Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

By NPR

Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Episodes

Millions Of Americans Could Be Facing Eviction

Back in March, Congress approved nearly $50 billion in aid for people who need rental assistance to avoid eviction. At the same time a federal moratorium on evictions is expected to be extended till the end of the July.
23/06/2113m 35s

The Unproven Lab Leak Theory Puts Pressure On China — But It May Backfire

From the beginning of the pandemic, the debate about the origins of the coronavirus was immediately politicized by former President Donald Trump. But now international efforts to investigate and find answers have stalled. NPR's Will Stone explains why.Despite a new focus on the lab leak theory, many scientists still believe the virus emerged naturally, reports NPR's Geoff Brumfiel. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik has also reported on the media's coverage of the lab leak theory. Listen to Fresh Air's interview with Vanity Fair's Katherine Eban on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Pocket Casts. Read Eban's article about the lab leak theory here: The Lab-Leak Theory: Inside the Fight to Uncover COVID-19's Origins.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/06/2114m 12s

50 Years Later, Is America's War On Drugs At A Turning Point?

In June 1971, then-President Richard Nixon said the U.S. had a new public enemy number one: addiction. It was the beginning of America's long war on drugs. Fifty years later, during months of interviews, NPR found a growing consensus across the political spectrum — including among some in law enforcement — that the drug war simply didn't work. The stories in this episode are from NPR's Brian Mann and Eric Westervelt as part of a special series: The War On Drugs: 50 Years Later.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/06/2115m 26s

BONUS: Tom Hanks, Fox News, And A Debate About Whiteness In Hollywood

This all started with a guest essay by Tom Hanks for The New York Times called "You Should Learn the Truth About the Tulsa Race Massacre," in which Hanks made the case for a more widespread teaching of American history involving Black Americans, especially of events like the Tulsa Race Massacre. He wrote: "History was mostly written by white people about white people like me, while the history of Black people — including the horrors of Tulsa — was too often left out. Until relatively recently, the entertainment industry, which helps shape what is history and what is forgotten, did the same. That includes projects of mine."NPR TV and film critic Eric Deggans appreciated those words, but wrote in a column of his own that Hanks could do more from his powerful perch in Hollywood. Eric speaks to host Audie Cornish about the reaction to his column, and how Hollywood reckons with its own power. (And no, he is not trying to cancel Tom Hanks.) In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/06/2116m 26s

Reparation Discussions Are Gaining Traction But Not Widespread Support

Juneteenth, the celebration to commemorate the end of chattel slavery in the United States, is the newest federal holiday after President Biden signed it into law on Thursday. It's another example of how the racial reckoning following the murder of George Floyd has been reshaping the way Americans think and talk about race. That shift is also evident in reparation programs for Black descendants of slaves that are being enacted by groups around the country. The Virginia Theological Seminary, for example, has started cutting checks to descendants of the forced labor the campus long relied on. The city of Evanston, Ill., has started to offer housing grants to its Black residents, and other progressive local governments are considering similar approaches. Despite increasing interest in reparations, there is not yet widespread acceptance among Americans. A recent poll from the University of Massachusetts Amherst shows that two-thirds of the U.S. does not agree with cash reparations on a federal scale.Professor Tatishe Nteta ran the poll. He explains what the findings say about the political future of reparations in the U.S. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/06/2114m 4s

Will The U.S. Meet Its July 4 Vaccination Goal? Your State May Already Have

Last month, President Biden laid out an ambitious goal: to get 70% of adults in the U.S. at least one vaccine dose by July 4. With less than three weeks to go, that goal may too ambitious, Harvard epidemiologist Bill Hanage tells NPR, and some states may see localized outbreaks this year. Still — nearly two dozen states have already exceeded the 70% threshold. Many are clustered in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, while states with the lowest rates are largely in the South and Southwest. But there is one exception: New Mexico — where some counties report vaccination rates as high as 90%. NPR's Kirk Siegler explains why. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/06/2112m 56s

Parents Want Schools To Make Up The Special Education Their Kids Lost In The Pandemic

Remote learning simply didn't work for many children with disabilities. Without the usual access to educators, therapists and in-person aides, the families of these children, and many like them, say they watched their children slide backward, losing academic, social and physical skills. Now they're demanding help, arguing to judges, state departments of education and even to the U.S. Department of Education that schools are legally required to do better by their students with disabilities. NPR education correspondent Cory Turner and reporter Rebecca Klein have spent months reporting on complaints filed across the country from families who say schools need to act now to make up for the vital services kids missed.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/06/219m 38s

What's At Stake As President Biden Enters Negotiations With Vladimir Putin

Wednesday will be President Biden's first meeting with one of America's greatest adversaries. Drawing a contrast with his predecessor is the least of what the commander-in-chief hopes to accomplish when he sits down with Russian President Vladimir Putin. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly is covering the summit in Geneva, where she spoke to former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul about what the U.S. could expect to gain from negotiations.For more coverage of the negotiations, follow Mary Louise Kelly on Twitter and tune into NPR's Up First on Wednesday morning. Listen via Apple, Spotify or Pocket Casts. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/06/2113m 53s

Why Everything Is More Expensive Right Now

From computer chips to rental cars to chicken breasts, a complex global supply chain is straining under pent-up post-vaccine demand. NPR's Scott Horsley explains what's going on — and why Biden administration officials think price hikes will eventually level out.Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Camila Domonoske — who reported on computer chips in car manufacturing — and NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday, which reported on slowdowns in food processing and manufacturing. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/06/2111m 34s

BONUS: A World Where The NRA Is Soft On Guns

About two months after the coronavirus began spreading in the United States, groups of Americans began to protest the quarantine lockdown measures in their states. At some of these anti-lockdown rallies reporters Lisa Hagen of WABE and Chris Haxel of KCUR discovered they weren't the spontaneous grassroots uprisings they purported to be. Rather, they were being organized by a group of three brothers: Aaron, Ben and Chris Dorr.
13/06/2132m 48s

ProPublica's 'Secret IRS Files' Unveil How Richest Americans Avoid Income Tax

The story made waves in Washington, D.C., this week: The Secret IRS Files: Trove of Never-Before-Seen Records Reveal How the Wealthiest Avoid Income Tax. ProPublica obtained private tax data from America's 25 wealthiest individuals, which revealed exactly how those people manage, through legal means, to pay far less income tax than most Americans — and sometimes, none at all. ProPublica senior editor and reporter Jesse Eisinger explains how it works to NPR's Rachel Martin. After the story's publication, some lawmakers reacted with concern about the fairness of the tax code. Oregon Democrat Ron Wyden, who chairs the Senate Finance Committee, explains a proposal to make it more equitable. He spoke to NPR's Ailsa Chang. Additional reporting on the history of the income tax from NPR's daily economics podcast The Indicator and Steven Weisman's 2010 appearance on All Things Considered. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/06/2113m 28s

Back To The Office: Not Everyone Is Welcoming The Return

For Americans who were able to work from home at the start of the pandemic, what felt like an extended snow day at first has now turned into 15 months and counting of Zoom calls and logging onto work in sweatpants. But now that about half of Americans are fully vaccinated, some are trickling back into the office. We asked you to tell us how your work has been for the last year and how you feel about returning to the office. The responses were mixed. Susan Lund, a partner at McKinsey & Company, says that after the pandemic it's unlikely that people will go back to the same pattern of working.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/06/2113m 43s

Listener Q&A: Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy On Variants, Boosters And Vax Mandates

More than half of U.S. adults have been fully vaccinated, and case rates are at their lowest point since the pandemic began. But there are still a lot of unanswered questions about the future of the pandemic. Questions about variants, vaccine booster shots and the idea of vaccine mandates in schools or publicly-funded universities. We had a chance to put some of the questions — including ones from you — to the nation's top doctor, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, in an interview conducted on Twitter Spaces, a new platform for live audio conversations on Twitter. To participate in future Twitter Spaces conversations, follow us on Twitter @nprAudie and @npratc. You can find our episodes on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtag #NPRConsiderThis.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/06/2114m 50s

Democrats' Path To Big Legislation Runs Through West Virginia. Is It A Dead End?

Democratic proposals for immigration reform, gun control, infrastructure and voting rights are stalled in Congress. Standing in between Democrats and much of their progressive wish list is one of their own, West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, who has signaled his opposition to eliminating the filibuster or passing an infrastructure plan without Republican support. He's not the only West Virginian with an outsized influence in Washington right now. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito is representing Senate Republicans in negotiations with the White House over infrastructure. Despite meeting with President Biden repeatedly in recent days, the two sides appear to be far apart. For more on the two Senators' role in national politics and what their mandate is from voters back home, congressional correspondent Sue Davis and Dave Mistich of West Virginia Public Broadcasting speak to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/06/2112m 54s

How The Biden Administration Is Confronting A Surge In Cyberattacks

Cyberattackers have recently targeted a crucial fuel pipeline, a global meat distributor and a water treatment plant. The Biden administration likens the surge in cyberattacks to terrorism — and says they plan to treat it like a national security threat. NPR National Security Correspondent Greg Myre details the administration's plans. When businesses are targeted by ransomware, someone like Bill Siegel steps in to help companies figure out if they have any options but to pay up. Siegel runs Coveware, a company that responds to ransomware attacks and often negotiates with hackers. He spoke to NPR's Rachel Martin. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/06/2112m 56s

BONUS: A Looping Revolt

Stockton, Calif., may represent the future of American news. The city's longtime newspaper, The Record, has lost reporters, subscribers and, therefore, power. Meanwhile a non-traditional news source, a controversial online outlet called 209 Times, has quickly become one of the most popular sources of news in town. It proudly doesn't follow most journalistic norms and brags about tanking the previous mayor's campaign. Critics say the 209 Times is filling Stockton with misinformation. Yowei Shaw, host of NPR's Invisibilia, investigates.Find all three parts of "The Chaos Machine," Invisibilia's series about 209 Times here.
06/06/2148m 16s

The U.S. Can't Agree On The Truth. Is It The Media's Job To Fix That?

Freedom of the press is enshrined in the Constitution as crucial to a functioning democracy. But what role does the press serve when it feels like the country can't agree on basic facts? NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with a handful of journalists to hear how they're navigating this divide.This episode feature's CBS's Leslie Stahl, CNN's Jake Tapper, NPR's Ayesha Rascoe, Dawn Rhodes of Block Club Chicago and Sherry Liang of the University of Georgia's Red & Black newspaper. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/06/2114m 6s

Companies Made Racial Justice Promises Last Summer. Did They Keep Them?

Corporations had a lot to say about racial justice last summer. They made statements. They donated millions to civil rights organizations. They promised to address their own problems with diversity and representation. A year later, NPR's David Gura reports on Wall Street's mixed progress.Kim Tran tells NPR's Sam Sanders that the diversity, equity and inclusion industry has lost its way.And DEI consultant Lily Zheng talks about their front row seat to corporations varied efforts to change culture and practices.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/06/2114m 48s

Pressure On The World's Biggest Polluters Is Increasing. But Can It Force Change?

The Atlantic hurricane season began Tuesday and another "above average" number of storms is expected. And it's not just hurricanes — overall, scientists are predicting more extreme weather events amplified by climate change this summer.While there's little to do in the short term to change this trajectory, recent actions by a Dutch court, the Biden administration and an activist hedge fund all suggest new pressure on large oil and gas companies could help in the long term. Pressure from these outside forces could signal a shift in how the companies operate.Nell Minow, an Exxon shareholder, explains the direction she wants to see the company move in.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/06/2112m 31s

Americans Are Feeling Optimistic And Uncertain As Second Pandemic Summer Begins

From dating apps, to airline travel, to in-person high school classes, the U.S. is seeing evidence of a return to close-to-normal life.KUOW's Clare McGrane reports on how that transition has been especially complicated for a choir in Washington state. Members were at the center of one of the earliest super-spreader events in the U.S. last year. Saskia Popescu, infectious disease expert and assistant professor at George Mason University, says for as much progress as the U.S. has made against the coronavirus, many countries are still dealing with outbreaks and struggling to get vaccines.Listen to GBH reporter Tori Bedford's story on easing back into socializing here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/06/2112m 43s

Does America Have Its Own 'Civil Religion?'

Much is said about how divided the U.S. is these days. But perhaps there is still something that unites Americans. Longtime NPR correspondent Tom Gjelten reports on what he calls the country's "civil religion" — a collection of beliefs, based on freedom, that should apply to every American equally. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/05/2112m 2s

BONUS: Barack Obama Talks About What It Means To Be A Man

Former President Barack Obama is thinking a lot about our values as Americans. These days, in a divided America, he's particularly thinking about what it means to be a man. Is a man thoughtful, caring? Are men held back by what society traditionally expects a man to be?These are questions that Aarti Shahani recently asked Obama on a recent episode of her podcast, Art of Power, from member station WBEZ in Chicago.Listen to Art of Power on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.
30/05/2148m 45s

Threats To Democracy Are Growing Around the World — And The U.S. May Be One Of Them

All over the world, democratic institutions are under threat. The United States isn't just part of that trend — it may also be one of the causes. Former Obama administration foreign policy adviser Ben Rhodes examines why in a new book called After the Fall: Being American in the World We've Made.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/05/2114m 52s

How Anti-Trans Bills Evoke The Culture Wars Of The 90s

Proponents of trans female athlete bans struggle to cite examples of trans women or girls gaining an unfair advantage in sports competitions. But amid a lot of debate about fairness, there's been less attention on science. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman spoke to a pioneering trans researcher who explains why — in most sports — trans women can compete fairly against cisgender women. Behind a recent spate of anti-trans state laws, LGBTQ communities see a new chapter in a familiar story: the culture wars that broke out in America in the 1990s. A new episode of the FX documentary miniseries Pride examines that era. It was directed by Academy-Award nominee Yance Ford, who tells NPR why the culture wars of the 90s are so relevant today. Additional reporting on the legal debate over Idaho's ban on trans female athletes from our colleague Melissa Block. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/05/2115m 23s

Fortnite Trial Tests Apple's 'Good Guy' Reputation

Apple has always wanted to be one of the good guys in tech. But now a high-stakes lawsuit with Epic Games, the creator of the hit video game Fortnite, isn't just challenging Apple's reputation. It's raising questions about whether the most valuable company in the world has grown into an illegal monopoly.NPR's Bobby Allyn reports on the federal trial that led to Apple CEO Tim Cook taking the stand last week to defend his company. And Sally Hubbard, who researches monopolies, explains how Apple's control over its app store reminds her of past antitrust violations from Microsoft and AT&T. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/05/2113m 47s

What's Changed — And What Hasn't — In The Year Since George Floyd Was Killed

After his death on May 25, 2020, George Floyd became the face of a movement against police violence. But attorney Andrea Ritchie says, in some ways, the prosecution and conviction of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin created a false sense of progress in that movement. Ritchie focuses on police misconduct and is the author of the book, Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women And Women Of Color.Bowling Green State University criminologist Phillip Stinson explains why so few police officers are prosecuted and convicted for murder. Stinson maintains the Henry A. Wallace Police Crime Database.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on a future episode about people who got involved in activism in the past year. We want to know why — and whether you've stayed involved. If this sounds like you, please respond to our callout here.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/05/2115m 23s

What's Behind The Progressive Push To Rethink America's Relationship With Israel

For decades, Israel had solid bipartisan support for Israel from Capitol Hill. But progressive congressional Democrats have started to question support for the policies of the Israeli government. Palestinian rights activists also feel tied to the growing power of racial justice movements in the United States. NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid explains. Peter Beinart, editor-at-large of Jewish Currents, says more Americans are hearing Palestinian voices in the media, and some Democrats can now criticize Israel without fear of losing their next election.Additional reporting in this episode comes from NPR's Connor Donevan and Eli Newman with member station WDET.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/05/2110m 31s

NPR Analysis Finds Growing Vaccine Divide Between Urban And Rural America

We know that Americans in blue states are getting vaccinated at higher rates than those in red ones. But that gap obscures another growing divide in America's vaccine campaign — the divide within states between rural and urban areas. An NPR analysis of county-level data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveals that divide exists across age groups in almost every state. NPR's Austin Fast explains why. The Biden administration says it's making progress on closing the gap. Their focus is on getting as many people vaccinated as possible. But public health officials tell NPR's Geoff Brumfiel that the U.S. may never reach 'herd immunity.' Additional reporting in this episode from Veronica Zaragovia of member station WLRN in Miami. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/05/2113m 0s

The CDC's Mask Guidance Created Confusion. Could It Also Boost Vaccinations?

A week ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new guidance that vaccinated people can safely return to most activities without wearing a mask. But the announcement caught many local officials and business leaders off guard. One of them was Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas. NPR's Andrea Hsu reports on the confusion among businesses, which now have to decide what to do on their own. NPR's Yuki Noguchi interviewed behavioral scientists about whether the new guidance may encourage more people to get vaccinated. Additional reporting in this episode came from NPR's Allison Aubrey and Pien Huang. Read more about what the new CDC guidance means for unvaccinated kids — and their parents. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/05/2113m 50s

The Latest On Biden's Infrastructure Plan, With A Vision For A New 'Climate Corps'

The White House is courting influential Democratic senators and making a public relations push for President Biden's infrastructure proposal, while Republicans draw a red line around corporate tax increases. Biden also spent part of this week test-driving Ford's new electric F-150 Lightning. But for all the talk of energy innovation and electric cars, one part of Biden's infrastructure plan is based on a pretty old idea — one from another era when millions of Americans were out of work. NPR's Scott Detrow and Nathan Rott report on Biden's proposal to revamp the nearly 100-year-old Civilian Conservation Corps — with a new focus on climate change. Read more from their reporting here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/05/2114m 39s

Long Before QAnon Conspiracies, The U.S. Was Swept By 'Satanic Panic'

Over the past year, QAnon conspiracies have migrated from obscure corners of the internet into national headlines. The false belief that left-wing Satanists are controlling the government helped fuel the U.S. Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6. These theories didn't come from nowhere. Back in the 1980s a similar "satanic panic" swept through the country and led to lawsuits that alleged preschool teachers were performing evil rituals with children. These claims were debunked but the accusations themselves had staying power. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on what factors contributed to the original "satanic panic" and what it can teach us about the conspiracy theories that attract followers today. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/05/2113m 42s

The Conflict Between Israel And Hamas Is Getting Worse, Raising Humanitarian Alarms

The conflict between Israel and Hamas has gone from bad to worse. The Biden administration says it's engaging in "quiet, intensive diplomacy" to broker an end to the violence. Leni Stenseth of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency tells NPR that the humanitarian situation in the region is "extremely alarming." NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro explains how the recent outbreak of violence began — and the historical seeds of the region's conflict. What is the diplomatic path toward some sort of peace? Israeli political analyst and journalist Akiva Eldar, a contributor to Israeli newspaper Haaretz, and Mkhaimar Abusada, a professor of political science at Al-Azhar University in Gaza, discuss what life on the ground is like for each of them, and the role of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/05/2114m 48s

BONUS: How One Family Is Learning To Support Their Non-Binary Child

Nine-year-old Hallel is the oldest of three children. They also identify as a "boy-girl," which was a revelation to their parents Shira and Ari when Hallel made the announcement to them.Through a series of family recordings and interviews with WBUR's Martha Bebinger, the family shared the story of how this realization unfolded, and what they're learning.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/05/2111m 23s

How To 'Human' Again: Advice For The Long Transition To Post-Pandemic Life

The promise of post-pandemic life is exciting, but that doesn't mean it won't get awkward at times. We asked for your questions about how to navigate this new normal and we have some answers. Dr. Lucy McBride, a primary care physician, and public theologian Ekemini Uwan have both written about this transitional moment Americans are living in and have some advice. To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/05/2113m 58s

The Debate Is Over: Donald Trump Owns The Republican Party

This week, House Republicans voted to expel Rep. Liz Cheney from party leadership after the Wyoming congresswoman repeatedly called out former President Trump's false claims about the 2020 election. Republican Congressman John Curtis of Utah told NPR the party's decision had nothing to do with her opposition to the former President.The fracture reminds Wall Street Journal Executive Washington Editor Gerald Seib of another era when Republican leadership tried to capture and control a growing political force: the tea party. Seib is the author of We Should Have Seen It Coming: From Reagan to Trump — A Front-Row Seat to a Political Revolution. To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/05/2115m 37s

Why Are So Many Businesses Struggling To Find Workers?

Republicans say enhanced pandemic unemployment benefits are what's keeping people out of the workforce. That could be playing a role, but the complete picture is far more complicated. NPR chief economic correspondent Scott Horsley lays out the evidence for what's really behind the struggle to find workers. Stacey Vanek Smith, host of NPR's daily economics podcast The Indicator, explains why the problem may be specific to a certain subset of the economy. More from the Indicator on that topic here. Find more episodes on Spotify or Apple Podcasts. To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/05/2114m 18s

'It's Top-Down': Three Generations Of Black Officers On Racism And Police Brutality

Three officers, each from a different generation, weigh in on Derek Chauvin's murder conviction and other recent acts of police violence. Isaiah McKinnon became a police officer for the city of Detroit in the 1960s, and eventually became chief of police. He also served two years as the city's deputy mayor starting in 2014.Cheryl Dorsey is a retired Los Angeles Police Department sergeant who first joined the force in the 1980s. Vincent Montague is president of the Black Shield Police Association, which supports officers serving in the Greater Cleveland area. He's been in law enforcement for 13 years. To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/05/2114m 1s

How One LA Neighborhood Reveals The Racist Architecture Of American Homeownership

Property ownership eludes Black Americans more than any other racial group. NPR's Ailsa Chang and Jonaki Mehta examine why. They tell the story of LA's Sugar Hill neighborhood, a once-vibrant black community that was demolished to make way for the Santa Monica Freeway.Their story is part of NPR's special series We Hold These Truths.To take a short, anonymous survey about Consider This, please visit npr.org/springsurvey. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/05/2116m 24s

BONUS: We Buy A Superhero

Comic book publishers like Marvel and DC sit on a treasure trove: thousands and thousands of comic book characters. Pieces of intellectual property. You know the big ones--Superman, Ironman, Captain America. They each make millions off of movies and merchandise. But for every marquee character, there are hundreds of others sitting unused.
09/05/2122m 1s

NPR Turns 50 Amid Reckoning In Journalism Over Who Tells Stories — And How

Now 50 years old, NPR has grown up alongside American journalism. We take stock of some lessons learned along the way. In this episode: Linda Wertheimer, Robert Siegel, Brooke Gladstone, Ira Glass, Michele Norris, and Andy Carvin. Hear more from NPR's very first broadcast of All Things Considered. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/05/2114m 25s

Supply Scarce Abroad, Demand Down At Home: Vaccine Access Is Starkly Unequal

Vaccine demand is beginning to slide in the U.S., but in other parts of the world, the pandemic is devastating countries where vaccines are more scarce. India is one of those countries. There only 2% of the population is fully immunized. There's an argument that waiving intellectual property rights could boost global vaccine production, and this week the Biden administration came out in support of that idea. Mustaqeem de Gama, South Africa's counsellor at the World Trade Organization, tells NPR that U.S. support is a "game changer." Meanwhile, in some parts of the U.S., it's getting harder to find enough arms for vaccine doses. Katia Riddle reports from Oregon. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/05/2113m 22s

Scotland May Try To Break Away From The United Kingdom — Again

On Thursday, Scots vote in Regional Parliamentary elections. That's not usually an international story, but the ruling Scottish National Party is running on a platform to hold another independence referendum. Another vote on whether Scotland should leave the United Kingdom. Northern Ireland and Wales could follow their lead.Scotland voted to stay in the U.K. during the last independence referendum in 2014. But then the Brexit vote happened. Scots heavily voted against leaving the European Union but were outnumbered by the British. Ultimately, the U.K. voted to leave the E.U.NPR's London correspondent Frank Langfitt has been driving across Scotland over the past few days, asking people how they feel about another referendum and the reviews are mixed. Ailsa Henderson, a senior lecturer at the University of Edinburgh, describes what might happen after this week's vote and what, if anything, is still keeping the U.K. together. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/05/2114m 12s

Is The Biden Rescue Plan Working? 'American Indicators' Weigh In On The Recovery

The pandemic economy has left different people in vastly different situations. Today, we follow up with four American indicators — people whose paths will help us understand the arc of the recovery. You first heard their stories back in February. Now, we're talking to them again to ask how the American Rescue Plan has affected their lives — or not. Brooke Neubauer in Nevada, founder of The Just One Project; Lisa Winton of the Winton Machine Company in Georgia; Lee Camp with Arch City Defenders in Missouri; and New Jersey-based hotel owner Bhavesh Patel. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/05/2112m 27s

How Brazen Smugglers Are Fueling Record Numbers At The Southern Border

A record 172,000 migrants were apprehended at the southern border in March. Those numbers are fueled, in part, by smuggling organizations that exploit desperate migrants, most of them from central America. NPR's John Burnett and KTEP's Angela Kocherga report on their tactics.Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas tells NPR about a new multi-agency effort to crack down on smugglers. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/05/2113m 36s

How India's COVID-19 Outbreak Got So Bad, And Why It May Be Even Worse Than We Know

Things have gone from bad to worse in the pandemic's global epicenter. India reported nearly 400,000 new COVID-19 cases on Friday — and the death count is likely higher than current estimates. Lauren Frayer, NPR's correspondent in Mumbai, explains why. Follow more of her work here or on Twitter @lfrayer.The surge in India may be due, in part, to new coronavirus variants circulating in the country. NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff reports on one that's been referred to as a "double mutant." In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/04/2112m 27s

What Makes President Biden's Massive Spending Pitch So Historic

Any one of President Biden's multi-trillion-dollar spending packages would be among the largest ever enacted by Congress. He has passed one — the American Recuse Plan — and proposed two others in his first 100 days. NPR Congressional correspondent Susan Davis explains his latest proposal — the American Families Plan.Presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin tells NPR that in times of crisis, past Presidents have had success enacting ambitious agendas. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/04/2113m 42s

The CDC's New Mask Guidance, Explained, And A Look At How Long Vaccines Protect Us

Fully vaccinated people can ditch the mask outdoors, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said this week — unless they're at a crowded event. Dr. Anthony Fauci explains the new guidance to NPR and weighs in on how soon children under 16 might be eligible for vaccines. NPR's Joe Palca reports on the scientific effort to learn more about how long vaccines protect us. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Allison Aubrey. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/04/2113m 27s

New Census Numbers Mean A Political Power Shift For Some States

The first set of results from the 2020 census are in, and according to the count, the official population of the United States is 331,449,281.
27/04/2112m 9s

How Faith Leaders In Israel And The U.K. Are Fighting Vaccine Hesitancy

Israel and the United Kingdom are among the most-vaccinated countries in the world. Their success is due in part to public health campaigns designed to fight vaccine disinformation in faith and minority communities. As part of NPR's series on fighting disinformation, London correspondent Frank Langfitt visited a mosque-turned-vaccination center on the frontline of that battle. In Israel, NPR's Daniel Estrin followed the man who helped lead the public health campaign for vaccines. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/04/2114m 29s

BONUS: Policing In America

Black Americans being victimized and killed by the police is an epidemic. As the trial of Derek Chauvin plays out, it's a truth and a trauma many people in the US and around the world are again witnessing first hand. But this tension between African American communities and the police has existed for centuries. This week, the origins of policing in the United States and how those origins put violent control of Black Americans at the heart of the system.
25/04/211h 5m

The Story Behind The SolarWinds Cyberattack

Last year, hackers believed to be directed by the Russian intelligence service, the SVR, slipped a malicious code into a routine software update from a Texas- based company called SolarWinds. They then used it as a vehicle for a massive cyberattack against America and successfully infiltrated Microsoft, Intel, Cisco and other companies, and federal agencies including the Treasury Department, Justice Department, Energy Department and the Pentagon.The Biden administration recently announced a roster of tough sanctions against Russia as part of what it characterized as the "seen and unseen" response to the SolarWinds breach.NPR investigative correspondent Dina Temple-Raston has spent months examining the landmark attack that — based on interviews with dozens of players — reveals a hack unlike any other.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/04/2114m 2s

How To Navigate Life When You're Vaccinated And Others Aren't (Or Vice Versa)

A little more than half of adults in the U.S. have had at least one shot of a COVID-19 vaccine. That means a growing number of Americans are figuring out how to navigate life in a hybrid society where some people are vaccinated and some are not. Two experts offer advice on how to do that: Dr. Leana Wen with George Washington University, and Dr. Monica Gandhi with the University Of California San Francisco. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/04/2111m 41s

Will Justice For George Floyd Lead To Lasting Change?

