay or bisexual, or men who have sex with men. The virus can affect anyone, but in response to where the majority of cases are, public health officials are gearing their information toward communities of gay and bisexual men. And that has some saying that the messaging echoes back to the HIV/AIDS crisis and has the potential to stigmatize the gay community while missing others who are susceptible to the disease. We speak with Dr. Boghuma K. Titanji, physician and clinical researcher in infectious diseases at Emory University, about the lessons public health officials can learn from the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 80s and 90s.And Northwestern University journalism professor Steven Thrasher talks about his recent article for Scientific American, "Blaming Gay Men for Monkeypox Will Harm Everyone."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/06/2215m 2s

Q&A: If Abortion Is Illegal, What Happens Next?

There are few issues as highly debated and emotionally charged as abortion. And in the coming days, the Supreme Court will issue a ruling that could fundamentally change the landscape for abortion in the U.S.The possibility that the court could strike down Roe v. Wade has raised all kinds of legal questions, as people consider what a post-Roe America might look like.We asked members of the NPR audience what questions they had about abortion access and reproductive rights. Khiara Bridges, a law professor at UC Berkeley who studies reproductive rights, and NPR's Sarah McCammon, who covers abortion policy, answer some of their questions. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/06/2214m 13s

China and Taiwan: What's Ukraine Got To Do With It?

The war between Russia and Ukraine is reverberating in Taiwan, a self-governed island that China claims as its own and has threatened to invade if Taiwan declares independence.Residents of the island are watching intently as Ukraine defends itself against a much larger and more powerful adversary. And they are thinking about what it takes to galvanize international support. The U.S. has a longstanding policy of ambiguity when it comes to talking about Taiwan and independence, not wanting to risk a conflict with China. So it was surprising last month when President Biden said the that U.S. will defend Taiwan in the event of an invasion by China.We speak to journalist Chris Horton, who is based in Taiwan. His recent piece in The Atlantic is headlined, "The Lessons Taiwan is Learning from Ukraine."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/06/2213m 12s

DACA Recipients On Ten Years Of Precarious Protection

It's been ten years since the Obama administration announced Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The policy provided protection from deportation for hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children.President Obama called it a "temporary stopgap measure," at the time, but Congress hasn't passed any legislation in the intervening years to create permanent protection for the people covered by DACA.Last year, a federal judge in Texas ruled the program is illegal, and the program is essentially frozen in place while the Biden administration appeals. Current DACA recipients can reapply, but the administration can't grant any new applications. NPR's Joel Rose reports that that has left roughly 80,000 DACA applications indefinitely on hold.Two early DACA recipients and advocates for undocumented immigrants, Diana Pliego and Esder Chong, discuss how they view the program, on its tenth anniversary. Help NPR improve podcasts by completing a short, anonymous survey at npr.org/podcastsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/06/2213m 39s

The Emerging Deal On Gun Violence: Is It Enough?

A bipartisan group of Senates say they have reached a deal on a package of safety and gun-related measures. The deal is not yet done, but lawmakers say they are closer than they've been in a long time. The package includes measures to enhance background checks for gun buyers under 21, incentivize states to pass so-called "red flag laws," and fund school safety and mental health initiatives. Is it enough? We put that question to Gabby Giffords, a former congresswoman who was injured in a 2011 shooting. Since then, Giffords has dedicated her life to calling for action on gun control, co-founding Giffords, an advocacy group that promotes gun safety. The group's executive director, Peter Ambler, also spoke to NPR. Help NPR improve podcasts by completing a short, anonymous survey at npr.org/podcastsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/06/2213m 9s

Inflation Is Not Getting Better. Why Some CEOs Are Predicting Recession

Prices rose more than expected in May. Gas is averaging $5 a gallon. Food, rent, and housing all cost more, too. NPR's Scott Horsley spoke to consumers trying to cope. Some CEOs are predicting a recession — but not all. NPR's David Gura reports. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Chris Arnold on the growing cost of housing. Transportation company owner Dennis Briggs spoke to NPR's Ayesha Rascoe on Weekend Edition Sunday. Help NPR improve podcasts by completing a short, anonymous survey at npr.org/podcastsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/06/2212m 56s

Is the U.S. Moving Closer to Erasing All Federal Student Loans?

After years of struggling to pay federal student loans used to attend the for-profit Corinthian Colleges, hundreds of thousands of student borrowers will have their debt canceled. Corinthian closed in 2015 after investigators found it had defrauded students with misleading claims about future job prospects. Earlier this month, The Department of Education discharged all outstanding debt for all Corinthian borrowers.With over a trillion dollars owed, federal student loan debt has been called a national crisis. Advocates for the cancellation of all federal student loans hope the Department of Education's latest move could signal a step in that direction.We speak with political strategist and student loan cancellation advocate Melissa Byrne. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/06/2212m 26s

January 6th hearings begin, with a focus on the Proud Boys

On Thursday, the House Select Committee investigating the January 6th insurrection at the U.S. Capitol began presenting its findings in the first in a series of high profile public hearings. The panel showed videos of aides to former President Trump testifying that his claims of a stolen election were simply not true. Some used more colorful language. The committee seeks to show that the mayhem at the Capitol was not spontaneous, but rather an orchestrated subversion of American democracy. And they say former President Trump was a key player. The hearing also included video of the Proud Boys at the Capitol on the day of the attack. We speak to documentary filmmaker Nick Quested who shot some of that footage and testified before the committee on Thursday. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/06/2212m 12s

With Gas Prices Still Soaring, Electric Cars Meet A Moment

There have never been more options for drivers who want an electric car. But the demand — fueled by high gas prices — is almost over-powering, and supply chain constraints aren't helping. NPR's Brittany Cronin reports on one of the biggest EV launches of the year: Ford's F-150 Lightning. NPR's Camila Domonoske explains why China dominates the market for electric car batteries. Also in this episode: General Motors President Mark Reuss, who spoke to NPR's Steve Inskeep on Morning Edition. Help NPR improve podcasts by completing a short, anonymous survey at npr.org/podcastsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/06/2211m 47s

A First Step To Crypto Regulation, Or A Step Backwards?

Nearly everyone agrees the cryptocurrency industry needs regulation, but there are huge disagreements about what that should look like.A Senate bill proposes a new regulatory framework for the industry. Cosponsors Cynthia Lummis (R-Wyoming) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) argue that their bill hits the "sweet spot" between allowing innovation and protecting consumers.Software engineer Molly White, who runs the blog Web3 is going just great, says that the bill is too industry-friendly, and puts into legislation the "foggy regulatory space" that crypto companies have taken advantage of. Help NPR improve podcasts by completing a short, anonymous survey at npr.org/podcastsurvey.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/06/2214m 59s

As Lawmakers Debate Gun Control, What Policies Could Actually Help?

President Biden urged Congress to act and the House is preparing to pass multiple gun control measures. But the Senate is where a compromise must be made. A bipartisan group of lawmakers is reportedly discussing policies like enhanced background checks and a federal red flag law. While it's unclear what Congress might agree to, researchers do have ideas about what policies could help prevent mass shootings and gun violence. NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce explains. Hear more from her reporting on Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast, via Apple, Google, or Spotify. NPR's Cory Turner reports on what school safety experts think can be done to prevent mass shootings, and former FBI agent Katherine Schweit describes where Uvalde police may have erred their active shooter response. Schweit is the author of Stop the Killing: How to End the Mass Shooting Crisis.Help NPR improve podcasts by completing a short, anonymous survey at npr.org/podcastsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/06/2214m 32s

New White House COVID Czar: 'Less Fear Is A Good Thing'

In the third summer of the pandemic, White House COVID response coordinator Ashish Jha tells NPR it's a good thing that many people feel less afraid of getting sick. But he says the Biden administration still has work to do. One of their latest challenges is managing the vaccine rollout for children under 5, which could begin in weeks — and educating parents and caretakers about the importance of vaccination. NPR's Rob Stein reports on another persistent public health challenge: long COVID. A recent study offers some clues about why many people suffer from symptoms for months. Rob also spoke to Gregory Glenn of Novavax, who you'll hear in this episode discussing the company's new COVID vaccine, which is awaiting FDA authorization.Help NPR improve podcasts by completing a short, anonymous survey at npr.org/podcastsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/06/2214m 1s

As School Shootings Claim More Victims, Young Activists Want to Be Heard

The mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX has parents and students worried about safety at school. Data gathered by the Washington Post estimates that more than 300,000 students have experienced shootings at school since the 1999 school shooting in Columbine, Colorado. But experts say the impact of school shootings is far more extensive, and even children who don't come into direct contact with violence can be traumatized.We speak with Hannah Rubin, a 16-year-old activist with March for Our Lives, a youth-led movement pushing for gun control measures. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/06/2212m 34s

Jubilee Jubilation for a Troubled Monarchy

The UK is celebrating Queen Elizabeth II's 70 years on the throne with four days of pomp and tribute. But, as the nation thanks its queen for seven decades of service, there are questions about what the monarchy will look like after she's gone. NPR's Frank Langfitt takes a look at a royal family at a crossroads. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/06/2211m 31s

Robb Elementary School and Uvalde's History of Mexican-American Activism

So many people in Uvalde, Texas have a shared history. Some of that history runs right through Robb Elementary School, a place that was part of the Mexican-American community's struggle for racial equality.NPR's Vanessa Romo spoke with Eulalio Diaz, Jr. He was the coronor on duty when a gunman massacred 19 children and two teachers at the school. Diaz also went to Robb Elementary and knew a lot of the victims' families. And NPR's Adrian Florido has the story of Robb Elementary's role in the fight for Mexican-American equality.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/06/2210m 6s

How A New Federal Prison Became One Of The Country's Deadliest

NPR and The Marshall Project have uncovered violence, abuse and a string of inmate deaths at a new penitentiary in Thomson, Ill.The reporting in this episode comes from NPR Investigative Correspondent Joseph Shapiro and reporter Christie Thompson of The Marshall Project. Find more from their story here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/06/2215m 32s

Q & A: What An Abortion Ban Would Mean For Patients Who Need One

What happens if a medical condition threatens the life of a pregnant patient? What about a fetus with a lethal anomaly? Will treatment for miscarriage change? This episode we're answering those questions and others from listeners about what would happen if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v Wade — with help from NPR health policy correspondent Selena Simmons-Duffin and Dr. Kristyn Brandi, an OB-GYN and family planning doctor who's also the board chair for Physicians for Reproductive Health.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/05/2212m 3s

Looking Back At A Life In Limbo

Some immigrants never look back. Some spend their lives look back. All Things Considered Senior Producer Miguel Macias has done both.For the last decade, Macias has documented his life as an immigrant from Spain. His story of migration, of being in limbo is, in some ways, unique, but also similar to that of many immigrants. Over the years, he has wondered time and time again about his decision to leave his country, and whether to return one day.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/05/2213m 54s

Can We Stop Mass Shootings Before They Start?

In the past two weeks the nation has borne witness to the tragedy of two mass shootings. In Uvalde, Texas, a gunman killed 19 students and their two teachers inside a fourth grade classroom at Robb Elementary School. At least 17 were wounded. In Buffalo, New York, a man is accused of shooting and killing 10 members of the Black community who were shopping at Tops supermarket. In a long internet screed, he wrote about how online racist ideology and white supremacist conspiracy theories fueled his violence. Witnessing the aftermath of these horrific acts leaves us wondering, once again, what can be done to identify the warning signs of those who plan to commit mass violence—before it's too late?We speak with Joanna Schroeder about ways to protect young people from being indoctrinated into violent white supremacist groups. Schroeder chronicles her sons' exposure to content from online racist hate groups and how she intervened. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/05/2215m 0s

Taking Stock of What George Floyd's Murder – And Life – Have Changed, Two Years Later

This week marks two years since George Floyd's murder at the hands of a white police officer and the subsequent racial justice protests and calls for police reform that spread from Minneapolis across the country. President Joe Biden has signed a new executive order meant to change how police use force among other measures, which experts say is a small — but important — step in preventing more tragedies like Floyd's death.But as Minnesota Pubic Radio's Matt Sepic reports, some Minneapolis residents say they're still waiting on the reform that leaders promised.Also in this episode, Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa of The Washington Post discuss their new biography, His Name Is George Floyd, and how those who knew Floyd best want to make sure his legacy covers more than his murder.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/05/2215m 49s

Why Americans Feel The Toll Of High Inflation Beyond Gas Pumps & Grocery Stores

This is a fragile moment for the U.S. economy. Many people are feeling the steep rise of the cost of gas and groceries, and some are having to decide whether to buy food or fill up their tanks. Food banks and local non-profits are seeing more people than ever. And experts worry that the Federal Reserve's efforts to combat inflation by raising interest rates could tip the economy into recession.NPR's Scott Horsley covers the big-picture economy, Chris Arnold covers housing and Brittany Cronin covers energy. They explain what sectors are feeling the most impact and how it's playing out for different people.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/05/229m 23s

Not Much Changed After Sandy Hook. Will Federal Laws Change After Uvalde?

At least 19 children were shot and killed by a man who investigators say was armed with assault rifles legally purchased after his 18th birthday. It was the deadliest school shooting since Sandy Hook in Newtown, Connecticut nearly 10 years ago. Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy tells NPR that lawmakers in Washington — including himself — bear responsibility for inaction on gun violence over the last decade. Also in this episode, gun control activist Sandy Phillips, who spoke to NPR's Steve Inskeep on Morning Edition; and Uvalde City Manager Vince DiPiazza, who spoke to NPR's Leila Fadel on Morning Edition. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/05/2214m 53s

What Could A Post-Roe Future Look Like? Poland Offers A Glimpse

Dozens of states could soon take steps to ban or restrict abortion. But there are a lot of unanswered questions about how those laws would be enforced if they vary from state to state, Kim Mutcherson tells NPR. That patchwork of laws is the most likely outcome if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v Wade, leaving the U.S. without a federally-protected right to abortion. That's the reality in Poland, where abortion is almost entirely illegal. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on an underground network of reproductive rights activists who risk prison time to help abortion patients.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/05/2215m 33s

Georgia's GOP Primaries, Where Trump's 'Big Lie' Is On The Ballot

It's 2022, but the 2020 election is on the ballot in Georgia, where several Trump-backed candidates are running in Republican primary races. WABE's Rahul Bali explains how the former President looms over Tuesday's elections, and WABE's Sam Gringlas looks at a race between two Democratic incumbents, forced to face off after their districts were redrawn by Republicans. For more political coverage from member station WABE, listen to Georgia Votes.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/05/2216m 2s

Investigating The Tragic History Of Federal Indian Boarding Schools

Last year the remains of 215 children were found in unmarked graves on the site of a former residential school for Indigenous children in British Columbia. The news was shocking, but among Indigenous people of Canada and survivors of the country's boarding school system, it was not a surprise. For generations there had been stories of children taken away from their parents never to be heard from again. Those who did return told of neglect, abuse, and forced assimilation. It's a brutal history that the United States and Canada share. Shortly after the unmarked graves were found in Canada, US Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland called for an investigation into US boarding schools. Her first report, released last week, identified more than 400 institutions operated or supported by the US government. At 53 of these schools, there are marked and unmarked burial sites with the remains of children who died there.We hear stories from some of the survivors of the boarding schools and speak with Secretary Haaland about the ongoing investigation and a year-long listening tour to bear witness to survivors and facilitate healing. This episode contains discussions of child abuse that some listeners may find disturbing.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/05/2213m 37s

How A Possible NATO Expansion Shows Russia's Plans are Backfiring

Russian President Vladimir Putin has used possible NATO expansion to justify invading Ukraine. Now, that invasion might expand the alliance. Finland and Sweden, both formerly neutral Russian neighbors, are applying for membership. NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Finland's ambassador to the U.S., Mikko Hautala, about the stakes of his country's bid to join.NPR's Emily Feng also talks to historian Mary Elise Sarotte about how we reached this impasse between NATO and Russia.You can also hear — and see — more on how war games and Russia's invasion of Ukraine are impacting life in Norway from NPR's Quil Lawrence here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/05/2214m 58s

They Fled The Most Traumatized Parts of Ukraine. Classrooms Are Offering Them Hope

A Polish school in Warsaw has taken in Ukrainian refugee students and teachers. The school provides safety and a place of hope as the war between Russia and Ukraine continues. Poland's minister of education says the country has absorbed more than 75,000 Ukrainian students into Polish schools. NPR's Ari Shapiro visited schools in Poland and spoke to teachers and students about what their life is like right now.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/05/2211m 27s

A Formula Shortage Shows How Policy, Societal Pressure Impact Babies & Parents

This week, the FDA announced new steps to ease a nationwide baby formula shortage prompted, in part, by a temporary shutdown of a facility that makes formula back in February. As millions of families who rely on formula wait for supplies to become more available, many are also looking for answers on the circumstances that gave rise to the shortage.NPR Chief Economics Correspondent Scott Horsley breaks down the tangle of supply chain issues and federal policies that are playing into the formula crisis. And Dr. Alison Stuebe of UNC Health — who also shares this resource for those looking for guidance on how to find or offer help with breastmilk supplies during the formula shortage — explains the systemic inequities that hinder the ability of many parents to feed their babies. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/05/2213m 34s

How Many Of America's One Million COVID Deaths Were Preventable?

As the U.S. marks one million people dead from COVID-19, scientists suggest that nearly one third of those deaths could have been prevented if more people had chosen to be vaccinated. NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin reports. And even though the unvaccinated continue to make up a majority of COVID-19 cases and related hospitalizations, the number of Americans who say they won't get a COVID shot hasn't budged in a year. NPR's John Burnett spoke to a few of them. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/05/2213m 24s

Buffalo Shooting Victims Are Likely Targets Of Racist 'Replacement' Violence

A man accused of killing 10 people in Buffalo, New York was allegedly motivated by a racist doctrine known as 'replacement theory.' It's just a new name for an old set of racial hatreds, Kathleen Belew told NPR. Belew is an assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago and the author of Bring The War Home: The White Power Movement And Paramilitary America.NPR's Quil Lawrence reports from Buffalo on the aftermath of the shooting, and NPR's Adrian Florido takes a closer look at the supermarket where it took place. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/05/2213m 40s

The Children's Mental Health Crisis Didn't Start With The Pandemic

The United States is experiencing an adolescent mental health crisis. Experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the Surgeon General are stressing the urgent need to address the mental health needs of children and teens. The pandemic focused attention on this issue as young people dealt with isolation, the uncertainty of lockdown and grief over the death of loved ones. But while the pandemic exacerbated the problem, it has been building for years. We speak with Judith Warner, a journalist and author, to find out how we got to this point, and what can be done to help kids now. Warner's most recent piece, "We Have Essentially Turned a Blind Eye to Our Own Children for Decades," appears in The Washington Post Magazine.This episode deals with suicide. If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or the Crisis Text Line by texting "HOME" to 741741. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/05/2211m 49s

Genetic Testing: Is It Better Not To Know?

Sasa Woodruff loves food—she's been accused of having far too many cookbooks. But in 2019, a phone call from an unknown caller changed her relationship to eating. A genetic counselor called to tell her that she had a rare genetic mutation which could lead to a lethal form of stomach cancer.The only way to prevent that cancer was to get her stomach surgically removed. While she's now grateful for the information that genetic testing gave her, Woodruff's story raises questions about what kind of information patients should have and how they can use it. Professor of law and philosophy at Duke University, Nita Farahany and professor of law and biosciences at Stanford University, Hank Greely discuss the implications of growing access to genetic testing and how to weigh health decisions. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.See Consider This from NPR sponsors and promo codes.
13/05/2215m 30s

Inflation Is Still High. Why That Hits Low-Income Americans Hardest.

Inflation dipped slightly in April, but it's still at a historically-high 8.3 percent. Research suggests lower-income families suffer the most when prices rise.NPR's Scott Horsley explains how people around the country are coping with inflation, and what the Federal Reserve is doing to try to bring it under control.This episode also includes reporting from NPR's Jennifer Ludden, on eviction rates rising in the face of increased rent and the end of pandemic rent aid in some places.And it features reporting from NPR's Brittany Cronin, on what's driving rising fuel prices.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/05/229m 48s

How Abortion Laws Around The World Compare To The U.S.

Some countries in Latin America are expanding abortion rights. Other countries, like Poland, have all but outlawed the procedure. Meanwhile, health officials in Canada have signaled Americans would be welcome to seek abortion services across the border if they cannot access care at home. All of that speaks to the reality that America's abortion debate is not happening in vacuum, and is being watched closely around the world.Mary Louise Kelly spoke about how abortion laws around the world compare to those in the U.S., with NPR correspondents Mara Liasson in Washington D.C., Philip Reeves in Brazil, and Rob Schmitz in Germany. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/05/2211m 18s

Why White Nationalists Identify With A Russian Church — And Vladimir Putin

The Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia is gaining followers in the U.S. — not Russian immigrants, but American converts drawn to its emphasis on "traditional values." NPR's Odette Yousef reports some new converts are using the religion to spread white nationalist views. More from her story here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/05/2211m 42s

Roe's Legal Fate Is Unclear. But Studies Already Show Who'd Likely Be Hit Hardest

Debates about the status of Roe v. Wade continue after the Supreme Court's draft opinion was leaked last week. This week, the Senate is planning to vote on legislation that would codify abortion rights into a federal law, but it's likely to fail given the 50-50 split between Democrats and Republicans. That means abortion access will be left up to states — and some already have restrictive abortion laws. Reproductive justice advocates are concerned about the disproportionate impact those laws will have on Black and Brown communities if Roe is overturned.NPR's Sandhya Dirks spoke to some advocates about how women of color are situated in this abortion access debate. And NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin explains how restricting abortion access means restricting health care for people across all demographic backgrounds. You can also hear more from Dr. Diana Green Foster, who spoke to NPR's science podcast Shortwave, which examined what happened when people had access to abortion and what happened when they were denied.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/05/2212m 38s

The Road To Overturning Roe v. Wade

Earlier this week, a leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court suggested that after nearly 50 years, the court intends to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion nationwide. Almost as soon as abortions became legal, opponents began organizing efforts to repeal the law. Eighteen states now have so-called "trigger laws" that will ban abortions the moment that Roe v. Wade is overturned or pre-"Roe" era bans that remain on the books, ready once again, to fall into place.We'll look back at the longstanding efforts by legal, political and religious groups - on both sides of the debate - that have led to this moment. And we'll discuss what comes next. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Audio in the podcast from Supreme Court arguments of Roe v. Wade was obtained from Oyez.org multimedia archive.
07/05/2216m 43s

As COVID-19 Cases Surge Again, Public Health Leaders See A Turning Point

For a few months, it looked like COVID-19 was retreating in the United States. But cases are rising across the country again. Still, public health leaders are signaling that the U.S. is turning another corner in this pandemic, and that continued COVID surges might just be part of the new normal.NPR Science correspondent Michaeleen Doucleff reports on what the new Omicron variant could have in store for the U.S. in coming weeks and months, and what scientists know about Americans' COVID immunity.Andy Slavitt, former senior advisor to President Joe Biden on COVID, explains what the "endemic phase" could look like.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/05/2211m 21s

The Harrowing Journey To Get Premature American Twins From Kyiv To The U.S.

