Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

By NPR

The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.

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Episodes

Forecasters predict another sweltering summer. Are we ready?

The summer of 2023 saw skylines choked by Canadian wildfire smoke, coral cooked in hot tub-warm ocean water and a month straight of 110-degree Fahrenheit high temperatures in Phoenix.Scientists say 2024 will likely bring another hotter-than-normal summer and, with it, the potential for more climate-driven disasters.NPR's Rebecca Hersher says forecasters predict an extremely active Atlantic Hurricane season.And NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on a shortage of federal wildland firefighters ahead of a high-risk wildfire season.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/05/2410m 56s

Make travel bearable on Memorial Day and beyond

It seems like every year we hear the same thing: that this will be the busiest summer travel season ever. But this one really stands out. AAA projects that this Memorial Day weekend will see the highest number of travelers in nearly two decades. What will that mean? Congested roads, crowded airports and a lot of headaches. Hannah Sampson, who covers travel news for The Washington Post, shares some tips to survive summer vacation season.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/05/249m 47s

Here are three possible outcomes in the Trump hush money trial

We bring you a special episode of Trump's Trials. Host Scott Detrow speaks with former Deputy Assistant Attorney General Harry Litman. Although Litman is convinced the jury will convict Trump in the New York hush money trial he also gives a rundown of other possible outcomes in the case.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/05/2416m 2s

Republicans soften stance abortion, 'abortion abolitionists' go farther

Abortion Rights has been a motivating political issue for generations, and this year might be the most intense for those on both sides of the issue. NPR's Sarah McCammon reports on the anti-abortion rights activists who want to ramp up restrictions, criminalize patients who pursue abortions, and ban procedures like IVF.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/05/2411m 36s

The Class of 2024: From a pandemic to protests

Everyone says you live through history, but "I don't think anyone prepared us for this much history," say the students in the Class of 2024.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/05/2413m 29s

The states where abortion is on the ballot in November

Since Roe v. Wade was overturned, state laws on abortion have been changing constantly. It will all be part of the picture as voters go to the polls in November.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/05/2410m 45s

What to expect after the sudden death of Iran's president, Ebrahim Raisi

Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi has died in a helicopter crash, according to state media. Here's how his death might contribute to instability in Iran and the region.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/05/2410m 33s

What Do Young Voters Want? Candidates Are Determined To Find Out

A little less than six months out from the general election, it seems like a new poll comes out every few minutes. In the constantly shifting data, every presidential candidate wants to know how to attract voters under 30.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/05/2411m 58s

How 'The Sympathizer' confronts Hollywood's version of the Vietnam War

Hollywood depictions have long helped inform America's understanding of the Vietnam War.But there was usually one thing missing from these Vietnam War stories: the Vietnamese perspective. For Vietnamese Americans, like author Viet Thanh Nguyen, that experience left him feeling confused as a child. In his Pulitzer-winning debut novel The Sympathizer, Nguyen filled that gap by telling the story of a Vietnamese double agent who struggled with his involvement in all parts of the conflict. And with the release of a new HBO series adapting the story, one question arises: Can The Sympathizer subvert the long-standing narrative on the Vietnam war in Hollywood?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/05/2411m 33s

As antisemitism grows, it is easier to condemn than define

For American Jews who grew up thinking antisemitism was a thing of the past, the last several years have been startling. White supremacists marched in Charlottesville. A gunman massacred worshippers at a synagogue in Pittsburgh. Then came the Hamas attacks of October 7th and Israel's war in Gaza.The Anti-Defamation League says since then, antisemitic incidents in the US are up 361% over the same period a year ago. Both Congress and the White House have tried to address antisemitism in recent weeks, yet there's still a debate about what it is. Two journalists, who have been thinking and writing about antisemitism in the U.S. weigh in.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/05/2411m 19s

The migrant aid group caught in a right-wing social media thread

A conservative group posted a social media thread showing flyers in a border encampment in Mexico urging migrants to vote for Joe Biden. Now, the woman caught up in it, speaks to NPR. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/05/2411m 18s

How this Girl Scout troop offers community to migrant children

The Girl Scouts have been part of American childhood for generations. And now that quintessential experience is helping young girls, who are new to the United States get a sense of belonging. It comes through a Girl Scout troop based in one of New York City's largest migrant shelters. The shelter has around 3,500 migrants, and all of the Girl Scouts are children of families seeking asylum. For the last few weeks, NPR's Jasmine Garsd has been spending time with them, and brings us their their story.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/05/249m 19s

Have the new weight-loss drugs changed what it means to be body positive?

America is a land of contradictions; while we're known as a nation that loves to eat, we also live within a culture that has long valued thinness as the utmost beauty standard.Over the last several years the body positivity movement has pushed back on that notion. But then came a new class of weight-loss drugs.New York Magazine contributing writer Samhita Mukhopadhyay grapples with the possible future of a movement like this in her recent article, So Was Body Positivity All A Big Lie?She joins All Things Considered host Juana Summers to discuss the ever-evolving conversation on health, size, and whose business that is in the first place.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/05/2411m 14s

He may be a longshot, but Robert F. Kennedy Jr. could impact the election

President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump have turned their attention on Robert F. Kennedy Jr. recently. And the fact that the major party candidates are either trying to criticize him or praise him is a sign that his independent candidacy could have a real impact.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/05/2411m 51s

Critics hated 'The Phantom Menace.' It might be time to reconsider

When Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace hit screens across the country in 1999, Return of the Jedi felt like ancient history to Star Wars fans. But after 16 long years, the movie let down fans and critics alike. Twenty-five years have changed how a lot of people feel. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/05/2416m 8s

From utility man to one of California's foremost journalists

Louis Sahagún first arrived at the Los Angeles Times in his early twenties as a utility worker, sweeping lead dust around the printing machines.But it was the buzzing newsroom that inspired Sahagún to soon spend his lifetime writing stories about the undiscovered characters and corners of California.Now after 43 years, he's retiring from the paper, and reflecting on what motivated him to cover a side of the Golden state that remained unknown to many.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/05/249m 49s

Israel seized control of the Rafah border crossing. The impact could be devastating

The Biden administration has put a hold on an arms shipment to Israel. A senior administration official speaking on the condition of anonymity told NPR it was due to concerns the bombs could be used in Rafah.Rafah is the site of Israel's latest campaign in its war against Hamas. It's also home to some 1.3 million Palestinians. More than half of those people have fled fighting in other parts of Gaza.On Monday night, Israeli tanks rolled into Rafah taking control of the Palestinian side of the border crossing with Egypt. The seizure of the border crossing cuts a key supply line for humanitarian aid. Israel says its incursion in Rafah is a "precise counterterrorism operation." But possible further military action along with the closed border crossing could exacerbate a humanitarian catastrophe.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/05/2411m 44s

Brittney Griner shares her experience behind bars in Russia

Brittney Griner didn't know the flight she was taking to Moscow in February 2022 would upend her life. But even before she left for the airport, Griner felt something was off.It was a premonition that foreshadowed a waking nightmare.She had accidentally left two vape cartridges with traces of cannabis oil in her luggage. What followed was nearly 10 months of struggle in a cell, and diplomatic efforts from the U.S. to get her home.Griner reflects on the experience in her new memoir, 'Coming Home' and discusses it in depth with NPR's Juana Summers.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/05/2414m 3s

What's behind the 'outside agitator' narrative

The term "outside agitator" has staying power.It's been used against protestors throughout history, from the Civil Rights Movement, to the anti-Vietnam War protests and now during the pro-Palestinian demonstrations on college campuses."Outside agitator" was also used to describe some of the people who protested the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri In 2014.Who exactly are the "outside agitators" and what purpose does it serve to call them out? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/05/2412m 59s

NASA chief is worried about China getting back to the moon first

On Friday, China launched its Chang'e-6 mission carrying a probe to the far side of the moon to gather samples and bring them back to Earth. If successful, it would be a first, for any country. The race to get astronauts back on the moon is in full swing. The U.S. has serious competition. China wants to put astronauts on the moon by 2030. Other countries are in the race, too.If the U.S. stays on schedule it will get humans back on the moon before anyone else, as part of NASA's Artemis program. That's a big if. But NASA is making progress.The space agency's making a bit of a bet, and mostly relying on private companies, mainly Elon Musk's SpaceX .With limited resources and facing a more crowded field, it's unclear if the U.S. will dominate space as it once did.Host Scott Detrow talks to NASA Administrator Bill Nelson about what he is doing to try to keep the U.S. at the front of the race back to the moon.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/05/2414m 30s

Wild Card: Jenny Slate

Welcome to Wild Card with Rachel Martin. In this first episode, Rachel talks to Jenny Slate, known for her roles in Obvious Child, Marcel the Shell with Shoes On and Parks and Recreation. Jenny opens up about whether fate brought her to her husband, what she's sacrificed for motherhood and what's so special about margarine and white bread sandwiches.Subscribe to Wild Card here.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/05/2429m 33s

Larry Demeritte will be the first Black trainer in the Kentucky Derby in decades

Larry Demeritte is the first Black trainer participating in the Kentucky Derby in 35 years. And while the betting-books have his colt West Saratoga running at long odds, Demeritte, who is battling chronic illness and cancer, is feeling confident. For the 70-something veteran trainer, this is his first time at the Derby, but he is part of a rich history of Black horsemen who helped shape the Kentucky Derby into the iconic race it is today. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/05/2410m 8s

Want to understand America's labor movement? Head south

If you go by headlines, the last 12 months have delivered major wins to organized labor. But despite well publicized victories the rate of U.S. union membership fell to a record low in 2023. Just 10%. And in southern states, the push to unionize can still be a grinding, uphill battle.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/05/2412m 5s

For weeks students have protested the war in Gaza — now things are escalating

From New York — to Illinois — to Los Angeles — encampments in support of Palestinians dot campuses across the country.And over the last couple of days the tension has only increased as police have intervened on several campuses, including Columbia University, UCLA and the University of Texas. Hundreds of protestors have been arrested.Pro-Palestinian protests on college campuses are growing in scope and intensity, and colleges are calling on law enforcement to help. Is it the right decision, and what happens next?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/05/2410m 15s

Judi Dench reflects on a career built around Shakespeare

Dame Judi Dench has played everyone from the writer Iris Murdoch to M in the James Bond films. But among the roles the actress is most closely associated, are Shakespeare's heroines and some of his villians. Amongst those roles are the star-crossed lover Juliet, the comical Titania and the tragic Lady Macbeth. Now she's reflecting on that work, and Shakespeare's work in Shakespeare: The Man Who Pays The Rent.The book is comprised of Dench's conversations with her friend, the actor and director Brendan O'Hea.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/04/2411m 58s

How the college protests echo history

Protests against Israel's war in Gaza on college campuses have expanded across the country. They're the biggest student protests, since college students demonstrated against the Vietnam war in the late sixties and early seventies.What do the campus protests of today have in common with those of the sixties? How might they affect the policies of their universities and the US government?Thirty years ago, South Africa became an emblem of a multiracial democracy. Decades on, how is that legacy holding up?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/04/2412m 7s

With the end of apartheid South Africa became an emblem of democracy. Is it still?

Three decades ago, South Africa held its first democratic election, closing the door on the apartheid era. And Nelson Mandela was elected its first Black president.Today, the country is still led by Mandela's political party - the African National Congress. But polls show that voters are growing increasingly dissatisfied with the party's leadership, and next month's national elections could lead to the ANC having to share power with opposition parties.Thirty years ago, South Africa became an emblem of a multiracial democracy. Decades on, how is that legacy holding up?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/04/2412m 42s

This former NIH chief went public with his prostate cancer to help others

During the early days of the pandemic, former NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins became a familiar voice steering the country through an unprecedented public health crisis. Now, he is going through his own health crisis, an aggressive form of prostate cancer. By talking about it publicly he hopes to draw attention to routine screening.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/04/2412m 36s

How DeSantis' immigration laws may be backfiring

Last year, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed a strict immigration law making it harder to hire undocumented workers. But like much of the country, Florida is dealing with a tight labor market and some employers are struggling to find workers. NPR's Jasmine Garsd reports on how the law is affecting the state's economy, from construction sites, to strawberry fields.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/04/249m 12s

Trump is arguing for immunity in his criminal case. Will the Supreme Court agree?

One of Richard Nixon's most famous quotes...right up there with "I am not a crook"... had to do with presidential immunity."When the president does it" he said "that means that it is not illegal." That idea – that you can't prosecute someone for actions taken as president - the Supreme Court has never actually ruled on it.On Thursday, the Justices will take a crack, with the federal election interference case against former president Donald Trump hanging in the balance.We preview how things might go.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/04/2410m 20s

How voters from different economic sectors see the 2024 election

Americans often rank the economy as a number one voting issue. As part of NPR's "We the Voters" series we check back in with four Americans we've been following since the pandemic.They share how they're faring in a the current economy, and how that might influence the positions they take in the 2024 presidential election.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/04/2412m 6s

Breaking down the legal case at the center of the political universe

The broad outlines of Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg's case have been known for months. Hush money payments to a former porn star made in 2016, when Trump was a presidential candidate. Bragg alleges Trump was involved in a scheme to cover up those payments, one that amounted to criminal fraud.Now we're getting a more detailed outline of their arguments – and Trump's defense. We break down the legal case at the center of the political universe.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/04/249m 58s

The push to deliver high-speed rail to Texas

For the last 60 years a transportation revolution has largely passed America by. Bullet trains were invented in Japan in the early 1960s. Since then, countries all over the world have adopted the technology and constructed sprawling networks of high speed rail lines. Despite spending billions of dollars in federal funding, he U.S. lags far behind. But a recent visit from Japan's Prime minister has revived interest in bullet train projects around the country. One of those projects is in Texas – a proposed high-speed rail line between Houston and Dallas.NPR's Andrew Limbong speaks with Dallas Morning News mobility and transportation reporter Amber Gaudet about what it will take to get Texas' high-speed rail project completed, and what it could mean for high-speed rail in America.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/04/2410m 40s

Is this fictitious civil war closer to reality than we think?

Civil War, the new A24 film from British director Alex Garland, imagines a scenario that might not seem so far-fetched to some; a contemporary civil war breaking out in the United States.And while the film has taken heat for little mention of politics, the question of an actual civil war has everything to do with it. Amy Cooter is a director of research at the Center on Terrorism, Extremism, and Counterterrorism at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies. Her work has led her to the question that Garland's movie has put in the minds of both moviegoers and political pundits: Could a second civil war really happen here? Cooter joins host Andrew Limbong to discuss the actual threat of current political movements in the U.S., outside of the movie theaters. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/04/2411m 3s

Trump's anti-abortion stance helped him win in 2016. Will it hurt him in 2024?

Back in 1999 when Donald Trump was flirting with a presidential run, he was pro-abortion rights. In an interview on Meet the Press with NBC's Tim Russert, the New York real estate developer said he didn't like abortion, but he wouldn't ban it.Fast forward almost two decades, and Trump was running for the republican presidential nomination, and he had a very different stance on abortion, even suggesting in an MSNBC town hall meeting that women should be punished for seeking abortions.Trump ultimately won the presidency with the support of white Evangelical voters, many of whom wanted to see Roe v. Wade overturned. Six years after he won, the Supreme Court justices Trump appointed helped deliver exactly that.Now as Trump mounts another run for the White House, abortion rights are on the ballot and winning. And Trump has once again evolved his stance on abortion. Is it a political calculation?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/04/2410m 21s

What happened when the threat of danger became Salman Rushdie's reality?

Salman Rushdie is probably most closely associated with his 1988 novel The Satanic Verses, a book inspired by the life of the prophet Muhummad. The book was notorious not just for its contents but because of the intense backlash, and the threat it posed to his safety and wellbeing. While Rushdie saw it as an exploration of Islamic culture, some Muslims saw it as blasphemous. The year after it published, Iran's supreme leader issued a fatwa, ordering Muslims to kill Rushdie.Rushdie moved to New York in 2000, and was able to resume the public life of a popular author, but that all changed on August 12th, 2022 when a young man charged at Rushdie while he was on stage at an event, stabbing him at least a dozen times.After two years, he has chronicled his brush with death, and the aftermath in his new memoir 'KNIFE'. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/04/2412m 29s

The man who inspired 'Hotel Rwanda' is still taking risks for his country

In 1994, the world watched as genocide unfolded in Rwanda. Nearly one million people died as neighbors brutally killed their neighbors. Paul Rusesabagina is credited for keeping more than 1,200 people safe in his hotel through weeks of violence. His life and story inspired the 2004 film Hotel Rwanda. In 2021, Rusesabagina says he was kidnapped, tried and imprisoned in Rwanda for two years and seven months over his ties to the Rwanda Movement for Democratic Change (MRCD), a group that opposes President Paul Kagame's rule. After intervention from the U.S. and other countries, Rusesabagina was eventually released from prison. At the time he was released, he says he electronically signed a letter promising not to criticize the government. Ultimately, he decided to disregard that promise.Many allies of President Kagame would argue that he has been responsible for shepherding an era of what they say is relative peace in the country. His critics say he leads an oppressive government that leaves no space for dissent. We hear from Paul Rusesabagina and his daughter Anaïse Kanimba, who are still speaking out against the Rwandan government.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/04/249m 6s

Iran's attack on Israel is a major escalation. What comes next for the region?

Iran launched a barrage of more than 300 drones and missiles at Israel over the weekend, saying it was in response to an airstrike earlier this month that hit Iran's consulate in Syria and killed seven Iranian military officials, including two generals.Israel neither confirmed nor denied responsibility for the Syria strike, though the Pentagon said Israel was responsible.Sima Shine is a former senior Israeli intelligence official. She now runs the Iran desk at the Institute for National Security Studies in Tel Aviv. She says this attack is "crossing the Rubicon" from the point of view of Iran, and explains what Israel's retaliation could be.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/04/2410m 0s

How do you select an impartial jury when your client is famous?

On Monday, former President Donald Trump will enter a Manhattan courtroom for his first criminal trial. But before a verdict can be rendered a jury must be selected. And for Trump's legal team that is going to be a challenge. A small number of attorneys have faced a similar challenge — how do you select an impartial jury when your client is famous? Host Scott Detrow speaks with attorney Camille Vasquez for insight into the art of jury selection in such a case. She represented Johnny Depp in his defamation suit against his ex-wife Amber Heard. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/04/2415m 35s

Is Israel perpetuating a cycle of radicalization rather than ending it?

For months, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been insisting that the goal of Israel's bombardment in Gaza is to "destroy Hamas."But in the path of that destruction, more than 33,000 Palestinian civilians have been killed. Regular people, entire families, and more than 13,000 children. Yet, it's not clear if Israel is any closer to its stated goal of destroying Hamas. In fact, is it possible that the horrors of this war could ignite a cycle of radicalization in the region?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/04/249m 21s

O.J. Simpson's trial divided the nation. What legacy does he leave behind?

O.J. Simpson was more than a football star. More than a pop culture icon or a defendant acquitted of murder.He became a symbol of America's complicated relationship to race, celebrity, and justice. His family announced that he died of cancer Wednesday at age 76.The murder trial of O.J. Simpson became not only about one man and two victims, but the entire country. Coming up, we assess the legacy of a case, and a verdict, that put race in America on the stand. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/04/248m 22s

Anti-Diet Culture Gets Hijacked

In recent years, the body positivity movement has raised it's profile, especially on social media largely through self-described anti-diet and body positivity influencers.These influencers and others like them represent a pivot away from the diet and fitness culture embodied by companies like weight watchers, which focuses on losing weight as a path to healthier living. Today there is a broad "anti-diet" movement that posits that bodies can be healthy at any size. But some are trying to co-opt this movement. An investigation by The Washington Post and the Examination found that large food companies are recruiting these influencers to promote sugary cereals and processed snacks.As people who are part of the anti-diet movement saw an opportunity to practice and spread a message of self-love and acceptance, big food companies saw an opportunity to make money. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/04/2410m 18s

Learning To Live As Neighbors In The Shadow Of A Brutal, Violent History

Many of us don't have the opportunity to handpick our neighbors. We buy or rent a place in a neighborhood with good schools or an easy commute. Some of us become friends with those who live nearby, others of us never talk to our neighbors at all. For most though, we co-exist. In the midst of a brutal civil war, neighbors killed their neighbors simply because of who they were. Thirty years ago this month, that wasn't the case in Rwanda.We visit a Rwandan village where how neighbors live alongside one another is deliberate, and complicated. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/04/2411m 58s

How Sibling Bonds Shape Our Lives

Researchers are finding that the impact of relationships with siblings —for better or worse — can be important, and endure well beyond childhood.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/04/249m 40s

Bad Omens Or The Cycle of Nature? How The Ancient World Viewed Eclipses

Tomorrow, the Great American Eclipse will sweep across North America, and millions will experience total darkness.It's an eerie and mysterious experience even though at this point, we know exactly what's happening: the moon passes in front of the sun, casting a shadow over earth. But imagine you lived in the ancient world, with no warning that an eclipse was about to happen, as the sun's disk suddenly disappeared and the day fell dark and cool. Unsurprisingly, eclipses were often seen as bad omens. That was true in Mesopotamia, the region that today includes Iraq, Syria, Kuwait and Turkey. But even then, ancient Mesopotamian astronomers were looking for other explanations.Watching an eclipse is one of humanity's oldest rituals, and it's been inspiration to scientists since the beginning of time. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/04/249m 27s

U.S. Stance On Israel Proving Divisive In Congressional Primaries

The American response to Israel's war with Hamas could be a major factor in the upcoming Congressional elections.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/04/2413m 24s

Bird Flu Has Jumped To Cattle And To Humans. What Are The Potential Risks?

Bird flu has spread to cows. And now a human has contracted the virus from an infected cow. What kind of risk does this virus pose to people, and are we prepared to treat it?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/04/247m 52s

In U.S., Over 100,000 Await Organ Transplants. Are Pig Organs The Solution?

The recent transplant of a genetically modified pig kidney into a living human raises hopes that lives will no longer depend on the availability of human donor organs.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/04/2413m 48s

Measuring The Economic Impact Of Baltimore's Port Closure

One week after a massive container ship crashed into Baltimore's Francis Scott Key Bridge, causing it to collapse, a massive effort is underway to clear the wreckage. But it's still unclear how long the cleanup will take.Meanwhile, with much of the Port of Baltimore shut down, the economic impact is being felt locally, regionally and in the broad economy.Host Mary Louise Kelly gets the latest from NPR's Laurel Wamsley, on the ground in Baltimore, and Camila Domonoske, who covers the auto industry for NPR. Baltimore is a major national hub for the import and export of vehicles. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/04/248m 31s

What Happens When A Powerful Corporation Owns The Local News?