As crowds gathered Tuesday evening after former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murder in the death of George Floyd, two themes emerged. Many expressed joy and relief for the verdict delivered by the 12-person jury. But they also said the work isn't over, and the national debate over police violence and accountability can't end with a single criminal trial.That message was also shared by the White House and Vice President Harris. On Wednesday, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the Justice Department is opening an investigation into possible patterns of discrimination and excessive force within the Minneapolis Police Department. And lawmakers in Congress are renewing a push for a police reform act that bears George Floyd's name. For the last eleven months, one of the loudest voices demanding justice for George Floyd — insisting that the country and the world not forget him — has been his brother, Philonise Floyd. Philonise and Benjamin Crump, the Floyd family attorney, share what lasting change will look like to them now that a verdict has been delivered.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/04/2114m 25s

Jury Finds Derek Chauvin Guilty On All Counts In Killing Of George Floyd

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been convicted on three counts in the trial over George Floyd's killing. The jury announced their verdict on Tuesday and found Chauvin guilty of unintentional second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/04/2111m 35s

With All U.S. Adults Eligible, How Can More Be Convinced To Get Vaccinated?

Starting Monday, every person in America 16 and older is eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Nearly 40% already have. Now public health officials will begin to focus more on those who have not. WHYY's Nina Feldman reports on the effort in Philadelphia, which is focused on racial equity. Two groups of people who are most likely to say they won't get a shot are Republicans and white evangelical Christians. Blake Farmer of member station WPLN in Nashville reports on outreach to those groups. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/04/2113m 30s

BONUS: Workin' 9 To 5

Flexible hours for working parents, daycare centers at the office, equal pay. Between the 1960s and 1980s, there was a real sense that big workplace changes were just beyond the horizon.At the time a very common job for women was clerical work. And in 1973, a group of secretaries in Boston formed a women's labor organization. They called themselves the "9to5."Actress Jane Fonda then decided to turn the real life struggles of working women into a hit Hollywood movie. Starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, and country singer Dolly Parton (who also wrote the famous theme song), 9 to 5 was one of the first movies focused on the lives of women in the workplace.Today on the show, we meet the women behind the movement that inspired the movie. And a look at how far we have — or haven't — come since then.
18/04/2123m 54s

What Amazon's Defeat Of Union Effort Means For The Future Of American Labor

A movement to unionize workers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Ala., was seen as a potential turning point for the American labor movement. But the effort failed resoundingly. Stephan Bisaha of member station WBHM in Birmingham examines why. Mohamed Younis, editor-in-chief of Gallup, tells NPR that public opinion of labor unions is generally lower in the South.Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Alina Selyukh.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/04/2112m 24s

'I Wish There Was An Easy Ending:' Afghanistan's Murky Future After Longest U.S. War

President Biden announced this week that all U.S. troops if Afghanistan will be withdrawn by Sept. 11, marking the end of America's 20-year war there. Former U.S. Army Col. Christopher Kolenda tells NPR there is "no easy ending" to American involvement in Afghanistan. Roya Rahmani, Afghanistan's ambassador to the U.S., tells NPR Afghan civilians will continue to face daily threats of violence. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/04/2113m 44s

Minneapolis Lives In 'A State Of Continuous Trauma' After Another Police Killing

There have been nightly protests in Brooklyn Center, Minn., following Sunday's killing of 20-year-old Daunte Wright, who was shot by former police officer Kim Potter.Police officials have said Wright's death resulted from an "accidental discharge," saying Potter mistook her handgun for her Taser.State Rep. Esther Agbaje tells NPR the city has been living in "a continuous state of trauma." NPR's Adrian Florido has been covering the trial of former Minneapolis police Derek Chauvin, which is taking place just miles from where Wright was killed. Wednesday was the second day for the defense to call witnesses in Chauvin's trial.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/04/2112m 24s

The J & J Pause, Explained — And What It Means For The U.S. Vaccination Effort

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration announced a recommended pause in use of Johnson & Johnson's single-use COVID-19 vaccine, while the agencies investigate reports of a rare but serious blood clot in six people. The pause comes at a time when public health officials face the growing challenge of vaccine hesitancy, as NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports. NPR's Tamara Keith and Pien Huang explain the science behind the pause, and how it's occurring at a challenging moment for the Biden administration. Additional reporting in this episode comes from NPR's Allison Aubrey. The NPR Politics Podcast is also covering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine pause. Listen on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/04/2112m 41s

The Biden Administration's Women-Led Push For Investment In 'Care Infrastructure'

President Biden wants to make a massive investment in infrastructure, and not just in roads and bridges. His administration is proposing big investments in "care infrastructure" — investments designed to help women succeed in the workforce. Three women leading the administration's effort speak to NPR: Janelle Jones, the chief economist at the Department of Labor; Heather Boushey, a member of the White House Council of Economic Advisers; and Jennifer Klein, co-chair of the White House Gender Policy Council. Additional reporting this episode on women and the workforce from NPR's Scott Horsley and Melissa Block. Hannah Rosin spoke to NPR's Michel Martin.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/04/2114m 41s

BONUS: 'We Already Belong'

"To Asian women, not for—there's no speaking for us, splendidly vast and manifold as our people are." So writes Korean-American novelist R.O. Kwon in an essay in Vanity Fair. The essay explores the reasons that R.O. was unable to talk openly with her own mother about rising anti-Asian rhetoric and violence in the past year, and how she finally broke that silence. In this episode, Rough Translation producer Justine Yan talks with R.O. about what the essay meant to her, and how to break familiar silences surrounding Asian American communities.
11/04/2126m 32s

As Anti-Trans Bills Advance, Trans Journalists Weigh In On 'Privilege' Of Reporting

This week Arkansas became the first state to outlaw gender-affirming health care for transgender youth, as the state legislature overrode a veto by Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson. Hutchinson tells NPR why he opposed the bill, which will become law later this summer. Dr. Joshua Safer, the executive director at Mount Sinai's Center for Transgender Medicine and Surgery, explains why gender-affirming therapies — such as puberty blockers or hormone treatment — are safe and healthy for trans youth. Misconceptions about trans people can be shaped by who tells their stories. Three trans journalists weigh in on how that should be done:Imara Jones is the creator of TransLash Media.Kate Sosin is a reporter at The 19th. Orion Rummler is a reporter at Axios. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/04/2114m 22s

Within Biden's Infrastructure Plan Lies An Agenda To Address Climate Change

The details in President Biden's proposed $2 trillion infrastructure plan have a lot to do with protecting the environment. There's a new clean electricity standard and a focus on low-income communities hit hardest by climate change. But will it be enough? NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben reports on how some progressives in congress wished Biden's plan was more ambitious. While many republicans, like Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, see it as an overreach and have vowed to fight it. Dr. Leah Stokes, a professor in the department of political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, says that she'd favor a quicker timeline but still thinks Biden's plan will go a long way for curbing the effects of climate change. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/04/2112m 38s

Amid Record Pandemic Travel, What's Safe? And The Debate Over Vaccine Passports

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's mixed messaging on travel reveals the uncertain future of the pandemic, Dr. Monica Gandhi tells NPR. Gandhi is an infectious disease expert at the University of California San Francisco. In the future, some travelers may be required to verify their vaccine status to enter a stadium or attend a wedding. Dr. Zeke Emanuel, a professor of medical ethics at the University of Pennsylvania and former member of President Biden's Transition COVID-19 Advisory Board, tells NPR so-called vaccine "passports" can be made secure and private. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/04/2113m 9s

The Housing Market Is Wild Right Now — And It's Making Inequality Worse

Home prices are soaring around the U.S. Amid low inventory and historically low interest rates, some buyers are hitting the market to find they can't compete with all-cash offers, or bidding wars that escalate well out of their price range. Sean Hawksford in Bozeman, Mont., is one of those buyers. He told his story to NPR's daily economic podcast, The Indicator. NPR's Chris Arnold explains why the market is so wild right now. And while homebuying is a big financial decision, it's also an emotional one. Those emotions are on full display in a new Netflix show called Marriage or Mortgage. Michelle Singletary, a personal finance columnist for The Washington Post explores what the show reveals about the homebuying process, and why — in more ways than one — it's not for everyone. Here's her recent column about the show.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/04/2113m 42s

How The Pandemic Has Changed Worship In America And The Debate Over Religious Freedom

Two Easters have now come and gone since the pandemic began, and the need for restrictions has not gone away. It has faith communities wondering when things will get back to normal. NPR's Lee Hale reports on how faith leaders have approached worship differently since the pandemic began.
05/04/2114m 24s

'It Hurts People': How Trans Youth Are Being Targeted By State Legislation

Bills under consideration in dozens of states target trans youth by focusing on two things: health care and sports. Some bills have already become law in states including South Dakota, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas and Alabama. One of the harshest measures is an Alabama, where a bill would make it a felony to provide gender-affirming therapy to anyone under the age of 19. NPR's Melissa Block reports on what that would mean for one trans teenager and his family. University of Pittsburgh professor Jules Gill-Peterson explains what she's uncovered about the history of trans youth in America. She is the author of Histories of the Transgender Child.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/04/2114m 13s

High School Seniors Ask, 'What Will College Look Like Next Fall?'

The COVID-19 vaccine rollout is giving us all hope that we'll be back to some sense of normal soon, but the pandemic will likely still play a role in what college life looks like next fall. We asked some high school seniors what questions they have about deciding where to go to school and what college life is like during a pandemic. To help with answering those questions and sharing some advice, we hear from two current college freshmen, Ayiana Davis Polen at Spelman College in Atlanta and Adam Ahmad at the University of California, Berkeley, and NPR reporter Elissa Nadworny.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/04/2113m 54s

Race To Immunize Tightens As Cases Rise; Promising Vaccine News Released

Scientists are growing concerned the U.S. may be headed for a fourth wave. COVID-19 cases are rising rapidly, mirroring an increase in many countries around the world. Harvard epidemiologist Bill Hanage tells NPR he's worried another surge in the U.S. will fuel the spread of the variant known as B.1.1.7. In the meantime, there's new evidence that vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna are effective at preventing viral spread — and that they produce "robust" antibody response in children ages 12-15. NPR's Joe Palca has more. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/03/2112m 56s

Inside The Opening Days Of The Derek Chauvin Trial — And The Trauma It's Resurfacing

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's trial began this week. He's accused of murdering Minneapolis resident George Floyd in May of 2020, when Chauvin was recorded kneeling on Floyd's neck for nearly 10 minutes. NPR's Adrian Florido has been covering the trial and reports from Minneapolis.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/03/2110m 42s

4 Countries Dominate Doses As Pressure Grows For Global Vaccine Solutions

More than half of worldwide vaccine doses have been administered in just four countries — India, China, the U.K. and the U.S. That kind of inequity will "extend the pandemic, globally," says Tom Bollyky, director of the Global Health program at the Council on Foreign Relations.NPR's Tamara Keith reports on the growing pressure for the Biden administration to step up its vaccine diplomacy. NPR's Lauren Frayer tours the largest vaccine factory in the world's top vaccine producing-country, India — a country poised for an even bigger role in global vaccine distribution. You can see photos and more from her report on the Serum Institute of India here.Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Jason Beaubien. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/03/2113m 55s

First-In-The-Nation Effort Advances Debate Over What Form Reparations Should Take

The city of Evanston, Ill., authorized spending on a reparation program this week — believed to be the first of its kind in the country. Here's the report on Evanston's racial history we mention in this episode. Alderwoman Cecily Fleming — an African American resident of Evanston — tells NPR why she voted against the plan. And Dreisen Heath, researcher at the Human Rights Watch, argues that reparations can take many forms. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/03/2113m 33s

One's Antifa. One's In A Militia. How An Ancestry Match Led To An Unlikely Bond

Two distant cousins connect online, only to learn that one is a militant leftist and the other is in a right-wing militia. Their story shows the complexities of a timely question: Who's an extremist? NPR's Hannah Allam followed both men for weeks, charting the growth of their relationship and revealing the moment they met in-person for the first time. NPR is withholding their last name, which the two men share, for security reasons. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/03/2114m 12s

Colorado Shooting Reveals Limits Of State Gun Control — And Steels Activists For More

Colorado has universal background checks, a red flag law and the city of Boulder recently passed an assault weapons ban. None of it was enough to stop a man from shooting and killing 10 people at a Boulder grocery store this week. State Rep. Tom Sullivan, whose son was killed in the 2012 Aurora movie theatre shooting, reacts to the events of this week — and tells NPR why he still believes incremental action at the state level can help prevent gun violence. Additional editing help in this episode from Bente Birkeland of Colorado Public Radio. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/03/2114m 51s

President Biden's Next Big-Ticket Item: A Transformational Infrastructure Plan

America's infrastructure GPA is a C-minus, according to the American Society Of Civil Engineers, which this month called for massive investment in the nation's roads, bridges and transit system. The Biden administration is preparing to propose that kind of investment — along with green energy policies and progressive programs that would total more than $3 trillion. NPR's Mara Liasson reports on the plan, which Biden has signaled he wants to pass with Republican support. That's just one political balancing act Biden will have to negotiate. Another is with a key part of his political coalition: labor unions. NPR's Don Gonyea explains. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's David Schaper. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/03/2114m 12s

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging In Europe. Why The U.S. Is In Better Shape — For Now

In Europe, the COVID-19 vaccine rollout has been slow. The U.S. is doing better — vaccinating as many as 3 million people per day this past weekend. Some of those people were vaccinated by Chichi Ilonzo Momah, who runs Springfield Pharmacy in Springfield, Pa. Momah says local independent pharmacists are trying to make sure no one falls through the cracks. The rollout is also progressing thanks in part to military personnel stationed at vaccine sites around the country that are run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. WUSF's Stephanie Colombini visited one site in Tampa. Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Allison Aubrey. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/03/2111m 50s

BONUS: Sohla El-Waylly on Race, Food and 'Bon Appétit'

Sohla El-Waylly was one of the most vocal critics of her previous employer, Bon Appétit, and eventually resigned after the magazine's racial reckoning.She's now a columnist at Food52 and star of the YouTube series Off-Script with Sohla. She and Sam talk about racism in the food media industry (and everywhere else), The Cheesecake Factory, and certain kinds of mushrooms.
21/03/2127m 2s

Are We Ready For The Next One? The Striking Pandemic Warnings That Were Ignored

Dante Disparte, founder and chairman of Risk Cooperative and member of FEMA's National Advisory Council, explains how lessons from last year can help us in the next pandemic — and why warnings from former Presidents Bush and Obama were not enough to prepare the U.S. for the coronavirus. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/03/2113m 53s

Georgia Shooting: The Latest In A Year Of Trauma And Terror For Asian Americans

Reports of hate incidents against Asian American and Pacific Islanders have skyrocketed in the past year, coinciding with former President Trump's racist rhetoric.The pattern is clear: Asian American and Pacific Islander communities are being terrorized by harassment and violence. State representative Bee Nguyen tells NPR the shootings in Atlanta this week have rattled the Asian-American community in Georgia.New York Congresswoman Grace Meng outlines a bill she's introduced to help address the issue. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/03/2113m 46s

Pregnant In A Pandemic: 'COVID Couldn't Rob Us Of Everything'

Three women come together to talk about the isolation and sacrifice that comes with being pregnant during the pandemic. Those women: Irène Mathieu, a pediatrician in Charlottesville, Virginia; Elizabeth Baron, a mental health counselor in New York City; and Ashley Falcon, a fashion stylist who moved from Florida to New York in the early stages of the pandemic. Economist Hannes Schwandt predicts the pandemic will coincide with a drop in birth rates. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/03/2115m 12s

What's Behind The Increase In Migrant Children At The Southern Border

Thousands of unaccompanied migrant children have shown up at the southern border in recent weeks, overwhelming the government's ability to process and transfer them into the custody of sponsors or family members. Melissa Lopez, director of Diocesan Migrant & Refugee Services Inc, tells NPR what the situations looks like from her vantage point in El Paso. Mark Greenberg, senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, explains why COVID-19 protocols are making it even harder for the government to handle the increase in migrants at the border. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/03/2114m 55s

Young And Radicalized Online: A Familiar Pattern In Capitol Siege Suspects

People who stormed the Capitol were radicalized by what they consumed online and in social media. That should sound familiar: Ten years ago, ISIS used a similar strategy to lure Americans to Syria. Dina Temple-Raston reports on the pattern of radicalization. Tom Dreisbach explores familiar warning signs in the past of one Capitol siege suspect — including hateful speech and violent rhetoric. More reporting from the NPR Investigations team is here.In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/03/2113m 53s

BONUS: Rapper Mac Phipps, After 20 Years In Prison, Is One Step Closer To Freedom

In this episode from NPR's Louder Than A Riot, New Orleans rapper Mac Phipps speaks exclusively to NPR about the power dynamics at play throughout his clemency hearing, and hosts Sidney Madden and Rodney Carmichael examine how his hip-hop career continues to affect his image in the eyes of the law. Find more episodes of Louder Than A Riot on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
15/03/2147m 56s

Breonna Taylor Was Killed By Police 1 Year Ago. What's Changed Since Then?

It's been one year since Breonna Taylor was shot and killed by police in her own apartment. In that year, Taylor's name has become a national symbol in the fight against racial injustice and police violence. But beyond the symbolism, many feel that actual progress has been disappointing.In Louisville, Taylor's death has made other young Black women reflect on their own safety. Reporter Jess Clark of member station WFPL spoke to Black high school students who say Taylor's death changed the way they look at police.Amid the national protests against police brutality and systemic racism, Kentucky State Rep. Attica Scott marched with her daughter. A year later and Scott has introduced legislation in Taylor's name that would ban no-knock search warrants, among other things. Scott spoke with NPR about what change she has seen in the last year.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/03/2114m 13s

The Pandemic Is Still Global. Here's How Vaccination Is Going In Other Countries

Less than 4% of Brazil's population has been vaccinated, and now a dangerous new variant has overwhelmed parts of the country's health care system. Duke University's Miguel Nicolelis tells NPR what it's like in Sao Paulo, where hospitals are turning patients away.Other countries are also struggling to contain the coronavirus, combat disinformation, and distribute vaccines. NPR international correspondents survey the obstacles: Diaa Hadid in Islamabad, Ruth Sherlock in Beirut and Julie McCarthy, who covers the Philippines. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/03/2113m 26s

The Day Everything Changed: Fauci, Collins Reflect On 1 Year Of The Pandemic

March 11 will mark one year since the World Health Organization officially declared the coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic — when schools, businesses and workplaces began shutting down. To mark the moment, two of the nation's top public health officials who have helped lead the U.S. response to the pandemic — Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Francis Collins — spoke to NPR about what they've learned, what they regret and why they're hopeful about the year ahead. Hear their full interview with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly.Collins is the Director of the National Institutes of Health and Fauci is the chief medical adviser to President Biden. And NPR's Brianna Scott reports on how some Americans remember March 11. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/03/2114m 44s

George Floyd Case: Trial Of Former Police Officer Derek Chauvin Underway

Jury selection in the highly anticipated trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin began Tuesday after being delayed amid an effort to gain clarity on the potential of a third-degree murder charge. Chauvin faces charges in the killing of George Floyd last Memorial Day. Jamiles Lartey, who reports on criminal justice and policing for The Marshall Project, explains the delay. NPR's Leila Fadel and Adrian Florido have been covering the trial in Minneapolis. Benjamin Crump, the attorney representing the family of George Floyd, argues that civil suits could deter police violence — even if settlements aren't accompanied by a criminal conviction. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/03/2114m 12s

COVID-19 Relief And Cash Payments Near; CDC Says Vaccinated Can Gather Without Masks

Over the weekend, the Senate approved a version of President Biden's $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, setting up a vote in the House that could send the package to Biden's desk as early as Tuesday. The package contains direct cash payments for many Americans, extended unemployment benefits, billions of dollars for vaccine distribution and a significant change to the child tax credit that could lift millions of American children out of poverty. Indi Dutta-Gupta of the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality explains how the credit would work. And there's new guidance for Americans who've been fully vaccinated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say vaccinated people can feel safe enjoying a few pre-pandemic freedoms. NPR's Allison Aubrey has details. Here's more information on the new CDC recommendations. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/03/2112m 29s

BONUS: 'It's OK That We're Alive'

What do you do after you've survived a mass shooting? In this episode of NPR's Embedded podcast, we hear the staff at the Capital Gazette newspaper return to work after losing five of their colleagues. Trauma reveals itself in unexpected ways, coworkers struggle to figure out how they fit together as a team, and the staff grapples with the question: Is the newspaper that existed before the shooting the same one that exists after?
07/03/2133m 34s

Colombia Welcomes Venezuelan Refugees With Open Arms: Will The U.S. Do The Same?

Colombian President Iván Duque won praise from the United Nations, Pope Francis and the Biden administration with his recent announcement that Colombia would welcome Venezuelan refugees with open arms — providing protected status, work permits and legal residency for up to 10 years. President Duque tells NPR why he's hopeful the move will spur the U.S. toward more aggressive support of Venezuelan migrants, some of whom are currently protected by a deferred deportation order signed by President Trump on his final day in office. Reporter John Otis explains what Colombia's new policy means to Venezuelans already living there. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/03/2114m 20s

Pandemic Inflection Point: Drop In Cases Stalls, States Loosen Public Health Measures

In the U.S., the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines is improving every day, but hundreds of millions of people are still vulnerable. And now, with some states relaxing or eliminating public health measures altogether, many people live in places where the virus will be freer to spread unchecked. KUT reporter Ashley Lopez reports on how business owners and employees are reacting to the rollback of COVID-19 restrictions in Texas. And Rochelle Walensky, the new director for the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, tells NPR this could be a turning point in the pandemic — as more states face crucial decisions about whether to relax public health measures. Here's more from Walensky's interview with NPR's Ari Shapiro. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/03/2114m 16s

Stacey Abrams On The Continuing Fight For Voter Access

The Supreme Court heard arguments this week about voting laws in Arizona that would make ballot access harder for people living in rural areas like the Navajo Nation. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the conservative court isn't likely to strike down the laws which could pave the way for more legislation that cuts into future election turnout. The push for legislation that would restrict voter access comes primarily from Republican lawmakers in state houses across the country. This is despite the fact that many GOP candidates benefited from record turnout last November. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with voting activist Stacey Abrams about her role in turning Georgia blue during the last election and the challenges that new legislation may pose for the future.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/03/2115m 2s

The Growing Threat Of Disinformation And How To 'Deprogram' People Who Believe It

Disinformation isn't new. But in the last decade, the growth of social media has made it easier than ever to spread. That coincided with the political rise of Donald Trump, who rose to power on a wave of disinformation and exited the White House in similar fashion. NPR's Tovia Smith reports on the growing threat of disinformation — and how expert deprogrammers work with people who believe it.Other reporting on disinformation in this episode comes from NPR correspondents Joel Rose and Sarah McCammon. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/03/2112m 55s

Post-Trump, New U.S. Intel Chief Seeks To Rebuild Trust — And Fight Domestic Terror

Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines has taken over after a turbulent time. Former President Donald Trump was frequently at odds with the American intelligence community, including some of his hand-picked intel chiefs. In her first interview after a month on the job, Haines tells NPR's Mary Louise Kelly "it has been a challenging time" for the U.S. intel community. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/03/2114m 59s

BONUS: The Man Behind the March on Washington

Bayard Rustin, the man behind the March on Washington, was one of the most consequential architects of the civil rights movement you may never have heard of. Rustin imagined how nonviolent civil resistance could be used to dismantle segregation in the United States. He organized around the idea for years and eventually introduced it to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. But his identity as a gay man made him a target, obscured his rightful status and made him feel forced to choose, again and again, which aspect of his identity was most important. Listen to more episodes of NPR's Throughline on Apple Podcasts, NPR One or Spotify.
28/02/211h 11m

America's Next Generation Of Legal Marijuana: New State Laws Focus On Racial Equity

It's been almost a decade since Washington and Colorado became the first states in America to legalize recreational marijuana. Now a new generation of states are wrestling with how to do it with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts. WBEZ reporter Mariah Woelfel reports from Chicago on why legalization plans in Illinois are still leaving Black businesses behind. VPM reporters Ben Paviour and Whittney Evans explain how lawmakers in Virginia are designing new marijuana legislation with equity in mind. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/02/2113m 19s

The Challenge To Stop The Next Outbreak Of Homegrown, Extremist Violence In The U.S.