Twin babies Lenny and Moishe were born via surrogate in Ukraine, just as Russia invaded the country. Their parents live in Chicago and had been anxiously awaiting the arrival of their new sons.Rescuers exfiltrated the babies, dodging Russian artillery fire and driving through a snowstorm before finally arriving at a Polish hospital, where new father Alex "Sasha" Spektor met the boys for the first time. But a more difficult journey for the family was just beginning. NPR's Ari Shapiro followed up with Spektor and his partner, Irma Nuñez, as they navigated the complicated bureaucratic process of getting their twins from Poland to the United States.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/05/229m 39s

Republicans In Michigan Have Replaced Election Officials Who Certified Biden's Win

Bipartisan members who serve on state and county boards of canvassers in Michigan have an important job: certifying the results of elections, making them official. In 2020, Former President Trump and his allies urged them not to certify as part of his campaign to undermine and overturn the presidential election, even though Joe Biden won Michigan by more than 154,000 votes.Since then, local GOP leaders have replaced many of the Republican canvassers who upheld their oaths and voted to certify the results for Biden.Michelle Voorheis, a Republican canvasser in Genessee County until last year, is one of them. She says she wasn't re-nominated because she pushed back against false allegations of election fraud.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/05/2212m 46s

The Potential Impact Of The Decision To Overturn Roe v. Wade

The right to an abortion in the United States appears closer than ever to being eliminated, after a draft of a majority opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade was leaked. Should it stand, the court's ruling wouldn't ban abortion nationwide, but would leave the decision up to individual states. Many Republican-led states are ready to enact their own bans, should Roe v. Wade be overturned, which could leave tens of millions of people without access to abortions.NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and national correspondent Sarah McCammon explain the far-reaching effects this draft could have on abortion-rights advocates, as well as its potential impact on the midterm elections later this year.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/05/2212m 46s

Voices From Lockdown In Shanghai As The City Battles A Surge Of COVID Cases

Cases of COVID-19 have been surging throughout China. The country has implemented a stringent "zero-COVID" strategy that includes mass testing, limited travel and large-scale lockdowns. In Shanghai, many residents haven't been able to leave their homes. It's an eerie reminder of the lockdowns in Wuhan during the first year of the pandemic. NPR's international correspondent Rob Schmitz spoke with two residents of a housing complex in Shanghai about their experiences with the city's lockdown.There are some people who are leaving their homes – mainly to enforce China's "zero-COVID" plan. China has hired tens of thousands of temporary workers to test, isolate and lock down entire cities.Beijing correspondent Emily Feng spoke to a few of those workers, many of whom are poorly treated and underpaid. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/05/2215m 52s

Understanding The Link Between Racial Justice And The Fight Against Climate Change

Communities of color are the most harshly affected by climate change in the United States. While the importance of environmental justice is becoming more mainstream, too often people in this movement who are Black, Indigenous and people of color are overlooked and left out of conversations about how to solve the crisis.Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, a marine biologist, policy expert and writer, wants the broader environmental movement to understand the crucial link between the fight to save the planet and the fight for racial justice.And we'll hear how the Donors of Color Network is working to increase philanthropic funding for environmental initiatives led by people of color.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/04/2214m 31s

How One Night In LA Illustrates The Growing Tension Between Police And The Press

Over the past two years, about 200 journalists across the country have been detained or arrested while on the job. Many were covering the social and racial justice protests that began after the murder of George Floyd by police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis. NPR Media Correspondent David Folkenflik and NPR producer Marc Rivers look at the growing tension between police and the press through the lens of one March 2021 night at Echo Park Lake, when police detained at least 16 journalists.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/04/229m 0s

The 1944 Law That Gave The CDC Its Powers, Explained

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's mask mandate on planes, trains and buses ended earlier this month, and it came down, in part, to a judge's interpretation of the word "sanitation." U.S. District Judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle voided the mask requirement, citing a 1944 law that gives the CDC power to stop the spread of communicable diseases through measures like inspection, fumigation, disinfection and sanitation.Lawrence Gostin is a professor of public health law at Georgetown University. He explains what the 1944 Public Health Service Act did and why he thinks the judge's interpretation could have an impact on the United States' ability to respond to future health crises. Additional reporting by NPR's Pien Huang also appeared in this episode.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/04/227m 50s

Following The Journey of One Palestinian Seeking Medical Care In Gaza

One Palestinian man's struggle to get life-saving medical care while living in the Gaza Strip highlights many lesser-seen victims of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Since the militant group Hamas took over Gaza 15 years ago, Israel's travel restrictions have resulted in many barriers for Palestinians seeking critical health care.Palestinians can try to get medical treatment both in and outside of Gaza, but need a travel permit to choose the latter. And while Israel grants thousands of travel permits a year, the timeline for securing one can be long. Some doctors have also fled Gaza. All of these factors can pose dangerous delays for vital treatment.NPR Jerusalem Correspondent Daniel Estrin followed one patient's difficult journey to get heart surgery.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/04/2225m 1s

How COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories Led To A Family Matriarch's Preventable Death

Stephanie is one of nearly one million Americans who have died of COVID-19. Her family says Stephanie's death was avoidable, but in recent years, she had been drawn into conspiracy theories.She believed that the coronavirus was a hoax and refused to get vaccinated. When she got COVID-19 last winter, Stephanie refused treatments and eventually died just a few days after Christmas. While there is no way to know exactly how many people like Stephanie have died because they believed conspiracy theories, the Kaiser Family Foundation recently found that more than 200,000 Americans would be alive today, had they had been vaccinated. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/04/2213m 36s

How One Republic Went From Resisting Russia to Supporting Its Attacks In Ukraine

Between the 1990s and late 2000s, people in Chechnya described Russia's wars there as a nightmare. Its former leader, Akhmad Kadyrov, resisted Russian forces. But today, the Muslim-majority Chechen Republic is ruled by Kadyrov's son, Ramzan. He's a close ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin, who is accused of numerous human rights abuses and is also leading his own forces against Ukraine to aid the Kremlin. Rachel Denber, Deputy Director of Human Rights Watch's Europe and Central Asia Division, explains Ramzan Kadyrov's stake in Russia's invasion of Ukraine. NPR National Security Correspondent Greg Myre, who reported from Chechnya during the wars, also breaks down the republic's evolution over the last 25 years. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/04/2213m 12s

Finding Power In Reclaiming One's Name

You introduce yourself and then someone mispronounces your name. At that point you have to decide if you correct them or let it slide. For many people from immigrant communities, this has been a lifelong experience. And sometimes, it's about more than mispronunciation, it can signal exclusion and disrespect. Some people even change their names in order to fit in more easily and not be "othered."For years, LA Times columnist, Jean Guerrero, let people say her name without rolling their r's, the way it would be said in Spanish. But after becoming the target of MAGA trolls online, she decided to reclaim the proper Spanish pronunciation.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/04/2211m 52s

A Special Ed Teacher Shortage Is Getting Worse — But One Fix Is Catching On

For years, most states have reported a shortage of special education teachers. Now, according to federal data, nearly every state is struggling to hire qualified educators. And when schools can't find a licensed teacher, they hire people who are willing to do the job, but lack the training. From member station WFYI in Indianapolis, Lee Gaines reports on what that means for students, and Dylan Peers McCoy reports on one approach — in Hawaii — that's helped to fill shortages. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/04/2214m 13s

California Is A Step Closer To Reparations. Not All Black Residents Will Qualify

California's Reparations Task Force is preparing to release its first report on the impact of racism on African Americans in June. It's the next step for the Task Force, following a narrow vote late last month to exclude some Black residents from being eligible if and when a reparations plan becomes law. Under the current proposal, only those who can trace their lineage to enslaved or freed Black people before the end of the 19th century will qualify for reparations from the state. Some Black Californians are fine with that for now. State residents Derika Denell Gibson, Taiwo Kujichagulia-Seitu, and Kaelyn Sabal-Wilson discuss what reparations would mean to them.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/04/2214m 59s

How The War In Ukraine Is Deepening The World's Hunger Crisis

The pains of every war ripple out beyond the borders of the conflict zone. And as the war between Russia and Ukraine drags on, the disruptions in the global food supply chain are beginning to deepen the already dire hunger crisis around the world. Ukraine and Russia combined export 30% of the world's wheat, in addition to other food supplies. Now, because of the ongoing war, the price of food worldwide is skyrocketing and 38 countries are facing acute food insecurity, meaning they are just one step from famine.NPR global health and development correspondent Nurith Aizenman reports on how the war is driving up prices. David Beasley, executive director of the UN World Food Programme, talks about how food insecurity looks inside of Ukraine, and what is to come for the rest of the world.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/04/2210m 48s

What The End Of The Mask Mandate Means For The Pandemic — And High-Risk Travelers

A federal judge struck down the CDC's mask mandate for public transportation on Monday, clearing the way for airlines and ride hailing companies to eliminate mask requirements for passengers. What might the change mean for travelers — especially those most vulnerable to infection or too young to be vaccinated? NPR science correspondents Selena Simmons-Duffin and Maria Godoy explain. NPR's Tamara Keith outlines the political implications for the Biden administration. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/04/2212m 23s

What Elon Musk's Twitter Bid Says About 'Extreme Capitalism'

Elon Musk wants to buy Twitter. His vision of the future may not pan out for the platform, but that vision represents what historian Jill Lepore calls 'extreme capitalism.' Lepore, a Harvard professor and New Yorker writer, is host of the podcast The Evening Rocket, where she examines what she calls Musk's extravagant, "extreme" capitalism — where stock prices are driven by earnings, and also by fantasies. NPR's Bobby Allyn also explains Twitter's effort to prevent Musk from gaining control of the company. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/04/2214m 14s

Ukrainian Teacher Plans For A Future In Romania

More than 4.5 million Ukrainians have left their country since Russia began its invasion of Ukraine. While many hope to return to Ukraine, they don't know when it will be safe to do so. As the war shows no sign of stopping, some refugees are beginning to integrate into life in their adoptive countries. One of those people is Anastasiia Konovalova. She used to be the head teacher at a primary school in Odesa, Ukraine, but fled to Bucharest, Romania after the war began. In a matter of weeks, she's managed to get a school for Ukrainian refugees up and running. With more than 600 Ukrainian children on a waitlist to attend, Konovalova is now thinking about what a future in Romania could look like for these refugee children. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/04/2215m 8s

What a Rare Holiday Overlap Means In a Time That Seems 'Catastrophic'

This weekend, followers of three major religions are observing some of their most sacred holidays. Many will do so together, in person, for the first time in years. Easter, Passover, and Ramadan all have their own symbolism and themes. And it's not a stretch to tie any of those themes to world events; from the COVID-19 pandemic to the war in Ukraine. We invited three faith leaders to tell us about the messages they're bringing to their congregations during a difficult time – and a holy time: Reverend Marshall Hatch of the New Mount Pilgrim Missionary Baptist Church in Chicago, Senior Rabbi Ruth Zlotnick of Temple Beth Am in Seattle, and Imam Mohamed Herbert from The Islamic Society of Tulsa.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/04/2212m 4s

Tensions Are Rising Among Jan. 6 Defendants In A D.C. Jail

A U.S. House investigation into the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol is entering its final phase before lawmakers' findings become public later this spring.As that probe continues, prosecutions are running on a parallel track. Dozens of defendants are now awaiting trial and being held in together in a single unit at a Washington, D.C. jail.While corrections officials have said the accused insurrectionists are being kept from the jail's general population "for their own safety and security," that decision has come with some unintended consequences, including a bitter divide among the defendants.Tom Dreisbach of NPR's Investigations team spoke to some of the defendants.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/04/2211m 19s

As Russians Shift East, Here's What They Left Behind In One Ukrainian Town

This past week, the world's attention has been focused on the death and destruction that's been discovered in Ukranian towns north of Kyiv after Russian forces withdrew. One of those towns — vistied by NPR — is Borodyanka. The carnage left behind by Russians is also a sign of what may be to come in the country's east, where a new offensive looms. NPR's Scott Detrow reported from Boyodyanka with producers Noah Caldwell and Kat Lonsdorf. Additional reporting this episode from correspondents Nathan Rott and Greg Myre.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/04/2213m 51s

Inflation Keeps Getting Worse. Is A Recession Next?

Prices are up on everything from groceries, to rent, to gas, and consumer price inflation hit a new 40-year high in March: Up 8.5% over a year ago.This increase impacts everyone across the economic spectrum, but inflation poses a particular hardship for low-income families. And while the Biden administration has announced new steps to bring down gas prices and other visible signs of inflation, there's mounting political pressure to do more during this midterm election year.NPR Congressional Correspondent Kelsey Snell and Chief Economics Correspondent Scott Horsley break down the stakes for those hit hardest by inflation and for the government. Scott Horsley also speaks to economists who explain why they believe the U.S. might be in another recession soon. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/04/2212m 56s

Eight Months Later, A Look At The Taliban's Broken Promises

After taking control of Afghanistan last summer, the Taliban made promises for more inclusive and less repressive leadership in Afghanistan. Many of those promises involved maintaining women's rights. But now, education for girls has become more limited, and other restrictions have been placed on women. NPR's Diaa Hadid reports on what the uneven implementation of those policies suggests about Taliban leadership. And Kathy Gannon of The Associated Press reports on how the Taliban backtracking on some of its promises bodes for Afghanistan's future.Additional reporting in this episode also comes from NPR's Fatma Tanis.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/04/2212m 32s

Refugee Assistance From One Of Europe's Poorest Countries

More than 400,000 Ukrainian refugees have poured across the border into the small country of Moldova, one of the poorest countries in Europe. Wedged between Ukraine and Romania, Moldova is a little bigger than Maryland, but it has received the most refugees per capita of any country in this crisis. Now Moldova is providing assistance and support to those who are choosing to stay in the country. Even as they open their doors to Ukrainian refugees, many in the small country fear they may be next in line for invasion by Russian forces. Moldova declared independence from the Soviet Union shortly after its fall in 1991, but since then there have been Russian troops stationed in a separatist region of the country called Transnistria. Moldova fears it would not be able to fend off a Russian offensive. NPR's Frank Langfitt explains why Moldova is in such a perilous position, and we talk to aid workers about how they are supporting Ukranians fleeing war.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/04/2213m 17s

Michelle Yeoh is a subversive superhero in 'Everything Everywhere All At Once'

Michelle Yeoh has been a star for decades. American audiences will know her as a warrior in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon or an icy matriarch in Crazy Rich Asians. Now, in Everything Everywhere All At Once, she's playing Chinese immigrant Evelyn Wang who is both a failure and possibly the key to saving the multiverse from a great chaos-spreading evil. Michelle Yeoh talks with NPR's Ailsa Chang about her journey through the multiverse, with all its wackiness, wonder and wisdom.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/04/2213m 48s

War Crimes Seem Evident In Ukraine, But Accountability Is Challenging

Reports of civilians being tortured and killed — and the accompanying images that have surfaced this week in the city of Bucha — have raised questions about potential war crimes committed by Russian forces in Ukraine. The Biden administration is assisting international investigators in looking into potential war crimes. And some experts say the evidence of such crimes is clear in this highly-documented conflict. But history shows that drawing a straight line between war crimes and heads of state is challenging. NPR's Scott Detrow spoke with senior researcher at Human Rights Watch, Yulia Gorbunova, about her reporting of alleged human rights violations in Russian-controlled parts of Ukraine. NPR's Julie McCarthy examines what constitutes war crimes and the prospects of Russian President Vladimir Putin being held to account.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/04/2211m 1s

Another Booster? Omicron Shot? What's Next For COVID Vaccines

Many Americans haven't gotten an initial COVID-19 booster. A second one is authorized for some. Others are waiting to see if they can get one soon. Will everyone need them eventually? An FDA advisory committee met Wednesday to discuss what's next in America's booster strategy. Dr. Anthony Fauci tells NPR the path forward is paved with uncertainties — about whether more variants will arise, how long booster protection lasts, and what kind of funding will be available for research. Fauci spoke to NPR's Rob Stein, who explains what's likely for booster guidance later this fall. Whatever the future of the pandemic holds, public health officials are hoping to get early glimpses of it by monitoring waste water treatment plants. John Daley reports. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/04/2212m 58s

What Florida's Parental Rights in Education Law Means for Teachers

Florida's Parental Rights in Education law, which prohibits classroom instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity for students in kindergarten through third grade, was signed into law at the end of March by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis. Critics have dubbed this it the 'Don't Say Gay' law.A lawsuit has been filed against Gov. DeSantis by several LGBTQ rights advocates in an effort to block the law.NPR's Melissa Block spoke with a number of teachers across the state of Florida who are worried about the chilling effect this law may have on not just what they teach and speak about in the classroom, but how it affects their students' well-being.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/04/2211m 35s

How The Wealthiest Corporations Are Dodging Lawsuits Through Bankruptcy

Thousands of people who claim Johnson & Johnson baby powder caused them to develop cancer cannot sue the company, which used a controversial legal maneuver in bankruptcy court to freeze lawsuits against it.NPR's Brian Mann explains. More from his reporting here. Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Scott Horsley. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/04/2212m 14s

BONUS: The Blind Spot

Roger Latimer says he was beaten by guards in a security camera blind spot at Western Illinois Correctional Center. He complained at the prison. He complained to local officials. He asked medical staff to take pictures. Nothing happened. Then another prisoner, Larry Earvin, died after an altercation with guards in the same blind spot.In this episode of WBEZ Chicago's Motive podcast, host Shannon Heffernan tracks the pattern of beatings in that blind spot, surfacing nine additional cases, sometimes involving the same guards, using very similar behavior in the same location. We ask the question of why this pattern persisted, even as prisoners like Latimer tried to stop it.Season 4 of Motive investigates the hidden world of big prisons in small towns. Places where everyone knows each other and difficult truths get buried.Listen to Motive on Apple podcasts and Spotify.
03/04/2241m 35s

Oligarch Assets Parked in the US Are Hidden in a Web of Financial Secrecy

Since Russia invaded Ukraine, there has been intense focus on Russian oligarchs - elites with enormous wealth and close ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin. The United States and international allies have imposed travel bans and economic sanctions on the billionaires, freezing accounts and impounding yachts and private jets. The goal is to disrupt the covert money funneled to Putin and his regime and to make the oligarch's lives difficult enough that they might pressure Putin to loosen his grip on Ukraine.Now President Biden's KleptoCapture task force faces the difficult and time consuming task of tracking down assets hidden in intricate webs of financial secrecy - many created by US regulations - that allow the oligarchy to hide their money and maintain power. We speak with Paul Massaro, a congressional foreign policy adviser who specializes in sanctions and illicit finance. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/04/2212m 29s

'The Unofficial Bridgerton Musical' Creators Nominated For Their First Ever Grammy

Binge watching a show you love is enjoyable, but not always productive. But artists Abigail Barlow and Emily Bear turned their binge into a Grammy nomination.They were inspired by Season 1 of Netflix's series Bridgerton, and used that inspiration to write a full musical theater album. They didn't intend to write a full album, but as they workshopped the songs on social media, fans everywhere watched as Barlow & Bear wrote the songs live — offering followers a front row seat to the music making process. This weekend at the 64th annual Grammy Awards, Emily Bear and Abigail Barlow will be in the audience waiting to hear if their album, The Unofficial Bridgerton Musical, wins in the category of Best Musical Theater Album.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/04/2211m 37s

The Growing Overlap Between The Far-Right And Environmentalism

Researchers say the intersection between far-right movements and environmentalism is bigger than many people realize — and it's growing. Blair Taylor, researcher at the Institute for Social Ecology, explains. Alex Amend, who researches eco-fascism, says climate change will only fuel the link between the far-right and environmentalism. Dorceta Taylor of Yale University traces the rise of the American conversation movement, which was partly motivated by a backlash against the racial mixing of American cities. Hop Hopkins of the Sierra Club opens up about racism in the organization's past. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/03/2210m 37s

Legal Experts Say Justice Thomas Should Recuse Himself From Jan. 6th Cases

Ginni Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, is a longtime conservative activist who has been public about her views and support of former President Donald Trump. And text messages that surfaced last week showed that she went as far as peddling falsehoods about the 2020 election directly to former White House staff and urging them to overturn President Joe Biden's victory. Earlier this year, Clarence Thomas was the sole dissenter as the Supreme Court ruled to give a House select committee investigating the January 6th attack access to White House communications during that period. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on why this possible conflict of interest is a true dilemma for the court and spoke with legal experts about what should happen next. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/03/2210m 21s

New Variants. New Boosters. But So Far, No New COVID Spending From Congress

An omicron subvariant known as BA.2 could soon become the dominant form of the coronavirus in the United States. It's not more deadly, but it is more transmissible. At the same time, the Biden administration has authorized a second booster shot for people over 50 and other people vulnerable to infection. But against that backdrop, Congress has so far refused to authorize more COVID spending measures, which would fund the stockpiling of more vaccine doses and public health surveillance for emerging variants. NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on the funding debate. NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff looks at another variant whose creation gives scientists insight into how COVID-19 variants change, and why.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/03/2210m 3s

Why Some Russians Are Fleeing To A Country Their Government Already Invaded

In 2008, Russia invaded another former Soviet republic: Georgia, a small country on the southeast edge of Europe. Today, Georgia is seeing an influx of Russians who are fleeing their home country in opposition to its invasion of Ukraine. Mary Louise Kelly traveled to Georgia to hear how people who live with Russian troops on their doorsteps are feeling as they watch the war in Ukraine play out. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/03/2211m 14s

Why Talking About Ye - the Artist Formerly Known as Kanye West - Is Complicated

Even if you're not a fan of celebrity gossip, you've probably heard that there's something going on with the rapper Ye, formerly known as Kanye West. He's exhibited increasingly erratic behavior, including relentless online harassment of his ex-wife, reality TV queen Kim Kardashian and her current boyfriend, comedian Pete Davidson. Now he's been banned from performing at the Grammys, and was recently suspended from Instagram for a day. For years Ye's behavior has been puzzling to observe - ranging from announcing plans to run for President, to moving into a windowless basement room inside of a stadium to complete his last album, to high profile feuds with everyone from Jay Z to Jimmy Kimmel. He has admitted that he struggles with bipolar disorder and that instead of medical treatment he uses his art as therapy.Fans, critics and those who write and talk seriously about the arts are just not sure how to talk about the situation.Aisha Harris of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour joins us to unpack some of the complexities. And we speak with mental health advocate Bassey Ikpi who offers a personal perspective on Ye's behavior._________________________In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/03/2214m 23s

The Film 'Flee' Reveals The Truth About A Man's Untold Refugee Story

The film Flee has already made Oscars history: it's the first to be nominated for best documentary, animated feature and international film. Flee tells the story of a boy whose family left Afghanistan in the 1990s. Now an adult and identified by an alias to protect him and his family, Amin Nawabi reveals a painful secret about his childhood journey to Denmark—a secret he has told almost no one.The film opens with the question: "What does the word 'home' mean to you?"Nawabi gives NPR his first interview with a news outlet, along with the director of "Flee," Jonas Poher Rasmussen. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/03/2210m 42s

High Gas Prices: Why There's No Quick Fix

This week, the average price for a gallon of gas in L.A. County crested six dollars — the highest in the country. The national average is up around 70 cents in the last month. The are a lot of complicated reasons why gas is more expensive — and a lot of ideas for how to make this easier on consumers. But none of them are quick or easy. NPR's Scott Horsley explains why drivers who are newly interested in purchasing an electric vehicle might not have a lot of options. NPR's Brittany Cronin reports on calls for more domestic oil production in the U.S. — and why it may take some time for that to happen. Here's more on why gas prices are so high from NPR's Chris Arnold. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/03/2211m 48s

How Name, Image, and Likeness Contracts Are Transforming College Sports

The NCAA's March Madness Tournament is upon us, and after over two years of pandemic restrictions at sporting events, stands are packed to full capacity with fans. Transformative changes are happening off of the court too: for the first time in March Madness history, college athletes can cash in on endorsement deals because of changes to the NCAA's Name, Image and Likeness (NIL) policies, which are a result of a Supreme Court ruling last summer.While the new arena in college sports has been lucrative for athletes, with contracts reaching 7 figures, NIL advocates are concerned about the lack of legal and financial protections for students. We speak with Stewart Mandel, Editor-In-Chief of college football at The Athletic, about how the current nature of NIL deals may risk exploiting student-athletes.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/03/2210m 32s

Ketanji Brown Jackson Is Poised To Make History

Tuesday was the second day of Ketanji Brown Jackson's Supreme Court confirmation hearings. She would be the first Black woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice, and the first Democratic nominee to be confirmed since Elena Kagan in 2010. A vote on her nomination could come in weeks, and Democrats have the votes to confirm her without Republican support. NPR political correspondent Juana Summers spoke to black women working to support Jackson's historic nomination. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/03/2213m 27s

How Becoming A Refugee Changes You

Inside Ukraine, millions of people have been displaced, with millions more living in increasingly dire conditions. In the city of Maruipol, hundreds of thousands of civilians remain trapped — with dwindling supplies of food and water and no electricity. Mariupol has been bombarded by the Russians for weeks now. Petro Andrushchenko, an adviser to Mariupol's mayor, told NPR civilians in bomb shelters are running out of food. Millions of others have fled Ukraine without knowing if or when they'll be able to return home. Amid that uncertainty, they must start a new life elsewhere. It's an experience only people who've been refugees can truly understand. Mary Louise Kelly talks with refugees from Vietnam, Syria, and Afghanistan about their experiences, how fleeing their home country has affected their life and what life is like now. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/03/2214m 56s

Why Do So Few Public Defenders Become Judges?