When news outlets shut down in a city, that creates what's often called a news desert. But in Richmond, California, NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik says the situation is more like a news mirage.Energy giant Chevron is the biggest employer - and the biggest polluter in the California city. Chevron also owns the local news site. How does that impact the community there?NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Folkenflik and Miranda Green, director of investigations for the news site Floodlight - about what happens when a major corporation owns the local news.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/04/2412m 10s

A Billionaire's Land Purchases In Rural Hawaii Have Locals Worried

Hawaii is no stranger to extravagant homes owned by the super-rich. But when a tech billionaire started buying up land in Waimea, a small, rural town on the Big Island, the community got curious - and worried. Locals fear it will become even more difficult for Native Hawaiians to afford to live in Waimea and buy property. In Hawaii, the average home price is close to a million dollars. Who's purchasing all this land in rural Hawaii and how will it affect the already high cost of housing in Waimea?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/03/2413m 22s

A new biopic on Shirley Chisolm fills in the picture on a woman who broke barriers

Shirley Chisholm made history in 1968 as the first Black woman ever elected to Congress. Four years later, the New York representative made history again when she ran for the Democratic presidential nomination, the first woman and the first African American to do so. A new Netflix movie, called simply "Shirley," tells her story. Host Ailsa Chang speaks with Regina King, who plays Shirley Chisholm and the film's director John Ridley.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/03/2411m 37s

One Year On, American Journalist Evan Gershkovich Remains In Russian Prison

This week Russian authorities extended the detention of American journalist Evan Gershkovich. Authorities have yet to provide any evidence to backup charges that Gershkovich was spying, and no trial date has been set.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/03/249m 20s

Could Universal Basic Income Help End Poverty?

People who work on ways to end poverty have been trying a simple approach lately: just giving money to those in need, with no strings attached.Universal basic income, or UBI, once seemed like a radical idea in the US. But now, many places in the country are pushing to make UBI a permanent part of the social safety net.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/03/2411m 5s

Investigators Search For Answers in Baltimore Bridge Collapse

Baltimore's Francis Scott Key Bridge collapsed early Tuesday morning after a cargo ship rammed into it. As search and rescue efforts continue, federal investigators are trying to understand what led to the collapse.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/03/2413m 4s

For Millions Of People In Conflict Zones, Famine Is A Man-Made Disaster

Famine is a man-made disaster affecting millions in conflict zones.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/03/2410m 21s

How Two Recent Cases Of Violence Illustrate The Lives of LGBTQ People

Suicide rates for queer and trans people are disproportionately high. They're also routinely targets of violence and hate crimes.While some states have protections for queer and trans people, many other states have passed laws that restrict the rights and visibility of transgender individuals.The stories of Nex Benedict and Dime Doe illustrate both those trends.Benedict died by suicide the day after a physical altercation in their school bathroom. Benedict had been bullied by other students for more than a year.Dime Doe, a Black trans woman, was killed in 2019. Last month a man who had been in a relationship with Doe was found guilty of killing her. It's the first time a hate crime against a trans person was brought to trial. What do these cases tell us about the lives of trans and queer people in America?If you or someone you know needs help, call or text 988 to reach the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/03/2413m 39s

Stephen King Has Ruled The Horror Genre For 50 Years. But Is It Art?

In 1974, Stephen King published his first book, "Carrie". But 50 years on, critics still debate if his work deserves a place in the literary canon.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/03/2410m 12s

Can America Win The Chips Manufacturing Race?

President Biden just awarded $8.5 billion dollars to the company Intel to help fund semiconductor factories in Arizona, Ohio, New Mexico, and Oregon. At a visit to Intel's campus outside Phoenix this week, Biden said the money will help semiconductor manufacturing make a comeback in the US after 40 years.The money for Intel comes from the CHIPS and Science Act, which was signed in 2022 to boost domestic semiconductor manufacturing. The administration's goal? For 20% of the world's leading-edge semiconductor chips to be made on American soil by 2030.The US currently makes zero of the world's leading-edge semiconductor chips. By 2030, the Biden administration wants to make a fifth of them. So how will America get there? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/03/2411m 18s

Is Netanyahu's Endgame Achievable?

Next week representatives of the Israeli government are scheduled to fly from Tel Aviv to Washington, DC. When they arrive, they'll head to the White House, where they'll meet with representatives of the US government.On the agenda – the next steps in Israel's war against Hamas. The meeting comes as famine is imminent for roughly 300-thousand Palestinians in Northern Gaza.At the same time, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu seems to be losing US support. Still, Netanyahu insists that Israel won't stop until it has achieved, quote, "total victory." But what does that mean – and how close is Israel to achieving that?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/03/2411m 2s

A $418 Million Settlement Could Change U.S. Home Buying. But Who Benefits?

The way we have bought homes for the last 100 years could change as soon as July. Who wins, who loses, and who gets a share of the $418 million class-action settlement?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/03/2410m 50s

What Another Putin Term Means For Ukraine

Vladimir Putin has ruled Russia for a quarter century. This weekend's election results confirmed that he will reign for another six years. Putin's hold on the Kremlin gives him control of the world's largest nuclear arsenal and a military that's been at war in Ukraine for more than two years, ever since he launched an invasion in February 2022.That war has killed or wounded hundreds of thousands of Russian and Ukrainian soldiers, but despite these losses, the Russian military is pressing forward.Ukraine faces the stark prospect of a fight in which key US military assistance is in question. So what will six more years of Vladimir Putin mean for the war in Ukraine? And where do both militaries stand at this point in that brutal war?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/03/249m 22s

To Fight Crime, Blue Cities Take A Page From The Conservative Playbook

Three solidly blue cities have rolled out crime fighting initiatives that feel more like conservative strategies.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/03/2413m 21s

NATO Positions Itself For War

When Russia's war in Ukraine began over two years ago, neighboring countries feared that they could be next.And NATO asked itself - was it prepared to defend its territory if war arrived on its doorstep?The answer was no.So, its military chief decided it was time to ramp up NATO's strategy and revive its military headquarters. And for the first time this spring, NATO will exercise brand new war plans to prepare for the worst. The plan comes as Donald Trump makes another run at the White House, and expresses skepticism about NATO along the way. Can NATO take on Russia if American support for the alliance doesn't hold?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/03/2411m 51s

What Do We Understand About Long COVID?

This week marks four years since the outbreak of Covid-19 was officially declared a pandemic. One of the most vexing legacies — one that science still hasn't solved — is long Covid. That's the debilitating condition that can develop in the aftermath of an infection. Millions of Americans are living with the often debilitating symptoms that can include brain fog, shortness of breath, and low energy. Some struggle with simple daily living tasks like laundry and cooking. Four years since the pandemic hit, patients with long Covid are still fighting for answers. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/03/249m 39s

You're Not Imagining It; Shrinkflation Is Real

Here's one sign that shrinkflation is no longer just a topic for economics nerds. Cookie Monster recently complained on social media that his favorite food was getting smaller. "Me hate shrinkflation!" the fuzzy blue monster declared. "Guess me going to have to eat double da cookies!" President Biden promised to sign a bill banning it during his State of the Union address.Shrinkflation isn't new. It's been happening for years. But people seem to be paying more attention right now amidst high food prices and inflation. And the White House is clearly aware of that. After years of rising prices, many Americans are fed up with paying more and getting less. Will the pendulum ever swing back? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/03/2410m 24s

Haiti's Prime Minister Says He'll Resign. Will It Help Calm The Violence?

Haiti's Prime Minister, Ariel Henry, has announced his resignation. But the country remains in freefall. Will Haitians finally have a chance to determine their own political future?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/03/2410m 45s

Ramadan In A Time Of War

The holy month of Ramadan begins this week. It is a holy month of worship for Muslims during which they worship, study the Quran, pray and fast from sunrise until sunset.It is a time of light, but Ramadan feels different this year, especially for Palestinian-Americans, says Eman Abdelhadi. She is a professor at the University of Chicago, whose research focuses on Muslim-Americans. Abdelhadi says "every moment of joy feels stolen and elicits a sense of guilt." The guilt she describes is connected to the mass death and suffering in Gaza. What does Israel's war against Hamas in Gaza mean for the holiest of Muslim holidays? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/03/2411m 26s

NASA Hopes To Land Humans On Mars By 2030. Is That A Good Thing?

We're moving closer to the dream of landing humans on Mars. But will sustaining human life on Mars even be possible?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/03/248m 32s

Is Catastrophic Climate Change Inevitable? We Ask Outgoing Climate Chief Kerry

As John Kerry leaves his role as the first Presidential Envoy for Climate, has he helped shift us away from climate disaster?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/03/2411m 9s

FX's Shogun Takes A New Approach To An Old Story

When Shogun, James Clavell's best selling novel was adapted into a powerhouse NBC miniseries in 1980. The hero of the story was Englishman John Blackthorne.The people he met when he landed in Japan in search of riches, are viewed and portrayed as primitive.In the 2024 Shogun adaptation the Japanese characters are fully formed. The series elevates the stories of the Japanese characters as much as it does Blackthorne's. That was a deliberate decision on the part of Shogun co-creators Rachel Kondo and Justin Marks.In the 1980 version of Shogun, Japan, its culture and its people were portrayed as foreign and remote. What do we lose when stories are only told from one point of view? And what can be gained when we widen the lens? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/03/2412m 1s

Generations After The First Nuclear Test, Those Sickened Fight For Compensation

On August 6, 1945, a stone-faced President Harry Truman appeared on television and told Americans about the atomic bomb being dropped on Hiroshima. The attack on Hiroshima marked the first time nuclear power was used in war, but the atomic bomb was actually tested a month earlier in the Jornada del Muerto desert of New Mexico. At least hundreds of New Mexicans were harmed by the test's fallout. Radiation creeped into the grass their cows grazed, on the food they ate, and the water they drank. A program compensating victims of government-caused nuclear contamination has been in place since 1990, but it never included downwinders in New Mexico, the site of the very first nuclear test. This week, the Senate voted to broaden the bi-partisan legislation that could compensate people who have suffered health consequences of radiation testing. Now, the bill will go to a House vote.Generations after the Trinity Nuclear Test, will downwinders in New Mexico finally get compensation? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/03/2411m 26s

Haley's Out: Can Trump Win Her Supporters?

Nikki Haley's announcement that she was suspending her campaign for president didn't come as a surprise. She's trailed front-runner Donald Trump in all but two Republican primary contests so far. Haley did manage to sway some Republican voters away from Trump. She also managed to recruit independents and Democrats, too. As she ended her campaign on a stage in South Carolina, Haley did not endorse Trump. She said he would have to earn their votes.Nikki Haley appealed to Republicans who did not want another four years of Trump. Now that she's out of the race, where will her voters go? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/03/249m 35s

How Conflict Can Influence Voters

This week marks a milestone in the presidential primary process. Fifteen states and one US Territory vote on Super Tuesday. This one day is the biggest delegate haul for candidates during the presidential primary season. The states voting on Super Tuesday include places with lots of Arab American voters, like Minnesota. Just last week, more than 13 percent of voters in Michigan's Democratic primary voted uncommitted. Many of those voters are Arab Americans who wanted to send Joe Biden a message about his support for Israel in the war in Gaza. The 2024 election is likely to be narrowly divided between President Joe Biden and Former President Donald Trump. The way the Biden administration handles conflicts abroad could have the power to shape the electorate here at home.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/03/2411m 10s

The Supreme Court Hands Trump A Legal And Political Win

Former President Donald Trump scored a legal victory today. The Supreme Court ruled 9 to 0 that the likely Republican nominee for President should be restored to the ballot in Colorado.The decision also says individual states cannot bar candidates for federal office under the insurrection clause. So: a legal victory, and also a political victory.As the clock ticks toward November 5th – Election day – it's increasingly looking like the many legal cases focused on former President Trump may tip his way, or remain unresolved.What impact will this have on Trump's campaign for a second term in the White House?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/03/2411m 2s

The Rematch: Biden v. Trump

Chances are, this November 5th 2024 is going to feel a lot like November 3rd 2020 — a bit like Groundhog Day.After a decisive set of Republican primaries, it's increasingly clear President Joe Biden is likely to face off against a familiar foe: former President Donald Trump. A race between Donald Trump and Joe Biden isn't only a rematch, but a contest between two men who have already occupied the Oval office and been in the public eye for decades. This, despite the fact that several polls show Americans did not want a rematch between Donald Trump and Joe Biden. So what is there still to learn about the two candidates, their styles, and the policies they would put in place if they get another four years in the White House? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/03/2412m 53s

Are We Alone In The Universe?

Are we alone in the universe? It's a question that's been posed again and again. Carl Sagan posed it in the 1970s as a NASA mission scientist as the agency prepared to send its twin Viking landers to Mars. And nearly 50 years after the first of two landers touched down on Mars, we're no closer to an answer as to whether there's life — out there.Scientists haven't stopped looking. In fact, they've expanded their gaze to places like Saturn's largest moon, Titan and Jupiter's moon Europa. The search for life beyond planet earth continues to captivate. And NASA has upcoming missions to both moons. Could we be closer to answering that question Carl Sagan asked some 50 years ago? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/03/2410m 51s

McConnell Releases His Grip On Power

Here in the US, the average age of retirement is 61. Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky passed that birthday more than 20 years ago. And on Wednesday afternoon, he announced that while he still isn't ready to retire just yet, he will no longer lead Republicans in the Senate. McConnell says he still has "enough gas" in the tank to thoroughly disappoint his critics. The soon-to-be former leader intends to serve out the rest of his term which continues through January 2027.McConnell's Congressional career began back in 1984 when Ronald Reagan was President. The Kentucky republican has long embraced Reagan's conservatism and view of American exceptionalism.Today's Republican party is one Mitch McConnell played a key role in shaping. Yet as he gets ready to step down from leadership, McConnell seems out of step with the direction the party is heading.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/02/2410m 16s

Can Speaker Of The House Mike Johnson Make A Deal?

Despite a last minute agreement to push a deadline for a shutdown, Congress and the White House have to agree on how to fund the government. So far, all they've been able to do is kick the can down the road. And conditions for making a political deal are only getting worse. Republicans can only lose two votes. And there's skepticism all around.Finding a way out largely depends on Speaker of the House Mike Johnson, Republican of Louisiana. But Johnson has a fractious caucus, is relatively inexperienced, and shutdowns have become the political weapon of choice.If the House leader can't find a path to a deal, the entire country could pay the price.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/02/2410m 25s

Trying To Protect Access To IVF

The backlash to the Alabama Supreme Court ruling designating frozen embryos has been intense. Republicans at the state and national level have openly disagreed with the decision. And Democrats have used the ruling to hammer Republicans over reproductive rights. Last month, Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth introduced a bill to protect IVF. It hasn't gotten a lot of attention - until now. Duckworth used IVF to build her own family, and has been warning since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade that the decision could lead to reproductive rights being challenged.Duckworth discusses her legislation and whether she thinks republicans will support it.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/02/2413m 23s

How The Underground Railroad Got Its Name

Popular culture is filled with stories of the underground railroad - the legendary secret network that helped enslaved people escape from southern slave states to free states in the north. Harriet Tubman is the underground railroad's best known conductor. Tubman, who was a Union spy during the Civil War, escaped slavery in Maryland, but returned again and again, risking her own freedom to help free others, including members of her family. Inevitably there's much we don't know ...including how the term, the Underground Railroad, came to be.Journalist Scott Shane, stumbled on the answer while he was writing his book "Flee North: A Forgotten Hero and the Fight for Freedom in Slavery's Borderland." His book tells the story of Thomas Smallwood, an activist and writer who's story and the key role he played in the abolition movement has mostly been lost to history.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/02/2410m 19s

De-influencers Ring the Alarm on the Environmental Impacts of Overconsumption

In the last few years, a new trend has emerged on social media: de-influencing.Instead of selling, de-influencers encourage their followers to stop buying things they don't need. De-influencers are also using this trend as an opportunity to raise awareness about the negative impact of overconsumption on the environment.From plastic packaging to useless gadgets that end up in landfills, overconsumption doesn't just have a negative effect on our wallets, but also on our planet and climate change. We look at what role de-influencers can play in helping to address climate change and spreading the message of sustainable living.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/02/2414m 39s

Kansas City Communities Continue Block By Block Efforts To Prevent Violence

In Kansas City neighborhood organizations do the work of violence prevention one block, and one person at at time.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/02/2410m 31s

Boredom Followed By Unexpected Tragedy: A Ukrainian Soldier's Life At War

Quote – "The fight is here; I need ammunition, not a ride." That statement, from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to the U-S Embassy, came two days after Russian missiles began raining down on his country two years ago.After weeks of speculation and warnings Russian President Vladimir Putin had declared war.Fueled by grit, patriotism and billions of dollars from the US, Ukraine has waged a fight no one expected they could. But nearly two years in that could be changing. US aid is stuck in Congress. This week, Russian forces captured their first city in 9 months. And that plea Zelensky made for ammunition in February 2022 – he's still making it. Ukraine has waged a war against Russia that has exceeded expectations. Can it continue to stand up to Russia if western aid doesn't come through?We get the view from the battlefield from a Ukrainian writer turned soldier.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/02/2411m 7s

Wind Power Is Taking Over A West Virginia Coal Town. Will The Residents Embrace It?

Keyser, West Virginia, was once known for coal. But the jobs have been disappearing. First because of automation, then cheap natural gas. And now, the urgency to address climate change is one more pressure on this energy source that contributes to global warming.Now the town, like so much of the country is attempting to transition to renewable energy. The country's first major climate policy, known as the Inflation Reduction Act, gave that transition a boost. It passed with the key vote of West Virginia's own Senator Democrat Joe Manchin.Keyser represents a national shift in American energy production. And in a town that was defined by coal for generations, change can be difficult.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/02/2413m 52s

Does Portugal Have The Answer To Stopping Drug Overdose Deaths?

Brian Mann covers the U-S opioid and fentanyl crisis for NPR. That means he talks to a lot of people struggling with addiction. Again and again, he's heard stories of people who have succumbed to their addiction — last year 112, 000 — more than ever in history. But when Mann traveled to Portugal to report on that country's model for dealing with the opioid crisis, he heard a very different story. Overdose deaths in Portugal are extremely rare.The country has taken a radically different approach to drugs – decriminalizing small amounts and publicly funding addiction services – including sites where people can use drugs like crack and heroin. Portugal treats addiction as an illness rather than a crime. No one has to pay for addiction care, and no one scrambles to navigate a poorly regulated recovery system. Could Portugal's approach help the U-S fight its opioid epidemic?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/02/2410m 37s

What Navalny's Death Means For The Russian Opposition

Much of the world has spent the weekend mourning Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. And asking why he chose to return to Russia, after he'd been poisoned, and when it was clear he was in danger. Filmmaker Daniel Roher, who interviewed Navalny for the Oscar-winning documentary "Navalny," says the Russian opposition leader was an incredibly optimistic and certain about himself and his mission. And that Navalny believed he could usher in a brighter future for Russia.So what happens to that future now? Aleksei Miniailo an opposition activist and researcher in Moscow weighs in on how the Russian opposition sustains its movement after the death of its most prominent figure.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/02/249m 50s

A Second Wind For Wind Power?

About two years ago, New Jersey's Democratic Governor Phil Murphy said that the state would be partnering with the Danish company Orsted, the largest developer of offshore wind projects in the world. The company had agreed to build Ocean Wind 1, the state's first offshore wind farm, powering half a million homes and creating thousands of jobs in the process. The following year, Orsted inked another deal with the state for Ocean Wind 2, a second offshore wind farm with similar capacity. After years of review, the projects were approved in summer 2023. Construction of the first turbines was slated to begin in the fall. And then Orsted backed out, cancelling the contracts full stop.Despite the setbacks, Murphy is still all-in on wind. A month after Orsted dropped out, Murphy directed the state's Board of Public Utilities to seek new bids from offshore wind developers. And the state just approved two new offshore wind contracts.After several setbacks, could this mean a second wind for offshore wind? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/02/2411m 1s

Rents Take A Big Bite

Rent has skyrocketed in the United States. That means Americans are handing over a bigger portion of their paycheck to their housing costs. They have less money for things like food, electricity, and commuting. The pandemic and inflation have both played a role in pushing rents higher.Whitney Airgood-Obrycki a Senior Research Associate at Harvard's Joint Center on Housing Studies says rents are actually going down, but that increases have been so large it's going to take time for the market to even out.We look at how rent prices got so high and what it might take to bring them down. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/02/2412m 13s

The Romance Between The American Right, Russia And Putin

For half a century, during the Cold War, every U-S president painted Russia as the dominant threat. America's ideological opposite, a hostile and nuclear-armed power. Ronald Reagan went so far as to call the Soviet Union an Evil Empire.So the events of recent days have been noteworthy. On top of a holdup of U-S aid for Ukraine, former President Trump said he might NOT come to the defense of a NATO ally who hadn't spent enough on defense.And Tucker Carlson, the erstwhile Fox news host, flew to Moscow to sit down with Vladimir Putin for more than two hours of mostly softball questions. Afterward, he pronounced Putin "impressive" on stage at the World Government Summit.So what gives? Why the romance between the American right and Russia?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/02/2412m 57s

Immigration: A Winning Issue For Democrats?

One single election does not a trend make. But does Democrat Tom Suozzi's victory in the special election for New York's 3rd Congressional District mean something bigger for democrats?The Congressman won his seat – which until recently had been held by disgraced Republican George Santos – by diving head on into an issue that democrats would usually rather avoid – immigration.Was that the opening chapter in a playbook Suozzi is writing, for fellow Democrats trying to find a way to deal with the thorny political issue of immigration?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/02/247m 56s

Double Standard On Age For Trump And Biden?

On June 14, Donald Trump will turn 78 years old.Joe Biden turned 81 in November.Whether the candidates like it or not, age, mental acuity and physical fitness are issues dominating the 2024 election cycle. Though the two men were born fewer than four years apart, voters have consistently expressed more concern about Biden's age than Trump's.Is a double standard being applied when it comes to the presidential candidates and age?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/02/2411m 11s

Are Biden And Netanyahu Breaking On The War Between Israel And Hamas?