Just because the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is done, it doesn't mean the story of what happened on Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol is over.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wants to set up a commission, similar to the one created after the Sept. 11 attacks, to investigate what happened that day and what measures might prevent a future attack. That's not so easy in this moment, when Congress is often gridlocked over the most basic things. And when lawmakers themselves are also witnesses to the attack — and make partisan arguments about what motivated the Trump extremists who were involved. NPR national security correspondent Hannah Allam was at the Capitol the day it was attacked. She shares how her beat and coverage of domestic extremism has changed over the years, from when she was a teenager living in Oklahoma City during the 1995 bombing to present day. You can follow more of her work here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/02/2113m 17s

America's Energy Future: How Gas Companies Are Fighting To Block Climate Rules

Natural gas utilities face a bleak future in a world increasingly concerned about climate change. An NPR investigation shows how they work to block local climate action and protect their business. More from NPR's Jeff Brady and Dan Charles: As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Nathan Rott.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/02/2112m 15s

Optimism About Case Rates, Vaccines, And Future Of The Pandemic

After more than 500,000 deaths and nearly a full year, experts say there are a growing number of reasons to be optimistic about the direction of the pandemic. Cases, hospitalizations and deaths have all fallen dramatically in recent weeks. Among those falling numbers, a vaccine from Johnson & Johnson that may be authorized by the Food and Drug Administration this week. Dr. Ashish Jha of Brown University explains why the shot is just as desirable as already-authorized vaccines from Pzifer and Moderna. Here's NPR's tool for how to sign up for a COVID-19 vaccination in your state. The Biden administration has promised to ramp up vaccination efforts even more as soon as Congress authorizes more money to do so. NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell has an update on the $1.9 trillion rescue package speeding through the House. Additional reporting on the drop in COVID-19 case rates in this episode came from NPR's Allison Aubrey and Will Stone. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/02/2112m 52s

Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

Last summer, the city of Austin, Texas, slashed the budget for its police department. More recently, the city council voted on a new way to spend some of that money. KUT reporter Audrey McGlinchy explains what other changes have taken place in Austin. A powerful new player is joining calls for reparations for Black Americans: the American Civil Liberties Union. Civil rights attorney Deborah Archer — the ACLU's newly elected board president and the first Black person to assume that role — explains the organization's new stance. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/02/2113m 23s

BONUS: Why 500,000 COVID-19 Deaths May Not Feel Any Different

Why is it so hard to feel the difference between 400,000 and 500,000 COVID-19 deaths — and how might that impact our decision making during the pandemic? In this bonus episode from NPR's daily science podcast Short Wave, psychologist Paul Slovic explains the concept of psychic numbing and how humans can often use emotion, rather than statistics to make decisions about risk. To hear more about new discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines, listen to Short Wave via Apple or Spotify.
21/02/2111m 32s

Memorializing The Deaths Of More Than 500,000 Americans Lost To COVID-19

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 is on track to pass a number next week that once seemed unthinkable: Half a million people in this country dead from the coronavirus.And while the pandemic isn't over yet, and the death toll keeps climbing, artists in every medium have already been thinking about how our country will pay tribute to those we lost.Poets, muralists, and architects all have visions of what a COVID-19 memorial could be. Many of these ideas are about more than just honoring those we've lost to the pandemic. Artists are also thinking about the conditions in society that brought us here.Tracy K. Smith, a former U.S. poet laureate, has already written one poem honoring transit workers in New York who died of the disease. Smith says she wants to see a COVID-19 memorial that has a broader mission, that it needs to invite people in to bridge a divide. Paul Farber runs Monument Lab, an organization that works with cities and states that want to build new monuments. He says he wants to see a COVID-19 monument that is collective experience and evolves over time. He also wants it to serve as a bridge to understanding.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/02/2113m 6s

Texas Is Defined By Energy. How Did The State's Power Grid Fail So Massively?

Millions of people in Texas have gone three or more days without power, water or both. Texas has had winter weather before, so what went so wrong this time? Reporter Mose Buchele of NPR member station KUT in Austin explains why the state's power grid buckled under demand in the storm. And Marshall Shepherd, director of the Atmospheric Sciences Program at the University of Georgia, explains the link between more extreme winter weather and climate change. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Camila Domonoske, who reported on the Texas power grid, Ashley Lopez of KUT, Laura Isensee of Houston Public Media, and Dominic Anthony Walsh of Texas Public Radio. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/02/2113m 40s

Impeachment Fallout At Home And Abroad: GOP Fractured, America 'Tarnished'

After the Senate vote failed to convict former President Donald Trump, a clearer picture of the political consequences is emerging — both for the Republican party and for the United States on the world stage. NPR's Don Gonyea reports on Republican infighting the national, state and local level. Secretary of State Antony Blinken tells NPR that the events of Jan. 6 have came up in conversations he's had with diplomatic counterparts around the world. Read more of Blinken's wide-ranging interview with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/02/2113m 46s

The Intensifying Race Between Coronavirus Variants And Vaccines

There's evidence of at least seven U.S. variants of the coronavirus, while another that emerged from the U.K. is poised to become the dominant strain here by the end of March. One adviser from the Food and Drug Administration tells NPR there's a tipping point to watch for: when a fully vaccinated person winds up hospitalized with a coronavirus variant.NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports on concerns that COVID-19 vaccines themselves could cause the virus to mutate. NPR science reporter Michaeleen Doucleff explains why the story of one COVID-19 patient may hold clues to how variants develop in the first place. For a deeper dive on variants, listen to Michaeleen's recent episode of NPR's Short Wave on Spotify or Apple Podcasts. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/02/2113m 24s

Asylum-Seekers Are Being Unlawfully Shut Out During The Pandemic

The United Nations refugee agency, UNHCR, says more than 60 countries around the world are using COVID-19 as an excuse to skirt international law by closing borders and ports to asylum-seekers. That has contributed to an increase in delayed rescues and unlawful expulsions of refugees to dangerous places. NPR's Joanna Kakissis tells the story of one teenage survivor. And NPR's Ruth Sherlock reports on a doomed journey of Lebanese refugees attempting to cross the Mediterranean sea — where over 1,000 migrants died in 2020. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/02/2111m 30s

Q & A: Expert Advice On Love, Dating, And Pandemic Relationships

We asked for your questions on navigating love and dating during the pandemic. Therapist and sexologist Lexx Brown-James has answers. She's joined by Sam Sanders, host of NPR's news and pop culture show, It's Been A Minute. Listen via Apple or Spotify. And University of Georgia social scientist Dr. Richard Slatcher shares some findings from his global research project, Love In The Time Of COVID. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/02/2114m 50s

Scenes From A Pandemic Economy: 4 American Indicators

The pandemic economy has left different people in vastly different situations. Today, we introduce four American indicators — people whose paths will help us understand the arc of the recovery. Hear their stories now, and we'll follow up with them in a few months: Brooke Neubauer in Nevada, founder of The Just One Project; Lisa Winton of the Winton Machine Company in Georgia; Lee Camp with Arch City Defenders in Missouri; and New Jersey-based hotel owner Bhavish Patel. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/02/2115m 22s

Public School Teachers Weigh In On Vaccines, Masks And Returning To The Classroom

The Biden administration has set a goal: a majority of public schools open "at least one day a week" by the 100th day of his presidency. But it's possible the country is already there — and decisions about when to reopen largely fall to cities and school districts, where administrators and teachers sometimes don't see eye-to-eye. Students are losing a lot of academic ground the longer their schooling is disrupted. Maine Public Radio's Robbie Feinberg reports on how one rural district is trying to reach students who haven't been showing up for online classes. This week, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expected to release new guidelines about how schools can reopen safely, three public school teachers weigh in: Mike Reinholdt of Davenport, Iowa; Maxie Hollingsworth of Houston, Texas; and Pam Gaddy of Baltimore, Md. For more education coverage, follow NPR's Anya Kamentez on Twitter, and check out her recent story "Keep Schools Open All Summer, And Other Bold Ideas To Help Kids Catch Up."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/02/2113m 51s

What Donald Trump's Impeachment Means The 2nd Time Around

In the weeks after Jan. 6. insurrection, even top Republicans like Mitch McConnell said Donald Trump provoked the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol, leaving five people dead. But it appears unlikely enough Republican Senators will find that he bears enough responsibility to warrant conviction in his second impeachment trial — which could prevent him from ever holding office again. Charlie Sykes, founder and editor at large of the conservative site The Bulwark, argues that Republicans are failing to hold themselves accountable. NPR's Melissa Block reports on the future of Trump's "big lie" about the results of the 2020 election. For more impeachment coverage, listen to the NPR Politics Podcast via Apple or Spotify.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/02/2113m 20s

Who's Getting Vaccinated And Who Isn't: NPR Analysis Finds Stark Racial Divide

Using data from several states that have published their own maps and lists of where vaccination sites are located, NPR identified disparities in the locations of COVID-19 vaccination sites in major cities across the Southern U.S. — with most sites placed in whiter neighborhoods. KUT's Ashley Lopez, Shalina Chatlani of NPR's Gulf States Newsroom, and NPR's Sean McMinn explain their findings. Read more here. Also in this episode: how one county in Washington state is trying to make vaccine distribution more equitable. Will Stone reports. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/02/2114m 11s

BONUS: Biden Promises To Grapple With Environmental Racism

People of color experience more air and water pollution than white people and suffer the health impacts. The federal government helped create the problem, and has largely failed to fix it. In this episode of Short Wave, NPR climate reporter Rebecca Hersher talks about the history of environmental racism in the United States, and what Biden's administration can do to avoid the mistakes of the past.Read Rebecca's reporting on how Biden hopes to address the environmental impacts of systemic racism.
07/02/2113m 31s

BONUS: The Lasting Power Of Whitney Houston's National Anthem

Why does Whitney Houston's 1991 Super Bowl national anthem still resonate 30 years later? In this episode of NPR's It's Been A Minute, host Sam Sanders chats with author Danyel Smith about that moment of Black history and what it says about race, patriotism and pop culture. Smith wrote about the significance of that national anthem performance back in 2016 for ESPN.Listen to more episodes of It's Been A Minute on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.
06/02/2125m 4s

Live Performance, The Pandemic And The Domino Effect Of Dark Stages

The pandemic leveled live performance, and the industry is last in line for a return to normal. Musician Zoe Keating and production designer Terry Morgan describe how their work has changed with live venues nationwide shuttered for nearly a year. Venue owner Danya Frank of First Avenue and Jim Ritts of the Paramount Theatre explain why the gears of the performing arts economy are not designed for a slow return to normalcy. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/02/2114m 7s

Life On Minimum Wage: Why The Federal Debate Continues

Raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour is one of President Biden's priorities with the newest COVID-19 relief package. But Republicans say it will hurt small businesses too much and some swing voting Democrats are hesitant too. The history of the minimum wage in the U.S. is tied closely to civil rights. Ellora Derenoncourt, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley, says one theme of the 1963 March on Washington was a call for a higher minimum wage. Many states have a higher minimum wage than the federally mandated $7.25. Arindrajit Dube from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst discusses how those states have fared. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/02/2113m 39s

Third Vaccine On The Way, Fauci Hails 'Spectacular Results'

A third COVID-19 vaccine could receive emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration this month. The vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson is 66% effective in preventing moderate to severe disease, according to a global study. Combined with the two vaccines currently in circulation, the U.S. could have three vaccines that are all highly effective at preventing death or hospitalization due to COVID-19.Despite that promising news, NPR's Richard Harris reports on why the journey to herd immunity still won't be easy.And Rae Ellen Bichelle goes inside a Colorado long-term care facility that has vaccinated nearly all of its residents. They say the initial steps to a return to normalcy feel great.Additional reporting in this episode on the spread of coronavirus variants from NPR's Allison Aubrey.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/02/2112m 29s

Myanmar Explained: How A Coup Followed Unproven Allegations Of Voter Fraud

For months, Myanmar's military party has claimed — without evidence — that its poor performance in the country's November parliamentary elections was the result of voter fraud. This week, when the new Parliament was scheduled to convene, the military launched a coup, detaining top civilian officials including State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi. Michael Sullivan reports from Thailand on the uncertainty over what happens next. Washington Post columnist Fareed Zakaria explains why the coup represents a test for the Biden administration. Zakaria is the author of Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/02/2113m 19s

After Biden's First Actions On Climate Change, How Much More Can He Do Alone?

This past week, President Biden signed executive orders that represent his administration's first actions in the fight against climate change. Some changes will take longer than others — and many more will not be possible without help from Congress. Correspondent Lauren Sommer of NPR's climate team explains the likelihood of that happening — and what Biden could do if it doesn't. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from Wyoming on Biden's ban on federal oil and gas leasing. Most of the oil and gas drilled in Wyoming comes from federal land and communities there are bracing for job losses and school funding cuts.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/02/2112m 35s

BONUS: Can't Stop GameStop

In 2019, GameStop seemed to be just another failing brick-and-mortar business. But a couple of internet dwellers at Wall Street Bets, in a strange corner of the giant forum, reddit, thought the hedge funds were making a mistake. On this episode of NPR's Planet Money: how a standoff between big market movers and an irreverent community of anonymous traders erupted into an epic showdown that is changing the way people think about power on Wall Street.Listen to Planet Money wherever you get your podcasts, including NPR One, Apple Podcasts and Spotify.
30/01/2127m 35s

What Lessons Should News Organizations Learn From Trump's Presidency?

There's is a reckoning happening across the media. Major news organizations are reconsidering what they cover and how. The Trump presidency is one big reason for the self-examination. But this new scrutiny goes beyond politics — beyond Washington, D.C.
29/01/2113m 2s

How Trumpism Led To An Ideological War Over Voice Of America

In its very first broadcast, the U.S.-government-run service called Voice of America pledged honesty."The news may be good and it may be bad. We shall tell you the truth."The idea was to model a free press, especially for audiences in places that might not have one. Places where political parties and governments might pressure or intimidate journalists.But over the past seven months, Voice of America and its federal parent organization, U.S. Agency for Global Media, have been caught in an ideological war. Employees say agency CEO Michael Pack, an appointee of former President Donald Trump, obsessed over staff loyalty and embraced conspiracy theories.NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik talked to more than 60 current and former staffers. He's put together a comprehensive picture of Pack's radical tenure.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/01/2114m 58s

Biden Administration: 'It Will Be Months' Before Widespread Vaccine Availability

President Biden said Tuesday that the federal government's vaccine distribution program is "in worse shape than we anticipated." His administration's coronavirus response team held its first public briefing on Wednesday where officials detailed plans to increase vaccine supply and capacity, but also said it will be months before anyone who wants a vaccine can get one. The lack of supply has led to different challenges in different areas of the country. NPR gathered three reporters to learn more: Blake Farmer with Nashville Public Radio, Amelia Templeton with Oregon Public Broadcasting, and Veronica Zaragovia with WLRN in Miami. Additional reporting this episode from Georgia Public Broadcasting's Grant Blankenskip, who reported on efforts by Georgia residents to get a vaccine. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/01/2113m 55s

Deplatforming: Not A First Amendment Issue, But Still A Tough Call For Big Tech

Removing disinformation — and users who spread it — can come at a cost for web hosts and social media platforms. But studies indicate "deplatforming" does stem the flow of disinformation. Kate Starbird with the University of Washington explains why it's easier to see the effects of deplatforming in the short-term. And NPR's Shannon Bond looks at how one growing social media site is dealing with new attention and new challenges. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Bobby Allyn, who's reported on the removal of Parler by Amazon Web Services.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/01/2113m 16s

'We Have To Stop Rewarding Obstruction:' Will Democrats Nuke The Filibuster?

Adam Jentleson knows firsthand how powerful a tool the filibuster can be — and what's possible without it. He was deputy chief of staff to former Nevada Sen. Harry Reid, who was majority leader in 2013 when Democrats exercised "the nuclear option," eliminating the filibuster for presidential appointees. Now, Jentleson and a growing number of Democrats argue Senate leaders should eliminate the filibuster for legislation, which would enable Democrats to pass major legislation with a simple Senate majority, instead of the current 60-vote threshold. Jentleson lays out his argument in a recent book, Kill Switch: The Rise of the Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/01/2114m 57s

BONUS: Breathe

Breathing is essential to life. And lately, the safety of the air we inhale, or the need to pause and take a deep breath, is on our minds a lot. In this episode of NPR's TED Radio Hour, we explore the power of breath.Guests include former world champion freediver Tanya Streeter, journalist Beth Gardiner, activist Yvette Arellano, paleontologist Emma Schachner, scent historian Caro Verbeek and mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe.Listen to TED Radio Hour wherever you get your podcasts, including NPR One, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Pocket Casts and Spotify.
24/01/2154m 30s

'Battlefield Medicine' In Los Angeles ICU As Biden Launches 'Wartime Effort'

More than 400,000 Americans have been killed by the coronavirus. That's more Americans than were killed in all of World War II, President Biden pointed out this week. He calls his new plan to fight the pandemic a "wartime effort."That effort begins with taking charge of a bottlenecked vaccine rollout. NPR pharmaceutical correspondent Sydney Lupkin reports on several factors that are slowing the process down. And NPR's Yuki Noguchi explores why it may take some time for pharmacies to become major vaccine distribution sites.The need for more vaccine is a national story, but the wait is especially excruciating in Los Angeles. NPR's Leila Fadel visited one hospital pushed to the brink, where doctors compare their work to "battlefield medicine."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/01/2113m 40s

How President Biden's Immigration Plan Would Undo Trump's Signature Policies

President Biden followed through on a day-one promise to send a massive immigration reform bill to Congress. Now the hard part: passing that bill into law. Muzaffar Chishti of New York University's Migration Policy Institute explains the president's plans — and the signal they send to other countries around the world. Biden is also pursuing big changes in how the U.S. admits refugees. Corine Dehabey, an Ohio-based director of the refugee settlement organization Us Together, says families who've been separated for years are looking forward to reuniting.Follow more of NPR's immigration coverage from Southwest correspondent John Burnett. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/01/2114m 38s

President Biden Hails 'Democracy's Day' In Unprecedented Transfer Of Power

"Through a crucible for the ages, America has been tested anew," President Biden said in his inaugural address on Wednesday. "And America has risen to the challenge." Outgoing Vice President Pence was present for the inauguration of the 46th president. President Trump was not. He left the White House in the morning after an overnight issuance of commutations and pardons — including for Steve Bannon, his former adviser who was arrested on charges of wire fraud and money laundering. NPR's Franco Ordonez reports on what President Biden did during his first day in office. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/01/2113m 18s

The 46th President: How Tragedy And Resilience Prepared Joe Biden To Meet A Moment

When Joe Biden takes the oath of office at noon ET on Wednesday, he will become the oldest president to ever hold the office. His journey to the White House spans nearly half a century in public life. New Yorker writer Evan Osnos has written a book about that journey called Joe Biden: The Life, The Run, And What Matters Now. He explains how Biden's deep "acquaintance with suffering" prepared him to meet the country at a moment of grief and loss. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/01/2114m 40s

1 Year, 400,000 Dead: What Could Change This Week About America's Pandemic Response

President-elect Joe Biden has outlined a plan to administer 100 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine in his administration's first 100 days. But before that he'll have to convince Congress to pay for it. NPR White House correspondent Scott Detrow spoke to Vice President-elect Kamala Harris about that, and her reaction to the siege at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Listen to more of their interview on the NPR Politics Podcast on Apple or Spotify. It's been almost a full year since the first case of coronavirus was detected on Jan. 20, 2019 in Washington state. NPR science correspondent Allison Aubrey looks back at what lessons the U.S. has learned — and what lessons we're still learning. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/01/2113m 57s

BONUS: Inside The Capitol Siege

In this episode from the team at NPR's Embedded, hear the stories of two NPR teams that spent January 6th on the grounds of the Capitol — and stories from a lawmaker, photographer, and police officer who were inside the building. Subscribe to or follow Embedded on NPR One, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Pocket Casts, Spotify, and RSS.
16/01/2149m 8s

Their Family Members Are QAnon Followers — And They're At A Loss What To Do About It

The QAnon conspiracy theory originated in 2017, when an anonymous online figure, "Q" started posting on right-wing message boards. Q claims to have top secret government clearance. Q's stories range from false notions about COVID-19 to a cabal running the U.S. government to the claim there's a secret world of satanic pedophiles. This culminates in the belief that President Trump is a kind of savior figure.Today, U.S. authorities are increasingly regarding QAnon as a domestic terror threat — especially following last week's insurrection at the Capitol. But the people in the best position to address that threat are the families of Q followers — and they're at a loss about how to do it.Some of those family members spoke with us about how their family members started following QAnon and how that has affected their relationships. Travis View researches right-wing conspiracies and hosts the podcast QAnon Anonymous. He explains how the QAnon story is not all that different from digital marketing tactics, and how followers become detached from reality.Dannagal Young is an associate professor of communications at the University of Delaware and studies why people latch onto political conspiracy theories. She share some ways to help family members who are seemingly lost down one of these conspiracy rabbit holes.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/01/2114m 11s

What The COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Looks Like Across The World

President-Elect Biden's plan to attack COVID-19 includes a $20 billion plan for vaccine distribution in the U.S., hiring 100,000 public health workers to do vaccine outreach and contact tracing, and funding to ensure supplies of crucial vaccine components like small glass vials. But in order to truly contain and end the COVID-19 pandemic, every country needs to vaccinate its population. As of last week, at least 42 countries had started rolling out safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines, but none of them were low-income countries. The World Health Organization says that's at least in part because rich countries have bought up the majority of the vaccine supply. In South Africa, health official Anban Pillay shares his country's challenge securing doses.NPR correspondents Rob Schmitz in Berlin, Phil Reeves in Rio de Janeiro and Daniel Estrin in Jerusalem discuss how the vaccine rollout looks in Germany, Brazil and Israel. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/01/2114m 59s

House Votes To Impeach, All Eyes On McConnell Amid Concerns About More Violence

House Democrats — joined by 10 Republicans — voted to impeach President Trump on Wednesday. Now the process moves to the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he hasn't made a final decision — and that he'll listen to the legal arguments presented in the Senate. GOP strategist Scott Jennings, who is familiar with McConnell's thinking, spoke to NPR about why that might be. No matter what McConnell does, Trump will not be president by this time next week. But between now and then, there are growing concerns about more violence in Washington, D.C., and in cities around the country, as NPR's Greg Allen has reported.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/01/2111m 10s

Extremists Face Charges As House Moves Toward Impeachment

California Rep. Adam Schiff, who led House Democrats in their first effort to impeach President Trump, tells NPR what they are hoping to achieve in doing it a second time. He spoke to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. And while a debate about the consequences for Trump plays out on Capitol Hill, his supporters are facing consequences of their own in federal court.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/01/2111m 39s

America's Vaccine Plan: What's Working — And What Isn't

More than 25 million vaccines have been distributed by the federal government, but only slightly more than one-third of those have made it into peoples' arms. Vaccine mega-sites are opening in major cities around the country as local officials try to speed up vaccination.There's also been pressure to expand the groups of people who are eligible for the vaccines. From Nashville, WPLN's Blake Farmer reports on how that pressure is often forcing those who administer the shots will to take people's word for it on whether they qualify. One state is doing better than every other when it comes to giving shots: West Virginia. NPR's Yuki Noguchi explains why. Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin, who's looked into how to improve America's vaccine rollout.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/01/2113m 24s

Race And The Capitol Riot: An American Story We've Heard Before

In 1898, white supremacists in Wilmington, N.C., led what is known as the only successful coup ever to take place on American soil. They overthrew the government because Black leaders there had recently been elected by Black voters, explains Vann Newkirk, who wrote about that day for The Atlantic.In some important ways, the attack on the U.S. Capitol this week was also about race. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks to Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, professor of African American studies at Princeton. Vann Newkirk spoke to producer Brianna Scott. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/01/2113m 11s

GOP Faces Trump Reckoning: 'If You Play With Matches, You Will Get Burned'

On Wednesday, in the nation's capital, a mob was incited to violence by the president of the United States. In the years that led up to that moment, many Republicans supported Trump. Now, where does their party go from here?NPR's Ailsa Chang puts that question to two Capitol Hill veterans: Michael Steel, a longtime aid to former Republican House Speaker John Boehner; and Antonia Ferrier, a former longtime staffer to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/01/2114m 26s

Trump Supporters Storm U.S. Capitol, Halting Final Count Of Biden Votes

A joint session of Congress to formally affirm the results of the 2020 presidential election was just getting started on Wednesday when a group of Republicans from the House and the Senate went on record objecting to election results in swing states.The first objection triggered a debate period with each chamber having hours to deliberate. But those sessions were halted as a mob of Pro-Trump extremists stormed the Capitol grounds and sent the entire complex into a lockdown.For more on what happened in Washington, D.C., NPR's congressional correspondent Sue Davis, spoke to All Things Considered hosts Ailsa Chang and Mary Louise Kelly. The bottom line: Joe Biden will be inaugurated in 14 days. And it looks like he'll take office with a Democratic-controlled Senate.Rev. Raphael Warnock spoke with NPR's Noel King after defeating Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler in one of Georgia's runoff elections, according to the Associated Press. Democrat Jon Ossoff defeated Republican Sen. David Perdue in the second Georgia Senate runoff, according to an AP race call.It looks like what helped put the Democrats over the top was Black voter turnout. LaTosha Brown is co-founder of Black Voters Matter, a Georgia group that helped lead get-out-the-vote efforts there. She spoke with NPR about where the fight goes next.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/01/2113m 48s

Why U.S. Vaccinations Started Slow And What We Know About The New Coronavirus Variant