Senate confirmation hearings begin next week for Supreme Court nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson. If she is confirmed she will be the first Black woman on the high court and the first public defender. Judge Jackson served as a federal public defender between 2005 and 2007. She defended several Guantanamo detainees and others accused of crimes, a fact that her critics use to suggest that she works to free terrorists and put criminals back on the street.The 6th Amendment to the Constitution guarantees every criminal defendant the right to an attorney. The right to have effective counsel, along with presumption of innocence are the basic principles of fairness in our legal system. But too often, having worked as a defense attorney is a stop sign on the road to the bench.We speak with Martin Sabelli, president of the board of directors of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. He explains why our legal system needs more judges with a background in criminal defense.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/03/2214m 1s

A Look At Anti-Asian Violence One Year After The Atlanta Shootings

It's been one year since a white man opened fire at three spas in the Atlanta area killing eight people — six of whom were Asian women. Since the beginning of the pandemic there has been an alarming rise in hate crimes against Asian people in America, and a majority of the victims are women.Harmful stereotypes of Asian Women play a huge role here — often portrayed in pop culture as demure, exotic, hyper sexualized, or carriers of disease. CNN journalist Amara Walker discusses what it feels like to live with these stereotypes and the threat of violence as an Asian American woman. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/03/2211m 4s

Can Diplomacy Prevail In Ukraine?

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy wants America to help impose a no-fly zone over Ukraine. The U.S. favors other avenues of support, providing weapons and equipment. Now there are signs the Russian advance is stalling. Could there be a diplomatic endgame in sight? Marie Yovanovitch is skeptical. The former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine tells NPR a no-fly zone should be kept on the table, citing the unpredictability and ruthlessness of Russian president Vladimir Putin. Yovanovitch has written a new memoir, Lessons From The Edge. More from her conversation with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly here. Former Naval Intelligence Officer Steven Horrell says there's an emerging possibility of a so-called 'frozen conflict' in Ukraine, with Russian forces failing to advance but also refusing to leave. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/03/2211m 25s

Some Who Rushed To Buy Homes During The Pandemic Now Regret It

The pandemic created a spike in demand for housing that sent real estate prices through the roof. Which means a lot of Americans could no longer afford to buy, while many of those who could are now experiencing buyer's remorse. NPR heard from many new homeowners who made compromises as they rushed to buy. Some even waived inspections or moved sight-unseen. Hyojung Lee, a professor at Virginia Tech, explains how low interest rates, lockdowns and a desire to stop renting created the real estate scramble. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/03/2211m 42s

A Third Pandemic Spring: How This One Will Be Different

In the U.S., with key COVID metrics trending rapidly downward, the pandemic's third spring is already looking very different. But concerns remain about future variants as China and Hong Kong battle new outbreaks.NPR's Tovia Smith reports on workers heading back to the office — where employers are figuring out how to give them new flexibility. NPR's Will Stone reports on a recent change to the way the CDC talks about COVID risk. More on that story here. NPR's Allison Aubrey has more on the battle over new COVID spending in Congress. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/03/2213m 22s

How Russia's Past Military Campaigns Can Help Us Understand What's Next In Ukraine

The scenes of devastation in Mariupol, a southeastern port city in Ukraine, are increasingly reflected in cities across the country as Russian forces advance. More than 2,000 people have been killed in the port city since the start of Russia's invasion. A humanitarian crisis is deepening, as residents say they can't find drinking water or food, and the International Committee of the Red Cross says they cannot get emergency supplies in.Journalists Maura Reynolds and David Filipov both reported on Russia's military campaigns in Chechnya. Olga Oliker of International Crisis Group is an expert on Russian military strategy. They talk about the lessons learned from past Russian actions in Chechnya, and later in Georgia and Syria, to help explain what could come next in Ukraine.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/03/2210m 32s

Amid Crackdown On Free Speech, Russians And Russian Americans Speak Out Against War

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a law that could impose fifteen years in prison on anyone who publishes or broadcasts what the Russian government considers "false information" about the invasion of Ukraine. The law makes it illegal to use the word "war" or "invasion," a move aimed at shutting down the last remaining independent Russian media outlets.Even as news is being censored and social media platforms are being shut down, some people in Russia are determined to be heard. The Russian independent human rights group OVD-Info reports that more than 13,000 protesters in 147 cities have been detained since the war began just over two weeks ago.Yulia Zhivtsova is one of those protesters. She was detained in Moscow for taking part in protests the day after Russia invaded Ukraine. She's one of the thousands of protesters across the country who are defying the threat of violence and prison to express their opposition to the war in Ukraine.And we'll hear how Russian immigrants and Russian Americans are showing support for Ukraine as attitudes among some in their community shift from acceptance of Putin to outrage. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/03/2214m 1s

The Political Benefit Of Book Bans

The movement to ban books from public school reading lists is not new, but lately it's been gaining momentum throughout the country. In part, because fights over children and schools is a tried and true political tool.Revida Rahman, with One WillCo, discusses efforts to ban books in her children's school district in Williamson County, Tennessee and how this just the newest iteration of parental outrage on display. And Elizabeth Bruenig, staff writer for The Atlantic, explains the political benefit of arguments over masks, critical race theory and book bans at schools. Especially as the U.S. nears midterm elections. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/03/2215m 51s

Parents of Transgender Youth Fear Texas' New Anti-Trans Orders

Governor Greg Abbot has directed the state's Department of Family and Protective Services to investigate certain gender-affirming care as possible child abuse, leaving parents of transgender youth feeling caught between two choices: support their children or face a possible CPS investigation.Annaliese and Rachel are mothers living in Texas, both have transgender children. They speak to NPR about the emotional and mental toll this order has had on their families. And Chase Strangio, Deputy Director for Transgender Justice with the American Civil Liberties Union, explains the status of other anti-LGBTQ bills in other states.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/03/2215m 10s

A Mission To Evacuate Premature Twin Babies From Ukraine

More than two million people have fled Ukraine since Russia attacked two weeks ago - at least half of them children. It's a dangerous journey for anyone, let alone premature babies who were already fighting for their lives. This is the harrowing story of some of the youngest evacuees - babies less than two weeks old who were born prematurely. Each day, they've been growing stronger as Kyiv grows weaker. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/03/2210m 36s

COVID-19 Inmate Deaths in Prisons

Throughout the pandemic, the The Federal Bureau of Prisons has maintained that they have a plan to keep the pandemic under control. But federal prison records tell a different story.NPR's Meg Anderson dug into those those records. Many high risk inmates applied for compassionate release, or Home Confinement, where they could live at home while being monitored by the prison.But since the beginning of the pandemic nearly 300 prisoners have died from COVID-19, and almost all of them were elderly or had pre-existing conditions. What went wrong?In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/03/2212m 57s

More Than 1.5 Million Ukrainians Have Fled Their Country

In what the U.N. refugee agency calls the fastest-growing refugee crisis in Europe since World War II, more than a million Ukrainians have fled their country since Russia invaded less than two weeks ago. The bulk of them have traveled through Poland and many are staying there. That's where Ari Shapiro spoke with acting United States ambassador to Ukraine Kristina Kvien. She and her staff relocated to Poland soon after the fighting started, and she discusses the strain this new humanitarian crisis is putting on the bordering countries. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/03/2211m 55s

BONUS: The Great Wager

President Richard Nixon has a plan: He wants to go to China. The only problem? The U.S. and China have had zero contact since the Communist Party took over China two decades before. In this episode of The Great Wager from NPR and WBUR's Here & Now, host Jane Perlez digs into the beginning of Nixon's improbable diplomatic mission. Listen to the rest of The Great Wager here.
06/03/2213m 41s

Facing History At The National Memorial For Peace And Justice

There's a battle raging over the telling and teaching of Black history in the United States. Much of that fight has been playing out in schools. School board meetings erupt into fights as critics attack the teaching of what they call critical race theory or charge that teaching about racism is too upsetting to white children or casts students either as oppressors or the oppressed.At the heart of these arguments is a much larger issue - whether or not the country can face the truth about its painful legacy of systemic racism. In Montgomery, Alabama the National Memorial for Peace and Justice is dedicated to acknowledging America's history of racial terrorism factually, honestly, and completely. Civil rights attorney and memorial founder, Bryan Stevenson, believes that embracing this truth is the only path to healing.We tour the memorial with Stevenson, hear some of the stories immortalized there and discuss the ongoing battle over how students should be taught about race.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/03/2216m 33s

Five Years After Trump's "Muslim Ban"

Just one week into his presidency, Donald Trump announced an executive order banning people from several Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., the so-called "Muslim Ban".This ban shut out travelers who were already on their way to the U.S. Visas were canceled, people were detained and sent back home, and protests ensued. Lawsuits were filed, but the Supreme Court upheld the policy.On his first day in office, President Biden reversed the ban. But five years later, hundreds of families that were separated by it are still waiting to be united. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/03/2211m 27s

The Man Leading Ukraine

It's been exactly one week since Russia invaded Ukraine, which means one week since Ukraine's president, Volodymyr Zelenskyy, became a wartime president. So far, he has mastered his message and has garnered praised from around the world, but there's a lot more to winning a war than videos and viral tweets. Emily Harding with the Center for Strategic and International Studies explains why Zelenskyy has been such an effective communicator and what challenges lie ahead. And Angela Stent of the Brookings Institution discusses what the world is learning about the other leader in this war, Russia's president Vladimir Putin. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/03/2214m 40s

The New Texas Abortion Law Is Putting Some Patients In Danger

Doctors in Texas have been warning that the state's abortion law known as SB 8 would make it harder for them to treat medical crises and would endanger their patients. Six months in, those predictions appear to be coming true. NPR correspondent Sarah McCammon reports from central Texas where some women have faced medical issues made more dangerous by SB 8.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/03/2210m 41s

As Masks Come Off, Immunocompromised Americans Feel Left Behind

The latest CDC guidance puts nearly 70% of the U.S. population in low or medium risk areas, and residents are no longer expected to wear a mask. In response, the vast majority of states in the U.S. have lifted or plan to lift mask mandates.While many Americans welcome the loosening of pandemic-era safety rules, people who are higher risk feel forgotten and left behind. Johnnie Jae is an Indigenous journalist and public speaker; Charis Hill is a disability activist; and Cass Condray is a university student. The three explain what it's like to be immunocompromised and chronically ill during the pandemic, and what can be done to allow them to better live their lives.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/03/2214m 43s

Russia Meets A Strong Resistance

Russia's war against Ukraine rages on, but for now Russian troops appear to have been met with a level of resistance they were not prepared for. While the U.S. and its allies have pulled together in an attempt to cripple Russia's economy. NPR's Chief Economic Correspondent Scott Horsley reports on sanctions have led to Russia's currency falling, which will mean higher prices for Russians. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/02/2212m 2s

What To Do About America's Child Care Crisis

America's child care system is in crisis. Experts say it's a failed business model. Parents can't afford it, and yet, daycare providers are some of the lowest paid workers in the country. The problem is an old one - but there's new energy in the debate over solutions. In part, because of the proposed funding for childcare outlined in President Biden's signature Build Back Better legislation, currently facing roadblocks. But also because the pandemic highlighted how broken the system is. Brenda Hawkins operates a small home-based daycare in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. She's been taking care of kids for 24 years, but the pandemic brought new uncertainty and stress. She was able to keep her doors open, but works longer hours, without increased pay, to keep her kids healthy and safe. She has never considered leaving the business, but understands why child care workers are quitting in droves.Elliot Haspel, author of Crawling Behind: America's Childcare Crisis and How to Fix It, outlines how the system broke down these past few years and the ways the US could fix it. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/02/2214m 56s

Ketanji Brown Jackson Is The First Black Woman Nominated To The Supreme Court

Ketanji Brown Jackson's nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court fulfills a promise President Biden made while running for office: to nominate the first Black woman for the highest court. Critics said he was prioritizing identity over qualifications, but many have praised Jackson for being well equipped for what could be a historic appointment. Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Harvard Radcliffe Institute, wrote a book about the first Black woman to ever become a federal judge, Constance Baker Motley. She explains how that, and much more, paved the way for this nomination. And NPR correspondent Nina Totenberg reports on Jackson's career and her path to the president's top pick. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
25/02/2214m 48s

Ukrainians Wake Up To War

Russia has launched an all-out, unprovoked invasion into Ukraine, the largest attack by one state against another in Europe since World War II. There have been missile strikes throughout the country, including in the capital city, Kyiv. President Biden said this escalation means even more economic sanctions against Russia, but reiterated that U.S. forces won't fight the battle in Ukraine.NPR Correspondent Eleanor Beardsley is covering the invasion from within Ukraine. And Democratic Senator from Virginia and Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee Mark Warner tells NPR's Ayesha Rascoe about what the the U.S. and its allies might do next.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/02/2215m 39s

Entering A Cautiously Relaxed Phase Of The Pandemic

As winter begins to fade, COVID-19 maps are changing colors from those ominous dark shades to a more hopeful outlook. Infections are down dramatically in the past few weeks and death and hospitalization rates are dropping too. But there's also reason for caution. NPR correspondent Rob Stein reports on a new version of the Omicron variant referred to as BA.2. It's been the dominant strain in some countries and it's showing up in the U.S. too. And NPR correspondent Michaeleen Doucleff discusses whether a fourth booster dose of vaccine may be in our future. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/02/2210m 25s

Russia Makes Moves Against Ukraine

On Monday, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a decree recognizing two breakaway republics in Eastern Ukraine and sent troops to the region. On Tuesday, President Biden called the move "the beginning of a Russian invasion" and announced a new set of sanctions. While Russia's actions reverberate throughout the world, no area has more at stake than Eastern Ukraine. That's where NPR correspondent Eleanor Beardsley has been reporting. And despite the escalation this week, U.S. diplomats are hoping to keep Russia at the bargaining table. But as Yale history professor Timothy Snyder explains, a sarcastic tone from Russian officials makes talks difficult. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/02/2214m 29s

Red Zip Codes Are Getting Redder, Blue Zip Codes Are Getting Bluer

The U.S. is becoming more geographically polarized. Red zip codes are getting redder and blue zip codes are getting bluer. And this is because people are purposefully moving to places that reflect their views. Which is a trend that comes with consequences. NPR correspondent John Burnett spoke with some Texan transplants about how their politics impacted their choice of community. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/02/229m 19s

Cryptocurrency: The Future Of Investing Or A Scam?

During the Super Bowl, clever ads from cryptocurrency companies urged a mainstream audience of 101 million viewers to buy now or regret it later. But besides high-minded rhetoric, what exactly were these ads selling? And why are some critics warning against investing? To understand the arguments for and against investing in cryptocurrency, you have to get a bit technical. YouTuber, Dan Olson helps us understand these digital currencies, how they function, what you can buy with them and the ideology behind the tech. We'll hear why Chinese dissident artist, Badiucao, thinks NFT's – non-fungible tokens – are the new frontier for political art. And critics explain why the crypto craze may be a market bubble and a scam. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/02/2215m 27s

The Canadian Trucker Protest Against Vaccines Has Evolved Into Something Much Bigger

Three weeks ago, semi trucks flooded the streets of Canada's capital city. Drivers were protesting a vaccine mandate at the U.S. border. But since then, the demonstration in Ottawa has evolved to be about much more and is spreading to other cities throughout the world. NPR correspondents Shannon Bond and Odette Youseff have been following this story and explain how the movement began and what has kept it going. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/02/2211m 27s

American-Born Athletes Competing For China Experience Extra Scrutiny

Just under three dozen of China's athletes competing at the Olympics this year were born in other countries. Most famously, ski prodigy Eileen Gu, who has dozens of brand sponsorships and is praised on Chinese social media. That's in contrast to skater Zhu Yi, who has been called a "disgrace" after she fell during her short program. And the rhetoric appears on both sides. Some U.S. commentators have criticized Gu for her decision to compete for China.Jules Boykoff is a political science professor at Pacific University and studies the politics of sports. He explains how politics play out in the Olympics. Amy Qin is a China correspondent for the New York Times. Her article on the subject is "The Olympians Caught Up in the U.S.-China Rivalry."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/02/2211m 16s

Russia May Be Able To Attack Ukraine From The Inside

Despite reports that Russia may have withdrawn some troops from the Ukraine border, NATO says there's no evidence of de-escalation and forces remain ready to attack. But it's not just the border that is at risk. NPR correspondent Frank Langfitt reports on hybrid war tactics like cyberattacks that Russia can, and may already be using to spark unrest in Ukraine. And Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Russian journalist Vladimir Pozner about how the crisis feels in his country. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/02/2215m 27s

Are States Ending Their Mask Mandates Too Soon?

More and more states are loosening their mask mandates as COVID-19 cases fall throughout the country. But the CDC says there isn't enough of a drop with deaths and hospitalizations to warrant this change. This muddled messaging can make it difficult to navigate this current phase of the pandemic. NPR correspondent Mara Liasson explains that while politics have played a role in public health decision making from the beginning of the pandemic, the divide between Republic and Democratic states is starting to close. And NPR science correspondent Rob Stein offers guidance on how to make sense of the ever evolving risk factors for daily life. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/02/2211m 43s

When Your Team Loses, Disappointment Can Lead To Genuine Grief

Fans of the Cincinnati Bengals may be licking their wounds after Sunday's Super Bowl loss, but every sports fan can relate to the pain that follows a big game not going their way. And while it's normal to be upset, those feelings of disappointment can occasionally turn into grief and even depression. Dr. Eric Zillmer, a professor of Neuropsychology at Drexel University, explains how the pandemic and brief pause on professional sports helped him understand just how strongly we rely on those games. And Greg Miller, a licensed therapist, discusses ways to deal with grief from your team's loss in a healthy way. A lesson he's learned first hand. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/02/2210m 42s

Love In The Time Of COVID: How We Date Is Changing

We're still learning how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting us emotionally and socially. Experts believe we will be seeing and analyzing its effects for years to come. But, thanks to popular online platforms, we do have some data on single people, their dating preferences and how those preferences changed during the pandemic. Helen Fisher, a biological anthropologist and chief science advisor for the online dating company Match, shares the latest trends from the 11th annual Singles In America study. Then, Logan Ury, Director of Relationship Science at the dating app Hinge and author of the book How To Not Die Alone: The Surprising Science That Will Help You Find Love, lays out some tips and tricks for how to get better at dating. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/02/2214m 26s

How Three Fashion Icons Shaped The Industry 'Beyond The Dress Or The Belt'

The fashion world has recently lost three of its greats - Andre Leon Talley, Thierry Mugler and Virgil Abloh. Each man was a pioneer in his own way: Mugler and Abloh pushed boundaries as designers, Talley was a Black editor at a time when they were few and far between. Robin Givhan, the Washington Post's senior critic-at-large, reflects on each man's influence and impact on the industry, and what these losses across the fashion industry mean.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/02/229m 36s

In Supreme Court Nomination Debate, Echoes of Past Judicial Breakthrough

When President Biden announced that he would nominate a Black woman—the Supreme Court's first—to the seat that will be vacated by retiring Justice Stephen Breyer, criticism from some on the right began almost immediately. Senator Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said it was "racist" to consider only Black women for the post, and Biden's decision was "insulting to African-American women."The conversation about identity and qualifications echoes some of the questions that arose when another breakthrough appointment was announced more than 50 years ago. In 1966, Constance Baker Motley became the first Black woman to serve on the federal bench. Her identity and lived experience as a civil rights attorney loomed large in the debate about her fitness to serve. Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of Harvard Radcliffe Institute, and author of Civil Rights Queen: Constance Baker Motley and the Struggle For Equality, discusses Motley's nomination and her career. She says Motley supported the appointment of women and people of color to the federal judiciary as a way to strengthen the institution.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/02/2214m 57s

In Bosnia, Fear Mounts Over Rising Ethnic Tensions

As the standoff over Ukraine continues, tensions are rising around another old conflict in Europe. Brutal ethnic fighting left at least 100,000 dead in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the 1990s. The U.S. brokered peace there, but the fragile, multi-ethnic state is once again in crisis, as NPR's Frank Langfitt saw on a recent trip. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/02/2213m 10s

Can The U.S. And Its Allies Stop Russia?

Russia never wanted NATO to spread east through the former soviet republics. But it especially didn't want it to reach Ukraine. A compromise in 2008 put Ukraine on the path to membership, and Russian President Vladimir Putin is now effectively holding the country hostage in effort to keep that from happening. NPR's Becky Sullivan reports on the history of NATO and how a disagreement over a past proposal is fueling Putin's frustration. Read more about that here. And NPR's European correspondents describe how U.S. allies France, Germany and the U.K. are attempting to work together to stop Russia from crossing the Ukraine border. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/02/2212m 51s

What's Next For ISIS After The Death Of Their Leader

Last Thursday morning, before dawn, U.S. special troops arrived at a house in Syria to capture the ISIS leader Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Qurayshi alive. Two hours later, he was dead after detonating an explosive that also killed the lives of at least 13 others. The U.S. opted for a ground attack in an effort to protect civilians but the mission didn't go as planned. Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby explains some of the complications. And Charles Lister, a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute, explains what might happen now that the leader of ISIS is dead. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/02/2210m 10s

BONUS: Brian Flores On Taking A Stand Against The NFL

It was an abrupt move that not many could have foreseen. Despite an impressive three-year showing with the Miami Dolphins, Brian Flores was fired from his position as head coach last month in a surprising end to a contract that was supposed to last for two more years.What's followed could be described as a "reckoning" for the NFL: Flores filed a class-action lawsuit against the league citing racial discrimination, a move that's prompted a closer look at the NFL's hiring practices and the racial makeup of those in power.Flores sat down with NPR's Jay Williams, host of The Limits with Jay Williams, to talk about his experience. Listen to more of The Limits with Jay Williams on NPR One, Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
06/02/2223m 18s

Treating Gun Violence As A 'Serious Public Health Threat'

Firearm-related injuries are among the 5 leading causes of death for people ages 1-64 in the United States, according to the CDC. In 2019, there were 39,707 firearm-related deaths in the United States. That's an average of 109 deaths per day. Firearm-related injuries are harder to quantify, but the Gun Violence Archive reports that there were over 40,000 last year. CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky has called gun violence a "serious public health threat." She's the first CDC Director to make strong public statements about gun violence since 1999. For decades, gun violence research received no federal funding. That's in large part because of pressure from the NRA. Once again, the United States is investing in a public health approach to stemming gun violence. Dr. Mark Rosenberg, founding director of CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, explains what this means. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Eric Westervelt.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/02/2214m 25s

TikTok Is Creating Music Stars – And The Music Industry Is Watching

User-generated content specific to TikTok has propelled songs old and new to viral success. Whether it's someone lip-syncing to a song, or participating in a dance or trend using that song, it's made music discovery more participatory. Success on the app can lead to success on the charts, and record labels are looking to TikTok for their next stars.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/02/2210m 49s

Two Uyghur Children Describe What Life Was Like In A Chinese Boarding School

China has been detaining and arresting ethnic Uyghurs in the region of Xinjiang en masse while their children are often sent to state boarding schools. China closely guards information about Xinjiang, including about these forced family separations. But NPR's Beijing correspondent Emily Feng managed to talk to two children who made it out of one such school and are sharing their story for the first time.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/02/2210m 45s

The Cost of COVID Safety Precautions Can Be A Big Burden For Some Families

Masks and at-home COVID-19 test kits have become staples of pandemic life. The Biden Administration announced in January that it would distribute 400 million free N95 respirators to pharmacies and grocery stores around the country. The U.S. Postal Service has begun taking orders for free at-home test kits. Supply remains limited, so many are still purchasing masks and tests on their own, and the costs can easily add up.Wendy Edelberg is a Senior Fellow of Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution who studies household spending and saving habits. She explains how time is one of the hidden costs associated with obtaining high-quality masks.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/02/2213m 58s

Along The Russian Border, Some Ukrainians Already Live With War

The world is watching as Russia continues it's threat of invasion with troops at the border of Ukraine. But close to that border, in the Donbas region, people look at you a little funny if you ask whether they're worried about war with Russia, because they are already living through it. Areas of Eastern Ukraine have been at war since 2014 when Russia-backed separatists moved in and declared breakaway republics. And that's where NPR's Mary Louise Kelly has been, talking with residents about what this new threat might mean for them. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/02/2210m 49s

Old Tactics Are Being Used To Find New Extremists

Before he took office, President Joe Biden said stopping domestic extremism would be a priority for him. His administration has now created the Center for Prevention Programs and Partnerships to stop radicalization before it starts. But critics say it's a repackaging of failed strategies and inadequate. NPR correspondent Odette Yousef has been reporting on the efforts of this new program built on old strategies. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/01/229m 59s

Reframing The Minimalist Lifestyle

Minimalist lifestyles are in vogue. From books to blogs, to Instagram to YouTube, Marie Kondo and other influencers have popularized living with less. But many of the dominant voices ignore the ways history and culture influence how and why we consume. Enter Christine Platt, The Afrominimalist. Platt is a lifestyle strategist and author of The Afrominimalist's Guide To Living With Less. She examines how a history of oppression shapes a community's views on ownership and consumption.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/01/2213m 14s

The Omicron Wave Is Receding. What Happens Now?