The question looming over the war between Israel and Hamas is what will happen what will happen to Rafah, the city in southern Gaza. More than half of Gaza's population has sought refuge there–an estimated one and a half million people.Israel says that in order to defeat Hamas, it needs to bring the war to Rafah. The Biden administration says a military operation in Rafah cannot proceed. Is this a hairline crack or the beginning of a rift between the U.S. and Israel that could reverberate across the region?President Joe Biden and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanayhu's visions for the future of the war in Gaza are beginning to look irreconcilable. What does that mean for Biden's steadfast support of Israel?For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/02/248m 49s

With A Second Term, Trump Would Take His Immigration Crackdown Further

Immigration is one of the main things Americans will be voting on in November. And many are currently unhappy with the situation at the US Southern Border, which is widely described as a crisis.As Donald Trump runs for another term, he's hoping to leverage that discontent just as he did in 2016.An across-the-board crackdown on immigration was one of the signature policies of the Trump presidency. In a second term, he's promising to go even further.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/02/2412m 1s

What Makes A Football Movie Great?

Hollywood films have long tried to capture America's obsession with its most popular sport. So on this Super Bowl weekend, we ask: what do the best football movies have in common?Is it the "Big Speech" with the team down a point and only seconds to go? Or what about the classic underdog story?Scott Detrow discusses that with Brittany Luse, host of NPR's It's Been a Minute, and with Stephen Thompson of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/02/2412m 11s

The Battle Over Abortion Rights In The 2024 Election

Abortion is a personal issue. But it's also political. And few things motivate voters and politicians like abortion rights. Over and over, U.S. voters have shown they're willing to choose lawmakers, presidents and ballot initiatives based on how they feel about abortion rights. We examine the role abortion could play in the 2024 elections.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/02/2412m 26s

The Supreme Court Weighs In On Trump Being Removed From The Ballot

When it comes to whether or not Trump should appear on presidential ballots, there are at least two questions to consider. The first is legal — does the 14th amendment apply him? The second is practical. What would happen if Trump WERE removed from the ballot? How might his tens of millions of supporters respond? At a rally last month, the former President suggested if he doesn't get what he views as "fair" treatment, the country is in big trouble.This week the Supreme Court will weigh whether Donald Trump is constitutionally ineligible to be president. We hear from a legal scholar who says it could be the beginning of a, "bloody unraveling of democratic norms." For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/02/2410m 56s

America's Immigration System Is Broken. Congress Can't Seem To Fix It.

The U.S. Immigration system isn't working. The last significant reform was in 1986. Presidents and Congress have been trying to fix it and change it ever since. Congress is at it again, but that effort, like so many others, looks doomed to fail. Just a few hours after the text from the Senate bipartisan bill dropped, Speaker of The House Mike Johnson said IF the bill reaches the house – it will be DEAD on arrival. And on Monday night GOP support for the legislation in the Senate seemed to all but fade away. As the Senate gets ready to vote on yet another attempt to address immigration in the U.S, we look at why the effort to fix America's broken immigration system fails across decades, administrations and parties. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/02/2413m 25s

East Palestine Residents Worry About Safety A Year After Devastating Train Derailment

It was a year ago this month that a Norfolk Southern freight train with 38 cars derailed in East Palestine, Ohio.Twenty of those train cars carried hazardous materials. In the days after the crash officials, decided to burn off one of those hazardous materials, vinyl chloride. The burn and massive plume of smoke it created caused environmental problems and concerns about the health and safety of residents. A year after that devastating derailment and chemical burn the train company Norfolk Southern and the EPA say the air and water are safe. The people who have to go on living there aren't so sure.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/02/2412m 12s

What Vision Zero Has And Hasn't Accomplished

More than 100 people are killed on U.S. roads every day — more than 40,000 people a year. So, it seemed bold, if not crazy, when city leaders across the country began to set their sights on eliminating traffic fatalities completely. It has now been 10 years since U.S. cities began to adopt the approach known as Vision Zero. NPR's Joel Rose reports on what has worked and what hasn't.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/02/2410m 5s

Masturbation Abstinence Is Popular, And Doctors Are Worried

More than two decades of growing internet use has surfaced fears about the social and psychological impacts of nearly unfettered access to pornography. But many researchers and sex therapists worry that the online communities that have formed in response to these fears often endorse inaccurate medical information, exacerbate mental health problems and, in some cases, overlap with extremist and hate groups.NPR's Lisa Hagen speaks about her reporting with NPR's Ayesha Rascoe.For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/02/2428m 47s

Why Trump's Persecution Narrative Resonates With Christian Supporters

Former president Donald Trump is facing dozens of criminal charges, including four felony counts on charges of trying to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. Trump says he's being persecuted, and that idea resonates with his Christian base.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/02/2411m 50s

Violent Crime Is Dropping, But Americans Feel Less Safe.

For people in the US, 2020 was one of the most dangerous years in decades. The first year of the pandemic saw a huge spike in violence. The number of homicides in the country rose about 30 percent from 2019.Fast forward a couple of years – and things look very different. According to crime analyst Jeff Asher, "2023 featured one of the lowest rates of violent crime in the US in more than 50 years."In big cities and small, from the East coast to the West, violence has dropped dramatically. Despite a significant and measurable drop in violent crime, Americans feel less safe. According to a Gallup poll released in November, more than three quarters of Americans believe there's more crime in the country than there was last year. We explore the reasons why the good news on crime isn't getting through.Sign up for Consider This+ to hear every episode sponsor-free and support NPR. More at plus.npr.org/considerthisEmail us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/02/2412m 28s

Is Fox News Still A Republican Kingmaker?

Fox News has been the Republican Party's biggest cheerleader almost since it premiered in 1996.Nearly three decades later, many Republicans perceive Fox as the de facto kingmaker for all kinds of Republican candidates — including presidential. That kingmaker status brought Fox News power, ratings and billions in profits and has spawned a succession of imitators and competition.But for Fox, that synergy with Trump and the Republicans has come with significant risk and significant consequences.Dominion Voting Systems sued Fox for defamation after network anchors amplified Trump's false election claims. The company settled, at a cost of nearly $790 million.Nevertheless, Fox News still has the power to shape Republican politics as the country heads into another presidential election cycle. But is that power diminished in 2024? Sign up for Consider This+ to hear every episode sponsor-free and support NPR. More at plus.npr.org/considerthisEmail us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/01/2411m 38s

Impeaching Mayorkas: High Crimes and Misdemeanors Or Politics As Usual?

Immigration and management of the U.S. Southern Border is always a politically charged issue, but especially at this moment. House republicans are trying to advance articles of impeachment against Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. They say he has refused to comply with the law and has breached the trust of the public.Meanwhile President Biden is describing the U.S. immigration system as broken. All this is playing out as a government funding bill is tied to the border and a presidential election is months away.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/01/2410m 32s

With 3 Soldiers Dead, The U.S. Tries to Avoid Direct Conflict With Iran

A deadly attack on an U.S. military base in Jordan pulled the United States deeper into a regional conflict that it's trying to avoid. How the U.S. responds could determine whether the country enters another full scale war. We ask National Security Council spokesperson, John Kirby, what comes next.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/01/248m 35s

What Would The Economy Look Like If Donald Trump Gets A Second Term?

During his time in office, former president Donald Trump talked a great deal about all of the positive changes he was making to improve the economy.When he gave his final State of the Union address in February 2020, employers had added more than six million jobs, unemployment was at three-and-a-half percent and the stock market was soaring.But by March all of that ended as coronavirus spread rapidly across the globe.Donald Trump is poised to capture the Republican presidential nomination. As president, some of his economic policies came out of the traditional Republican playbook. But other policies were more populist, more nativist and more unpredictable.NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with Chief Economics Correspondent Scott Horsley about what might change, and what might stay the same, under a second Trump administration.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/01/2412m 23s

How Do You Win An Oscar? It's More Complicated Than You Think

A look behind the curtain at the Oscar campaign machine and what it takes to bring home the gold.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/01/2413m 39s

US troops in the Middle East face a growing challenge

Ever since the start of the war between Israel and Hamas almost four months ago, U.S. leaders have been afraid that the conflict will grow. That could have consequences for American troops in the Middle East. Recently, U.S. forces have been attacked in Iraq by Iran-backed militias, for example.Host Ari Shapiro speaks with NPR's Jane Arraf in Amman, Jordan and NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman about what all this could mean for troops in the region.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/01/249m 38s

In Israel, Anger At Netanyahu Getting Louder

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has spent a career defying political gravity. Now he's facing his biggest challenge yet.For decades, Netanyahu has sold himself as a leader who would keep Israelis safe.Instead, one of the world's strongest militaries failed to protect its citizens from a long-planned, Mad Max style invasion - with attackers from Gaza coming in on motorcycles, pickup trucks and hang gliders. Israeli authorities say 1,200 people were killed October 7th and more than 200 taken hostage.Netanyahu promised an investigation after the war with Hamas, but public outrage has grown louder in recent days. Now as public outrage grows in Israel, Netanyahu's future seems all but certain. And that future is inseparable from the future of Israel's war with Hamas, or an eventual peace in Gaza.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/01/249m 58s

Trump Brings Back Birtherism Taunts

In a republican primary field that at one time boasted more than a dozen candidates, former South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley and former President Donald Trump are the last ones standing. That means Trump's fire is concentrated on Haley — a daughter of Indian immigrants. And he's using that heritage to try to undermine Haley's candidacy, and stoke concern about her legitimacy for the presidency. For the record, that concern is unfounded – Haley, as the Constitution dictates, is a natural-born US citizen. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly and Senior Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro dissect the reasons WHY Trump keeps returning to this particular political playbook. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/01/2411m 6s

Alabama To Use Untested Execution Method This Week

Alabama has already tried to execute Kenneth Smith once. On the night of November 17, 2022, he was scheduled to be put to death by lethal injection, but workers couldn't find a vein to place an IV. They tried for an hour, during which, he was jabbed with needles in his arms, hands and collar bones. Smith, one of only two living people in the U.S. to have survived an execution attempt, faces death again. On Thursday, the state of Alabama plans to execute him using a method it calls nitrogen hypoxia. It has never been tested in the U.S.NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to investigative correspondent Chiara Eisner about Smith's execution, and what led Alabama to use a new and untested execution method.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/01/2410m 16s

With DeSantis Out Of The Race, What To Expect From New Hampshire Primary

Just days away from the nation's first primary in New Hampshire, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has suspended his bid for president. What will this mean for the remaining candidates?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/01/2413m 49s

Zingers and Gaffes: A Look At the Utility of Presidential Debates

The presidential debate has been a right of passage for both primary and general election candidates for more than thirty years.Now in the midst of another election season, it looks like this well-established tradition might be fading away. But do debates inform voters, and do they change minds?We take a look at how the modern presidential debate came to be, and what their absence would mean for candidates and voters.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/01/2410m 41s

The Cozy Relationship Between Boeing and the Federal Government

These days when you think of Boeing, the words that come to mind might be: door plug, 737-max, grounded. But before this month's safety debacle and the Ethiopian and Lion Air crashes five years ago, Boeing was synonymous with industry and innovation, and the company enjoyed a special relationship with the U.S. government and U.S. presidents.Former President Barack Obama joked he was Boeing's top salesman, and former President Donald Trump praised the company at a visit during his presidency.Now that special relationship between Boeing and the U.S. government is under renewed scrutiny.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to transportation correspondent Joel Rose about that relationship and what this latest incident could mean for the company and its oversight.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/01/2411m 0s

Is the US Already in a Regional Conflict in the Middle East?

Since Israel's war against Hamas began, the US has tried to prevent a wider regional war from breaking out. Now, with US attacks against Iran-backed rebels in Yemen, drone strikes in Iraq and fighting across Israel's northern border with Lebanon is that regional conflict the US wanted to avoid, already here?The last three presidents have tried to shrink the US footprint in the Middle East. NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Ben Rhodes. Rhodes was Deputy National Security Advisor to President Barack Obama.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/01/249m 42s

The Headline Everyone Expected - Trump Wins Iowa Caucuses

Former President Donald Trump's victory in the Iowa caucuses this week surprised almost no one, but should news outlets have called the contest before some caucus goers, even had a chance to vote?That's one of the questions we explore in today's episode. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly looks ahead to what happens next in the race for the republican nomination with senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/01/248m 41s

How AI Is Transforming National Security

Artificial Intelligence is front of mind these days. Many of us are spending a lot of time pondering how AI can make our lives easier. Or on the flip side — whether it's going to put us out of a job. But how would you be thinking about AI... if you were in charge of a major US intelligence agency? NPR's Mary Louise Kelly spoke to FBI Director Chris Wray and National Security Agency Director Paul Nakasone about Artificial Intelligence as a national security threat.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/01/2411m 32s

25 years Ago Jon Stewart Took Over The Daily Show And Redefined Political Comedy

Jon Stewart ushered in a new era of late night comedy and pushed the boundaries between news and entertainment.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/01/2411m 59s

Are We Having Fun Yet? The Serious Business Of Having Fun

If you can't remember the last time you had fun, you're not alone. If you want to have more fun, prioritizing it may be the key.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/01/2413m 4s

Taiwan's History of Colonialism Forged Its Distinct Cuisine

Tainan is considered the culinary capital of Taiwan. At one of the oldest wet markets in that Southern city, Shuixian Gong Market, the island's vibrant cuisine is on the display.There are displays of shiny orange and silver fish, bright rows of glistening pork ribs and overflowing crates of dragon fruit and guava.It's the place for everyday grocery shopping for cooks around here.But it's much more it's a portrait of all the forces – both indigenous and colonial – that have shaped modern Taiwan. In essence, Taiwan's cuisine is a reflection of its long history of influences.NPR's Ailsa Chang tours the market with "Made in Taiwan" cookbook authors Clarissa Wei and Ivy Chen.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/01/248m 38s

'It's the Stuff of Nightmares' Scenes from Inside a Gaza Hospital

It's been nearly a hundred days since Hamas' deadly attack on Israel, which prompted Israel's ongoing bombardment of Gaza. Israel says it aims to destroy Hamas.By Palestinian officials' tally - more than 23,000 Palestinians have been killed in Gaza and about one in every 40 people there have been wounded in just three months. Israel's military is now pushing deeper into central Gaza. The World Health Organization says the most important hospital there is al-Aqsa Hospital.American pediatrician Seema Jilani, spent two weeks working at the al-Aqsa hospital there. She recorded voice memos about what she saw and talks to NPR's Ari Shapiro about the experience.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/01/2412m 12s

What It Means To Be Taiwanese For One Family

On Saturday, the Taiwanese people vote for a new president. It's one of the most important and closely-watched elections around the world this year. While most of the world – including the United States – does not officially recognize Taiwan as an independent country, they are watching the results.On New Year's Eve, Chinese leader Xi Jinping said China would "surely be reunified" with Taiwan – reiterating Beijing's aspiration to one day control Taiwan. Caught in the middle of this are the island's people.NPR's Ailsa Chang and Emily Feng spent some time with one family who don't agree on what it means to be Taiwanese.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/01/2412m 37s

The Political Evolution of Nikki Haley

In 2015, then-South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley led the way for the removal of the Confederate Flag from the state Capitol. The move came after a white gunman had murdered nine Black parishioners at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston.Fast forward almost eight years. At a town hall in New Hampshire, a voter asked Haley what she believed caused the Civil War. Haley failed to identify slavery in her answer, and she's been trying to clean up that misstep ever since.When Haley rose to political prominence a decade ago, she was touted as the future of an inclusive and diverse Republican party. Now, in 2024, she's trying to win the Republican nomination against Donald Trump, who has used divisive rhetoric and politics to build a political base with unwavering support.Can Haley win over those voters and the nomination without losing herself?Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/01/249m 51s

Will Changes to Medicare Coverage Improve the Mental Health Gap?

Accessing mental health services can be challenging for people on Medicare, the federal health insurance program available to most people over 65.At the beginning of this year, the program expanded coverage to licensed professional counselors and licensed marriage and family counselors. But is this expansion enough to address a growing mental health gap in the United States.NPR's Juana Summers talks to a licensed professional counselor and professor about what these changes could mean.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/01/2411m 25s

With The Resignation Of CEO LaPierre And A Looming Civil Trial, Will The NRA Survive?

Longtime CEO of the National Rifle Associate has announced his resignation. LaPierre steps down amid accusations of misappropriating funds from the non-profit. Facing a civil trial, what will the NRA look like after LaPierre? Host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR's Brian Mann, who's been following the case.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/01/2410m 57s

Why The Epstein Documents Matter

Several hundred pages of documents were released Wednesday in a lawsuit brought against Jeffrey Epstein. They include the names of dozens of powerful men with alleged connections to Epstein. Bill Clinton, Donald Trump, magician David Copperfield, Prince Andrew and more. Most of those publicly named — many of whom are already known to have links to Epstein — have denied any wrongdoing or knowledge of Epstein's criminal activities.Epstein died by suicide in prison in 2019.We make sense of the newly revealed documents and discuss why the Jeffrey Epstein case still matters.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/01/249m 6s

Violence in Iran and Lebanon Prompts Concern Israel-Hamas War Could Expand

Twin bombings in Iran and a senior Hamas leader killed in Lebanon are just two recent events that are prompting concern that the war between Israel and Hamas could be expanding to other parts of the Middle East.NPR correspondents Jane Arraf and Peter Kenyon, both with deep experience in the region, talk to All Things Considered host Mary Louise Kelly about the days events, and what it could mean for the stability of the region going forward.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/01/2410m 40s

Could January 6th Decide the Next Election?

Former President and likely Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has been kicked off primary ballots in Maine and Colorado. His name on the ballot is being challenged in several other states across the country. All the challenges are based on the insurrection clause in the 14th amendment and stem from Trump's involvement in the January 6th attack on the US Capitol. Trump is appealing the Maine decision, and is expected to appeal the Colorado decision.Maine Secretary of State Shenna Bellows, a democrat, told All Things Considered that Trump's actions on January 6th are what drove her decision to remove him from the ballot. NPR's Juana Summers, talks to Senior Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro about the decisions to remove Trump, whether they'll stand, and what these challenges could mean for the outcome of the Presidential election.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/01/248m 40s

How To Make New Year's Resolutions You Can Actually Keep

The tradition of the New Year's resolution can be alluring. What better moment in time to resolve to accomplish important goals ? New year, new you, right?But research and polling show that a lot of people who set out make resolutions give up on them. If the temptation of an extra hour of sleep is likely to crush your dream to attend that 6am spin class, maybe you need to rethink your resolution. Host Juana Summers talks with Marielle Segarra, host of NPR's Life Kit, about why focusing more on smaller goals and intentions can help you succeedLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/01/2414m 18s

Finding Comfort And Joy In The New Year

If you've had a tough 2023, it might be hard to jump into 2024 with enthusiasm. For our last episode of the year we check in with a writer who's advice on life and writing has resonated with millions of readers.NPR's Adrian Ma speaks with author Anne Lamott who shares some tips for a happier new year.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/12/238m 50s

A Sarajevo Museum Gives Children Of War A Voice

The trauma of war and its aftermath can leave scars on those who survive - deep scars that can be both physical and emotional. For children who experience war, trauma can cut deep, reshaping every part of their lives.While we hear news reports from war zones, stories from survivors don't often include children's voices.The War Childhood Museum is a unique place, dedicated to creating a space for those affected by war as children to tell their stories and donate items of significance.The museum collects and preserves the stories of both adults, describing their experiences as children, and of children currently living with war. The museum houses audio, video and objects from World War II to the current war in Ukraine - a collection that spans both the globe and time.NPR's Adrian Ma speaks with Jasminko Halilovic about growing up in war torn Bosnia, and dignity and resilience of children facing war.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/12/2312m 47s

Aboard a rescue ship, migrants talk about their journey to Europe

The United Nations says more than 2,500 people died in the Mediterranean Sea this year as they tried to reach Europe. Those who survive the journey on smuggler's boats mostly arrive on Italy's shores – where their future will be determined, in large part, by the EU's new migration process, should it be ratified next year. This fall, NPR's Ruth Sherlock joined a rescue ship run by the charity Doctors Without Borders where migrants picked up at sea told her about the risks they took escaping their country and their hopes for a new life in Europe.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/12/2312m 46s

Division Keeps the U.S. From Effectively Tackling the Fentanyl Crisis

Fentanyl has killed an unprecedented number of people in the United States again in 2023. But so far Washington's political leaders haven't been able to workout creative solutions to the crisis together. Like the pandemic before it, the fentanyl crisis has divided Americans along political and cultural fault lines. NPR's Asma Khalid speaks with three reporters — NPR's addiction correspondent Brian Mann, WBUR's Martha Bebinger, and KFF Health News' Aneri Pattani — about the depth of the crisis and possible solutions.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/12/2310m 27s

You Don't Think AI Could Do Your Job. What If You're Wrong?

2023 might go down as the year that artificial intelligence became mainstream. It was a topic of discussion everywhere - from news reports, to class rooms to the halls of Congress.ChatGPT made its public debut a little over a year ago. If you'd never thought much about AI before, you're probably thinking - and maybe worrying - about it now.Jobs are an area that will almost certainly be impacted as AI develops. But whether artificial intelligence will free us from drudge work, or leave us unemployed depends on who you talk to.Host Ari Shapiro speaks with NPR's Andrea Hsu on how people are adapting to AI in the workplace and ways to approach the technology with a plan instead of panic.This episode also feature's reporting on AI and Hollywood background actors from NPR's Bobby Allyn.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/12/2311m 18s

The Day the Guns Fell Silent

It's the stuff of legend. In the months after World War I erupted, young men in Europe were killing each other by the tens of thousands. Yet on a frozen Christmas Eve in 1914, the guns briefly fell silent. That simple act of humanity in the midst of war has inspired operas, movies, and even television commercials. NPR's Ari Shapiro highlights the many ways in which this incredible event inspired generations of artists, and brings you the voices of the soldiers themselves, who were on the frontlines that day.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/12/2312m 19s

We Have Our Favorites, But What Makes A Christmas Movie A Classic?

