Fresh Air

Fresh Air

By NPR

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

Episodes

Best Of: B.J. Novak / Colson Whitehead

B.J. Novak played Ryan on 'The Office' and served as a writer and an executive producer of the series. His new FX/Hulu anthology show, 'The Premise,' deals with important cultural issues, like social justice, sex tapes, guns, and how we're shaped by social media. We talk about Novak's early stand-up and his friendship with Mindy Kaling.Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the reboots of 'The Wonder Years' and 'Scenes from a Marriage.' Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Colson Whitehead's new book, 'Harlem Shuffle,' is about a furniture store owner in Harlem whose sideline is fencing stolen goods. We talk about heists, how New York City has changed, and writing in the pandemic.
25/09/2148m 54s

Ray Charles On Country Music

Last month, Ray Charles was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. That may sound odd to you since he's such a pivotal figure in soul music and rhythm & blues. But his 1962 album, 'Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music,' became one of his best known records, and included two of his biggest hits, "I Can't Stop Loving You" and "You Don't Know Me." Charles spoke with Terry Gross in 1998. Also, John Powers reviews two thriller films: 'Wife of a Spy' and 'Azor.'
24/09/2146m 50s

The Facebook Files: What Leaked Documents Tell Us

'Wall Street Journal' reporter Jeff Horwitz says Facebook executives often choose to boost engagement at the expense of tackling problems like misinformation and mental health issues in teens that are rampant on their platforms.
23/09/2144m 47s

B.J. Novak

B.J. Novak played Ryan on 'The Office' and served as a writer and an executive producer of the series. His new FX/Hulu anthology show, 'The Premise,' deals with important cultural issues, like social justice, sex tapes, guns, and how we're shaped by social media. We talk about Novak's early stand-up, doing the MTV prank show 'Punk'd,' and his friendship with Mindy Kaling.
22/09/2145m 51s

Who Is Tech Billionaire & 'Contrarian' Peter Thiel?

Peter Thiel co-founded PayPal, invested early in Facebook, secretly funded the Hulk Hogan lawsuit that put the website Gawker out of business, and put more than a million dollars into Trump's campaign just after the appearance of the 'Access Hollywood' tapes. Thiel is also known for his interest in some unusual ideas, like independent city-states that float on the ocean, free from oppressive governments. We talk with 'Bloomsberg Businessweek' tech reporter Max Chafkin about his book on Thiel, 'The Contrarian.'Also, critic David Bianculli reviews two remakes of classic TV shows, 'The Wonder Years' and 'Scenes from a Marriage.'
21/09/2146m 0s

Evan Osnos On The 'Making Of America's Fury'

How did Americans become so divided? And how did we come so close to overturning the results of a presidential election? These are some of the questions at the heart of the new book 'Wildland,' by 'New Yorker' staff writer Evan Osnos. Osnos bookended his coverage of Trump by reporting on Trump's white nationalist support during his 2016 campaign and the attack on the capital by Trump supporters after the 2020 election. Osnos is also the author of a book about Joe Biden, and has profiled Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin. He'll offer some insights into Manchin and his complicated relationship with Biden, now that Manchin holds the key vote on infrastructure and voting rights legislation.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Fortnight in September,' by R.C. Sherriff.
20/09/2146m 29s

Best Of: Banjo Star Béla Fleck / When Animals Break The Law

Béla Fleck is one of the most famous banjo players in the world. He's taken that instrument out of its folk and bluegrass traditions to play pretty much any kind of music, including jazz and pop to classical and reggae. But bluegrass has always been where he comes from — and he's returned to it for his new album, 'My Bluegrass Heart.'Science writer Mary Roach ('Stiff', 'Gulp') explores scenarios where animals are the ones committing "crimes" — and how society deals with it. We talk about bear attacks, drunk elephants, and monkey thieves. Her new book is 'Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law.'
18/09/2140m 27s

Jean Smart / Remembering Newport Jazz & Folk Festival Founder George Wein

Jean Smart is nominated for two Emmys — one for her lead role in 'Hacks' and one for her supporting role in 'Mare of Easttown.' We're revisiting her May 2021 interview. Pioneering music impresario George Wein created the Newport Jazz Festival in 1954 and the Newport Folk Festival in 1959. He died Sept. 13. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2003.
17/09/2146m 17s

The Battle To Keep Local Journalism Alive

In the past 15 years, one in four newspapers has shuttered in the U.S. We talk with Art Cullen, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, editor, and co-owner of 'The Storm Lake Times' in the meatpacking town of Storm Lake, Iowa. He and his family are the subject of a new documentary, called 'Storm Lake,' about the challenges the industry is facing as news moves to free digital platforms and ad revenues dwindle. The film is opening in select theaters and be on PBS Nov. 15.
16/09/2145m 4s

Colson Whitehead On His Crime Novel 'Harlem Shuffle'

Whitehead's new novel 'Harlem Shuffle,' is about a furniture store owner in Harlem whose sideline is fencing stolen goods. Whitehead won a Pulitzer Prize for his novel 'The Underground Railroad,' about a 15-year-old enslaved girl who escapes a brutal Georgia plantation. The novel was adapted into a TV series that is now nominated for several Emmys. Whitehead won another Pulitzer for his next novel 'The Nickel Boys,' based on the story of the Dozier School for Boys, a segregated reform school notorious for its brutal punishment. We talk about heists, how New York City has changed, and writing in the pandemic Justin Chang reviews the film 'Blue Bayou.'
15/09/2146m 0s

The Weird World Of Animal Crimes

Science writer Mary Roach ('Stiff', 'Gulp') explores scenarios where animals are the ones committing "crimes" — and how society deals with it. We talk about bear attacks, drunk elephants, and monkey thieves. Her new book is 'Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law.' Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from saxophonist Joel Frahm.
14/09/2146m 35s

Banjo Player Béla Fleck

Béla Fleck is perhaps the most famous banjo player in the world. He's taken that instrument out of its folk and bluegrass traditions to play pretty much any kind of music: from jazz and pop to classical and reggae. But bluegrass has always been where he comes from — and he's returned to it for his new album, 'My Bluegrass Heart.' He's dedicated it to two musical heroes that died in the last year: Chick Corea and Tony Rice. Fleck joins Sam Briger to play his banjo, and talk about returning to his roots; his trip to Africa, the continent of the banjo's origin; and meeting his father for the first time in his 40s. Ken Tucker reviews, 'Dreaming of You,' a collection of songs by actor Karen Black, best known for 'Easy Rider' and 'Five Easy Pieces.' Black died in 2013.
13/09/2148m 26s

Best Of: Michael K. Williams / Poet Laureate Joy Harjo

Michael K. Williams was best known for playing Omar on 'The Wire' and Chalky White on 'Boardwalk Empire.' He died Sept. 6 of a suspected drug overdose. In 2008, Williams told Terry Gross the story behind the scar on his face and his background in dance. In 2016, he reflected on his lucky breaks and what it was like to leave Omar behind. "When 'The Wire' and the character of Omar ended, I had zero tools, personally speaking, in how to deal with letting that go. ... I didn't equip myself with the tools of how to wash that off my psyche." Maureen Corrigan reviews Sally Rooney's new novel, 'Beautiful World, Where Are You.' Also, we hear from U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo. She's the first Native American appointed to the position. She has a new memoir, 'Poet Warrior,' that's in part about her family's history. She's a member of the Muskogee (Creek) Nation.
11/09/2149m 38s

The Rise And Fall Of Osama Bin Laden

As the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks approaches, a new biography traces Osama bin Laden's path from a shy, religious teenager to the leader of a global jihadist group dedicated to mass murder. Journalist Peter Bergen, who met the al-Qaida leader in 1997, says that a series of events kept pushing bin Laden "further and further down the path of radicalization." We also talk about conditions in Afghanistan after the U.S. troop withdrawal, and the chances that terrorist organizations will flourish there as al-Qaida did in the '90s. Bergen's new book is 'The Rise and Fall of Osama bin Laden.'Also, Justin Chang reviews the new Paul Schrader film 'The Card Counter,' starring Oscar Isaac and Tiffany Haddish.
10/09/2146m 6s

SCOTUS & The Future Of Roe V. Wade

Ian Millhiser covers the Supreme Court for Vox. He says the Court's decision to uphold the recent Texas abortion law was a generational victory for abortion opponents: "They've spent many decades working for this moment."Maureen Corrigan reviews Sally Rooney's new novel, 'Beautiful World, Where Are You.'
09/09/2147m 4s

Remembering Michael K. Williams

Williams was best known for playing Omar on 'The Wire' and Chalky White on 'Boardwalk Empire.' In 2008, Williams told Terry Gross the story behind the scar on his face and his background in dance. In 2016, he reflected on his lucky breaks and what it was like to leave Omar behind. "When 'The Wire' and the character of Omar ended, I had zero tools, personally speaking, in how to deal with letting that go. ... I didn't equip myself with the tools of how to wash that off my psyche." Williams died Sept. 6 of a suspected drug overdose.Also, critic David Bianculli reviews the new reboot of Doogie Howser, M.D.
08/09/2147m 4s

Poet Laureate Joy Harjo / Historian Tiya Miles

The nation's first Native American poet laureate has a new memoir in which she tells her own story — as well as the story of her sixth-generation grandfather, who was forced from his land in the Trail of Tears. It's called 'Poet Warrior.' "If my work does nothing else, when I get to the end of my life, I want Native peoples to be seen as human beings," she says.Historian Tiya Miles tells the story of an enslaved woman who, upon hearing that her child was being sold off, hastily packed her a cotton sack with a few personal items. That cotton bag remained in the child's possession and was passed on from one generation to the next, and at one point in the early 1900s, was inscribed with the family's tale. Eventually it ended up at the National Museum of African American History. Miles joins contributor Arun Venugopal to talk about what this story tell us about slavery. Her book is 'All That She Carried.'
07/09/2147m 42s

Mavis Staples / Gladys Knight

We conclude our Summer of Soul series with Mavis Staples and Gladys Knight, two performers featured in Questlove's documentary about the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival. As a teenager, Mavis Staples performed with her family in the Staple Singers, led by her father, "Pops" Staples. By the late '50s, the Staple Singers was one of the most popular gospel groups in the country. In the early '70s, they crossed over to the top of the pop charts.Gladys Knight's Motown hits with the Pips included "I heard it Through the Grapevine," "Neither One of Us," and "The End of Our Road." She had one of her biggest hits after leaving Motown: "Midnight Train to Georgia."
06/09/2148m 33s

Best Of: Sandra Oh / Aretha Franklin

Sandra Oh stars in the new comedy series 'The Chair,' as the newly appointed chair of the English department at a prestigious college-- the first woman and first person of color to hold the position. Oh co-starred in Grey's Anatomy and is currently shooting the fourth and final season of the spy thriller series 'Killing Eve.' Also, we'll listen to our 1999 interview with Aretha Franklin. She's portrayed by Jennifer Hudson in the new biopic 'Respect.' And Justin Chang reviews 'Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.' It's the first Marvel movie to feature an Asian superhero.
04/09/2149m 10s

Abbey Lincoln / Max Roach

We're continuing our "Summer of Soul" series with archival interviews with singer Abbey Lincoln and drummer Max Roach. Both were featured in the Questlove documentary about the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival. Abbey Lincoln started out as a seductive nightclub singer in the 1950s, but after meeting Max Roach, she started performing in a style influenced by modern jazz and the civil rights movement. She evolved into an introspective singer who wrote achingly beautiful songs about love and life. Max Roach was one of the inventors of modern jazz drumming. He helped formulate the language of bebop. In the early 1960s, he recorded some of the first jazz music inspired by the Civil Rights Movement.Also, John Powers reviews the PBS Masterpiece series 'Guilt.'
03/09/2153m 50s

B.B. King / Hugh Masekela

We're revisiting archival interviews with some of the musicians featured in the documentary 'Summer of Soul.' The film is about the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, a series of free concerts which reflected changes in Black culture and politics. Today we'll hear our 1996 interviews with B.B. King, perhaps the most famous blues singer and guitarist of his generation, and our 1988 interview with Hugh Masekela, the South African trumpeter who was described in the 'New York Times' as a symbol of South Africa's anti-apartheid movement, even as he spent three decades in exile.
03/09/2147m 16s

Questlove Revives "Black Woodstock" With 'Summer Of Soul'

Today we begin our series Summer of Soul, featuring interviews from our archive with some of the performers showcased in the documentary 'Summer of Soul,' about the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival. The festival was a series of six concerts that reflected changes in Black music, culture and politics. Over the next few days, we'll hear interviews from our archive with B.B. King, Hugh Masekela, Gladys Knight, Mavis Staples, Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln. We start with Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, who directed the documentary. Questlove founded the band The Roots, the house band of 'The Tonight Show' and is known for his encyclopedic knowledge of hip-hop, funk, soul and R&B. Justin Chang reviews 'Shang-Chi,' Marvel's first superhero film starring an Asian lead.
01/09/2145m 29s

Celebrating Aretha Franklin, Queen Of Soul

To mark the debut of the biopic 'RESPECT,' we listen back to archival interviews with Aretha, as well as with Atlantic Records producer Jerry Wexler, and songwriter Dan Penn, who co-wrote "Do Right Woman." We'll hear about Aretha's upbringing in the church, the iconic "sock-it-to-me's" in Respect, and recording at Muscle Shoals.
31/08/2147m 24s

Sandra Oh

Oh stars as chair of the English department at a prestigious university in the Netflix series 'The Chair.' The 'Grey's Anatomy' co-star joined us to talk about her upbringing in Canada, breaking barriers for Asian women in Hollywood, and the sexual tension between her 'Killing Eve' character and the psychopath Villanelle. TV critic David Bianculli shares his first impressions of the Hulu comedy 'Only Murders in the Building,' starring Martin Short, Steve Martin and Selena Gomez as amateur sleuths.
30/08/2146m 11s

Best Of: 'Schmigadoon!' Co-Creator / How Dopamine Works

Cinco Paul loves musicals — unlike his long-time writing partner, Ken Daurio, with whom he created the new Apple TV+ satire, 'Schmigadoon!' Their series centers on a couple who become trapped in a musical town. We talk with Paul about what inspired the series. Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'CODA.' Psychiatrist Dr. Anna Lembke's new book, 'Dopamine Nation,' explores the brain's connection between pleasure and pain. It also helps explain addictions — not just to drugs and alcohol, but also to food, sex and smart phones.
28/08/2150m 16s

Remembering Chuck Close, Joe Galloway, Charlie Watts

We remember an artist, a journalist and a musician, each of whom made significant contributions to their respective fields: Known for his giant hyper-realist paintings of faces, Chuck Close was one of the leading artists of his generation. After a stroke left him partially paralyzed, he was able to keep painting. Former war correspondent Joe Galloway was the only civilian to be awarded the Medal of Valor in the Vietnam War. And Charlie Watts, the drummer for the Rolling Stones, who helped define rock 'n' roll.
27/08/2147m 9s

CNN's Clarissa Ward On The Taliban & Afghan Women

Clarissa Ward, CNN's chief international correspondent, spent 3 weeks in Afghanistan, first with the Afghan military in Kandahar, just before it fell; then in Ghazni province, in territory that was taken over by the Taliban, and in Kabul, where the Taliban were celebrating their victory. After reporting on the chaos and danger at the airport, as thousands of people tried to escape on U.S. military flights, she got on an Air Force C-17 to Doha, Qatar, along with hundreds of evacuees. We'll talk about what she learned and what she experienced.
26/08/2146m 34s

The Neuroscience Of Pleasure, Pain And Addiction

Psychiatrist Dr. Anna Lembke's new book, 'Dopamine Nation,' explores the brain's connection between pleasure and pain. It also helps explain addictions — not just to drugs and alcohol, but also to food, sex and smart phones. "Living in this modern age is very challenging," Lembke says. "We're now having to cope with: How do I live in a world in which everything is provided? And if I consume too much of it — which my reflexes compel me to do — I'm going to be even more unhappy."Maureen Corrigan reviews Yoon Choi's collection of stories 'Skinship.'
25/08/2146m 31s

The Story Of Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher

In 2018, a decorated U.S. Navy SEAL was arrested and accused of some shocking crimes. Investigators said, while Eddie Gallagher was leading a platoon of these elite commandos in the battle to retake Mosul, Iraq from ISIS, he stabbed a defenseless prisoner to death. The accusations came from SEALs in Gallagher's own platoon, who also said he was known for taking shots at civilians from his sniper's nest, and killing at least two. We talk with 'New York Times' correspondent Dave Philipps, who covered Gallagher's trial and interviewed many of the Navy SEALs who leveled the accusations against Gallagher. His new book is 'Alpha: Eddie Gallagher and the War for the Soul of the Navy SEALs.'
24/08/2146m 48s

'Schmigadoon!' Songwriter & Co-Creator Cinco Paul

Cinco Paul loves musicals — unlike his long-time writing partner, Ken Daurio, with whom he created the new Apple TV+ satire, 'Schmigadoon!' Their series centers on a couple who become trapped in a musical town. Paul talks about his songwriting process and how the Marx Brothers inspired him. Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'CODA.'
23/08/2145m 56s

Best Of: Billie Jean King / Kenan Thompson

Tennis legend Billie Jean King is known for winning a record 20 Wimbledon titles and defeating Bobby Riggs in the 1973 "Battle of the Sexes." But she's also remembered for taking on the tennis establishment and fighting for recognition and pay for women players, a high-risk undertaking that opened doors for generations of women that followed. Her new book is 'All In: An Autobiography.'TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Nine Perfect Strangers' on Hulu. Kenan Thompson joined the 'SNL' cast in 2003, making him the longest-running cast member on the show. We'll talk about his sitcom 'Kenan' and some of his more memorable 'SNL' sketches.
21/08/2150m 0s

Tony Bennett

Tony Bennett, the singer Frank Sinatra called "the best in the business," is retiring from performing at the age of 95, after eight decades on stage and in clubs. Earlier this year it was announced he had Alzheimer's disease, diagnosed five years earlier; but he'd continued to perform. His last performance was just two weeks ago, with Lady Gaga, in sold-out shows at Radio City Music Hall in New York. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1982, 1991, and 1998.
20/08/2148m 11s

America's Failed Mission In Afghanistan: Intentions & Mistakes

The stunning collapse of the government of Afghanistan following President Biden's decision to remove U.S. troops from the country has led to chaotic scenes throughout Afghanistan, including at the airport in Kabul, where many are desperate to leave. It has also left countless Afghans wondering what the future holds as the Taliban takes control of the country. "They're frightened. They don't know what awaits them. ... It's devastating. It's a country that deserved better," 'New Yorker' staff writer Steve Coll says.
19/08/2146m 32s

Who Is Doing Your Dirty Work?