Cases rates are dropping, but the number of people dying each day is not. Many hospitals are still overwhelmed. NPR's Will Stone reports. Deaths are a lagging indicator — meaning they, too, will soon fall as the omicron wave continues to recede. What does the next phase of the pandemic look like? NPR's Allison Aubrey explains why some public health experts think the coronavirus may not disappear — but become easier to live with. In the meantime, workplaces are still reeling from the surge as employees call out sick or must quarantine. NPR's Andrea Hsu says it's even worse than last winter's pre-vaccine surge. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/01/2210m 6s

What It's Like In Ukraine, Under Threat Of A Russian Invasion

Tensions are not abating as the U.S. and NATO continue efforts to avoid armed conflict with Russia. This week President Biden said a Russian invasion of Ukraine would "change the world." State Department spokesperson Ned Price tells NPR what leverage the U.S. has to prevent that from happening. Mary Louise Kelly reports from Kyiv, where some people are preparing for an invasion, even as the Ukraine government urges calm. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Michele Kelemen and Daniel Estrin. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/01/2213m 3s

What Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer's Retirement Means

After 27 years on the Supreme Court, liberal justice Stephen Breyer is retiring. His departure won't change the balance of the court, but it will give President Biden a chance to put his stamp on it — and cement a new, younger justice in place for decades. NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg explains who might replace Breyer, and NPR political editor Domenico Montanaro outlines how the process will unfold. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/01/2213m 4s

Rethinking Joss Whedon's Legacy Amidst Bullying Allegations

Writer-Director Joss Whedon has responded to his former colleagues' accusations of bullying on set. NY Magazine reporter Lila Shapiro interviewed Whedon, and his accusers, for a profile in Vulture called "The Undoing of Joss Whedon."Motherboard's Gita Jackson considers Whedon's influence on his fans and, more broadly, pop culture, and freelance tv critic Robyn Bahr talks about the reasons why she doesn't think she'll ever rewatch Buffy the Vampire Slayer again.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/01/2212m 23s

Experts Call The Pandemic A Collective Trauma. Why Don't We Talk About It That Way?

When we talk about the pandemic, we talk about stress. Burnout. Uncertainty. Isolation. We don't talk as much about trauma. But a growing number of mental health professionals say that's what people are experiencing as the pandemic drags on — and we may need a new way to talk about what they're going through. NPR's Kat Lonsdorf reports. Psychiatrist, neurologist and author Bessel van der Kolk explains how the brain processes and recovers from trauma. His 2004 book The Body Keeps the Score surged to the top of bestseller lists during the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/01/2213m 27s

BONUS: The Beauty, Style, And Life Of André Leon Talley

A towering figure of the fashion world, André Leon Talley was impossible to ignore. His influence extended well beyond the runway — during his time at Vogue, he was a rare Black editor in a largely white industry, and also a major figure in the LGBTQ+ community.In this episode of It's Been A Minute, host Sam Sanders discusses Talley's influence and legacy with Saeed Jones and Zach Stafford. Listen to more It's Been A Minute with Sam Sanders via Apple, Spotify, or Google.
23/01/2234m 29s

Amid Covid Surge, Students And Teachers Want To Be Heard

In Florida and Virginia, Governors Ron DeSantis and Glenn Youngkin are bolstering the right of parents to defy school mask mandates. While some parents are celebrating, others are filing lawsuits opposing the policies that make mask-wearing in schools optional.There are a lot of opinions about how schools should be run during the pandemic, but some key voices are often missing from the conversation – students and teachers. Over the last few weeks, amid a nationwide surge of coronavirus cases, students across the country have staged walkouts to emphasize various COVID mitigation measures they would like to see implemented. We'll hear from some of those students. And we'll speak to a teacher in Arizona who understands how difficult it is, as a parent, community member and school staffer, to find the right balance between physical health, mental health and educational priorities.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/01/2213m 58s

The Fate Of That Unwanted Air Fryer After You Return It

The pandemic has led to a huge rise in online shopping. And record spending from last year means record returns. But what happens to the items we send back is often a mystery. NPR correspondent Alina Selyukh reports on the like hood of an unwanted holiday gift making it into another customers hands. And Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi of NPR's Planet Money podcast visits a bargain bin store in North Carolina where dogged resellers rifle through mounds of unwanted items to find something they can turn for a profit. Listen to the full Planet Money episode here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/01/228m 11s

One Year In, Tracking Biden's Progress And Shortfalls

Today marks one year since President Joe Biden took office. His most immediate challenge was the pandemic, but he also promised action on climate, racial equity, and infrastructure. One year later, NPR correspondents Kelsey Snell and Tamara Keith take stock of Biden's accomplishments and shortfalls. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/01/2213m 11s

Addiction Is Deadlier Than Ever. But New Research Shows Most Americans Can Heal

Federal data released last week showed more than 101,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in a one-year period. This was partly due to the pandemic and disruptions to treatment, as well as a surge in methamphetamine and fentanyl use.But there is some positive news. A recent study on recovery success, co-authored by Dr. David Eddie, shows that three out of four people who experience addiction eventually recover, if they get the care they need.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/01/229m 48s

Why Trump Still Looms Large In Many Evangelical Congregations

During his time in office, former President Donald Trump embraced a Christian nationalist stance; the idea that the U.S. is a Christian country and should enforce those beliefs. Now, despite being out of office for nearly a year, those beliefs continue to spread. NPR correspondent John Burnett reports on the growing movement of Christian nationalism, and the the other Christian congregations that are pushing against it. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/01/2210m 40s

More Vaxxed People Are Acting As If They're 'Done' With The Pandemic. Should They?

More people are hospitalized with COVID than at any point in the pandemic. But the omicron variant is also causing more Americans to tune out the pandemic and turn away from public health measures right when they're needed most. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports.Even some vaccinated and boosted Americans are ready to move on from COVID, writes Derek Thompson in The Atlantic — a group he's dubbed 'vaxxed and done.' Thompson spoke to Jane Clayson on Here & Now, a production of NPR and WBUR Boston. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff, who reported on why the omicron variant appears to be less deadly; and from NPR's Will Stone, who reported on hospitals struggling to manage the omicron surge. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/01/2213m 30s

How To Fix Declining Trust In Elections And The News Media

Americans' trust in both their government and in each other is declining. That's according to the Pew Research Center, who have been collecting this data for decades. Researchers Bradley Jones and Katerina Eva Matsa discuss how and why Americans are losing trust in two critical institutions: elections and news media. Then, Eric Liu, the co-founder and CEO of Citizen University, and Tony Marcano, managing editor of member station KPCC and the LAist, share the steps they are taking to help citizens engage in civic life and re-establish trust in our country's election systems and news media. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/01/2214m 53s

Is Russia About To Invade Ukraine? NATO, U.S. Promise 'Massive Consequences'

Secretary of State Antony Blinken says the U.S. is planning "things that we have not done in the past" if Russia invades Ukraine. His comments follow days of diplomatic talks and a deadlock on resolving the crisis brewing along the Ukraine-Russia border, where Russia has massed 100,000 troops with tanks and artillery.Blinken speaks to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about the current tensions and this week's diplomatic efforts. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/01/2214m 9s

A Texas Prison's Radio Station Helps Incarcerated Men Build Community

The men on death row in Allan B. Polunsky Unit, a maximum security prison in southeastern Texas, spend most of their time in solitary confinement, isolated from each other. Now, a prison radio station is giving them a sense of community and a way to be heard.Keri Blakinger talks about how it started and the impact it's had. Read her piece "The Prisoner-Run Radio Station That's Reaching Men on Death Row" at The Marshall Project.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/01/2210m 12s

Why COVID Tests Are Still So Scarce And Expensive — And When That Could Change

Many public spaces across the country now require negative COVID-19 tests for entry. But the cost of testing can vary widely, and some say they have had to spend hundreds of dollars to purchase tests.Adam Tanner explains some of the reasons for the drastic difference in at-home test prices. Read his piece 'How Much Should It Cost to Get Tested for COVID-19' on Consumer Reports.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/01/2211m 31s

Senator Raphael Warnock Wants You To See Voting Rights As A Moral Issue

As Democrats are making a push for voting rights legislation in Congress, more faith leaders want Americans to approach it as a moral – even spiritual – issue, including pastor and Democrat, Sen. Raphael Warnock of Georgia. Warnock explains why he thinks ending the legislative filibuster in the Senate may be a necessary step, a move that President Joe Biden also endorsed while speaking in Warnock's home state on Tuesday. And Warnock describes his spiritual motivation for this voting rights push. He says democracy is the "political enactment of a spiritual idea."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/01/2212m 5s

Omicron Has Schools And Parents Scrambling. How Are They Coping?

A surge in COVID-19 cases fueled by the Omicron variant has meant many school districts across the country have considered or committed to returning to remote learning for the time being.WBEZ reporter Sarah Karp spoke with parents in Chicago where a standoff between the teachers union and mayor has resulted in no teaching happening in person or virtually for the last few days. And we hear from three mothers who share how they've been coping with the stress and unpredictability of a very confusing return to school. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/01/2212m 58s

BONUS: Maverick Carter On Building The LeBron James Empire

Before they built one of the biggest athlete-driven business empires in the world, LeBron James and Maverick Carter were just two kids from Akron, Ohio. On this episode of NPR's newest podcast, The Limits With Jay Williams, Carter explains how he and James succeeded — on their own terms. Carter is CEO of the SpringHill Company. Listen to more of The Limits via Apple, Google, or Spotify.
09/01/2236m 52s

How To Build Public Trust When Fighting A Pandemic

If you're confused about the new CDC Coronavirus guidelines, you're not alone. In fact, this week, the American Medical Association released a statement saying, "The new recommendations on quarantine and isolation are not only confusing, but are risking further spread of the virus." Adherence to public health guidelines is built on trust, and over the last few weeks, trust in the CDC seems to be eroding. Jessica Malaty Rivera, a Senior Advisor at the Pandemic Prevention Institute and a science communicator, explains how we got to this point...and what steps need to be taken to ensure public trust in the CDC.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/01/2214m 9s

Countries Accused Of Human Rights Abuses Are Pouring Money Into Soccer

A new owner can change everything for a professional sports team. And in the world of professional soccer, more and more of those new owners are countries accused of human rights abuses. Former Manchester City player Nedum Onuoha describes what it was like when a member of the Abu Dhabi royal family took charge of his club. Plus, New York Times reporter Tariq Panja explains why complaints about where money is coming from does little to change this growing trend, as evidenced by the recent purchase of Newcastle United by a Saudi-led investment group.And in case you missed it on our All Things Considered radio broadcast, co-host of the show and of this podcast Audie Cornish is considering a new adventure and leaving NPR. You can hear the show's tribute to Audie here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/01/2212m 22s

'The Big Lie' Lives On, And May Lead Some To Oversee The Next Election

A year since the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol, the belief in 'the big lie' is now mainstream. And in states around the country, that belief is driving people to run for public office, where they would oversee elections this year. NPR's Miles Parks reports. Here's his complete report on where election-denying candidates are running to control voting.And NPR's Tovia Smith reports on why 'the big lie' is still so hard to dispel. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/01/2215m 0s

Kids Under 5 Still Can't Get Vaccinated. What The Omicron Surge Means For Them

New daily cases are at an all-time high. The good news: vaccines and boosters have never been more widely available — but not for everyone. Children five and under still do not have a vaccine available as the omicron surge stretches health care workers thin. For advice on navigating the pandemic in this moment, we turn to Dr. Ibukun Kalu, a pediatric infectious disease doctor at Duke University. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Allison Aubrey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/01/2213m 1s

The 'Big Lie' Continues To Threaten Democracy

A year ago, insurrectionists stormed the Capitol building in hopes of overturning the election results - fueled by the "Big Lie" that Donald Trump actually won. He did not.As NPR Special Correspondent Melissa Block reports, this lie has become entrenched in the Republican party. And Republican state legislators across the country have used it to justify passing new laws restricting voting access. We look at those changes, and what all this might mean for elections in 2022 and 2024. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/01/2211m 35s

Revisiting January 6th One Year Later

This week marks a year since the January 6th insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, and in this episode we're returning to the events of the day, which have become much clearer over the past year. And Capitol Police Sergeant Aquilino Gonell, who was there on January 6th, describes what it's like returning to work in the building where he says he was almost certain he would die. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/01/2213m 36s

Was That This Year?

We take a look back on the year in news and pop culture... in quotes. Audie Cornish and Ari Shapiro join Sam Sanders for a special episode of NPR's It's Been a Minute to play a deluxe version of their favorite game, Who Said That. Listen to It's Been A Minute on NPR One, Apple Podcasts or Spotify. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/12/2115m 55s

Ai Weiwei On His Father's Exile — And Hopes For His Own Son

In 2011, influential Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei was secretly detained by Chinese authorities. While in detention, he thought often about his father – who had also been punished by the Chinese government – and how incomplete his understanding of his father was.Ai spoke to Ailsa Chang about his new book, which explores his time in detention, his relationship with his father, and his attempt to avoid a similar disconnect with his own son. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/12/2110m 47s

We're Halfway Through Another Intense Year For Teachers

We're halfway through another intense pandemic school year. As many teachers are taking a well-deserved holiday break, we'll hear why these past few months in the classroom have gotten harder – and what that could mean for students and parents. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/12/2110m 50s

CDC Guidelines Change As Omicron Cases Cause Disruptions

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced this week that people who test positive for COVID-19 but remain asymptotic can cut their quarantine time in half, from ten days to five. This shift comes in part due to major disruptions causes by rising Omicron cases, with hospitals and airlines in particular struggling to stay fully staffed. This moment in the pandemic feels a little like living in a contradiction. Cases are rising, yet guidance on certain restrictions is loosening. Hospitals are filling up, yet many infections are mild. Prof. Gaurav Suri, computational neuroscientist at San Francisco State, and Dr. Leana Wen, emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University, discuss how to live with the threat of Omicron right now. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/12/2111m 50s

NPR Investigates: How States Charge Poor Parents For Their Own Kids' Foster Care

An NPR investigation digs into the practice of billing parents for their children's foster care — something that happens in every state in the country. It's a bill many cannot afford to pay, which in turn makes it even more difficult for parents to get their lives back on track and reunite with their children. On top of that, research shows government actually loses money when it tries to collect on foster care bills.NPR investigative correspondent Joseph Shapiro reports, in collaboration with Teresa Wiltz of POLITICO. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/12/2112m 38s

The Holiday Dishes That Are Never Missing From Your Table

After everything that has happened this year, it can feel difficult to find things to celebrate. So we're using this episode to spread a little joy, through something everyone can relate to: food. We asked all of you what holiday dish is never missing from your table, and you answered – from seafood gumbo in Louisiana to Hungarian Beigli to traditional New Mexican cookies called Biscochitos and more. Be careful listening on an empty stomach. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/12/2110m 51s

Manchin's Holiday Gift To Fellow Dems: A Lump Of Coal On Climate Change

This week, Democratic West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin said he cannot support the Build Back Better Act, which contains more than half a trillion dollars in climate investments. The White House has been negotiating with Manchin for months, hoping he would cast a key vote for the plan in the Senate, where their party's majority is razor thin. Without Manchin's support, the Biden administration's most ambitious action on climate may be dead, and the U.S. could fall short of key goals to prevent the worst effects of climate change. Reporters from NPR's climate change team — Jeff Brady, Lauren Sommer, and Dan Charles — take stock of where things go from here. NPR's Jennifer Ludden also contributed to this episode. Read her piece Manchin says Build Back Better's climate measures are risky. That's not true.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/12/2114m 11s

The Women Of 'Succession' And Reflections On Navigating Corporate Sexism

The HBO show Succession is compelling in part because it portrays a world most of us will never see: the backroom deals between cutthroat billionaires and their fraught family relationships. But the show's dark comedy also gives us insight into the world we all inhabit, and how that world treats women across a spectrum of relationships.From entrenched sexism to performative feminism, writer Flannery Dean explains the different forms of misogyny on display in Succession. (Note: Spoilers ahead for those not caught up on the latest season!) Then, actor J. Smith-Cameron – who plays the character Gerri Kellman – discusses navigating through the toxic machismo of Succession's world, and how she made the role her own. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/12/2112m 52s

How To Get Through The Holidays As Omicron Looms

This holiday season we all deserve a little peace and quiet with the people we love, but the rapid spread of the Omicron variant of COVID-19 threatens to complicate things for everyone.As tests appear to be in short supply in places like New York City, the White House announced plans to send 500 million at-home tests to Americans who want them and new federal testing sites to meet the demand in the coming weeks. But despite the rising cases and concern, Dr. Ashish Jha, Dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, says this is not March 2020 all over again. And he offers some guidance to help us through the next few weeks. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/12/2110m 50s

School's In, But The Kids Are Out: Why Enrollment Continues To Drop

Public school enrollment dropped three percent nationwide during the 2020-2021 school year.NPR's education team continued to track enrollment this school year and found that while districts have gained students, a significant majority are still not back to where they were prior to the pandemic.A similar story has unfolded in Los Angeles, Chicago and at more public schools across the nation.NPR education reporter Cory Turner looked into why students are still not coming back to school and what schools are trying to do about it.Meanwhile, some of the students not enrolled in public school have started being homeschooled during the pandemic. WBHM education reporter Kyra Miles spoke to Black families in Alabama who are choosing that option in increasing numbers.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/12/2110m 45s

BONUS: 12 Favorite Moments Of 2021

NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast has a tradition to look back on some of their favorite things from the last 12 months of television, movies and music. In this episode they're revisiting the pop culture that thrilled them, moved them and kept them company during another challenging year. Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour on NPR One, Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
19/12/2131m 46s

Fox Hosts' Texts To White House Official Contradict Coverage Of Jan. 6 Capitol Siege

On Jan. 6, three Fox News hosts desperately urged former Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows to get the president to tell supporters to stop attacking the Capitol building.The texts, which were made public this week as the House of Representatives voted to hold Meadows in contempt, reveal a starkly different message than the one those same Fox hosts delivered to their audiences about the insurrection. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik and investigative correspondent Tom Dreisbach discuss the gap between Fox's messaging behind closed doors and in front of the camera. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/12/219m 47s

The Story Behind the Summit: Leading A Global Climate Change Fight Into 2022

The COP26 Summit, the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow last month brought together people from all over the world. And everyone had stories of how climate change is already affecting their lives. But, did the conference accomplish what it set out to do? Alok Sharma, president of COP26, gives us a behind-the-scenes glimpse into what the conference felt like from the inside, why he apologized for the process, and what it was like trying to get delegates from nearly 200 countries on the same page. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/12/2112m 21s

Deadly Tornadoes Bring Heartbreak And Questions on Resiliency and Climate Change

Five days after tornadoes first touched down in the Midwest and South of the U.S., survivors are coming to grips with what they have lost. Of the several states that the storms tore through last weekend, Kentucky was the hardest hit. At least 74 people have been confirmed dead there. Many more are unaccounted for.As survivors, volunteers, and officials sort through and pick up what's left, how might they think about shoring up homes, businesses and buildings for the future? NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with University of Florida civil engineering professor David Prevatt about how to prepare buildings for tornadoes and hurricanes. The severity and timing of these storms have also raised the question of whether climate change has anything to do with tornadoes. NPR correspondent Dan Charles reports.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/12/2111m 29s

How A Pact Made In Prison May Have Saved An American's Life

Kevin Dawes, an American from California, traveled to Syria in 2012 with hopes of a launching a career as a foreign correspondent. But shortly after crossing the border he was arrested and jailed for three-and-a-half years. And he hasn't shared his story publicly until now.NPR correspondent Deborah Amos interviewed Dawes about his nightmarish experience in a Syrian prison, how he's seeking to bring the government to court, and how he hopes to help do the same for the family of a British doctor he met in the cell next to his. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/12/2111m 39s

Hunting A Rapid COVID Test For The Holidays? Good Luck With That

Almost two years into the pandemic, at-home rapid tests can still be difficult to find in the U.S. If you do find them, they're often expensive. Other countries are faring better, like the U.K. and South Korea, which provide free tests each day to anyone who wants them. Why is the U.S. different? NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/12/219m 30s

What We Learned When Elizabeth Holmes Took The Stand In Her Fraud Trial

After seven days of testimony directly from Elizabeth Holmes, her defense announced it had rested its case this week in a federal fraud trail that began in September. Holmes, a former Silicon Valley luminary, was CEO of the blood-testing startup Theranos. She told jurors she was not responsible, as prosecutors allege, for fleecing investors of millions of dollars and delivering flawed results to patients.And as NPR tech reporter Bobby Allyn explains, Holmes detailed a story of abuse that could sway the outcome of the trial. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/12/2113m 37s

Why 'Abortion Or Adoption' Is Not An Equal Choice

During oral arguments last week in a major Supreme Court case, Justice Amy Coney Barrett brought up the idea of adoption as an alternative to abortion. But many people who choose not to have a child do not consider adoption and abortion equal and opposite choices, sociologist Gretchen Sisson tells NPR. Plus, one woman shares her experience of relinquishing her rights as a parent.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/12/2113m 38s

US Political Divide Reflected in Attitudes And Deaths Related to COVID

At least six conservative broadcasters who spread misinformation about COVID-19 and questioned coronavirus vaccines have now died from just this year. Their deaths may mirror a wider trend in the United States: Americans who live in pro-Trump parts of the country are less likely to be vaccinated and more likely to die from COVID-related complications.NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports on new analysis from NPR showing that counties that voted for Donald Trump had almost three times the death rate of the counties that voted for Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/12/2112m 48s