Initially, U.S. officials predicted that as many as 20 million Americans would be fully vaccinated before the end of 2020. And while that many vaccine doses were distributed, only a fraction of them have been administered. The federal government has given states control over distribution plans which has led to different systems with differing levels of success. In one Florida county, Julie Glenn of member station WGCU reports on the haphazard vaccine rollout that has led elderly residents to camp out in tents to get their first shot.As vaccinations lag behind schedule, a new, more contagious variant of the coronavirus is spreading in many countries, including the U.S. The new variant isn't thought to be more deadly, and scientists believe the vaccines currently being administered will work against it. Additional good news is that masks and social distancing will still slow the spread of the new variant.Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Allison Aubrey, who's reported on the slow start to vaccinations, and from NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff, who's reported on the new coronavirus variant. Reporting on the vaccine rollout at the state level came from Will Stone in Seattle, Nashville Public Radio's Blake Farmer, and WBUR's Martha Bebinger.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/01/2112m 21s

All Eyes On Georgia: Senate Hangs In The Balance As Trump Tries To Steal Votes

Georgia was already going to be the center of the political universe this week. Now, leaked audio of a phone call between President Trump and Georgia election officials raises new questions about how far he's willing to go to overturn an election he lost. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly reports on how it's all playing out in Georgia, where control of the U.S. Senate hangs in the balance. She speaks to Fulton County elections director Rick Barron and Emma Hurt of member station WABE. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/01/2114m 23s

Advice For Making (And Succeeding At) Your New Year's Resolution

Back in November, comedian Robyn Schall found an old list of her goals for 2020. She shared the list in a video that went viral — because it turned out a lot of people could relate to a year that didn't go as planned. Gretchen Rubin and R. Eric Thomas have some advice on how to make 2021 a little better. Rubin writes books about happiness and habits — her latest is Outer Order, Inner Calm — and she hosts the podcast Happier with Gretchen Rubin. Listen on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. Thomas dispenses opinions and wisdom as a senior staff writer at elle.com. He's the author of the memoir Here For It.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/01/2113m 10s

The Long Awaited Brexit Deal Is Finally Here

After four and a half tumultuous years in British politics, Brexit is now becoming a reality. NPR's London correspondent Frank Langfitt reports on mixed views about the new deal from a highway outside the Port of Dover along the English Channel, where truckers are trying to cross the border before rules change in the new year. Anand Menon, director of the think tank UK In A Changing Europe, sees the new deal as a win, and says it help avoid further economic disruption.
31/12/2012m 26s

Congress Is Sending Relief But Many Cities And States Didn't Get What They Wanted

While it took time for congress and President Trump to agree on the $900 billion pandemic relief bill, one thing has been certain for a while. Many mayors and governors did not get the money they requested. Tracy Gordon, a senior fellow at the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, explains that while states will get funding for things like public education and vaccine distribution, what mayors and governors really want are unrestricted funds to spend how they'd like. NPR's Ailsa Chang reports on how public transit has been hit especially hard during the pandemic. And scaled-back services, while saving some money, hurt passengers who rely on them.
30/12/2012m 45s

Contact Tracers Struggle to Keep Up As Coronavirus Cases Surge From Holiday Travel

One in every thousand people has died of COVID-19 in the U.S. And California just passed 2 million confirmed coronavirus cases. This surge, likely from Thanksgiving travel, is making contact tracing efforts difficult across the country. Dr. Christina Ghaly, Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, says hospitals are being forced to treat COVID-19 patients in conference rooms and gift shops as beds fill up. To help contain the spread, Brett Dahlberg reports that some health officials in Michigan are asking people to do their own contact tracing. In New York City, WNYC's Fred Mogul found a contact tracer who is making home visits in an effort to alert people in at-risk categories.
29/12/2012m 50s

'Where Are We Going?' Inside The Deadly Decision to Evacuate An Entire Nursing Home

On a crisp morning in late March, health care workers in yellow hazmat suits arrived at St. Joseph's Senior Home in Woodbridge, New Jersey. They were responding to an outbreak of COVID-19 at the facility. But that response would make St. Joe's different than every other long-term facility in the state: it was the only such facility in New Jersey to be completely evacuated.NPR Investigations correspondent Dina Temple-Raston has been digging into why that happened — and whether some residents of St. Joe's might still be alive if it hadn't. More from her reporting is here.
28/12/2014m 18s

BONUS: 12 Memorable Pop Culture Moments From 2020

At the end of every year, the hosts of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour like to look back on some of their favorite things from the last 12 months. In this episode, they revisit some of the TV, film and music that helped us make it through 2020.Here's the full list:1. Moira's wedding officiant outfit in the series finale of Schitt's Creek2. Ted Lasso and the year in escapism3. Uncle Clifford and Lil Murda in the season 1 finale of P-Valley4. Michael Jordan watching interviews about him on an iPad in The Last Dance5. Parasite winning best picture at this year's Oscars, portending the further rise of non-English-language powerhouses6. The first 10 minutes of The Invisible Man7. Kentucky Route Zero8. "Born Under Punches (The Heat Goes On)" from David Byrne's American Utopia9. Fiona Apple chirping like a dolphin on "I Want You To Love Me"10. Cassidy Diamond (played by Shalita Grant) in the third season of Search Party11. "Uncle Naseem" (Season 2, Episode 9) of Ramy12. The Good Place series finale
27/12/2033m 33s

How The Pandemic Is Reshaping Our Holiday Traditions

Nothing could stop Christmas from coming. Not even a pandemic. But this year many of our holiday traditions look a bit different. NPR business correspondent Alina Selyuk reports on how hand sanitizer and face masks have become popular stocking stuffers this year. And we asked you to send in stories about how you're rethinking your celebrations as previous plans have been put on hold.
25/12/2010m 6s

Our Favorite Reads Of 2020 (And Hundreds More)

Every Fall NPR asks our critics and staff to pick their favorite books from the past year. Those nominations - there's hundreds of them - are then sorted down to a semi-manageable number. This year is our largest list yet with 383 titles. Click here to visit NPR's Book Concierge for 2020. The hosts of Consider This all submitted their picks to the list. Here are some of their favorites:Ari Shapiro recommends Susanna Clarke's novel Piranesi. A mythic story about a man who is disoriented and trapped in a mysterious sort of house. Mary Louise Kelly has a suggestion great for a book club. Maggie O'Farrell's Hamnet explores the connection between what was arguably William Shakespeare's greatest play, Hamlet, and the death of his only son four years before. Ailsa Chang's pick is a good read for ages 10 and up. Everything Sad Is Untrue by Daniel Nayeri takes you on a journey through myth, youth and cultural clash as a young boy and his family flee Iran and end up in Oklahoma. Audie Cornish chose to share Just Us by poet Claudia Rankine. It's a collection of essays, photos, poems and conversations that Rankine has been having with friends and strangers about race. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/12/2013m 29s

U.S. Secures More Vaccine Doses As Distribution Continues For Essential Workers

Americans got some good news on Wednesday morning when the White House announced that it had secured another 100 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine.Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar released a statement afterward saying the U.S. will now have enough supply "to vaccinate every American who wants it by June 2021." Even with these announcements questions remain on how exactly everyone will get vaccinated. States are having varying levels of success with the vaccine rollout process. Dr. Jose Romero, Arkansas health secretary and chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention immunization advisory committee, discusses the success Arkansas has had with vaccine distribution and the lessons learned in the process.In Seattle, NPR's Will Stone has been following vaccine distribution, including to health care workers who have been caring for COVID-19 patients for nearly a year. One of the questions that remains as more people get vaccinated is should volunteers who got a placebo during the vaccine trials now be offered the real thing? NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Dr. Steven Goodman of Stanford School of Medicine who is advising the Food and Drug Administration about this.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/12/2012m 12s

Congress Passes Relief Bill, But For Many Americans It Comes Too Late

After seven months since the last coronavirus relief bill, Congress finally passed a new one on Monday. Neither Democrats or Republicans are completely happy with the $900 billion package, but it does provide some relief. Included in the newest bill are extended unemployment benefits and $600 direct deposit payments to most Americans. But for many people who previously lost their jobs and livelihoods, this relief comes too late. NPR's Lauren Hodges reports on the millions of people who are have been in financial limbo since the COVID-19 pandemic hit.And the financial impacts of the pandemic have not been felt evenly. Women and communities of color are bearing the greatest burden. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly spoke with associate professor of economics Michelle Holder of John Jay college at City University of New York, about how industries like retail and hospitality have been disproportionately gutted and when they might return to pre-pandemic levels.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/12/2010m 24s

The Election Was Secure, But Russia Found Other Ways To Interfere In The U.S.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo acknowledged who was behind the cyber attack on Friday, saying Russia used third-party software to get inside the systems of multiple U.S. government agencies.But the attack didn't happen last week. It started in March. To help make sense of how an attack of this magnitude went undiscovered for months, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly spoke with Fiona Hill, who served as President Trump's most senior Russia adviser on the National Security Council until last year.Now that it's clear who was behind the attack, how do deal with Russia will be a big question for the incoming Biden administration. NPR's Russia correspondent Lucian Kim explains how the U.S.-Russia relationship may change as Biden takes office in January.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/12/2013m 56s

BONUS: We Buy A Lot Of Christmas Trees

Every year, Americans buy tens of millions of Christmas trees. But decorative evergreens don't just magically show up on corner lots, waiting to find a home in your living room. There are a bunch of fascinating steps that determine exactly how many Christmas trees get sold, and how expensive they are. On this episode of Planet Money, NPR's Nick Fountain and Robert Smith visit the world's largest auction of Christmas trees — and then see how much green New Yorkers are willing to throw down for some greenery. Listen to more episodes of Planet Money on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
20/12/2028m 21s

Vaccinating Inmates Is Good For Public Health. Why Aren't More States Doing It?

Prisons and jails are hotbeds for COVID-19. Public health experts say they should be given early access to a coronavirus vaccine. But only six states have prioritized vaccination for people who are incarcerated. Sharon Dolovich, director of UCLA's Prison Law & Policy Program, tells NPR why the debate over vaccinating inmates is a particularly American one. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/12/2012m 38s

With 100,000 Restaurants Already Closed, Owners Left Wondering If Help Is Coming

An emerging coronavirus relief package may not do enough to help restaurants hobbled by the pandemic, many of which have struggled to make ends meet all year — with 100,000 restaurants closed on a permanent or long-term basis, according to a survey from the National Restaurant Association.Andrew Genung, the writer behind the restaurant industry newsletter Family Meal, explains why so many restaurants did not get enough help in the first round of relief passed by Congress early in the pandemic. Nya Marshall, owner of Ivy Kitchen and Cocktails in Detroit, describes the adjustments necessary to run her restaurant this year. And at least one restaurant-adjacent business is doing well: Auction Factory, which repairs and sells liquidated restaurant equipment. Cleveland-based owner Russell Cross tells NPR his warehouse is full of equipment from shuttered restaurants.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/12/2014m 9s

When Hospitals Decide Who Deserves Treatment: NPR Investigates 'Denial Of Care'

In an Oregon hospital, a disabled woman fought for her life as her friends and advocates pleaded for proper care. Her case raises the question: Are disabled lives equally valued during a pandemic?NPR investigations correspondent Joseph Shapiro reports on what happened to Sarah McSweeney.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/12/2017m 19s

Electors Seal Biden's Win, Sanders Pushes For Direct Cash Payments

Electors in every state officially sealed Joe Biden's presidential victory this week, and Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., congratulated the president-elect on Tuesday. Biden is now 36 days away from inauguration, waiting to face a public health and economic crisis that is growing by the day.NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid reports on the economic experts close to Biden's team who are advising the next president on how he can offer economic relief to Americans without Congress. And Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., tells NPR why he's urging Democrats to reject an emerging pandemic relief package if it does not include direct cash payments to individual Americans. Sanders spoke to NPR's Ailsa Chang.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/12/2013m 9s

Your Questions Answered: How To Navigate Changing Relationships In The Pandemic

The U.S. officially began vaccinating people against COVID-19 on Monday, starting with Sandra Lindsay, a critical care nurse in New York City. The first vaccination came the same day that the country hit another grim milestone of 300,000 dead from the disease.Though vaccinations have begun, the pandemic is still raging and affecting people in all kinds of ways, including their relationships with partners, family and friends.We asked you to share your questions with us on how to navigate those changing relationships. To help answer those questions, we're joined by Dr. Lexx Brown-James, a marriage and family therapist and sexologist based in St. Louis, and NPR's Cory Turner, who covers parenting and education.To hear more about how parents can help their kids feel less anxious right now, check out this episode of NPR's Life Kit podcast. Listen on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/12/2013m 35s

BONUS: How Effective Are Antibody Treatments For COVID-19?

The Food and Drug Administration has issued emergency use authorizations for two monoclonal antibody treatments for COVID-19 – one produced by Eli Lilly and another by Regeneron. But emergency use authorization doesn't assure the drugs are effective.In this episode of Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast, science correspondent Richard Harris explains how the new treatments work — and whether they could really make a difference for patients with COVID-19. Listen to more episodes of Short Wave on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
13/12/2012m 21s

White House Reporters Reflect On 4 Years As 'Enemies Of The People'

President Trump once told veteran CBS journalist Lesley Stahl why he attacks the press. "I do it to discredit you all and demean you all," he admitted to her in 2017, "so when you write negative stories about me, no one will believe you."Trump made attacks on the press a central fixture of his campaign for president, and of his four years in the White House. As his term comes to a close, three members of the White House Press Corps reflect on what it's been like to cover the 45th president since the beginning. NPR's Tamara Keith, Jeff Mason of Reuters, and Yamiche Alcindor of the PBS NewsHour spoke to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/12/2015m 40s

John Kerry: Restoring American Credibility On Climate Change 'Not So Simple'

In his first round of interviews since President-elect Joe Biden announced John Kerry would be his special envoy for climate, the former Secretary of State tells NPR why restoring American credibility on climate issues will be a key challenge for the Biden administration. Kerry spoke to NPR's Steve Inskeep. NPR's Nathan Rott reports on another climate ambition for the incoming administration: conserving 30% of America's land and water by 2030. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/12/2014m 46s

Vaccine Approval Looks Imminent, But Distrust, Misinformation Have Experts Worried

The Food and Drug Administration could vote as soon as Thursday to approve a COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer for emergency use authorization in the United States. Speaking to NPR this week, FDA head Dr. Stephen Hahn reiterated the government's commitment to vaccine safety. But public opinion polls suggest many Americans are still skeptical of COVID-19 vaccines, and misinformation about them has been spreading online. Renee DiResta of the Stanford Internet Observatory tells NPR why misinformation often takes hold where people are not necessarily looking for it. NPR's Adrian Florido reports public health experts are worried that Latinos and African Americans — communities that are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 — may be less likely to get vaccinated. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/12/2013m 38s

Life After ISIS: A Portrait Of Human Resilience In The Middle East

2020 has been a year of resilience in the face of tragedy. But for much longer, resilience in the face of tragedy has been a defining story of the Middle East. In her final conversation for NPR, international correspondent Jane Arraf reflects on what it's been like to watch that story unfold. Arraf is departing NPR to take on the role as Baghdad bureau chief for The New York Times. Follow her on Twitter here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/12/2014m 29s

COVID Is Straining Rural Hospitals, Where There's No Plan B

Health care facilities in rural areas hard-hit by the coronavirus are running out of ways to provide safe care to patients. Unlike earlier in the pandemic, it's more difficult to find hospitals with capacity to spare. A travel nurse shares an audio diary recorded for NPR in Fargo, N.D., and two health care workers from North Dakota and Utah describe the unique challenges they're facing. WPLN's Blake Farmer and NPR's Carrie Feibel have reported on the staffing challenges hospitals are facing.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/12/2014m 11s

BONUS: Life In The Time Of Coronavirus

"What has this pandemic been like for you?"NPR host Sam Sanders and his team at It's Been A Minute put that question to their listeners and heard from people all over the world with ages ranging from 0 to 99. Their stories will stay with you. Listen to more episodes of It's Been A Minute on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.
06/12/2054m 2s

In Many States, 2020 Election Winners Hold All The Redistricting Power

Every 10 years after the U.S. Census, lawmakers in most states have the power to redraw congressional and state legislative districts. It's called redistricting. The party in power can do it in a way that benefits them politically — and it's perfectly legal. That's called gerrymandering. Now that the 2020 election season is nearly over, a picture is emerging of how redistricting and gerrymandering will unfold in states across the country. NPR's Ari Shapiro spoke to reporters in three state capitals: Ashley Lopez with member station KUT in Austin, Texas; Dirk VanderHart from Oregon Public Broadcasting in Portland; and Steve Harrison of member station WFAE in Charlotte, N.C.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/12/2014m 41s

Trump's Election Denialism Could Hurt His Own Party, And Its Media Allies

President Trump and his allies have spent nearly a month promoting an alternate reality of rigged elections and stolen votes. Now, there's concern in Georgia that some of the president's supporters may sit out a crucial runoff election on January 5, which will determine the balance of power in the Senate, as Lisa Hagen with NPR member station WABE reported. Turnout isn't the only concern for some Republicans in the state. Election officials like Gabriel Sterling have been the target of death threats. Sterling spoke to NPR's Ari Shapiro. Trump's conspiratorial denials of his own defeat have been bolstered by allies from some relatively new media sources — including the right-wing network Newsmax. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik reported on the network and its efforts to outfox Fox News. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/12/2013m 55s

Fauci Predicts Widespread Vaccine Availability By April. Are Americans Ready?

Dr. Anthony Fauci said this week that it's likely that any healthy American who wants a coronavirus vaccine will be able to walk into a drugstore and get one by April. The challenge will be convincing enough people not to put it off. While the vaccine is months away for most, health care personnel and residents of long-term care facilities will be able to receive the first doses when they become available, a committee from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended this week. NPR's Pien Huang has reported on that decision and others by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices. NPR's Andrea Hsu reports on the debate over mandatory vaccines in the workplace. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/12/2013m 38s

Millions In Crisis As Coronavirus Relief Set To Expire At Years' End

Lawmakers have been deadlocked for months on another coronavirus relief package. Now millions of Americans who have relied on emergency spending programs during the pandemic are about to see their benefits expire at the end of the year — unless Congress and the White House can agree to a spending deal before the holidays. NPR correspondents Scott Horsley and Chris Arnold explain what could happen weeks from now if American workers, homeowners, renters and student loan borrowers lose key economic lifelines. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/12/2013m 50s

Why Our Brains Struggle To Make Sense Of COVID-19 Risks

Millions of Americans traveled for Thanksgiving despite pleas not to do so from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Deborah Birx of the White House Coronavirus Task Force says if you're one of them, assume you're infected, get tested and do not go near your friends or family members without a mask on. Because COVID-19 is a largely invisible threat, our brains struggle to comprehend it as dangerous. Dr. Gaurav Suri, a neuroscientist at San Francisco State University, explains how habits can help make the risks of the virus less abstract. Emergency room doctor Leana Wen discusses why it's tempting to make unsafe tradeoffs in day-to-day activities and how to better "budget" our risks.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/11/2011m 0s

BONUS: The Badder, The Better

Brooklyn rapper Bobby Shmurda blew up in 2014 off of his song "Hot N****" and the instantly viral Shmoney Dance. But just months after his breakout hit, Bobby and about a dozen of his friends were arrested and slapped with conspiracy charges in connection with a murder and several other shootings. In this episode of NPR's new podcast Louder Than A Riot, hosts Rodney Carmichael and Sidney Madden head to Clinton Correctional Facility in upstate New York to meet Bobby for an exclusive in-person interview, tour his neighborhood with his crew, grab a bite at his mom's seafood joint and learn new details of the studio raid that changed Bobby's life.Listen to more episodes of Louder Than A Riot on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
29/11/2053m 19s

Student Debt Is Weighing Americans Down. Here's How Biden May Address It

Student loans can crush an individual. And when a lot of people have more debt than they can handle, the effects ripple into the larger economy. Judith Scott-Clayton, an associate professor at Columbia University, discusses the economic impact of the $1.6 trillion Americans collectively owe in student debt. President-elect Joe Biden and some members of Congress have proposed different ways to erase some amount of student debt across the board. NPR's Anya Kamenetz explains the likelihood of those proposals actually working out. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/11/2012m 38s

Play It Forward: A Musical Chain Of Gratitude

What began as a Thanksgiving tradition five years ago for NPR host Ari Shapiro is now a recurring segment on All Things Considered. Play It Forward is a musical chain of gratitude.Shapiro starts the chain with an artist he's thankful for, and then that musician chooses someone they're thankful for, and it continues onward with each artist choosing the next link in the chain. This episode features interviews with John Mayer, Leikeli47, Indigo Girls and Kae Tempest. Listen to all the Play It Forward interviews here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/11/2012m 49s

A Feast For A Few: Rethinking The Traditional Thanksgiving Meal

Thanksgiving is going to look different for many Americans this year. As the coronavirus pandemic rages, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning against traveling to see friends or family, or even gathering with people who do not live with you.But that isn't a reason to forego a delicious, sit-down meal.Three chefs share their scaled-down Thanksgiving recipes. These dishes — Anita Lo's turkey roulade, Aarón Sánchez's brussels sprouts with roasted jalapeño vinaigrette and Sohla El-Waylly's apple (hand) pies — are meant to serve up to four people.Find all three recipes here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/11/2010m 57s

As Biden Transition Picks Up Pace, Trump Lays Government Speedbumps

After an unusually dramatic meeting of the Michigan Board of State Canvassers, the state voted to certify its election results, slamming the door on yet another effort by President Trump to overturn the results of the election. Hours later, Emily Murphy of the General Services Administration officially authorized the use of federal transition funds by President-elect Biden. But while the Biden transition picks up speed, Trump is using his remaining time in office to push through last-minute policy changes and staffing appointments that may complicate things once the President-elect takes office. NPR has a team of reporters following that story: health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin, chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley, and Pentagon reporter Tom Bowman. NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid reported on what role President-elect Biden may play in negotiations over a coronavirus relief package. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/11/2013m 51s

Stunned By Congressional Losses, Democrats Debate The Future

Democrats went into the election expecting to gain seats in the House. Instead, they lost at least eight of them. Virginia Rep. Abigail Spanberger speculated about why in a Nov. 5 conference call, audio of which was obtained by The Washington Post. NPR's Juana Summers reports that the young, activist coalition that voted for Joe Biden plans to pressure his administration to deliver on bold, progressive policies. Outgoing Democratic Sen. Doug Jones tells NPR that bold action in Washington won't be possible without appealing to a broad swath of voters. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/11/2014m 11s

BONUS: Biden And McConnell

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President-elect Joe Biden have a long working relationship. And if republicans retain a majority in the senate, McConnell could be a thorn in the side of the Biden administration's agenda. In this episode of NPR's Embedded, host Kelly McEvers talks to Janet Hook and Jackie Calmes, both currently at the Los Angeles Times, about the relationship between these men who will shape the country for the months and years to come.|Listen to more episodes of Embedded on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
22/11/2023m 39s

The Growing Backlash Against Trump's Efforts To Subvert The Election

Election experts say there is no realistic legal path for President Trump to overturn the results of the 2020 election. But his determination to proceed anyway is doing real damage to the idea of American democracy. A growing number of current and former government officials are speaking out against his efforts. Sue Gordon, former deputy director of national intelligence, tells NPR if this were happening in another country, "we would say democracy was teetering on the edge."And Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a Republican, tells NPR he was pressured by Trump ally Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., to reject certain absentee ballots. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/11/2013m 58s

Vials, Cold Storage, Staggered Doses: The Challenges Of Vaccine Distribution

Distribution of the first doses of a coronavirus vaccine could be mere months away. But how that distribution will work remains a massive logistical puzzle that is still coming together piece by piece. NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on how drug companies and the federal government are planning to ship and store vaccines that must remain frozen, some at temperatures that require special freezers. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston outlines the federal government's $590 million plan to avoid shortages of crucial vials and syringes. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/11/2013m 52s

America's Other Epidemic: The Opioid Crisis Is Worse Than 4 Years Ago

During President Trump's first year in office, 42,000 Americans died of drug overdoses linked to heroin, fentanyl and prescription opioids. After a minor decrease in 2018, deaths rose to a record 50,042 in 2019. That number will likely be even worse for 2020. NPR's Brian Mann reports on the surge of synthetic fentanyl, especially in the western U.S. And NPR's Emily Feng unveils a web of Chinese sellers exporting individual chemical components to produce fentanyl. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/11/2013m 54s

Vaccine Trials Point To December Doses, 'Light At The End Of The Tunnel'

Data from two leading COVID-19 vaccine trials indicate they may be between 90 and 95% effective. Dr. Moncef Slaoui, the chief scientist in charge of the U.S. government's vaccine development program, Operation Warp Speed, tells NPR he's optimistic there is "a light at the end of the tunnel."Dr. Anthony Fauci told NPR the results are worth celebrating — but that they should not be seen as a signal to pull back on public health measures. He also said the first vaccine doses may be available next month. But it will still be months longer before any vaccine is widely available. Two former government health officials — Scott Gottlieb and Andy Slavitt — tell NPR that in the meantime, the pandemic is could kill 200,000 more Americans. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/11/2012m 5s

Barack Obama On Trump's Defeat And Cooperation In A Divided America

Former President Barack Obama talks with NPR's Michel Martin about his time in office, President Trump's pandemic response, the 2020 election and what he thinks President-elect Joe Biden says about the United States right now. In Obama's new memoir, A Promised Land, he writes about his first term in the White House. Read NPR's full interview with Obama here.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/11/2013m 55s

Pandemic Fatigue Q & A: Mental Health, Processing The News, And Staying Occupied

The U.S. is entering the worst of the pandemic. For many, pandemic fatigue set in months ago. Others are struggling anew with cases spiking dramatically almost everywhere in the country. Psychotherapist Gina Moffa and NPR's Linda Holmes answer listener questions about mental health, processing the news, and keeping ourselves occupied.Linda hosts NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour. Listen on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/11/2014m 28s

'There's No Transition': Trump's Non-Existent National Security Handoff

President Trump's refusal to engage in any meaningful national security transition is dangerous, say two former national security officials. Kori Schake with the American Enterprise Institute served on George W. Bush's National Security Council and in senior posts at the Pentagon and the State Department. Harvard's Nicholas Burns served at the State Department and on the National Security Council in every administration from Jimmy Carter to George W. Bush.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/11/2013m 1s

Hospitals Pushed To The Brink, Governors Warn Of Health Care Shortages

The governors of North Dakota, Ohio and Utah all delivered the same message this week: hospital resources normally used for patients with heart attacks, strokes or emergency trauma will soon be overrun by patients with COVID-19. KCUR's Alex Smith reports on rural hospitals that are already at capacity, forcing them to transfer patients to city hospitals. Lydia Mobley, a traveling nurse working in central Michigan, says she sees multiple patients every shift who say they regret not taking the coronavirus more seriously. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/11/2012m 17s

The Consequences Of Election Denialism

We know President Trump lost the election. What we don't know is what will happen between now and Inauguration Day if he refuses to accept the results. In the short term, the Biden transition team cannot access certain government funds, use office space or receive classified intelligence briefings without official recognition of Biden's victory from a government agency called the General Services Administration. NPR's Brian Naylor has reported on the delay. At the Department of Justice, the top prosecutor in charge of election crimes, Richard Pilger, resigned from his position this week. A former DOJ colleague of Pilger's, Justin Levitt, tells NPR that the department is enabling the president's baseless claims of widespread election fraud. And Washington Post columnist David Ignatius explains what might be happening at the Department of Defense, where Trump's election denialism has coincided with a number of high-level firings and a debate over the release of classified information.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/11/2014m 28s

As Senate Hinges On Georgia, GOP Mostly Silent On Biden's Victory

President Trump may be on his way out, but Republicans will have to rely on his voters to hold power in the Senate. If Democrats win two runoff elections in Georgia on January 5, they will win a narrow Senate majority.Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting explains how Republicans in Georgia are attacking the state's election process.LaTosha Brown, co-founder of the Black Voters Matter Fund, explains how Democrats in Georgia turned out voters in the presidential race. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/11/2013m 8s

Joe Biden Could Take Office During The Worst Of The Pandemic. What's His Plan?