Author Eyal Press calls them "jobs of last resort" — slaughtering animals, working in prisons, engaging in remote drone combat — society needs them, but doesn't want to talk about them. Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Dream Girl,' a new suspense-thriller novel from Laura Lippman.
18/08/2146m 33s

Tennis Legend Billie Jean King

King is known for winning a record 20 Wimbledon titles and defeating Bobby Riggs in the 1973 "Battle of the Sexes." But she's also remembered for taking on the tennis establishment and fighting for recognition and pay for women players, a high-risk undertaking that opened doors for generations of women that followed. In a new memoir, King describes her battles for equity and inclusion in the game, becoming an activist for women's and LGBTQ rights, and some difficult moments in personal life, including having a closeted lesbian relationship outed in a lawsuit. Her new book is 'All In: An Autobiography.'Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews a new film about Broadway, from 1959 through the '80s.
17/08/2145m 3s

Why America's Colleges Have Always Been Unequal

In his new book, 'The State Must Provide,' Adam Harris explains how slavery, segregation and continuing racism prevented or stymied Black education. He examines some of the turning points when higher education could have been made equal and centuries of discrimination could have been remedied. He also writes about the important role Historically Black Colleges and Universities have played, and the reasons why they have been underfunded. Harris went to an HBCU, Alabama A&M University. He's now a staff writer at 'The Atlantic.'
16/08/2146m 47s

Best Of: Sondheim Collaborator James Lapine / SNL's Cecily Strong

Lapine collaborated with Stephen Sondheim to create three musicals — 'Sunday in the Park with George,' 'Into the Woods' and 'Passion.' Lapine's new book is about the making-of 'Sunday in the Park' called 'Putting it Together.' It's based on Lapine's memories, as well as interviews with Sondheim, and members of the cast and crew.Then, Ken Tucker reviews a new posthumously released Prince album.Finally, Strong is nominated for an Emmy for 'Saturday Night Live.' She also stars in the new show 'Schmigadoon,' about a couple that ends up trapped in a town where life is a musical and the townspeople frequently burst into song. Her new memoir is about the depression, anxiety, and grief she experienced during the first months of the pandemic.
14/08/2150m 31s

Remembering Longtime NPR Host Neal Conan

Conan, who died Aug. 10, worked at NPR for 36 years, as a reporter, executive producer of 'All Things Considered' and host of 'Talk of the Nation.' He spoke with Terry Gross in 2002. Also, Justin Chang reviews the new Aretha Franklin biopic 'Respect.'And Ken Tucker shares his songs of the summer.
13/08/2148m 26s

Investigating Trump's Efforts To Subvert The Election Results

'New York Times' reporter Katie Benner discusses the latest revelations about how former President Donald Trump pressured the Justice Department to undermine the results of the 2020 election. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the debut album by singer Samara Joy.
12/08/2147m 31s

Kenan Thompson On 'SNL' And 'Kenan'

Thompson is currently nominated for two Emmys — one for starring in his sitcom 'Kenan,' and another for 'Saturday Night Live.' He's been a cast member on 'SNL' since 2003, which makes him the performer with the longest tenure in the history of the show. Thompson talks about some of his most memorable 'SNL' sketches. He also talks about playing the Bill Cosby character Fat Albert in a 2004 movie, and later feeling disappointed by Cosby. "He was a prime example of a career that I wanted to have," Thompson says. "I felt super betrayed."Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Agatha Of Little Neon,' a novel about nuns that she calls "sharp and, by turns, melancholy and wry."
11/08/2146m 44s

Trump Impeachment Key Witness Alexander Vindman

The retired Army officer who testified about President Trump's call to the president of Ukraine, talks about the experience and the price he paid. Vindman's new memoir is 'Here, Right Matters: An American Story.'Also, John Powers reviews the novel 'Bullet Train,' a thriller about five assassins boarding the same train.
10/08/2147m 19s

Cecily Strong On 'SNL,' 'Schmigadoon,' And Her New Memoir

Strong is nominated for an Emmy for 'Saturday Night Live.' She also stars in the new show 'Schmigadoon,' about a couple that ends up trapped in a town where life is a musical and the townspeople frequently burst into song. Her new memoir is about the depression, anxiety, and grief she experienced during the first months of the pandemic. "I just kept thinking, all the work I've done on myself with anxiety, I'm going to lose it all because of this," she says. Also, Ken Tucker reviews a new posthumously released Prince album.
09/08/2145m 4s

Best Of: Writer Tarell Alvin McCraney / Osama Bin Laden Biographer

After winning an Oscar for co-writing the film 'Moonlight,' McCraney says he received a lot of opportunities, many of which he turned down. "Some of it had to do with waiting for the other shoe to drop," he says. He's now the creator of the TV series 'David Makes Man,' which is in its second season on OWN. The series begins with a Miami boy whose mother struggles with addiction — and has echoes of McCraney's own childhood.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Anthony Veasna So's posthumously published short story collection 'Afterparties.'And as the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks approaches, a new biography traces Osama bin Laden's path from a shy, religious teenager to the leader of a global jihadist group dedicated to mass murder. Journalist Peter Bergen, who met the al-Qaida leader in 1997, says that a series of events kept pushing bin Laden "further and further down the path of radicalization." Bergen's new book is 'The Rise and Fall of Osama bin Laden.'
07/08/2149m 58s

'The Hiroshima Cover-Up'

76 years ago, the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima. Historian Lesley M.M. Blume's book, 'Fallout,' tells the story of John Hersey, the young journalist whose on-the-ground reporting in Hiroshima exposed the world to the devastation of nuclear weapons. "Hersey had seen everything from that point, from combat to concentration camps," Blume says. "But he later said that nothing prepared him for what he saw in Hiroshima."Also, we remember Ron Popeil, the inventor and TV pitchman whose products included the Veg-O-Matic, Mr. Microphone, and the smokeless ashtray.
06/08/2147m 7s

The 'Dark Money' Effort To Win Elections 'At All Costs'

Jane Mayer's latest investigation for 'The New Yorker' is about rich and powerful conservative groups that are exploiting Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud in order to promote alterations in the way that ballots are cast and counted. "The 2020 election is long since over in most people's minds, and settled and decided," Mayer says. "But these groups are doubling down in the money they're putting into and the effort they're putting into trying to push the idea of fraud — potentially in order to challenge the 2022 midterms, and the 2024 election."Also, Justin Chang reviews the new movie musical 'Annette' starring Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard, which he calls "strange and singular."
05/08/2146m 13s

Inside Osama Bin Laden's Final Hideout

As the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks approaches, a new biography traces Osama bin Laden's path from a shy, religious teenager to the leader of a global jihadist group dedicated to mass murder. Journalist Peter Bergen, who met the al-Qaida leader in 1997, says that a series of events kept pushing bin Laden "further and further down the path of radicalization." Bergen's new book is 'The Rise and Fall of Osama bin Laden.'
04/08/2146m 40s

Behind-The-Scenes Stories Of Working With Sondheim

James Lapine collaborated with Stephen Sondheim to create three musicals — 'Sunday in the Park with George,' 'Into the Woods,' and 'Passion.' "We're very, very different," Lapine says. "I tend to jump into the deep end of things and figure out how to swim. And Steve is very analytical and doesn't start writing until he knows exactly where he's going." Lapine has written a new book about the making-of 'Sunday in the Park' called 'Putting it Together.' It's based on Lapine's memories, as well as interviews with Sondheim, and members of the cast and crew.
03/08/2144m 29s

Pulitzer Prize-Winner Katori Hall

Hall is the writer and a producer of 'Tina: The Tina Turner Musical.' She won a Pulitzer Prize for her play 'The Hot Wing King.' She's also the creator of 'P-Valley,' a breakout show on Starz about the women working in a fictional Mississippi strip club. "Any time I get an opportunity to lay my hands on a Black woman's story, I just want to make sure that she is fully rendered," Hall tells 'Fresh Air' guest interviewer and 'Atlantic' staff writer Hannah Giorgis. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Anthony Veasna So's posthumously published short story collection 'Afterparties.'
02/08/2147m 5s

Best Of: Jad Abumrad / Public Health Expert Dr. Leana Wen

Abumrad is the creator of the hit public radio series 'RadioLab.' The new 'RadioLab' miniseries, 'The Vanishing of Harry Pace,' is about the man who co-founded a publication with WEB DuBois, founded the first Black-owned record company, helped desegregate a Chicago neighborhood — and then kind of disappeared. Abumrad also co-reported the podcast miniseries 'Dolly Parton's America.'Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Wayward' by Dana Spiotta.Finally, Dr. Wen has commented extensively on CNN and in her 'Washington Post' column about COVID-19 and the precautions we need to take. She emigrated from China as a child and relied on the public health system while she had severe asthma. She talks about her new memoir called 'Lifelines.'
31/07/2148m 53s

Actor Courtney B. Vance / Remembering Bob Moses

Vance is nominated for an Emmy for his guest appearance in the HBO series 'Lovecraft Country.' He played the charismatic and show-stopping attorney Johnnie Cochran in 'The People v. O.J. Simpson.' More recently, he played Aretha Franklin's father, Rev. C.L Franklin, in 'Genius: Aretha.'Also, John Powers reviews a new edition of a 1963 novel by black reporter William Gardner Smith.Then, we remember pioneering civil rights activist Bob Moses. He died Sunday at age 86. Finally, Kevin Whitehead reviews two very different new albums by outstanding tenor saxophonists.
30/07/2147m 39s

Leaks Reveal Spyware Meant To Track Criminals Targeted Activists Instead

'Washington Post' reporter Craig Timberg explains how military-grade spyware licensed to governments and police departments has infiltrated the iPhones of journalists, activists and others. "It takes a story like this to help people understand how deeply enmeshed these tiny little computers have gotten into our lives," Timberg says. "I still carry my iPhone everywhere I go ... And the reality of that is that every time I do that, I'm exposing not just myself, but everyone I deal with to the possibility of spying by governments all over the world."Also, Justin Chang reviews 'The Green Knight' starring Dev Patel.
29/07/2145m 57s

'Moonlight' Writer Tarell Alvin McCraney

After winning an Oscar for co-writing the film 'Moonlight,' McCraney says he received a lot of opportunities, many of which he turned down. "Some of it had to do with waiting for the other shoe to drop," he says. He's now the creator of the TV series 'David Makes Man,' which is in its second season on OWN. The series begins with a Miami boy whose mother struggles with addiction — and has echoes of McCraney's own childhood.
28/07/2146m 13s

Public Health Expert Dr. Leana Wen On COVID & Mandates

Dr. Wen is an emergency physician, CNN Health Analyst and former Baltimore Health Commissioner. We talk about mask and vaccine mandates, the return to school and work, and the Delta variant. "Unfortunately, we're in a situation now where the vaccinated are having to pay the price for the actions of the unvaccinated," she says. Wen emigrated from China as a child and relied on the public health system while she had severe asthma. She has a new memoir called 'Lifelines.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Wayward' by Dana Spiotta.
27/07/2146m 49s

Jad Abumrad

Abumrad is the creator of the hit public radio series RadioLab. The show started off as a series about science-related mysteries, but now it investigates all kinds of stories. The new RadioLab miniseries, 'The Vanishing of Harry Pace,' is about the man who co-founded a publication with WEB DuBois, co-wrote St. Louis Blues with WC Handy, founded the first Black-owned record company, helped desegregate a Chicago neighborhood — and then kind of disappeared. Abumrad also co-reported the podcast miniseries 'Dolly Parton's America,' which uses her life and music to examine larger issues like America's cultural divide.
26/07/2145m 46s

Best Of: Questlove / Growing Up In A Utopian Community

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson talks about directing the new film 'Summer of Soul,' documenting the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival. It features performances by Nina Simone, Stevie Wonder, Mahalia Jackson and more, and reflects on the cultural and political changes of the time. We'll also talk about big changes in Questlove's life. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead remembers electric guitarists George Barnes and Mary Osborne, who were born 100 years ago.Writer Akash Kapur reflects on growing up in a Utopian community founded in India 1968. While living in the U.S., he connected with a woman who also grew up in that community. They married and returned there, to better understand the social tumult of their childhood, and to learn more about the mysterious circumstances surrounding her parents' deaths. His book is 'Better to Have Gone.'
24/07/2149m 53s

Hugh Grant On 'The Undoing'

Hugh Grant has been nominated for an Emmy for his role in the HBO miniseries 'The Undoing,' in which he played an adulterous doctor suspected of murder. Grant got his start in romcoms, but lately he's been getting darker roles. "It's alarming how many pretty unpleasant narcissists I've played or been offered in the last six or seven years. But It's certainly been a blessed relief after having to be Mr. Nice Guy for so many years," he says. Ken Tucker reviews two new albums from Australia and David Bianculli reviews the second season of 'Ted Lasso' on Apple TV+.
23/07/2147m 51s

How GOP State Legislatures Are Remaking The U.S.

Journalist Ron Brownstein says Republican-controlled state legislatures are taking a sharp right turn, in a conscious backlash against unified Democratic control of Congress. These states are not only passing voting rights restrictions, they're passing a torrent of other conservative bills that reflect the cultural and racial priorities of Trump's base. Brownstein is a senior editor at 'The Atlantic' and a senior political analyst at CNN. His latest book is called 'Rock Me on the Water: 1974 - The Year Los Angeles Transformed Movies, Music, Television and Politics.'Justin Chang reviews the South Korean film 'The Woman Who Ran.'
22/07/2146m 0s

Questlove On 'Summer of Soul'

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson is coming out of the pandemic a changed man. The co-founder of the Roots and the music director for 'The Tonight Show' did something he never thought he'd do — he bought a farm in upstate New York. "I thought chaos was the only way that I could exist. But now I embrace quiet and I can hear myself think." Now he's venturing into a new arena: He's made his directorial debut with the documentary 'Summer of Soul,' which tells the story of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, known as the "Black Woodstock."
21/07/2147m 8s

Reopening The Jeffrey Epstein Investigation

Long after Jeffrey Epstein got a lenient sentence for sexual abuse of minors, 'Miami Herald' reporter Julie K. Brown identified 80 women who said they survived his abuse. "There is nothing that was more powerful than the words of the women talking about this themselves," she says. Her book is 'Perversion of Justice.'
20/07/2147m 17s

Growing Up In A Utopian Community

Memoirist Akash Kapur was raised in an intentional community in India, then moved to the U.S. at age 16. He's seen the idealism of people trying to remake human society and renounce materialism. He's also seen how idealism and spirituality can turn into zealotry--and how individuals can become victims of their own search for perfection. Kapur writes about the reality of utopian communities in 'Better to Have Gone: Love, Death, and the Quest for Utopia in Auroville.'Kevin Whitehead reviews a new Bill Evans anthology.
19/07/2146m 12s

Best Of: 'Startup Wife' Author Tahmima Anam / MLB Pitcher C.C. Sabathia

Tahmima Anam's new novel is about a married couple, Cyrus and Asha, who found a social media platform that customizes ceremonies and rituals for people who aren't religious. The platform's success turns the husband into a messiah figure — even though it was his wife who designed it. We talk with Amam about how her real life boardroom experience helped inspire the novel.TV critic David Bianculli reviews the comedy series 'Schmigadoon!' Six-time All Star C.C. Sabathia pitched for the Yankees and the Indians over the course of his 19-year career. He also struggled with alcoholism. Sabathia reflects on baseball and sobriety in the memoir, 'Till the End.'
17/07/2149m 57s

Anthony Bourdain, 'Roadrunner'

We revisit our 2016 interview with culinary icon Anthony Bourdain. He hosted the CNN series 'Parts Unknown' which took audiences to countries all over the world. He spoke with 'Fresh Air' about his breakout book, 'Kitchen Confidential,' and why he didn't think of himself as a journalist. Bourdain died in 2018 by suicide while filming in France. 'Roadrunner,' a new documentary about his life and tragic death, is now in theaters.TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Schmigadoon!' starring Cecily Strong of 'SNL.'
16/07/2146m 57s

Our Renewable Energy Future

'New York Times' reporter Ivan Penn unpacks the debate over infrastructure: Do we go big and fund huge wind and solar farms with new transmission lines, or go local, with rooftop solar panels, batteries and micro-grids? Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews a reprint of Gloria Naylor's landmark novel, 'The Women of Brewster Place.'
15/07/2146m 51s

MLB Pitcher C.C. Sabathia

The six-time All Star pitched for the Yankees and the Indians over the course of his 19-year career. He also struggled with alcoholism. Sabathia reflects on baseball and sobriety in the memoir, 'Till the End.' Justin Chang shares his favorite picks from the Cannes Film Festival, which he screened from L.A. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead celebrates the centennial of two early electric guitarists, George Barnes and Mary Osborne.
14/07/2146m 44s

The 'Ugly Truth' About Facebook

In their new book, 'New York Times' reporters Cecilia Kang and Sheera Frenkel examine the problems Facebook created and the problems it's facing. We talk about disinformation, hate speech, and how CEO Mark Zuckerberg knew the "Stop the Steal" private groups were planning a riot on the capitol but decided against warning the president. "Facebook knew the potential for explosive violence was very real [on Jan 6]," Kang says.
13/07/2146m 15s

'Startup Wife' Author Satirizes Tech Culture & Sexism

Tahmima Anam's new novel is about a married couple, Cyrus and Asha, who found a tech startup. It's a social media platform that customizes ceremonies and rituals for people who aren't religious. The platform's success turns the husband into a messiah figure — even though it was his wife who designed it. We talk with Amam about how her real life boardroom experience helped inspire the novel, the allure of rituals, and her childhood growing up in many different countries.
12/07/2146m 57s

Best Of: Writer Ashley C. Ford / Flight Attendant-Turned-Author T.J. Newman

Ashley C. Ford's father was incarcerated when she was too young to remember, and she was 30 when he got out. For many of those years, no one told her what his crime was. When she was in her teens, not longer after she'd been raped by a boyfriend, she was shocked to learn her father had been convicted of rape. Her memoir is 'Somebody's Daughter.'Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly released recording of a 1969 Sarah Vaughan concert.Also, we'll hear from former flight attendant T.J. Newman. Her 10 years working crowded cabins informed her debut novel, 'Falling.' It's a thriller about a flight from LA to New York, in which the pilot learns a terrorist plans to kill his family unless he crashes his plane.
10/07/2149m 45s

Mindy Kaling On 'Never Have I Ever'

Kaling's Netflix show, 'Never Have I Ever,' is based on her own experiences as a nerdy, confident teen who pined for a boyfriend. The second season drops next week. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2020 about the series, how being a diversity hire at 'The Office' inspired her movie 'Late Night,' and how the grief of losing a parent has impacted her as a mother. TV critic David Bianculli reviews the music documentaries 'Summer of Soul' and 'McCartney 3-2-1.'
09/07/2147m 4s

Freeing An Innocent Man From Prison

When Yutico Briley was 19 years old, he was sentenced to 60 years in prison for an armed robbery he said he didn't commit. After serving 7 years of his sentence, Briley heard criminal justice reporter Emily Bazelon on 'Fresh Air' and wrote to her about his case. Bazelon started corresponding with him and doing some research, and found flaws in his defense and trial representative of larger problems in the justice system. Her sister Lara Bazelon, a lawyer, decided to take Briley's case and file for an appeal. Lara won the appeal and his exoneration. Emily Bazelon's article about Briley is the cover story of this week's 'New York Times Magazine.' We'll hear from Emily Bazelon and Yutico Briley.
08/07/2146m 58s

Sex & Censorship In The Gilded Age

The Comstock Act, which passed in 1873, virtually outlawed contraception. In 'The Man Who Hated Women,' author Amy Sohn writes about the man behind the law — and the women prosecuted under it. John Powers reviews the detective drama 'Unforgotten' on PBS.
07/07/2146m 50s

Former Flight Attendant Shares Stories From The Sky

T.J. Newman's new book, 'Falling,' is a thriller about a hijacking on a commercial flight. The pilot is told he must crash the plane or his family on the ground will be killed. We talk with Newman about her book and about her 10 years in the skies — from pet peeves to scary situations. "If all you see us do is a beverage service, that's a great day at work because that means that we're not actually doing our job, because we have training in everything from hazmat to hijackings to medical situations to turbulence to mechanical issues," she says. Also, podcast critic Nick Quah reviews Audible's comedy fiction podcast 'Hot White Heist,' starring SNL's Bowen Yang.
06/07/2147m 17s

Bandleader Jon Batiste

Batiste is the bandleader of 'The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.' He joins us from his home piano where he plays music he wrote for the Pixar movie 'Soul' and songs from his album 'We Are.' We'll also hear his rendition of 'The Star Spangled Banner' and the Black national anthem, "Lift Every Voice."
05/07/2147m 39s

Best Of: Uzo Aduba / Desus & Mero

Uzo Aduba's breakout role was as Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" Warren in the Netflix series about a women's prison, 'Orange is the New Black.' Now she stars in the HBO reboot of 'In Treatment,' as therapist Dr. Brooke Taylor. We'll talk about the 180 degree change between the two roles.Ken Tucker reviews new albums by Chrissie Hynde singing Dylan songs and Shannon McNally doing songs associated with Waylon Jennings. Desus Nice and The Kid Mero started out doing comedy together on Twitter, then created the 'Bodega Boys' podcast. Their comedy series on Showtime is now in its third season. We talk about growing up in the Bronx in the '80s and '90s, graffiti, hip-hop and the odd jobs that shaped them.
03/07/2150m 5s

Bruce Springsteen Returns To Broadway

"The Boss" spoke with Terry Gross at his New Jersey home studio in 2016 about masculinity, depression, and wishing he was his stage persona. His one-man show, 'Springsteen on Broadway,' returned to Broadway this week. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews Steven Soderbergh's 'No Sudden Move,' starring Don Cheadle and Benicio del Toro.
02/07/2148m 46s