Maybe you and your family are gathering round the new 65 inch TV that Santa brought and snuggling in with some hot cocoa for your yearly holiday movie marathon.Your tradition may include It's a Wonderful Life, or cheering on the Grinch's loyal dog Max, or fighting with your spouse over whether or not Die Hard is a Christmas movie. If you celebrate Christmas, you probably have a movie that you consider the best. There's personal preference, but what other elements give a Christmas movie staying power for generation after generation?Host Scott Detrow talks with NPR's pop culture correspondent Linda Holmes about what makes a classic a classic.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/12/2313m 7s

Trump's Trials: The Supreme Court takes a pass

Today we're sharing an episode of NPR's podcast Trump's Trials, hosted Scott Detrow. In this episode, Scott is joined by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson.This week's focus: The Supreme Court and presidential immunity. The court decided they would not take up Special Counsel Jack Smith's request to fast-track arguments on whether former President Donald Trump is immune from prosecution for alleged crimes committed while in office. Instead, the case will continue to make its way through the appeals process, further delaying the trial start date. Plus, Colorado's Supreme Court decision to remove Trump from the Republican primary ballot. Topics include: - The Supreme Court and presidential immunity - Colorado Supreme Court ruling on Trump - Predictions on how the U.S. Supreme Court may eventually respond - A look ahead to 2024 Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/12/2312m 54s

Why the Comparisons Between Beyoncé and Taylor Swift?

It was the year of Beyoncé! It was the year of Taylor! Both musicians had highly successful tours, highly successful concert films and both women pumped billions into the economy. And each has been supportive of the other this year, and in the past. So why is there a narrative that they're rivals? NPR's Juana Summers revisits the year that was for Beyoncé and Swift, and talks to Miami University of Ohio Music Professor Tammy L. Kernodle about the tendency of society, and the media, to pit successful women in the music industry against one another. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/12/2313m 56s

The Impact of Restrictive Abortion Laws in 2023

Nearly two years into Roe v. Wade being overturned, pregnant people continue to have a hard time accessing abortion and miscarriage care. This year saw the addition of new restrictive abortion laws in some states and protection of existing abortion laws in others. What does this mean for abortion care in 2024, and how might all of this affect the 2024 elections?NPR's Juana Summers digs into these questions with health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin and national political correspondent Sarah McCammon.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/12/2314m 54s

Oprah's Done with the Shame. The New Weight Loss Drugs.

Americans are increasingly using drugs like Ozempic, Wegovy and Mounjaro to lose weight. And they got a big endorsement last week when Oprah Winfrey announced that she, too was using weight loss drugs.And it's not just Oprah, the decades-old weight management company Weight Watchers is also embracing the drugs, integrating them into the business model.NPR's Juana Summers speaks with Weight Watchers CEO Sima Sistani about the company's decision, and talks to NPR consumer health correspondent Yuki Noguchi about what is known and unknown about these drugs.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/12/2314m 34s

Trump's Rhetoric, Always Extreme, Is Getting More So

Former President Donald Trump has always embraced dehumanizing rhetoric, but now as he tries to capture the presidency again, he's making even more extreme statements.It's a strategy that gets him lots of attention and that fuels his base.NPR's Juana Summers talks to White House correspondent Franco Ordonez and domestic extremism correspondent Odette Yousef about Trump's use of increasingly autocratic statements and social media posts.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/12/2310m 20s

Vladimir Putin's Horrible, Terrible, but in the End Pretty Good Year

For Russian President Vladimir Putin, 2023 began with his war against Ukraine stagnating. It went on to deliver one of the most public challenges to his leadership, ever. Now as 2023 comes to a close, the man who lead the rebellion against Putin Yevgeny Prighozin is dead. US aid to Ukraine is on the Congressional chopping block, and Putin is getting ready to embark on a fifth campaign for the presidency of Russia. Odds are, he'll win.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Russia correspondent Charles Maynes about Putin's year that was, and how things are looking for 2024.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/12/2314m 10s

Is A Trump Win In Iowa A Done Deal?

On January 15, Iowa will take center stage as the first leg of the Republican primary race to the presidential nomination.Usually, the caucuses signal the kickoff to primary season. But this year, there isn't a lot that is usual about the Republican race so far.Former President Donald Trump is vying for his party's nomination - against an increasingly smaller pool of challengers.And despite the fact that Trump is currently facing 91 felony charges from state and federal jurisdictions, and has not attended a single debate, he continues to lead the pack.The most recent Iowa polls show him at over 50%. If that number sticks, it would be impossible for any of his four challengers to pull ahead in any significant way.NPR's Scott Detrow speaks to Iowa Public Radio's Clay Masters and J. Ann Selzer, president of the Iowa based polling firm Selzer and Company, on what the candidates numbers say about the race and the overall state of the Republican party.Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/12/2311m 59s

Trump's Trials: Jack Smith's big gamble

Today we're sharing an episode of NPR's podcast Trump's Trials, hosted Scott Detrow with regular analysis from Domenico Montanaro. They are joined by former Deputy Assistant Attorney General Harry Litman. This week's focus: the January 6th federal election interference case. Prosecutor, Special Counsel Jack Smith, made an unusual move, and sidestepped the appeals court and went straight to the Supreme Court to answer a fundamental question at the heart of the case:. Can presidents be criminally prosecuted for crimes they are allegedly committed while in office? Topics include: - Presidential immunity - Does presidential immunity apply to Trump's actions on January 6th - Predictions on how the Supreme Court may respond - New case timeline - An update on the New York Civil Fraud trial Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/12/2318m 19s

Is the US Falling Behind in the Race to Electric Vehicles?

The auto industry, along with the Biden administration, has bet billions on the electric vehicle industry, but as 2023 comes to a close the auto industry is scaling back on its investment in EVs, prices are higher than many consumers can afford and charging stations can be hard to find.NPR's Scott Detrow digs into the state of EVs in the United States with Biden administration Infrastructure Czar Mitch Landrieu and Keith Barry senior writer with Consumer Reports.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/12/2313m 50s

The Fight Over Free Speech on College Campuses

Protests by students supportive of Israeli and Jewish communities, and protests by students supportive of Palestinian communities, have reignited the debate over free speech on college campuses. That debate only intensified when the Presidents of Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania and MIT testified before a Congressional committee last week about antisemitism.NPR's Scott Detrow talks with NPR education correspondent Elissa Nadworny and first amendment lawyer Greg Lukianoff about the climate on college campuses and the tension between protecting students and supporting free speech. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/12/2315m 21s

Finding The Light In Hanukkah At A Time Of War

Hanukkah's origin story has been a moving target since the beginning says Rabbi Amichai Lau-Lavie, but throughout its evolution, it's been associated with bringing and sustaining light. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Lau-Lavie about the how the lights of Hanukkah can be a tool for those trying to find peace amidst the conflict between Israel and Hamas.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/12/2310m 4s

Zelenskyy's Pitch for More American Dollars

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy spent Tuesday in Washington pressing American lawmakers to approve a new funding package for his country's war with Russia.Zelenskyy's lobbying effort comes as the current U.S. aid package is rapidly dwindling, and the fight between Ukraine and Russia has all but stalled.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to NPR Pentagon Correspondent Tom Bowman about the state of the war, what new funding would be used for, and what the country can – and can't – do without more money.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/12/239m 16s

Social Media Affects Opinions, But Not the Way You Might Think

Anyone who spends time on social media has seen it — the post from someone about a current event, or issue that's dividing people — abortions, mask wearing, the election. But do those posts change minds? Researchers have been gathering data on this question for years. They've found that social media affects opinions on these issues, but probably not the way you think.NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with researchers, who've studied the relationship between social media posts and opinions, and outlines their findings.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/12/2311m 25s

Trump's Authoritarian Impulses and the Justice Department

If Donald Trump is elected next November, he's promising to use the power of the presidency to go after political enemies and perceived rivals.In a recent interview with Fox's Sean Hannity, the former President said he'd only be a dictator on "day one." At other moments, he's pledged to "root out the communists," and said he'd have his Attorney General go after people who run against him. Consider This host Scott Detrow and NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson breakdown what a second Trump term would mean for the Justice Department.Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/12/2311m 29s

Trump's Trials: Should the Jan 6 trial be televised?

Today we're sharing an episode of NPR's podcast Trump's Trials, hosted by Scott Detrow with regular analysis from Domenico Montanaro. This week they're joined by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Each week they'll break down the latest courtroom drama, testimony, and legal maneuverings in the criminal and civil cases facing former President Trump — and talk about what it all means for American democracy. This week we focus on the January 6th federal election interference case led by special counsel Jack Smith. The case is scheduled to go to trial in March in Washington, D.C., and it might be coming to a TV near you. Yes, Trump and some media outlets are requesting cameras in the courtroom. We'll talk about how likely that is, how it could impact the case and the campaign, plus some news from a couple of key swing states.Topics include: - How televising the trial could help and hurt Trump - Prosecution and defense strategies for the federal election interference case - Pro-Trump electors from Wisconsin admit President Biden won the 2020 election- Pro-Trump electors criminally indicted in Nevada over attempts to overturn Biden's 2020 winFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/12/2318m 42s

65 Years After Release, A Rockin' Christmas Classic Hits Number One

Brenda Lee was just 13 years old when she recorded "Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree" in 1958. It's a true Christmas classic, a bouncy earworm — and pretty much everyone knows the lyrics. But it's never made it to number one on Billboard's Hot 100 — until now.NPR's Scott Detrow spoke with the 78-year-old about her long career and how she feels now that her iconic holiday tune is finally at the top of the charts.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/12/239m 21s

Women Candidates and the Race for Big Money

A woman has never been president. Hillary Clinton has come the closest, but that highest, hardest glass ceiling is still intact. Now Republican Nikki Haley wants to succeed where her predecessors have not.The list of reasons a woman hasn't won is long — sexism, lack of representation in circles of power, and lack of representation in circles of money. But Nikki Haley has just scored an endorsement from the Koch Network that could change that.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Political Scientist Kira Sonbonmatsu about the inequities between men and women when it comes to fundraising and what the Koch Network endorsement could mean for Haley.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/12/2311m 43s

The Seriousness of America's Latest Homegrown Spy

Diplomat and former US Ambassador Manuel Rocha is facing charges related to secretly serving as an agent of Cuba's government.Rocha is the latest in a long line of spies, who have worked for the federal government while spying for other countries. Some for decades at a time.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to former CIA officer Robert Baer about the charges against Rocha and how he might have managed to go undetected for four decades.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/12/2310m 23s

The Symbolism And History Of The Keffiyeh

Keffiyehs, checkered scarves most closely associated with Palestinians, have been in the news lately. In Vermont, three men of Palestinian descent, two of whom were wearing keffiyehs, were shot. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Wafa Ghnaim, a fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and curator for the Museum of the Palestinian People, about the history of the garment, what it means to Palestinian identity and what it means to her.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/12/239m 59s

Is Biden's Unconditional Support Of Israel Nearing Its Limit?

Israel has stepped up military operations in Gaza after the temporary ceasefire ended last week. Gaza health officials say several hundred Palestinians have been killed and hundreds more have been wounded since the fighting resumed, complicating how the U.S. maintains its alignment with Israel.NPR's Fatma Tanis speaks with analysts who say that U.S. support for Israel is undermining American interests and NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for the New York Times, about how President Biden's history with Israel is shaping current U.S. policy. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/12/2312m 46s

Ranked Choice Voting May Be Coming To An Election Near You

Ranked choice voting has become the latest political change touted as a way to strengthen democracy. Instead of choosing one candidate, in ranked choice voting a voter picks a favorite candidate, a second favorite and so on. According to an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll conducted after the midterm elections, more than 8 in 10 Americans feel there is a serious threat to Democracy in the U.S.NPR's Miles Parks reports on whether ranked choice will live up to the hype as a cure-all for the country's deep partisan divides. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/12/2312m 36s

Big Oil Leads at COP28

Every year world leaders gather at the Conference of the Parties, or COP, to devise solutions to what amounts to a growing existential crisis for humankind: our rapidly heating planet. The United Arab Emirates is hosting COP28 this year. The goal of the conference is to decrease emissions and protect the planet. But leading the climate talks is the head of one of the biggest oil companies in the world, in a nation that derives much of its wealth from oil. Are the goals of this meeting truly in sync with the goals of the hosts?NPR's Miles Parks speaks with NPR international correspondent Aya Batrawy from COP28. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/12/239m 47s

The Legacy of Henry Kissinger

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger was viewed as brilliant by some and a war criminal by others. The only man to ever hold the jobs of National Security Advisor and Secretary of State at the same time died at his Connecticut home at the age of 100. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to author and historian Jeremi Suri about Kissinger's complicated legacy.Listen to Throughline's deeper dive on Kissinger here.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/11/2313m 30s

Rosalynn Carter Practiced What She Preached

Former first lady Rosalynn Carter leaves behind a rich and expansive legacy, including fierce and enduring advocacy for better mental health care in the US.But her commitment to the issue extended well beyond her role as First Lady.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Anne Mahoney Robbins, a friend of the Carters and member of President Jimmy Carter's mental health commission, about how Rosalynn Carter supported her during her own crippling depression.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/11/239m 37s

Police Pushback Against Progressive Prosecutors

In different places throughout the country, police are pushing back against the policies of progressive prosecutors.NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer tells the story of one such struggle in St. Louis where a detective wouldn't testify in a case. That refusal may have helped a man charged with murder walk free.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/11/2312m 32s

Rebuilding Life After Captivity

Dozens of hostages have been released by Hamas over the last four days. Now after 50 days in captivity, and joyous reunions, the long journey of healing and rebuilding begins. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to Hostage US executive director Liz Cathcart about that process.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/11/239m 21s

What Young Voters Want in 2024

Next year Gen Z and Millennials will make up nearly half of the electorate. What exactly that will mean in the 2024 election is an open question.Host Scott Detrow talks with NPR political reporter Elena Moore about the different ways new voters approach politics than older voters.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/11/2311m 38s

Black Friday and Beyond

Consumer spending is a huge part of the economy and sends a strong signal about how Americans feel about the financial health of the country. Host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR business correspondent Alina Selyukh about what Black Friday shopping says about where the economy has been and where it might be headed.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/11/238m 0s

The mystery of a missing father leads to an unmarked grave, new family members

For this holiday episode, we're bringing you a story from the Radio Diaries podcast, The Unmarked Graveyard: Stories from Hart Island. Hart Island is a narrow strip of land in New York, off the coast of the Bronx. More than a million people are buried there in mass graves, with no headstones or plaques. Annette Vega never met her biological father. She had been searching for him for decades. That search finally led to Hart Island. Along the way, she found the family that she never knew. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/11/2314m 38s

How the Hostage Deal Looks to Palestinians and Israelis

On Wednesday, Israel and Hamas announced details of a deal that calls for the freeing of at least 50 Israeli women and minors taken hostage during last month's Hamas attack on Israel in exchange for at least 150 Palestinian women and minors held in Israeli jails.NPR correspondents Brian Mann in Israel, and Lauren Frayer in the occupied West Bank, report on how Israelis and Palestinians are reacting to this moment.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/11/2310m 49s

Making the Most Out of Friendsgiving

It's just a few days before Thanksgiving, but there's a good chance your holidays are already underway. Maybe you are hosting, or attending, a Friendsgiving celebration. The increasingly widespread alt-holiday meal and gathering happens in November. It's a time to eat, drink, and bask in the glow of our closest friends. But it turns out there can be just as much stress within our social circles as within our families. So what can you do to handle any potential stress or drama? NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with friendship coach Danielle Bayard Jackson about how to avoid unneeded stress and have an enjoyable holiday gathering with your friends.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/11/2310m 35s

Remembering The Long Life And Lasting Legacy Of Rosalynn Carter

It was announced on Sunday that former first lady Rosalynn Carter had died, at age 96. The Carter family had said she was suffering from dementia earlier this year.Although President Jimmy Carter only served for one term, Rosalyn Carter transformed the role of first lady.And her influence continued for decades after she left the White House. NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with journalist Judy Woodruff, who covered the Carter administration, about Rosalynn Carter's life and legacy.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/11/2312m 36s

Pope Francis: Climate Activist?

Pope Francis says he will attend the COP28 climate conference in Dubai next month, which would make him the first pontiff to attend the annual UN gathering. The pope has made addressing the climate crisis an important focus since 2015, when he published an encyclical on climate change and the environment. Last month, he doubled down on his stance with a new document – Laudate Deum. It's a scathing rebuke of the inaction by world leaders over the last eight years. As Francis takes on an even bigger role in climate activism. What does he hope to achieve? And how does this all fit into his broader legacy as leader of the world's 1.3 billion Roman Catholics. NPR's Scott Detrow spoke with Fordham professor Christiana Zenner, and Associated Press Vatican correspondent Nicole Winfield, about Pope Francis and his role in advocating for action on climate change. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/11/2311m 30s

Trump's Trials: 'The boss is not going to leave'

Today we're sharing an episode of a new NPR podcast called Trump's Trials, hosted by Scott Detrow with regular analysis from Domenico Montanaro. Each week they'll break down the latest courtroom drama, testimony, and legal maneuverings in the criminal and civil cases facing former President Trump — and talk about what it all means for American democracy. In this week's episode, Scott and Domenico spoke with NYU's Melissa Murray about leaked confidential videos of two former Trump lawyers — and what they could mean for the Georgia election interference case. Plus: a development in the January 6th case. Follow Trump's Trials on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for episodes available every Saturday.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/11/2316m 13s

Benjamin Netanyahu on the Future of Gaza

In an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu often referred to post-WW II Germany as a possible road map for what he called the "de-militarizing" and "de-radicalizing" of Gaza. Netanyahu said Gaza needs a new 'civilian government,' but won't say who.NPR National Security Correspondent Greg Myre parses what Netanyahu said in a conversation with co-host Ari Shapiro.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/11/239m 39s

Fresh Start for Student Loan Borrowers in Default

Nearly 7 million federal student loan borrowers are in default, and now the U.S. Department of Education is rolling out a new program, called Fresh Start, to make getting out of default easier. NPR's Cory Turner reports on the Fresh Start program and the ripple effects of landing in default. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/11/238m 59s

Biden's Support of Israel Could Cost Him Votes in 2024

There's a very real possibility that the 2024 presidential election could come down to a few thousand votes in a few pivotal states.One of those states is Michigan, which is home to a large Arab American community — with some two hundred thousand registered voters. Many of those voters say that the White House has disproportionately supported Israel, while doing little to protect the lives of Palestinians. And that position could cost President Biden their votes.Meanwhile, the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll shows how the Israel-Hamas War has divided Americans along racial and generational lines.NPR National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea reports from Detroit on the concerns of Arab American voters. And Host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro about what the latest polling tells us about Americans' changing views on Biden's support of Israel. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/11/2313m 11s

The Promise and the Limits of the UAW Deals

The United Auto Workers secured its biggest victory in decades in deals with the Big 3 car companies after weeks of strikes. While the union won a lot of concessions for workers: big pay raises, cost of living adjustments tied to inflation and increased retirement contributions, some workers are focused on what the new contracts are missing.NPR Labor and Workplace Correspondent Andrea Hsu reports on what the historic contracts include and what they don't. Host Ari Shapiro speaks with NPR business reporter Camila Domonoske about how the UAW is looking to build on its gains.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/11/2311m 20s

Fighting False Election Claims Could Get A Lot Harder In 2024

Researchers, election officials and former tech executives are concerned the federal government, fearful of kicking up a storm, has pulled back from its rumor fighting efforts that were effective in 2020 and 2022. NPR correspondents Miles Parks and Shannon Bond joined our co-host Ailsa Chang to discuss their reporting on misinformation. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/11/239m 44s

Election Battle Lines Emerging in the 2024 Race

Elections in Ohio, Virginia, Kentucky, and elsewhere showed slightly surprising Democratic strengths and the enduring power of abortion as a campaign issue. Meanwhile, a series of polls indicate that President Joe Biden is unpopular, and struggling against former President Donald Trump, a year out from the elections. In the background, Trump's multiple criminal cases which could impact his popularity going forward.Host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR Senior Political Editor/Correspondent Domenico Montanaro and White House Correspondent Asma Khalid about the emerging battle lines in the 2024 election.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/11/2311m 59s

When Disaster Hits, Dogs Come To The Rescue

This year the U.S. has experienced devastating natural disasters. Outbreaks of tornadoes leveled entire neighborhoods. Flooding trapped people in their homes. Wildfires burned out of control. When people go missing during these catastrophes, it's a race against time to find them alive – or their remains. That crucial search is often carried out by specially trained dogs.FEMA has 280 certified detection dogs trained to find people in disasters. Another 80 dogs are trained to search for human remains. NPR's Scott Detrow visits a Maryland training facility where dogs, and their handlers, learn skills that could save lives. Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/11/2311m 27s

Far from Gaza, West Bank Farmers Face Harassment from Israeli Soldiers and Settlers

It's olive harvesting season in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. But farmer Ayoub Abu Hejleh hasn't been able to harvest olives from any of his 370 trees yet this year. He says Israeli soldiers and settlers have blocked him from his land since the war started. That was back on October 7, when Hamas insurgents attacked Israel, killing more than 1,400 people. While the world has focused on Israel's response in Gaza, violence in the West Bank is also spiking. The International Crisis Group estimates more than 130 Palestinians have been killed in the West Bank since the war began. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly and her team traveled to Abu Hejleh's village. They saw first-hand how the war between Israel and Hamas is upending lives for Palestinians in the West Bank, sometimes in extremely frightening ways. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/11/2311m 16s

Big Cities Struggle To House Migrants, Asylum Seekers

Across America, big cities facing an influx of migrants, struggling to provide basic resources.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/11/2311m 38s

Gun Bans for Domestic Abusers Face a Test at the Supreme Court

At the Supreme Court on Tuesday, justices seemed inclined to uphold a federal law that bans anyone covered by a domestic violence court order from having a gun. But if they do that, the decision will likely be a narrow one, leaving many questions about the future of gun regulations unanswered.NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports. A note to listeners, there is a graphic description of violence in this episode. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/11/239m 2s

An American Citizen Managed To Leave Gaza, But The Decision Was Not Easy

Since the Rafah border opened between Egypt and Gaza opened last week, it has been flooded with people hoping to leave. With food, water and electricity in short supply, thousands of people in Gaza are hoping for a chance to flee to Egypt. But so far, only a trickle of people have been allowed to pass through, a few hundred at a time. NPR's Mary Louis Kelly is reporting from Tel Aviv, and spoke with an American citizen who managed to make it out of Gaza.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/11/239m 46s

A Class Action Suit Could Upend The Entire Real Estate Industry

If you have ever bought a home or are thinking about buying one, you know it can be expensive. For most people, a home is the most expensive purchase they will ever make. But selling a home can be expensive too. In part, that's because of the commissions real estate agents collect when a home is sold.Depending on the price of the home, commissions can be tens of thousands of dollars.A class action lawsuit brought by a group of Missouri home sellers against the National Association of Realtors argues that these fees hurt consumers by artificially inflating home prices. This past week, a federal jury awarded the home sellers $1.8 billion. Adrian Ma and Wailin Wong, co-hosts of NPR's The Indicator, break down how that decision could change the entire real estate industry. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/11/239m 10s

Is Israel Breaking the Laws of War in Gaza?