In 2008, then President-elect Obama and President Bush set up a join task force to help the incoming administration deal with the financial crisis they were about to inherit. Brown University's Ashish Jha tells NPR a similar effort is needed now to deal with the coronavirus. But so far, there's no sign of any cooperation from the Trump administration.President-elect Biden has established his own task force of scientists and physicians to work on his administration's response to the pandemic. Task force member Dr. Nicole Lurie tells NPR one goal of their effort will be to convince Americans the virus is the enemy — not each other. The Biden administration will also inherit Operation Warp Speed, the government's vaccine development program. Gus Perna is the Army general in charge. He explains how vaccine distribution might work. The pandemic won't be the only public health challenge facing the Biden administration if millions of people lose their health care coverage. That's what could happen if the Supreme Court strikes down the Affordable Care Act, explains Erin Fuse Brown with Georgia State University's College of Law. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/11/2014m 21s

The 2020 Election Has Tested American Democracy. Are We Passing?

Disinformation, foreign interference, a global pandemic and an incumbent president who refused to say he'd accept the results — all were concerns headed into the 2020 election. If those challenges were a test of America's democratic system, did we pass? Jelani Cobb of The New Yorker and election law expert Michael Kang weigh in, with Joe Biden on the verge of becoming the president-elect. Listen to more election coverage from NPR: Up First on Apple Podcasts or Spotify The NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts or SpotifyIn participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/11/2014m 2s

What We're Learning About The Electorate That Made 2020 So Close

Early on election night, when it seemed clear that Joe Biden was underperforming with a specific group of Latino voters in the Miami-Dade County, a narrative began to take hold: the Democratic Party had failed to energize the Latino vote. But as more results came in from across Florida, they told a different story. Biden would have lost the state even if he had performed better in Miami-Dade, because of President Trump's popularity with white voters. NPR's Leila Fadel reports on Democratic head-scratching about the Latino vote, and Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch podcast talks about the enduring power of the white vote in the American electorate. Listen to more election coverage from NPR: Up First on Apple Podcasts or Spotify The NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts or SpotifyIn participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/11/2012m 48s

Historic Turnout Leans Biden With Votes Still Being Counted

Early data suggests 160 million people voted this year — which would be the highest turnout rate since 1900. With an unprecedented number of those votes cast by mail, knowing the results of the presidential election on Tuesday was never a guarantee. We know a little more about the results of congressional elections — and they are not great for Democrats. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis explains.One thing we do know is that voters in 32 states decided on dozens of ballot measures, from legalizing marijuana to raising the minimum wage. Josh Altic with the website Ballotpedia has been tracking those measures.Listen to more election coverage from NPR: Up First on Apple Podcasts or Spotify The NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts or SpotifyIn participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
04/11/2014m 43s

The Electoral College: Why Do We Do It This Way?

The electoral college is a system unlike any other in American democracy. Why does it exist? Ramtin Arablouei and Rund Abdelfatah explored that question on a recent episode of NPR's history podcast, Throughline. Find them on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.NPR senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving explains why more Republicans now support the electoral college — and whether that's likely to change. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/11/2014m 15s

An Unprecedented Election Season Ends The Way It Began: With Voters Locked In

NPR political correspondents Tamara Keith and Asma Khalid reflect on an election season shaped by unprecedented events: a global pandemic, President Trump's COVID-19 diagnosis, and the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — none of which seemed to dramatically change the shape of the race. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/11/2014m 34s

Bonus: The Latinx Vote Comes Of Age

Today, a bonus episode from NPR's Code Switch. For the first time in election history, Latinos are projected to be the second-largest voting demographic in the country. The reason? Gen Z Latinx voters, many of whom are casting a ballot for the first time in 2020. So we asked a bunch of them: Who do you plan to vote for? What issues do you care about? And what do you want the rest of the country to know about you?
01/11/2030m 5s

What To Expect On Election Day — And In The Days After

There is no reason to expect we will know the result of the Presidential election on Tuesday night. Wendy Weiser of the Brennan Center and David Scott, deputy managing editor with the Associated Press, explain why. Part of the reason: a few key states will have millions of mail-in ballots to count after in-person voting has concluded. The Supreme Court ruled this week to allow that counting to proceed in two key states, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Election lawyer Ben Ginsberg has been following those cases. NPR's Joel Rose reports watchdog groups who normally monitor elections abroad for violence and unrest are turning their sights toward the U.S. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/10/2012m 44s

Expectations Vs. Reality: Trump Supporters, Opponents On The Last 4 Years

Four years after Donald Trump won, he turned out to be a better president than many of his supporters hoped — and worse one than many of his opponents feared. That's what NPR's Ari Shapiro found as he re-connected with voters who first spoke to NPR in early 2017, just before Trump was inaugurated. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/10/2013m 10s

Early Voting Points To Possible Record Turnout, With New States In Play

More than 74 million people have already voted. Michael McDonald of the Florida Elections Project tells NPR that could indicate the U.S. is headed for record turnout in a modern election. Maya King of POLITICO has been following the early vote in Georgia, where black voters came close to electing the nation's first black female governor in 2018. NPR's Miles Parks and Pam Fessler explain why it may be too late to vote by mail — and how legal challenges are still complicating the rules around early voting in some states. Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Greg Allen and Barbara Sprunt; Stephen Fowler with Georgia Public Broadcasting and Jen Rice with Houston Public Media.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/10/2011m 41s

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging Past The Summer Peak — And Not Just In The U.S.

The U.S. looks poised to exceed its summer peak, when the country averaged as many as 65,000 cases a day for a 10-day stretch in late July. The seven-day average of cases is now more than 69,000, according to the COVID Tracking Project. The situation is similar in Europe, which just logged more new cases than any week so far.Cases are rising in North Dakota faster than any other state. Fargo Mayor Tim Mahoney recently imposed a mask mandate there. NPR's Will Stone reports on the growing outbreak in the Midwest, where some hospitals may not be able to handle an influx of COVID-19 patients. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/10/2012m 10s

As COVID-19 Cases Climb, How Safe Is It To Go Home For The Holidays?

On Friday, the U.S. hit its highest number of daily coronavirus cases since the pandemic began. Holiday travel could lead to even more drastic and deadly spikes. As cases surge throughout the country, many people are wondering how to plan for the holidays. Is it safe for kids to see their grandparents? Should people be gathering as usual for big Thanksgiving dinners? How should people travel — to drive or to fly? You sent us your questions — and we put them to NPR's Allison Aubrey and David Schaper, who reported out some answers ahead of a usually busy season for gathering and travel.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/10/2011m 59s

How Much Do You Really Know About Your Flood Or Wildfire Risk?

Every year, millions of American renters and homebuyers make decisions about where to live. They have a lot of information to help them make a decision — about everything from schools to public transit to lead paint. But what many never learn, until it's too late, is that their homes are in areas that are increasingly prone to flooding or wildfires. This episode contains elements from a special reporting project by NPR's Rebecca Hersher and Lauren Sommer. You can read an overview of their reporting here. They also have advice for questions to ask about your property when it comes to wildfire and flood risk in a changing climate. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Listen to Embedded on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/10/2014m 50s

Why More White Voters Aren't Supporting President Trump In 2020

Polls show that Joe Biden has strong support among white voters with a college degree, especially white women, young voters, and those who live in cities and suburbs.That support adds up to record support with white voters for a Democratic presidential candidate. Nearly half of white voters, overall, support Joe Biden. NPR's Sam Gringlas spoke with a few of them in battleground states. And NPR's Domenico Montanaro explains why this shift fits a longer pattern of the Republican party losing college-educated whites. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/10/2014m 59s

From Air Travel to Hospital Treatment, We're Still Learning About The Virus

Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR this week that he's "guardedly optimistic" about the prospects of a coronavirus vaccine being approved by the end of the year.In the meantime, scientists are still learning new things about the coronavirus. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports on improvements in medical treatment for COVID-19 patients, and NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff explains new research on air travel. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/10/2012m 4s

Election FAQs: Postmark Deadlines, Ballot Security And How To Track Your Vote

With two weeks until election day and more than 35 million votes already cast, NPR's Miles Parks and Pam Fessler answer your questions about voting, ballots and election security. For more information on voting this year, NPR's Life Kit has a guide to help you out. Read at npr.org or listen on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/10/2013m 38s

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

Women are dropping out of the workforce in much higher numbers than men. Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute explains that women are overrepresented in jobs that have been hit hardest by the pandemic and child care has gotten harder to come by. The situation is especially dire for Latina women, as NPR's Brianna Scott reports. Last month, out of 865,000 women who left the workforce, more than 300,000 were Latina. Victoria de Francesco Soto of The University of Texas at Austin explains why it's not just the pandemic economy hurting women. Some may be left out of the recovery, too. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/10/2012m 2s

The Pandemic Bounceback Abroad: Concerts And Movies In Other Countries

While U.S. movie theaters continue to struggle, the picture is better for the international box office. NPR's Bob Mondello, who's reported on how domestic theaters are getting by, explains why things look more promising abroad. A recent outbreak of the coronavirus in the Chinese city of Qingdao says a lot about how aggressively the country has adopted public health measures. Those measures have led to a return of some music festivals, as NPR's Emily Feng reports. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/10/2012m 1s

Pandemic 'Halftime': U.S. Looks At Lessons Learned As Fall & Holidays Near

As cases spike around the country, Utah is one state changing the way it's approaching the coronavirus. Republican Gov. Gary Herbert has a "new game plan" to beat back record-high cases that threaten to overwhelm the state's hospital system. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says "halftime adjustments" like that are necessary for states to slow the spread of the virus this fall, as more Americans prepare to spend more time indoors. An exclusive NPR survey of contact tracing efforts reveals many states are not prepared to handle the coming surge in cases. NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin explains. And Dr. Anthony Fauci warns Thanksgiving gatherings may accelerate spread even more. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/10/2014m 5s

The Politics At Play In Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Confirmation Hearings

With less than three weeks to go until Election Day, Republicans have the votes to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Her confirmation hearing is now much about the politics of the election. Democrats, including Delaware Sen. Chris Coons, are focused on issues like the future of the Affordable Care Act. While Republicans, as NPR's Melissa Block reports, are emphasizing Barrett's motherhood in an effort to appeal to white suburban voters. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/10/2013m 9s

The U.S. Pandemic Is Stuck In A Cycle Of Endless Ups And Downs

Coronavirus cases fall, so people let their guard down. Cases rise, so they get more vigilant. That's the cycle the U.S. is stuck in. In most states across the country, the number of new coronavirus cases each day is up. That's the situation in Wisconsin, where cases are surging. Infectious disease specialist Dr. Michael Landrum spoke with NPR about what he's been seeing the last several weeks. As a whole, the U.S. is seeing around 50,000 new cases each day. That's an increase from 35,000 a month ago. NPR's Will Stone charts the course of the pandemic's ups and downs over the last nine months, from early cases in Washington state to the current spread of the virus into rural America. And the predictions for winter are grim, as people are likely to spend more time indoors.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/10/2012m 10s

An NPR Investigation Into Lethal Injection: Why It Could Amount To Torture

Lethal injection is commonly thought of as the most painless method of execution. But now many lawyers and doctors are looking inside the bodies of executed inmates and making the case that lethal injection could amount to torture.To take a closer look at this claim, NPR producer Noah Caldwell and a team at All Things Considered obtained more than 300 inmate autopsies through Freedom of Information Act requests. It's the largest collection of lethal injection autopsies in the U.S. They found that more than 80% of the inmates may have experienced the sensation of drowning. Read and listen to the entire investigation here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
12/10/2014m 5s

The Michigan Kidnapping Plot And What's Fueling Right-Wing Extremism

The FBI announced Thursday that it had thwarted a plan by far-right militia members to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, and charged six men in relation to the plot.The plot began as talk on social media sites, with a group of men gathering on Facebook to share anti-government reaction to Whitmer's coronavirus restrictions and shutdowns. Experts say the pandemic, protests, and the words of the president have combined to fuel a rise in right-wing extremism. Cynthia Miller-Idriss, a professor at American University who tracks right-wing extremism, spoke to NPR about how right-wing recruiters are taking advantage of President Trump's hesitancy to condemn white supremacy and militia groups.And while these men have been referred to as members of a "militia," that term has also resurfaced a debate about whether groups like this should actually be referred to as domestic terrorist groups, says Kathleen Belew, an assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago who studies paramilitary and white power groups.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/10/2013m 56s

Pandemic 'Profiteers': Why Billionaires Are Getting Richer During An Economic Crisis

"Excess" profits during wartime have been subject to tax at several points in American history. Writer Anand Giridharadas argues we are at similar point today as billionaire wealth has continued to grow in spite of the pandemic. He is the author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World.Chuck Collins of the Institute for Policy Studies notes U.S. billionaires rebounded quickly from the economic collapse earlier this year.Alan Murray, CEO of Fortune Media, argues that business leaders today are more conscious of social injustice and inequality than the billionaires of the past. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/10/2013m 49s

Millions Of Americans Can't Afford Enough To Eat As Pandemic Relief Stalls In D.C.

Two years ago, about 12% of American households reported they didn't have enough food. Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, that number has nearly doubled. It's even more severe for Black and Hispanic families. Texas Public Radio's Paul Flahive reports on a giant food bank in San Antonio that can barely keep up with the growing demand. Experts say the problem of food insecurity in America needs bigger, longer-term solutions. Erthain Cousin, former U.S. Ambassador to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, tells NPR's Michel Martin the country needs to think bigger than food banks and start investing in businesses that can improve nutrition in low-income communities. And Jim Carnes of Alabama Arise, an organization working to end poverty in Alabama, explains that food insecurity goes hand in hand with poverty. And the main factor driving poverty in the U.S.? Medical expenses. Listen to a special episode of All Things Considered all about food insecurity during the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/10/2013m 45s

President Trump's COVID-19 Treatment Reveals Unequal Burden Of The Disease

President Trump told the country Tuesday: "Don't be afraid of COVID. Don't let it dominate your life." This was in a video published after the president's return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. During his nearly 72-hour stay, Trump received care from top doctors and experimental treatments that are not readily available to the millions of Americans who have tested positive for the coronavirus.Marshall Hatch, a pastor of New Mount Pilgrim Church in Chicago, lost his sister to COVID-19 and says the president's message feels like an insult for families grieving in the wake of this disease. While the vast majority of Americans don't have access to the kind of care that the president received, it's not the only example of how the pandemic is having disproportionate effects on certain groups. California Health Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly explains a new state rule that will tie re-opening plans to improvements in its hardest-hit communities. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/10/2012m 34s

The White House COVID-19 Crisis

The president, first lady, and a growing list of White House staffers have tested positive for the coronavirus. Ever since President Trump left the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday, administration officials — including the president's physician — have been reluctant to share clear and complete information about his health. Zeynep Tufecki, professor at the University of North Carolina, explains how the White House cluster may have developed. The president's niece, psychologist Mary Trump, tells NPR that her family has a hard time confronting the hard reality of disease. Trump is the author of Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/10/2013m 28s

The President Has Coronavirus. What Happens If He Gets Sicker

News broke overnight that President Trump and the first lady tested positive for the coronavirus. The White House says they have mild symptoms. Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, calls the diagnosis "a nightmare." NPR's Rob Schmitz reports on reaction abroad. John Fortier spoke to NPR about what could happen if the president gets sicker. Fortier is the former executive director of the Continuity of Government Commission, a group set up in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks.For more on this story, follow our NPR politics team on their podcast and listen to Up First Saturday morning for the latest.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions, and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/10/2012m 4s

As Social Media Giants Plan For Disinformation, Critics Say It's Not Enough

Facebook and Twitter have plans for an election season rife with disinformation on their platforms. Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg explains what lessons the company learned from 2016 and what they're doing differently this time. She spoke to NPR's Audie Cornish about that, and about the burden of work falling on women during the pandemic. Hear more of their conversation here.Critics say the social media giants are too large to realistically enforce their own policies. NPR's Life Kit has a guide to voting by mail or in-person this election season. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/10/2014m 1s

Trump's Baseless Attacks On Election Integrity Bolstered By Disinformation Online

President Trump used Tuesday night's debate to attack the integrity of the upcoming election with false claims about voter fraud and mail-in ballots. National security officials say claims like those are being amplified on social media by foreign countries — including Russia — and by bad actors in the U.S. NPR's Shannon Bond and Greg Myre report on how government officials and tech companies are handling that disinformation. And NPR's Pam Fessler explains why the President's false claims about voter fraud have election experts worried about conflicts at the polls. NPR's Life Kit has a guide to voting by mail or in-person this election season. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/09/2013m 6s

With 1 Million Dead Worldwide, The Latest On A Coronavirus Vaccine

With 10 vaccine candidates now in phase three trials, one expert predicts another million people worldwide could die within three to six months.One of those vaccine candidates is produced by Novavax. Dr. Gregory Glenn, head of research and development for Novavax, tells NPR he's not concerned about politics tainting the vaccine approval process.While the world waits for a vaccine, NPR science reporter Michaeleen Doucleff reports on a small but growing number of scientists asking: what if we already have a vaccine that could slow the spread of the virus? In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
29/09/2011m 55s

Ahead Of First Presidential Debate, Almost 1,000,000 Americans Have Already Voted

President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden will meet Tuesday night in Cleveland for the first of three presidential debates. Michael McDonald, who runs the U.S. Elections Project at the University of Florida, says almost 1,000,000 people have already voted in this year's election.NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson previews the debate, and political correspondent Scott Detrow looks at what to expect from Joe Biden based on his performance in past debates. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.We're working on an upcoming episode about pandemic precautions and we want to hear from you. Fill out the form on this page and we may follow up on your response. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/09/2012m 39s

What's Next For Breonna Taylor's Family, And The Movement That Followed Her Death

The Kentucky attorney general said this week that police were "justified" in the shooting that killed Breonna Taylor during a botched narcotics raid, and no charges were brought against any officers in her death. The only charges brought were against one officer whose shots went into another apartment. That announcement touched off more protests in Louisville and around the country.Jamiles Lartey of The Marshall Project explains the legal rationale behind the decision. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear explains why he supports the release of grand jury testimony in the case. And Ibram X. Kendi of Boston University's Center for Antiracist Research discusses where the movement for racial justice goes from here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
25/09/2013m 38s

How Countries Around The World Are Coping With New Surge In Coronavirus Cases

India is poised to overtake the U.S. as the country with the most COVID-19 cases. This week the Taj Mahal reopened to tourists for the first time in more than six months. NPR correspondent Lauren Frayer reports on how that's not an indication that the pandemic there has subsided.Across Europe, countries are also seeing cases surge. NPR correspondents Frank Langfitt, Eleanor Beardsley, and Rob Schmitz discuss the rise in cases, new restrictions and how people are coping in the U.K., France and Germany.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/09/2014m 14s

What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means for Abortion — And The 2020 Election

This week Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol. She'll be the first woman in history to do so. Ginsburg's death sparked record political donations from Democrats, explains Jessica Taylor of Cook Political Report. Those donations may help Democrats in an uphill battle to retake the Senate. Meanwhile, Senate Republicans appear to have the numbers to fill Ginsburg's seat with a conservative nominee, which would shift the balance of power on the court. Professor Mary Ziegler of Florida State University explains why that could change the outcome of several cases concerning abortion restrictions that could land before the Supreme Court. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/09/2013m 41s

White Support For BLM Falls, And A Key Police Reform Effort Is Coming Up Short

Daniel Prude died of asphyxia a week after his brother called 911 on March 23. His death was ruled a homicide. Joe Prude told NPR his brother was having a mental health crisis. Calls like that make up an estimated 20% of police calls. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports that efforts to reform how police respond — with crisis intervention teams — have fallen short.And as protests for racial justice have continued, public support for the Black Lives Matter movement has fallen — especially among white Americans. NPR's Brian Mann and Elizabeth Baker explain why activists say they need more support from white protesters. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/09/2014m 13s

With Nearly 200,000 Dead, Health Care Workers Struggle To Endure

The coronavirus has killed nearly 200,000 people in America — far more than in any other country, according to Johns Hopkins University. And experts are predicting a new spike of cases this fall. It's not clear exactly how many of the dead are health care workers, who remain especially vulnerable to the virus. Dr. Claire Rezba has been tracking and documenting their deaths on Twitter. Christopher Friese with the University of Michigan School of Nursing explains how we all feel the effects of a health care system whose workers are stretched to the brink.NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports on a crucial advancements health care workers have made that mean ICU patients are more likely to survive now than they were at the outset of the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/09/2014m 28s

Costs Of Climate Change Continue To Rise As Storms Become More Destructive

There have been so many tropical storms this year that the National Hurricane Center has already made it through the alphabet to name the storms. The last storm name started with "W" (there are no X, Y or Z names). Now, storms will be named using the Greek alphabet. In the last five years, the United States has lost $500 billion because of climate driven weather disasters, including storms and fires. That estimate by the federal government doesn't even include the storms that have hit the Southern coasts in 2020.Hurricanes and wildfires are getting more destructive. And with a world that's getting hotter, NPR's Rebecca Hersher and Nathan Rott report that the costs of these disasters will continue to go up. The change to energy sources with smaller carbon footprints comes with its own risks, too. NPR's Kat Lonsdorf went to Japan to visit the Fukushima region — the site of a nuclear disaster in 2011. Now, people there are working to make the region completely powered by renewables by 2040.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgYou can see more of Kat Lonsdorf's reporting from Fukushima here.
18/09/2012m 35s

This Election Season Is Shaping Up To Be The Most Litigated Ever

During the 2000 Presidential election season, it took 36 days and a Supreme Court decision before George W. Bush became the 43rd president of the United States.Before that final Supreme Court decision, there was a five-week battle over the ballots, the rules, the laws and the courts. The amount of litigation and lawyers involved has been called "unprecedented." But what was unprecedented two decades ago looks quaint in 2020.This year campaigns and political parties have staffed up their legal war rooms, making this election season one of the most litigated ever. A lot of the on-going lawsuits are due to coronavirus-related election issues, with at least 248 nationwide.Three of the lawyers preparing for this election season take us from where they were on election night in 2000 to the work they're doing now. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgSpecial thanks to Sam Gringlas and Courtney Dorning for reporting featured in this episode.
17/09/2012m 55s

Who Was Breonna Taylor Before She Became The Face Of A Movement?

Breonna Taylor was shot and killed by police in March. Her killing in Louisville, Ky., was part of the fuel for the nationwide protests against police brutality and systemic racism this spring and summer. On Tuesday, an announcement came that the city of Louisville had reached a $12 million settlement in a civil lawsuit brought against it. But Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, says this is only the beginning when it comes to getting full justice. There are on-going state and federal investigations, but still no criminal charges against any of the officers involved. Before she became the face of a movement, Taylor was a daughter, a niece and a treasured friend. Ahead of what would have been Taylor's 27th birthday, NPR's Ari Shapiro went to Louisville to speak with her family and friends about how they remember Taylor. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgSpecial thanks to Becky Sullivan, Sam Gringlas, Sarah Handel, Jason Fuller and Ari Shapiro for the reporting featured in this episode.
16/09/2014m 3s

Conspiracies Add Fuel To An Already Challenging Wildfire Season

Wildfires in Western states aren't slowing down and conspiracy theories about who started them are only making things harder for responders. Conrad Wilson from Oregon Public Broadcasting reports on how claims of Antifa arsonists have clogged up the phone lines for 911 dispatchers in some Oregon towns. And NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Nick Clegg, Facebook's Vice President of Global Affairs and Communication, about the company's decision to remove some misinformation about the fires — and their broader attempts to stop the spread of misinformation online.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
15/09/2012m 17s

Journalist Bob Woodward Says Trump Is 'The Wrong Man For The Job'

If President Trump knew how contagious and potentially deadly the coronavirus was back in February, why didn't he express that to the American public? That's the question Trump has been facing since last week, when a recording of him expressing a desire to "play down" the virus went public. The audio came from interviews with Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward that he conducted for his latest book, Rage. In an interview with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly, Woodward comes to the conclusion that the president failed to protect the country from the virus and is "the wrong man for the job."Listen to more of the Bob Woodward interview.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.
14/09/2012m 6s

Wildfires Have Gone From Bad To Worse — And More Are Inevitable

More than 3 million acres have burned in California this wildfire season. The previous record in a single season was 1.7 million, two years ago. Towns are being decimated across California, Oregon and Washington — and firefighting resources are maxed out, as NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from Boise, Idaho. In California, NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on an effort to fight fire with fire — something some Native American tribes have been doing for a long time.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
11/09/2013m 20s

Why Are So Many Americans Hesitant To Get A COVID-19 Vaccine?