How A Former Spy Trained Conservatives To Infiltrate Progressive Groups

'NYT' reporter Adam Goldman describes an undercover effort, led by an avid Trump supporter, that trained conservatives in espionage techniques and sent them to dig up dirt on progressives. Some operations were aimed at discrediting perceived enemies of Trump when he was president, including his national security advisor, H.R. McMaster.Also rock critic Ken Tucker reviews new songs by veteran artists Tom Jones, Jackson Browne and John Mayer.
01/07/2145m 16s

Global Sanitation & Transforming The Toilet

The United Nations estimates that 4.2 billion people — more than half of the world's population — live without any access to safely managed sanitation. No septic systems. No waste treatment plants. In 'Pipe Dreams,' Chelsea Wald examines the health issues related to sanitation and looks at global efforts to manage human waste, including turning it into fuel and fertilizer.Also, John Powers reviews the novel 'The Netanyahus,' by Joshua Cohen, and Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly released 1969 concert recording by Sarah Vaughan.
30/06/2146m 44s

Watergate, The Tapes & The Fall Of The Nixon White House

Historian and author Michael Dobbs reconstructs how the scandal gradually engulfed more administration officials, with operatives turning on each other — and eventually the president. We'll talk about what led to Nixon's downfall and why there are more tapes of Nixon than of any other president. Dobbs' book is 'King Richard.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli shares his thoughts on Conan O'Brien's farewell to his late night show, as he moves to HBO Max for a variety show.
29/06/2146m 9s

Uzo Aduba

Aduba's breakout role was as Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" Warren in the Netflix series about a women's prison, 'Orange is the New Black.' Now she stars in the HBO reboot of 'In Treatment,' as therapist Dr. Brooke Taylor. We talk about the 180 degree change between the two roles, colorism in Hollywood, and the significance of her full Nigerian name — Uzoamaka Nwanneka Aduba.
28/06/2145m 43s

Best Of: Anthony Ramos / Renée Elise Goldsberry

Anthony Ramos says Lin-Manuel Miranda's Broadway musical 'In the Heights' filled him with hope about a life on the stage: "I felt like I'm watching my cousins and my aunts and uncles on the stage ... like friends that I grew up with. And these people are speaking vernacular that's familiar to me." Now he's starring — and singing and dancing and rapping — in the film adaptation. We also talk about his roles in 'Hamilton' and his childhood. Justin Chang reviews 'Luca' and 'Undine.' The comedy series 'Girls5Eva,' which was just renewed for a second season, follows a 1990s band that reunites after a long stretch of obscurity. Renée Elise Goldsberry was once in a girl group herself. She spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado about women being pitted against each other in showbiz and her show-stopping song "Satisfied" in 'Hamilton.'
26/06/2150m 2s

The Early Years Of The CIA

In his book, 'The Quiet Americans,' author Scott Anderson profiles four daring and resourceful soldiers who became intelligence agents after World War II, when America was strong and respected after defeating Nazi Germany. The CIA then embarked on hundreds of ill-considered covert operations in Eastern Europe, and its obsession with fighting Communism propelled it into the subversion of several democratically-elected governments around the world. David Bianculli reviews the new seasons of 'Evil' and 'The Good Fight.'
25/06/2146m 53s

The Battle Over Teaching Critical Race Theory

An NBC News analysis finds at least 165 local and national groups are trying to disrupt or block lessons on critical race theory. NBC reporter Tyler Kingkade explores who is waging this fight, and why. "Opponents are using critical race theory as really more of a catchall to include anything teaching students about systemic racism, any mention of white privilege, and really the definition that they're using has expanded to include anything related to equity, diversity and inclusion," he says. Also, critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the last albums from bassist Mario Pavone, which he recorded near the end of his life.
24/06/2145m 48s

Megan Rapinoe

The USWNT soccer star and activist spoke with Terry Gross last year about her World Cup wins, being one of the first openly gay players on the national team, and taking a knee in solidarity with Black Lives Matter — and the repercussions she faced. The team's ongoing fight for equal pay is the subject of a new HBO Max documentary called 'LFG.' Ken Tucker reviews two cover albums, one by Chrissie Hynde of Bob Dylan songs, and one by Shannon McNally of Waylon Jennings songs.
23/06/2146m 47s

Renée Elise Goldsberry On 'Girls5Eva' & 'Hamilton'

The comedy series 'Girls5Eva,' which was just renewed for a second season, follows a 1990s band that reunites after a long stretch of obscurity. Goldsberry was once in a girl group herself. She spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado about women being pitted against each other in showbiz, her show-stopping song "Satisfied" in 'Hamilton,' and what she learned from her time on a soap opera. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Francis Spufford's novel, 'Light Perpetual.'
22/06/2147m 0s

Desus & Mero

Desus Nice and The Kid Mero started out doing comedy together on Twitter, then created the 'Bodega Boys' podcast. Their comedy series on Showtime is now in its third season. We talk about growing up in the Bronx in the '80s and '90s, graffiti, hip-hop and the odd jobs that shaped them. Also, Justin Chang reviews the Pixar film 'Luca' and the German film 'Undine.'
21/06/2146m 29s

Best Of: Julie Lythcott-Haims / How Junk Food Companies Get Us 'Hooked'

Former Stanford University undergraduate dean Julie Lythcott-Haims' memoir, 'Real American,' is the story of her coming to terms with her racial identity. Her father was a successful Black physician, her mother a white British woman. She recalls stories from her childhood, and the racist messaging she received. "I knew by 7 that something was wrong with Blackness." Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'Minor Swing,' by Vincent Herring. Journalist Michael Moss says processed foods can be as addictive as cocaine, heroin and cigarettes. In his new book, 'Hooked,' Moss explores how these companies appeal to our senses, nostalgia and brain chemistry to keep us snacking.
19/06/2150m 38s

The 50th Anniversary Of The Pentagon Papers

Fifty years ago this week, 'The New York Times' published the first in a series of articles based on a classified Defense Department study that was leaked to the paper by Daniel Ellsberg. This study came to be known as the Pentagon Papers. It chronicled decades of failed U.S. policy in Vietnam, and the ways the American public was misled in how the war was conducted. We listen back to archival interviews with Ellsberg and Ben Bradlee of 'The Washington Post,' who ran their own series on the documents. Later, we remember actor Ned Beatty, who died this week and critic David Bianculli reviews the Apple TV+ series 'Physical,' starring Rose Byrne.
18/06/2147m 38s

Questions Surrounding The COVID-19 Lab-Leak Theory

What are the credible questions related to the theory that COVID-19 leaked from a lab in Wuhan, China? President Biden has asked the intelligence community to investigate, but 'Vanity Fair' reporter Katherine Eban says there have been many roadblocks.
17/06/2145m 43s

Challenging The Myths Of The Alamo

Remember the Alamo? According to Texas lore, it's the site in San Antonio where, in 1836, about 180 Texan rebels died defending the state during Texas' war for independence from Mexico. But in a new book, Bryan Burrough (along with co-writers Chris Tomlinson and Jason Stanford) challenge the historical lore of the Alamo — including the story that Davy Crockett refused to surrender. "Most academics now believe, based on Mexican accounts and contemporary accounts, that, in fact, [Crockett] did surrender and was executed," Burrough says. His book is 'Forget the Alamo.'Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Republic of Detours' by Scott Borchert.
16/06/2146m 18s

Writer Ashley C. Ford On Her Memoir 'Somebody's Daughter'

For most of Ashley C. Ford's life, her father was incarcerated for rape. This was especially traumatizing for Ford, as she herself is a survivor of sexual assault. Her new bestselling memoir 'Somebody's Daughter' details her evolving relationship with her father and her own body. "I'm in love with my humanity. I love being a human. I do," she says. "The range of emotions is terrifying and beautiful. The range of actions are terrifying and beautiful that a human can experience, and some of my experiences suck really, really bad. A lot of them are fantastic." Also John Powers reviews the second season of the Netflix series 'Lupin.'
15/06/2147m 36s

Anthony Ramos On 'In The Heights' & 'Hamilton'

Anthony Ramos says Lin-Manuel Miranda's Broadway musical 'In the Heights' filled him with hope about a life on the stage: "I felt like I'm watching my cousins and my aunts and uncles on the stage ... like friends that I grew up with. And these people are speaking vernacular that's familiar to me." Now he's starring — and singing and dancing and rapping — in the film adaptation. We also talk about his roles in 'Hamilton,' his childhood, and his Calvin Klein ads.
14/06/2146m 27s

Best Of: Rita Moreno / Daisy Hernández

Rita Moreno moved to the U.S. mainland from Puerto Rico as a child. She says her 'West Side Story' role is "the only part I ever remember where I represented Hispanics in a dignified and positive way." Moreno is an EGOT, a winner of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.Film critic Justin Chang reviews the film adaptation of the musical 'In the Heights.'Also, we'll talk with Daisy Hernández, author of 'The Kissing Bug: The True Story of a Family, an Insect and a Nation's Neglect of a Deadly Disease.' It's part medical history, part personal history about growing in an immigrant family, including her aunt who had the disease.
12/06/2149m 5s

Catching Up With Stephen Colbert / Remembering Clarence Williams III

We remember actor Clarence Williams III, best known for playing Linc Hayes, one of three hippie undercover cops on the TV series 'The Mod Squad' from 1968 to 1973. Also, Stephen Colbert begins taping the 'The Late Show' in front of a live audience again on Monday. We hear his interview with Terry about doing the show from home taping during the pandemic. "I got into show business in a way to not be alone. Like a lot of comedians, I'm a bit of a broken toy," Colbert says.And Justin Chang reviews the new film adaptation of Lin-Manuel Miranda's musical 'In the Heights.'
11/06/2147m 47s

Inside The Ransomware Industry

New York Times investigative reporter Michael Schwirtz gained access to the dashboard of DarkSide, a ransomware operation that's pulled in more than $90 million since it began last August. Schwirtz talks about DarkSide's business model, its customer support system to help the hackers it enables, and help the victims learn how to use Bitcoin to pay the ransom.
10/06/2146m 6s

The Space Race & The Dangerous Early Days Of NASA

On the morning of Feb. 20, 1962, about 100,000 spectators gathered in Cape Canaveral, Fla., to witness the launch of the Friendship 7, the United States' first mission to put an astronaut in orbit around the Earth. Historian Jeff Shesol says there was real fear that astronaut John Glenn wouldn't survive the day. We talk with Shesol about the early days of NASA, and how the Cold War pushed the U.S. space program to its limits. His book is 'Mercury Rising.' David Bianculli reviews the Disney+ series 'Loki' starring Tom Hiddleston.
09/06/2147m 6s

Race, Sexuality & The Deadly 'Kissing Bug'

When Daisy Hernández was 5, her aunt in Colombia came down with a mysterious illness that caused her large intestine to swell. Hernandez details her aunt's story — and her own — in a new memoir.
08/06/2145m 25s

Rita Moreno

Moreno moved to the U.S. mainland from Puerto Rico as a child. She says her 'West Side Story' role is "the only part I ever remember where I represented Hispanics in a dignified and positive way." We talk about some of the racism and sexism she experienced in Hollywood, her relationship with Marlon Brando, and why she's happier than ever now at 89 years old. Moreno is an EGOT, a winner of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.
07/06/2145m 45s

Best Of: Exonerated 5 Member / Reckoning With The Legacy Of Slavery

In 1990, Yusef Salaam was one of the five boys wrongly convicted in the so-called Central Park jogger case. Salaam spent nearly seven years behind bars and wasn't exonerated until 2002, when a serial rapist confessed to the crime. Salaam tells his story in his memoir 'Better, Not Bitter.'Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Black to the Future' by Shabaka Hutchings and the Sons of Kemet. In 'How the Word is Passed,' writer and poet Clint Smith visits eight places central to the history of slavery in America, including Thomas Jefferson's Monticello plantation and Louisiana's Angola prison. "This history that we are told was so long ago wasn't, in fact, that long ago at all," he says.
05/06/2150m 11s

Producing The Philly Sound

We hear from songwriter, arranger and producer Thom Bell. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Philadelphia International Records. Among the songs he arranged were Joe Simon's "Drowning in the Sea of Love," and "Back Stabbers" by The O'Jays. Bell is in the Songwriters Hall of Fame. He also wrote and arranged for The Stylistics, The Spinners, and The Delfonics. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2006. Also, Justin Chang reviews the horror movie 'A Quiet Place Part II,' the sequel to John Krasinski's 2018 film.
04/06/2147m 21s

How Russia Used An Overt Agent To Attack Biden In The 2020 Election

'Time' investigative correspondent Simon Shuster says that Andriy Derkach, a seven-term member of the Ukrainian parliament, and widely believed to be a Russian agent, gave misleading information to Rudy Giuliani to discredit Biden during the 2020 campaign. Derkach and Giuliani are both under investigation by federal prosecutors in the U.S.
03/06/2146m 41s

The Racist Roots Of The 2nd Amendment

Carol Anderson says the Second Amendment was designed to ensure slave owners could quickly crush any rebellion or resistance from those they'd enslaved. "One of the things that I argue throughout this book is that it is just being Black that is the threat. And so when you mix that being Black as the threat with bearing arms, it's an exponential fear," she says. "This isn't an anti-gun or a pro-gun book. This is a book about African Americans' rights." Anderson's new book is 'The Second.'Ken Tucker reviews the album 'Outside Child' by Allison Russell.
02/06/2145m 34s

Reckoning With The History Of Slavery

In 'How the Word is Passed,' writer and poet Clint Smith visits eight places central to the history of slavery in America, including Thomas Jefferson's Monticello plantation and Louisiana's Angola prison. "We are taught that the history of slavery is something that happened almost like when there were dinosaurs," he says. But Smith notes that his grandfather's grandfather was enslaved — and that "this history that we are told was so long ago wasn't, in fact, that long ago at all." Maureen Corrigan reviews two thriller novels: Chris Power's 'A Lonely Man' and Jean Hanff Korelitz's nightmare of a thriller 'The Plot.'
01/06/2146m 16s

50 Years Of Philadelphia International Records

TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia) was the theme from 'Soul Train,' and was one of the many hits written and produced by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff for Philadelphia International Records, the label they co-founded. The label is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. They recorded The O'Jays, Patti LaBelle, Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, Teddy Pendergrass, Billy Paul, McFadden and Whitehead, Soul Survivors and more. We'll listen back to the interview Terry Gross recorded with Gamble and Huff in 2008, in which they talked about their partnership, their label, and some of their greatest recordings.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'Black to Future' by the London quartet Sons of Kemet.
31/05/2148m 39s

Best Of: 'Opal & Nev' Author / The History Of Juneteenth

Dawnie Walton's novel, 'The Final Revival of Opal & Nev,' is a faux oral history about a '70s interracial rock duo. Opal is a Black proto Afro-punk singer from Detroit, and Nev is a goofy white British singer-songwriter. Walton was inspired by Grace Jones, Betty Davis, Elton John and Bowie. We talk with Walton about how her career in journalism and her taste in music growing up informed the book.Maureen Corrigan reviews 2 suspense novels: 'A Lonely Man,' by Chris Power, and 'The Plot,' by Jean Hanff Korelitz.Juneteenth, formerly Emancipation Day or Jubilee, celebrates the day slavery ended in Texas, June 19, 1865. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed studies the early American republic and the legacy of slavery. Her book is 'On Juneteenth.'
29/05/2149m 45s

2 Concerts: Rachael & Vilray / Loudon Wainwright III & Vince Giordano

The music duo Rachael & Vilray perform songs from their debut album — new songs written by Vilray that could have been on the radio in the '30s and '40s, and songs from the '20s and '30s. We'll also hear from Loudon Wainwright III and Vince Giordano. They teamed up last year to record an album of songs written by Fats Waller, Harold Arlen and others. It's called 'I'd Rather Lead a Band.'Also, Justin Chang reviews 'Cruella,' the origin story of Cruella de Vil, starring Emma Stone.
28/05/2146m 44s

How States Are Making It Harder To Vote

'New York Times' reporter Nick Corasaniti says Republican-led state legislatures are restricting voting and seizing more power over how elections are run — making previously non-partisan jobs political. David Bianculli reviews three documentaries the commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa race massacre.
27/05/2146m 43s

'Exonerated Five' Member Yusef Salaam

In 1990, Yusef Salaam was one of the five boys wrongly convicted in the so-called Central Park jogger case. Salaam spent nearly 7 years behind bars and wasn't exonerated until 2002, when a serial rapist confessed to the crime. "When the truth came out, that's when we got our lives back," Salaam says. "But for those of us who had five to 10 years prison sentences, we had done all of someone else's time. ... We will never know what our life would have been like had we not gone through this horrible experience." Salaam tells his story in his memoir 'Better, Not Bitter.' And podcast critic Nick Quah reviews a stunning new series called 'The Line.'
26/05/2146m 38s

The History Of Juneteenth

Juneteenth, formerly Emancipation Day or Jubilee, celebrates the day slavery ended in Texas, June 19, 1865. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed studies the early American republic and the legacy of slavery. "It was a very, very tense time — hope and at the same time, hostility," Gordon-Reed says. Her book is 'On Juneteenth.'
25/05/2144m 48s

'Opal & Nev' Author Dawnie Walton

Dawnie Walton's novel, 'The Final Revival of Opal & Nev,' is a faux oral history about a '70s interracial rock duo. Opal is a Black proto Afro-punk singer from Detroit, and Nev is a goofy white British singer-songwriter. Walton was inspired by Grace Jones, Betty Davis, Elton John and Bowie. We talk with Walton about how her career in journalism and her taste in music growing up informed the book. And John Powers reviews 'Whitstable Pearl,' a crime drama on Acorn TV.
24/05/2146m 38s

Best Of: Seth Rogen / Jean Smart

Seth Rogen returns to talk about his new memoir, 'Yearbook,' which is filled with funny and surprising stories — starting with the first time he did stand-up when he was 12 and continuing through his life and film career. He's produced, directed, written and starred in many films, including 'Knocked Up,' 'Superbad,' and 'The Interview.' Justin Chang reviews the Indian film 'The Disciple' about an aspiring classical singer.Jean Smart's breakout role was on the '80s sitcom 'Designing Women.' She's had recent great roles as the head of a crime family on 'Fargo' and as an FBI agent on 'Watchmen.' Now she co-stars in the HBO series 'Mare of Easttown' and stars in HBO Max comedy 'Hacks,' as a veteran comic forced to update her act.
22/05/2150m 34s

Remembering Actor Charles Grodin / Delmark Records' Bob Koester

Actor Charles Grodin, of 'Midnight Run' and 'Heartbreak Kid' fame, died May 18. He was known for his deadpan humor and his ability to make even the most unpleasant characters likable and funny. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1989. Also, we remember Bob Koester, who died May 12. He was the founder of Delmark Records, which released records by blues and jazz artists, and he also operated the Jazz Record Mart in Chicago. He was a mentor and father figure for many Chicago musicians, and he was considered one of the major forces behind the blues revival in the mid '60s. Justin Chang reviews 'The Killing of Two Lovers' and TV critic David Bianculli reviews two shows, 'The Bite' and 'Solos.'
21/05/2146m 4s

Inside The COVID Crisis In India

Jeffrey Gettleman of the 'New York Times,' based in New Delhi, says the air has been filled with smoke from crematories. Meanwhile, the health care system is collapsing and the black market for oxygen and medicine is thriving. "What we're seeing now is the nightmare that we really wanted to avoid," he says. "And that is this virus just tearing through a really large country. 1.4 billion people, many of them living in close quarters, a perfect recipe for disaster for a highly contagious disease."
20/05/2145m 56s

Actor John Boyega On 'Star Wars' & 'Small Axe'

Boyega played Finn in the 'Star Wars' sequel trilogy and he won a Golden Globe for his leading role in the anthology series 'Small Axe,' as a Black British police officer who joined the force in the '80s to try to change the system. Boyega has been outspoken about systemic racism — including in Hollywood. Last year, he talked about how his character in 'Star Wars' was sidelined, along with the other characters played by actors of color. He spoke with guest interviewer Sam Sanders. Ken Tucker reviews Sophia Kennedy's new album 'Monsters' and John Powers reviews Rachel Cusk's novel 'Second Place.'
19/05/2147m 49s