A Real-Life Pearl Harbor Love Story

In October of 1941, a young soldier was on leave in southern California when he met the woman he was sure he would marry. Then, two months later while stationed in Hawaii, Art "Bud" Montagne witnessed the attack on Pearl Harbor firsthand, and was swept up in the conflict that followed. NPR special correspondent Renee Montagne tells the story of what her father witnessed on that day 80 years ago, and how a cinematic love story — put on pause by war — turned out for him.Read more about Art Montagne's experiences at Pearl Harbor. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/12/2111m 12s

Women's Tennis Stands Up To China

Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai made an assault allegation in November, then disappeared from the public eye. She has since re-emerged, but in protest of her treatment, the Women's Tennis Association's has now suspended all tournaments in China. That decision by the WTA could cost the organization and its players hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe more, in revenue. And it's the threat of losing that kind of money that usually keeps most professional sports organizations — like the NBA — treading lightly in response to China. NPR correspondent Tom Goldman has been following the story and looks at how the WTA's unflinching support for Peng may inspire a wider outcry over China's actions.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/12/2113m 16s

Bonus: Banned Books

Banning books from classrooms and school libraries is nothing new, but it's recently become a topic of considerable political debate. How should parents react to this news, and to the books their children are reading? In this episode of NPR's It's Been A Minute senior editor Barrie Hardymon and Traci Thomas, host of The Stacks podcast, joined guest host Ayesha Rascoe to talk about banned book lists.The three talk about why it's important for kids to discover books freely, even if that means starting a hard conversation with them. They also discuss their favorite — and least favorite — books that often show up on banned book lists.
05/12/2130m 54s

Omicron Is Here. What That Means For The Winter

It was only a matter of time before cases of the COVID-19 omicron variant started popping up in the U.S., and now, it's here. Although it's too early to tell how this virus strain will spread, the threat it poses has already lit a fire under public health messaging. President Biden announced a new strategy to avoid a winter surge of cases that involves free at-home testing, a vaccine booster messaging campaign and heightened international travel safeguards. Meanwhile, the race is on to detect how omicron is already spreading in this country. NPR reporter Will Stone gives us a look into what's happening in labs right now across the country. And Saad Omer, director of the Yale Institute for Global Health, discusses what we know about how effective travel bans are scenarios like this. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/12/2113m 58s

Why Americans Love To Shop And What It's Doing To The Planet

Buying stuff is a part of this country's DNA. It's a tradition that really took off near the end of World War II, when the American economy was thriving and the market exploded with products Americans didn't even know they wanted. And even in an economy rocked by a pandemic, buying is on track to exceed 2020 levels this holiday season.The result of all that spending means consumption drives 70% of our country's GDP, but it's also the leading driver of nearly every environmental issue our planet faces. Journalist J.B. MacKinnon, who also wrote "The Day the World Stops Shopping, How Ending Consumerism Saves the Environment and Ourselves," discusses how curbing consumption could positively affect a warming planet.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/12/2113m 23s

A Supreme Court Case That Could Upend Roe v. Wade

Getting an abortion in Mississippi has never been easy, but it hasn't been impossible. Now, a case before the Supreme Court that centers on a clinic in Mississippi could upend abortion rights for pregnant people across the country. Today, the conservative-leaning court heard arguments in the case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization. The clinic, which is the only abortion provider remaining in Mississippi, is challenging a 2018 state law that bans termination after 15 weeks of pregnancy. If the court upholds the law, it would reverse its own precedent by allowing states to interfere with the right to abortion at that stage of pregnancy. NPR Chief Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, SCOTUS Blog's Tom Goldstein, and Florida State University Law Professor Mary Ziegler parse the arguments and weigh in on the possibilities on how the justices could rule.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/12/2112m 35s

The Infrastructure Package Was Signed By The President. Now What?

After years of jokes about unsuccessful Infrastructure Weeks, months of deliberation, and bouts of gridlock on the political left, a $1.2 trillion package made its way through Congress at long last. The president signed it into law earlier this month. Now, the challenge of actually getting the money where it needs to be remains.NPR's White House Correspondent Franco Ordonez followed President Biden around the country earlier this month to report on the changes to come, now that the bill is law.And NPR's National Desk Correspondent Nathan Rott reports on the portions of the infrastructure package that address resilience and protecting communities historically hit hardest by climate change. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/11/2111m 16s

What We Know (And Don't Know) About The Omicron Variant

The World Health Organization is warning that the omicron variant of the coronavirus, which was first detected in South Africa, has a "very high" global risk because of the possibility that it spreads more easily and might resist vaccines and immunity in people who were infected with previous strains. On Monday, President Joe Biden said this this variant is a "cause for concern, not a cause for panic." He urged Americans to get fully vaccinated and get a booster dose if they qualify. WHO spokesperson Dr. Margaret Harris explains what more there is to learn about the severity and transmission of this new variant. And Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) discusses why vaccine hesitation on a global scale could make this next phase of the pandemic more dangerous. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/11/2111m 57s

Constance Hauman 'Plays It Forward': A Musical Gratitude Project

This Thanksgiving week, we're sharing a segment from our special series Play It Forward, in which artists tell us about their own music and the musicians who inspire them. This episode, opera singer and funk keyboardist Constance Hauman speaks to Ari Shapiro about her new album, Tropical Thunderstorm, her experiences as a multi-genre musician and an artist she's grateful for: Daf player Asal Malekzadeh. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/11/219m 16s

George Clinton 'Plays It Forward': A Musical Gratitude Project

For Thanksgiving Day, we're sharing a segment from our special series Play It Forward, in which artists tell us about their own music and the musicians who inspire them. In this episode, funk legend George Clinton speaks to Ari Shapiro about the longevity and enduring influence of his band, Parliament-Funkadelic, being a hype man for other musicians, and an artist he's grateful for: opera singer and funk keyboardist Constance Hauman. On tomorrow's episode: Constance Hauman plays it forward.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/11/2110m 17s

The Indigenous Stories Glossed Over In The Typical 'First Thanksgiving' Story

The commonly-told version of the first Thanksgiving story leaves out a lot: The indigenous Wampanoag people who lived in a complex society long before the Mayflower arrived at Plymouth Rock; Squanto escaping bondage in Spain before becoming an emissary to the Pilgrims; and the long legacy of violent displacement that followed.Paula Peters, a writer and a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, still lives near where the Pilgrims made landfall on her ancestral homeland. She talks about how the 1621 feast fits into history.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/11/2110m 58s

NPR Investigates: CTE, Desperate Patients, And The Hope For A Cure (Pt 2)

CTE — chronic traumatic encephalopathy — is a degenerative brain disease found in many former professional football and hockey players, for whom blows to the head have long been part of the job. But those injuries also occur outside the world of pro sports. And as awareness of CTE has grown, so has a thriving market of dubious remedies marketed to everyday people who believe they are suffering from CTE — a disease that can't even be diagnosed until after death, through an autopsy of the brain. In the second of two episodes, Sacha Pfeiffer of NPR's Investigative Team reports on some of those desperate patients and their hope for a cure. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/11/2114m 12s

NPR Investigates: CTE, Desperate Patients, And The Hope For A Cure (Pt 1)

CTE — chronic traumatic encephalopathy — is a degenerative brain disease found in many former professional football and hockey players, for whom blows to the head have long been part of the job. But those injuries also occur outside the world of pro sports. And as awareness of CTE has grown, so has a thriving market of dubious remedies marketed to everyday people who believe they are suffering from CTE — a disease that can't even be diagnosed until after death, through an autopsy of the brain. In the first of two episodes, Sacha Pfeiffer of NPR's Investigative Team reports on some of those desperate patients and their hope for a cure. If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/11/2114m 46s

Living with Long COVID

For those living with long COVID, daily activities like going for a walk, washing the dishes, or being on a Zoom call can be incredibly draining. These long-term effects of a COVID infection - called post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2, PASC, or more simply long COVID - have been a reality for many patients since the start of the pandemic. While it is not known exactly how common long COVID is, it isn't rare. One study found that some 30% of participants across multiple age ranges reported persistent symptoms. For some, symptoms fade after a few months, while for others, long COVID feels like their new reality. NPR's Mallory Yu has been reporting on long COVID and gathered the stories of patients who are desperate for answers. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/11/2111m 28s

How A Dictator Engineered A Migration Crisis At The Belarus-Poland Border

Migrants from faraway countries are stuck in Belarus, just across its border with Poland. They've traveled there to seek asylum in the EU. But Poland has refused to accept them. How did they get there? They were invited — and in some cases, their travel facilitated — by the regime of Belarusian dictator Alexander Lukashenko. EU leaders say Lukashenko and his backers in Russia are 'weaponizing' migration in retaliation for sanctions placed on Belarus last year. Those sanctions came after the EU accused Lukashenko of rigging his most recent election. Now, many hundreds of migrants are stuck on the Belarus side of the border. There have been at least nine recorded deaths, but observers think there have been many more. Migrants were reportedly moved from makeshift camps outdoors to a government-run shelter on Thursday, though it's unclear what Belarus plans to do with them next. NPR international correspondent Rob Schmitz has seen the crisis up close. This episode is a collection of his reporting. Find more of it here, and see photos from the border on NPR's Picture Show. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/11/2114m 52s

Half Of Afghanistan's Population Faces Acute Food Insecurity. Here's Why.

Afghanistan is facing its worst drought in decades, but that's not the only reason it is on the verge of a hunger crisis. After the Taliban took over, much of the country's international development aid was suspended, and the United States froze $9.5 billion in Afghan government assets. The economy has plummeted.Richard Trenchard, country director for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in Afghanistan, explains what he's heard from farmers and herders.PBS NewsHour special correspondent Jane Ferguson recently returned from a reporting trip in the country, where she saw hospital wards filling up with malnourished babies and toddlers. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/11/219m 44s

China Poses A National Security Threat Unlike Any The U.S. Has Seen Before

This week's virtual summit between President Joe Biden and China's President Xi Jinping may have restored a tone of respect between the world's two largest powers, but U.S. intelligence is telling a different story. NPR's Greg Myre reports on a national security conference held in Georgia last month where former and current U.S. intelligence officers were surprisingly candid about what they see as the biggest growing threat: China. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/11/2111m 26s

Yeah, The Supply Chain Situation Isn't Looking Great For The Holidays

The holiday shopping season is basically here. But a lot of things that Americans want to buy are not. Now the race is on to get goods off ships and into stores and warehouses — before it's too late. NPRs Scott Horsley reports some retailers are already feeling the pinch from less inventory and higher shipping costs. Even if goods do make it into the U.S., many are sitting in warehouses, which are bursting at the seams. NPR's Alina Selyukh explains why.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/11/2113m 46s

Young Activists At U.N. Climate Summit: 'We Are Not Drowning. We Are Fighting'

Thousands of youth activists from all over the world gathered in Scotland this week for the COP26 UN climate summit. They say climate change is already transforming their countries — and that their generation has the most to lose if greater action isn't taken. This episode contains reporting from Ari Shapiro in Glasgow, with production and editing by Mia Venkat, Noah Caldwell, and Ashley Brown. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/11/2112m 23s

What Went Wrong At Astroworld? The Deadly Dynamics Of Crowd Surge

Who is to blame for the deaths of nine people at the Astroworld Festival last Friday? Houston police have opened a criminal investigation and concertgoers have already filed more than 20 lawsuits against the event organizers and rapper Travis Scott, who continued to perform for more than half an hour after officials declared a mass casualty event. Crowd safety expert Keith Still explains the science behind how a concert crowd can transform into an uncontrollable mass that threatens human life. Houston Chronicle music critic Joey Guerra, who attended the festival, grapples with how music fans are processing the tragedy. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/11/2114m 36s

Secret Tapes Of NRA Leadership Reveal Debate Of Post-Columbine Strategy

Following the Columbine shooting in April of 1999, top leaders of the National Rifle Association huddled in private to discuss their public response to the tragedy. Secret tapes of those deliberations were obtained by NPR investigative correspondent Tim Mak. He explains what's revealed in the tapes: that the group considered a much different stance than the one it ultimately took — a stance that would help set the stage for decades of debate about gun violence in America. Tim Mak is also author of the book Misfire: Inside the Downfall of the NRA.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/11/2111m 35s

Is The Future Of The Internet In The Metaverse?

Mark Zuckerberg says the metaverse is not just the next chapter of his company: it's the next chapter of the internet. There are a lot of questions about what role Meta, the company formerly known as Facebook, should play in building that future.Meta's Vice President of metaverse, Vishal Shah, argues that the company has learned from its struggle to moderate content on Facebook, and will build safety and privacy into the metaverse.Jason Moore — Assistant Professor at Brooklyn College teaching television and virtual reality — explains how he uses the metaverse today.And Benedict Evans, an independent technology analyst, argues that the metaverse may never emerge as one cohesive movement. Read his essay about Facebook's rebrand: Metabrand. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/11/2114m 12s

Education In Virginia's Election: It Wasn't Just About Critical Race Theory

Now that the hot takes have cooled after Virginia's gubernatorial election, NPR correspondents Anya Kamenetz and Tamara Keith dissect the role of education in the race — and why it was about way more than critical race theory. Read more from Anya here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/11/2112m 51s

BONUS: How To Wake Up Early

Waking up at dawn with the bakers and the baristas may not be for everyone — especially night owls. Whether you have to wake up early, or you'd like to become more of a morning lark, here are a few habits that can help you set yourself up for success at that first alarm. In this episode of NPR's Life Kit, host Kavitha George speaks with early risers who have tips to help adjust one's biological clock. Listen to more episode's of Life Kit on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or NPR One.
07/11/2122m 10s

How Sudan's Military Coup Is Threatening Its Long March Toward Democracy

In recent years, Sudan has been home to one of the most successful pro-democracy movements on the African continent. Now, a military coup threatens that movement's progress. NPR's Eyder Peralta, who has been reporting in the region, explains how it all unfolded — and what could happen next. Read more on the events in Sudan from NPR's Becky Sullivan: The coup in Sudan could threaten U.S. influence in a strategically important region.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/11/2113m 17s

Young Kids Are Now Vaccine-Eligible. Why Doctors Say Parents Shouldn't Wait

The CDC made it official on Tuesday: kids 5 - 11 are now eligible to receive Pfizer's COVID-19 pediatric vaccine. Within hours, some of the first shots were administered in Hartford, Connecticut. Jenny Brundin of Colorado Public Radio spoke to parents and kids in Denver about getting a shot. While some are eager, others want to 'wait and see.' NPR's Allison Aubrey and Selena Simmons-Duffin wrote about why pediatricians say it's better not to wait. Read their piece: Some parents want to wait to vaccinate their kids. Here's why doctors say do it now. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/11/2112m 9s

Will The Supreme Court Rule Against The Texas Abortion Law?

Any ruling is months away, but this week's oral arguments provided some clues. NPR's Nina Totenberg watched them unfold. Hear more from Nina's coverage on the NPR Politics Podcast via Apple, Google, or Spotify.Also in this episode: Dr. Ghazaleh Moayedi, an OB-GYN in Texas, who told NPR pregnant people in Texas have been travelling to Oklahoma for abortions. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/11/2110m 13s

'Striketober' And The Power Of Workers

In what some have called "Striketober," workers in factories as well as the health care and food industries have either started or authorized strikes in the past month.Thousands of workers across the U.S. are on strike, demanding better wages, better working conditions and more benefits. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Joseph McCartin, professor of history at Georgetown, about what this moment means for the future of labor in America and how long the momentum may last. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/11/2111m 41s

As Climate Summit Moves Ahead, The World's Biggest Polluters Are Behind

A U.N. climate summit is underway this week in Glasgow, Scotland. Many of the world's top carbon emitting-countries will be represented there. Scientists say they need to do more to curb greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the most catastrophic effects of climate change. The U.S, along with the China, are the world's top greenhouse gas emitters. India is third. And Brazil plays a crucial role in global climate, because it is home to vast rainforests that feed on carbon. But those rainforests are disappearing faster until the current government. Ahead of the summit, NPR international correspondents in China, India, and Brazil gathered to discuss what climate action those countries are taking: Emily Feng in Beijing, Lauren Frayer in Mumbai, and Philip Reeves in Rio de Janeiro.NPR's Lauren Sommer outlined the stakes at the Glasgow summit here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/11/2112m 18s

BONUS: Embedded — 'The Capitol Gazette'

In this episode of NPR's investigative podcast Embedded, Chris Benderev reports on the trial of a man who shot and killed five people in the office of an Annapolis newspaper in 2018. Embedded's series of episodes on the Capitol Gazette began in February of 2021. Listen via Apple, Spotify, or Google.
31/10/2132m 47s

Author Grady Hendrix Explores What Happens To 'Final Girls' After The Credits Roll

A final girl in the horror genre is the woman who is left to deal with the aftermath of surviving a terrifying killer. From The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, to Friday the 13th, to Halloween.The term 'Final Girl' was first coined by writer Carol J. Clover in her book Men, Women, and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film. Society knows this trope well. But after the credits roll, audiences typically don't know much about what actually happens to that final girl. Or whether she can live a normal life after being hunted down by a masker killer. Author Grady Hendrix unpacks that in his latest novel, The Final Girl Support Group."The ultimate faceless killer they can't escape is the forces of market capitalism. There's always a sequel. So even if you survive Part I and II, they're going to get you in Part III. And there's something terrible about that to me, that you never get to let your guard down," Hendrix said.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/10/2111m 8s

Why Iraq's Protest Movement Led To An Election That Millions Sat Out

Two years ago, a massive protest movement swept through Iraq. People were angry about corruption and a lack of basic services like electricity and health care in a country that brings in billions of dollars in oil revenue each year. That protest movement culminated in a parliamentary election, held earlier this month. NPR international correspondent Ruth Sherlock reported on the election closely from inside Iraq. Through her reporting, and in conversation with host Ari Shapiro, Ruth explains why Iraq's election failed to deliver on hopes for reform — and what it revealed about America's long and costly investment in the country's democracy. This episode contains excerpts from multiple stories Ruth Sherlock reported over the course of weeks inside Iraq. You can find more of her work here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/10/2115m 8s

Barack Obama And Bruce Springsteen On Their Belief In A Unifying Story For America

Last summer, when former President Barack Obama and Bruce Springsteen sat down to tape their podcast, the country was facing a pandemic, joblessness and a contentious election. And their conversations, they say, were an effort to offer some perspective and an attempt to try and find a unifying story for the country. The two talked about their dads, race, and the future of the country. Those conversations have now become a book, titled Renegades: Born in the U.S.A. — and they spoke to Audie Cornish about it's publication.You can watch a video of this interview and see images from the book here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/10/2114m 48s

Booster Guidance For All 3 Vaccines; Shots For Kids Weeks Away

The CDC has now released booster guidance for all three vaccines available in the U.S. — making tens of millions of people eligible for another shot. And on Tuesday, an FDA panel met to review data from Pfizer on their vaccine for children ages 5 - 11. NPR's Alison Aubrey explains what those data say about the vaccine — and how it might be rolled out. Pediatrician Dr. Reah Boyd tells NPR how she's talking to parents about vaccinating their young children. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Pien Huang, Rob Stein, and Selena Simmons-Duffin. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/10/2113m 27s

School Boards: A New Front Line In The Culture Wars

School board members across the country are being intimidated and threatened. Now the National School Boards Association wants the federal government to step in. The group said in a recent letter to President Biden that acts of school board harassment and confrontations seem to be coordinated. The online newsletter Popular Information has written about national groups targeting school boards. NPR Ed correspondent Anya Kamenetz travelled to Gwinnett County, Georgia, where school board members have been targeted with threats. Read more in her story, What it's like to be on the front lines of the school board culture war.NPR White House Correspondent Tamara Keith has also reported on why school board elections will be an early test of what issues motivate voters.Anya and Tamara recently discussed their reporting on school boards on the NPR Politics Podcast. Listen via Apple, Spotify, or Google. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/10/2112m 38s

BONUS: Wisdom From The Top

This episode is from our friends at Wisdom From The Top. From the creator of How I Built This, host Guy Raz invites you to listen in as he talks to leadership experts and the visionary leaders of some of the world's biggest brands. Along the way, you'll hear accounts of crisis, failure, turnaround, and triumph, as the leaders reveal their secrets on their way to the top. These are stories that didn't make it into their company bios, and valuable lessons for anyone trying to make it in business. In this episode: As a child growing up in Ibadan, Nigeria, Dara Treseder was often told to get her head out of the clouds. But her mother encouraged her to dream big and to follow her ambition if it would lead her to contentment. For Treseder, that meant moving across the world to attend both Harvard and Stanford, and chasing a deeply-held desire to make a positive impact on the world. Her career in marketing began with stints at Apple and Goldman Sachs, then, in 2020, she became SVP, Head of Global Marketing and Communications at Peloton. Today, she is one of the most influential marketing leaders of her generation. Listen to more Wisdom From The Top via Apple, Spotify, or Google.
24/10/2159m 3s

The Great Resignation: Why People Are Leaving Their Jobs In Growing Numbers

A record 4.3 million workers in America quit their jobs in August.Anthony Klotz coined this ongoing phenomenon "The Great Resignation."Klotz is an organizational psychologist at Texas A&M University.In part, he says, the pandemic has made workers reevaluate what they are actually getting out of their jobs."During the pandemic, because there was a lot of death and illness and lockdowns, we really had the time and the motivation to sit back and say, do I like the trajectory of my life? Am I pursuing a life that brings me well-being?" Klotz said.Employers are also having to rethink what their employees really need.NPR's Audie Cornish spoke with Laszlo Bock, co-founder and CEO of the human resources company Humu, about the basic human need for respect."You know, in the pandemic, people have talked a lot about essential workers, but we actually treat them as essential jobs," said Bock. "We treat the workers as quite replaceable."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/10/2112m 31s

Why The Global Supply Chain Is Still Clogged — And How To Fix It

Last week the White House announced a plan to help move the port of Los Angeles into 24/7 operating status. But that will only "open the gates" of the clogged global supply chain, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg told NPR on the NPR Politics Podcast. Another crucial supply chain link is the trucking industry, which is short tens of thousands of drivers. Bruce Basada, President of the Diesel Driving Academy in Shreveport, Louisiana, explains why. The clogged supply chain is leading to delays and shortage on all kinds of products. NPR coverage in this episode includes excerpts from Scott Horsley's report on a shortage of glass bottles, Petra Mayer's story on the slowdown in book production, and Alina Selyukh's look at shipping delays for children's toys. Special thanks to Scott, Petra, and Alina for editing help on this episode. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/10/2112m 43s

Havana Syndrome: Over 200 Cases Documented Yet Cause Remains A Mystery

Since 2016, a number of U.S. diplomats and federal employees have reported symptoms of a mysterious illness, the so-called Havana Syndrome.The list of symptoms include hearing loud sounds, nausea fatigue, and dizzying migraines, among others. The cause of this mystery illness is a source of curiosity, but it remains unknown.Last year the State Department commissioned a study by the National Academies of Sciences for researchers to investigate Havana Syndrome.NPR's Sarah McCammon spoke to Dr. David Relman, a Stanford professor who headed the investigation.One possible cause their group came to was a form of microwave radiation that occurs in a pulsed or intermittent form. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/10/2112m 33s

Colin Powell's Complicated Legacy

Colin Powell's life was marked by public service, first as a soldier in Vietnam and then eventually as President George W. Bush's secretary of state. By that time he had already held many prominent positions in government, including national security adviser and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He was the first African American to hold each of these roles. But Powell's story will always be entwined with the Iraq War. Although he argued against the invasion in private White House meetings, he did see it through. And he famously defended the strategy on a national stage before the United Nations. NPR National Correspondent Don Gonyea reports on Powell's enormous and complicated legacy. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/10/2111m 48s

The Trial For The Killing Of Ahmaud Arbery

One of the killings that sparked racial justice protests last year is again in the national spotlight, with a trial that begins this week in Brunswick, Ga. Three white men are accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man shot and killed as he was jogging down a residential street. NPR correspondent Debbie Elliott reports on the defendants' expected arguments and the evidence stacked against them in a trial that serves as yet another test case for racial justice. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/10/2110m 39s

BONUS: 'Nina' And 'Just Us' Offer Ways To Start A Conversation On Race

After the protests last year, we heard the phrase "racial reckoning" a lot, as some groups of people struggled to catch up with what's just been reality for many others. On this episode of NPR's new Book of the Day podcast, we've got two books that might help you reckon with that reckoning, in two different ways: Traci Todd and illustrator Christian Robinson's bright and powerful picture book biography Nina: A Story of Nina Simone and poet Claudia Rankine's Just Us: An American Conversation, in which she puts together poetry, essays and images to bring readers into an uncomfortable but necessary conversation about race. Listen to NPR's Book of the Day on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or NPR One.
17/10/2118m 40s

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures As Water Runs Short In The West

Large parts of the West have been hot and dry for so long that reservoirs are running low and some communities are mandating conservation. California is talking about a statewide mandate, too. Meanwhile, farmers are preparing to flood their fields to replenish aquifers, while ranchers are selling off parts of their herds and worried about feeding the rest. NPR's Dan Charles reports from California and NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from North Dakota. Also in this episode: water rights lawyer Christine Klein, who originally spoke to NPR's daily economics podcast The Indicator from Planet Money, in one of a series of episodes on the drought and the economy. Listen to more of The Indicator via Apple, Spotify, or Google. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/10/2115m 3s

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

Patricia Maginnis, who was 93 when she died on August 30, may have been the first person to publicly call for abortion to be completely decriminalized in America. Despite her insistence on direct action on abortion-rights at a time when many were uncomfortable even saying the word "abortion," Maginnis is not a bold letter name of the movement. That may be because she didn't seek the limelight and she cared more for action then self-presentation.Guests include Lili Loofborow, who profiled Maginnis for Slate; Professor Leslie J. Regan, who wrote the book When Abortion Was a Crime; and the artist Andrea Bowers whose video piece, Letters to An Army of Three recreated the messages people would send Maginnis when they were desperate to access abortion services. Special thanks to the Schlesinger Library, where the 1975 oral history of Pat Maginnis is housed. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/10/2114m 55s

Social Media Misinformation Stokes A Worsening Civil War In Ethiopia

Hate and division on Facebook are not just a problem in the U.S. That's one of the messages whistleblower Frances Haugen took to Congress last week, where she accused Facebook's algorithms of quote, "literally fanning ethnic violence in Ethiopia," a country that's endured nearly a year of civil war. Freelance reporter Zecharias Zelalem has been keeping track of how inflammatory posts on Facebook have led to attacks in the real world. And NPR's East Africa Correspondent Eyder Peralta describes what Ethiopia looks like from the ground as he moves closer toward the conflict. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/10/2111m 58s

Is China A Threat Or An Opportunity?