As trials continue for a coronavirus vaccine, some of the world's biggest drug companies have come together in an unusual way. This week, nine drugmakers released a joint statement pledging to not submit a coronavirus vaccine to the Food and Drug Administration unless it's shown to be safe and effective in large clinical trials. NPR's Sydney Lupkin reports that the statement comes as a commitment to science, at a time when some Americans have expressed concern that the trials are being rushed.Part of this concern comes from those who feel politics are influencing the processes vaccines must go through. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have told states a potential vaccine may be ready for distribution as soon as late October — right before Election Day. But when speaking with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly, Dr. Moncef Slaoui, chief scientific adviser to Operation Warp Speed, said there is a "very low chance" a vaccine will be ready by then. While some Americans are skeptical about a coronavirus vaccine, it doesn't seem like many of those people work on Wall Street. Each time a new vaccine trial phase is announced or a new scientific hurdle is cleared, drug company stock goes up. NPR's Tom Dreisbach reported that executives at one company took advantage of those rising stock prices.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
10/09/2012m 50s

Gen Z Is Getting Ready To Vote. Are Political Parties Speaking To Them?

Youth voter turnout exceeded expectations in 2018 and may do so again in 2020. Generation Z — those born after 1996 — is the most pro-government and anti-Trump generation, according to the Pew Research Center. But Democrats can't count on those voters to be automatic allies. Gen Z voters in the LA area spoke with NPR host Ailsa Chang ahead of November's election. They discussed today's Democratic party, and why they will — and won't — be voting for Joe Biden.While Gen Z Democrats are split on Biden, young Republicans are deciding whether they will support President Trump. NPR political reporter Juana Summers spoke to young Republicans about their choices and the future of the GOP.Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, told NPR that young voters are more concerned with issues and values than with identity and branding. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
09/09/2013m 33s

School Is Off To A Slow Start, And It's Going To Be A Long Year

With Labor Day weekend gone, summer is unofficially over — and millions of children head back to school this week, many virtually. Two teachers — Rosie Reid in California and Lynette Stant in Arizona — share how things are going in their schools so far. Many states have decided to allow high school football to go forward, even if kids are not in school. NPR's Tom Goldman reports that one coach in Alabama is demanding a coronavirus testing program for his players. Students who are not in school are not just missing out on in-person education. Many are missing free or reduced-cost meals. NPR's Cory Turner reports on how some school districts are trying to feed students when they're not in school. And for many parents who can't work at home, no school means a need for child care. But a recent study suggests millions of child care centers may not reopen after the pandemic, as Kavitha Cardoza with member station WAMU reports. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
08/09/2012m 22s

What's Driving California's Biggest-Ever Wildfire Season

California set a new record high this week for the most acres burned in a single wildfire season. In an average season, 300,000 acres burn. This year more than 2 million acres have been scorched — and the season isn't over yet. Some communities have taken actions to prevent fires from spreading, but as NPR's Nathan Rott and Lauren Sommer report, those efforts may not be enough.Fire itself isn't the only threat to people. NPR's daily science podcast Short Wave looked into the science of wildfire smoke and how far-reaching it can be. Listen on Apple or Spotify. Reporter Erika Mahoney from member station KAZU has more on dual threats facing farmworkers: wildfire smoke and COVID-19. As these fires have been burning, other regions across the country have also faced extreme weather. Hurricane forecasters are watching multiple storm systems in the Atlantic that could develop into tropical storms in what has already been an extremely busy hurricane season. NPR's Rebecca Hersher, Nathan Rott, and Lauren Sommer on the growing threat of extreme weather due to climate change. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
07/09/2013m 6s

Banning Evictions Should Help The Economy. But Can The CDC Do That?

Jerome Powell, the chair of the Federal Reserve, told NPR today that keeping people in their houses and 'connected to the economy' will cost money now, but pay dividends later. But the White House and Congress have been unable to agree on a deal for additional economic relief, millions of people are still unemployed, and many states now have no eviction protection. The Trump administration issued an eviction ban through the CDC this week. NPR's Chris Arnold and Selena Simmons-Duffin reported on the CDC's temporary halt on evictions and the legal issues that will likely follow. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
04/09/2011m 16s

The President's New Advisor Is A Fan Of 'Herd Immunity' — And Scientists Are Worried

As the Northern Hemisphere prepares for a flu season with COVID-19, there are lessons to be learned from the south. Countries like Australia and Argentina made it through the middle of winter with very few cases of the flu. That could be thanks to social distancing measures in place to fight the coronavirus. NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce reported on flu in the southern hemisphere and the possibility that it could mix with the coronavirus. NPR's Tamara Keith and Geoff Brumfiel take a look at President Trump's new health advisor, Dr. Scott Atlas. He has no background in infectious diseases and his ideas are worrying scientists who do. Mary Louise Kelly spoke with Moncef Slaoui, chief adviser for the coronavirus vaccine development program, Operation Warp Speed, about the status of vaccines in the U.S. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
03/09/2013m 20s

President 'Heaping Fuel On The Fire' Of Unrest, Ex-Trump DHS Official Says

President Trump has stoked tensions and repeatedly failed to condemn acts of violence from racially — and ethnically — motivated attackers, says Elizabeth Neumann, former assistant secretary in the Department of Homeland Security. Neumann left her job in April and is now speaking publicly about her experience in the administration. She told NPR's Steve Inskeep why she no longer supports the president — and how his rhetoric has fueled unrest in Kenosha, Wis., and elsewhere across the country. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org
02/09/2015m 2s

Getting Back To School Isn't Easy For Anyone — But It's A Lot Harder For Some

It's September and millions of kids are going back to school this month. Millions more already have. And while some students are beginning the new year in physical classrooms, many are still learning in online classrooms that schools transitioned to when the pandemic began in March. Remote learning isn't easy for anyone, but it's especially challenging for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other learning disabilities. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports on the challenges facing these students and their parents, who are often required to become educators to make it work.Not all parents have the privilege of being able to help their children with remote learning though. Many students also face the challenge of logging on for school without reliable Internet. NPR's Anya Kamenetz and WWNO's Aubri Juhasz report on "learning hubs" that offer free child care and additional learning resources — but only for a lucky few.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/09/2011m 20s

Race, Hollywood, And The Rise Of Chadwick Boseman

Chadwick Boseman had raw talent, world-class training and the will to defy Hollywood gatekeepers. As a college student at Howard University, he had a helping hand from Denzel Washington. Boseman often spoke about the impact of that contribution and how it helped him chart his own path.Boseman died on Friday after battling colon cancer for four years. He was 43. Today, we look at what his success reveals about race in America — and in Hollywood.Jamil Smith, a senior writer at Rolling Stone, profiled Boseman for Time Magazine in 2018. Smith says even before the premiere of Black Panther, Boseman seemed to know what the film would mean for pop culture and how its success could reshape Hollywood.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/08/2012m 32s

Scientists Fear The Trump Administration Is Putting Politics Before Public Health

From therapeutics to testing to vaccine development, public health experts are increasingly worried the Trump administration is letting politics guide public health decisions. NPR's Richard Harris reports on a quiet change to testing guidelines made by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week. NPR's Joe Palca explains what protections exist to insulate the vaccine development process from political influence. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/08/2012m 39s

The Reaction To Kenosha, From Pro Sports To Washington, D.C.

Professional athletes from several leagues said they would not play scheduled games Wednesday night in response to events in Kenosha, Wis.Basketball, baseball, tennis and soccer players announced in the last 24 hours that they would not play scheduled games. These decisions come after Jacob Blake, a Black father was shot by police in Kenosha on Sunday. NPR spoke to the lawyer representing Blake's family, who said earlier this week that Blake is paralyzed from the waist down.Ahead of the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington, NPR's Cheryl Corley reports on an upcoming march for racial justice.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/08/2013m 21s

2016 On Loop: GOP Targets White Voters Amid Police Shootings, Protests

Donald Trump told the Republican National Convention: "The crime and violence that today afflicts our nation will soon — and I mean very soon — come to an end." That was in 2016. Today the president and his party are reprising a similar pitch to voters, as police shootings and the protests that follow them continue. NPR's Ayesha Rascoe reports on how the president's 'law and order' message has changed over time. And Evan Osnos of The New Yorker explains why some white voters are still sticking with the GOP. He wrote about that in his recent piece, "How Greenwich Republicans Learned To Love Trump."Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
26/08/2013m 37s

Believers Of Internet Hoax 'QAnon' Could Be Headed To Congress

The FBI has called it a potential domestic terror threat. The President says he doesn't know much. Now, congressional candidates who've signaled support for the internet hoax 'QAnon' are on the ballot this November. Email the show at considerthis@npr.org.
25/08/2013m 51s

Postmaster General Says 'No, I Will Not' Put Mail Sorting Machines Back

Louis DeJoy testified in front of the House Oversight Committee today. He denied ordering the removal of mail sorting machines, but also said he would not put them back into operation. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on how the recent slowdown in mail service is hurting Americans in rural areas — people who helped elect President Trump. NPR's Planet Money tells the story of how the USPS got so strapped for cash in the first place. Listen to their full episode on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/08/2011m 55s

Voters React To A Virtual Convention Unlike Any Before

For the first time in modern history, a major political party convention was not about the optics, the crowds, or arena-sized production value. The Democratic National Convention, held virtually, was less about the medium and more about the message. NPR spoke to three Democratic voters to hear what they thought. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/08/2013m 28s

What Would A Biden-Harris Administration Look Like?

Former President Barack Obama reportedly changed the speaking order during Wednesday night's Democratic National Convention so that he would speak before Vice Presidential nominee Kamala Harris, symbolizing a passing of the torch from one political generation to another. So what would a Biden-Harris administration look like?NPR's Susan Davis explains that while Biden would inherit new problems caused by the pandemic, he'll also face long-standing issues with Congress. And NPR's Carrie Johnson explores what Joe Biden and Kamala Harris have said about the possibility of a Biden administration Department of Justice prosecuting President Trump — if he's voted out of office. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/08/2013m 40s

Chaos And Confusion: The President, The Postal Service, And Voting By Mail

For months President Trump has tried to suggest voting by mail is not reliable, while 'absentee' voting is. There's no difference. NPR's Pam Fessler reports some states are trying to make the process easier by tweaking the deadline by which ballots must be postmarked. And reporter Frank Morris explains what's happening to hundreds of mail sorting machines that have been taken out of service at postal locations around the country. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
19/08/2013m 17s

Can College And COVID Co-Exist?

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill welcomed students back to campus, only to cancel all in-person classes a week later. Can any college campus really open while the virus is still so widespread? NPR's Elissa Nadworny reports on what it looks like to try, from The University Of Georgia. And NPR's Sequoia Carrillo reports on how U.S. military academies are making it work. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
18/08/2013m 4s

Why Are Testing Rates Going Down?

Testing is down 40% in two of the hardest-hit states — Texas and Florida. Ashish Jha of Harvard's Global Health Institute explains what might be going on. NPR's Alison Aubrey describes a new COVID-19 test developed by Yale University that works with saliva. And NPR's Kirk Sielger reports on a school district in Idaho that's preparing to reopen — and possibly close right back down again. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/08/2013m 2s

The 2020 Census Could Be The Least Accurate Ever — And It's Ending A Month Early

The Census Bureau has said it needs more time to complete their count of every person living in the country. But the Trump administration is ending the effort a month earlier than planned. Census experts worry it could lead to an undercount of historically under-represented groups. Find more coverage of the census from NPR's Hansi Lo Wang, or follow him on Twitter. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/08/2014m 31s

Congress Is Stuck On Coronavirus Aid. What's President Trump Doing?

Democrats and Republicans have been unable to agree on a new coronavirus aid package. The president has his own plan — a handful of executive orders that would delay the federal payroll tax and provide a smaller amount of federal unemployment benefits than existed before. But those efforts would not help millions of Americans who've been out of work for months. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/08/2014m 28s

Former 'Top Cop' Kamala Harris And America's Reckoning With Police

No major political party has ever put a woman of color on a presidential ticket. Until now, when Senator Kamala Harris — a former district attorney and state attorney general — is meeting a moment of national reckoning with the role of law enforcement in American life. Email the show at considerthis@npr.org.
12/08/2012m 43s

What's Changing At The Postal Service, And What It Could Mean For 2020

More Americans are expected to vote by mail this year than ever before. But President Trump has called the U.S. Postal Service "a joke," and now a major GOP donor runs the organization. A USPS employee tells NPR's Noel King that changes from the new Postmaster General are making her job harder.And NPR's Pam Fessler reports that secure drop boxes for ballots could help some states rely less on the mail.If you want to hear NPR's latest coverage on Joe Biden's pick for Vice President, Senator Kamala Harris, the NPR Politics Podcast will have a new episode on Tuesday evening — listen on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. NPR's Up First will have more Wednesday morning — also on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
11/08/2013m 28s

5,000,000 Cases And Counting: The U.S. Is Still Failing To Contain The Virus

A school district in Georgia learned firsthand last week that the virus is almost impossible to contain — especially without masks and social distancing. A new effort in New York City encourages travelers to self-isolate when they get into town. And public health workers in Texas and California explain that the size of the outbreak makes contact tracing a huge challenge. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/08/2012m 22s

President Trump Wants To Ban TikTok. Is It Really A National Security Threat?

The app doesn't seem to collect any more data than other social media platforms. But the Trump administration argues that data could fall into the hands of the Chinese government. NPR's Bobby Allyn reported on TikTok's role in the racial justice movement. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/08/2011m 25s

From Online Conventions To Teen Poll Workers, The Virus Is Transforming Election 2020

States are scrambling to replace older poll workers with younger ones. The two major political parties will hold their conventions mostly online. And in one big battleground state, the pandemic is shifting the political geography. NPR's latest battleground state map is here. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/08/2012m 35s

The Patchwork Pandemic Continues As New States Approach A 'Danger Point'

First New York, then the Sun Belt. Now, new states like Illinois and Mississippi are urging residents to wear masks and take the virus more seriously. Bars remain one of the most dangerous places to be during the pandemic. Reporter Will Stone explains why, from Seattle.While Michigan and New York saw similar spikes in cases near the beginning of the pandemic, New York has flattened the curve. Michigan hasn't. Reporters Kate Wells and Fred Mogul discuss what lessons can be learned from the disparity. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
05/08/2012m 45s

Americans Want To Go Back To Normal, But 'Normal' Is What Got Us Here

After rising for weeks, the rate of daily COVID-19 cases in the U.S. has started to level off. But now, just as we saw in the spring, the country is facing a spike in deaths. In the new issue of The Atlantic, two stories share the cover. One, by Ed Yong, is about the pandemic. The other, by Ibram Kendi, is about racism in America. Both ask the same question: how did it come to this? Email the show at considerthis@npr.org.
04/08/2011m 5s

The Virus Is Out Of Control, And Kids Are Headed Back To School Anyway

Millions of students are getting ready to head back to school. Some already have. NPR's Anya Kamentez reports on what happens when positive cases crop up — as they inevitably will.School nurses understand the challenges of returning to school safely better than just about anyone. But NPR's Clare Lombardo reports somenurses have no input in the process. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/08/2011m 39s

Slow Mail, Misinformation, And The Pandemic: What Could Go Wrong On Election Day 2020

Rosa Brooks, law professor at Georgetown University, recently helped organize an experiment to game out what might happen if the winner on election night isn't immediately clear. She explains what she found. And NPR's Sally Herships reports on cuts at the postal service — and concerns they're politically motivated. Garrett Graff wrote about how election day could go off the rails for Politico Magazine.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
31/07/2012m 13s

The U.S. Has Lost Control Of The Coronavirus. What Now?

The spread of the virus exceeds our capacity to test, contact trace, and isolate those who test positive. Some public health experts say the only option that remains is a second shutdown. NPR's Rob Stein reports on what that would look like. Derek Thompson, writer and editor at The Atlantic, says there's another part of our virus strategy we may need to rethink. He calls it 'hygiene theater.' Email the show at considerthis@npr.org.
30/07/2012m 33s

In The Pandemic, Big Tech Is Bigger Than Ever. Should Consumers Be Worried?

The CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google faced questions today from a House subcommittee. Some lawmakers believe those companies have too much economic and political power. Former Facebook policy executive Dipayan Ghosh agrees. Email the show at considerthis@npr.org.
29/07/2010m 46s

John Lewis Fought For Voting Rights His Entire Life. Why His Work Is Still Unfinished

John Lewis, the civil rights icon and late congressman from Georgia who represented Atlanta for more than three decades, spent his life fighting for equal voting rights in America. Myrna Perez, Director of the Voting Rights and Elections Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, explains why his work remains unfinished. Lewis spoke to 'Fresh Air' in 2009. Listen on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
28/07/2014m 23s

First Phase III Vaccine Trial Underway, Government Seeks Thousands Of Volunteers

This morning in Savannah, Georgia, the first volunteer was injected in a phase-three vaccine trial administered by Moderna and the National Institutes of Health. Dr Anthony Fauci hopes that up to 15,000 volunteers will be in place by the end of the week. (Tens of thousands more will be needed for additional vaccine trials.) It will take months to learn if the vaccine produces an effective immune response. Scientists who've studied antibody reactions in coronavirus patients have reason to be optimistic, at least in the short-term. And Dr Elke Webber, psychology professor at Princeton University, explains why the pandemic may be getting too big to wrap our heads around. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
27/07/2011m 12s

Expanded Unemployment Set To Expire; Americans Face 'Utterly Preventable' Evictions

More than 25 million Americans have been receiving expanded federal unemployment benefits — $600 a week. Those benefits disappear in days.Congress is unlikely to agree on new package before the end of next week. And temporary moratoriums on evictions are coming to an end in many places around the country. NPR's Noel King spoke with Matt Desmond, founder of Princeton University's Eviction Lab, about what could happen if Congress doesn't provide more help, and why so many American families were already in trouble before the pandemic.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
24/07/2010m 28s

The Fight Over Confederate Statues, And How They Could Tell Another Story

Monument Avenue is a large, tree-lined street in Richmond, Virginia that used to have several confederate statues and monuments. In the wake of protests against racism and police brutality, the city has removed most of them. But a monument of Robert E. Lee still stands — for now. Even before the statues started coming down, WVTF's Mallory Noe-Payne reports that Richmond residents began reclaiming the space where it stands. And historian Julian Hayter tells NPR's Scott Simon there's a way for confederate statues to tell a different story. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
23/07/2012m 47s

Voting By Mail Will Increase Dramatically This Year — And It Could Get Messy

Up to 70% of vote this November could be cast by mail. But not all states will allow it. And a recent NPR survey found that 65,000 absentee or mail-in ballots have been rejected this year for being late.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly visited a county in Pennsylvania to see what challenges lay ahead for election night in a critical swing state. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
22/07/2012m 5s

Masks May Protect Those Wearing Them; Vaccines To Enter Large-Scale Trials

Dr. Anthony Fauci tells NPR he's glad the President is promoting masks, and hopes more frequent White House briefings will be a source of clear and concise public health messaging. Experimental coronavirus vaccines are headed for large-scale tests on tens of thousands of people. Multiple companies are preparing to begin those tests, a major hurdle in vaccine development. We know masks keep us from infecting others with the virus. Now, scientists believe they can also help protect the people wearing them.And NPR's Nurith Aizenmann reports that face coverings are one of the surest ways for cities and states to avoid returning to full lockdown measures and could potentially save 40,000 American lives. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
21/07/2010m 13s

Federal Officers Could Expand Beyond Portland; Trump Searches For Campaign Strategy

In Portland, Oregon, federal agents have been using violent force against protesters. Some protesters have been arrested by officers in unmarked vehicles. Governor Kate Brown has asked the Department of Homeland Security to step aside, while President Trump threatened to dispatch federal officers to more cities.NPR's Mara Liasson reports Trump was hoping to campaign on a thriving economy and a swift end to the pandemic. Surging cases have forced him to change his message — and given Joe Biden an opening. Ongoing coverage of the Portland protests and police response from our colleagues at Oregon Public Broadcasting.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
20/07/2012m 11s

Money Is Flowing For Big Banks. For Unemployed Americans, It's About To Be Cut Off

The United States had 71,000 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday. Back in June, Dr. Anthony Fauci said he wouldn't be surprised to see 100,00 cases per day. That grim prediction is getting closer to reality. While the economy is in a recession and tens of millions of people have lost jobs, some big banks are enjoying huge profits. Three unemployed workers from different parts of the country share what options they have once the federal CARES Act benefits expire at the end of July. Indivar Dutta-Gupta, co-executive director of Georgetown University's Center on Poverty and Inequality, told NPR that the expiration of CARES Act benefits will not only hurt those workers relying on them — but the economy as a whole. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
17/07/2011m 38s

Trump Administration Push To 'Consolidate' CDC Data Worries Public Health Experts

Until now, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has collected important information about COVID-19 hospitalizations and equipment from around the country. The Trump Administration now says hospitals must stop reporting that data to the CDC and instead send information to a different federal database.Meanwhile, four states have agreed to share driver's license records to help the Trump administration produce citizenship data. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports this data could be used for redrawing voting districts. And some imported surgical masks are turning out to be defective. Sellers of the masks are touting FDA certificates but those certificates are useless.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
16/07/2011m 1s

There's No Untangling The Pandemic From The Economy

A lot of Americans are having trouble getting a coronavirus test. If they do get one, they may have to wait more than a week for results.On Tuesday, some of the country's biggest banks announced their second quarter results. The bottom line? The pandemic and the economy can't be separated.Walmart, the nation's largest retailer, announced they will require customers to wear masks beginning next week. Small businesses around the country are already dealing with fallout when customers refuse.And in a surprise move, Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced they will rescind regulations barring international students from staying in the U.S. if their colleges don't offer in-person classes this fall. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
15/07/2011m 6s

Can Schools Open Safely? What Other Countries Have Decided

Admiral Brett Giroir of the White House coronavirus task force tells NPR that the United States is still growing testing capacity. Positivity rates in parts of the South suggest there is a long way to go. Teachers, parents and public health officials around the country are trying to figure out what do to in the fall. The Trump administration says schools should re-open, but individual school districts will ultimately decide. Some already have: Los Angeles and San Diego announced this week school will resume remote-only. And while Disneyland in Hong Kong shut down after dozens of new cases there, Walt Disney World in Florida reopened after 15,000 were reported on a single day over the weekend. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
14/07/2011m 17s

Florida ICU Could Hit Capacity 'In Days' As Health Care Workers Face Burnout

Governors in Southern states like Louisiana are starting to come around to mask mandates, but not all residents are following suit. On Sunday, Florida reported more than 15,000 positive coronavirus cases. At Jackson Memorial Hospital in South Florida, director of medical ICU Dr. David J. De La Zerda says beds are running and low — and so are nurses to staff them. And the NFL's Washington, D.C.-based team is officially changing its name and logo. Activist Crystal Echo Hawk says she cried when she heard the news. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
13/07/2010m 7s

Consider This: Make Sense Of The Day

Every weekday afternoon, Kelly McEvers and the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered — Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro — help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR.
12/07/201m 25s

The GOP Operatives Toying With Trump, Hoping For A President Biden

The President traveled to Florida today. It's one of three states that just set records for new daily deaths from the coronavirus. Trump's trip there included a stop at a fundraiser for his re-election campaign. Several Republican-run groups including The Lincoln Project are opposing that campaign, running slick political ads aimed at an audience of one. Ari Shaprio explains. And Asma Khalid reports GOP opposition to the President draws a lot of attention, but it's unclear whether voters are moved by the messaging. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
10/07/209m 40s

Testing Labs Falling Behind; SCOTUS Rules On Trump Taxes

With so many new coronavirus cases, testing labs are falling behind and people are waiting days for results. On Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled President Trump was not immune from a grand jury subpoena for his financial records. But Americans are not likely to see the president's taxes before Election Day. There were nearly 2.4 million new applications for state and federal unemployment benefits last week, according to the Labor Department. After four straight months of people applying for unemployment by the millions, NPR's Scott Horsley reports there are growing signs it won't be getting better anytime soon. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
09/07/2010m 26s

3 Million Cases And Counting, U.S. Faces Same Problems From Beginning Of Pandemic

The U.S. Supreme Court has made it more difficult for women to get access to birth control. The opinion upheld a Trump administration rule that allows employers to use religious or moral reasons to deny birth control coverage. The United States has more than 3 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus and is still facing the same problems from the early days of the pandemic, including a lack of PPE, slow testing and not enough contact tracing.Doctors are using a new antigen test that is a faster way to spot people infected with the coronavirus. NPR's Rob Stein reports it's cheaper and simpler but may be less reliable. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
08/07/2010m 18s

Ideas For Reopening Schools; Evidence Of Airborne Spread

The Australian state of Victoria, which includes Melbourne, just started a new six-week lockdown. The state just recorded a record number of new daily cases: 191.Education and public health experts agree it's important that kids get back to school in the fall. The question is how to do it safely. NPR's Anya Kamenetz reports on some radical ideas for reopening. Some experts say there's increasing evidence that COVID-19 is transmitted through particles that travel through the air when we breathe. The World Health Organization has been cautious about confirming that idea. Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
07/07/2010m 59s

Lawsuit Forces Release of Government Data On Racial Inequity Of Coronavirus

For the first time in the states history, Arizona has activated "crisis of care standards," a set of protocols health care workers can use to make decisions about how to allocate resources. The mayor of Houston says ICU beds are starting to fill up and the city has two weeks to get things under control. The New York Times sued the federal government to obtain data collected by the CDC that reveals more information about how the virus has affected people of color in the United States. The numbers revealed Latinx and Black people are three times as likely to become infected as white people.The virus is spreading fast in Florida. To reach the hardest hit communities, public health workers in Miami are going door to door in Latinx neighborhoods with supplies and information.Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
06/07/208m 51s

America Relied On 'Individual Decisions' To Slow The Virus. It Didn't Work

It can feel a bit like headline deja vu: New cases on the rise; bars and restaurants closing back down. More than 130,000 people have died in the United States. Hotspots cropping up across the country.How — after four months — are we here? We examine the emphasis on individual decision making, and science journalist Ed Yong explains how individual actions led to a "patchwork pandemic." Find and support your local public radio station.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
03/07/2011m 40s