Seth Rogen

Rogen returns to talk about his new memoir, 'Yearbook,' which is filled with funny and surprising stories — starting with the first time he did stand-up when he was 12 and continuing through his life and film career. He used to be the youngest person in the room, but now that he's approaching 40, he's reconsidering a lot of things, from what message not to give teens in his films to how to create a set where everyone feels comfortable and safe. He's produced, directed, written and starred in many films, including 'Knocked Up,' 'Superbad,' 'Pineapple Express,' 'This is the End,' 'The Interview' and 'Long Shot.'
18/05/2146m 39s

Failure & Dysfunction In The Secret Service

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Carol Leonnig's new book, 'Zero Fail,' examines how the Secret Service is underfunded, overworked, and increasingly relying on luck. "They strongly believed that it was a matter of time before a president was shot on their watch," Leonnig says. We talk about the impact of JFK's assassination on the agency, the prostitution scandal in Colombia ahead of Obama's trip there, and how Trump's golf trips drained the agency's resources.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Notes on Grief' by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
17/05/2147m 21s

Best Of: Filmmaker Barry Jenkins / Writer Francisco Goldman

We talk with 'Moonlight' filmmaker Barry Jenkins about his new series, 'The Underground Railroad.' Adapted from Colson Whitehead's novel, the series follows Cora, an enslaved young woman who has escaped a plantation and heads North on a literal railroad train. Jenkins says the series made him feel closer to his ancestors. Maureen Corrigan reviews Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's latest book, 'Notes on Grief.' Also, Francisco Goldman talks about his new, semi-autobiographical novel, 'Monkey Boy.' The son of a Jewish father and a Guatemalan mother, Goldman grew up mostly in working class suburbs of Boston. He reflects on the impact of physical abuse from his father, and the assaults and insults he endured from kids who resented his ethnic background.
15/05/2150m 10s

Tom Jones

The singer Tom Jones, who became a pop star and sex symbol in the 1960s with "It's Not Unusual," "Delilah," and "What's New Pussycat?" has a new album. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2003. Also, we remember dancer Jacques d'Amboise, who was with the New York City Ballet for decades. He died May 2. And Justin Chang reviews 'The Woman in the Window.'
14/05/2147m 46s

Unlocking The Mysteries Of Endometriosis

It's estimated that one in 10 women experience endometriosis during their reproductive years, a condition where cells from the uterine lining go rogue, move to other organs and grow there, leading to terrible pain. Many women who have the disorder struggle to be properly diagnosed. Dr. Linda Griffith spent years in debilitating pain before she was finally diagnosed. "I was told it was normal. I was told that I was under stress ... [that] I was rejecting my femininity," she says. In 2009, she co-founded the MIT Center for Gynepathology Research, where she studies the disorder. We talk about "period privilege," why she kept her condition a secret for so long, and treatments on the horizon.Also, David Bianculli reviews the HBO Max series 'Hacks' starring Jean Smart.
13/05/2146m 27s

Actor Jean Smart

Smart's breakout role was on the '80s sitcom 'Designing Women.' She's had recent great roles as the head of a crime family on 'Fargo' and as an FBI agent on 'Watchmen.' Now she co-stars in the HBO series 'Mare of Easttown' and stars in HBO Max comedy 'Hacks,' as a veteran comic forced to update her act. Smart talks about meeting her late husband, learning the Delaware County accent for 'Mare of Easttown' and the 'Fraiser' line fans quote back to her.
12/05/2147m 42s

Writer Francisco Goldman Revisits His Childhood With 'Monkey Boy'

The son of a Jewish father and a Guatemalan mother, Goldman grew up mostly in working class suburbs of Boston. His new novel, 'Monkey Boy,' draws on his own experiences, including being physically abused by his dad. "I wanted to go back and look at some very difficult years of my childhood and adolescence," Goldman says.
11/05/2147m 11s

Filmmaker Barry Jenkins On 'The Underground Railroad'

Barry Jenkins says filming his new series about an enslaved girl who escapes from a plantation was the most difficult project of his career — and one that made him feel closer to his own ancestors. "It was incredibly difficult, partly because we were standing in places where ... these atrocities had occurred," he says. Jenkins directed 'Moonlight,' which won the 2017 Oscar for Best Picture, as well as the 2018 adaptation of James Baldwin's novel, 'If Beale Street Could Talk.' We talk about depicting the brutality of slavery onscreen, his own family history, and why he wanted to become a filmmaker.
10/05/2146m 59s

Best Of: Advocate For Teen Moms, Nicole Lynn Lewis / Cartoonist Alison Bechdel

As a pregnant teenager, Nicole Lynn Lewis felt ashamed. Now she knows many pregnant teens share the problems she had — including an abusive boyfriend, and being temporarily homeless. She says the odds against pregnant teens going to college and having a career are even greater, if you're Black, like she is. We talk about her new memoir, 'Pregnant Girl.' Also, we hear from Alison Bechdel. Her graphic memoir 'Fun Home,' about coming out and learning her father had secret gay affairs, was adapted into a Tony Award-winning musical. Her new graphic memoir, 'The Secret to Superhuman Strength,' is about her obsession with exercise and the issues that have fed that obsession. And, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new Louis Armstrong box set.
08/05/2151m 0s

Celebrating Mothers: Feat. Trevor Noah, Scorsese & More

We celebrate Mother's Day with stories of mom from past interviews with 'Daily Show' host Trevor Noah, Martin Scorsese and filmmaker Albert Brooks. And Lorna Luft remembers her mother, Judy Garland.Also, David Bianculli reviews 'Attenborough's Journey,' a BBC America special that salutes the nature broadcaster.
07/05/2148m 34s

How Systemic Racism Determines Black Health & Wealth In Chicago

There is a 30-year gap in the life expectancy of some Black and white Chicagoans. Journalist Linda Villarosa talks about the link between racism and health outcomes, and tells her own family's story.Also, we remember rock historian Ed Ward, who died this week.
06/05/2148m 20s

Alison Bechdel On 'The Secret To Superhuman Strength'

Bechdel's new graphic memoir is about her lifelong obsession with exercise. She says she has a "predisposition of being extremely self-conscious and very caught up in my head" — and exercise helps. Bechdel's previous graphic memoir, 'Fun Home,' was about coming out at age 19, and discovering her father had a secret gay life. It was adapted into a Tony Award-winning Broadway show. Also, Justin Chang reviews 'The Disciple,' a film about a man from Mumbai who aspires to be a great classical musician.
05/05/2145m 17s

The Social Lives Of Trees

Ecologist Suzanne Simard says trees are "social creatures" that communicate with each other in remarkable ways — including warning each other of danger and sharing nutrients at critical times. Her book is 'Finding the Mother Tree.' Also, classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews a collection by composer Bernard Herrmann, best-known for the scores he wrote for Alfred Hitchcock.
04/05/2147m 31s

Former 'Pregnant Girl' Now Helps Other Teen Moms Succeed

In her new memoir, 'Pregnant Girl,' Nicole Lynn Lewis recalls feeling overwhelmed and isolated as a young mom in college. Now she runs an organization that is designed to support young parents with their education. We talk about her experience as a teen mom, the way society abandons young mothers — particularly young Black mothers — and how to help give young families the support they need to succeed.
03/05/2146m 23s

Best Of: Stephen Colbert / NPR's 50th Anniversary

Stephen Colbert has been taping 'The Late Show' without a studio audience during the pandemic — but he's not always alone. Sometimes his wife Evie is in the room. If she laughs, he knows he's on the right track. "I got into show business in a way to not be alone. Like a lot of comedians, I'm a bit of a broken toy," he says. NPR's program, 'All Things Considered' debuted on May 3, 1971. 'ATC' creator Bill Siemering and former co-host Susan Stamberg look back on the early years of the network, NPR's mission, and Stamberg's pioneering role as the first woman to anchor a daily national news program in America.
01/05/2149m 18s

Remembering Astronaut Michael Collins

While Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made their historic walk on the moon, Lt. Col. Michael Collins orbited above in the Apollo 11 command capsule, waiting to rendezvous with them. For a time, on the far side of the moon, he was cut off from everyone. "It's utterly quiet. Completely serene," he told Terry Gross in 1988. "I knew that over on the other side there were 3 billion on that funny looking little planet out there, and two on the surface of the moon, but where I was that was all. Just me." Collins died Wednesday at the age of 90. Also, we hear an excerpt of our interview with Kate Winslet. She's starring in the new HBO series 'Mare of Easttown.'And Justin Chang reviews the Swedish film 'About Endlessness,' which he calls "beautifully bittersweet"
30/04/2147m 37s

Novelist Imbolo Mbue

Set in a fictional African village in the 1980s, Mbue's latest novel, 'How Beautiful We Were,' is a David and Goliath tale about a group of villagers who take on an American oil company. Guest host Arun Venugopal talks with Mbue about her childhood in Cameroon, becoming a U.S. citizen, and the activist that inspired her new novel. Her first book, 'Behold the Dreamers,' was a 'New York Times' bestseller.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews a new collection of Louis Armstrong studio recordings. And Maureen Corrigan reviews two stories about the bargains we strike for love — 'Early Morning Riser' and 'Secrets of Happiness.'
29/04/2147m 4s

50 Years Of NPR: Radio Legends Susan Stamberg & Bill Siemering

NPR's program, 'All Things Considered' debuted on May 3, 1971. 'ATC' creator Bill Siemering and former co-host Susan Stamberg look back on the early years of the network, NPR's mission, and Stamberg's pioneering role as the first woman to anchor a daily national news program in America.
28/04/2148m 37s

Catching Up with Stephen Colbert

Stephen Colbert has been taping 'The Late Show' without a studio audience during the pandemic — but he's not always alone. Sometimes his wife Evie is in the room. If she laughs, he knows he's on the right track. "I got into show business in a way to not be alone. Like a lot of comedians, I'm a bit of a broken toy," he says. Colbert and Terry Gross catch up on the past four years, since the Trump administration and COVID-19 changed his comedy.
27/04/2147m 56s

How Processed Food Companies Get Us 'Hooked' On Junk

Journalist Michael Moss says processed foods can be as addictive as cocaine, heroin and cigarettes. In his new book, 'Hooked,' Moss explores how these companies appeal to our senses, nostalgia and brain chemistry to keep us snacking. "It's inexpensive, it's legal, it's everywhere," Moss says. "And the advertising from the companies is cueing us to remember those products and we want those products constantly."Ken Tucker reviews Carsie Blanton's album 'Love & Rage.'
26/04/2147m 13s

Best Of: 'Resistance' Podcast Host Saidu Tejan-Thomas Jr. / Courtney B. Vance

Saidu Tejan-Thomas Jr. lost a close friend from college to police violence. His Spotify podcast, 'Resistance,' explores different aspects of the movement for Black lives — including Tejan-Thomas Jr.'s personal history. We also talk about his childhood in Sierra Leone during the civil war.Courtney B. Vance got his start in the theater, with a breakout role in the August Wilson play 'Fences' on Broadway. We talk about his origin story and his recent roles as Aretha Franklin's father, Rev. C.L. Franklin, in 'Genius: Aretha,' and as the show-stopping attorney Johnnie Cochran, in 'The People v. O.J. Simpson.'
24/04/2150m 38s

Pixar 'Soul' Creators Pete Docter & Kemp Powers

The Oscar-nominated animated film imagines a place where souls are matched with unique passions. It follows Joe Gardner, a middle school band teacher and aspiring jazz musician, who nearly dies right after securing the gig of his life. Pete Docter and Kemp Powers say their movie is meant to challenge conventional notions of success and failure. We talk about lost souls, appreciating the small things, and early versions of the film. Justin Chang reviews 'Moffie,' about a white gay teen in Apartheid South Africa.
23/04/2146m 30s

The Social Psychologist Who Works To Reduce Harm In Policing

Yale professor Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff co-founded the Center for Policing Equity, which collects data on police behavior from 18,000 law enforcement agencies across the country. He says most people think of racism as an issue of character and ignorance. But, he says, focusing on changing racist attitudes is "a bad way to stop the behavior," He says. "The best way to regulate behavior is to regulate behavior. And that's what we can do in policing. That's what we can do in our communities. That's what we can do with policies." Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Nives' by Italian writer Sacha Naspini, newly translated into English.
22/04/2148m 21s

Courtney B. Vance On Playing Rev. C.L. Franklin & Johnnie Cochran

Courtney B. Vance got his start in the theater, with a breakout role in the August Wilson play 'Fences' on Broadway. We talk about his origin story and his recent roles as Aretha Franklin's father, Rev. C.L. Franklin, in 'Genius: Aretha,' and as the show-stopping attorney Johnnie Cochran, in 'The People v. O.J. Simpson.' Vance attributes much of his career success to the dean of the Yale Drama School when he was there, Lloyd Richards, who lifted up Black performers.
21/04/2147m 16s

Growing Up In A Cult, Lauren Hough Freed Herself By Writing

Hough was 15 when her family left the Children of God cult. Afterward, she struggled to face the trauma of her past. At 18 she joined the Air Force during "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," and was discharged for being gay. "I spent a long time lying to myself more than, I think, anyone else. Telling myself that my childhood didn't affect me, telling myself that the military didn't affect me," she says. "I think writing, more than anything, brought that out. ... You kind of have to tell the truth or it's crap and you know it." Her new collection of personal essays is 'Leaving Isn't the Hardest Thing.' Podcast critic Nick Quah reviews 'Renegades,' Spotify's podcast of President Obama and Bruce Springsteen in conversation. And jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a tribute album to Ornette Coleman by Miguel Zenón.
20/04/2148m 1s

'How To Be An Adult' & 'Real American' Author Julie Lythcott-Haims

Former Stanford University undergraduate dean Julie Lythcott-Haims' new book, 'Your Turn: How to Be an Adult,' is a handbook on adulthood, offering insights and strategies on education and career choices, building friendships and coping with setbacks. Her 2017 memoir, 'Real American,' is the story of her coming to terms with her racial identity. Her father was a successful African American physician, her mother a white British woman. We talk about both books and her upbringing.Also John Powers reviews the first English translation of Kaoru Takamura's 'Lady Joker,' a crime novel that sold a million copies and spawned a movie and TV series in Japan.
19/04/2149m 14s

Best Of: Choreographer Twyla Tharp / Henry Louis Gates On 'The Black Church'

'Twyla Moves,' a new documentary by PBS American Masters, tells the story of the legendary choreographer and dancer, who got her start performing on subway platforms and rooftops in the 1960s. "If it was kind of level, it was fair territory," she tells Terry Gross.Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly unearthed album from Hasaan Ibn Ali.'Finding Your Roots' host Henry Louis Gates has a new book and PBS series called 'The Black Church.' Gates describes the Black church as "the cultural cauldron Black people created to combat a system designed in every way to crush their spirit." We'll talk about the bargain Gates made with Jesus when he was 12 in an attempt to save his mother's life.
17/04/2149m 58s

Native Peoples' 'Long, Brutal Fight For Survival'

Louise Erdrich's novel, 'The Night Watchman,' was inspired by her grandfather, a chairman of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa who fought a Congressional initiative to move indigenous peoples off their land and into cities. Erdrich says the policy amounted to tribal termination. "Termination was a way to finally resolve what Congress thought of as 'the Indian problem,'" she says.David Bianculli reviews HBO's 'Mare of Easttown,' starring Kate Winslet.
16/04/2147m 52s

'Resistance' Podcast Host On The Fight For Black Lives

Saidu Tejan-Thomas Jr. lost a close friend from college to police violence. His Spotify podcast, 'Resistance,' explores different aspects of the movement for Black lives — including Tejan-Thomas Jr.'s personal history. We talk about his childhood in Sierra Leone, his poetry, and losing his parents at a young age.
15/04/2145m 53s

The 'Secret History' Of The Sackler Family & The Opioid Crisis

The Sackler family owns Purdue Pharma, which made billions of dollars selling OxyContin, an opiate painkiller stronger than morphine. Introduced in 1996, OxyContin has been largely blamed for the opioid addiction crisis that followed. The Sacklers and the company are currently facing more than 2,500 lawsuits related to its practices. We talk with journalist Patrick Radden Keefe about the development of OxyContin, what the family knew about the danger of the drug, and how they have tried to thwart his reporting. His book is 'Empire of Pain.'
14/04/2147m 5s

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On The Black Church

The 'Finding Your Roots' host has a new book and PBS series called 'The Black Church.' Gates describes the Black church as "the cultural cauldron Black people created to combat a system designed in every way to crush their spirit." We'll talk about the bargain Gates made with Jesus when he was 12 in an attempt to save his mother's life. He'll tell us how that bargain changed him, and how his relationship to the church has changed over the years. Maureen Corrigan reviews the new novel 'The Final Revival of Opal and Nev,' about a '70s rock duo.
13/04/2148m 13s

Leslie Odom Jr. / 'Promising Young Woman' Filmmaker Emerald Fennell

Tony and Grammy-winning actor Leslie Odom Jr. is best-known for his role as Aaron Burr in 'Hamilton.' Now he stars as Sam Cooke in Regina King's film 'One Night in Miami,' which imagines a night where Cassius Clay, Malcolm X, Jim Brown and Cooke meet. Odom talks about studying Cooke's voice, hearing Burr's song "Wait for It" for the first time, and how the musical 'Rent' inspired him as a teen. Odom is nominated for two Oscars — for his role as Sam Cooke and for his original song, "Speak Now." In the dark comedy 'Promising Young Woman,' Cassie (Carey Mulligan) works at a coffee shop by day, and hunts sexual predators by night. She goes to bars, pretends to be falling down drunk — and then confronts the men who try to take advantage of her. Cassie is avenging the death of her best friend, who, the movie implies, has died by suicide after being raped at medical school. Writer and director Emerald Fennell says the film was inspired, in part, by the messages other movies send about alcohol and consent. We talk with Fennell about her Oscar-nominated film, her work on 'Killing Eve' and her portrayal of Camilla Parker Bowles on 'The Crown.'
12/04/2148m 31s

Best Of: Brandi Carlile / Palestinian Cookbook Author Reem Kassis

Six-time Grammy winner Brandi Carlile got her start onstage as a kid, singing backup for an Elvis impersonator. Her new memoir, 'Broken Horses,' is about her early life and the family of misfits she's built. "I think I'm starting to really feel sort of solid and loved in my world. Like maybe I've kind of finally found my place," she says.Maureen Corrigan reviews Kaitlyn Greenidge's novel 'Libertie.' Palestinian cookbook author Reem Kassis began gathering family recipes after the birth of her first child. The recipes, she says, "could be the story of any and every Palestinian family." Her new cookbook is 'The Arabesque Table.'
10/04/2150m 26s

Prolific Background Singer Merry Clayton

Singer Merry Clayton did the iconic background vocals of the 1969 Rolling Stones song "Gimme Shelter." But despite the fame and success of the record, Clayton remained largely anonymous. Until, that is, she was featured as one of the backup singers in the 2014 Oscar-winning documentary '20 Feet from Stardom.' Over the course of her career, Clayton sang with Ray Charles, Joe Cocker, Carole King and many others. Now she's got a new album — where she's front and center — called 'Beautiful Scars.' She spoke with Terry Gross in 2013. Also, we'll hear some of our 2020 interview with filmmaker Craig Foster. His Netflix documentary 'My Octopus Teacher' is nominated for an Oscar.
09/04/2148m 23s

Choreographer Twyla Tharp

'Twyla Moves,' a new documentary by PBS American Masters, tells the story of the legendary choreographer and dancer, who got her start performing on subway platforms and rooftops in the 1960s. "If it was kind of level, it was fair territory," she says. We talk about starting an all-women dance company, mixing classical and modern dance, and choreographing dancers over Zoom in the pandemic. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'The Nevers' on HBO Max.
08/04/2148m 30s

Palestinian Cookbook Author Reem Kassis

Reem Kassis began gathering family recipes after the birth of her first child. The recipes, she says, "could be the story of any and every Palestinian family." We talk about her favorite fried egg recipe, the importance of za'atar seasoning, and her unlikely friendship with Israeli chef Michael Solomonov. Her new cookbook is 'The Arabesque Table.'
07/04/2148m 26s