In many parts of the U.S., China remains a huge business opportunity despite recent friction. That's the country where Apple makes its phones and Nike stitches its shoes. Yet inside the Washington Beltway, China is a security threat. Full stop. It's one of the few things Democrats, Republicans and most everyone else in the capital agree on. NPR correspondents Greg Myre and John Ruwitch report on this gap between how China is viewed in Washington policy circles and how many outside the proverbial beltway think about the country. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/10/2111m 14s

Native Americans Take Over The Writers' Room and Tell Their Own Stories

After decades of Indigenous stories told by non-Natives, two shows from this past year signal a change. Reservation Dogs from FX on Hulu was created by and stars Native people. It follows four Indigenous teenagers growing up on a reservation in rural Oklahoma, with dreams of adventuring to California. Vincent Schilling, a Native journalist and critic for Rotten Tomatoes, calls Reservation Dogs 'a show about Native American resilience.' Rutherford Falls is a sitcom on NBC's streaming platform, Peacock, which follows a conflict over a historical statue in a small town. When the show was co-created by Sierra Teller Ornelas, she became the first Native American showrunner of television comedy. Teller Ornelas told Audie Cornish this year: "There are five Native writers on staff. We had a Native director for four of the episodes, and this is really a reflection of our shared experience as Native people from nations all over the country." In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/10/2111m 42s

BONUS: Janet Jackson Once Had 'Control' of the Charts

Thirty-five years ago, Janet Jackson released an album that changed the course of her career, and of pop music. Control took over radio, reinvented the playbook for Black artists crossing over into pop and ushered in a whole new sound for R&B. But after the wardrobe malfunction at the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show, Janet's reputation took a hit, and she's yet to receive the flowers she deserves. In this episode of NPR's It's Been A Minute, host Sam Sanders wants to set the record straight. Listen to It's Been A Minute on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or NPR One.
10/10/2142m 37s

R. Kelly, Britney Spears, And The Rise Of 'Consequence Culture'

Last month, R&B singer R. Kelly was found guilty of racketeering and sex trafficking. Days later, a judge suspended Jamie Spears as the conservator of his daughter Britney Spears' estate. While these cases are completely unrelated, they do have one crucial thing in common: a massive online following, and an ecosystem of think pieces and documentaries that fuel conversation online.NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans discusses the role documentary series have played in cases like R. Kelly's and Britney Spears. He says it's part of a larger movement that some are calling "consequence culture." In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/10/2112m 59s

For Facebook, A Week Of Upheaval Unlike Any Other

One day after a worldwide outage on multiple of its platforms, Facebook was accused by a whistleblower of hiding concerns about its products from the public and its shareholders. Both crises reveal the same thing: just how powerful Facebook is on a global scale. Ayman El Tarabishy of George Washington University explains what Monday's outage meant to small businesses around the world. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/10/2113m 43s

America's Other Drug Crisis: New Efforts To Fight A Surge In Meth

Meth-related overdoses have tripled in recent years. In the west, 70 percent of police departments identify meth as their biggest problem. Now one state — California — is on the brink of implementing a major new treatment program that would pay drug users to stay clean. KQED's April Dembosky reports. The meth surge has hit some Black and Native American communities the hardest. NPR's addiction correspondent Brian Mann has this look at what kind of help people in those communities say they need. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/10/2114m 6s

Kids Born Today Could Face Up To 7 Times More Climate Disasters

Children being born now will experience extreme climate events at a rate that is two to seven times higher than people born in 1960, according to a new study in the journal Science. The researchers compared a person born in 1960 with a child who was six years old in 2020. That six-year-old will experience twice as many cyclones and wildfires, three times as many river floods, four times as many crop failures and five times as many droughts. Read more about the study here. These extreme changes not only endanger the environment, they take a toll on our mental health. KNAU reporter Melissa Sevigny spoke with residents in Flagstaff, Arizona who are reeling from a summer rife with fires and floods. And NPR's Michel Martin spoke with two climate activists of different generations — Jasmine Butler and Denis Hayes — about their outlook on the planet's future amid new climate change reports. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/10/2115m 13s

The U.S. Has Passed Its Delta Peak — With More Vaccine Rules Coming

Cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are all on the decline in the U.S. — with September marking a turning point in the delta surge. Vaccination rates continue to tick up and will be helped along by more workplace vaccine rules, including one from the Department of Labor. That rule, which has yet to be released, will be enforced by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. NPR's Andrea Hsu reports on the small agency with a big task. Vaccine rules have been implemented successfully at big companies like United Airlines and Novant Health, where the vast majority of employees have gotten their shots. But in smaller workplaces, vaccine rules present a different challenge. Katia Riddle reports from Malheur County, Oregon. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/10/2113m 15s

BONUS: Goodbye, Climate Jargon. Hello, Simplicity!

People are likely to be confused by climate change terms like "mitigation" and "carbon neutral," according to a recent study. Yet, these terms are ubiquitous in climate research and reports that are meant to be accessible to a general audience.
03/10/2110m 45s

The Best Song Japanese Breakfast Says She's Written Is For A Video Game

Michelle Zauner is best known as the frontwoman of indie rock band Japanese Breakfast and like most musicians, she's trying to tell a personal story through her music. But she's spent the last couple of years composing music that has nothing to do with her — for a video game soundtrack.
01/10/2111m 12s

Redistricting: What Happens When The Party With Power Gives Themselves More

Like lawmakers across the country, the Republican majority in Texas is getting ready to redraw the lines that define state and congressional voting districts. Those lines cement the shape of political power in the state for the next decade — and it's perfectly legal for the party in power to draw them to its own advantage. Texas Tribune reporter James Barragán and Michael Li of the Brennan Center discuss redistricting in Texas, and around the country. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/09/2113m 14s

Why A Growing Number Of Haitian Migrants Are Headed To The U.S.

Thousands of Haitian migrants who had gathered on the southern border were deported back to their home country last week, even though some of them haven't lived there for a decade. They'd been living in Chile. But increasingly, Haitians in that country are fleeing, in response to a pandemic-battered economy, rising anti-immigrant sentiment, and new government policies. All those factors are not disappearing any time soon — and neither is the flow of migrants out of the country, says Chilean journalist Ignacio Gallegos. NPR's John Otis reports on one part of their perilous journey north. Additional reporting in this episode from Stephania Corpi. Special thanks to Texas Public Radio news director Dan Katz. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/09/2113m 14s

The Global Supply Chain Is Still A Mess. When Will It Get Better?

Retail experts are already warning of delays, shortages, and price hikes this holiday shopping season as the pandemic continues to disrupt global supply chains. NPR's Scott Horsley reports on the interconnected nature of those chains — and what happens when a single part delays manufacturing by months at a time. University of Michigan economist Betsey Stevenson explains why labor-related delays and shortages are not going away any time soon. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/09/2114m 17s

Religious Exemptions To Vaccines: Who Wants Them And What's Legal

Some city and state workers around the country have already begun to resist workplace vaccination rules on religious grounds. Soon those rules will be the norm in the private sector too, with the Biden administration's announcement this month that businesses with 100 or more employees must require those employees to be vaccinated or undergo weekly testing.NPR correspondents Andrea Hsu and Shannon Bond explain what the law says about religious exemptions to vaccine rules in the workplace. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/09/2110m 59s

BONUS: A Friendly Ghost Story

It's one of the most common and perplexing friend mysteries out there - when friends ghost friends. In this episode of NPR's Invisibilia, they examine a contemporary real-life ghost story to see why we're so haunted. Also, a listener attempts to find the friend who got away. And finally, we offer a new way to think about friendship endings.
26/09/2148m 19s

Lil Nas X Is Not Trying To Comfort Anyone

Every generation has its musical "boogeyman." The Rolling Stones, N.W.A., Madonna. And the latest musician to be inducted into this notorious list is Lil Nas X. Not only has he broken Billboard records, he's breaking barriers.
24/09/2111m 39s

Border Crisis: Thousands Of Haitians Flown to Haiti Against Their Will

Thousands of Haitan migrants who were camping out under a bridge in a Texas border town seeking to cross the Rio Grande and find refuge in the US are now being forced back to their home country.
23/09/2114m 10s

Lessons Learned From Flint

The infrastructure bill moving through Congress includes billions to replace lead pipes. In Flint, Mich., NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with residents on how governments can tackle a water crisis equitably.
22/09/2110m 53s

Boosters Won't Make It To Everyone For Now, But Vaccines For Young Children Are Coming

The FDA Advisory Committee decided not to approve boosters for people sixteen and up. Instead, they made a recommendation for those 65 and up, or younger people at high risk to get a booster shot right now from Pfizer-Biontech.
21/09/2111m 52s

Germany Is Holding Syrian Officials Accountable For Alleged War Crimes

10 years ago, when the Syrian regime sent tanks and warplanes to stop a an uprising, it sparked a bloody civil war that is still ongoing.
20/09/2111m 55s

BONUS: The Lost Summer

Twenty years ago, during the dog days of summer, a fledgling journalist named Shereen Marisol Meraji — maybe you've heard of her? — headed to Durban, South Africa. Her mission: to report on the meeting of thousands of organizers and ambassadors at the United Nations Conference Against Racism.
19/09/2147m 24s

To The Stage: After A Year Away, Broadway Is Back

After a year away, Broadway's lights are back on. Some of the biggest productions have returned for vaccinated and masked audiences. From "Wicked" to "Chicago" to "Hamilton," theaters in New York are open at 100 percent capacity.
17/09/2111m 48s

Heatwaves Are The Deadliest Weather Events, But They're Rarely Treated That Way

Heatwaves don't have names or categories like hurricanes and wildfires, but they kill more people each year than any other weather event, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
16/09/2112m 56s

One Month After The Fall Of Kabul Thousands Still Wait For Escape

It has been exactly one month since Kabul fell and the Taliban took control of Afghanistan. With U.S. troops gone from the region and the collapse of the Afghan Armed forces, thousands have been fleeing the country for safety.
15/09/2114m 33s

India's 'Love Jihad' Laws Make Marriage Difficult For Interfaith Couples

In India, where arranged marriages are the norm, people typically marry within their religion or caste. But occasionally, some find love on their own and end up with a partner of a different faith.
14/09/219m 38s

Will A Federal Mandate Make The Difference For Unvaccinated Americans?

Last week President Biden announced a six-pronged strategy to combat the newly surging pandemic — including a federal rule that all businesses with 100 or more employees must ensure their workers are vaccinated for COVID-19, or submit to weekly testing for the virus.
13/09/219m 29s

StoryCorps Presents: The Lasting Toll Of 9/11

This weekend the nation marks 20 years since 9/11 — a day we are reminded to never forget. But for so many people, 9/11 also changed every day after. In this episode, a special collaboration between NPR and StoryCorps, we hear stories about the lasting toll of 9/11, recorded by StoryCorps in partnership with the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. You can learn more about that initiative and find out how you can record your reflections on the life of a loved one at storycorps.org/september11. Also in this episode: the story of how an Afghan translator's life was shaped by 20 years of conflict in his home country, culminating in a desperate attempt to help his family escape. Said Noor's story first aired on Morning Edition and was originally produced by Steve Inskeep, Arezou Rezvani, and Danny Hajek. More here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/09/2114m 56s

In A New Afghanistan, Some Women Fear For Their Rights — But Others Are Hopeful

This week, women protested in Kabul after the Taliban announced an all-male interim government. One woman who helped organized the protests told NPR "the world should feel" what Afghan women are facing. That woman — and another who was desperately trying to leave the country — spoke to Rachel Martin on Morning Edition. More from their interviews here. While some women fear the rights they've gained in the last 20 years will disappear, other women — particularly in rural areas — are hopeful for a future with less violence and military conflict. Anand Gopal wrote about them for The New Yorker in a piece called "The Other Afghan Women." He spoke to Mary Louise Kelly. Special thanks to NPR's Michele Keleman for production help on this episode. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/09/2112m 51s

Delta Surge Slows Recovery As Parts Of Pandemic Safety Net Disappear

Last week's jobs report for the month of August show signs the delta surge is slowing the economic recovery, just as some pandemic safety net programs disappear. The Supreme Court recently struck down a federal eviction moratorium, and supplemental pandemic unemployment benefits expired on Monday. NPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley explains what that could mean for the pace of the recovery. With a federal eviction ban no longer in effect, renters could tap into billions of dollars in federal rental assistance authorized by Congress. But there's a problem: states have been slow to get that money into programs that can distribute it to tenants and landlords. NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports on one effort to speed things up in Tennessee. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Chris Arnold, who's been covering evictions during the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/09/2114m 50s

As A Destructive Fire Season Rages On, What Might Prevent The Next One?

The good news is that firefighters in California have regained control of the Caldor Fire near Lake Tahoe and tens of thousands of evacuated residents can now return to their homes. The bad news is the Caldor Fire is the second wildfire this season to burn through the Sierra Nevada Mountains from one side to the other. Something that never happened before this year. The other fire to do it is the Dixie Fire further north, which is on pace to be the largest California wildfire on record. And while thousands have been impacted with evacuations, millions of people in western states have been living with the smoke for weeks. The general guidance when living with hazy and polluted air is to stay indoors. But NPR's Nathan Rott reports on new research that shows the air behind closed doors may not be much better. And NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on a region of the country that is leading the way with fire prevention that may surprise you.
07/09/2112m 29s

What Kids Feel Entering A Third COVID School Year (And How To Help Them Through It)

Most kids are now in their third year of school during the pandemic. It's been a time of ups and downs; adjustments and re-adjustments. Some have flourished in online school and want to stay home — others have floundered and are excited to go back. NPR spoke to a group of kids ages 6 and up about what the pandemic has been like, and how they're feeling about the new school year. Two experts in childhood education and development explain how the pandemic has challenged kids and what we can do to help them: Robin Lake, director of the Center on Reinventing Education; and Katie McLaughlin, a psychologist at Harvard University.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/09/2114m 55s

Did The Supreme Court Just Overturn Roe v. Wade?

The Supreme Court's conservative majority allowed a Texas law banning most abortions to go into effect. Almost immediately, abortion providers had to begin turning people away. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on the court's interpretation of the Texas law and its controversial enforcement provision, which allows any private citizen to sue someone who helps a person get an abortion — with the plaintiff due $10,000 in damages and court costs. Kathryn Kolbert, co-founder of the Center for Reproductive Rights, explains how abortion rights activists are responding. Additional reporting in this episode came from stories by NPR's Wade Goodwyn and Ashley Lopez of member station KUT. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/09/2112m 35s

The Delta Surge Keeps Getting Worse. What Happens When Hospitals Fill Up

Some states in the south are have more people in the hospital than at any point during the pandemic — fueled by the highly transmissible delta variant and low vaccination rates. Dr. David Kimberlin, co-division director of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, tells NPR the hospital system is Alabama is on the verge of collapse. He spoke to reporter Pien Huang. So what happens — for patients and the people who treat them — when hospitals are full? NPR put that question to two people in charge of hospitals: Dr. Aharon Sareli, Chief of Critical Medicine with the Memorial Healthcare System near Miami; and Dr. Adriano Goffi, a medical director at Altus Lumberton Hospital east of Houston.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/09/2113m 19s

Scenes From The Aftermath Of The U.S. Withdrawal From Afghanistan

The U.S. military's mission in Afghanistan is over. For many still living in the country, a new struggle has begun: how to move forward after they were not able to make it before the U.S. withdrawal. Mark Schmitz is also grappling with how to move forward. His 20-year-old son, Jared, was one of 13 U.S. service members killed in an attack on the Kabul airport. Schmitz spoke to NPR's Rachel Martin — his interview was produced and edited by the staff of NPR's Morning Edition, where it originally aired. More from the interview here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/09/2113m 33s

How Climate Change Is Making Storms Like Ida Even Worse

Hurricane Ida's winds intensified rapidly as the storm approached coastal Louisiana over the weekend — making landfall at its most powerful. NPR's Rebecca Hersher explains how Ida was supercharged by climate change.Now the hurricane's remnants are moving north and east, where millions are bracing for flooding and tornado threats. Janey Camp with Vanderbilt University tells NPR why climate change means flooding will become more common in areas where people haven't been accustomed to it in the past. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/08/2111m 43s

How A Bankruptcy Deal Could Offer Clean Slate For Opioid Billionaires

A federal bankruptcy judge says he'll rule Wednesday in the case of Purdue Pharma, makers of OxyContin. The company is owned by the Sackler family, who are at the center of a national reckoning over the deadly opioid epidemic.NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann has been covering the story of Purdue Pharma for years, and explains how the Sacklers may emerge from Purdue's bankruptcy proceedings with their personal fortunes in tact. Find more of Brian's reporting here or follow him on Twitter @BrianMannADK.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/08/2112m 14s

BONUS: Venezuela's Rise and Fall

Venezuela is facing an economic and humanitarian crisis as extreme poverty and violence have forced many to flee the country in recent years. How did a country once wealthy with oil resources fall into such turmoil?
29/08/2155m 7s

Taliban Vs ISIS-K: An Emerging And Deadly Conflict In Afghanistan

For Afghans like Fawad Nazami, life under the Taliban would be a fate 'worse than death.' Nazami is a political counselor at the Afghan embassy in Washington D.C. He told NPR this week he would never return to an Afghanistan under Taliban rule. Now, that same Afghanistan confronts a deadly new reality: the emergence of ISIS-K, which claimed responsibility for this week's attack that killed 13 Americans and dozens of Afghan civilians. Seth Jones with the Center for Strategic and International Studies explains how the group fits into the complex picture of Afghanistan, where the Taliban is still trying to gain international recognition. Mina Al-Lami, a BBC expert on extremist messaging, has been following their efforts. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/08/2114m 13s

12 U.S. Service Members Killed In Kabul: What We Know About The Attack

12 U.S. service members were killed in an attack at the Kabul airport on Thursday. They were among some 5,000 U.S. troops evacuating American citizens, Afghans allies, and others from Kabul. At least 60 Afghans were also killed.New York Times journalist Matthieu Aikens describes the scene at the airport moments after the attack. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports on reaction from the Pentagon. For more coverage of unfolding events in Afghanistan, listen to NPR's morning news podcast, Up First, via Apple, Spotify, Google, or Pocket Casts. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/08/2110m 57s

Pfizer's Fully-Approved Shot Opens The Door To More Mandates

New York City, New Jersey, Goldman Sachs, and the Pentagon all imposed new vaccine requirements in the days following the FDA's full approval of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine. Public health officials — and the President — hope more mandates will follow. But some businesses are trying a different approach to encourage vaccination. NPR's Andrea Hsu visited one offering $1,000 bonuses to vaccinated employees. Meanwhile, Delta airlines announced unvaccinated employees would face a monthly surcharge. And some are arguing that airline passengers should be subject to vaccine requirements, too. Juliette Kayyem spoke about that with NPR's Noel King — originally aired on Morning Edition. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/08/2113m 45s

Time Is Running Short For The U.S. Evacuation Effort In Afghanistan

The Biden administration said Tuesday that the U.S. was on pace to meet an August 31 deadline to fully withdraw from Afghanistan, but that "contingency plans" are being developed in case they do not complete evacuations in time. Some Afghan evacuees will wind up in America, where one of their main destinations is the Seattle area. NPR's Martin Kaste reports on the resettlement effort ramping up there. President Biden made the decision not to extend evacuations despite calls to do so from some members of his own party. NPR's Asma Khalid examines what Biden's decisions on Afghanistan reveal about his view of America's role in the world. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/08/2113m 17s

Why Are Millions Of U.S. Workers Still On The Sidelines?