Fauci Admits Government Fault On Masks; Celebrating July 4 Safely

Employers added 4.8 million jobs last month but the U.S. is still down 15 million jobs since February. And those new figures are from a survey before the recent surge in COVID-19 cases. Coronavirus cases in the U.S. rose in part due to Memorial Day weekend celebrations, when people went out to beaches and restaurants. From a report by NPR's Allison Aubrey, experts share tips on how to safely celebrate the Fourth of JulyThere's been a lot of mixed messaging on masks. Dr. Anthony Fauci tells NPR the government could have done a better job early on. And NPR's Maria Godoy reports on how to choose the best mask for you. Find and support your local public radio station. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
02/07/2010m 57s

The Mask Debate Is Over; Fauci On Mandates, Vaccine Skepticism

As Arizona hits new records of coronavirus cases and deaths, the state announced they will pause their reopening plans.More and more Republicans are speaking up in support of face masks. Even Vice President Mike Pence has been wearing one in public lately. Dr. Anthony Fauci tells NPR the coronavirus surges we're seeing now are partly the result of too few people wearing masks. Fauci said it's especially hard to explain the risk to young people, because the virus has such a broad range of severity.Plus, a group of scientists who wanted to make it easier to track the virus in your community created an online risk assessment map. NPR's Allison Aubrey and Carmel Wroth reported on the new tool.Find and support your local public radio station. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
01/07/2013m 22s

Gaps In The Russian Bounties Story; Fauci Warns Of 100k Cases A Day

Dr. Anthony Fauci told members of Congress Tuesday that although he can't predict the ultimate number of coronavirus cases in the United States, he "would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around."The New York Times reported that Russian military intelligence offered money to the the Taliban in exchange for killing American troops in Afghanistan. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly spoke with Aaron O'Connell, a Marine Corp veteran who served on the National Security Council, about Russia's possible motives. Coronavirus testing in the U.S. is up, but not up enough. Public health researchers say only a handful of states are testing at the level needed to suppress the virus.To see how your state is doing with testing, go to NPR's tracker.Find and support your local public radio station. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
30/06/2012m 20s

After SCOTUS Decision, The Future Of Abortion Rights; Mask Mandates

On Monday, the Supreme Court issued a major decision on access to abortion. The court struck down a Louisiana law that required doctors who perform abortions at clinics to also have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. NPR's Sarah McCammon reported from the clinic at the center of the case last year.With coronavirus cases surging in North Carolina, officials issued a statewide mandate for face coverings, and are hiring bilingual contact tracers to work with the state's Latinx community.Warehouses are a big source of temporary jobs in New Jersey, especially for undocumented immigrants. Workers often have to travel in crowded vans, despite guidelines to social distance. Now, WNYC's Karen Yi reports, some of them are getting sick.Find and support your local public radio station.
29/06/2012m 23s

Stay Tuned For 'Consider This'

On Monday, June 29th, the name of this show will change to 'Consider This from NPR.' You don't need to re-subscribe. All our existing episodes will still be right here. Even though our name is changing, we will still be a place where you can get the latest news about this pandemic. And we'll bring you some other news, too. Thanks for listening!Questions? Email us: considerthis@npr.org
27/06/2049s

White House Task Force Briefing Is Back; Texas Emergency Rooms Are Filling Up

COVID-19 cases are at an all-time high in the U.S. And for the first time in almost two months, The White House Coronavirus Task Force had a televised briefing. In Texas on Thursday, 6,000 new cases of the coronavirus were reported. An ER doctor in Houston says beds are filling up and they are running out of places to send patients. Some states are closing down bars and restaurants, again, as COVID-19 cases continue to rise. But NPR's Scott Horsley explains that customer traffic has already been dropping for days. Even now, it can still be tough to get a coronavirus test especially, as NPR's Kirk Siegler reports, in tribal communities. Plus, with many movie theatres closed, the films topping the box office are a bit ... retro.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
26/06/2013m 41s

Mask Debate Heats Up; Creating A Vaccine For A Mutating Virus

Just two months ago, the Northeast was the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S. On Wednesday, there were just 581 new reported cases of the coronavirus in New York and now visitors from other states are expected to quarantine after they arrive. More Governors across the country are touting the benefits of masks but not all are willing to make wearing them a state policy. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports that scientists are closely tracking mutations in the coronavirus to ensure the changes don't complicate a future vaccine. Plus, COVID-19 has presented particular challenges for women and reproductive health. Many say that the pandemic is causing them to rethink their plans to have children. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
25/06/2012m 14s

The Pandemic Isn't Over: Nearly 10 Million Coronavirus Cases Worldwide

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the WHO, started Wednesday's coronavirus briefing on a somber note: By next week there will be a total of 10 million cases globally. A reminder, says Ghebreyesus, that the pandemic isn't over, despite places around the world reopening. There's been a lot of news about coronavirus spikes in states like Texas and Florida. But not in Georgia. Why? Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Grant Blankenship has more. And we talk to a public health official in Washington State scrambling to identify hotspots in her community. America can't fully get back to work without childcare, and many children are suffering without social opportunities. But how to reopen schools, camps and daycares safely? NPR's Anya Kamenetz talks to childcare centers that have stayed open on how they've been trying to keep kids and staff safe. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
24/06/2012m 33s

Fauci Fact-Checks Trump On Testing

Wearing a face mask, with hand sanitizer and Lysol wipes close at hand, Dr. Anthony Fauci testified before the House Tuesday, to explain why the U.S. still struggles to get a handle on the coronavirus. On Saturday, the U.S. reported 32,411 new cases in just that one day. Fauci also countered President Trump's claim that more testing is "a double-edged sword" to blame for the rise in coronavirus cases across the country. Instead, Fauci says testing is essential if we want to get control of the virus. And NPR's Lauren Frayer takes us to India, where the health care system is collapsing under the heavy demand caused by COVID-19. Plus — for the past three months, just about everyone who can work from home has. And for the most part, things seem to be working. So, as NPR's Uri Berliner reports, more and more employers are looking to make the move permanent. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
23/06/2012m 0s

Florida Passes 100,000 Cases; More Young People Are Testing Positive

Florida passed a grim milestone: 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The latest numbers include a lot of people in their 20s and 30s. Some officials are putting a pause on reopening. The Trump administration has started shipping out supplies needed to ensure sufficient testing. But those supplies haven't always been very helpful and in some cases they've been hazardous. NPR's Rob Stein has the details. Iowa is home to some 10,000 refugees from Myanmar. The coronavirus has been especially hard on them, with estimates saying as many as 70% have contracted the virus. As Iowa Public Radio's Kate Payne reports, many in the Burmese community work at local meatpacking plants, where social distancing is a constant challenge.Preparing to visit family in long-term care facilities? NPR's Allison Aubrey has some tips to keep everyone safe. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
22/06/2012m 3s

The President's Indoor Rally; Rise In Cases Not Explained By More Testing

COVID-19 cases are on the rise in some states — and more testing isn't the only explanation.Find out how cases are in your community. Today is Juneteenth. On this day in 1865, U.S. Army troops landed in Galveston, Texas to tell some of the last enslaved Americans they were free. More American businesses are recognizing the holiday this year.President Trump was planning on holding a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma today. Instead, thousands will be gathering to see the President tomorrow — indoors. And as NPR's Tamera Keith reports, public health officials aren't thrilled. Plus, Germany has been able to slow the spread of the coronavirus with the help of an army of contact tracers working around the clock. NPR's Rob Schmitz has more. Yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA). NPR's Code Switch spoke with one of the plaintiffs in the case about how she's processing the news.You can find Code Switch on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and NPR One. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
19/06/2013m 44s

Restaurants Are Closing. Again.

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration's plan to end DACA — Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals — was "arbitrary and capricious." The ruling is welcome news for recipients of the program, some of whom are essential workers on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19.As areas reopen, officials are working to ensure businesses are adopting safety precautions to avoid the spread of the coronavirus. Officials in Los Angeles found that half of the restaurants they surveyed violated rules and safety standards. Plus, NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin with an update on which communities across the country have sufficient staff in place for contact tracing. Check out the state-by-state breakdown here. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
18/06/2013m 9s

Which Masks Are Better; The Rich Aren't Spending (And That's Hurting The Economy)

While President Trump wants to celebrate an uptick in retail sales as states reopen, there's still a long way to go before the economy is back on track. Part of the problem is that the wealthiest Americans are saving their cash rather than spending it. More and more people are leaving their home without a face covering, but experts tell NPR's Maria Godoy they really do help — some more than others. There has been growing support of the Black Lives Matter movement among white Americans. But why now? Police brutality isn't new. Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch podcast explains what the pandemic might have to do with it. Listen to "Why Now, White People?" on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or NPR One. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
17/06/2013m 31s

Isolation Causes Loneliness. What Else Can It Do To Our Bodies?

There's a cost to staying home, too. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a neuroscientist and social psychologist at Brigham Young University, explains the toll that social isolation can take. It's been exactly three months since President Trump issued the first national guidelines for social distancing, including pausing nursing home visitors. NPR's Ashley Westerman recently checked in on her 100-year-old grandfather. Paul Westerman's wife of 76 years is in hospice care. He's alone, except for the nurses in his veteran's home. Plus NPR's Chris Arnold checks in on a Boston hair stylist going back to work. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
16/06/2012m 40s

There Is No 'Second Wave.' The U.S. Is Still Stuck In The First One

Nationwide, numbers were never trending downward in any big way. Now in some states that are reopening, they are going up. Oregon and Arizona are two of those places. Each state is taking a different approach. Testing is more available than ever before. Some cities are urging people who don't feel sick to get a test, just as a precaution. But WPLN's Blake Farmer reports some insurance companies won't pay for the cost of a test unless it's "medically necessary." Due to the pandemic, a lot of states are making it easier to vote by mail. NPR's Miles Parks says this new process could mean waiting a lot longer for elections results come November. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station. Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
15/06/2012m 45s

What We Don't Know About Potential Vaccines; Protest Safety

All week we've been hearing about rising cases in states around the country. The stock market reacted on Thursday, in part after Federal Reserve officials predicted the unemployment rate will still be above 9% at the end of the year. There's a lot we don't know about the White House's public-private partnership to develop a vaccine, Operation Warp Speed. NPR's Sydney Lupkin reports on a winnowing field of vaccine candidates. And during a pandemic, the most vulnerable newborns require even more protection. Plus, NPR's Maria Godoy shares tips to minimize the risks of COVID-19 for yourself and others if you've been out protesting.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
12/06/2012m 27s

Masks Are Even More Important Than We Thought

Many states that reopened a few weeks ago are seeing spikes in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. In Arizona, officials say if cases continue to rise, they may have to be more aggressive about enforcing reopening protocols for businesses.In major cities across Texas there are disparities in access to COVID-19 testing, resulting in less testing in black neighborhoods than white neighborhoods.Dr. Atul Gawande spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about why face masks remain essential in dealing with the coronavirus and the efficacy of different masks.To help with shortages of PPE, one volunteer group has used 3D printers at home to make nearly 40,000 NIH-approved face shields for health care workers and first responders.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
11/06/2014m 6s

Numbers Steady, Hundreds More Dead Each Day; The Cost Of Opening Schools

The numbers aren't really changing. 20,000 new cases a day, and more than 800 dead. Experts warn that by fall, in America, the death count could rise to 200,000.Some members of the National Guard who were sent to Washington D.C. during the protests over the death of George Floyd have tested positive for the coronavirus. Dr. Anthony Fauci is concerned — but not surprised. Many nursing homes banned all visitors and nonessential workers from their facilities to stop the spread of COVID-19. Some advocates and families say they want that ban to end.A big unanswered question is whether it will be safe for public K-12 schools to reopen safely in the fall. The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions held a hearing on the topic Wednesday.Plus, the Mall of America reopened after nearly three months.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
10/06/2013m 36s

Kids And COVID-19; Mixed Messages On Asymptomatic Spread

George Floyd's killing by police sparked protests around the world. Because of the coronavirus, attendance at Floyd's Houston funeral was limited and mourners were encouraged to wear masks.People of color have been hit hard by the coronavirus because of risk factors including chronic health conditions and less access to health care. Experts say scientists need better data on who's getting sick and public health officials need to communicate better with communities of color.A top official from the World Health Organization walked back a statement Monday in which she said transmission from asymptomatic carriers of the virus is "very rare."A small but growing number of kids have a dangerous reaction to coronavirus called multi-inflammatory syndrome, which can cause inflamed hearts, lungs and other organs.Plus, one man built an art piece he calls a 'Doorway To Imagination' in his social distancing-created free time.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
09/06/2014m 34s

New York Reopening; Hindsight On Sweden's Lack of Lockdown

After a nearly three-month lockdown and over 20,000 coronavirus-related deaths, New York City is taking its first steps to reopen parts of its economy amid protests over police brutality.The coronavirus is surviving the heat and humidity despite initial hopes it would not last through the summer. Experts now think the coronavirus will be here for years to come. Sweden's government implemented limited restrictions in an attempt to protect the country's economy during the pandemic. Now, they're seeing mixed results.And for the first time in months, the massive Vatican Museums are open. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
08/06/2012m 40s

Surprising Job Gains Are Good News — But Not For Everyone

Editor's note: In this episode, we mispronounced the name of professor Sven-Eric Jordt.It looks like another weekend of protests across the country. And that means more people could be exposed to tear gas, pepper spray and other "chemical irritants" that trigger — among other things — coughing and sneezing. Two things people are trying to avoid during this pandemic. Americans are skipping payments on mortgages, auto loans and other bills due to the economic impact of the pandemic. And as NPR's Chris Arnold reports, for some, catching up is going to be painful.Plus, the coronavirus has hit people of color especially hard. As Harvard's David Williams writes in an article for the Washington Post, before COVID-19, Black Americans were already struggling with the health effects of everyday discrimination. The pandemic is only making it worse. And NPR's Short Wave team takes us to San Francisco where Hispanics and Latinxs make up 46% of all coronavirus cases ⁠— but they make up just 15% of the population. Don't forget to check out Short Wave on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter. Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
05/06/2013m 33s

Phase III Vaccine Trials Could Start In July

It's been 96 days since the first person in America was reported to have died of COVID-19. And for the first time, the federal government will require states to keep track of who's getting sick and who's dying based on their age, sex, and race and ethnicity. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterAround the world, 10 vaccine candidates have begun human trials. COVID-19 has killed nearly 110,000 people in America. And black Americans are dying at nearly two and half times the rate of white Americans. As NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith and Greg Rosalsky report on the economic reasons why. Plus, WAMU reporter Jacob Fenston reports on 85-year-old Margaret Sullivan, who feels like she's been "living in a bubble" since the start of the pandemic. Find and support your local public radio stationThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
04/06/2012m 16s

Fauci's New Vaccine Hopes For 2021; A Pandemic Election

Eight states and the District of Columbia went to the polls Tuesday. More mail-in ballots and fewer in-person polling places caused long delays in some places, highlighting the challenges for the November elections. KUT's Ashley Lopez reports, since naturalization ceremonies have been halted due to the pandemic, thousands who were due to become U.S. citizens over the last few weeks are now in limbo. Public health workers are encountering resistance, online harassment and even violent threats as they conduct contact tracing and other containment strategies in their local communities. NPR's Will Stone has more. Plus, a visit to the Six Feet Away Museum in Jacksonville, Florida, and an update on a coronavirus vaccine. Find and support your local public radio station Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
03/06/2013m 26s

The Coronavirus In America: One More Racial Inequity

The more we learn about the coronavirus, the clearer it becomes that it's disproportionately affecting communities of color. And as protests continue across the country, some health experts worry that the hardest hit areas could be in for another wave of cases. By almost every economic measure, black Americans have a harder time getting a leg up. As the pandemic has sent the country's economy into the worst downturn in generations, it's only gotten worse. More from NPR's Scott Horsley and the team at NPR's Planet Money. Despite all of this, there is a bit of good news. Some communities across the country are reporting a decrease in COVID-19 cases. NPR's Rob Stein breaks down the national outlook.Plus, advice on how to combat anxiety, avoid insomnia and get some rest. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.You can find more sleep tips on NPR's Life Kit on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio station This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
02/06/2011m 45s

Protesting In A Pandemic; The Fight Over Mail-In Voting

The coronavirus pandemic has collided with protests all over the country over police brutality and the deaths of George Floyd in Minneapolis and many other black Americans. Now public health officials are concerned for the health of protesters. Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms even encouraged protesters in her city to get tested.NPR's Pam Fessler reports the legal fight between Democrats and Republicans over mail-in voting has intensified ever since the pandemic hit.Listen to Short Wave's episode about what we will ⁠— and won't ⁠— remember about the pandemic on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
01/06/2010m 44s

Q & A: Voting And Acts Of Kindness

Bestselling author Cheryl Strayed joins NPR's Ari Shaprio as listeners share stories about acts of kindness they've experienced.These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, The National Conversation. In this episode:-NPR reporter Miles Parks answers questions about how upcoming elections can be run safely.-Cheryl Strayed, bestselling author of 'Wild' and host of the podcast Sugar Calling, joins NPR host Ari Shapiro to hear listeners' stories about acts of kindness during the pandemic.Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
30/05/2016m 41s

The Rural/Urban Divide; Safe Summer Activities

Democrats want another coronavirus relief bill. A sticking point for Republicans is $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits — which means some workers have been able to collect more money on unemployment than they did in their previous jobs.Essential workers who have continued to work may have received temporary wage bumps. But NPR's Alina Selyukh reports many companies are ending that hazard pay. Challenges to statewide stay-at-home orders are mounting in rural communities that have few coronavirus cases. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on the dispute in Baker County, Oregon. Plus, experts weigh in on the safety of different summer activities.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
29/05/2012m 52s

Why Are Some Countries Doing Better Than Others?

A new study suggests the coronavirus is both more common and less deadly than it first appeared, NPR's Jon Hamilton reports. From NPR's Joel Rose: a shortage of machines to process tests is the latest bottleneck in the pandemic supply chain.Certain countries like New Zealand, Germany and several nations in Asia have been successful in controlling the coronvavirus. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports on how leadership played a strong role. Mara Gay is 33-years-old, lives in New York City and got sick with COVID-19 in April. She spoke with NPR's Michel Martin about her long recovery process, despite being young and healthy.Plus, two teenagers who were looking forward to competing in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, which was cancelled this week. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
28/05/2013m 17s

Global Vaccine Competition; More Than 100,000 Dead

According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 100,000 people have died in the United States from COVID-19, and experts at the World Health Organization warn a second peak of COVID-19 infections could occur during this first wave of the virus. Meanwhile, the global race for a vaccine is generating competition between nations, mainly the U.S. and China. New numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal more than 60,000 health care workers have been infected with COVID-19, and almost 300 have died. This is a dramatic increase since the CDC first released numbers six weeks ago. Bangladesh has extended its coronavirus lockdown — except for the garment factories. But with big brands canceling orders, workers face pay cuts, hunger and little to no social distancing. Plus, an obituary writer reflects on COVID-19 deaths.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
27/05/2013m 16s

99,000 People Dead And A Dire Summer Prediction

As the United States nears 100,000 coronavirus deaths and states begin to re-open, what's next for the country? Dr. Ashish Jha of Harvard's Global Health Institute cautions it's still early in the crisis. Researchers have found the coronavirus was introduced to the U.S. in part by affluent travelers — but those weren't the people hit the hardest. Cathy Cody owns a janitorial company in a Georgia community with a high rate of COVID-19. Her company offers a new service boxing up the belongings of residents who have died. Read or listen to the full story from NPR's Morning Edition.Plus, rollerblading is having a moment.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
26/05/2013m 0s

The Cost Of Being "Essential"

From NPR's Embedded: The workers who produce pork, chicken, and beef in plants around the country have been deemed "essential" by the government and their employers. Now, the factories where they work have become some of the largest clusters for the coronavirus in the country. The workers, many of whom are immigrants, say their bosses have not done enough to protect them. Regular episodes return tomorrow. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
25/05/2020m 28s

Q & A: Vaccine Development And Kids' Questions

NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca answers listener questions about vaccine development, and medical experts tackle questions sent in by kids.These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, The National Conversation. In this episode:-NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca explains how vaccines are made and the unique challenges associated with COVID-19.-Kids' questions are answered by pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison from the Capitol Medical Group in Washington, D.C., and Dr. Wanjiku Njoroge, medical director for the Young Child Clinic at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.Find and support your local public radio station.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
23/05/2012m 59s

Fauci Optimistic On Vaccine; What's Different About Military Homecomings

Earlier this week, an experimental coronavirus vaccine showed promise. But, for the moment, the full data from that research hasn't been released. Friday morning, Dr. Anthony Fauci told NPR he's seen the data and it looks "quite promising." According to Fauci, barring any setbacks, the US is on track to have a vaccine by early next year. Millions of Americans are turning to food banks to help feed their families during the pandemic. A new federal program pays farmers who've lost restaurant and school business to donate the excess to community organizations. But even the people in charge of these organizations say direct cash assistance is a better way to feed Americans in need.A few months ago, before the lock downs, nearly 3,000 paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division left on a short-notice deployment to the Middle East. The 82nd is coming back is being welcomed back to a changed nation and a changed military.Plus, about 180 people are hunkered down together in a Jerusalem hotel, recovering from COVID-19. Patients from all walks of life — Israelis, Palestinians, religious, secular groups that don't usually mix — are all getting along. Listen to the full Rough Translation podcast "Hotel Corona."Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterFind and support your local public radio stationThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
22/05/2011m 39s

Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

A new analysis from Columbia University says that roughly 36,000 people could've been saved if the United States had started social distancing just one week earlier. But that all hinges on whether people would have been willing to stay home. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterResearch with mice, guinea pigs and monkeys is making scientists increasingly optimistic about the chances for developing a COVID-19 vaccine. Three studies released Wednesday show promising results after the animals received experimental vaccines. But public health success will require global cooperation. Meanwhile, state unemployment agencies are feeling the pinch as they try to keep up with unparalleled demand for their services. And as bordering towns begin to ease stay-at-home restrictions, the logistics around reopening neighboring areas is leading to quite a bit of confusion. Plus, sometimes you just need a hug. And if you're isolating alone, TikTok star Tabitha Brown has got you covered with comfort content to help you feel loved. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
21/05/2012m 54s

What Contact Tracing Tells Us About High-Risk Activities

Three-quarters of Americans are concerned that a second wave of coronavirus cases will emerge, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Despite that, groups around the country, including in Michigan, are protesting state lockdowns. President Trump's stance on hydroxychloroquine has made the drug harder to study, according to some scientists. Researchers have been digging into contact tracing data from countries that had early outbreaks. Data suggest high risk activities include large indoor gatherings. Lower risk is going to the grocery store.Plus, what is happening with classroom pets when school is out of session due to the coronavirus. Reporter Sara Stacke's story with photos.You can hear more about the NPR poll on the NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
20/05/2012m 5s

Indoor Spread, Workers' Anxieties, And Our Warped Sense Of Time

There are still a lot of questions about how the coronavirus is transmitted through air. Researchers are looking at how the virus is spread indoors and how to safely have people under one roof. As states around the country lift restrictions and businesses reopen, many workers in close-contact jobs are scared for their health and would rather stay on unemployment. NPR's Chris Arnold reports on what options workers have.Listen to Short Wave's episode about why it's so hard to remember what day it is and some tips for giving time more meaning on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
19/05/2011m 58s

Encouraging Vaccine News; Pandemic Grows More Political

A new coronavirus vaccine candidate shows encouraging results. It's early, but preliminary data shows it appears to be eliciting the kind of immune response capable of preventing disease. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has been signaling that more government spending might be necessary to prevent long-term economic damage. As the pandemic becomes more political, researchers are concerned debates over masks, social distancing and reopening the economy are inflaming an already divided nation. Incidents of violence are rare, but concerning to experts.Plus, a 102-year-old woman who survived the influenza of 1918, the Great Depression, World War II and now, COVID-19.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
18/05/2010m 59s

Q & A: Sleep Problems And Summer Childcare

Sleep experts answer listener questions about insomnia, and a nurse practitioner offers advice to parents about summer childcare.These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered.' In this episode:- Dr. Sonia Ancoli-Israel of the Center for Circadian Biology, and Dr. Christina McCrae of the Mizzou Sleep Research Lab offer advice to listeners who are having trouble falling asleep.- Pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison answers parents' questions about childcare this summer.If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
16/05/2014m 5s

The Government's Vaccine Push; Businesses Struggle With Reopening Rules

To speed up the process of developing a coronavirus vaccine, the Trump Administration says the government will invest in manufacturing the top candidates even before one is proven to work.As parts of the country reopen, different rules apply across state and even city lines, leaving business owners trying to figure things out for themselves, 'All Things Considered' host Ari Shapiro reports.Demand for goods and services plunged in April according to new data. NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith of The Indicator reports on pent-up demand and what that means for the future of the U.S. economy.The Navajo Nation has one of the highest rates of COVID-19 deaths per capita in the United States. NPR's Code Switch podcast examines why Native Americans have been so hard hit by the coronavirus. Listen to their episode on race and COVID-19 on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Listen to Throughline's episode about the origins of the N95 mask on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSubmit a question for "The National Conversation"Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
15/05/2013m 27s

Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

Career government scientist-turned-whistleblower Rick Bright testified before Congress Thursday that without a stronger federal response to the coronavirus, 2020 could be the "darkest winter in modern history."Schools might not open everywhere in the fall, but some experts say keeping kids home is a health risk, too.Apple and Google want to develop technology to track the spread of COVID-19 while protecting individuals' privacy, while some states like North Dakota are developing their own apps.Plus, tips on social distancing from someone who's been doing it for 50 years: Billy Barr's movie recommendations spreadsheet.Listen to the NPR Politics Podcast's recap of today's hearing on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Send your remembrance of a loved one to embedded@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
14/05/2013m 24s

Public Health Vs. Politics; Lessons From An Anti-Mask Protest

The U.S. has more coronavirus deaths than any country in the world. Dr. Anthony Fauci says the number of American fatalities is likely an under count.Nearly 40% of households making less than $40,000 a year lost a job in March. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said on Wednesday that additional government spending may be necessary to avoid long-lasting economic fallout.A small but vocal minority of people are pushing back against public health measures that experts say are life-saving. It's not the first time Americans have resisted government measures during a pandemic. Listen to Embedded's episode on the backlash on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. President Trump has prioritized getting sports running again after the coronavirus lockdown. But NPR's Scott Detrow reports the idea is facing logistical and safety challenges.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
13/05/2011m 45s