The Intersection Of Black Performance, Joy & Pain

What do 'Soul Train' and Whitney Houston tell us about race in the U.S? Poet and culture critic Hanif Abdurraqib's book, 'A Little Devil in America,' traces the history of Black performance through moments in pop culture, emphasizing the joy and excellence. He spoke with contributor Arun Venugopal. Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews a posthumous record by jazz pianist Hasaan Ibn Ali, and book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Libertie,' a new novel by Kaitlyn Greenidge.
06/04/2149m 33s

Brandi Carlile

The six-time Grammy winner got her start onstage as a kid, singing backup for an Elvis impersonator. Her new memoir, 'Broken Horses,' is about her early life and the family of misfits she's built. "I think I'm starting to really feel sort of solid and loved in my world. Like maybe I've kind of finally found my place," Carlile says.
05/04/2148m 46s

Brandi Carlile

The six-time Grammy winner got her start onstage as a kid, singing backup for an Elvis impersonator. Her new memoir, 'Broken Horses,' is about her early life and the family of misfits she's built. "I think I'm starting to really feel sort of solid and loved in my world. Like maybe I've kind of finally found my place," Carlile says.
05/04/2146m 58s

Best Of: The Amazing Lives Of Migratory Birds / 'Lovecraft Country' Creator

Author and bird researcher Scott Weidensaul shares amazing stories of the billions of migratory birds that journey over our heads every year, how they manage their feats physically, and how they're threatened by economic development and climate change. His new book is 'A World on the Wing.'Ken Tucker reviews the first full-length solo album from gospel singer Elizabeth King.Also, we hear from Misha Green, the creator of the HBO series 'Lovecraft Country,' which takes the real horrors of the Black experience in the 1950s and adds to it the supernatural terrors of the horror genre.
03/04/2149m 27s

Christopher Meloni / Remembering Larry McMurtry & G. Gordon Liddy

We remember novelist and screenwriter Larry McMurtry who died last week at the age of 84. Raised on a Texas ranch, McMurtry wrote about the American West in the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel 'Lonesome Dove', which was later made into a beloved miniseries. He also authored 'The Last Picture Show' and 'Terms of Endearment,' both of which were adapted into films.Also, we listen back to some of our interview with actor Christopher Meloni. He's best known for his 12 seasons as detective Elliot Stabler on 'Law & Order: SVU.' He's returning to the franchise, starring in the new series 'Law & Order: Organized Crime.' And we'll hear some of Terry's 1980 interview with Watergate conspirator G. Gordon Liddy, who died Tuesday.
02/04/2148m 58s

Tackling Child Poverty Through COVID Relief

'New York Times' reporter Jason DeParle says a provision in the new COVID relief package has the makings of a policy revolution — and "would roughly cut child poverty in half." Qualifying families with children will receive between $250 and $300 a month per child, money families can spend however they want. This kind of child allowance is the norm in other affluent countries, like Canada and the U.K., but is "stunning in the American context," he says. Also, John Powers reviews the new Tunisian film 'The Man Who Sold His Skin,' nominated for the Oscar for Best International Feature.
01/04/2146m 7s

The High Stakes Of Amazon's 'One-Click America'

ProPublica journalist Alec MacGillis says a union vote by Amazon workers in Alabama could determine "what life is going to look like for the working class in America in years to come." We talk with MacGillis about how Amazon's size, aggressive business practices and warehouse working conditions are drawing the attention of union organizers and anti-trust crusaders in Congress. His new book is 'Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-Click America.' Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews Erwin Helfer's record 'Celebrate the Journey.'
31/03/2147m 41s

'Lovecraft Country' Creator Misha Green

The HBO series 'Lovecraft Country' takes the real horrors of the Black experience in the 1950s and adds to it the supernatural terrors of the horror genre. We talk to series creator Misha Green about reclaiming the genre space for people of color, her writers' room, and how scary movies make her feel brave. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Ken Burns PBS documentary series 'Hemingway.'
30/03/2147m 55s

The Amazing Lives Of Migratory Birds

Author Scott Weidensaul talks about the millions of birds flying unseen over our heads in the night sky, how the bar-tailed godwit can fly more than a week over water without stopping, and how new tracking technology may help with strategies to keep them alive. His new book is 'A World on the Wing.'Also, Ken Tucker reviews the first full-length solo album from gospel singer Elizabeth King.
29/03/2146m 46s

Best Of: The Making Of 'Soul' / The Afterlife Of Mass Incarceration

The Oscar-nominated animated film 'Soul' imagines a place where souls are matched with unique passions. It follows Joe Gardner, a middle school band teacher and aspiring jazz musician, who nearly dies right after securing the gig of his life. Filmmakers Pete Docter and Kemp Powers say their movie is meant to challenge conventional notions of success and failure. There are 45,000 laws, policies and administrative sanctions in the U.S. that target people with criminal records. We talk with University of Chicago sociologist Reuben Jonathan Miller about how they affect people's lives. "I want us to think about all these traps that we've created, we've produced, and I want us to unmake them," Miller says. His book is 'Halfway Home.'
27/03/2150m 15s

Actors Riz Ahmed / Kathryn Hahn

Riz Ahmed plays a drummer who loses his hearing in 'Sound of Metal.' To prepare for the role, he immersed himself in deaf culture — an experience that changed the way he thought about communication and listening. The film earned him a Best Actor Oscar nomination. Also, we listen back to our 2019 interview with actor Kathryn Hahn. She's known for her roles in 'Parks & Rec,' 'Mrs. Fletcher,' and 'I Love Dick.' Now she's co-starring in 'WandaVision' as a nosey and mysterious neighbor. "The most complicated and messy roles I've been able to get have been offered through women," she says. "I'm just so buoyed and galvanized that the juiciest part of [my career] has been post-kids."
26/03/2148m 21s

The Threat Of Domestic Terrorism

Elizabeth Neumann resigned from the Department of Homeland Security in April of 2020. She says the Trump administration ignored the threat — and fanned the flames — of violent domestic extremism. She's now co-director of the Republican Accountability Project, which pushes back on conspiracy theories and false claims that the election was stolen and is trying to hold accountable elected leaders who have supported those narratives.John Powers reviews the Danish film 'Another Round.'
25/03/2147m 53s

The Afterlife Of Mass Incarceration

There are 45,000 laws, policies and administrative sanctions in the U.S. that target people with criminal records. University of Chicago sociologist Reuben Jonathan Miller researches how they affect people's lives in 'Halfway Home.' "I want us to think about all these traps that we've created, we've produced, and I want us to unmake them," Miller says.
24/03/2146m 8s

The Making Of Pixar's 'Soul'

The Oscar-nominated animated film imagines a place where souls are matched with unique passions. It follows Joe Gardner, a middle school band teacher and aspiring jazz musician, who nearly dies right after securing the gig of his life. Pete Docter and Kemp Powers say their movie is meant to challenge conventional notions of success and failure. We talk about lost souls, appreciating the small things, and early versions of the film. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Christine Smallwood's novel 'The Life of the Mind.'
23/03/2146m 57s

Correcting The Record On Lady Bird Johnson

The former first lady is often remembered as a genteel Southerner who promoted highway beautification, but author Julia Sweig says archival records show Lady Bird was a savvy political strategist and key advisor to her husband, President Lyndon Johnson. Lady Bird was a supporter of women's rights, and a sponsor of ambitious programs to protect the environment and address urban poverty and blight. Sweig's book is 'Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight.' Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews an album from pianist Benoit Delbecq.
22/03/2148m 54s

Best Of: The Story Behind 'Unorthodox' / Novelist Kazuo Ishiguro

Deborah Feldman's memoir, 'Unorthodox,' about leaving the Satmar Hasidic community in Brooklyn, inspired the Netflix series of the same name. Growing up, she wasn't supposed to pursue an education or career, and, at 17, she entered into an arranged marriage with a man she'd barely met. Her departure from the community earned the scorn of Satmar leaders and forced a break with family members she'd known all her life.Ken Tucker reviews Julien Baker's third studio album, 'Little Oblivions.'Nobel Prize-winning novelist Kazuo Ishiguro's new book, 'Klara and the Sun,' is set in the future and has an artificially intelligent narrator. "I wanted some of that childlike freshness and openness and naivety to survive all the way through the text in her," he says.
20/03/2149m 57s

Country Icon Loretta Lynn

The country music star's 50th studio album, 'Still Woman Enough,' is out now. Lynn spoke with Terry Gross in 2010 about her memoir, 'Coal Miner's Daughter.'Also, Justin Chang reviews 'The Father,' starring Anthony Hopkins and Olivia Coleman. And Lloyd Schwartz reviews a PBS special about Black contralto singer Marian Anderson.
19/03/2148m 8s

Could Trump Be Convicted Of Criminal Charges?

'New Yorker' writer Jane Mayer talks about the criminal investigation into whether Donald Trump engaged in tax, banking and/or insurance fraud. If convicted, he could be sentenced to prison. "The thing that's most complicated about this case and makes it really hard is that in order for this to be a criminal act, they have to prove that there was criminal intent — that Trump intended to break the law and knew what the law was," Mayer says.
18/03/2146m 18s

Novelist Kazuo Ishiguro

The Nobel Prize-winning novelist's new book, 'Klara and the Sun,' is set in the future and has an artificially intelligent narrator. "I wanted some of that childlike freshness and openness and naivety to survive all the way through the text in her," he says. We talk about his writing process, hitchhiking in the '60s, and his family history in Nagasaki. Ken Tucker reviews Julien Baker's third studio album, 'Little Oblivions.'
17/03/2149m 10s

How to 'Futureproof' Yourself In An Automated World

'New York Times' tech columnist Kevin Roose says we've been approaching automation all wrong. "What we should be teaching people is to be more like humans, to do the things that machines can't do," he says. We talk about misconceptions about A.I, how algorithms decide who gets government assistance, and which jobs are less likely to be automated. His new book is 'Futureproof.' Also, Justin Chang reviews the film 'Quo Vadis, Aida?' about the legacy of the Bosnian war through the eyes of a U.N. translator.
16/03/2146m 6s

'Unorthodox' Author On Her 'Scandalous Rejection' Of Hasidic Life

Deborah Feldman's memoir, 'Unorthodox,' about leaving the Satmar Hasidic community in Brooklyn inspired the Netflix series of the same name. Growing up, Feldman spoke Yiddish and was discouraged from speaking or reading English at home. She wasn't supposed to pursue an education or career, and, at 17, she entered into an arranged marriage with a man she'd barely met. Her departure from the community earned the scorn of Satmar leaders and forced a break with family members she'd known all her life. "I left on faith," she says. "I think it's important to say that, because where I come from, faith is everything. And when you leave this community, you also leave on faith — because that's how you've been trained to take risks. I sold my jewelry. I sold a book proposal. I had enough money to make a start."
15/03/2147m 19s

Best Of: Musician Jon Batiste / Magician Derek DelGaudio

The bandleader of 'The Late Show with Stephen Colbert' joins us from his home piano where he plays music he wrote for the Pixar movie 'Soul' and songs from his new album 'We Are.' Batiste has been playing pop-up shows at Black Lives Matter protests, vaccination sites, and voter registration events. Sleight-of-hand master Derek DelGaudio explores themes of identity, honesty and the emotional cost of keeping secrets in the memoir, 'AMORALMAN.' His one-man show 'In & Of Itself' is now available on Hulu.
13/03/2150m 36s

The Rise Of White Supremacy In Wilmington, N.C.

Journalist David Zucchino tells the forgotten story of a murderous coup that led to a white supremacist takeover of a Southern city. In the 1890s, Wilmington, N.C., was a mixed-race community with a thriving Black middle class, Black aldermen and police officers, and a Black newspaper. But white supremacists plotted a bloody purge around the 1898 election. They rampaged through the streets, killing 60 Black men, and banished prominent Black people and their white allies from the city. His book is 'Wilmington's Lie.' Also, John Powers reviews 'Bloodlands,' a four-part original series from Acorn TV.
12/03/2148m 28s

Musician Jon Batiste On Sharing Joy In A Painful Year

The bandleader of 'The Late Show with Stephen Colbert' joins us from his home piano where he plays music he wrote for the Pixar movie 'Soul' and a stirring rendition of the national anthem. Batiste has been playing pop-up shows at Black Lives Matter protests, vaccination sites, and voter registration events. "I wanted to articulate through the music and through my presence there that we're all in this together," Batiste says. "Ultimately, this is our time. This is our world. We have to come together and understand that or else everything is going to completely disintegrate." His new album is 'We Are.'
11/03/2147m 49s

Sherry Turkle On The Burden Of Family Secrets

MIT professor and social scientist Sherry Turkle was 27 when she learned that her estranged father had conducted psychological experiments on her when she was a child. She looks back on her childhood in a new memoir, 'The Empathy Diaries.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Reality and Other Stories,' John Lanchester's collection of ghost stories about the digital era.
10/03/2147m 16s

Inside The Right-To-Die Movement

Journalist Katie Engelhart's new book, 'The Inevitable,' follows people who are planning to end their lives due to terminal illness or unbearable disability — either legally with physician-assisted death, or as part of the "euthanasia underground," outside of the law. "Most people who choose to end their lives at a preplanned moment are more concerned with things like dignity ... autonomy," she says. "They're worried less about the physical pain than the loss of themselves."
09/03/2148m 15s

Author Walter Isaacson On The Gene Editing Revolution

Biochemist Jennifer Doudna, the subject of Walter Isaacson's new biography 'The Code Breaker,' shared a Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2020 for the part she played in developing the CRISPR gene editing technology. We discuss mRNA vaccines, how gene editing works, and some of the moral questions that these developments raise. Also, Ken Tucker reviews 'Living The Dream,' an expanded album by Hailey Whitters.
08/03/2147m 49s

Best Of: Writer Tim O'Brien / Inside The Capitol Insurrection

Known for his novel 'The Things They Carried,' Tim O'Brien is now the subject of a new documentary, 'The War and Peace of Tim O'Brien.' When he became a father in his late 50s, he initially feared parenthood would curtail his writing. "Much as Vietnam did, [parenthood] gave me a body of material, that kind of context to write about," he says.Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Behind Her Eyes,' a thriller series on Netflix with many twists and turns. George Polk Award-winning journalist Luke Mogelson followed a mob of MAGA supporters into the Capitol on Jan. 6 and filmed what he saw. His video footage from inside the Senate chamber was used as evidence in the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump.
06/03/2150m 0s

Novelist James McBride

James McBride's novel 'Deacon King Kong' takes place in 1969, in a Brooklyn housing project similar to the one he grew up in. "In this book and in this community, people generally love each other," he says. McBride's novel 'The Good Lord Bird' was adapted last year into a miniseries starring Ethan Hawke. Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the new box set of music by jazz saxophonist and composer Julius Hemphill. And Justin Chang reviews the new Disney animated film 'Raya and the Last Dragon.'
05/03/2147m 35s

What's Next For The War In Afghanistan?

America's 19-year war in Afghanistan may soon be coming to an end. The Trump administration negotiated a deal with the Taliban, in which the U.S. agreed to withdraw all its troops by May 1. But the Afghan government was not included in those talks. Now President Biden has to decide whether to honor the Trump deal and risk that the Taliban will try to take over the country again. We speak with 'New Yorker' reporter Dexter Filkins about what he saw in Afghanistan while he was there in January.
04/03/2147m 2s

'Minari' Director Lee Isaac Chung

Based on Chung's own childhood, 'Minari' is about a Korean American family that moves to rural Arkansas to start a farm. The director spoke with contributor Arun Venugopal about the memories that inspired the film, why he initially kept the project a secret from his family, and choosing the title of the movie. 'Minari' just won a Golden Globe for best foreign language film. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Klara and the Sun,' by Kazuo Ishiguro.
03/03/2148m 38s

How Bellingcat's Web Sleuths Solve Global Crimes

Eliot Higgins is the founder of an online collective that picks apart conspiracy theories and investigates war crimes and hate crimes using clues from the Internet — like social media posts, leaked databases and free satellite maps. We talk about how Bellingcat traced the origin of the missile that shot down flight MH17 in Ukraine, the ethics of the Bellingcat methods, and the emotional impact of seeing atrocities online. His new book is 'We Are Bellingcat.'Also, David Bianculli reviews the Netflix miniseries 'Behind Her Eyes.'
02/03/2147m 59s

From Card Cheat To Illusionist: Magician Derek DelGaudio

The sleight-of-hand master explores themes of identity, honesty and the emotional cost of keeping secrets in the memoir, 'AMORALMAN.' DelGaudio's one-man show 'In & Of Itself' is now available on Hulu. "[Secrets] are like a drug," he says. "They enter your system and they intoxicate you and they get you to modify your behavior, whether you know it or not. And so it's learning to control the effects of secrecy that really were key for me, in terms of creating a convincing illusion."John Powers reviews Mick Herron's spy thriller 'Slough House.'
01/03/2147m 42s

Best Of: Sacha Baron Cohen / Changing Policing From The Inside

British actor Sacha Baron Cohen is known for taking his absurd characters like Borat, Brüno and Ali G into the world and interacting with unwitting real people. Baron Cohen has been chased, sued and nearly arrested while in character. We talk about why he revived Borat after a 13-year hiatus and playing Yippie leader Abbie Hoffman in 'The Trial of the Chicago 7.'Also, John Powers reviews the film 'Minari.'For four years, Georgetown Law professor and human rights activist Rosa Brooks carried a badge and a gun and worked a minimum of 24 hours a month for the DC police department — all on a voluntary basis. Brooks writes about her experiences with the police in 'Tangled Up in Blue.'
27/02/2150m 37s

The Legacies Of Sam Cooke, Muhammad Ali & Malcolm X

The movie 'One Night in Miami,' directed by Regina King, imagines the conversations between four Black icons in 1964: Cassius Clay, Sam Cooke, Jim Brown and Malcolm X, on the night of Clay's surprise win over Sonny Liston. We listen back to archival interviews about three of those men. We hear from Peter Guralnick, who wrote a biography of Sam Cooke, the popular singer and one of the first gospel artists to cross over to soul music; with Jonathan Eig, who spent four years researching and writing a biography of Muhammad Ali (previously known as Cassius Clay); and with Alex Haley, who was chosen by Malcolm X to help write his now famous autobiography. This was before Haley wrote his seminal book 'Roots'. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the film 'The United States vs. Billie Holiday' on Hulu.
26/02/2147m 18s

Behind-The-Scenes Of The Capitol Insurrection Video

George Polk Award-winning journalist Luke Mogelson followed a mob of MAGA supporters into the Capitol on Jan. 6 and filmed what he saw. His video footage from inside the Senate Chamber was used as evidence in the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump. "I think that the majority of people who were there were generally geared up and prepared for some kind of violence," he says. "So once all these folks were gathered on the Mall and listening to Trump, I think that they could have been sent in any number of directions. What did happen was Trump specifically directed them towards a target, a specific target, and that was the Capitol."
25/02/2147m 18s

Writer Tim O'Brien On Fatherhood & The Burden Of Vietnam

Known for his novel 'The Things They Carried,' O'Brien is now the subject of a new documentary, 'The War and Peace of Tim O'Brien.' When he became a father in his late 50s, he initially feared parenthood would curtail his writing. "Much as Vietnam did, [parenthood] gave me a body of material, that kind of context to write about," he says. "Maybe it's biology just keeping the species going, but I feel that I'm part of something age-old that's going to continue long after I'm gone."Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the true crime book 'Two Truths and a Lie,' about a botched execution and a quest for justice.
24/02/2147m 54s

Inside The 'Ten Year War' Over Obamacare

In his new book, 'The Ten Year War,' Jonathan Cohn looks at the intense debate surrounding the Affordable Care Act, the compromises of the law itself, and how it has been functioning during the pandemic. Also, John Powers reviews 'Minari,' about a South Korean family struggling to start a farm in Arkansas.
23/02/2147m 59s

Sacha Baron Cohen

The British actor is known for taking his absurd characters like Borat, Brüno and Ali G into the world and interacting with unwitting real people. Baron Cohen has been chased, sued and nearly arrested while in character. A scary experience at a gun rights rally while filming 'Borat Subsequent Moviefilm' has finally solidified his decision to stop doing his undercover style of comedy. "At some point, your luck runs out," he says. We talk about why he revived Borat after a 13-year hiatus, the ethics of his comedy, and playing Yippie leader Abbie Hoffman in 'The Trial of the Chicago 7.'
22/02/2147m 59s