On October 31st Israeli military forces bombed the Jabalia refugee camp just north of Gaza City. They said the area was a Hamas stronghold that included underground tunnels and a command center, and that they were targeting a Hamas commander there.The health ministry in Gaza says the strike caused a large number of civilian casualties. So what are the rules of war that might apply to such situations? NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Tom Dannenbaum, an associate professor of international law at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy about the rules of war in an urban setting. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/11/239m 4s

Eric and Donald Trump Jr. Take the Stand

The two older sons of former President Donald Trump spent Thursday in a New York courtroom testifying in the civil fraud case against them and their father.The trial accuses the two brothers, as well as their father, of knowingly committing fraud by submitting statements of financial condition that inflated the value of their properties and other assets. During testimony, Eric and Donald Jr. repeatedly distanced themselves from The Trump Organization's fraudulent financial statements and declarations to banks. NPR's Andrea Bernstein and Ximena Bustillo report on the trial and what's at stake for The Trump Organization.Email us at considerthis@npr.org Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/11/239m 22s

Egypt's Border with Gaza Opened for a Select Few

After weeks of being bombarded by Israeli airstrikes, following the Hamas attacks of October 7th, some in the Gaza strip are finally able to leave the besieged territory.Hundreds of people – including wounded Palestinians and individuals with foreign passports – have now crossed into Egypt.The opening of the Rafah Border is a small diplomatic success in a war that has claimed the lives of thousands of civilians. But it's unclear just how many people will be allowed to make the crossing. Consider This co-host Mary Louise Kelly speaks with NPR's Aya Batrawy, who's in Dubai and has been reporting on the situation.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/11/236m 13s

After An Unthinkable Tragedy, A Mother Channels Her Grief Into Action

The deadly mass shooting this month in Maine shone a spotlight on the small city of Lewiston. Once again, like far too many American communities, the people of Lewiston face the challenge of trying to move forward after the loss of family members, friends and neighbors.For many survivors of a mass shooting, charting a path forward can mean searching for purpose in the wake of senseless violence.Kimberly Mata-Rubio's, Lexi daughter, was killed in May of 2022, at her elementary school in Uvalde, Texas. In total, 19 students and two teachers were killed in Uvalde. Mata-Rubio has decided to turn her anger and grief into action. She is running for mayor of Uvalde.Host Juana Summer spoke with Mata-Rubio, prior to the shootings in Lewiston.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/10/2310m 37s

Pandemic Era Benefits Made A Big Dent In Poverty. So Why Did They End?

Without Pandemic Era Safety Net, Millions Of Americans Could Fall Into PovertyLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/10/2313m 59s

The Nightmare Before Christmas Turns 30

The Nightmare Before Christmas is back in theaters, celebrating its 30th anniversary. The film, directed by Henry Selick and produced by Tim Burton, was not a smash hit upon its release, but has become something of a holiday classic over the years. And while there is some debate as to whether it counts as a Halloween movie or a Christmas movie, its spooky themes draw many viewers back to the film every October. NPR's Scott Detrow spoke with Todd Lookinland, the set builder for The Nightmare Before Christmas, and writer and film critic Jordan Crucchiola, about the enduring legacy of film. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/10/2314m 19s

A Mass Shooting in Maine and the Manhunt that Followed

Residents of Lewiston, Maine spent two days sheltering in place as authorities searched for the man suspected of fatally shooting 18 people and wounding 13 others.Law enforcement has a playbook for capturing fugitives. But Maine's rural setting, the nearby international border with Canada and the suspect's military training all complicate the search.NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Kenneth Gray, who was a special agent with the FBI for 24 years, about what a search like this entails.Note: This episode was recorded on Friday afternoon, shortly before authorities lifted the shelter-in-place order for Lewiston and the surrounding area.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/10/236m 46s

"A Complete Catastrophe:" The Humanitarian Crisis in Gaza

In Gaza doctors are operating without anesthesia. Fuel is running out. Food is running out. And trucks full of it can't get through — including those from the UN World Food Programme or WFP.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Cindy McCain, the WFP's Executive Director, about the humanitarian crisis in Gaza which she calls "a complete catastrophe."Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/10/2310m 13s

Who is Mike Johnson, new Speaker of the House?

After three weeks of congressional paralysis, House Republicans have elected a new Speaker of the House: Mike Johnson of Louisiana. There's a pretty good chance you've never heard of him. He's kept a low profile since he was first elected in 2016.Here's what you should know: He's a conservative lawyer who opposes abortion and same sex marriage — and played a major role in attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential election. Johnson is one of Trump's biggest supporters in Congress. Now he's House speaker. What does that tell us about how he'll lead the house — and work with the current president, whose election he tried to overturn?Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/10/237m 44s

Diplomats Race The Clock To Free Hostages Before Ground Invasion

During the brutal Hamas-led attack on Israel earlier this month, more than 1,400 Israelis were killed and more than 200 Israeli and foreign hostages were kidnapped.So far, Hamas has released just four hostages. The families of the remaining hostages fear that time may be running out to save their loved ones. Israeli airstrikes continue and a ground invasion into Gaza seems imminent. Experts say that would put the hostages in danger.NPR's Michele Kelemen speaks to host Juana Summers about the diplomatic efforts to free the remaining hostages.And host Mary Louise Kelly talks to Bader Al-Saif, a professor of history at Kuwait University, on the Gulf nation of Qatar's role in negotiating for the hostages' release.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/10/2311m 16s

A Mental Health Hotline In Israel Has Been Overwhelmed Since The War Started

The violence between Israel and Gaza is entering its third week. As the number of dead and wounded continues to rise, survivors of the October 7th attack by Hamas are still reeling from shock. And thousands of friends and family are left mourning loved ones and wondering how they'll pick up the pieces of their lives. The Natal helpline has existed for 25 years to help people experiencing PTSD from war. But for the last two weeks they have been in "emergency mode" and calls are surging. NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Emi Palmor, chair of Natal, the Israeli helpline.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/10/2311m 12s

How a Rookie Hockey Player Prepared for the Big League

Hockey season is underway and NPR followed one hopeful rookie dreaming of taking the ice for the Washington Capitals.NPR's Scott Detrow spends time at hockey training camp with goalie Mitchell Gibson.A note for our listeners. We want to hear from you about what you like and how we could improve. Please visit npr.org/fallsurvey to complete a short, anonymous survey. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/10/2313m 3s

With Jim Jordan Out, What Does The Latest Failed Speaker Bid Mean For Republicans?

Ever since Kevin McCarthy was ousted as Speaker of the House by only eight members of Congress, things have been pretty messy in the chamber. Ohio Republican Jim Jordan tried and failed to rally support for his nomination. After losing three ballots on the House floor and a secret Republican-only vote, he's out. Not having a speaker has essentially shut down the business of governing, and House Republicans have no consensus on a candidate. Host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR's Congressional Correspondent Deirdre Walsh and Political Correspondent Susan Davis about the ongoing speaker battle and what comes next. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/10/238m 5s

Will War Between Israel And Hamas End Hopes For Two-State Solution?

During his visit to Tel Aviv this week, President Biden reiterated a desire for peace between Israelis and Palestinians through the implementation of a two-state solution.For years, the idea of establishing a state for the Palestinian people and a state for the Israeli people has been a strategy that presidents - on both sides of the political aisle - have evoked as a framework for peace in the Middle East.With the unprecedented violence playing out between Israel and Hamas for many political analysts, a peaceful, two-state agreement seems impossible. But a little over two decades ago there was hope that it could be achieved.NPR's Scott Detrow talks with ambassador Dennis Ross about how 23 years ago Palestinian leaders and Israel's prime minister came close to an agreement.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/10/2310m 52s

Palestinians Appear to Have Been Killed in Reprisal Attacks in the West Bank

More than 60 Palestinians have been killed in the Israeli-occupied West Bank in the days after Hamas' attack on southern Israel. Some of those deaths appear to be reprisal killings. NPR's Leila Fadel visited the village of Qusra in the West Bank where some of these killings have taken place.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/10/2313m 35s

Israelis Working 24/7 to Identify Hundreds Killed in Hamas Attacks

At a military base south of Tel Aviv, Israeli soldiers and medical examiners are working around the clock to identify remains of hundreds of people killed in the Hamas attacks earlier this month.NPR's Ari Shapiro visited the base and spoke with those conducting the work about the challenges of identifying so many bodies.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/10/2312m 0s

Palestinians In Jordan Fear For Family Members In Gaza

Israel's military has ordered all residents of Gaza City and northern Gaza to evacuate to the southern end of the territory ahead of an expected ground invasion. Tens of thousands of Palestinians are struggling to evacuate - as closed borders hamper those efforts. Others refuse to leave the areas Israeli military forces say they will target. For Jordanian Palestinians who have family in the Gaza Strip their loved ones are just 90 miles away. But that distance can feel painfully close AND impossibly far. NPR's Ari Shapiro traveled to Amman, Jordan. He spoke with two Jordanian Palestinians who have family in the Gaza Strip about their hopes and fears. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/10/2312m 10s

The Emotional Impact of the Israel-Gaza Conflict on Jewish and Palestinian Americans

It's been more than a week of war in Israel and Gaza, following Hamas attacks in southern Israel that left more than 1,300 Israelis dead. In response, Israeli air strikes in Gaza have killed more than 2,500 Palestinians, according to Gaza health officials. The intense violence — and the prospect of more to come — is having a deep emotional impact on people who care about both Israelis and Palestinians.NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with Aziza Hasan, executive director of NewGround: A Muslim Jewish Partnership for Change, and Alyson Freedman, a member of Sisterhood Salaam Shalom. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/10/2310m 11s

Israel's Evacuation Order in Gaza

How do you evacuate more than a million people across a cramped, urban bombed out territory and get them to safety — in just one day? In the lead up to a likely ground war invasion, Israel on Friday gave residents of Gaza an ultimatum: move to the southern end of the territory, or face the full force of the Israeli military as it plans to go after Hamas militants on the ground. Israel's government is intent on stamping out the Hamas militants who planned and carried out last week's attack that killed 1,300 Israelis. Since then, Israel has launched a wave of airstrikes into Gaza that Palestinian health officials say have killed at least 1,500 civilians. NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Mark Regev, Senior Advisor to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Ari Shapiro speaks to Dr. Mustafa Barghouti a member of the Palestinian National Initiative in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/10/2316m 24s

What Happened the Last Time Israel Invaded Gaza and What to Expect Now

Following the surprise attack launched by Hamas militants, hundreds of thousands of Israeli forces are gathering along the border of Gaza.All signs suggest an Israeli ground invasion of the Palestinian territory is imminent. The last time this happened was in 2014.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with reporter Gregg Carlstrom, who covered that conflict, to hear what we might expect if Israel invades Gaza again in the coming days.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/10/239m 58s

Here's Why it's Hard to Make Money as an Amazon Seller

Amazon is by far the U.S.'s largest online marketplace. But sellers say they're being squeezed out by higher fees and cheaper merchandise sold direct from Amazon itself. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/10/2312m 29s

How We Reached This Point in the Israel-Gaza Conflict

Conflicts have broken out between Israel and Gaza several times over the years. But this past weekend saw Hamas launch a surprise attack unlike any other before.Hamas killed over a thousand people, took others hostage, and even assumed control of several Israeli communities. Israel's military was caught completely unaware. Now the Israeli military has laid siege to Gaza. Retaliatory Israeli air strikes have killed at least 800 Palestinians and displaced around 200 thousand people. They've cut off fuel, electricity and food supplies into the area. How did we get to this point?NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Tal Schneider, political and diplomatic correspondent for the Times of Israel, and Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat professor of peace and development at the University of Maryland. Additional reporting in this episode by Daniel Estrin and Aya Batrawy.Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/10/2311m 45s

Using AI to Combat Homelessness

One of the main challenges to countering homelessness is to figure out who's most at-risk of losing their homes and getting them the resources they need. Now, in a first-of-its-kind experiment, Los Angeles is using artificial intelligence to help make those predictions and keep people in their homes.NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports on the program and meets people who are benefitting from this new use of AI technology.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/10/239m 45s

What Comes Next, After Surprise Hamas Attacks on Israel?

The death toll rose in both Israel and Gaza as the Israeli military and Hamas militants battled for a second day on Sunday. The surprise multi-pronged attacks by Hamas against Israel have killed at least 700 people, according to Israeli media reports.Israel's response has included air strikes gainst targets in Gaza. At least 400 people have been killed in Gaza, according to Palestinian officials. Thousands are injured in both Gaza and Israel.Host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR correspondent Aya Batrawy in Tel Aviv for the latest developments on the ground, and we also hear from NPR's Michele Kelemen about diplomatic efforts to try and contain the violence in Israel and Gaza. Email us at considerthis@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/10/2311m 37s

To Be Greener, Get Rid Of Your Grass

Who doesn't love a lush, perfectly manicured grass lawn? It turns out, a lot of people are actively trying to get rid of their lawns, ripping out grass in favor of native plants, vegetables, and flowers to attract pollinators. As the realities of climate change become starker, more and more people are looking for ways to create environmentally friendly spaces. NPR's Scott Detrow talks with research ecologist Susannah Lerman with the United States Forest Service about the impact of grass lawns on the environment and sustainable alternatives.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/10/2314m 40s

The Challenge of Filling the Army's Ranks

In the 1980s the U.S. Army launched a recruiting drive around the slogan, "Be all you can be." They've relaunched the slogan now as the push is on to make up for a drop off in recruitment. The Army is having a hard time convincing potential recruits that the military is the best place to reach their full potential. Last year, the Army was 15,000 soldiers short of its recruiting goal. Army surveys have found that many potential recruits don't want to join because they fear getting wounded or killed, even though the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are over. And the tight labor market means recruits have lots of other job opportunities. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Secretary of the Army Christine Wormuth about the struggle to staff up the largest branch of the U.S. military. NPR's Pentagon Correspondent Tom Bowman provides additional reporting for this episode.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/10/2310m 58s

With McCarthy Out What's Next for Republicans in the House?

It took just eight Republicans, voting with Democrats, to oust Kevin McCarthy from the House speakership. His removal may have been unprecedented, but for several years now the Republican caucus in the House of Representatives has been marked by chaos and unruliness. The job to lead them seems increasingly impossible.NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Rep. Matt Rosendale, of Montana, who was one of the eight Republicans to vote for McCarthy's removal. Co-host Juana Summers speaks with NPR Congressional Correspondent Deirdre Walsh about the challenge Republicans face to replace McCarthy.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/10/2311m 29s

The CFPB On Trial

The Supreme Court heard a case Tuesday that threatened the existence of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on the legal arguments in a case brought by payday lenders against the watchdog agency.And NPR's Scott Horsley walks through the track record of the CFPB since its founding in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/10/2312m 34s

The Chair Of the Joint Chiefs Is Retiring. What's His Legacy?

Army General Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, had a tenure marked by a relentless series of challenges. He served through the U.S. withdrawal of forces from Afghanistan, Russia's invasion of Ukraine and rising tensions with China. He also served under an American president with little regard for the norms that have historically separated politics from the U.S. military: Donald Trump.In an interview shortly before his retirement last weekend, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly asked Milley about the relationship between the military and the executive branch — and how it was tested under Trump.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/10/2310m 12s

Does Sam Bankman-Fried's Fraud Trial Spell the End of Crypto?

Not too long ago, crypto was being trumpeted as the next big thing. Celebrities were getting in on it, including Kim Kardashian, Matt Damon and Tom Brady.Now the former face of crypto, Sam Bankman-Fried, who ran the FTX exchange, is going on trial. He's accused of orchestrating one of the largest frauds in history. As his case gets underway it's as if the whole crypto industry is on trial.NPR's David Gura speaks with Bloomberg reporter Zeke Faux who wrote the book "Number Go Up: Inside Crypto's Wild Rise and Staggering Fall," and Sheelah Kolhatkar, a staff writer for The New Yorker who has a new article out on Bankman-Fried and his parents.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/10/2314m 6s

How Mortal Kombat Konquered Gaming

When the video game Mortal Kombat released in 1992, it took arcades — and later the American home — by storm. Thirty years on, the franchise is still going strong. NPR's Scott Detrow faces off against co-host Juana Summers in the latest version of the game, Mortal Kombat 1, and speaks with co-creator Ed Boon. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/09/2314m 8s

Here's How a Government Shutdown Could Impact Millions of Americans

The federal government will shut down on October 1st if Congress doesn't pass funding legislation for the next fiscal year before then. That looks increasingly likely as House Republicans continue to hold out for deep spending cuts before agreeing to any deal to keep the government running.A shutdown could potentially affect millions of Americans, among them some of the country's most vulnerable people.Host Ari Shapiro speaks with a trio of NPR correspondents about the potential impact of a government shutdown. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/09/2310m 26s

Could The Big Antitrust Lawsuit End Amazon As We Know It?

The U.S. government and 17 states sued Amazon on Tuesday in a landmark case that could take down the tech giant.The Federal Trade Commission and a bipartisan group of state attorneys general say that Amazon is a monopolist that chokes competitors and raises costs for both sellers and shoppers.Lina Khan, the head of the Federal Trade Commission, has spent years arguing that a few big companies have too much control over corporate America. The new lawsuit against Amazon is the biggest test of these arguments yet. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to FTC Chair Lina Khan, the driving force behind the case.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/09/2310m 23s

Biden On The Picket Line

President Biden made history on Tuesday when he joined members of the United Auto Workers union on a picket line outside Detroit as they strike for better pay and benefits from the Big Three automakers.Biden is walking a political tightrope. He wants a better contract for workers–and to win union members' votes in battleground states. He also wants to support carmakers as they transition to a future of electric vehicles.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Micheline Maynard, the author of The End of Detroit: How the Big Three Lost Their Grip on the American Car Market, to understand how profitable the big carmakers are right now. And NPR's Michel Martin speaks with historian Jefferson Cowie about the unprecedented nature of Biden walking the picket lines.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/09/2314m 11s

WGA Reached A Tentative Deal With Studios. But The Strike Isn't Over Yet

146 days.That's how long it took for the WGA to reach a tentative agreement with major Hollywood studios.WGA leadership is scheduled to vote Tuesday on accepting the new three-year deal. They'll pass it on to the guild's entire membership for ratification. It will take longer for the WGA membership to learn the details and vote. While this is happening, actors are still on the picket line. SAG-AFTRA hasn't reached an agreement yet.Until then, writers say they will stand in solidarity with actors, which means many TV shows and movies won't be resuming production right away. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Kim Masters, The Hollywood Reporter's editor, about the WGA's new deal and what it means for the industry at large as actors continue to strike.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/09/239m 24s

How Important Are Biden And Trump's Ages? We Asked Older Voters.

As president Joe Biden's campaign for a second term gets underway, a slew of recent polls show that voters have concerns about his age. At the end of a second term, he would be 86 years old. The Republican frontrunner, former president Donald Trump, is just a few years younger.We wanted to check in with some voters who have first-hand experience with aging: seniors. So we headed to Pittsburgh and the surrounding suburbs, a pivotal region in a pivotal state in the 2024 race, and spoke with older voters how they're thinking about age in this election.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/09/2312m 8s

Why Are So Many Inmates at This Federal Prison Dying?

Close to five thousand people have died in federal prison since 2009.There are 100 federal prisons across the U.S. An NPR investigation found that a quarter of those deaths happened at one federal prison. Butner Federal Correctional Complex in North Carolina. Inmates have a constitutional right to health care. Being denied care is considered cruel and unusual punishment. But many of the sick inmates who wind up at Butner don't get the healthcare they are entitled to – and some end up dying. NPR's Meg Anderson tried to find out why.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/09/2316m 10s

How New York City Became the Center Of a Debate Over Immigration

New York City has become an unlikely battleground for migrant rights.The city, like others, has struggled to deal with the arrival of tens of thousands of migrants - bussed in from Republican-led states like Texas and Florida. Amid rising pressure to do something to alleviate this problem, the Biden administration announced on Wednesday that it was granting Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, to nearly a half million Venezuelans - thousands of whom are in New York City. TPS protects them from deportation and allows them to apply for work permits.Host Ailsa Chang speaks with NPR's Jasmine Garsd about how New York has landed at the center of America's immigration debate and what the Biden administration's policy announcement means for migrants.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/09/2310m 20s

What the US-Iran Prisoner Swap Means For the Family of a Man Freed After 8 Years

On Tuesday, five Americans detained for years in Iran stepped off a plane back onto US soil. They were released in the US-Iran prisoner swap that also saw five Iranians freed and the US agreeing to 6 billion dollars of Iranian oil money being unfrozen. Per the deal, Iran is supposed to spend the money only on humanitarian goods like food and medicine.Among the five freed Americans: Siamak Namazi. The longest-held US citizen in Iran, detained since 2015. When he stepped off that plane yesterday, his brother Babak was there to greet him.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Babak Namazi on what the prisoner swap means for his family.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/09/239m 42s

California's Big Oil Lawsuit Strategy Mirrors Fight Against Big Tobacco

The state of California has filed a massive lawsuit against oil companies. The charge is that oil companies knew they were causing climate change, and lied to cover it up. And now, California is suing for damages. The state is suing to force fossil fuel companies to help fund recovery efforts related to California's extreme weather related events — floods, fire, dangerous heat --which have been made more common and intense by climate change. Back in the 1990s, states across the country sued tobacco companies - demanding that they be compensated for healthcare costs associated with treating people for smoking-related illnesses. It was a long and complicated process, but states won more than $360 billion. The victory brought a big change to the tobacco industry, forcing companies to accurately label cigarettes as potentially lethal, and limiting where and how cigarettes could be marketed. Host Ailsa Chang speaks with Richard Wiles, president of the Center for Climate Integrity on the ramifications of the climate lawsuit.A previous version of this episode did not include a statement from the American Petroleum Institute responding to Richard Wiles' comments.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/09/2310m 41s

U.S.-Iran Exchange Prisoners – A Year Since the Death of Masha Amini Sparked Protests

On Monday, five Americans who were imprisoned in Iran, stepped off a plane in Doha, Qatar. They were freed as part of a prisoner exchange deal between the U.S. and Iran.Despite the happy news, the Biden administration is facing a lot of criticism for this deal, which also gave Iran access to about $6 billion of its oil revenue - money that had been frozen under sanctions targeting the government in Tehran. The deal also comes just a little over a year after the death of a young Kurdish-Iranian woman named Mahsa Amini. Her death sparked the biggest anti-regime protests that Iran had seen in years. NPR's Arezou Rezvani tells us about the legacy of those protests a year later. We also hear reporting from NPR's Michele Kelemen about the U.S.-Iran prisoner swap. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/09/2312m 27s

Speaker McCarthy and the Impeachment Inquiry

Since becoming Speaker of the House of Representatives Kevin McCarthy has faced the constant threat that members of the right wing of his own Republican Party could move to oust him from power. And now, many view his launch of an impeachment inquiry into President Biden as a political move to protect his flank.Host Scott Detrow speaks with former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich about McCarthy's political dilemma and with NPR's Congressional Correspondent Deirdre Walsh.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/09/2313m 26s

Rotten Tomatoes Changed The Role Of Film Critics. But Is That A Good Thing?