School districts can't find bus drivers. The TSA is short on security screeners. Ports can't find enough workers to load and unload shipping containers. Across many different sectors, the unavailability of workers is holding the economy back, and sending prices even higher. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. Fuel truckers are another critical job that employers can't fill fast enough, explains NPR's Camila Domonoske. Also in this episode: reporting from NPR's Andrea Hsu on why millions of older workers have decided to retire early during the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/08/2112m 45s

On Our Watch: The Brady Rule

Antioch police officials suspected one of their veteran detectives of leaking operational details as far back as 2010. But they didn't fire Santiago Castillo for another seven years. During that time, he investigated hundreds of cases including several homicides, and his testimony helped put dozens of people behind bars.
22/08/2139m 20s

Teachers Are Stressed, Burnt Out — Yet Hopeful As School Begins

Across the country, it looks like this time, last year. Schools — some days or weeks into the start of the new year — are forced to close temporarily over COVID outbreaks. In many cases, the closures are necessary because too many teachers and staff members are sick or quarantined. Audie Cornish talks to three teachers about their fear, exhaustion, and hope at the start of a new school year. For more coverage from NPR as kids head back to school around the country, follow NPR Ed's Back to School liveblog.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/08/2113m 2s

The Desperate Effort To Get Afghan Allies To Safety

As many as 100,000 Afghans — those who worked with the U.S. military over the years, and their families — are trying to get out of the country. But access to the Kabul airport is controlled by the Taliban, and the American military says evacuating American citizens is its 'first priority.' Among the Afghans trying to flee are those who've applied for or been granted a Special Immigrant VISA. James Miervaldis, chairman of No One Left Behind — which helps Afghan and Iraqi interpreters resettle in the U.S. — tells NPR the process has been frustratingly slow. For Afghans and the families who do make it out, those who wind up in the United States will be offered help from organizations like the Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service. Krish O'Mara Vignarajah, the group's president and CEO, tells NPR how the resettlement process unfolds. This episode also features stories from family members of Afghan refugees already living in the U.S., which which first aired on NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday, with production from Hiba Ahmad and Ed McNulty. Correspondent Eleanor Beardsley in Paris reported on Afghan refugees in France. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/08/2113m 41s

How Haiti Is Weathering Two Natural Disasters At Once

Just weeks after the shock of a presidential assassination, Haiti was hit by a devastating 7.2 magnitude earthquake on Saturday. The death toll is nearing 2,000 — and still rising — while thousands more are injured and homeless. Haiti's last major earthquake was in 2010. It killed an estimated 200,000 people and injured 300,000 more. This week's quake struck farther from major population centers, but that's made search and rescue efforts challenging. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Haiti where Tropical Storm Grace has made matters even worse. And Haiti's ambassador to the U.S. Bocchit Edmond tells NPR's Ailsa Chang what the country needs now. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/08/2113m 8s

Booster Shots Coming Soon As Delta Overwhelms Some Hospitals

Hospitals like the University of Mississippi Medical Center are overwhelmed. Dr. LouAnn Woodward, vice chancellor of the Jackson hospital, told NPR they are nearly out of beds — and treating patients in hallways. Meanwhile, Biden administration health officials are coalescing around a plan that would advise most Americans to get a COVID-19 booster shot eight months after their last dose. A booster is already recommended for immunocompromised people. Here are six things to know if you're immunocompromised and are considering a third shot.If a booster is recommended for most Americans, that means millions of people may soon receive a third shot, while many others have yet to receive a single one. But there are still additional public health measures that could work to help stem the delta surge. NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin reports.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/08/2110m 52s

Chaos And Collapse In Afghanistan: How Did The U.S. Not See It Coming?

The Taliban now control Afghanistan. How did the country's government fall so quickly — and why didn't the U.S. see it coming? NPR put those questions to the former commander of U.S. and allied forces in Afghanistan, General David Petraeus. Afghanistan's future remains unclear, especially for its women and girls. One of them is Freshta Karim, a Kabul resident and founder of a mobile library project called Charmaghz, who spoke to Audie Cornish. Karim is one of many Afghans who NPR reached in Kabul during the final hours before its collapse into Taliban control. Those interviews aired on Morning Edition, and on special coverage produced by the staffs of Weekend Edition and All Things Considered. For more Afghanistan coverage listen to Up First via Apple, Spotify, or Google; or the NPR Politics Podcast via Apple, Spotify, or Google. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/08/2115m 14s

On Our Watch: Neglect of Duty

In the agricultural town of Salinas, Calif., Police Officer William Yetter repeatedly makes mistakes. First there's a stolen bike he doesn't investigate. Then, his bosses discover he's not filing police reports on time.
15/08/2150m 54s

Taliban Gains, U.S. Evacuates: What's The Endgame In Afghanistan?

In the last week, the Taliban have gained control of large sections of Afghanistan faster than most people expected. The Pentagon is dispatching troops to assist in evacuating staff from the American embassy in Kabul, where refugee camps are growing more crowded. The U.N. says the country may be on the brink of a humanitarian catastrophe. State Department spokesperson Ned Price told Audie Cornish the 300,000-member Afghan military needs "the willpower" to stand up to the Taliban. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/08/2115m 30s

After Dire U.N. Warning On Climate, Will Anything Change?

What struck John Kerry the most about this week's landmark U.N. report on climate change? "The irreversibility" of some of the most catastrophic effects of global warming, he tells Audie Cornish. Kerry, the U.S. Special Envoy for Climate, tells NPR the U.N. report underscored the need for the world to respond more forcefully to climate change — and he's called an upcoming U.N. climate summit in Scotland the "last best hope" for global action. At the same time, the Biden administration faces an uphill battle to take major action on climate at home. Hear more on that from the NPR Politics Podcast via Apple, Spotify, or Google. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/08/2114m 41s

Uncharted Territory: Back To School Meets The Delta Surge

In the next few weeks, millions of children will head back to school. Many of them are too young to be vaccinated. At the same time, children are being hospitalized with COVID-19 in small but growing numbers — and approaching rates higher than the winter surge. Dr. Marcos Mestre with Niklaus Children's Foundation Hospital in Miami told NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday many of the children his hospital is treating come from families with unvaccinated parents or caretakers. Unlike last year, many schools will have no remote learning option this fall. While some may have mask mandates, a handful of Republican governors — including Florida's Ron DeSantis — have issued executive orders banning those mandates. NPR's Pien Huang surveyed experts about how to keep children safe during the delta surge. Read more coverage from the NPR science desk here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/08/2115m 5s

Ethiopia's Civil War Is Becoming A Humanitarian Crisis

The Tigray region in northern Ethiopia is at the center of a civil war that broke out last November, after rebels there attacked a military base. Since then, the political fight has become an ethnic one, with troops no longer distinguishing civilians from rebel fighters. NPR's Eyder Peralta visited the war-torn region in May and spoke with the people at the center of the conflict. The United Nations says more than 400,000 people are now living in famine conditions in Ethiopia, putting them at risk of starvation if the country's civil war doesn't let up. The United States is the country's largest foreign aid donor. And the person who controls that funding currently is Samantha Power, administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). She spoke with Ari Shapiro about she learned from her recent trip the area. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/08/2113m 28s

'A Code Red For Humanity:' Climate Change Is Getting Worse — Faster Than We Thought

A landmark new report from the United Nations warns that the world is running out of time to avoid the catastrophic effects of global warming. Those effects are already becoming clear as extreme weather, drought, and fire become more common. One of the latest examples: wildfires are raging amid a record heat wave in Turkey, Lebanon, Italy and Greece. Durrie Bouscaren reports for NPR from Istanbul. And, as NPR's Jeff Brady reports, climate change is also changing lives in subtler ways. Other reporting heard in this episode came from NPR's Rebecca Hersher, who's been covering the new U.N. report on climate change. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/08/2113m 34s

On Our Watch: Perceived Threat

Episode four of On Our Watch from NPR and KQED investigates the case of a plainclothes Stockton police officer who grabbed a Black 16-year-old, took him to the ground and punched him, knocking the teen's two front teeth onto a convenience store floor.
08/08/2147m 55s

Biden Admin Sees Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill As A Win

After months of bipartisan negotiation, the Senate may finally vote this weekend on a 2,700 page infrastructure bill that includes $1 trillion in spending on things like roads, bridges, public transit, and broadband.
06/08/2112m 39s

A Resistant Gov. Cuomo Could Face Impeachment

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is refusing to resign after this week's explosive report from the state's attorney general. It detailed multiple allegations of sexual harassment and assault against Cuomo. Cuomo has categorically denied harassment and groping allegations. And he said that people have "sought to unfairly characterize and weaponize everyday interactions." Multiple high profile politicians have called for Cuomo to step down, including President Biden. Meanwhile, NPR's Brian Mann discusses how Democratic leaders in New York state legislature plan to move forward with impeachment proceedings. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/08/2112m 53s

Beirut's Deadly Port Explosion, One Year Later

It's been exactly one year since a massive explosion in Beirut's port killed over 200 people, injured thousands and caused billions of dollars in damage.
04/08/2111m 38s

Eviction Protection Extended, But Millions Of Renters Still Face Uncertainty

At the stroke of midnight last Saturday, a federal moratorium that had been in place for nearly eleven months expired. After the Supreme Court ruled that the CDC could not extend that moratorium, the Biden administration asked Congress to take action. But Congress failed to maintain protections for renters before the House went into August recess. Now, many renters fear eviction could coming knocking at their doors.Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., told NPR that she is urging local governments to institute any protections possible to prevent a wave of mass evictions across the country. The Virginia Poverty Law Center's Christine Marra explains where the national situation leaves renters in her state and across the country. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/08/2111m 30s

New Phase Of Pandemic Met With Confusion And Exhaustion

The United States has reached yet another turning point in this pandemic—one that may feel particularly unrelenting and confusing.
02/08/2114m 25s

On Our Watch: 20-20 Hindsight

In episode three of On Our Watch, we examine the records that were unsealed by this transparency law to piece together what exactly happened on September 14, 2014 when Pedie Perez was shot and killed outside a liquor store by a police officer, Wallace Jensen.
01/08/2152m 47s

Vaccine Mandates Are Spreading Alongside Dangerous Delta Variant

The Delta variant is more dangerous and contagious than many experts initially realized. In response to the uptick in cases and hospitalizations countrywide, some government leaders are implementing mask mandates. President Biden announced on Thursday that federal government employees will be asked to attest to their vaccination status. White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator Jeff Zients explains what the new requirement will look like. And NPR Correspondent Brian Naylor reports on how federal employees are feeling about this change.
30/07/2111m 47s

Black Olympians Often Have 'The Weight Of The World' On Their Shoulders

When Simone Biles dropped out of her Olympic competitions this week, the whole world took notice. At 24 years old Biles is the most decorated gymnast ever, she's won 36 medals—27 of those are gold. And she said via Instagram that it can feel like she "has the weight of the world," on her shoulders at times. When an athlete performs on a stage as hallowed and renowned as the Olympics, it's not surprising to see that this can have a negative psychological effect. University of Denver professor Mark Aoyagi explains that in many ways, elite competitions are inherently unhealthy. The stress can be even more acute for Black athletes like Biles. Sociologist Harry Edwards wrote about this over 50 years ago and says these young Olympians are forced to deal with both the aspiration and fear of "Black excellence." In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/07/2113m 45s

Justice Department Struggles To Bring Jan. 6th Cases To Trial

Four police officers offered harrowing testimony of their experiences protecting the U.S. Capitol on January 6th during the first hearing for a new Democrat-led House Select Committee investigating the attacks. The committee was proposed as a bi-partisan effort by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi but after she rejected two nominees from Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, the hearings have begun without support from Republican leaders. Since January 6th the Justice Department has arrested hundreds of people who were at the Capitol. NPR Investigations Correspondent Dina Temple-Raston reports that while those cases initially seemed like they'd be a slam dunk, the process of bringing them to trial has proved more difficult than anyone could have imagined.
28/07/2115m 5s

Who Pays When Sea Levels Rise?

Rising seas are threatening coastal communities around the world, which will need billions of dollars to protect themselves. It's clear the water is coming. What's not clear is who pays. This tension is playing out on the shoreline of San Francisco Bay, where the wealthiest companies in the world have built their headquarters next to low-income communities of color. Both need protection, but as cities there plan massive levee projects, they're struggling to figure out what's fair. Will the cost fall on taxpayers or private landowners who benefit the most?NPR climate correspondent Lauren Sommer reports from San Francisco.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/07/2112m 41s

Food Service Workers Are Quitting At Record Rates. Why? Because They Can

Food service workers in America have newfound bargaining power, and they're using it — quitting jobs for better ones at record rates. NPR's Alina Selyukh reports on why some are leaving the restaurant industry for good. Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Andrea Hsu, who examined the pros and cons of one-time hiring bonuses for workers. Follow more coverage from NPR's special series, Where Are The Workers? In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/07/2111m 53s

On Our Watch: Conduct Unbecoming

One officer in Los Angeles used car inspections to hit on women. Three hundred miles away in the San Francisco Bay Area, another woman says an officer used police resources to harass and stalk her.
25/07/2146m 55s

Rodrigo Amarante Throws a Musical Tantrum in Latest Album, 'Drama'

Starting over can be scary. But not for Rodrigo Amarante. After an established musical career in Brazil, he made the jump to the U.S., where his relative anonymity was a source of creative energy — and an opportunity to reinvent himself. Amarante's second solo album, Drama, is about rejecting traditional forms of masculinity and embracing imperfections — then releasing them as a beautiful symphony of chaos and, well, drama. Hear Rodrigo Amarante's live performance of the song "Tara" from his new album.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/07/2114m 59s

Haiti's Unraveling: How A Mysterious Assassination Fanned Violent Unrest

It's still unclear who is responsible for planning and funding the assassination of Haiti's president Jovenel Moïse earlier this month. But violence and unrest in the country has been ramping up for months. The United Nations says that over the last six weeks nearly 15,000 people have been forced from their homes in Port-au-Prince. NPR's Jason Beaubien reported the story of one family who fled in early June. Moïse's death left a power vacuum that's been filled by Interim Prime Minister Ariel Henry, a 71-year-old neurosurgeon. NPR International Correspondent Carrie Kahn has been tracking his attempt to rebuild the Haitian government. And Jean Eddy Saint Paul, a professor at Brooklyn College, explains why the turmoil in Haiti has been decades in the making. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/07/2112m 7s

Will Delta Surge Sway Unvaccinated? Plus: The Truth About 'Breakthrough' Infections

The delta variant now makes up an estimated 83% of coronavirus cases in the U.S., a sharp increase over recent weeks. Cases are rising more rapidly in places with low rates of vaccination. Arkansas is one of those places. The state's Republican governor, Asa Hutchinson, tells NPR what he's doing to try to convince more people to get a shot. Amid those localized surges and reports of breakthrough infections, NPR's Allison Aubrey explains how to think about your own risk. Find more NPR coverage of breakthrough infections here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/07/2114m 26s

The New Child Tax Credit Is Here. Will Millions Get Cash Permanently?

Tens of millions of American families are beginning to receive direct cash payments as part of the expanded child tax credit, which was part of the COVID relief bill passed back in March. Those payments top out at $3,600 a year per child — an amount experts say could lift tens of millions of children out of poverty. But the expanded credit is only scheduled to last one year. The question now is: will Democrats succeed in making it permanent? Here's a breakdown of what you need to know from NPR's Andrea Hsu.This episode contains excerpts from NPR's daily economics podcast The Indicator. Listen and subscribe via Apple, Spotify, Google, or Pocket Casts. Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Cory Turner and Mara Liasson.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/07/2111m 21s

How The Pandemic Shaped Medical Education And, Ultimately, Your Healthcare

Medical education must always keep up with the times. But the pandemic forcing medical students to learn virtually revealed new fault lines and opportunities to rethink the way medical professionals should learn. The medical field is grappling with which of those changes should become permanent and which ones could jeopardize the quality of healthcare. To get a better understanding of how technology has enabled new ways of approaching medical education, NPR's Jonaki Mehta visits Kaiser Permanente's Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine, a school that was uniquely positioned to adapt to the conditions imposed by the pandemic since it opened during quarantine. Elisabeth Rosenthal, editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News and a non-practicing physician, shares her concerns about the medical field leaning more heavily on telemedicine as a result of the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/07/2115m 4s

On Our Watch: In Good Faith

From police officer misconduct to deadly shootings, internal affairs investigations are how law enforcement agencies investigate their own and promise to hold themselves accountable. In California, those investigations were secret — that is, until a new police transparency law unsealed thousands of files.
18/07/2147m 42s

Cross-Cultural Casting: Noteworthy For Hollywood, But Not Exactly New

Jodie Turner-Smith in Anne Boleyn. Mindy Kaling in Scooby Doo. Dev Patel in The Green Knight, and last year's David Copperfield.It seems like Hollywood gatekeepers are opening up more traditionally white parts to other performers. But as NPR film critic Bob Mondello explains, cross-cultural casting isn't new — and it's always raised eyebrows. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/07/2110m 57s

How Cuba's Government Is Attempting To Silence Unprecedented Protests

The protests that erupted in Cuba over the weekend are the biggest the country has seen in decades. Cubans are suffering through a summer of shortages, from food and electricity to medicine. All of which have been made worse by the pandemic. Officials in the authoritarian government are tying to stamp out the unrest quickly. These demonstrations present a political opportunity for President Biden. NPR's Franco Ordonez reports on how the White House's response could change future Florida votes. NPR international correspondent Carrie Kahn looks into internet blackouts enacted by the Cuban government in an attempt to stop organizing happening on social media platforms. And Miami-Herald editorial writer Luisa Yanez explains why a younger generation of Cubans may not buckle under pressure.
15/07/2114m 35s

Democrats Assail 'Jim Crow' Assault On Voting Rights. So What's Their Plan?

In a speech this week, President Biden said Democrats must 'vigorously challenge' what he described as the '21st Century Jim Crow assault' on voting rights, attacking Republican-led state efforts to pass new voting restrictions. Democrats, Vice President Kamala Harris told NPR, must respond on multiple levels: "It will be litigation, legislation, it will be activating the people." Harris spoke to NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid. Hear more on the NPR Politics Podcast via Apple, Google, or Spotify.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/07/2115m 25s

The U.S. Almost Out Of Afghanistan. What Happens There Next?

The U.S. military will be fully out of the country by August 31. The Taliban already control more than half of it. A U.S. intelligence assessment reportedly says the Afghan government could collapse in as little as six months. Some members of the Afghan military feel "abandoned and alone," Commanding General of the Afghan Army Sami Sadat tells NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Diaa Hadid. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/07/2113m 41s

Latest On Boosters; 'Trusted Messengers' Lead Vaccine Outreach

The Biden administration is emphasizing vaccine outreach by 'trusted messengers' — community volunteers, faith leaders, and primary care providers — who are best-positioned to convince people to get vaccinated. NPR's Maria Godoy reports on that kind of outreach in Maryland, one of just a handful of states where at least half of the Latino population is vaccinated. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/07/2112m 28s

Co-Opted And Weaponized, 'Cancel Culture' Is Just Today's 'Politically Correct'

'Cancelling' is a term that originated in young and progressive circles, where it was used to mean 'boycott,' University of Pennsylvania linguist Nicole Holliday tells NPR. Now the term 'cancel' has been co-opted and weaponized by some conservative media and politicians. Something similar happened in the 1990s with the term 'politically correct.' John K. Wilson wrote about that time in a book called The Myth Of Political Correctness. And — just like 'politically correct' — 'cancelling' and 'cancel culture' have been co-opted and weaponized to attack the left today. Social media has made that easier, says Jon Ronson, author of So You've Been Publicly Shamed. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/07/2112m 32s

Why Wildfire Is Not Just A Western Problem

All over the east coast and Midwest, forests are getting hotter and drier. Many are also overgrown and overdue for wildfire. And increasingly, Americans are moving to areas where these forests and their homes tangle close together. The fastest such growth is in the Southeast, where few consider wildfire much of a threat. Molly Samuel with member station WABE reports from Tate City, Georgia.Additional reporting in this episode from Annie Ropeik of New Hampshire Public Radio and from NPR's Nathan Rott, who reported on fire risk in Wisconsin, home to the deadliest fire in American history.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/07/2113m 18s

NPR Traces California Yoga Teacher's Alleged Path To The Capitol Riot

NPR's Tom Dreisbach reports on the story of Alan Hostetter, a former police chief and yoga instructor from California who's now facing conspiracy charges for his alleged role in the U.S. Capitol riot. Hostetter is one of more than 500 people facing charges related to January 6th. Hear more about how prosecutors are proceeding from NPR's Ryan Lucas and the NPR Politics Podcast. Listen via Apple, Google, Spotify, or Pocket Casts.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/07/2114m 20s

How Critical Race Theory Went From Harvard Law To Fox News

Critical race theory is a legal framework developed decades ago at Harvard Law School. It posits that racism is not just the product of individual bias, but is embedded in legal systems and policies. Today, it's become the subject of heated debate on Fox News and in local school board meetings across the country. Adam Harris, staff writer at The Atlantic, explains why. Harris has traced the debate over critical race theory back decades. Gloria Ladson-Billings spoke to NPR about watching that debate morph in recent years. She's president of the National Academy of Education and one of the first academics to bring critical race theory to education research.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/07/2114m 33s

Questlove Unearths The Long-Forgotten 'Summer Of Soul'

In 1969, during the same summer as Woodstock, another music festival took place 100 miles away. The Harlem Cultural Festival featured black musicians like Gladys Knight and Stevie Wonder — stars who we might not have glimpsed at this point in their careers. Footage of the festival had been locked in a basement for 50 years, because TV and film companies were not interested in it at the time. Questlove and his fellow filmmakers speak to Audie Cornish about bringing the concert festival to the big screen in their movie, Summer Of Soul, which is also out on Hulu. NPR's Eric Deggans also reviewed the film. Some descriptions of the film from his review are heard in this episode. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/07/2110m 42s

BONUS: American Anthem

The Star-Spangled Banner is the official anthem for the United States, but there are plenty of songs that have become informal American anthems for millions of people. On this episode of NPR's Throughline, we share three stories from NPR Music's American Anthem series, which explored the origins of songs that have become ingrained in American culture. Throughline is NPR's history podcast. Listen via Apple, Spotify, Google, or Pocket Casts.
04/07/2126m 59s

How The Delta Variant Is Changing The Pandemic On A Global Scale

Cases are surging in countries around the world as the more transmissible delta variant spreads rapidly. Also growing: pressure on vaccine-rich countries to help people in countries where vaccines are still scarce. NPR's Will Stone reports on the waiting game. And Harvard's Junaid Habi argues vaccine hesitancy in America is a peculiar privilege. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/07/2112m 54s

What Donald Rumsfeld Left Behind

The former Secretary of Defense was a chief architect of the conflict that came to be known as America's 'forever war.' After his death this week at age 88, that conflict has now officially outlived him. NPR's Steve Inskeep reports on one group of people still living with the consequences: thousands of Afghans who worked with the U.S. military over the past 20 years. More from that story, which aired on Morning Edition, is here. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Greg Myre.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/07/2112m 21s

A 'Pandemic Of Unvaccinated People' As Delta Variant Spreads Rapidly

Los Angeles County — America's most populous county — recently recommended mask wearing even for vaccinated people, just two weeks after the state relaxed most COVID restrictions. County officials say masks will help protect unvaccinated people from the more transmissible delta variant, which is spreading rapidly across the country. CDC director Rochelle Walensky tells NPR the federal government may "encourage" states to return to more mitigation measures in places where vaccination is low and the delta variant is driving cases up. That describes the situation in Missouri. Rebecca Smith with member station KBIA reports from Columbia. Shalina Chatlani of the Gulf States Newsroom looks at the challenge of getting more people vaccinated in southern states.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/06/2113m 58s

What The Pentagon's UFO Report Reveals About Aliens — And Ourselves

Late last year the Senate passed a bill that required U.S. intelligence agencies to share what they know about "unidentified aerial phenomena," the technical term for UFOs. That report was released last week. Spoiler alert — it doesn't confirm the existence of alien spacecraft. But it doesn't rule them out either.Retired U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Alex Dietrich recounts her first-hand encounter with a UFO off the coast of Southern California. It's one of 144 sightings mentioned in the new unclassified report. Historian and University of Pennsylvania professor Kate Dorsch explains some of the possible reasons why Americans report more UFO sightings than any other county in the world.
29/06/2113m 44s

What We've Learned In The First 100 Hours Since The Surfside Condo Collapse

Susana Alvarez, a survivor of the condo collapse in Surfside, Florida, explained to NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro on Weekend Edition Sunday that residents were told in a late 2018 meeting that the building was safe — despite evidence it wasn't. NPR confirmed Alvarez's account. An engineering report issued five weeks before that meeting warned of "major structural damage" to the building that would require "extremely expensive" repairs. Jenny Staletovich with member station WLRN reports on efforts by rescuers, which include Miami's own world-renowned search and rescue team. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/06/2113m 25s

BONUS: Battle Rattle

Alicia Argelia met Army veteran Matt Lammers when he rolled into the store where she worked. Matt had lost both legs and one arm during a deployment to Iraq. Strangers often approached him to awkwardly thank him for his service or ask him what happened; his physical injuries made him a living reminder of the cost of war. But Alicia was different. She offered friendship without pity, and he was charmed by her from the start.
27/06/2139m 44s