Best Of: Rashida Jones / The Cyber Weapons Arms Race

Rashida Jones filmed 'On the Rocks' shortly after her son's birth and her mother's death. She nearly turned down the role, and is glad she didn't. "This movie was kind of a salvation for me," she says. We talk about biracial representation in Hollywood and the toxicity of fame.Justin Chang reviews 'Judas and the Black Messiah.' The world is on the precipice of cyber catastrophe, and everything is vulnerable, including our government, nuclear weapons, elections, power grid, hospitals, and cell phones. 'New York Times' cybersecurity reporter Nicole Perlroth explains how the U.S. went from having the world's strongest cyber arsenal to becoming so vulnerable to cyber attack. Perlroth's new book is 'This Is How They Tell Me The World Ends.'
20/02/2148m 50s

The Story Of "Black Radical" William Monroe Trotter

Historian Kerri Greenidge tells the story of William Monroe Trotter, a Black newspaper editor who was a forceful crusader for civil rights in the early 20th century. He built a national following in his time as a fierce advocate for the full citizenship rights that had been promised to former enslaved people after the Civil War. Trotter organized mass protests, confronted presidents, and openly challenged leaders such as Booker T. Washington who took a more cautious approach to Black empowerment. Greenidge's book is 'Black Radical.'Justin Chang reviews 'Nomadland starring Frances McDormand, and Kevin Whitehead shares a remembrance of legendary jazz pianist Chick Corea.
19/02/2147m 52s

How The Pandemic Hurts Working Moms

Women are bearing the brunt of kids' virtual schooling and the increased household work associated with the pandemic. 'NYT' reporter Claire Cain Miller says many working mothers have scaled back on their hours or left the workforce entirely due to the pandemic — which could have lasting effects on gender and economic equity. "It took a very, very slow moving process from the 1970s until today to get women where they are professionally," Miller says. "I do worry that this has erased so much of it so quickly that it could be a massive setback for decades."
18/02/2147m 19s

What Racism Costs Everyone

In her book, 'The Sum of Us,' Heather McGhee examines the cost of racial discrimination in the U.S., and draws on a wealth of economic data to make the case that discriminatory laws and practices that target Black people also negatively impact society at large. McGhee says when racial barriers to voting, employment, and housing are broken down, white working people are among the beneficiaries.Also, John Powers reviews the miniseries 'It's a Sin' about a group of friends in London during the AIDS epidemic.
17/02/2147m 36s

Tackling Police Reform From The Inside

For four years, Georgetown Law professor and human rights activist Rosa Brooks carried a badge and a gun and worked a minimum of 24 hours a month for the DC police department — all on a voluntary basis. "If you want to change something, you have to understand it," she says. Brooks writes about her experiences as with the police in 'Tangled Up in Blue.'
16/02/2148m 25s

Spike Lee / Remembering Cloris Leachman

Guest host Sam Sanders talks with Spike Lee about 'Da 5 Bloods,' about four Black Vietnam War vets who return together to Vietnam. Lee also talks about working with late actor Chadwick Boseman. Also, we remember Cloris Leachman and listen back to an excerpt of her 2009 interview. She co-starred in the Mel Brooks films 'Young Frankenstein' and 'High Anxiety,' won an Oscar for her role in 'The Last Picture Show.'
15/02/2148m 6s

Best Of: Dr. Fauci / How Women Police Differently

Only a few weeks into the new Biden administration, infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci is encouraged by the president's approach to the pandemic. We'll talk about an early chapter of his career, during the AIDS crisis, when he was criticized for not making experimental drugs available to people with AIDS. Fauci listened to his critics and worked with them, leading to medical reforms that are benefiting us today, during the pandemic.The new documentary 'Women in Blue' follows four women who worked for the Minneapolis Police Department. We talk with the director, Deirdre Fishel, as well as Sergeant Alice White, one of the women profiled in the film.
13/02/2150m 19s

Remembering Supremes Singer Mary Wilson / Actor Christopher Plummer

We remember Mary Wilson, one of the founding members of The Supremes. She died Monday at the age of 76. We'll listen back to our 1986 interview with her about the early days of the Supremes, when they were just starting out. Also, we remember actor Christopher Plummer who died last Friday. Though he had a long stage and film career, he's best-known for his role as Captain von Trapp in 'The Sound of Music.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Judas and the Black Messiah' about the 1969 death of Fred Hampton, one of the leaders of the Black Panthers.
12/02/2149m 6s

Rashida Jones

Jones filmed 'On the Rocks' shortly after her son's birth and her mother's death. She nearly turned down the role, and is glad she didn't. "This movie was kind of a salvation for me," she says. We talk about 'Parks & Rec,' the toxicity of fame, and growing up surrounded by musicians in her father, Quincy Jones', studio.
11/02/2145m 54s

Inside The Cyber Weapons Arms Race

The world is on the precipice of cyber catastrophe, and everything is vulnerable, including our government, nuclear weapons, elections, power grid, hospitals, and cell phones. 'New York Times' cybersecurity reporter Nicole Perlroth explains how the U.S. went from having the world's strongest cyber arsenal to becoming so vulnerable to cyber attack. "We have to stop leaving gaping holes in software that could be used by adversaries to pull off some of these attacks," she says. Perlroth's new book is "This Is How They Tell Me The World Ends."
10/02/2148m 42s

How Humans Try (And Fail) To Master Nature

'New Yorker' writer Elizabeth Kolbert talks about efforts to reverse some of the harm humans have done to the natural world. Her new book, 'Under a White Sky,' details visionary ideas, like scattering tiny particles into the stratosphere to block some sunlight and cool the planet. She also reports on current efforts, like the millions spent trying to control Asian carp imported to American rivers. "We're now intervening to counter the effects of our own intervention," Kolbert says. "I call it the control of the control of nature." Kolbert is also author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book 'The Sixth Extinction.'Also, Ken Tucker reviews three new songs that confront the ache and fury of lost love: Jazmine Sullivan's "Pick Up Your Feelings"; Matthew Sweet's "At a Loss"; and Olivia Rodrigo's "Drivers License."
09/02/2148m 18s

'Women In Blue' Doc. Explores How Women Police Differently

The new documentary 'Women in Blue' follows four women who worked for the Minneapolis Police Department. We talk with the director, Deirdre Fishel, as well as Sergeant Alice White, one of the women profiled in the film. Fishel set out to examine how women police differently. "They rely less on physical force, that they possess more effective communication skills, and that they're better at defusing potentially violent confrontations before they turned deadly," she says. 'Women in Blue' is on the PBS Independent Lens series.Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'We Run the Tides' by Vendela Vida, which she calls "a wonder of a novel."
08/02/2148m 13s

Best Of: Ben & Ellen Harper / The Mob On Main Street

Ellen Harper, and her Grammy award-winning son, musician Ben Harper, both grew up in the Folk Music Center in Claremont, Calif. Ellen's parents founded the center in 1958, and Ellen runs it today. Her new memoir, 'Always a Song,' is her story of the folk music revival of the '50s and '60s, and about raising her three biracial sons, mostly as a single mother. Also, John Powers reviews 'The Copenhagen Trilogy' by Tove Ditlevsen. Finally, writer Russell Shorto's grandfather was a mob boss in the industrial town of Johnstown, Pa., where Shorto grew up. He talks about uncovering his family's secret gambling operation in his new memoir, 'Smalltime.'
06/02/2150m 19s

Dusty Springfield's Manager & Biographer Vicki Wickham

The late British singer Dusty Springfield was best-known for her seemingly effortless singing and distinctive voice. She had many hits in the 1960s in England and the U.S. We listen back to a 2002 interview with her longtime friend and manager Vicki Wickham, who co-wrote a biography of her. There's a new anthology that collects Springfield's singles for Atlantic Records. Also, we remember the venerable actor Hal Holbrook. He devoted his life and career to playing Mark Twain on stage and in film. He also played the role of Deep Throat in 'All the President's Men.'Finally, Justin Chang reviews two international Oscar submissions: 'Two of Us,' from France, and 'Preparations to Be Together for an Unknown Period of Time,' from Hungary.
05/02/2149m 12s

Dr. Anthony Fauci

Less than three weeks into the new Biden administration, the infectious disease expert is encouraged by the president's approach to the pandemic. "Science [is] going to rule," Fauci says. He talks about what he learned from the AIDS epidemic that he's applying to the current pandemic, the problem with achieving herd immunity through infection, and the new mutations of COVID-19. Also, podcast critic Nick Quah reflects on the era of Trump podcasts.
04/02/2148m 14s

Biden's Economic Plan & The Decline Of The Middle Class

'New York Times' reporter Jim Tankersley talks about Biden's $1.9 trillion rescue plan for the economy amid the pandemic. For much of his reporting career, Tankersley has focused on the declining middle class — and what the country can do about it. His 2020 book on the subject is 'The Riches of This Land.' Also, John Powers reviews 'The Copenhagen Trilogy' by Tove Ditlevsen.
03/02/2148m 22s

Writer Russell Shorto On His Family's Secret Mob Operation

Russell Shorto's grandfather was a mob leader in the industrial town of Johnstown, Pa. He writes about the family havoc that resulted from his grandfather's operation in the new memoir, 'Smalltime.'
02/02/2147m 59s

Ben Harper & Ellen Harper On The Folk Music Revival

Ellen Harper runs the Folk Music Center in Claremont, Calif., and her son Ben Harper is a Grammy award-winning singer and songwriter. Ellen Harper's new memoir 'Always a Song' tells her story of the '50s and '60s folk music revival and her experience raising three biracial children, mostly as a single mom. They talk about growing up surrounded by folk music luminaries.
01/02/2148m 46s

Best Of: China's Surveillance State / Understanding The Human Voice

German journalist Kai Strittmatter says the Chinese state has amassed an astonishing amount of data about its citizens, which it uses to punish people for even minor offenses. We talk about facial recognition, a citizen point system, and the widespread use of barcodes. Strittmatter's new book is 'We Have Been Harmonized.' Justin Chang reviews the serial killer thriller film 'The Little Things,' starring Denzel Washington, Rami Malek and Jared Leto.We talk with 'New Yorker' writer John Colapinto about how voices work, Colapinto's own vocal injury and the procedure to repair damaged vocal cords. His book is 'This Is the Voice.'
30/01/2150m 16s

Hank Azaria On 'The Simpsons' & 'Brockmire'

Azaria plays a colorful baseball announcer in the IFC comedy series 'Brockmire.' All 4 seasons are now available for streaming. Azaria spoke with 'Fresh Air' about sobriety, his flamboyant character in 'The Birdcage,' and why he doesn't voice the Indian American convenience store owner Apu on 'The Simpsons' anymore.Also, Justin Chang reviews the serial killer thriller film 'The Little Things,' starring Denzel Washington, Rami Malek and Jared Leto.
29/01/2148m 40s

With Trump Gone, What's Next For QAnon?

'Washington Post' reporter Craig Timberg suggests some in the QAnon movement will become even more extreme now that Trump, their "messiah," has left office. "There is a real danger that what we'll see is a somewhat smaller but maybe more fervent and maybe more hateful and maybe more stealthy remnant that remains a force in our political life for years to come," Timberg says. We talk about the impact of Trump's ban from social media, the inception of the conspiracy theory/extremist group, and how the movement is responding to a new administration. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'My Year Abroad' by Chang-rae Lee.
28/01/2147m 33s

Surveillance & Local Police: How Technology Is Evolving Faster Than Regulation

Journalist Jon Fasman says local police departments are able to use very powerful surveillance tools, often with little oversight. Fasman talks about license plate readers, predictive policing, facial recognition software and more. "The question is: Is it worth the cost to our privacy and liberty to implement this technology? And if so, what limits are we willing to set? What penalties do we want for failing to observe these limits?" Fasman's book is 'We See It All.'Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'The Lady and the Dale,' a docuseries on HBO.
27/01/2148m 37s

'The Human Factor' & Middle East Peace Negotiations

We get an inside look at the negotiations between Palestinian and Israeli leaders during the Clinton administration that held real promise for a peace agreement — before an assassin's bullet changed everything. We talk with filmmaker Dror Moreh about his documentary, 'The Human Factor, and with Dennis Ross, President Clinton's point man in the effort.
26/01/2148m 6s

Exploring The Human Voice

We talk with 'New Yorker' writer John Colapinto, author of 'This Is the Voice,' about how voices work, how they evolved in our prehistoric ancestors, how babies learn to vocalize words of their parents' languages so quickly, and what makes voices sexy or authoritative. Colapinto's own vocal injury led him to explore this subject.Also, we remember legendary broadcaster Larry King. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1982.
25/01/2148m 45s

Best Of: 'News Of The World' Director / Busting Myths About Exercise

News of the World' is a Western set five years after the end of the Civil War. It stars Tom Hanks as a former Confederate captain who travels from one small poor Texas town to another, reading aloud from newspapers to townspeople who gather, paying ten cents apiece to be informed and entertained by these stories. We talk with director Paul Greengrass, who also directed Hanks in 'Captain Phillips.'Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Aftershocks,' by Nadia Owusu.Paleoanthropologist Daniel Lieberman says the concept of "exercise" is a relatively new thing. His new book, 'Exercised,' examines why we run, lift and walk for a workout, when our ancestors didn't.
23/01/2150m 24s

How Tragedy & Resilience Made Joe Biden

Journalist Evan Osnos talks about President Biden's long career in the Senate, how personal tragedy changed him, and some of the political missteps he made along the way. Osnos' biography is 'Joe Biden: The Life, the Run, and What Matters Now.' (Interview was recorded before the election in Oct. 2020) Also, we remember late musician Howard Johnson, who made a place for tuba in jazz, working with Charles Mingus, McCoy Tyner, Gil Evans and others. He later expanded into rock and roll playing with Taj Mahal and The Band. He also helped create and played in the original 'Saturday Night' Live band. And Justin Chang reviews 'The White Tiger' on Netflix.
22/01/2149m 1s

Busting Myths About Exercise

Paleoanthropologist Daniel Lieberman says the concept of "exercise" is a relatively new thing. His new book, 'Exercised,' examines why we run, lift and walk for a workout, when our ancestors didn't. We'll also talk about how sitting and slouching affect our health.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the digital album 'Some Kind of Tomorrow,' recorded over Zoom.
21/01/2148m 30s

Biden's Plan To Enact A Climate Agenda

Trump called climate change a hoax. Biden calls it an existential threat. 'Washington Post' journalist Juliet Eilperin talks about how Biden might reverse his predecessor's environmental policies.John Powers reviews the Polish thriller film 'Spoor.'
20/01/2147m 52s

The Story Of The Blackwell Sisters, Pioneers Of Women In Medicine

Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to earn her medical degree​ in the United States​. Her sister Emily​ soon after​ followed in her footsteps. Janice Nimura tells the story of the "complicated, prickly" ​19th century ​trailblazers​ in her book 'The Doctors Blackwell.' ​"To me, [the Blackwells] taught me that it's really important in this moment to kind of relearn how to admire women​," Nimura says. ​Also Ken Tucker reviews 'Peter Stampfel's 20th Century' a new collection from the folk musician.
19/01/2148m 18s

The FBI's Effort To Take Down MLK

Filmmaker Sam Pollard talks about his new documentary 'MLK/FBI,' based on newly declassified documents, which exposes the ways that the FBI attempted to discredit Martin Luther King Jr. Pollard talks about how the agency bugged his phones, surveilled hotel rooms, and even sent King a letter suggesting he kill himself. Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Aftershocks' by Nadia Owusu.
18/01/2148m 2s

Best Of: Fran Lebowitz / The Legacy Of William Monroe Trotter

The Netflix docuseries 'Pretend It's a City' features iconoclastic humorist Fran Lebowitz's conversations with Martin Scorsese. Lebowitz talks about why she loves living alone, driving a cab in the '70s, and her friendship with Toni Morrison. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'Cloud Script' from Joshua Abrams' quartet.Historian Kerri Greenidge tells the story of William Monroe Trotter, a Black newspaper editor who was a forceful crusader for civil rights in the early 20th century. He built a national following in his time as a fierce advocate for the full citizenship rights that had been promised to former enslaved people after the Civil War. Greenidge's new book is called 'Black Radical.'
16/01/2149m 59s

Remembering Michael Apted, William Link And Neil Sheehan

We look back on the lives and careers of three people who have recently died. First, filmmaker Michael Apted, best-known for his documentary series, 'Up,' which followed the lives of a group of British citizens. He updated their stories with a new episode every seven years, from childhood through their 60s. Apted died last week. We also listen back to our interview with screenwriter William Link, who co-created many long-running TV series, including 'Columbo' and 'Murder She Wrote.' Also we remember Vietnam War correspondent Neil Sheehan. He broke the story of the Pentagon Papers, and wrote 'A Bright Shining Lie,' a Pulitzer-Prize winning book about the war. David Bianculli reviews 'WandaVision,' the new miniseries on Disney+.
15/01/2148m 41s

Dir. Paul Greengrass On 'News Of The World'

News of the World' is a Western set five years after the end of the Civil War. It stars Tom Hanks as a former Confederate captain who travels from one small poor Texas town to another, reading aloud from newspapers to townspeople who gather, paying ten cents apiece to be informed and entertained by these stories. We talk with director Paul Greengrass, who also directed Hanks in 'Captain Phillips.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews the new HBO documentary about the Bee Gees, and a new album by the only one of the three Bee Gee brothers still alive, Barry Gibb.
14/01/2148m 20s

The Story Of 'Black Radical' William Monroe Trotter

Historian Kerri Greenidge tells the story of William Monroe Trotter, a Black newspaper editor who was a forceful crusader for civil rights in the early 20th century. He built a national following in his time as a fierce advocate for the full citizenship rights that had been promised to former enslaved people after the Civil War. Trotter organized mass protests, confronted presidents, and openly challenged leaders such as Booker T. Washington who took a more cautious approach to Black empowerment. Greenidge's new book is called 'Black Radical.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Promising Young Woman' and 'Pieces of a Woman.'
13/01/2148m 44s

The Racist History Of The Senate Filibuster

Adam Jentleson traces the history of the filibuster, which started as a tool of Southern senators upholding slavery and then later became a mechanism to block civil rights legislation. His book is 'Kill Switch: The Rise of the Modern Senate and The Crippling of American Democracy.'
12/01/2147m 38s

Humorist Fran Lebowitz

The Netflix docuseries 'Pretend It's a City' features Lebowitz's conversations with Martin Scorsese on many topics, Manhattan in particular. "If I dropped the Hope Diamond on the floor of a subway car, I'd leave it there," she says. Lebowitz also talks about getting expelled from school, working for Andy Warhol, and why she loves living alone. Also, John Powers reviews the book 'The Liar's Dictionary' by Eley Williams.
11/01/2147m 36s

Best Of: Dr. Sanjay Gupta / Philippine Journalist Maria Ressa

CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks about how learning new skills can optimize brain health. His new book is 'Keep Sharp.' Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Outlawed,' a novel by Anna North, which she describes as 'Handmaid's Tale' meets 'Butch Cassidy.'Journalist Maria Ressa has faced criminal charges and death threats because of her coverage of the populist, authoritarian Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. We talk about her work in the Philippines and the threats she's faced. Ressa is the subject of a new PBS FRONTLINE documentary, 'A Thousand Cuts.'
09/01/2150m 16s

Remembering Nature Writer Barry Lopez

We remember the award-winning writer Barry Lopez, who wrote evocatively about nature, and in turn shed light on truths about the human experience. He died Christmas day at the age of 75. Lopez lived among the Arctic's Inuit people for five years, and raised a wolf pup for his book about the relationship between wolves and men. Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the new album by Chicago bassist Joshua Abrams. Then David Bianculli remarks on the live TV coverage of the insurrection led by Trump rioters on Wednesday.
08/01/2148m 15s

America's Pandemic Failures

The U.S. has only 4% of the world's population — and yet it accounts for 20% of all COVID deaths. 'New Yorker' writer Lawrence Wright discusses America's "plague year." We'll talk about the mishandling of the outbreak and his novel 'The End of October,' about a deadly pandemic.
07/01/2148m 3s