If you're over a certain age and you love movies, when you think "movie critic", you probably picture Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert and their popular TV shows. Their iconic "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" move made it clear what each of them thought about a film. In some ways, the movie review website Rotten Tomatoes is the opposite of Siskel and Ebert. Their viewers depended on the insights of two individuals that they trusted, and felt they knew.Rotten Tomatoes aggregates and averages reviews from lots of critics to assign a movie a number ranking, and declare it "fresh" or "rotten". Since its launch 25 years ago, it's become the the go to site for lots of potential movie goers, offering everything they need to decide whether or not a movie is worth seeing. But for a while now, there have been complaints about the way the site ranks films. And concerns that those rankings unfairly influence whether a movie succeeds or bombs.Host Scott Detrow talks to Lane Brown, who took the site to task in a recent article on Vulture, and film critic Jamie Broadnax, editor-in-chief of the culture site, Black Girl Nerds.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/09/2314m 8s

Without Expanded Child Tax Credit, Families Are Sliding Back Into Poverty

It can be hard to see how big government policies have a direct effect on an individual's experience. But it was easy to measure the difference made by the expanded child tax credit. Giving more money to low-income families with children had a big impact. After the expanded child tax credit took effect, child poverty hit a record low of 5.2% a year ago.But less than a year later, Congress let it expire. New census data shows that child poverty has more than doubled. Host Ari Shapiro speaks with pediatrician and researcher Megan Sandel, who has seen the health consequences for kids play out in real time.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/09/239m 27s

How Concerns Over EVs are Driving the UAW Towards a Strike

The president of the United Auto Workers says the union is planning to carry out sudden, strategic and partial strikes at plants should contract talks with Detroit's Big Three automakers fail ahead of a contract deadline on Thursday night.UAW President Shawn Fain also held out the possibility of an all-out strike in the future of the nearly 150,000 union members.In addition to concerns over pay, workers are worried about what electric vehicles mean for their future. NPR's Camila Domonoske reports on how the transition to electric vehicles has many autoworkers concerned about their job security.And Senior White House Correspondent Tamara Keith reports on why the UAW hasn't endorsed President Biden for re-election in 2024.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/09/239m 57s

New Shots and a New Era for COVID

Right now it seems like people all around us are testing positive for COVID. But for the most part, they are not getting seriously ill. The Food and Drug Administration just approved a new booster. And on Tuesday advisers to the CDC recommended it for everyone six months and older.With a new variant and a new booster, how should we think about the pandemic in this moment? Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/09/2310m 15s

What Putin And Kim Jong Un Stand To Gain By Meeting

When North Korean leader Kim Jong Un visited Russian President Vladimir Putin in 2019, both countries were in a different position. Russia had yet to invade Ukraine.Four years later, Russia is trying to secure weapons from North Korea. The two leaders are expected to meet this month to discuss a deal. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Jean Lee, the former Pyongyang bureau chief for the Associated Press, and Georgetown University's Angela Stent, about the upcoming meeting between Kim Jong Un and Putin — and what North Korea might get out of it.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/09/2310m 15s

Sports Betting And The NFL Are Profitable Partners, But Controversies Continue

The National Football League's regular season is finally underway. And for loyal fans who have been devouring all the news of their favorite teams, it couldn't have come soon enough.But even if you're just a casual viewer of football, or really any network television program, you've probably seen the star-studded ads for a related business: sports betting.The league's partnership with major sports betting sites continues to draw criticism. Ten NFL players have been suspended for gambling violations since April, leaving critics and fans wondering if the relationship between football and gambling will harm the integrity of the game.Host Nathan Rott speaks with David Purdum who covers the gambling industry for ESPN.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/09/2313m 12s

Climate Change is Making It Difficult to Protect Endangered Species

The Endangered Species Act turns 50 this year. The landmark law has been successful for decades at stopping extinctions of several plants and animals.Recovering endangered or threatened species to the point where they no longer need federal protection has been more difficult because of climate change.NPR's Nathan Rott speaks with Martha Williams, Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service about the agency's plans to mitigate threats of extinction caused by climate change.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/09/2314m 7s

Fran Drescher on How the Hollywood Strikes Can End

The writers and actors strikes have been grinding on for months with no end in sight. Many on the picket lines are struggling to pay for basics.NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to Fran Drescher about what it's going to take to end the strikes. Drescher's the president of SAG-AFTRA, which represents the actors on strike. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/09/2313m 37s

When Big Oil Gets In The Carbon Removal Game, Who Wins?

Giant machines sucking carbon dioxide out of the air to fight climate change sounds like science fiction, but it's close to becoming a reality, with billions of dollars of support from the U.S. government. And a key player in this growing industry is a U.S. oil company, Occidental Petroleum.With a major petroleum company deploying this technology, it begs the question, is it meant to save the planet or the oil industry? NPR's Camila Domonoske reports.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/09/2311m 29s

Google Turns 25

Google was founded 25 years ago by two Stanford PhD students, Larry Page and Sergei Brin. The company went on to shape the internet and now, after a quarter century, finds itself at a turning point. With the rise of AI and social media platforms like TikTok, its continued dominance is not assured.NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Nilay Patel, editor-in-chief of The Verge, about Google's legacy and what the future holds for the company.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/09/2310m 21s

What Is The Future Of Remote Work?

It's been over three years since the pandemic started and changed the way millions of Americans work. The possibilities of remote work gave a new kind of freedom to many workers. But as more and more companies demand employees return to the office, is the work from home era coming to an end?Host Scott Detrow speaks with Anne Helen Petersen, culture writer and the author of Out of Office, about the future of remote work.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/09/239m 45s

Student Loan Payments Are Back. Now What?

After three and a half years, the pause on federal student loan payments is coming to an end. Getting more than 40 million borrowers back into repayment will be an enormous challenge, especially because many students who graduated when the pause was already in place have never made a payment.We put borrowers' questions to two experts: NPR Education correspondent Cory Turner, and Carolina Rodriguez, director of the Education Debt Consumer Assistance Program, a non-profit funded by New York State to help residents navigate repayment of their student loans.Read Cory's list of 12 things every student loan borrower should know.And if you're having an issue with your student loan servicer, Cory wants to know. Email him at dcturner@npr.org.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/09/2311m 56s

Do Youth Curfews Help Curb Crime?

Hundreds of towns, cities and counties across the country impose curfews on young people. On September 1st a curfew went into effect in seven neighborhoods across the District of Columbia that will affect those aged 17 and under. Like many other cities, the nation's capital has seen an increase in violent crime. And some of the most shocking crimes have been committed by young people.Teens as young as thirteen as well as pre-teens have been suspected of, or charged with carjacking. In the past couple of months a 14 year-old and a 16 year-old have been charged with murder. And young people are also the victims of violent.Keeping kids inside at night may seem like a good strategy for cities facing a surge in youth violence. But experts say that research doesn't back up the effectiveness of curfews.Host Scott Detrow speaks with Kristin Henning, director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic at Georgetown University about what does and doesn't work.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/09/2313m 58s

What Do Mitch McConnell's Silent Episodes Tell Us?

For the second time this summer the top Republican in the Senate, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, abruptly went silent at a news conference. He was about to answer a question from a reporter when he suddenly froze up. He seemed unable to speak. An aide then stepped in, trying to keep things moving along.The senator's silences have raised concerns about his mental fitness – and larger questions about an aging Congress.NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Dr. Ann Murray, the Movement Disorders division chief at the Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute at West Virginia University.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/08/238m 22s

Here's What Goes Into a Hurricane Evacuation Order

When people find themselves in the path of a hurricane they are faced with the question: should they evacuate or not? Who makes that call and how? NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with former FEMA administrator Craig Fugate about the decision-making process behind evacuation orders and why people should heed them ahead of hurricanes making landfall.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/08/239m 4s

Biden's Push to Make Some of the Most Expensive Prescription Drugs Cheaper

On Tuesday, the Biden administration released a list of 10 medications that it's planning to negotiate prices for Medicare in an effort to bring down the costs of some of the most expensive drugs. It's part of a reform included in the Inflation Reduction Act. Many on the list are life-saving drugs that treat diabetes, cancer and other major health problems.|The new prices that the federal government will eventually negotiate for these prescription drugs won't actually go into effect until 2026, and that's only if it doesn't get tied up in court with drugmakers. Six pharmaceutical companies who have filed lawsuits against the administration are calling these provisions unconstitutional. Juana Summers speaks with NPR's pharmaceuticals correspondent Sydney Lupkin and Deepa Shivaram at the White House about the battle lines being drawn between the Biden Administration and pharmaceutical companies.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/08/239m 31s

The Latest Mass Shooting in Florida Was Racist. What Role Do State Politics Play?

The latest mass shooting in Jacksonville, Florida left three people dead.All of the victims were Black and the white gunman left behind racist, hate-filled letters.The Justice Department is now investigating this shooting as a hate crime.A big part of the conversation now is what role state politics play in crimes like this. Florida Republican Governor Ron DeSantis has loosened gun laws in recent years and put restrictions on how race is taught in public schools.NPR's Juana Summers talks with Mutaqee Akbar, president of the Tallahassee branch of the NAACP, about how much responsibility lies with politicians. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/08/2311m 12s

Biden's Climate Moves

U.S. climate envoy John Kerry is preparing for the next major climate summit, in Dubai. He's calling for an end to permitting new, unabated coal-fired power anywhere in the world. We ask him about whether the U.S. has lived up to its climate commitments. We also talk to Vox climate reporter Rebecca Leber about Biden's signature climate legislation, which was passed a year ago this month. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/08/2313m 14s

The New Space Race Is On - And Everyone Is Headed To The Moon

The South Pole of the Moon is the coolest place to be. And nearly every country with a space program is vying for a spot there - for a chance to explore the shadowy, polar craters in hopes of finding usable quantities of water ice.On Wednesday, the Indian Space Research Organisation successfully landed its Chandrayaan-3 probe near the moon's south pole. It was the first time India had landed a spacecraft on the moon, and the first time any country had successfully landed at the coveted moon's south pole. Many have tried including, Japan, Israel, and most recently Russia, whose Luna-25 spacecraft crashed onto the surface just days before India's successful landing. NASA is preparing its ARTEMIS mission to return to the moon. Luxembourg and Saudi Arabia have also set their sites on moon missions. A new space race is underway. But why exactly are we racing to the moon again? NPR's Scott Detrow speaks to space lawyer Michelle Hanlon to find out. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/08/2312m 58s

The Dangers of Grass Fires

With the wildfires in Maui contained, the recovery process has begun.The focus has also turned to how the island can prepare for similar disasters in the futureOfficials and experts hope to address Hawaii's emergency alert system, as well as the construction of more fire-resistant homes. But what of the fires themselves? We often hear about forest fires, but the deadliest fire in the US in more than a century was a grass fire. Co-host Ailsa Chang talks to Jeva Lange, who wrote a story called "Most Wildfires Aren't Forest Fires," about how wildfires largely occur in grasslands. Also Rebecca Thiele with Indiana Public Broadcasting reports on how certain native plants can help combat the deadly effects of climate change.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/08/2310m 9s

The End for Russian Mercenary Chief Yevgeny Prigozhin?

Russia's state news agency Tass reported that the country's most famous mercenary, Yevgeny Prigozhin, was on the passenger list for a flight that crashed on its way from Moscow to St. Petersburg on Wednesday, killing all ten people on board. Despite being on the passenger list, it's not clear Prigozhin was on the flight.As head of the Wagner Group, Prigozhin led an unsuccessful mutiny against the Russian military in June. He quickly stood down and struck a deal with Russian President Vladimir Putin that would see him exiled to neighboring Belarus. That exile never came and questions swirled about what punishment, if any, Prigozhin would face for crossing Putin. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Nina Khrushcheva. She is a professor of international affairs at The New School in New York City, and she's also the great-granddaughter of former Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/08/238m 3s

A Trumpless Debate

Former president Donald Trump is the frontrunner in the Republican presidential primary. And with a healthy lead in the polls, he's skipping the first Republican presidential debate on Wednesday. So how do you prep for a big, televised debate when your biggest opponent decides not to show up?That's been the question facing the eight Republicans who will be on stage in Milwaukee on Wednesday night.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/08/2313m 50s

In Puerto Rico, Natural Disasters Take A Mental And Academic Toll On Children

Puerto Rico has seen a string of natural disasters in the past few years – hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, and landslides. When COVID-19 hit in 2020, things got even worse.These disasters have taken a heavy toll on student mental health. They've disrupted everyday life - including school. That disruption has seriously impacted educational outcomes for kids and teens on the island.The Nation's Report Card shows that more than one-third of fourth graders overall in the U.S are considered proficient or better in math. In Puerto Rico, that number rounds out to zero. Children on the island have worse outcomes when it comes to graduation rates, and reading scores continue to decline.Reporter Kavitha Cardoza traveled to Puerto Rico to learn how students and teachers cope.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/08/2311m 39s

Cities Voted For Progressive Prosecutors. Republican State Leaders Are Pushing Back.

The last few elections have brought a wave of self-styled progressive prosecutors into office. They've won elections by campaigning on issues like bail reform and alternatives to incarceration for non-violent offenders. Now, Republican-controlled state legislatures and governors are taking steps to curtail their power, or strip them of it altogether.We talk to Monique Worrell, who was elected state attorney for Florida's ninth judicial circuit, which includes the city of Orlando, in 2020. This month, Republican Governor and presidential candidate Ron DeSantis suspended her and installed a replacement. He said her office had refused "to faithfully enforce the laws of Florida," in its charging decisions. Worrell called her suspension an attack on democracy.And we talk to Carissa Byrne Hessick, director of the Prosecutors and Politics Project at the University of North Carolina, explains how these sorts of battles are playing out across the country.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/08/2312m 8s

Fighting Noise Pollution

A growing body of research makes it clear that noise pollution can have severely harmful impacts on our health. It has been tied to heart disease and thousands of premature deaths around the world.Still, our communities seem to get louder and louder. Some people are fighting back - pushing for more regulation and quieter cities.NPR's Pien Huang takes a sonic tour of Providence, Rhode Island with researcher Erica Walker and talks about noise pollution solutions with Jamie Banks the founder and president of Quiet Communities, and New York City Council member Gale Brewer.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/08/2314m 51s

NPR Investigation Reveals 'Barbaric' Conditions in ICE Detention Facilities

The Biden administration is under intense political pressure from Republicans over immigration, who accuse the president of being too lenient toward migrants. Now, the administration is locking up more unauthorized immigrants and asylum-seekers in detention facilities, and NPR has exclusively obtained more than 1,600 pages of confidential inspection reports examining conditions inside those facilities. They describe barbaric practices, negligent medical care, racist abuse and filthy conditions. NPR's Tom Dreisbach reports on the abysmal conditions detainees are forced to endure. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/08/2313m 44s

COVID Nearly Sunk the Cruise Industry. Now it's Trying to Make a Comeback.

The CDC says that a new omicron variant called EG.5 is causing a summer wave of COVID cases.Yet, COVID is nowhere near the threat that it was more than three years ago at the beginning of the pandemic. And that might be one of the reasons that people are cruising again on big ships following a COVID-19 decline.WLRN reporter Tom Hudson tells us how one of the hardest hit industries during the peak of the pandemic is trying to make a comeback.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/08/2311m 40s

The Georgia Indictment May Be Trump's Most Difficult Legal Challenge

A grand jury in Georgia has indicted Donald Trump for his role in failed efforts to overturn the state's 2020 presidential election results, implicating the former president as the head of a sweeping conspiracy to subvert his defeat. The indictment also includes charges against former Trump attorneys Rudy Giuliani, Sidney Powell, John Eastman and Jenna Ellis, and former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, along with a number of so-called fake electors.In charging former President Donald Trump and his allies, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis is relying on Georgia's broad set of RICO anti-racketeering lawsIn participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/08/2311m 24s

100,000 Afghans Were Airlifted Out Of Kabul. What Happened To Those Who Weren't?

It's been two years since the Taliban entered Kabul, throwing the final days of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan into chaos. Crowds of people desperate to leave the country surrounded the airport. Tens of thousands of Afghans were airlifted out before American troops pulled out. Many more are still trying to reach the U.S. Some are risking their lives to cross the border from Mexico.NPR's Tom Bowman has the story of one family who traveled from Afghanistan to Virginia, by way of Pakistan and Mexico, to get medical care for their young daughter.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/08/2312m 30s

The Challenges for a Saudi-Israeli Peace Deal

For the past few months, President Biden's top foreign policy advisors have been working as intermediaries between Saudi Arabia and Israel. Eventually they want to get the two countries to agree on a deal to finally establish formal diplomatic relations.It would be a breakthrough for Israel to get that recognition, after decades of Arab hostility stemming from the Israeli Palestinian conflict. Saudi Arabia is home to two of Islam's holiest sites, and it's an oil giant in the region.But it seems like an almost impossible three-way agreement. So, what's standing in the way?NPR's Daniel Estrin, who covers Israel, speaks with Felicia Schwartz from the Financial Times, Bader Al Saif, an assistant professor of history at the University of Kuwait, and fellow NPR correspondent Aya Batrawy, who covers Saudi Arabia, to understand what challenges remain for the two countries to normalize relations.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/08/2312m 32s

The Battle Over Book Bans Takes a Toll on Librarians and Comes at a Financial cost

As the battle over book bans in schools and libraries continues to play out in various states across the U.S., the toll it's taking on librarians is coming at a great cost — personally and financially.Many librarians are speaking up about fearing for their jobs and safety.Yet some conservative activists see the current fight playing out as necessary to protect children. NPR's Tovia Smith traveled to Louisiana where tensions have been flaring up — pitting librarians against book ban advocates in the local community.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/08/2316m 6s

Maui's Devastating Wildfires

Hawaii may be a tourist attraction to many Americans, but for over a million people, it's their home. And like any state in the US, it is not immune to the effects of climate change. This week brought a devastating reminder, as wildfires stoked by Hurricane Dora spread across the island of Maui. Dozens have been killed in the fires and thousands have been evacuated. Much of the historical town of Lahaina lies in ruins. Hawaii, like many other places on the planet, has experienced less rainfall in recent years, making it more prone to devastating wildfires that seemed unimaginable a generation ago. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/08/238m 38s

The People Smuggling Fentanyl Across The Border From Mexico May Not Be Who You Think

The number of overdoses from fentanyl continues to soar, as do concerns from those in Washington. Immigration authorities say illicit fentanyl is flowing into the U.S. from Mexico through official ports of entry.Not everyone believes that's the full story.NPR's Joel Rose traveled to the border to find out what's really happening.Fentanyl is largely smuggled by U.S. citizens and other authorized border crossers. We hear the story of one of the smugglers. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/08/2310m 46s

From Selfies To Satellites, The War In Ukraine Is History's Most Documented

In past wars, updates have trickled out slowly — often tightly controlled by the militaries involved. In the war in Ukraine, every day is a firehose of nearly real-time information, in the form of cell phone footage captured by civilians, updates from satellite intelligence companies and embedded military bloggers.NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre explains how that's shaping perceptions of the war in Russia, in Ukraine and around the world.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/08/239m 14s

Military Families Urge An End To Senator's Hold On Pentagon Appointments

One Republican senator from Alabama is single-handedly holding up over 300 senior-level military promotions and appointments. Senator Tommy Tuberville says he's doing it to take a stand against a Defense Department policy that reimburses travel expenses for military personnel who have to leave their states to get an abortion or other reproductive care. Tonya Murphy is a military spouse who went to Capitol Hill to hand deliver a petition signed by hundreds calling on lawmakers to stop the impasse. She explains how this political standoff is impacting military families. And NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman gives us the big picture overview of how all of this is affecting the Pentagon and, potentially, national security.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/08/2314m 58s

Three Stories From A Very Hot July

July was almost certainly the hottest month, globally, on record. It was also a month in which many lives were upended by weather related-disasters — the sort of disasters that are increasingly likely as climate change continues. So what do the people who lived through those disasters make of all this? We asked Dr. Frank LoVecchio, an emergency room doctor at Valleywise Health Medical Center in Phoenix, Ariz., about trying to keep people alive who spent too much time out in the deadly heat.And Michelle Eddleman McCormick, general manager at the Marshfield Village Store in Vermont, about living through extreme flooding.And Will Nicholls, of the Cree Nation of Mistissini, editor-in-chief of The Nation magazine, about how historic wildfires in northern Quebec have affected his community.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/08/2311m 45s

Former Baptist Leader Sees A Crisis Of Faith In America — But Also A Way Forward

For years, Russell Moore was one of the top officials in the Southern Baptist Convention. But after he criticized Donald Trump, Moore found himself ostracized from many other Evangelical leaders who embraced Trump and Trumpism.Moore eventually resigned from his post, and found himself on the outside of a denomination that had, up until that point, defined his life.Today, Moore argues that Christianity is in crisis in America, and he explores a way forward for the faith he loves in his book, "Losing Our Religion: An Altar Call For Evangelical America."Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/08/2314m 2s

Would A Free Speech Defense Work For Donald Trump In Court?