Testing, Reopening Schools, Vaccines: Fauci And Others Testify

In a Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, Chair Lamar Alexander of Tennessee asked Dr. Anthony Fauci whether coronavirus treatments or a vaccine could be developed in time to allow college students to return to school in the fall. Fauci said that "would be a bridge too far." There's a full recap of today's hearing on The NPR Politics Podcast. listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.New York is trying to build what could become one of the largest contact tracing programs for COVID-19. Starting this month, public health officials there are looking to hire as many as 17,000 investigators.Nursing homes account for nearly half of COVID-19 deaths in some states. NPR's Ina Jaffe reports on why nursing homes have been so vulnerable to the virus and what could be done to improve them in the future.Plus, a professional musician sidelined by the coronavirus becomes a one-man marching band for his neighborhood.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
12/05/2013m 10s

How To Stay Safe As States Reopen; The Latest on Masks

Democrats want another stimulus plan, but Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin says the Trump administration wants to wait before providing any further aid. As more states ease stay-at-home orders, NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on ways to stay safe while seeing friends, going to church and returning to work. The CDC still recommends people wear masks. The coronavirus pandemic has had a disproportionately large effect on black Americans. Lawmakers and local officials are looking for ways to make sure the communities hit hardest are getting the right information about the virus.In Life Kit's latest episode, Sesame Street's Grover answers kids' questions about the coronavirus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
11/05/2011m 47s

Q & A: Home Cooking And Environmental Impact

Chef Samin Nosrat, author of 'Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,' answers listener cooking questions. NPR's science correspondent discusses the pandemic's environmental impact.These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered.' In this episode:- NPR Science Desk correspondent Lauren Sommer talks about the environmental impact of the economic slowdown- Samin Nosrat, author and host of the Netflix series 'Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,' offers inspiration to those who find themselves short on ingredients or cooking for oneIf you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
09/05/2018m 8s

Antibodies And Immunity; Why Even Health Care Workers Are Losing Jobs

Most people infected with the coronavirus develop antibodies in response. NPR's Richard Harris reports that scientists are trying to figure out if that means people who've been exposed are immune from reinfection and, if so, for how long.The Labor Department reported 20.5 million jobs were lost in April, putting the jobless rate at its highest level since the Great Depression. Health care workers are among those hard hit by the economy. Many are losing work as hospitals struggle financially due to a decrease in non-emergency visits and procedures. Only a few states have enough tests to ensure safe reopening. One of them, Tennessee, has taken a unique approach to testing: Its state government pays for every single test, no questions asked.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
08/05/2012m 34s

Track Your State's Testing; What A Possible Mutation Means

Testing for the coronavirus is still falling short in many places in the U.S. How is your state doing? Track it using a tool from NPR.A mutated strain of the coronavirus may have helped it spread more widely, according to a new preliminary study that's getting a lot of attention even before it's peer-reviewed.Despite Trump administration claims that the coronavirus may have accidentally escaped from a lab in China, scientists it's more likely the coronavirus spread naturally. Listen to Short Wave's episode about why, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One, and explore a second episode about the likelihood the virus originated in bats. One of the deadliest outbreaks of the coronavirus has been at the Holyoke Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts. Officials are investigating what happened there.Plus, experiments are undeway to see if dogs can be trained to sniff out the coronavirus. Meanwhile, U.S. animal shelters have reported having all their dogs fostered during the lock down. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
07/05/2013m 24s

More Americans Are Getting Tested, But Experts Warn Of Second Wave

The White House Coronavirus Task Force is not disbanding, but instead shifting its focus to "opening up our country," according to President Trump. Testing in the U.S. has been rising steadily, but experts say more is still needed and the US should be prepared for a second wave.Several states are allowing restaurants to reopen and dining to resume, with limited capacity. Owners are struggling to figure out how they can reopen and turn a profit during the pandemic. The United Kingdom now has the second most lives lost to the coronavirus pandemic, behind the United States. NPR's Frank Langfitt reports on what's happening in Britain. Plus, an 11-year-old wrote a letter to thank her mail carrier. Postal workers from all over the country responded.Share a remembrance if you've lost a loved one to the coronavirus at npr.org/frontlineworkersFind and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
06/05/2013m 14s

When To See A Doctor; Policing During The Pandemic

California, one of the first states to shutdown, joins a growing list of states that are trying to restart their economies. Customers around the country are deciding if they are comfortable starting to shop again.Law enforcement is adapting to what it means to police during a pandemic.A fever and dry cough are no longer the only official symptoms of COVID-19. NPR's Maria Godoy has tips for when even milder symptoms, like headaches and loss of smell and taste, should prompt you to seek testing. Plus, scientists on a research vessel in Arctic have been isolated from the coronavirus. Some are anticipating what it will be like to return to a society in lock down. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
05/05/2013m 15s

New Cases Plateau For Now As States Chart Their Own Course

One model forecast 60,000 Americans would die from COVID-19 by August. But fatalities keep rising, and the United States has surpassed that number.Around the country, different states are taking different approaches to reopening. Donald Kettl, professor of public policy at the University of Texas at Austin, says this pandemic has brought up questions about federalism.Few online grocery delivery services accept payments from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as SNAP. That causes problems for recipients at high risk for COVID-19.Plus, NPR's reporter in Nairobi finds his parents connecting with his kids through TikTok.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
04/05/2011m 45s

Q & A: Dentists, Reopening Businesses, And Contact Tracing

A dentist, epidemiologist and NPR journalists answer listener questions on 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered,' NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis. Excerpted here:- NPR's senior business editor Uri Berliner and epidemiologist Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo discuss reopening nonessential businesses- NPR's health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin on the logistics of contact tracing- Dentist Dr. Suhail Mohiuddin on when a dental problem is urgent enough for an in-person visitIf you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
02/05/2023m 36s

Operation Warp Speed; Essential Workers Fight For Benefits

The Trump administration is calling the effort to develop a vaccine for COVID-19 "Operation Warp Speed." Dr. Anthony Fauci says if all goes well, we could have hundreds of millions of vaccines as early as next January. Today is International Workers Day, and this year workers at Amazon, Walmart and Target are using the occasion to organize mass protests. They say their companies are not doing enough to protect and compensate them, even as the nation hails them as "essential." Today is also historically known as National College Decision Day for college-bound high school seniors. But that's changed this year too. Many colleges have postponed their decision deadlines to June 1. And as the pandemic continues to cause students' personal circumstances to change, some are reconsidering attending a four-year college full time at all. In New York City, a funeral director says knowing that his team is performing a service for their community helps him get through long and stressful days. Plus, some happy news: NPR producer Emma Talkoff's twin sister and her now-husband got married in their apartment last weekend. Talkoff shares what it was like for her family to witness the joyful moment via Zoom. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
01/05/2012m 55s

Federal Stay-At-Home Guidance Ends; A Potential New Test For COVID-19

The federal stay-at-home guidance ends on Thursday. Some governors are planning to open up their states, but others say it's too soon. A potential new kind of test for COVID-19 could be simpler and cheaper to use than existing tests. But because it has a relatively high false negative rate, some scientists are wary. The pandemic has left more than 30 million people in the U.S. unemployed. Activists and community organizers are putting together strikes, refusing to pay rent on May 1. But landlords are also facing financial pressure.Using the Defense Production Act, President Trump has ordered meatpacking plants to stay open despite a high rate of coronavirus outbreaks among workers. KCUR's Frank Morris reports on what's happening in the industry.Life Kit's guide to managing screen time on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
30/04/2011m 35s

A Drug Could Speed Up Recovery; The Economy Declines

Results from a trial involving more than a thousand hospital patients showed the drug Remdesivir could speed up recovery from COVID-19 and possibly also reduce deaths. Wednesday morning's first quarter gross domestic product report shows that the economy shrank last quarter at a rate not seen since the fall of 2008. New findings suggest a link between COVID-19 and life-threatening blood clots that cause strokes in all age groups. Republican Gov. Charlie Baker of Massachusetts talks about how his state is trying to lead the charge in contact tracing, and how leadership during a pandemic is uniquely challenging. Plus, in New Orleans, Brass-a-Holics bandleader Winston "Trombone" Turner wanted to honor the deceased of COVID-19 like they would have been ordinarily — with music. So, he picked up his horn and called a few friends to record a performance of "I'll Fly Away," a celebratory song played at almost every traditional New Orleans funeral. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
29/04/2012m 55s

1 Million Confirmed Coronavirus Cases In U.S.; Labs Struggle To Test Faster

More than 1 million cases of COVID-19 have been diagnosed in the United States, according to Johns Hopkins University.Nationwide social distancing guidance runs through April 30. After that, what happens is up to individual states. One reason why coronavirus testing has been stymied in the United States is that public health labs in at least 10 states have been underfunded for years, an investigation by APM found.Plus, listeners of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders share how they are spending their free time. Listen on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.Life Kit's full episode on how to start running with Peter Sagal on Apple, Spotify and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
28/04/2012m 49s

New Symptoms; A Missed Chance At Early Detection

Challenges with testing and logistics, clashes between federal and state officials and even hospitals' fears of being stigmatized as a source of infection — all cost valuable time in detecting the spread of the coronavirus in the U.S., reports NPR's Lauren Sommer. The federal government has re-started the Paycheck Protection Program, which gives loans to small businesses. Lawmakers required some of the money to go community banks this time around.Also, the CDC recognizes new symptoms of the coronavirus. Meanwhile, Italy will start reopening the country next week. The country has suffered high death rates, second only to the U.S., and it was the first western nation to lock down. Plus, one of the top-grossing movie theaters in the country this past week was the Ocala Drive-In in Ocala, Florida. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
27/04/2011m 39s

Q & A: Ethical Dilemmas And Disinfectants

A scientist and a philosopher answer listener questions on 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered,' NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis. Excerpted here:- Aerobiologist Joshua Santarpia discusses disinfectants.- Professor David Chan talks through the day-to-day ethical dilemmas during the pandemic.If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
25/04/2015m 29s

Southern States, Moving To Reopen, Could Be Most Vulnerable

Data shared at a White House press briefing Thursday was unusual, says David Lappan of the Bipartisan Policy Center — and not just because it prompted the President to wonder if disinfectants could be injected into coronavirus patients. Southern states are some of the first to start reopening, but NPR's Debbie Elliott reports people there may be more vulnerable to COVID-19 because of high rates of poverty, chronic diseases, and natural disasters.Plus, a Washington Post reporter on what America looks like from the open road. The biggest risk in grocery shopping comes from the people you could come in contact with, not the food. Watch Life Kit's video for tips on grocery shopping safely.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
24/04/2012m 58s

Coronavirus Not Going Away Before Next Fall, Fauci Says

Dr. Anthony Fauci said we will still be dealing with the coronavirus next fall. The severity depends on what we do over the next few months.What about college campuses? NPR's Elissa Nadworny reports universities are figuring out if they can reopen for fall semester or go virtual.Plus, a study finds wearing a nylon stocking over homemade masks can boost protection.And a look at why COVID-19 seems to be killing more men than women. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
23/04/2011m 57s

Georgia's Plan To Reopen; Anti-Shutdown Protests And Fox News

Posthumous autopsy results revealed the first U.S. death from COVID-19 happened much earlier than previously thought.The state of Georgia will reopen parts of its economy on Friday, even as members of the White House coronavirus task force can't say how all parts of the state could safely do so. NPR's David Folkenflik reports on the link between Fox News and anti-shutdown protests.Plus, a website that recreates the sounds of your office.NPR's reporting on the NIH's recommendation against doctors using hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for the treatment of COVID-19 patients.Listen to the latest episode of NPR's Rough Translation on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
22/04/2012m 48s

More Small Business Aid; Antibody Test Results

The Paycheck Protection Program was created to help small businesses hit by the pandemic, but the program was exhausted quickly. Now congress has secured another round of funding.Recovering from COVID-19 can be a long journey. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports on the oftentimes grueling process.Experts say contact tracing and antibody testing are crucial steps for reopening the country. Plus, a look at one part of the economy that never closed. Must-run factories operating around the clock have lessons for other businesses about how to keep workers safe.Listen to Life Kit's episode on how to spot misinformation on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
21/04/2012m 47s

Why Testing Is Still So Far Behind

President Trump's guidelines for reopening the country put the onus on governors across the nation. But many say they don't have enough testing supplies to reopen their states.A Harvard infectious disease specialist explains why testing in the United States is still a problem. Plus, a couple share the lessons they learned from the 1918 flu pandemic. (He's 107-years-old. She's 100.) Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
20/04/2011m 29s

Q & A: Pets And COVID-19, Ventilators, And The View From Wuhan

Public health experts and NPR journalists answer listener questions on 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered,' NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis. Excerpted here:- NPR's Emily Feng discusses China's next steps.- Emergency Physician Richard Levitan addresses skepticism about the effectiveness of ventilators.- Veterinarian Krista Miller answers questions about pet care and adoption. If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
18/04/2020m 58s

Testing Holds States Back; Vaccine Timeline

According to new White House guidelines, a state, city, or county has to show a decreasing rate of confirmed coronavirus cases for 14 days before reopening their economy. A year may seem like a long time to develop a vaccine for the coronavirus, but vaccine development typically takes longer. NPR's Joe Palca explains why it's so hard and what researchers are doing to speed things up.Food banks around the country have been stretched, including one in San Antonio. Last week it served 10,000 families, many of whom are dealing with joblessness and food insecurity caused by the pandemic. Plus, the man who developed the N95 mask filter technology comes out of retirement.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
17/04/2012m 37s

New White House Guidance for When States Can Move To Reopen

The White House Thursday offered a blueprint for states to re-open. It starts with a decline in confirmed cases of COVID-19 and includes extensive testing that does not yet exist. Johns Hopkins epidemiologist Jennifer Nuzzo told NPR's Rachel Martin that the lack of testing means the outbreak is still largely unpredictable. In the past four weeks, 22 million people have filed for unemployment, nearly wiping out all the job gains since the Great Recession. A group of volunteer EMTs in New Jersey is on the front lines of the coronavirus outbreak.Plus, after seven months in space, astronaut Jennifer Mier returns to a very different reality on Earth.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
16/04/2011m 36s

Reopening Won't Feel Normal; Tech Giants Plan For Contact Tracing

Governors around the country are starting to plan for what reopening their states could look like. California Gov. Gavin Newsom said testing will be a big part of his decision-making.Millions of Americans should have received an economic impact payment from the government today. Meanwhile, many are still waiting on unemployment benefits.Plus, Apple and Google's plan to help with contact tracing will depend on trust from the public.Listen to Life Kit's episode on giving back on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
15/04/2012m 18s

Some Government Aid Checks Will Arrive This Week

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says 80 million Americans should receive economic impact payments by Wednesday. President Trump said during Monday's contentious coronavirus task force briefing that he plans to lift federal guidelines on social distancing soon, falsely claiming that he has "total" authority on the matter. Meanwhile, as an outbreak of COVID-19 in South Dakota closes a major meat processing facility, Governor Kristi Noem continues to reject the idea of a statewide stay-at-home order. Many Americans are reporting that they're having unusually vivid dreams at night. One Bay Area resident started a website for others to share their dreams. Read what others are dreaming about on i dream of covid.Listen to Short Wave's episode, 'How To Talk About The Coronavirus With Friends And Family'Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
14/04/2011m 8s

Trump's Unfulfilled Promises; What Contact Tracing Could Look Like

Exactly one month ago, President Trump declared a national emergency and promised a mobilization of public and private resources to attack the coronavirus. NPR's Investigations Team finds that few of those promises have come to pass.The CDC says they'll soon release a plan to help state and local governments with contact tracing, but Massachusetts has already started building its own contact tracing system.NPR's Allison Aubrey discusses why some are more vulnerable to COVID-19 than others, and looks ahead at what opening up the country may look like.And if you're one of the many families feeling a budget squeeze right now, Life Kit has some tips for you. NPR's Investigations Team's full story on each claim Trump made one month agoTips on budgeting from Life Kit. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
13/04/2013m 14s

Q & A: Masks, Unemployment Aid, And Recovering From COVID-19

Public health experts and NPR journalists answer listener questions on 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered,' NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis. Excerpted here:- Dr. Abraar Karan on wearing masks- Dr. Lucy McBride on what to do if someone is recovering from the coronavirus at home- NPR's Scott Horsley on unemployment relief and how to get itWe'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
11/04/2018m 59s

Some Infection Rates Drop, But U.S. Hasn't Peaked Yet

Dr. Deborah Birx said despite signs of progress in New York and elsewhere, the United States hasn't reached the peak of the pandemic yet. Rigorous testing and contact tracing specifically are being called for, but Birx said the White House Task Force is being realistic about "how strategically that very valuable resource can be used" in the U.S.Despite empty grocery store shelves, there's an excess of food other places, like farms. NPR's Dan Charles reports on the struggling supply chain.Chaplain Rocky Walker's full conversation with Morning Edition host David Greene. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
10/04/2012m 13s

Antibody Tests Coming "Very Soon"; Is The Coronavirus Seasonal?

Antibody tests that could help determine who has had the virus are being developed Dr. Anthony Fauci said. There's hope those people will have some measure of immunity.The CDC issued return-to-work guidelines for critical workers who had contact with someone who had a confirmed or even suspected case of COVID-19.Scientists are trying to figure out whether changing seasons will affect the spread of the coronavirus.Plus, how public health experts create models to help us predict where the outbreak is headed. Wuhan resident Piso Nseke's conversation with Mary Louise Kelly about his first day outside after almost three months of lockdown.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
09/04/2012m 28s

Social Distancing Is Working; Why The Virus Hits Hard In The Second Week

New York state saw its highest daily death count today, but Dr. Anthony Fauci says because of mitigation strategies like social distancing, a turnaround may be in sight.Some people who get COVID-19 will experience relief from symptoms, only to crash in the second week. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports doctors think they may have found a treatment for these patients. Plus, U.S. states are competing against each other for the same scare medical resources. Scott Horsley's reporting on women losing more jobs than men. Nell Greenfieldboyce's reporting on why men appear to be more likely to die from COVID-19 than women.Video of Fenway Park's organist Josh Kantor.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
08/04/2011m 12s

Deaths Climb In Louisiana; Delays In Aid For Small Businesses

The Paycheck Protection Program was created to help small businesses during the coronavirus pandemic. But the program got off to a rocky start, with some businesses having trouble applying for and getting the money.In Louisiana, an alarming number of black people are dying from COVID-19.Plus, how the coronavirus affects animals and what you can do to protect your pets.Derek Thompson's article in The Atlantic 'The Four Rules of Pandemic Economics.'Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
07/04/2013m 53s

Fauci: Half Of Those With Coronavirus May Have No Symptoms

Even as the total number of deaths grows, White House officials said Sunday that if the public forcefully practices social distancing, the United States might see the curve bending soon. Experts say masks can help prevent those who are asymptomatic from unknowingly spreading COVID-19.Plus, health care worker who have recovered from the virus share their experiences. And while many companies are required to offer sick leave and other benefits to their employees, gig workers are running into hurdles to get the help they were promised. Life Kit's episode, 'How To Get Therapy When You Can't Leave The House' is on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
06/04/2012m 45s

Masks Now Recommended; Not All States Are 'Staying Home'

The CDC now recommends Americans cover their nose and mouth when they leave their home, but to save medical masks for healthcare workers. And as deaths from the coronavirus climb, some states have yet to declare a stay-at-home order. Plus the groups racing to produce a vaccine for COVID-19. And some physicians say racial and economic disparities are emerging in the testing and treatment of the virus. Links:Rough Translation's episode, 'WeChats From The Future' is on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
03/04/2013m 24s

Ventilator Shortages; 6.6 Million New Unemployment Claims

6.6 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week, doubling the record-setting numbers from the week before. The rapid increase has overwhelmed state offices. Ventilators are a scare resource right now. While they are lifesaving for some, NPR's Jon Hamilton reports when it comes to COVID-19, they do not guarantee survival.Plus, how to protect essential workers when ordering delivery and going to the grocery store.Links:The Indicator's episode on scarcity in the emergency room on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.Camila Domonoske's reporting on grocery store worker safety.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
02/04/2012m 46s

The Mask Debate; Preventing More New York-Sized Clusters

Officials on the White House coronavirus task force have a goal: to limit the number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 to 100,000 people. But they say preventing more clusters the size of New York and New Jersey is key. And with conflicting opinions about who should be wearing masks, NPR's Allison Aubrey reports new guidance may be coming soon.Plus, what a 1995 heat wave can teach us about fighting today's pandemic — and the scientific debate over what could be early symptoms of COVID-19 — a loss of taste and smell.Links:Short Wave's episode, 'Is This Real? Loss of Smell And The Coronavirus' on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
01/04/2012m 30s

Trump And Governors Mix Messages; Managing Your Mortgage Or Rent

Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, messages from President Trump and state governors have been mixed. Meanwhile, New York City has over 40,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, making it the epicenter of the pandemic in America. WNYC reporter Gwynne Hogan visits a Brooklyn hospital on the front lines of the pandemic, and the owner of a restaurant in Manhattan's Chinatown explains why he closed three weeks ago. Also, tips to help you pay your mortgage or rent if you've lost your job.Links:Find and support your local public radio stationRachel Martin's conversation with Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan Life Kit's guide to receiving financial help during the pandemic on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
31/03/2013m 34s

Social Distancing Extended; Grocery Store Tips

Two weeks ago, President Trump told Americans to stay home for 15 days. On Sunday, he extended that guidance for another month, as the U.S. trails behind other countries on per-capita testing. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on a new test expected this week that promises quicker results.Plus, tips on how to grocery shop safely.Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter Find and support your local public radio stationThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
30/03/2012m 30s

Trump Signs Aid Package, Epicenter Is Now The U.S.

The $2 trillion economic recovery package is now law, as the number of COVID-19 cases in America approaches 100,000 and deaths near 1,500. A Johns Hopkins scientist weighs in on the idea of relaxing social distancing in select locations and the importance of more testing for coronavirus. And we explain when Americans could expect to receive federal stimulus money. More links: Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour's episode, 'Family Friendly Crowd Pleasers: Three Things To Stream Your Whole Family Can Enjoy' on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or on the NPR One App. Check out Tarriona 'Tank' Ball's Tiny Desk (Home) ConcertSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter Find and support your local public radio stationThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
27/03/2012m 57s

Unemployment Claims Hit Record as Testing Grows — But Is It Fast Enough?

Weekly unemployment claims soared last week to nearly 3.3 million and Congress works to finalize a coronavirus relief package. Plus Anthony Fauci talks about the state of testing for Covid-19 in the US, and NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports on why more testing is critical. Also, a grocer in Maine reflects on the boredom and anxiety of working through the pandemic. More links: Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter Contact 'Embedded' with your story from the front lines of the crisis at embedded@npr.org. Dr Anthony Fauci's interview on 'Morning Edition'Find and support your local public radio stationThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
26/03/2011m 59s

Details Emerge On Senate's $2 Trillion Rescue Package

It would be the largest such stimulus package in American history. The Governor of New York says it's not nearly enough. Plus, NPR's Ayesha Rascoe reports on the confusion about the Trump administration's use of the Federal Defense Production Act, and how one ER doctor in Seattle is coping on the front lines of the pandemic. More links: Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter Find and support your local public radio station Chef Amanda Freitag's pandemic cooking tips and recipesThis episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
25/03/2012m 22s

New York City, U.S. Epicenter, Braces For Peak

Governor Andrew Cuomo said the pandemic could peak in New York in the next 14-21 days — around the same time President Trump said he'd love to "open" the economy. Plus why the aviation and other transportation industries are lining up for federal bailout money, and a theory about why the virus might be so good at spreading. More links: Find and support your local public radio station here. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on how to clean surfaces inside your home.Listen to Atlantic journalist Ed Yong on 'Short Wave' on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or at npr.org. Listen to 'Wow In The World' on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or at npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
24/03/2012m 30s

The Cost Of Social Distancing

How do officials weigh the economic cost against the public health benefit? Plus a report from the hardest-hit area of Italy, and a sampling of free things that you had to pay for before the coronavirus. Planet Money's episode 'How To Save The Economy Now' is here. Here's a list of things that weren't free before the coronavirus from NPR's Brakkton Booker. Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org. This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
23/03/2012m 26s

CA, NY On Lockdown; Mortgage Relief For Some Homeowners

Two of the hardest-hit states order residents to stay home in an effort to fight the pandemic. Plus what the World Health Organization has learned about the coronavirus in the months since it began to spread. And how homeowners could have their mortgage payments reduced or suspended for up to 12 months. More links: Life Kit's episode on how to spot fake news. Find and support your local public radio station. Follow host Kelly McEvers on Twitter. Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
20/03/2011m 46s

GOP Senator Raised Virus Alarms Weeks Ago — In Private

U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, in a private luncheon, compared the coronavirus to the 1918 flu. NPR's Tim Mak obtained a secret recording — more of his reporting is here. Plus how nurses are coping in the Seattle region, and why schools are struggling to make informed decisions about keeping kids home from school. Check out Life Kit's episode '8 Tips To Make Working From Home Work For You' here. Find and support your local public radio station here. Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
19/03/2012m 54s

Why U.S. Coronavirus Cases Are About To Rise Dramatically

White House officials expect a spike tied to increased testing. Plus a guide to social distancing, a look at the grocery store supply chain, and a suggestion from NPR Music to take the edge off feelings of isolation and stress. You can hear Life Kit's episode on social distancing, "Disrupted and Distanced," here on Apple podcasts or at NPR.org.You can stream NPR Music's 'Isle Of Calm' playlist via Spotify or Apple Music. Find and support your local public radio station here. Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org.This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
18/03/2012m 18s

Introducing NPR's Daily Update On Coronavirus News

The coronavirus pandemic is changing everything, and fast. Here's a way to follow the latest news on the virus, the public health fight against it, and how the world is coping. Each weekday we'll bring you stories and conversations from NPR journalists. Hosted by Kelly McEvers.
17/03/2053s
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