Journalist Maria Ressa On Standing Up To Philippine President

Journalist Maria Ressa has faced criminal charges and death threats because of her coverage of the populist, authoritarian Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. She's covered Duterte's bloody "war on drugs," his expanding grip on all parts of the government and his crackdown on the press. In 2018, she was Time Magazine's Person of the Year. Ressa is the subject of a new PBS FRONTLINE documentary, 'A Thousand Cuts,' directed by Ramona Diaz.Also book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Outlawed,' a novel by Anna North, which she describes as 'Handmaid's Tale' meets 'Butch Cassidy.'
06/01/2148m 28s

Life In China's Surveillance State

German journalist Kai Strittmatter says the Chinese state has amassed an astonishing amount of data about its citizens, which it uses to punish people for even minor offenses. We talk about facial recognition, a citizen point system, and the widespread use of barcodes. Strittmatter's new book is 'We Have Been Harmonized.'Also, David Bianculli reviews 'Mr. Mayor,' a new sitcom on NBC starring Ted Danson.
05/01/2147m 51s

Neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta On How To 'Keep Sharp'

CNN's chief medical correspondent says it's never too late to develop new brain pathways. Even small changes, like switching up the hand you hold your fork with, can help optimize brain health. We talk about the importance of learning new skills, good sleep, and how stress affects the brain. Dr. Gupta's new book is 'Keep Sharp.'
04/01/2147m 13s

Best Of: NPR's Nina Totenberg / 'Watchmen' Writer Cord Jefferson

Nina Totenberg is widely regarded as the dean of legal journalists. She started covering the Supreme Court in 1971 and became NPR's legal correspondent in 1975. We talk about breaking the Anita Hill story, her friendship with the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and being a pioneer for women in journalism.The HBO series 'Watchmen' uses sci-fi and action heroes to examine American racism. We talk with show writer Cord Jefferson, who wrote the episode of the series in which the main character narrowly survives the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, when white supremacists destroyed a prosperous Black community.
02/01/2150m 35s

Francis Ford Coppola On Making 'The Godfather'

Coppola was 29 years old when he signed on to direct a film. "I was young and had no power," he said. "So [the studio] figured they could just boss me around." But Coppola fought back. He recalled the making of his masterpiece in a 2016 interview with Terry Gross.
01/01/2149m 52s

Loudon Wainwright III & Vince Giordano In Concert

We close out the year with music from singer-songwriter Loudon Wainwright III and Nighthawks bandleader Vince Giordano. They collaborated on the 1920s and '30s style music for the series 'Boardwalk Empire' and the film 'The Aviator.' Now they've gotten together again on the new album, 'I'd Rather Lead a Band,' a collection of songs from the Great American Songbook. They talk with Terry Gross about their new record and the music of the era.
31/12/2050m 28s

Remembering Broadway Star Rebecca Luker

Luker died last Wednesday of ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease. She was 59. She had a beautiful singing voice, and received Tony nominations for her performances in 'Showboat,' 'The Music Man,' and 'Mary Poppins.' She also starred in a revival of 'The Sound of Music.' We listen back to excerpts of several Fresh Air interviews.Also, Kevin Whitehead remembers some jazz greats we lost his year.
30/12/2049m 41s

Stephen King / Sir. Patrick Stewart

Even Stephen King is feeling like he's living in a Stephen King novel these days. The author of the 1978 pandemic novel 'The Stand' says he understands why fans have said the COVID-19 pandemic feels like something out of his books. King says he doesn't feel panic or terror, but rather, a "gnawing anxiety." Patrick Stewart is back as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the CBS All Access series 'Star Trek: Picard.' He says he's changed as an actor over the years: "I am not averse to risk-taking and I don't judge myself." Stewart spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger about 'Picard,'
29/12/2050m 29s

'Queen's Gambit' Co-Creator Scott Frank

One of the most popular shows of the year is the Netflix limited series 'The Queen's Gambit,' which has been streamed by more than 62 million households. It's about an orphaned girl who becomes a chess prodigy, then a chess pro in a male-dominated world. We hear from Scott Frank, the co-creator, executive producer and director of the series. He spoke with guest contributor Arun Venugopal.John Powers reviews the new psychological thriller 'Elizabeth Is Missing' starring Glenda Jackson, which airs on PBS Masterpiece. And Clint Smith reads a poem about growing up in the shadows of Confederate statues.
28/12/2048m 7s

Best Of: 2020 In Film, TV & Music

COVID upended the movie, TV and music industries. Concerts were canceled and movie theaters were mostly closed. Still, our critics say there was some really good stuff to watch and listen to this year, and many people had more time than usual to do it. We'll hear from our TV critic David Bianculli, our rock critic Ken Tucker and our film critic Justin Chang. Also, we lost a lot of great musicians this year, our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead will pay tribute to some of them.
26/12/2050m 43s

Christmas Concert: Rosemary Clooney & Rebecca Kilgore

On a Christmas that has many of us wishing for the familiar comforts and pleasures of a holiday with family and friends, we turn to two singers whose performances have been a pleasure to return to over the years. We'll hear a 2005 interview with Rebecca Kilgore in which she sang some classic Christmas songs, and we have an excerpt of our onstage concert and 1997 interview with Rosemary Clooney.
25/12/2048m 14s

2020 In TV, Film & Podcasts

Our TV critic David Bianculli and film critic Justin Chang sit down with Terry Gross to share their favorites of the year. Also, Vulture writer Nick Quah shares some of his favorite podcasts of 2020.
24/12/2050m 44s

How The Pandemic Made The Ultra-Rich Even Richer

"You have a group of 650 people whose wealth has gone up a trillion dollars since mid-March," says Chuck Collins of the Institute for Policy Studies. Collins talks about how the richest Americans have profited from the pandemic, and his own relationship to generational wealth. Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy spoke with contributor Ann Marie Baldonado about 'The Tweedy Show,' which he does from his home, and his songwriting process.
23/12/2048m 22s

Angela Bassett

Bassett is one of the stars of the new Pixar animated film 'Soul.' She was in the Marvel blockbuster 'Black Panther' and has portrayed iconic people like Tina Turner in 'What's Love Got to Do With It,' and Betty Shabazz, Malcolm X's wife, in Spike Lee's movie 'Malcolm X. ' Early in Bassett's career, she appeared in the 1991 film 'Boyz n the Hood.' She spoke with contributor Sam Sanders about her career, and what it has been like as a Black woman in the movie industry.Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews several new Christmas songs that fit the mood of this COVID Christmas.
22/12/2050m 24s

Michael J. Fox

The 'Family Ties' star was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson's disease in 1991. He says that if he doesn't know if he can do something, he fakes it — a strategy that works 80 percent of the time. His memoir is 'No Time like the Future.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Tomorrow Will Be Better' a newly reprinted novel by Betty Smith, and Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly released album by tenor sax player George Coleman.
21/12/2047m 18s

Best Of: Riz Ahmed / Rock Photographer Bob Gruen

Riz Ahmed plays a drummer who loses his hearing in 'Sound of Metal. ' To prepare for the role, he immersed himself in deaf culture — an experience that changed the way he thought about communication and listening.Maureen Corrigan shares her favorite books of 2020. Bob Gruen has photographed countless rock stars, including John Lennon, the Rolling Stones, Chuck Berry and Tina Turner. His new memoir is 'Right Place, Right Time.'
19/12/2050m 34s

Elton John On Music, Addiction & Family

Sir Elton John spoke with Terry Gross in 2019 after the publication of his memoir, 'Me.' The book was pretty forthcoming about family, addiction and sexuality, and so was the conversation. A new CD box set collects rarities, demos, B-sides and fan favorites from his long career.Also, Justin Chang reviews 'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom' starring Chadwick Boseman in his last film before he died this year at age 43.
18/12/2049m 8s

COVID Vaccine Rollout & Where Research Fell Short

'Atlantic' science writer Ed Yong says the COVID vaccination program will be the most complicated the U.S. has ever attempted: "It's going to be a slow process, and there are a lot of possible roadblocks." We talk with Yong about what the rollout process will be like, where COVID research fell short, and what to expect for 2021.
17/12/2050m 6s

American Folk Music Curators / Comedian Amber Ruffin

Music producers Lance and April Ledbetter talk about curating their new anthology, which collects the flip sides of the 78s Harry Smith chose for his 1952 Anthology of American Folk Music. They spoke with producer Sam Briger. Also, we talk with 'Late Night with Seth Meyers' writer and performer Amber Ruffin. She's now got her own show on Peacock. "I've earned (hopefully) enough grace to do whatever I want," she tells contributor Ann Marie Baldonado.
16/12/2048m 15s

MC & Actor Riz Ahmed

Ahmed plays a drummer who loses his hearing in 'Sound of Metal. ' To prepare for the role, he immersed himself in deaf culture — an experience that changed the way he thought about communication and listening. We talk about that film, the formative experience of being racially profiled in an airport, and his breakthrough song "Post 9/11 Blues." Also, Ken Tucker shares his favorite albums of the year.
15/12/2049m 24s

Remembering Novelist (And Former Spy) John Le Carré

Best-selling novelist John Le Carré, who died Dec. 12, worked for MI5 and MI6 early in his career and later drew on that experience in thrillers like 'The Spy Who Came in from the Cold' and 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.' He spoke with Terry Gross in 1989 and 2017 about how his work for British intelligence informed his writing. Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly issued 1971 live recording by tenor saxophonist George Coleman.
14/12/2048m 20s

Best Of: Kate Winslet / Loudon Wainwright III & Vince Giordano

Kate Winslet co-stars in the new film 'Ammonite' as Mary Anning, a 19th-century paleontologist who has an intense love affair with the wife of a geologist. We talk about her new film and how things have changed for women in Hollywood.Singer-songwriter Loudon Wainwright III and Nighthawks bandleader Vince Giordano collaborated on the 1920s and '30s style music for the series 'Boardwalk Empire' and the film 'The Aviator.' Now they've gotten together again on the new album, 'I'd Rather Lead a Band,' a collection of songs from the Great American Songbook.
12/12/2050m 32s

Rachel Maddow On Spiro Agnew's Bribery Scandal

Richard Nixon's first vice president, Spiro Agnew, resigned in 1973 amidst charges of bribery and tax evasion. MSNBC host Rachel Maddow and producer Mike Yarvitz investigated the Agnew scandal in the podcast 'Bag Man.' Now their work on the podcast has been adapted into a book, 'Bag Man: The Wild Crimes, Audacious Cover-Up, and Spectacular Downfall of a Brazen Crook in the White House.' Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Farewell Amor.'
11/12/2047m 59s

NYT Reporter Maggie Haberman Unpacks The Trump Years

White House correspondent Maggie Haberman sheds light on Trump's refusal to concede."[He] can't handle the concept of the label 'loser,' " she says. "He has never before encountered a problem that he couldn't sue away through the court system or spin away." We'll also talk about what's next for the president and the frustrations of covering this particular administration.
10/12/2049m 34s

A Lawyer Combats The Mass Incarceration Crisis

Lawyer Brittany Barnett works on behalf of people sentenced to harsh sentences as a result of the war on drugs. Nine of her clients have been granted clemency. Barnett's new memoir is 'A Knock at Midnight: A Story of Hope, Justice And Freedom.' Critic John Powers shares his list of the year's best TV, books and movies.
09/12/2048m 24s

Rock & Roll Photographer Bob Gruen

Gruen has photographed countless rock stars, including John Lennon, the Rolling Stones, Chuck Berry and Tina Turner. We talk about his friendship with John Lennon, why Bob Dylan doesn't like him, and surviving the party lifestyle of the '70s. His new memoir is 'Right Place, Right Time.' Also, we remember test pilot Chuck Yeager who broke the sound barrier. He died yesterday at 97.
08/12/2050m 49s

Kate Winslet

Winslet co-stars in the new film 'Ammonite' as Mary Anning, a 19th-century paleontologist who has an intense love affair with the wife of a geologist, played by Saorise Ronan. We talk about why the role scared her, how playing an epidemiologist in the 2011 film 'Contagion' prepared her for COVID, and how 'Titanic' changed her life. Also, Justin Chang reviews 'Mank,' directed by David Fincher, now on Netflix.
07/12/2048m 35s

Best Of: Hugh Grant / The Sanitation Crisis In Rural Alabama

Hugh Grant co-stars in the HBO miniseries 'The Undoing' as a charming doctor suspected of brutally murdering his lover. We talk with Grant about the "blessed relief" of taking on darker roles.Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Ammonite,' starring Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan. MacArthur fellow Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in rural Alabama and has spent 20 years calling attention to the problem of people living with inadequate sanitation systems, resulting in human waste collecting in their yards and sometimes seeping into their homes. Her new book is 'Waste: One Woman's Fight Against America's Dirty Secret.'
05/12/2051m 21s

Celebrating Jazz Great Dave Brubeck / Best Books Of 2020

We celebrate the life and music of influential jazz pianist and composer Dave Brubeck, who was born 100 years ago. Brubeck's album 'Time Out,' released in 1959, was the first jazz album to sell a million copies. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1999. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan shares her top 10 books of the year, and David Bianculli reviews Showtime's series 'Your Honor' starring Bryan Cranston.
04/12/2049m 39s

National Security & The Final Weeks Of The Trump Administration

President Trump has ousted his secretary of defense and the head of the Pentagon's Defeat Isis Task Force. Trump has also considered striking Iran, and is expected to pull troops from Afghanistan. We talk with 'New York Times' reporter Eric Schmitt about what this may mean for American national security.
03/12/2049m 53s

Loudon Wainwright III & Vince Giordano Play From The Great American Songbook

Singer-songwriter Loudon Wainwright III and Nighthawks bandleader Vince Giordano collaborated on the 1920s and '30s style music for the series 'Boardwalk Empire' and the film 'The Aviator.' Now they've gotten together again on the new album, 'I'd Rather Lead a Band,' a collection of songs from the Great American Songbook. They talk with Terry Gross about their new record and the music of the era.
02/12/2048m 47s

Hugh Grant

Grant co-stars in the HBO miniseries 'The Undoing' as a charming doctor suspected of brutally murdering his lover. We talk with Grant about the "blessed relief" of taking a break from playing nice guys, his activism about tabloid privacy, and how 'Four Weddings and a Funeral' changed his life. ​
01/12/2050m 26s

Sen. Ted Kennedy & American Liberalism

A liberal voice in the U.S. Senate for decades, Senator Ted Kennedy led a life marked by tragedy and scandal. Historian Neal Gabler says Kennedy's career shaped the course of American liberalism. His book is 'Catching the Wind.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Happiest Season.' It stars Kristen Stewart and Mackenzie Davis as a lesbian couple trying to keep their relationship a secret during a Christmas family gathering.
30/11/2047m 50s

Best Of: Chef David Chang / Actor Gillian Anderson

Momofuku chef David Chang talks about his new memoir, 'Eat a Peach,' which details his struggle with bipolar disorder and how cooking saved his life. He also hosts the series 'Ugly Delicious' on Netflix. John Powers reviews the gripping Romanian documentary 'Collective,' about journalists uncovering a corruption scandal. 'X-Files' and 'Sex Education' actor Gillian Anderson talks about playing Margaret Thatcher in the new season of 'The Crown,' and then coaches Terry Gross on how to imitate the former prime minster's voice.
28/11/2050m 36s

Carol Burnett

The celebrated variety and sketch comedy series, 'The Carol Burnett Show' aired from 1967-1978 and won more than 20 Emmy Awards. The series is going to streaming services for the first time. Burnett talked to Terry Gross in 2003 and our TV critic David Bianculli interviewed her this year about her signature ear pull, why she didn't do topical humor, and why the show stands the test of time.
27/11/2049m 11s

Conan O'Brien

After 28 years of hosting late-night shows, O'Brien will be starting something new at HBO. He spoke to Terry Gross in 2019 about his early days as a comic and how late-night TV has changed over the years. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly discovered live recording by Sonny Rollins.
26/11/2049m 52s

Chef David Chang

Momofuku chef and 'Ugly Delicious' host David Chang talks about fatherhood, mixing culinary traditions, and how depression led him to take his biggest career risks. "Momofuku was an exercise in combating depression," he says. "Otherwise, a 26 year-old with very little experience should never open a restaurant — and that's what happened." His new memoir is 'Eat a Peach.'Also, we remember travel writer and memoirist Jan Morris. She died last week at 94.
25/11/2048m 41s

Vaccine Expert On COVID & The Year Ahead

Dr. Peter Hotez is part of a team working to develop a low-cost COVID vaccine that could be distributed globally. "Vaccines are coming," he says. "We have to get everybody through to the other side." Hotez talks about vaccine development, the anti-vax movement, and what the year ahead might look like.
24/11/2048m 34s

The Sanitation Crisis In Rural America

In a 2017 study of a rural area of Alabama, more than one in three people tested showed traces of hookworm, an intestinal parasite spread by contact with human feces, previously thought to be eradicated in the U.S. Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in Alabama, and has spent 20 years calling attention to the problem of people living with no sanitary means of human waste disposal, so it collects in their yards, and sometimes seeps into their homes. Earlier this year, she was awarded a MacArthur fellowship to support her work. Her new book is 'Waste: One Woman's Fight Against America's Dirty Secret.' Also, John Powers reviews the documentary 'Collective,' about a team of journalists investigating the aftermath of a 2015 Bucharest nightclub fire that killed 64 people
23/11/2049m 1s

Best Of: President Obama / The Chicago 7

President Barack Obama talks about birtherism and fake news, and reflects on what he misses most about being president — and why he still has faith in democracy. The first volume of his memoir about his presidency is 'A Promised Land.'Also, Justin Chang reviews 'Small Axe,' a series of five films by Steve McQueen. The Chicago 7 were anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The trial is the subject of a new movie written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. We talk with author Jon Wiener about his book, 'Conspiracy in the Streets.'
21/11/2050m 22s

The CIA's Secret Mind Control Experiments

Stephen Kinzer's book, 'Poisoner in Chief,' exposes how CIA scientist Sidney Gottlieb worked in the 1950s and early '60s to develop mind control drugs and deadly toxins that could be used against enemies of the U.S. government. Gottlieb believed the key to mind control was LSD, and is credited with bringing the drug to the U.S. He also experimented on unwitting people in prisons and detention centers in Japan, Germany, and the Philippines. (Originally broadcast Sept. 2019) Also, Justin Chang reviews, 'Small Axe,' Steve McQueen's new collection of five films set in London's West Indian community.
20/11/2048m 40s

President Barack Obama

In his first interview with Terry Gross, President Barack Obama talks about birtherism and fake news, and reflects on what he misses most about being president — and why he still has faith in democracy. The first volume of his memoir about his presidency is 'A Promised Land.'
19/11/2048m 11s

The Extraordinary 'Chicago 7' Trial / 'Alex Rider' Author Anthony Horowitz

The Chicago 7 were anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The trial is the subject of a new movie written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. We talk with author Jon Wiener about his book, 'Conspiracy in the Streets.'Anthony Horowitz's novels about Alex Rider, a reluctant teen spy, have been adapted into a TV series for Amazon. Horowitz is also the author of 'Moonflower Murders,' a mystery for adults. He spoke with producer Sam Briger.
18/11/2048m 18s

The GOP Identity Crisis Post-Trump

Donald Trump was scorned by party leaders when he ran in the 2016 primaries. But after nearly four years in office, he's so popular among Republican voters that few Republican officials dare to cross him. We talk with 'New Yorker' staff writer Nicholas Lemann about what influence Trump might have on the party going forward once he leaves the White House, and how the GOP will deal with the changes Trump has made to the party's identity and ideology. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Book Collectors: A Band of Syrian Rebels and the Stories That Carried Them Through a War' by Delphine Minoui.
17/11/2048m 1s

Gillian Anderson On 'The Crown' & 'The X-Files'

Anderson talks about playing Margaret Thatcher in the new season of 'The Crown,' and then coaches Terry Gross on how to do the former prime minster's voice. We'll also talk about Anderson's role as a sex therapist in 'Sex Education,' and her ongoing fight for equal pay for her co-starring role in 'The X-Files.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews the album 'The Otherside' from country singer-songwriter Cam.
16/11/2047m 28s