Former President Donald Trump pleaded not guilty to criminal charges related to efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election. And a member of his legal team told NPR that Trump plans to invoke the right to freedom of speech as part of his defense.To learn how a free speech defense would work for the former president in court, we hear from Ciara Torres-Spelliscy, a professor at Stetson University's College of Law in Florida. And former acting solicitor general of the United States, Neal Katyal, tells us about Tanya Chutkan, the U.S. district judge assigned to Trump's case.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/08/2313m 3s

Hollywood And The Threat From Artificial Intelligence — Real Or Imagined

The unions representing actors and writers in Hollywood have some differences in what they want from the big film studios. But one thing they agree on is the threat posed by artificial intelligence to their members' livelihoods.The threat of AI is something Hollywood was imagining long before it was real. NPR arts critic Bob Mondello tells the story of how AI became a movie villain.The threat of AI is something Hollywood was imagining long before it was real. NPR arts critic Bob Mondello tells the story of how AI became a movie villain.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/08/2314m 35s

Latest Trump Indictment Is 'Most Important' One Yet

Former President Donald Trump was indicted Tuesday by a federal grand jury on four counts related to the efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election, according to court documents.Trump was charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States, witness tampering, conspiracy against the rights of citizens and attempt to obstruct an official proceeding. Special counsel Jack Smith has been leading the investigation into Trump's conduct after the 2020 election and his role in the insurrection that played out at the U.S. Capitol on January 6th.We hear from presidential historian Tim Naftali about the significance of the new charges against the former president.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/08/2312m 58s

Leaders of the Niger Coup Face a Deadline to Avoid Military Intervention

Two years ago, Mohamed Bazoum was elected as president in Niger's first peaceful democratic transfer of power. He enjoyed the backing of Western governments, including the United States. Then, last week, members of his own presidential guard detained him and seized power. The coup in Niger is part of a wave of attempted, and successful, power grabs in West and Central Africa, a region gripped by political instability. Now, a group of West African nations imposed sanctions on Niger, and threatened military action if the coup leaders don't reinstate the president within the week. NPR's Emmanuel Akinwotu reports from neighboring country Nigeria, and he brings us the latest developments. We discuss what this means for the Sahel, and for democracies around the world. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/07/2310m 21s

America's Farms Are Facing A Serious Labor Shortage

There's a labor shortage on farms in the U.S., and that has implications for all of us who enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables.For farmers across America, finding enough labor has become a top concern. Decades ago, whole families of migrant farmworkers, the majority of them from Mexico, would travel around the U.S. in search of seasonal work. But over time, farmworkers began to settle. Now, many of them are aging out. And their children and grandchildren are finding opportunities in other sectors.Who will replace them? And what is Congress doing to solve this issue? This summer, two NPR reporters visited some farms to see how this is playing out: NPR's Ximena Bustillo who reports on food and farm policy, and NPR's Andrea Hsu who covers labor.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/07/2314m 8s

NPR Investigation Reveals Flaws In U.S. Claims About Baghdadi Raid Casualties

Editor's note: This episode contains graphic descriptions of violence.The U.S. military has consistently maintained that its troops didn't harm civilians during the 2019 raid on the Syrian hideout of ISIS founder Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, which lead to Baghdadi blowing himself up.It stuck to that version of events even after NPR reported on claims from Syrians that civilians were killed and maimed by U.S. helicopter fire during the raid. The Pentagon claimed the men were enemy combatants.NPR sued the Pentagon under the Freedom of Information Act to release documentation of the airstrikes, and obtained a redacted copy of the Defense Department's confidential 2020 report on the incident.NPR's Daniel Estrin digs into the document, and finds that it reveals flaws in the Pentagon's conclusion.His investigation, in English and Arabic, includes declassified Pentagon documents, photos, maps and videos. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/07/2313m 19s

Affirmative Action — For The Rich

The Supreme Court may have ended race-conscious admissions in higher education. But the end of affirmative action seems to have added fuel to another contentious debate around college admissions policies. For decades, many elite, private institutions have given prospective college students preference if a relative attended the school or, in some cases, when a major donor was involved. While the practice of affirmative action is dead, legacy admissions continue. But more and more critics of the practice are calling on schools to do away with them, including President Biden. Host Juana Summers speaks with economist John Friedman, a professor and chair of economics at Brown University. He co-authored a study that quantifies the lasting socio-economic disparities between legacy students and their less affluent peers.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/07/2310m 51s

A Patchwork of Transgender Healthcare Laws Push Families Across State Lines

When Utah passed a ban on gender-affirming care for people younger than 18, Kat and their family had to make a tough choice. Should they uproot their lives and leave the state?Kat is 14 and transgender. The Utah law banned the medical care that Kat was considering.Around 20 states have passed similar laws — meaning many families could face the same tough decision: whether to leave their homes and where to go. Often it's to a state like Minnesota, where elected officials have protected trans health care for patients and providers. We speak with reporters Saige Miller from KUER in Salt Lake City and Dana Ferguson, a political reporter with Minnesota Public Radio to hear how this patchwork of laws in both states affects trans patients and their doctors.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/07/2315m 56s

After East Palestine Derailment, Are Railroads Any Safer?

When a fiery, toxic train wreck forced residents of East Palestine, Ohio to evacuate last February, the crash and its aftermath became a national flashpoint and a hot button issue on both sides of the political aisle. Alan Shaw, the CEO of Norfolk Southern - the freight railroad responsible - found himself in front of Congress, grilled by bipartisan lawmakers. Shaw insists the company is continuing its commitment to help East Palestine recover, and that they are at the forefront of improving safety in the rail industry. Host Scott Detrow speaks with Shaw about how the company hopes to become "the gold standard" in rail safety.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/07/2313m 55s

The Judicial Overhaul That Has Torn Israeli Society Apart

On Monday, Israel's parliament voted into law a key measure to overhaul the country's judiciary. The measure prevents judges from striking down government decisions on the basis that they are "unreasonable." The law strips Israel's Supreme Court of a key check on the power of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government. This marks the first big move in a broader effort to weaken court oversight of senior officials. It comes after six months of protests from Israelis concerned that their government will have unchecked power. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is defending it, saying this law is the essence of democracy and will allow the elected government – his government – to carry out its agenda. We hear from concerned protestors outside Israeli parliament — many citizens are afraid that their way of life is in danger. Dahlia Scheindlin is a political analyst from Tel Aviv, she explains what this new Israeli law says about the state of democracy there.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/07/239m 54s

Messi Mania: Will Bringing Soccer's 'G.O.A.T.' Change Major League Soccer's Rep?

The United States' preeminent professional soccer league, Major League Soccer, has long lagged behind top European leagues.However, international soccer superstar Lionel Messi joining the Inter Miami might be the boost the league needs.NPR's Scott Detrow reports on the impact of Messi coming to the MLS and what the league's future could be.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/07/2312m 27s

Remembering Tony Bennett

Tony Bennett, the crooner whose success spanned generations, died Friday. He was 96 years old.His voice was synonymous with the Great American Songbook, which he continued to bring to new audiences even as the country's musical tastes changed.NPR's Walter Ray Watson traces the arc of Bennett's life, from his days as a singing waiter in Astoria, New York, to his Billboard-charting hits as a nonagenarian.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/07/2310m 27s

How To Protect Ourselves From Extreme Heat — And Our Planet From Climate Change

We know that climate change is making all sorts of extreme weather events more likely all around the globe. So what can we do about that?In this episode, NPR's Allison Aubrey gives us tips on how to avoid heat-related illnesses when temperatures soar to dangerous levels.And we hear from a climate researcher about what steps we would need to take on a global scale to try and bring temperatures down.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/07/2311m 17s

January 6, Election Interference Could Be Focus of New Trump Indictments

It's easy to lose track of the seriousness of the legal cases involving Donald Trump, in part because there are just so many.This week the former president and current presidential candidate said he received a letter informing him he is a target in Special Counsel Jack Smith's investigation of the January 6, 2021 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Such a letter often precedes an indictment. And a grand jury in Fulton County, Georgia, may soon consider an election interference case there that could lead to yet another indictment of Trump.We hear about both cases in this episode.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/07/2311m 58s

New Research Could Change the Landscape of Human Reproduction

One of the most cutting-edge and controversial fields of biomedical research right now is the quest to create eggs and sperm in the lab for anyone with their own DNA. And now, private companies have jumped into the race to revolutionize the way humans reproduce.In vitro gametogenesis, or IVG, would enable infertile women and men to have children with their own DNA instead of genes from the sperm and eggs of donors. It would also provide queer couples the opportunity to have children biologically related to both partners. NPR health correspondent Rob Stein reports on the excitement and concerns this new technology has fueled.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/07/2312m 2s

The Spanish Tennis Pipeline That Led Carlos Alcaraz To A Wimbledon Trophy

Carlos Alcaraz's victory over Novak Djokovic in the Wimbledon final was the latest coronation of a tennis great from Spain.NPR's Rob Schmitz looks into how the country became such fertile ground for outstanding players.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/07/238m 23s

Ahead of the 2024 Election, Young Rural Voters Want To Be Heard

Since the 2024 Presidential election may ultimately be decided by a handful of votes in a handful of states, courting young voters will be key. Gen Z has been turning out in record numbers in recent midterms. Often much of the political conversation focuses on young voters in and around big cities. But since young voters are so key for Democrats' success, and rural voters are an essential bloc for Republicans, what young, rural voters think really matters. Host Scott Detrow spoke with NPR's Elena Moore and Xinema Bustillo, who talked to Gen Z voters in rural North Carolina.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/07/2314m 12s

Alabama's Last Two Executions Failed. They're Trying Again Next Week

James Barber is scheduled to be executed on Thursday in Alabama, for the murder of Dorothy Epps in 2001. It's the first execution since Governor Kay Ivey paused capital punishment in the state and ordered a "top-to-bottom" review of death penalty protocols after the state failed to execute two inmates last year.Host Scott Detrow speaks with The Atlantic's Elizabeth Bruenig. She reported extensively on Alabama's troubles with lethal injection last year. She says the state's process is very opaque, and almost nothing of the review was made public.Deborah Denno, a death penalty expert at Fordham Law School, says lethal injection problems are an issue all around the country.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/07/2314m 42s

One Couple's Fight to Cure ALS

Six years ago when former Obama staffer Brian Wallach was diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - ALS - a rare neurological disease that kills most people who contract it within a few years, he and his wife Sandra Abrevaya quickly got to work. They launched a non-profit advocacy group I am ALS and a battle to try and fight for increased funding and research that they hoped would lead to a cure for the disease.Since then Wallach and Abrevaya have changed the face of medical advocacy in the country, helping secure legislation that President Biden signed in 2021 that funds $100 million worth of ALS initiatives each year. NPR's Juana Summers spent time with Wallach and Abrevaya to hear about their fight for a cure for ALS.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/07/2314m 36s

The Anthropocene

As we confront the realities of a changing climate, a group of scientists says we're living in a world of our very own making - a world altered by the burning of fossil fuels, the explosion of nuclear weapons, plastic pollution and environmental degradation. The scientists call it the Anthropocene. And they have identified a geological site in Canada they say best reflects this new epoch in Earth's history. We hear from NASA's Chief Scientist and Senior Climate Advisor Kate Calvin. Also, NPR's Adrian Florido speaks with Francine McCarthy, a professor of Earth Sciences, who led a working group of scientists who identified Canada's Crawford Lake as the best example of a place that demonstrates humanity's impact on the planet.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/07/239m 56s

Trying to Reverse the Decline of Black Players in Major League Baseball

Baseball was once known for breaking racial barriers in the U.S. But now, Black representation in the major leagues is at its lowest level in decades.This year, MLB did something to try and change that, by staging the first annual HBCU Swingman Classic. It's an opportunity for players from historically Black colleges and universities to play in front of scouts and executives on a national stage.NPR's Juana Summers reports from Seattle on MLB's efforts to reverse the decline and recruit Black American players.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/07/2312m 51s

The Impact of Cluster Bombs

Since the war began, military aid from the US to Ukraine has largely received bipartisan report. But a new planned 800 million dollar package has split Democrats and also riled up Human Rights Groups because of one weapon included in the package — cluster bombs.More than a hundred countries, including allies of the US, have banned use of the weapon, which releases a large number of bomblets over a wide area. Unexploded bomblets pose a danger to civilians. The Biden administration is defending the decision, citing Ukraine's desperate need for ammunition.To get a sense of the human cost of cluster bomb use during wartime, we take a look at Laos. Between 1964 and 1973, the U.S. dropped more than 270 million cluster bombs on Laos during the Vietnam War. Host Mary Louise Kelly discusses this with Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Lewis Simons, who reported from Asia and the Middle East for decades.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/07/2313m 13s

The Black Maternal Mortality Crisis and Why It Remains an Issue

The U.S. has the worst maternal mortality rate of high-income countries globally, and the numbers have only grown. According to a new study published in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association – maternal death rates remain the highest among Black women, and those high rates have more than doubled over the last twenty years.When compared to white women, Black women are more than twice as likely to experience severe pregnancy-related complications, and nearly three times as likely to die. And that increased rate of death has remained about the same since the U.S. began tracking maternal mortality rates nationally — in the 1930s. We trace the roots of these health disparities back to the 18th century to examine how racism influenced science and medicine - and contributed to medical stereotypes about Black people that still exist today.And NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with Karen Sheffield-Abdullah, a nurse midwife and professor of nursing at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, about how to improve maternal health outcomes for Black women.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/07/2315m 24s

Are We Witnessing The Death Of Movie Stars?

Humphrey Bogart, Cary Grant, Bettie Davis, Clark Gable. During Hollywood's Golden Age, which existed roughly from the 1910s and 20's into the early 1960s, these actors weren't just stars... They were in the words of NPR's movie critic Bob Mondello "American royalty".But in an age of Disney and Marvel, the movie star appears to have been eclipsed by the franchises in which they appear.NPR critics Mondello and Aisha Harris breakdown the decline and seemingly disappearance of the classic movie star and what that means for Hollywood.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/07/2313m 15s

Confronting Police Violence and Racism in France

The police killing in France of a 17-year old of North African descent sparked protests and violence across the country as well as a national conversation about racism and police brutality. Rebecca Rosman reports from the Paris suburb of Nanterre where the police killing took place. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Marseille, the scene of some of the worst violence. And Ari Shapiro interviews Sebastian Roche, a sociologist who studies policing and race in France.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/07/239m 54s

Palestinians Deal with Loss and Destruction Following Israeli Attack on Jenin

On Wednesday Israel said it concluded a two-day military operation in the Jenin refugee camp meant to root out armed militants. The raid on the camp in the occupied West Bank - complete with airstrikes – was the most intense military operation Israel has carried out in more than 15 years. At least 12 Palestinians were killed and scores wounded. One Israeli soldier was killed.Israel claimed the attack was one that targeted militants and minimized harm to non-combatants. NPR's Daniel Estrin visited Jenin as the operation was winding down and said Palestinians had a different story to tell.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/07/239m 9s

LGBTQ Vets Still Suffering The Consequences of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'

It's been more than a decade since 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' was repealed. Introduced in 1993, the law remained in effect until 2011. During that time an estimated 114,000 troops were forced out of the military because of their sexual orientation. Veterans who received an "other than honorable" discharge from the military under "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" were ineligible for veterans' benefits. That meant missing out on benefits like free VA healthcare, VA-backed home loans or funds for college tuition. While the Pentagon says that 90% of applications to change discharge status have been granted, advocates say that as of March 2023, only 1,375 vets have had benefits reinstated – a tiny fraction of the number of affected vets believed to be out there. NPR's Quil Lawrence follows the story of two gay veterans, both affected by "Don't Ask Don't Tell", but in very different ways. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/07/2313m 32s

Hot Dog Eating Contests: A Distinctly American Tradition

There's nothing obviously patriotic about scarfing down as many hot dogs as you can in ten minutes. So how did competitive eating become so synonymous with the holiday celebrating the Fourth of July?To find out, host Scott Detrow visits a hot dog eating contest in Washington, D.C.And producer Matt Ozug unpacks the evolution of eating as a sport, from a 17th century farmer to today's televised competitions.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/07/2312m 33s

Supreme Court Term Ends With Decisions That Will Impact Millions

The Supreme Court ended its term this week with three rulings that will have far reaching consequences in the lives of millions of Americans.The court struck down President Biden's student debt relief program. It also sided with a Colorado website designer who wants to refuse business to a same-sex couple, and it effectively killed affirmative action in college admissions.All three rulings were a 6-3 split. All of the court's Republican-nominated justices voting against the three justices who were put forward by Democratic presidents. NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with two legal experts, journalist Dahlia Lithwick and law professor Leah Litman from the University of Michigan, about what this term tells us about the current Supreme Court.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/07/2311m 48s

Putin's Hold on Power

A week on from an aborted uprising, Vladimir Putin is still standing. But for how long? The brief rebellion, launched by the leader of the mercenary Wagner Group Yevgeny Prigozhin, marked the greatest challenge to Putin's rule since he came to power, 23 years ago. The mercenary leader is now in exile in Belarus and no charges are being filed against him or his followers. So where does that leave Putin, who has a reputation for being ruthless with his enemies? In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/06/2310m 8s

The Death of Affirmative Action

The Supreme Court effectively killed race-conscious admissions in higher education on Thursday. In two cases, the court decided that the admissions policies of Harvard and the University of North Carolina - both of which consider race - are unconstitutional, ruling the policies violated the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment.The decisions reversed decades of precedent upheld over the years by narrow court majorities that included Republican-appointed justices. The rulings could end the ability of colleges and universities, public and private, to do what most say they still need to do: consider race as one of many factors in deciding which of the qualified applicants is to be admitted. NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg reports on the ruling and what it means for college admissions. NPR's Adrian Florido looks at how colleges and universities in California adjusted their admissions policies when the state banned affirmative action 25 years ago.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/06/2312m 16s

What — And Who — Is To Blame For Extreme Heat?

A punishing heat wave has left more than a dozen people dead across Texas. In recent days temperatures have climbed above 100 degrees in many parts of the state. Now the extreme heat is heading east, putting people's health at risk across the Mississippi Valley and the Central Gulf Coast. NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on how climate change and the El Niño climate pattern are increasing the intensity and frequency of heat waves. And Monica Samayoa from Oregon Public Broadcasting reports on how one county is suing oil and gas companies for damages caused by a heat wave. This episode also features reporting from KERA's Toluwani Osibamowo in Dallas.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/06/238m 29s

Florida In The Political Spotlight

When it comes to American politics, Florida regularly finds its way to the center of the conversation. Often important, if not pivotal in presidential elections, Florida is home to former President Trump and his strongest opponent in the Republican presidential primary for 2024, Governor Ron DeSantis. As he campaigns for the nomination Gov. DeSantis has taken center stage in some of the most contentious battles of the culture war, those around trans rights, book censorship and immigration. But just how did the Sunshine State end up the center of the political universe? NPR's Political Correspondent Kelsey Snell and National Correspondent Greg Allen explain.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/06/239m 54s

Putin Survived An Uprising. What's Next?

Russian President Vladimir Putin faced a direct challenge to his authority over the weekend. Mercenary fighters with the Wagner group took over a military headquarters and launched a march toward Moscow.The group's leader, Yevgeny Prigozhin, eventually called off the uprising. He's apparently accepted a deal to live in exile, and claims the weekend's events were a protest, not an attempt to overthrow the government.NPR's Charles Maynes in Moscow, and Greg Myre in Kyiv, explain what the turmoil could mean for the future of Putin's rule and the course of the war in Ukraine.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/06/239m 2s

Mitch Landrieu, the man Biden hopes can rebuild America, bring broadband to millions

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Act is a $1.2 trillion law meant to spur a massive infrastructure renewal and rebuilding program complete with new bridges, railroads and highways.It also allocates $65 million to expand internet access to all.Mitch Landrieu, the former mayor of New Orleans, is the man Biden tapped to make sure the massive job gets done. We speak with Landrieu about the Affordable Connectivity Program – which provides monthly $30 subsidies for lower-income individuals to buy Internet access.Then we speak with Kathryn de Wit, project director for the Pew Charitable Trust's Broadband Access Initiative, about why accessing the internet is no longer a luxury, but a necessity. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/06/2313m 23s

A Year After Dobbs Ruling, Seeking Reproductive Health Care Can Mean Few Good Options

Last June, when the Supreme Court reversed the Roe v. Wade decision, which had stood for nearly 50 years, the constitutional right to abortion ceased to exist. While reproductive health providers had been fearing, and preparing for the possible reversal for years, it still left millions of people seeking reproductive health care in flux. A year on, state controlled access to abortion continues to shift in many locations across the country.We hear from people who have been forced to make decisions that they never imagined. And, we learn how lawmakers plan to defend reproductive rights. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/06/2312m 52s

A New Report Warns China And The U.S. Are 'Drifting Toward A War' Over Taiwan

There has been no shortage of confrontations between the U.S. and China this year. This week, shortly after a trip by Secretary of State Antony Blinken to Beijing, intended to thaw relations with China, President Biden likened Chinese President Xi Jinping to a "dictator" in off the cuff remarks. A spokesperson for the Chinese Foreign Ministry called that "an open political provocation." Before that there were dust ups over TikTok and a Chinese spy balloon.But one of the most intractable and volatile issues continues to be the fate of Taiwan. And a new report sponsored by the Council on Foreign Relations says that the U.S. and China are 'drifting toward a war' over the island. Two of the report's authors, former Deputy Director of National Intelligence Sue Gordon and Admiral Mike Mullen, formerly the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, argue the U.S. should take action now to prevent that outcome.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/06/2311m 18s

Insurers Flee California As Catastrophic Wildfires Become The Norm

As climate change gets worse, California is seeing larger and more dangerous wildfires. And in response some insurers are leaving the state behind, finding the growing risk too high to pay.Host Ailsa Chang talks with Michael Wara, who directs a climate and energy policy program at Stanford, about the financial calculus insurers are making as the threat of climate-fueled disasters grows.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/06/239m 20s

What It's Like Inside The Submersible That's Lost In The Atlantic

Time is running out to locate the submersible vessel that went missing Sunday, on a voyage to visit the wreckage of the Titanic. The U.S. Coast Guard estimates the five people aboard the vessel, known as the Titan, could run out of air by Thursday morning.CBS Sunday Morning correspondent David Pogue was aboard the same vessel to take the same voyage last year. He says its interior is the size of a minivan, it's built with a combination of off-the-rack and highly technical components and it has a hatch that's bolted shut from the outside.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/06/239m 36s

Remembering The Children's Crusade On Juneteenth

While Black people in this country have been celebrating Juneteenth for decades, what is sometimes referred to as Emancipation Day or America's "second Independence Day" is only being celebrated as a national holiday this year for the third time.June 19th marks the date in 1865 when the last enslaved people in the U.S. learned they were free. on that day, Major General Gordon Granger of the Union Army delivered the news to enslaved Black people in Galveston, Texas.But for African Americans, the fight for freedom began long before the Civil War. And it didn't end with the Emancipation Proclamation. So to mark the day we're looking at a turning point in the fight for civil rights — The Children's Crusade. NPR's Debbie Elliot traveled to Birmingham, Alabama, which is marking the 60th anniversary of the movement, when leaders like Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. looked to children to join the struggle for equal rights. The vicious response from white segregationists shocked the world and galvanized support for the Civil Rights Act.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/06/2311m 59s

Made in America: It's trickier than it sounds

Made in America. It may be a catchy political slogan, but it's a lot more complicated than it sounds. So many things we use everyday come from China. In 2018 - former President Donald Trump launched a trade war with the country, eventually slapping tariffs on more than 300 billion dollars worth of Chinese imports. Two and half years into the Biden presidency – those taxes are still here.To understand why, NPR's White House correspondent Asma Khalid spoke with policy makers, economists and even went out to a factory floor in Minnesota.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/06/2312m 19s

Celebrating Fathers From All Walks Of Life

It depends on when, and where you grew up, but you can probably name a few of your favorite sit-com dads - from Mike Brady and his "bunch", to Homer Simpson, to Andre Johnson from Blackish. There is no single, universal way to be a father. There are as many ways to be a dad as there are dads. This year, for Father's Day, we asked a variety of different dads to tell us their stories about what fatherhood means to them. And we have a story that puts a new twist on the old saying "like father, like son".In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/06/2313m 17s

The drug fueling another wave of overdose deaths

A deadly and addictive chemical normally used as a horse tranquilizer is being mixed into illegal drugs.Xylazine has been around for a while, but over the last year authorities have been seeing it turn up in higher quantities all over the country. In recent weeks, U.S. Drug Czar Rahul Gupta has been sounding the alarm, even acknowledging public health experts and police are mostly in the dark about how Xylazine took hold so quickly.NPR's Juana Summers speaks with addiction correspondent Brian Mann, who has been reporting on the mysterious and deadly emergence of the drug. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/06/239m 48s

A North Korean Defector SharesThoughts On Diplomacy With U.S.