What Hollywood Could Learn From The 20-Year Success Of 'Fast & Furious'

What's behind the 20-year success of the Fast & Furious franchise? Casting, storytelling and reinvention. NPR's Linda Holmes — who wrote an owner's manual to the franchise — explains. Linda is one of the hosts of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour. Find their episode about F9 on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or Pocket Casts. F9 premiered overseas last month while waiting for pandemic-shuttered cinemas to open in the U.S., where it's supposed to restart the Hollywood blockbuster. NPR's Bob Mondello has more in his review of the film. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/06/2113m 0s

Not Just Wildfire: The Growing Ripple Effects Of More Extreme Heat And Drought

For the second weekend in a row, parts of the American West will be gripped by historic heat, coming in the second decade of megadrought that has gripped the region for 22 years.Wildfire is an obvious threat — but there are other consequences of extreme heat and drought, as smaller snowmelts and lower reservoirs lead to water cutbacks and more expensive electricity. And climate change is making it all worse. Colorado Public Radio's Michael Elizabeth Sakas reports on another consequence: what happens when there isn't enough water to build new homes. Kristina Dahl, senior climate scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists, explains how extreme heat can affect the human body, Additional reporting in this episode: • Jordan Kern spoke to NPR's Scott Detrow about hydropower in the West. • Michael Elizabeth Sakas reported on western snowmelt. • NPR's Kirk Siegler reported on record high temperatures. • NPR's Lauren Sommer reported on dwindling water supplies. • NPR's Nathan Rott, Luke Runyon of KUNC in Colorado and Annie Ropeik of New Hampshire Public Radio discussed the growing consequences of heat and drought.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/06/2112m 42s

Millions Of Americans Could Be Facing Eviction

Back in March, Congress approved nearly $50 billion in aid for people who need rental assistance to avoid eviction. At the same time a federal moratorium on evictions is expected to be extended till the end of the July.
23/06/2113m 35s

The Unproven Lab Leak Theory Puts Pressure On China — But It May Backfire

From the beginning of the pandemic, the debate about the origins of the coronavirus was immediately politicized by former President Donald Trump. But now international efforts to investigate and find answers have stalled. NPR's Will Stone explains why.Despite a new focus on the lab leak theory, many scientists still believe the virus emerged naturally, reports NPR's Geoff Brumfiel. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik has also reported on the media's coverage of the lab leak theory. Listen to Fresh Air's interview with Vanity Fair's Katherine Eban on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Pocket Casts. Read Eban's article about the lab leak theory here: The Lab-Leak Theory: Inside the Fight to Uncover COVID-19's Origins.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/06/2114m 12s

50 Years Later, Is America's War On Drugs At A Turning Point?

In June 1971, then-President Richard Nixon said the U.S. had a new public enemy number one: addiction. It was the beginning of America's long war on drugs. Fifty years later, during months of interviews, NPR found a growing consensus across the political spectrum — including among some in law enforcement — that the drug war simply didn't work. The stories in this episode are from NPR's Brian Mann and Eric Westervelt as part of a special series: The War On Drugs: 50 Years Later.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/06/2115m 26s

BONUS: Tom Hanks, Fox News, And A Debate About Whiteness In Hollywood

This all started with a guest essay by Tom Hanks for The New York Times called "You Should Learn the Truth About the Tulsa Race Massacre," in which Hanks made the case for a more widespread teaching of American history involving Black Americans, especially of events like the Tulsa Race Massacre. He wrote: "History was mostly written by white people about white people like me, while the history of Black people — including the horrors of Tulsa — was too often left out. Until relatively recently, the entertainment industry, which helps shape what is history and what is forgotten, did the same. That includes projects of mine."NPR TV and film critic Eric Deggans appreciated those words, but wrote in a column of his own that Hanks could do more from his powerful perch in Hollywood. Eric speaks to host Audie Cornish about the reaction to his column, and how Hollywood reckons with its own power. (And no, he is not trying to cancel Tom Hanks.) In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/06/2116m 26s

Reparation Discussions Are Gaining Traction But Not Widespread Support

Juneteenth, the celebration to commemorate the end of chattel slavery in the United States, is the newest federal holiday after President Biden signed it into law on Thursday. It's another example of how the racial reckoning following the murder of George Floyd has been reshaping the way Americans think and talk about race. That shift is also evident in reparation programs for Black descendants of slaves that are being enacted by groups around the country. The Virginia Theological Seminary, for example, has started cutting checks to descendants of the forced labor the campus long relied on. The city of Evanston, Ill., has started to offer housing grants to its Black residents, and other progressive local governments are considering similar approaches. Despite increasing interest in reparations, there is not yet widespread acceptance among Americans. A recent poll from the University of Massachusetts Amherst shows that two-thirds of the U.S. does not agree with cash reparations on a federal scale.Professor Tatishe Nteta ran the poll. He explains what the findings say about the political future of reparations in the U.S. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/06/2114m 4s

Will The U.S. Meet Its July 4 Vaccination Goal? Your State May Already Have

Last month, President Biden laid out an ambitious goal: to get 70% of adults in the U.S. at least one vaccine dose by July 4. With less than three weeks to go, that goal may too ambitious, Harvard epidemiologist Bill Hanage tells NPR, and some states may see localized outbreaks this year. Still — nearly two dozen states have already exceeded the 70% threshold. Many are clustered in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, while states with the lowest rates are largely in the South and Southwest. But there is one exception: New Mexico — where some counties report vaccination rates as high as 90%. NPR's Kirk Siegler explains why. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/06/2112m 56s

Parents Want Schools To Make Up The Special Education Their Kids Lost In The Pandemic

Remote learning simply didn't work for many children with disabilities. Without the usual access to educators, therapists and in-person aides, the families of these children, and many like them, say they watched their children slide backward, losing academic, social and physical skills. Now they're demanding help, arguing to judges, state departments of education and even to the U.S. Department of Education that schools are legally required to do better by their students with disabilities. NPR education correspondent Cory Turner and reporter Rebecca Klein have spent months reporting on complaints filed across the country from families who say schools need to act now to make up for the vital services kids missed.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/06/219m 38s

What's At Stake As President Biden Enters Negotiations With Vladimir Putin

Wednesday will be President Biden's first meeting with one of America's greatest adversaries. Drawing a contrast with his predecessor is the least of what the commander-in-chief hopes to accomplish when he sits down with Russian President Vladimir Putin. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly is covering the summit in Geneva, where she spoke to former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul about what the U.S. could expect to gain from negotiations.For more coverage of the negotiations, follow Mary Louise Kelly on Twitter and tune into NPR's Up First on Wednesday morning. Listen via Apple, Spotify or Pocket Casts. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/06/2113m 53s

Why Everything Is More Expensive Right Now

From computer chips to rental cars to chicken breasts, a complex global supply chain is straining under pent-up post-vaccine demand. NPR's Scott Horsley explains what's going on — and why Biden administration officials think price hikes will eventually level out.Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Camila Domonoske — who reported on computer chips in car manufacturing — and NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday, which reported on slowdowns in food processing and manufacturing. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/06/2111m 34s

BONUS: A World Where The NRA Is Soft On Guns

About two months after the coronavirus began spreading in the United States, groups of Americans began to protest the quarantine lockdown measures in their states. At some of these anti-lockdown rallies reporters Lisa Hagen of WABE and Chris Haxel of KCUR discovered they weren't the spontaneous grassroots uprisings they purported to be. Rather, they were being organized by a group of three brothers: Aaron, Ben and Chris Dorr.
13/06/2132m 48s

ProPublica's 'Secret IRS Files' Unveil How Richest Americans Avoid Income Tax

The story made waves in Washington, D.C., this week: The Secret IRS Files: Trove of Never-Before-Seen Records Reveal How the Wealthiest Avoid Income Tax. ProPublica obtained private tax data from America's 25 wealthiest individuals, which revealed exactly how those people manage, through legal means, to pay far less income tax than most Americans — and sometimes, none at all. ProPublica senior editor and reporter Jesse Eisinger explains how it works to NPR's Rachel Martin. After the story's publication, some lawmakers reacted with concern about the fairness of the tax code. Oregon Democrat Ron Wyden, who chairs the Senate Finance Committee, explains a proposal to make it more equitable. He spoke to NPR's Ailsa Chang. Additional reporting on the history of the income tax from NPR's daily economics podcast The Indicator and Steven Weisman's 2010 appearance on All Things Considered. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/06/2113m 28s

Back To The Office: Not Everyone Is Welcoming The Return

For Americans who were able to work from home at the start of the pandemic, what felt like an extended snow day at first has now turned into 15 months and counting of Zoom calls and logging onto work in sweatpants. But now that about half of Americans are fully vaccinated, some are trickling back into the office. We asked you to tell us how your work has been for the last year and how you feel about returning to the office. The responses were mixed. Susan Lund, a partner at McKinsey & Company, says that after the pandemic it's unlikely that people will go back to the same pattern of working.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/06/2113m 43s

Listener Q&A: Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy On Variants, Boosters And Vax Mandates

More than half of U.S. adults have been fully vaccinated, and case rates are at their lowest point since the pandemic began. But there are still a lot of unanswered questions about the future of the pandemic. Questions about variants, vaccine booster shots and the idea of vaccine mandates in schools or publicly-funded universities. We had a chance to put some of the questions — including ones from you — to the nation's top doctor, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, in an interview conducted on Twitter Spaces, a new platform for live audio conversations on Twitter. To participate in future Twitter Spaces conversations, follow us on Twitter @nprAudie and @npratc. You can find our episodes on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtag #NPRConsiderThis.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/06/2114m 50s

Democrats' Path To Big Legislation Runs Through West Virginia. Is It A Dead End?

Democratic proposals for immigration reform, gun control, infrastructure and voting rights are stalled in Congress. Standing in between Democrats and much of their progressive wish list is one of their own, West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, who has signaled his opposition to eliminating the filibuster or passing an infrastructure plan without Republican support. He's not the only West Virginian with an outsized influence in Washington right now. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito is representing Senate Republicans in negotiations with the White House over infrastructure. Despite meeting with President Biden repeatedly in recent days, the two sides appear to be far apart. For more on the two Senators' role in national politics and what their mandate is from voters back home, congressional correspondent Sue Davis and Dave Mistich of West Virginia Public Broadcasting speak to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/06/2112m 54s

How The Biden Administration Is Confronting A Surge In Cyberattacks

Cyberattackers have recently targeted a crucial fuel pipeline, a global meat distributor and a water treatment plant. The Biden administration likens the surge in cyberattacks to terrorism — and says they plan to treat it like a national security threat. NPR National Security Correspondent Greg Myre details the administration's plans. When businesses are targeted by ransomware, someone like Bill Siegel steps in to help companies figure out if they have any options but to pay up. Siegel runs Coveware, a company that responds to ransomware attacks and often negotiates with hackers. He spoke to NPR's Rachel Martin. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/06/2112m 56s

BONUS: A Looping Revolt

Stockton, Calif., may represent the future of American news. The city's longtime newspaper, The Record, has lost reporters, subscribers and, therefore, power. Meanwhile a non-traditional news source, a controversial online outlet called 209 Times, has quickly become one of the most popular sources of news in town. It proudly doesn't follow most journalistic norms and brags about tanking the previous mayor's campaign. Critics say the 209 Times is filling Stockton with misinformation. Yowei Shaw, host of NPR's Invisibilia, investigates.Find all three parts of "The Chaos Machine," Invisibilia's series about 209 Times here.
06/06/2148m 16s

The U.S. Can't Agree On The Truth. Is It The Media's Job To Fix That?

Freedom of the press is enshrined in the Constitution as crucial to a functioning democracy. But what role does the press serve when it feels like the country can't agree on basic facts? NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with a handful of journalists to hear how they're navigating this divide.This episode feature's CBS's Leslie Stahl, CNN's Jake Tapper, NPR's Ayesha Rascoe, Dawn Rhodes of Block Club Chicago and Sherry Liang of the University of Georgia's Red & Black newspaper. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/06/2114m 6s

Companies Made Racial Justice Promises Last Summer. Did They Keep Them?

Corporations had a lot to say about racial justice last summer. They made statements. They donated millions to civil rights organizations. They promised to address their own problems with diversity and representation. A year later, NPR's David Gura reports on Wall Street's mixed progress.Kim Tran tells NPR's Sam Sanders that the diversity, equity and inclusion industry has lost its way.And DEI consultant Lily Zheng talks about their front row seat to corporations varied efforts to change culture and practices.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/06/2114m 48s

Pressure On The World's Biggest Polluters Is Increasing. But Can It Force Change?

The Atlantic hurricane season began Tuesday and another "above average" number of storms is expected. And it's not just hurricanes — overall, scientists are predicting more extreme weather events amplified by climate change this summer.While there's little to do in the short term to change this trajectory, recent actions by a Dutch court, the Biden administration and an activist hedge fund all suggest new pressure on large oil and gas companies could help in the long term. Pressure from these outside forces could signal a shift in how the companies operate.Nell Minow, an Exxon shareholder, explains the direction she wants to see the company move in.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/06/2112m 31s

Americans Are Feeling Optimistic And Uncertain As Second Pandemic Summer Begins

From dating apps, to airline travel, to in-person high school classes, the U.S. is seeing evidence of a return to close-to-normal life.KUOW's Clare McGrane reports on how that transition has been especially complicated for a choir in Washington state. Members were at the center of one of the earliest super-spreader events in the U.S. last year. Saskia Popescu, infectious disease expert and assistant professor at George Mason University, says for as much progress as the U.S. has made against the coronavirus, many countries are still dealing with outbreaks and struggling to get vaccines.Listen to GBH reporter Tori Bedford's story on easing back into socializing here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/06/2112m 43s

Does America Have Its Own 'Civil Religion?'

Much is said about how divided the U.S. is these days. But perhaps there is still something that unites Americans. Longtime NPR correspondent Tom Gjelten reports on what he calls the country's "civil religion" — a collection of beliefs, based on freedom, that should apply to every American equally. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/05/2112m 2s

BONUS: Barack Obama Talks About What It Means To Be A Man

Former President Barack Obama is thinking a lot about our values as Americans. These days, in a divided America, he's particularly thinking about what it means to be a man. Is a man thoughtful, caring? Are men held back by what society traditionally expects a man to be?These are questions that Aarti Shahani recently asked Obama on a recent episode of her podcast, Art of Power, from member station WBEZ in Chicago.Listen to Art of Power on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.
30/05/2148m 45s

Threats To Democracy Are Growing Around the World — And The U.S. May Be One Of Them

All over the world, democratic institutions are under threat. The United States isn't just part of that trend — it may also be one of the causes. Former Obama administration foreign policy adviser Ben Rhodes examines why in a new book called After the Fall: Being American in the World We've Made.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/05/2114m 52s

How Anti-Trans Bills Evoke The Culture Wars Of The 90s

Proponents of trans female athlete bans struggle to cite examples of trans women or girls gaining an unfair advantage in sports competitions. But amid a lot of debate about fairness, there's been less attention on science. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman spoke to a pioneering trans researcher who explains why — in most sports — trans women can compete fairly against cisgender women. Behind a recent spate of anti-trans state laws, LGBTQ communities see a new chapter in a familiar story: the culture wars that broke out in America in the 1990s. A new episode of the FX documentary miniseries Pride examines that era. It was directed by Academy-Award nominee Yance Ford, who tells NPR why the culture wars of the 90s are so relevant today. Additional reporting on the legal debate over Idaho's ban on trans female athletes from our colleague Melissa Block. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/05/2115m 23s

Fortnite Trial Tests Apple's 'Good Guy' Reputation

Apple has always wanted to be one of the good guys in tech. But now a high-stakes lawsuit with Epic Games, the creator of the hit video game Fortnite, isn't just challenging Apple's reputation. It's raising questions about whether the most valuable company in the world has grown into an illegal monopoly.NPR's Bobby Allyn reports on the federal trial that led to Apple CEO Tim Cook taking the stand last week to defend his company. And Sally Hubbard, who researches monopolies, explains how Apple's control over its app store reminds her of past antitrust violations from Microsoft and AT&T. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/05/2113m 47s

What's Changed — And What Hasn't — In The Year Since George Floyd Was Killed

After his death on May 25, 2020, George Floyd became the face of a movement against police violence. But attorney Andrea Ritchie says, in some ways, the prosecution and conviction of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin created a false sense of progress in that movement. Ritchie focuses on police misconduct and is the author of the book, Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women And Women Of Color.Bowling Green State University criminologist Phillip Stinson explains why so few police officers are prosecuted and convicted for murder. Stinson maintains the Henry A. Wallace Police Crime Database.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on a future episode about people who got involved in activism in the past year. We want to know why — and whether you've stayed involved. If this sounds like you, please respond to our callout here.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/05/2115m 23s

What's Behind The Progressive Push To Rethink America's Relationship With Israel

For decades, Israel had solid bipartisan support for Israel from Capitol Hill. But progressive congressional Democrats have started to question support for the policies of the Israeli government. Palestinian rights activists also feel tied to the growing power of racial justice movements in the United States. NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid explains. Peter Beinart, editor-at-large of Jewish Currents, says more Americans are hearing Palestinian voices in the media, and some Democrats can now criticize Israel without fear of losing their next election.Additional reporting in this episode comes from NPR's Connor Donevan and Eli Newman with member station WDET.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/05/2110m 31s

NPR Analysis Finds Growing Vaccine Divide Between Urban And Rural America

We know that Americans in blue states are getting vaccinated at higher rates than those in red ones. But that gap obscures another growing divide in America's vaccine campaign — the divide within states between rural and urban areas. An NPR analysis of county-level data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveals that divide exists across age groups in almost every state. NPR's Austin Fast explains why. The Biden administration says it's making progress on closing the gap. Their focus is on getting as many people vaccinated as possible. But public health officials tell NPR's Geoff Brumfiel that the U.S. may never reach 'herd immunity.' Additional reporting in this episode from Veronica Zaragovia of member station WLRN in Miami. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/05/2113m 0s

The CDC's Mask Guidance Created Confusion. Could It Also Boost Vaccinations?

A week ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new guidance that vaccinated people can safely return to most activities without wearing a mask. But the announcement caught many local officials and business leaders off guard. One of them was Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas. NPR's Andrea Hsu reports on the confusion among businesses, which now have to decide what to do on their own. NPR's Yuki Noguchi interviewed behavioral scientists about whether the new guidance may encourage more people to get vaccinated. Additional reporting in this episode came from NPR's Allison Aubrey and Pien Huang. Read more about what the new CDC guidance means for unvaccinated kids — and their parents. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/05/2113m 50s

The Latest On Biden's Infrastructure Plan, With A Vision For A New 'Climate Corps'

The White House is courting influential Democratic senators and making a public relations push for President Biden's infrastructure proposal, while Republicans draw a red line around corporate tax increases. Biden also spent part of this week test-driving Ford's new electric F-150 Lightning. But for all the talk of energy innovation and electric cars, one part of Biden's infrastructure plan is based on a pretty old idea — one from another era when millions of Americans were out of work. NPR's Scott Detrow and Nathan Rott report on Biden's proposal to revamp the nearly 100-year-old Civilian Conservation Corps — with a new focus on climate change. Read more from their reporting here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/05/2114m 39s

Long Before QAnon Conspiracies, The U.S. Was Swept By 'Satanic Panic'

Over the past year, QAnon conspiracies have migrated from obscure corners of the internet into national headlines. The false belief that left-wing Satanists are controlling the government helped fuel the U.S. Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6. These theories didn't come from nowhere. Back in the 1980s a similar "satanic panic" swept through the country and led to lawsuits that alleged preschool teachers were performing evil rituals with children. These claims were debunked but the accusations themselves had staying power. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on what factors contributed to the original "satanic panic" and what it can teach us about the conspiracy theories that attract followers today. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/05/2113m 42s

The Conflict Between Israel And Hamas Is Getting Worse, Raising Humanitarian Alarms

The conflict between Israel and Hamas has gone from bad to worse. The Biden administration says it's engaging in "quiet, intensive diplomacy" to broker an end to the violence. Leni Stenseth of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency tells NPR that the humanitarian situation in the region is "extremely alarming." NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro explains how the recent outbreak of violence began — and the historical seeds of the region's conflict. What is the diplomatic path toward some sort of peace? Israeli political analyst and journalist Akiva Eldar, a contributor to Israeli newspaper Haaretz, and Mkhaimar Abusada, a professor of political science at Al-Azhar University in Gaza, discuss what life on the ground is like for each of them, and the role of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/05/2114m 48s

BONUS: How One Family Is Learning To Support Their Non-Binary Child

Nine-year-old Hallel is the oldest of three children. They also identify as a "boy-girl," which was a revelation to their parents Shira and Ari when Hallel made the announcement to them.Through a series of family recordings and interviews with WBUR's Martha Bebinger, the family shared the story of how this realization unfolded, and what they're learning.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/05/2111m 23s

How To 'Human' Again: Advice For The Long Transition To Post-Pandemic Life

The promise of post-pandemic life is exciting, but that doesn't mean it won't get awkward at times. We asked for your questions about how to navigate this new normal and we have some answers. Dr. Lucy McBride, a primary care physician, and public theologian Ekemini Uwan have both written about this transitional moment Americans are living in and have some advice. To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/05/2113m 58s

The Debate Is Over: Donald Trump Owns The Republican Party

This week, House Republicans voted to expel Rep. Liz Cheney from party leadership after the Wyoming congresswoman repeatedly called out former President Trump's false claims about the 2020 election. Republican Congressman John Curtis of Utah told NPR the party's decision had nothing to do with her opposition to the former President.The fracture reminds Wall Street Journal Executive Washington Editor Gerald Seib of another era when Republican leadership tried to capture and control a growing political force: the tea party. Seib is the author of We Should Have Seen It Coming: From Reagan to Trump — A Front-Row Seat to a Political Revolution. To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/05/2115m 37s

Why Are So Many Businesses Struggling To Find Workers?

Republicans say enhanced pandemic unemployment benefits are what's keeping people out of the workforce. That could be playing a role, but the complete picture is far more complicated. NPR chief economic correspondent Scott Horsley lays out the evidence for what's really behind the struggle to find workers. Stacey Vanek Smith, host of NPR's daily economics podcast The Indicator, explains why the problem may be specific to a certain subset of the economy. More from the Indicator on that topic here. Find more episodes on Spotify or Apple Podcasts. To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/05/2114m 18s

'It's Top-Down': Three Generations Of Black Officers On Racism And Police Brutality

Three officers, each from a different generation, weigh in on Derek Chauvin's murder conviction and other recent acts of police violence. Isaiah McKinnon became a police officer for the city of Detroit in the 1960s, and eventually became chief of police. He also served two years as the city's deputy mayor starting in 2014.Cheryl Dorsey is a retired Los Angeles Police Department sergeant who first joined the force in the 1980s. Vincent Montague is president of the Black Shield Police Association, which supports officers serving in the Greater Cleveland area. He's been in law enforcement for 13 years. To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/05/2114m 1s

How One LA Neighborhood Reveals The Racist Architecture Of American Homeownership

Property ownership eludes Black Americans more than any other racial group. NPR's Ailsa Chang and Jonaki Mehta examine why. They tell the story of LA's Sugar Hill neighborhood, a once-vibrant black community that was demolished to make way for the Santa Monica Freeway.Their story is part of NPR's special series We Hold These Truths.To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/05/2116m 24s

BONUS: We Buy A Superhero

Comic book publishers like Marvel and DC sit on a treasure trove: thousands and thousands of comic book characters. Pieces of intellectual property. You know the big ones--Superman, Ironman, Captain America. They each make millions off of movies and merchandise. But for every marquee character, there are hundreds of others sitting unused.
09/05/2122m 1s