When Kim Hyun-woo stepped into the NPR studios in Washington, he was doing something that in his past life would have gotten him killed - speaking frankly with an American journalist. That's because Mr. Kim spent 17 years working for North Korean intelligence at the Ministry of State Security.He defected in 2014 and lives today in South Korea. In a rare glimpse behind the curtain of one of the most isolated countries in the world, he shared his thoughts on pathways to diplomacy between Washington and Pyongyang, possible successors to Kim Jong Un and his fears for loved ones who remain in North Korea. Kim Hyun-woo spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly in an exclusive interview. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/06/2310m 38s

Trump in Court...Again

On Tuesday, former president Donald Trump appeared in a federal courthouse in Miami where he pleaded not guilty to 37 criminal charges, including obstruction and unlawful retention of classified documents at his Florida home and private resort Mar-a-Lago. He is the first former U.S. president to face federal criminal charges. Trump and many of his supporters have called the indictment politically motivated. NPR's White House correspondent Franco Ordonez has been following Trump's case and he spoke to Ailsa Chang about how Trump, as well as his opponents in the Republican primary are reacting to the indictment on the campaign trail. Ailsa Chang spoke with NPR's Andrea Bernstein about why Trump sees so many lawyers come and go. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/06/239m 57s

Making It Easier For Kids To Get Help For Addiction, And Prevent Overdoses

The U.S. is in the midst of a drug crisis, with opioid overdose deaths climbing to epidemic proportions. And overdose deaths among young people, between the ages of 10 and 19, have been on the rise with sharp increases in recent years. Across the country, cities and states are looking for strategies to help kids survive the opioid crisis. At a school in Virginia, students are learning how to obtain and use the lifesaving overdose reversal nasal spray Narcan that was recently made available for sale over the counter.And in California, where fentanyl is the cause of 1 in 5 deaths among youths, a pending bill could allow younger teens to seek drug treatment without parental consent.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/06/2312m 56s

The PGA LIV Golf Deal Is All About The Green

For more than a year the PGA, the world's leading pro golf league, has basically been at war with the upstart Saudi-funded LIV Golf league. Lawsuits and countersuits were filed as the the leagues competed for marquee golfers and control of the narrative around the game. Some PGA players resisted big paydays to join LIV because they were critical of the Saudi Public Investment Fund, the source of the league's seemingly endless supply of money. But last week, the two leagues announced a plan to join forces.Though the deal has yet to be finalized, it's already faced backlash from players who remain loyal to the tour, and from human rights activists who see this as an attempt by the Saudi government to use sports to draw attention away from their record of human rights abuses. NPR's Susan Davis speaks with Sally Jenkins, a sports columnist for the Washington Post, who wrote a column critical of the merger, and Terry Strada, who chairs the group 9/11 Families United, which represents thousands of surviving family members of those killed in the September 11, 2001 attacks. Strada has been one of the most vocal critics of the plan. We also hear from Doug Greenberg, a writer for the sports news site Front Office Sports, who says the Saudi-backed league has actually been good for golf.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/06/2313m 28s

An American Indian Boarding School That Was Once Feared Is Now Celebrated

Federal Indian boarding schools left a decades long legacy of abuse, neglect and forced assimilation of Indigenous children.Last year, when the federal government finally acknowledged its role — that painful history drew attention to a few schools that remain open. NPR's Sequoia Carrillo and KOSU's Allison Herrera visited Riverside Indian School in southwest Oklahoma to find out how a school that once stripped children of their Native identity now helps strengthen it.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/06/2310m 44s

Missing White Woman Syndrome: Media Bias And Missing People of Color

Every year about 600,000 thousand people are reported missing in the United States per the National Missing and Unidentified Persons database.In 2022, about 34,000 people reported as actively missing were people of color. But people of color who disappear seldom get the same amount of media attention devoted to white people who go missing - especially white women and children. The late journalist Gwen Ifill coined the phrase "Missing White Woman Syndrome" to describe the media's fascination with, and detailed coverage of, the cases of missing or endangered white women - compared to the seeming disinterest in covering the disappearances of people of color.NPR's Juana Summers speaks with David Robinson II. His son, Daniel Robinson, has been missing for nearly two years. And Natalie Wilson, co-founder of the Black and Missing Foundation, who has been helping him find answers.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/06/2316m 7s

Black Immigrants in the South

Being Black and an immigrant is an increasingly common phenomenon in the South, where 1 in 10 Black people are immigrants. Still, despite growing numbers of Black immigrants in the region, their experience is fraught with worries over discrimination and assimilation. NPR's Leah Donnella reports on hurdles Black immigrants face in order to drive in Tennessee, a state with one of the fastest growing populations of Black immigrants in the South, and with few options for transportation.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/06/2310m 45s

If Allah Has No Gender, Why Not Refer To God As 'She?'

When people speak about God in various religions, the deity is typically referred to using the masculine pronoun "He."In Islam, Allah is not depicted as male or female — Allah has no gender. Yet Allah has traditionally been referred to, and imagined by many, as a man. Some Muslim women have begun to refer to Allah with feminine or gender neutral pronouns.NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Hafsa Lodi, who wrote about this movement in the religion magazine The Revealer, about what's driving this.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/06/238m 24s

For Russia and Ukraine, The Battlefield Includes The Economy

Wars are expensive. And Russia's invasion of Ukraine has had an impact on the economies of both countries.NPR's Julian Hayda, in Kyiv, reports that international assistance is allowing Ukraine to stabilize its economy and avoid collapse.The Russian economy seems to have remained resilient in the face of sanctions and other trade and financial restrictions. But NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith reports on how that could be changing.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/06/2312m 2s

The Future Of Black Owned Media

While it may seem like Black-focused media is at a high these days, the reality is only 4% of all media in the U.S. is Black-owned.Moreover, experts say that biased practices from advertisers make it harder for Black-owned media companies to be profitable. NPR's Eric Deggans talks to Byron Allen, about his ambitions to grow his media empire, hold advertisers to account, and control the narrative of how Black people are represented in media. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/06/2313m 53s

The Power Of Lullabies

Lullabies. We all know one. Whether we were sung one as a baby or now sing one to our own children. Often, they're used to help babies gently fall asleep. But lullabies can be more than that. They can be used to soothe, to comfort, and to make children feels closer to their parents and vice versa. We hear from Tiffany Ortiz, director of early-childhood programs at Carnegie Hall, about their Lullaby Project, which pairs parents with professional musicians to write personal lullabies for their babies. Also NPR's Elissa Nadworny takes a look at a program inside a South Carolina prison that helps incarcerated mothers write lullabies for their kids. And NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin examines the science behind a good lullaby.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/06/2314m 23s

This Is What Democracy Looks Like? How Erdogan Won Again In Turkey

In the months ahead of the election, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan faced criticism for his government's response to devastating earthquakes and for crushing inflation. Yet, he still managed to come out ahead in this week's runoff election, extending his two-decade tenure leading Turkey by another five years.His victory was a case study in how to use populism, intimidation and division to harness a democracy and stay in power.NPR's Fatma Tanis breaks down his victory and what it means for democracy in Turkey and more broadly.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/06/2312m 25s

A right to repair in Minnesota and beyond

The right to repair movement scored a big victory last week in Minnesota, where it got legislation signed into law that requires manufacturers to let independent shops and consumers buy the parts and tools necessary to repair their own equipment. The new law could make fixing your own devices, gadgets and appliances a lot easier in states across the country. NPR's Eric Deggans speaks with Gay Gordon-Byrne the executive director of the Repair Association, about the importance of the new law. And Minnesota State Rep. Peter Fischer talks about how he got involved in the movement and the obstacles he and others faced on the path to getting this law passed.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/05/2314m 56s

Iran's Nuclear Program Marches Forward, 5 Years After The U.S. Abandoned The Deal

It's been five years since the U.S. pulled out of the nuclear deal. What followed: the U-S re-imposed crushing sanctions, over time, Iran stopped adhering to the limits the deal had set and day-by-day its nuclear program crept forward.So how close is Iran to a bomb? What can the U.S. do to stop Iran, if it chooses to pursue one? And how are regional and global shifts changing the equation?NPR's Mary Louise Kelly puts these questions to the U.S. special envoy for Iran, Rob Malley, and to Vali Nasr with the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/05/2312m 36s

Unraveling The Evolution of Hong Kong's Civic Life

Back in March, roughly 80 people in Hong Kong marched in opposition to a land reclamation project that protesters say would increase pollution. Police were watching closely. Demonstrators had to wear numbered badges around their necks as they walked in the rain. It was a different image from the hundreds who protested in 2019. Back then, the people of Hong Kong showed up in unprecedented numbers. They were opposing what they saw as mainland China's latest efforts to impose authoritarian restrictions to chip away at Hong Kong autonomy.NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Louisa Lim, author of Indelible City: Dispossession And Defiance In Hong Kong. They discuss the long history of friction between Hong Kong and China, and the state of freedom of expression in Hong Kong today.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/05/2311m 30s

What's Up With Twitter?

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis' presidential campaign announcement on Twitter did not go as planned. A series of awkward technical glitches delayed the event for about 20 minutes. Nevertheless, it was still a big moment, not just for DeSantis, but for Twitter, too.In fact, Desantis' announcement is just one example of how the social media platform has changed since Elon Musk took over the company.NPR's Eric Deggans talks with writer Charlie Warzel, who has covered the platform for 15 years, about his latest piece in The Atlantic, "Twitter is a Far Right Social Network."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/05/2312m 6s

Remembering Rock and Roll Icon Tina Turner

Tina Turner, one of Rock and Roll's greatest stars, died this week in her home in Switzerland at the age of 83, after a long period of illness.In a career that spanned six decades, Turner left behind an indelible legacy in music, on the stage and on screen. Host Eric Deggans looks back on her tumultuous, and triumphant, life. Also we answer whether the "Queen of Rock and Roll" was somehow still underappreciated.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/05/2314m 48s

How A Jeopardy! Champ's Disappearance From The Show Left Fans Mystified For Decades

Since its relaunch in the 1980s, Jeopardy! has had thousands of contestants. For some of the its most memorable champions, the gameshow has been a launchpad for wider success. However, the disappearance of one of the earliest champions from the show left fans mystified for decades.NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Claire McNear, a staff writer with The Ringer, about the 40-year-long mystery behind one of Jeopardy's most enigmatic champions. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/05/2311m 28s

Uvalde One Year Later

It's been one year since an 18-year-old gunman killed 19 students and 2 teachers at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas. The tragedy reignited debates around gun safety in America and has haunted a community still seeking to fully understand how law enforcement was so slow to take down the shooter. About a month after the shooting, Congress passed the most significant gun legislation since the Federal Assault Weapons ban of 1994, but many Republican led-states, including Texas, have resisted gun safety legislation, even loosening gun restrictions.Uvalde, too, is divided — between those who want stricter gun laws and those who oppose them, between those who want to mark a year since the massacre, and those who want to move on. And for the families who lost loved ones, they're still searching for justice, accountability, and healing. NPR's Adrian Florido reports from Uvalde. And we hear from Texas Tribune reporter Zach Despart about the police response to the shooting.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/05/2312m 55s

With The Expansion of Carbon Capture Pipelines Come Safety Fears

The United States has 27 years to reach its net-zero emissions goal. And among other initiatives to move towards that goal, the Biden administration is offering incentives for carbon capture and storage. Carbon capture is a way to suck up carbon dioxide pollution from ethanol plants, power plants and steel factories, and store it deep underground.While the companies that build the pipelines say the technology will help the U.S. meet its greenhouse gas emissions goals, they have also run into problems. In Iowa, farmers are pushing back against the pipelines crossing their land. And for a town in Mississippi, a CO2 pipeline endangered lives.NPR's Julia Simon reports from Satartia, Mississippi on the aftermath of a pipeline rupture. The Climate Investigations Center obtained recordings of the 911 calls from Satartia and shared them with NPR. Harvest Public Media's Katie Peikes also provided reporting in this episode.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/05/2311m 32s

David Simon, Creator Of The Wire, On AI, Television and the WGA Strike

The Hollywood writers' strike has meant three weeks of late-night comedy and soap opera reruns for television fans. And for some fans, it might feel familiar. 15 years ago a Writers Guild strike lasted 100 days. And the effect of that strike was felt on shows from Saturday Night Live to Friday Night Lights. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with veteran TV writer David Simon about the strike and the changing business practices in the entertainment industry.And writer and cultural critic Emily St. James explains how the 2007 WGA strike may have saved the life of an iconic character in Breaking Bad.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/05/2311m 25s

Post Roe V. Wade, A Senator Wants to Make Birth Control Access Easier — and Affordable

A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recently recommended allowing birth control pills to be sold without a prescription.While more than 100 countries currently allow access to birth control pills over the counter, the U.S. is not one of them.Washington Senator Patty Murray says it's important that the pill is easily available - but also affordable.When - and if - that day comes and the pill is available over the counter, Murray wants to require insurance companies to cover the cost, free of charge.NPR's Sarah McCammon speaks with Senator Murray on the proposed legislation.And we hear the latest on the legal challenge to the abortion medication mifepristone, as attorneys gather in New Orleans at the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals to argue whether it should be removed from the market.NPR's Becky Sullivan and Selena Simmons-Duffin contributed reporting on the real-life experiences of individuals taking mifepristone.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/05/2312m 0s

How The Class Of 2023 Survived High School In A Pandemic

Across the country, members of the class of COVID are graduating: students who started high school before the pandemic, then spent the end of their freshman year and subsequent years navigating a new reality.And it was a very difficult path. According to many studies there has been considerable learning loss for K-12 students throughout the pandemic. And a recent study from researchers at Harvard and Stanford shows that the pandemic exacerbated existing inequalities.NPR's Sarah McCammon talks with three graduating high school seniors about how they made it through remote learning and coped with social isolation, and what they learned about themselves.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/05/2314m 52s

Parkinson's Threatened To Tear Michael J. Fox Down, But He Keeps On Getting Up

Few stars shined brighter in the 80's than Michael J Fox, and when the '90s rolled around, he was still one of the top names in show biz. But in 1991, after a night of heavy drinking, Fox noticed a tremor developing in his right pinky, an early symptom symptom of Parkinson's Disease, a diagnosis that would change the course of his life.Fox speaks to NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer, about his new documentary "Still", and how he found meaning in sharing his disease with the world. A note for our listeners, The Michael J. Fox Foundation is a supporter of NPR.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/05/2311m 11s

Florida Guts Trans Rights

At least fourteen states in the US have passed laws or policies that limit or restrict gender-affirming care for young people. Republican lawmakers claim the bills are meant to protect kids, but most medical groups say the treatment is safe, effective and potentially live-saving. Even so, Republican leaders like Texas governor Greg Abbot compare gender-affirming care to child abuse. Meanwhile trans people, parents, and their supporters have protested outside of Republican controlled statehouses across the country. Florida has targeted gender-affirming care more than most other states. And on Wednesday, Republican Governor Ron DeSantis signed the latest such bill into law. It's gotten to the point where some trans youth are leaving the state, rather than living under the ban.With reporting from WUFS's Stephanie Columbini and WFSU's Regan McCarthy.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/05/2310m 21s

Palestinian Family Stays Connected To Their Home Village, Long After Its Destruction

The state of Israel turned 75 this week. For many Israeli Jews, it's a moment of celebration - the nation was established as a homeland and refuge from the persecution they have faced throughout history.But in the war surrounding Israel's founding, the majority of Palestinian Arabs were permanently displaced from their homeland.Palestinians call the anniversary of Israel's founding "The Nakba", an Arabic word that translates to "the catastrophe." And many say the catastrophe is not history, it is ever present with the Israeli military occupation.NPR's Daniel Estrin tells the story of how one Palestinian family stays connected to their home village, decades after it was destroyed. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/05/2311m 17s

COVID Public Health Emergency Ends, But For ERs, There's Still No "New Normal"

Hospital emergency rooms saw some of the most painful scenes of the pandemic: beds filled to capacity, nurses and doctors risking sickness themselves, and patients dying without their loved ones.Today, ERs are still living with the consequences of the pandemic. They face staffing challenges, patients who delayed care and arrive sicker, and the lingering emotional strain.We visit an emergency room at a hospital outside Baltimore to hear how this moment looks to the doctors and nurses who work there.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/05/2311m 27s

Biden Administration Ends Title 42. What Now?

On Thursday, the Biden administration lifted title 42, a pandemic-era policy that shut down virtually all avenues for migrants to seek asylum in the US. In March of 2020 then president Trump invoked the rule as a public health emergency measure, allowing for the quick expulsion of migrants at the border. Now that Title 42 has been lifted, tens of thousands of migrants fleeing poverty, violence and political instability will be subjected to decades-old immigration laws that will allow them to stay in the country while their cases make their way through immigration court. But the process could cause a bottleneck at the border and strain federal, state and local government resources. How will the Biden administration respect asylum law and get control of the border, all while running a re-election campaign?Host Asma Khalid talks to White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez. Also NPR's Joel Rose provide a view from the southern border.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/05/2313m 42s

Breaking Down The Conflict in Sudan

Sudan's month-long conflict has been a story of broken ceasefires, constant clashes, mass displacement and an exodus of refugees. Now, a conflict that started in the capital has spread across the country. At the center of this conflict is a bitter rivalry between two generals. General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, the leader of the country's military, and his former deputy, Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, head of the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF). Sudan is Africa's third largest country, it shares a border with seven other countries in an already volatile region. The longer the conflict drags on, the greater the risk that it could erupt into a civil war - and the greater the danger that the conflict could spill over into surrounding countries.NPR's Asma Khalid speaks with Africa correspondent Emanuel Akinwotu, Middle East correspondent Aya Batrawy, and Michele Kelemen who covers the U.S. State Department. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/05/2314m 10s

Jordan Neely's Killing Turns Spotlight On New York's Crisis Of Homelessness

On Wednesday, after a week of demonstrations, New York City mayor Eric Adams made some of his most forceful comments about the death of Jordan Neely – a homeless Black man who died on a subway train last week when another passenger - Daniel Penny, who's white - held him in a chokehold. While Mayor Adams said that Neely should not have died, he did not call for Penny to be arrested and charged with Neely's death. On Friday, Daniel Penny was arraigned and criminally charged in a Manhattan courtroom.Jordan Neely's death raises difficult questions – about race, class, justice, and society's responsibility to care for those in need. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Milton Perez, head of the Homelessness Union of VOCAL-New York, on how New York is succeeding and failing at providing services for people who are living on the streets.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/05/2313m 43s

Dolly Parton's New Kid's Book Is A Story Of Perseverance and Standing Up To Bullies

In addition to being one of country music's biggest icons, Dolly Parton is also a prolific philanthropist. One of the most important causes she's dedicated herself to is child literacy, which she does through both the work of her non-profit organization the Imagination Library, as well as by being a writer of children's books.Parton newest book Billy the Kid Makes It Big! and she spoke with NPR's Melissa Block about writing for children, standing up to bullies, and why her program to deliver books to children meant so much to her dad. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/05/2310m 59s

How Parking Explains Everything

No matter how you measure it, there is a lot of parking in the U.S. According to some estimates there are as many as six parking spaces for every car. Put another way, America devotes more square footage to storing cars than housing people.Henry Grabar walks through how we got here, and what Americans have sacrificed on the altar of parking. From affordable housing to walkable neighborhoods to untold hours spent circling the block, hunting for a free spot. His new book is Paved Paradise: How Parking Explains the World.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/05/2311m 35s

Violence In Sudan Forces A Mother To Make Difficult Choice

Sudan's capital city Khartoum has been embroiled in a vicious urban battle between rival armies for nearly two weeks. With the country on the brink of collapse, Residents Muhjah Khateeb, and her son have to make the difficult decision to leave their home and everything they have, behind. We hear excerpts from the audio diary that Khateeb recorded as they undertook the harrowing journey.NPR's Emmanuel Akinwotu reported her story.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/05/2312m 3s

The Texas Lawyer Behind The So-Called "Bounty Hunter" Abortion Ban

Jonathan Mitchell devised the legal strategy behind SB 8, a near-total ban on abortion in Texas. That legislation pioneered the idea of allowing private citizens to file lawsuits against people they suspected of helping provide access to abortion. Mitchell is also involved in similar efforts by conservative ac