Best Of: Megan Rapinoe / The Science Of Smell

USWNT soccer star Megan Rapinoe speaks with Terry Gross about her World Cup wins, the ongoing fight for pay equality in women's sports, and being an LGBTQ activist. Her new memoir about her life on and off the field is 'One Life.'Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'We Keep the Dead Close,' by Becky Cooper, a true crime story about the murder of a Harvard student in 1969 that went unsolved until two years ago.Harold McGee is best-known for his books about food science. In his new book, 'Nose Dive,' he writes about why things smell the way they do — and the ways different chemicals combine to create surprising (and sometimes distasteful) odors.
14/11/2050m 40s

Jazz Pianist Keith Jarrett

Jarrett is one of the most celebrated pianists in jazz — a musician acclaimed for his emotionally intense and physically energetic improvised performances. He was a prodigy who started playing piano at the age of 3. Now he has a new album, 'Budapest,' which was recorded during his last European concert tour. Jarrett recently revealed he had two strokes in 2018 and now he's partially paralyzed and unable to perform. Critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the album and we listen back to our 2000 interview with Jarrett.Also, Justin Chang reviews the new film 'Ammonite,' starring Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan.
13/11/2048m 41s

What Trump Might Do With His Remaining Weeks In Office

'Politico' journalist Garrett Graff says presidents typically reserve their most controversial decisions for their last weeks in office. In a new article, Graff lays out some of the norm-busting actions President Trump may take in the days remaining in his presidency. Trump is already blocking president-elect Biden's access to classified information — and some worry he might destroy White House records and begin issuing pardons.
12/11/2048m 25s

A 'Nose Dive' Into The Science Of Smell

Harold McGee is best-known for his books about food science. In his new book, 'Nose Dive,' he writes about why things smell the way they do — and the ways different chemicals combine to create surprising (and sometimes distasteful) odors. We talk about stinky cheese, cat pee, mask breath and why cooking releases smells. Also, John Powers reviews season 4 of 'The Crown,' in which Princess Diana is introduced.
11/11/2048m 1s

Embracing Life With A Heart Condition

Writer Katherine Standefer tells us about long QT syndrome — and the implanted cardiac defibrillator that helps regulate her heart. In her new memoir, 'Lightning Flowers,' she writes about how the device changed her life, and about trying to get medical care with little income 11 years ago — just as Congress was trying to establish the Affordable Care Act. "One of the greatest gifts is to feel alive while you are alive," Standefer says.Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the new album from Susan Alcorn, a pedal steel guitarist who played in country and western bar bands. And book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'We Keep the Dead Close' by Becky Cooper, a true crime story about the murder of a Harvard student in 1969 that went unsolved until two years ago.
10/11/2048m 43s

Megan Rapinoe / Remembering Alex Trebek

The USWNT soccer star and activist spoke with Terry Gross about her World Cup wins, the ongoing fight for pay equality in women's sports, and taking a knee in solidarity with Black Lives Matter. Her new memoir about her life on and off the field is 'One Life.' Also, we remember longtime 'Jeopardy!' host Alex Trebek. He died Nov. 8.
09/11/2048m 47s

Best Of: Writer Jerald Walker / The Enduring Impact Of COVID-19

Author Jerald Walker talks about growing up on Chicago's South Side, raising his two sons in a predominantly white suburb and preventing his essays from turning into clichés about the Black experience. His new collection of essays is 'How to Make a Slave.' The title is a reference to Frederick Douglass' line, "You've seen how a man was made a slave; you shall see how a slave was made a man."Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album by cornet player Ron Miles.Nicholas Christakis is a doctor and a sociologist who has studied the science of infectious diseases and how plagues of the past have altered societies. "Everywhere you see the spread of germs, for the last few thousand years, you see right behind it the spread of lies," he says. "Denial and lies ... [are] almost an intrinsic part of an epidemic." Christakis' book is 'Apollo's Arrow: The Profound and Enduring Impact of Coronavirus on the Way We Live.'
07/11/2050m 49s

Jazz Singer Cécile McLorin Salvant

McLorin Salvant's repertoire includes jazz standards and forgotten early songs, show tunes, and originals. ​She'​s one of this year's MacArthur fellows​. We'll also listen back to our 2001 interview with dancer and choreographer Marge Champion, who died Oct. 21.
06/11/2049m 17s

Reconstructing The Presidency 'After Trump'

Jack Goldsmith, former legal counsel to George W. Bush's White House, says no matter when Trump leaves office, his successor will face tough questions about how to reconstruct the battered presidency. In his book, 'After Trump,' Goldsmith and his co-author Bob Bauer write that Trump has exposed the presidency's vulnerability to excesses of authority and weaknesses in accountability. The book details the norms Trump has violated, and recommends reforms that would hold future presidents more accountable. (Note: This interview was recorded the morning of Nov. 5)
05/11/2048m 17s

How The 2020 Election Is A 'Stress Test' Of American Democracy

'Atlantic' writer Barton Gellman returns to discuss what this election has revealed about our system's strengths and weaknesses, and what he's learned about the legal strategies the Trump and Biden campaigns are considering if the election is contested. Trump claimed victory on Election Night, and said he'd petition the Supreme Court to halt the vote counting. Gellman's latest articles are titled "The Election That Could Break America," and "How Trump Could Attempt a Coup." (Note: This interview was recorded on the morning of Nov. 4)
04/11/2048m 45s

Writer Jerald Walker On 'How To Make A Slave'

Walker talks about growing up on Chicago's South Side, raising his two sons in a predominantly white suburb and preventing his essays from turning into clichés about the Black experience. His new collection of essays is 'How to Make a Slave.' The title is a reference to Frederick Douglass' line, "You've seen how a man was made a slave; you shall see how a slave was made a man."
03/11/2048m 2s

Aaron Sorkin On 'The Trial Of The Chicago 7'

In 1968, several prominent anti-war activists were accused of conspiring to start a riot at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Aaron Sorkin, writer of 'The West Wing,' and 'The Social Network,' has a new film that follows the trial of the so-called Chicago Seven. He spoke with new 'Fresh Air' contributor Sam Sanders about parallels between the summer of '68 and 2020, and if the past year has changed his idealistic style of writing. Also, Ken Tucker reviews three new songs by Stevie Wonder, The Pretenders and Bruce Springsteen.
02/11/2048m 17s

Best Of: Inside A Pro-Trump Militia / Chef Marcus Samuelsson

'Atlantic' writer Mike Giglio profiles the Oath Keepers, a pro-Trump militia group, in a new article. They have recruited thousands of police, soldiers and veterans. We talk about what they might do on Election Day and after. Ken Tucker reviews three songs by The Pretenders, Bruce Springsteen, and Stevie Wonder.Harlem chef Marcus Samuelsson talks about his new book, 'The Rise.' It's a celebration of Black excellence in the culinary world — and the many Black cooks who have influenced American food, often without credit.
31/10/2050m 27s

Remembering Country Songwriter Billy Joe Shaver

We remember the songwriter that Johnny Cash described as his favorite writer: Billy Joe Shaver. His songs have been performed by Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan and Elvis Presley. Shaver first became known as the songwriter for the country music outlaws of the '70s. He died this week at the age of 81. We'll listen back to two of his interviews with Terry Gross.Justin Chang reviews 'City Hall,' a riveting documentary about local government by filmmaker Frederick Wiseman.
30/10/2049m 6s

The Enduring Impact Of COVID-19

Nicholas Christakis is a doctor and a sociologist who has studied the science of infectious diseases and how plagues of the past have altered societies. "Everywhere you see the spread of germs, for the last few thousand years, you see right behind it the spread of lies," he says. "Denial and lies ... [are] almost an intrinsic part of an epidemic." Christakis's book is 'Apollo's Arrow: The Profound and Enduring Impact of Coronavirus on the Way We Live.'Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Jess Walter's new novel 'The Cold Millions.'
29/10/2047m 39s

Pro-Trump Militias: Election Day & Beyond

'Atlantic' writer Mike Giglio profiles the Oath Keepers, a pro-Trump militia group, in a new article. They have recruited thousands of police, soldiers and veterans. We talk about what they might do on Election Day and after. "We, as Americans, are so comfortable with the idea of sending people out into foreign wars. And now [these militia groups are] starting to look at America itself as a part of that battle space." Giglio also shares insights from covering civil wars overseas.
28/10/2048m 1s

The Personal Scars & Political Mistakes That Shaped Joe Biden

We talk with journalist Evan Osnos about the former vice president's long career in the Senate, how personal tragedy changed him, and some of the political missteps he made along the way. Osnos' new biography is 'Joe Biden: The Life, the Run, and What Matters Now.'
27/10/2048m 40s

Chef Marcus Samuelsson Writes Black People Into U.S. Food History

Samuelsson's new book, 'The Rise,' is a celebration of Black excellence in the culinary world — and the many Black cooks who have influenced American food, often without credit. He also talks about converting his Harlem restaurant Red Rooster into a community kitchen during the pandemic, and his roots in both Ethiopia and Sweden. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Witches,' an adaptation of Roald Dahl's classic children's book.
26/10/2049m 0s

Father Of The Psychedelic Movement, Timothy Leary

Psychologist Timothy Leary, who died in 1996, was the father of the psychedelic movement of the 1960s and its experiments with mind-altering drugs. In 1960, Leary joined the faculty of Harvard at the Center for Personality Research, where he analyzed the effects of psychedelics and personality. As part of his research, he introduced L.S.D. and other psychedelic drugs to many, and also used them himself. Leary was eventually asked to leave the university, and later served time in jail on drug charges. We listen back to Terry Gross' 1983 interview with Leary as well as our 1990 interview with spiritual leader Ram Dass, who joined Leary in some of his psychedelic experiments. And we'll hear from journalist Michael Pollan whose 2018 book 'How to Change Your Mind' explored the therapeutic benefits of psychedelics. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews HBO's 'The Undoing,' starring Hugh Grant and Nicole Kidman.
23/10/2048m 43s

Best Of: Novelist Rumaan Alam / 'My Octopus Teacher' Filmmaker

Rumaan Alam's novel, 'Leave the World Behind,' centers on two families — one Black and one white — who are sharing a vacation home during a mysterious disaster. It explores issues of race and class, fear, and how we respond to crisis.Ken Tucker reviews a new deluxe edition of Prince's masterpiece 'Sign O' The Times.' Craig Foster spent a year diving — without oxygen or a wetsuit — into the frigid sea near Cape Town, South Africa. One octopus began coming out of her den to hunt or explore while Foster watched. He documents their unlikely friendship in 'My Octopus Teacher,' now on Netflix.
23/10/2050m 21s

SCOTUS Correspondent Nina Totenberg

Nina Totenberg is widely regarded as the dean of legal journalists. She started covering the Supreme court in 1971 and became NPR's legal correspondent in 1975. We talk about breaking the Anita Hill story, her friendship with the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and her early career as a pioneer for women in journalism. This conversation was recorded from a live Zoom event for WHYY.
22/10/2048m 9s

Novelist Sigrid Nunez

Nunez's new novel, 'What Are You Going Through,' is about facing mortality and the relationship between a writer dying of cancer and the friend she asks to stay with her. Lloyd Schwartz reviews a collection of performances by Leontyne Price, the first Black soprano to have a major career at the Metropolitan Opera. And John Powers reviews the Netflix miniseries 'The Queen's Gambit.'
21/10/2047m 51s

Free Speech In The Age Of Disinformation

'New York Times Magazine' writer Emily Bazelon talks about how the lies and conspiracy theories sweeping through American media are leading some scholars to question our faith in free speech and in minimal government regulation of speech. Bazelon says false content moves through the Internet unchecked — undermining the political process along the way.Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'El Duelo.'
20/10/2048m 24s

John Brown, Abraham Lincoln & The Fight To End Slavery

Historian H.W. Brands' new book, 'The Zealot and the Emancipator' looks at two very different 19th century leaders, John Brown and Abraham Lincoln. Brown was a militant abolitionist who embraced violence and was hanged after he tried to spark an insurrection at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. President Lincoln resisted conflict as long as possible, hoping laws and reason would keep Southern states in the Union, and eventually bring an end to human bondage. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Martin Eden,' an adaptation of the Jack London novel.
19/10/2048m 32s

Best Of: Broadway Stars Danny Burstein & Rebecca Luker / 'Nice White Parents' Creator

Married Broadway stars Danny Burstein and Rebecca Luker both contracted COVID in the spring, just as theaters went dark. Burstein was starring in 'Moulin Rouge' at the time. Burstein's case was severe and he nearly died. Luker's case was mild, but it came soon after she had been diagnosed with ALS. They talk with Terry Gross about how their illnesses have changed their lives and careers, and their hopes for the future.Also, John Powers reviews 'David Byrne's American Utopia' on HBO, directed by Spike Lee.'This American Life' producer Chana Joffe-Walt says progressive white parents may say they want their kids to go to diverse schools — but the reality tells a different story. "I think white parents are pretty savvy at evading the explicit conversation around race, although it's clearly shaping our thoughts about schools." She examines the complicated history of gentrification in a Brooklyn school in her new podcast, 'Nice White Parents.' It's a production of 'Serial' and 'The New York Times.'
17/10/2050m 41s

How Women Have Been Left Out Of The Constitution / Remembering MLB's Joe Morgan

As a teen, Heidi Schreck debated the Constitution in competitions. Later she realized it had failed to protect four generations of women in her family. "I believed it was perfect. I believed it was a tool of justice. I did not realize as a 15-year-old girl how profoundly I had been left out of it. I didn't realize that it didn't protect me," Schreck says. Her award-winning Broadway play, 'What the Constitution Means to Me,' is now streaming on Amazon. Also, we remember Joe Morgan, one of the few second-basemen to make it into baseball's Hall of Fame. He died Oct. 11 at the age of 77. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1993.
16/10/2049m 18s

'My Octopus Teacher' Filmmaker

Craig Foster spent a year diving — without oxygen or a wetsuit — into the frigid sea near Cape Town, South Africa. One octopus began coming out of her den to hunt or explore while Foster watched. He documents their unlikely friendship in 'My Octopus Teacher,' now on Netflix. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the Netflix film, 'The Trial of the Chicago 7,' written by Aaron Sorkin.
15/10/2048m 9s

2 Broadway Stars Grapple With Illness And Uncertainty

Married Broadway stars Danny Burstein and Rebecca Luker both contracted COVID in the spring, just as theaters went dark. Burstein was starring in 'Moulin Rouge' at the time. Burstein's case was severe and he nearly died. Luker's case was mild, but it came soon after she had been diagnosed with ALS. They talk with Terry Gross about how their illnesses have changed their lives and careers, and their hopes for the future.
14/10/2049m 1s

Lessons For A Post-Pandemic World

CNN host and 'Washington Post' columnist Fareed Zakaria says COVID-19 presents a chance to make positive changes: "We could well look back on these times 10 or 20 years from now and say, 'This was the turning point.'" His new book, 'Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World' examines the way COVID-19 will change everything from our trust in government to our relationship with technology. Also, John Powers reviews 'David Byrne's American Utopia' on HBO, directed by Spike Lee.
13/10/2049m 1s

How 'Nice White Parents' Can Undermine School Integration

'This American Life' producer Chana Joffe-Walt says progressive white parents may say they want their kids to go to diverse schools — but the reality tells a different story. "I think white parents are pretty savvy at evading the explicit conversation around race, although it's clearly shaping our thoughts about schools." She examines the complicated history of gentrification in a Brooklyn school in her new podcast, 'Nice White Parents.' It's a production of 'Serial' and 'The New York Times.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews the album 'Private Lives' from Philly band Low Cut Connie.
12/10/2048m 16s

Best Of: Ethan Hawke / Lenny Kravitz

Ethan Hawke plays 19th-century abolitionist John Brown in the seven-part Showtime series, 'The Good Lord Bird.' He says Brown's story feels particularly relevant today, as America confronts systemic racism and the legacy of slavery. Also, Justin Chang reviews the film 'The Forty-Year-Old Version.' Lenny Kravitz talks about growing up the son of a Jewish father and Black mother. His new memoir about his life up until his breakout album is 'Let Love Rule.'
10/10/2050m 47s

Remembering MLB Pitcher Bob Gibson

We remember Bob Gibson, one of baseball's most intimidating pitchers. He dominated hitters from the mound for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1960s and '70s and he holds the record for most strikeouts — 17 — in a World Series game. Gibson died last week at the age of 84. First we'll listen back to Terry's 1994 interview with Gibson when he had just published his memoir. Then, in our 2009 interview with Gibson and Hall of Fame slugger Reggie Jackson, we hear him talk about the classic confrontation between the player at the plate and one on the mound. Justin Chang reviews two new documentaries, 'Totally Under Control' and 'Time.' The former is about the Trump administration's handling of the pandemic; the latter chronicles the impact of long-term incarceration on one family.
09/10/2048m 42s

The State Of The Affordable Care Act

As President Trump recovers from COVID-19 and candidates debate the issue of insurance for people with pre-existing conditions, we take stock of the nation's health care system. We talk with the 'New York Times' health policy reporter Sarah Kliff about the state of the Affordable Care Act, after 10 years of legal assaults and attempts in Congress to repeal the law. "Republicans have been trying to drive a stake into the heart of Obamacare pretty much since it was passed," Kliff says.Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'General Semantics,' by the trio Geof Bradfield, Ben Goldberg and Dana Hall.
08/10/2047m 28s

Novelist Rumaan Alam

Alam's novel, 'Leave the World Behind,' centers on two families — one Black and one white — who are sharing a vacation home during a mysterious disaster. It explores issues of race and class, fear, and how we respond to crisis. We'll also talk about Alam's upbringing as the son of Bengali immigrants and why he has hope about his children's generation.
07/10/2048m 6s

Lenny Kravitz

Kravitz talks about growing up the son of a Jewish father and Black mother, finding his musical style, and how Lisa Bonet changed him as a songwriter. His new memoir about his life up until his breakout album is 'Let Love Rule.'Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Searcher,' a suspenseful crime novel by Tana French.
06/10/2049m 45s

Ethan Hawke

Hawke plays 19th-century abolitionist John Brown in the seven-part Showtime series, 'The Good Lord Bird.' He says Brown's story feels particularly relevant today, as America confronts systemic racism and the legacy of slavery. We also talk about 'Training Day,' collaborating with filmmaker Richard Linklater, and how stage fright made him a better actor.
05/10/2049m 54s

Best Of: What If Trump Contests The Election? / Filmmaker Kirsten Johnson

'Atlantic' staff writer Barton Gellman says if President Trump claims mail-in votes are fraudulent and contests the results, Republican legislatures might then try to ignore their states' popular votes and send Trump representatives to the Electoral College. His latest article is 'The Election That Could Break America.'Kevin Whitehead reviews the first album from an all-star band of jazz women, called Artemis.After filmmaker Kirsten Johnson's father started showing signs of dementia, she had a hard time accepting that his death was getting closer. Her new Netflix film, 'Dick Johnson is Dead,' enacts his death from a series of imagined accidents.
03/10/2050m 43s

A Cave Diver On The Thrill & Terror Of Going 'Into The Planet'

Diver and photographer Jill Heinerth shares some of her most dangerous and exhilarating experiences underwater — like getting trapped inside an iceberg in Antarctica. Heinerth also explains how she stays calm when things go wrong: "I take a really deep breath and try and slow my heart, slow my breathing, and then just focus on pragmatic small steps," she says. Her book is 'Into the Planet.'David Bianculli reviews the Showtime documentary series 'The Comedy Store,' about the iconic comedy club.
02/10/2049m 7s

What Happens If Trump Contests the Election?

'Atlantic' writer Barton Gellman says the 2020 election could trigger a constitutional crisis, and if the election is close, it could take weeks to determine the results in key battleground states as mail-in ballots are scrutinized for technical flaws and counted. If President Trump cries fraud and his supporters take to the streets, state legislatures could resolve to set aside the popular vote in their states and choose their own partisan delegations to the Electoral College. "This is not going to be a normal election. ... Preserving its legitimacy is going to take extra effort," he says.
01/10/2048m 6s

Filmmaker Faces Her Dad's Mortality In 'Dick Johnson Is Dead'

After Kirsten Johnson's dad started showing signs of dementia, she had a hard time accepting that his death was getting closer. Her new Netflix documentary, 'Dick Johnson is Dead,' enacts his death from a series of imagined accidents. Johnson has been the cinematographer for over 50 documentaries, including 'Citizenfour.' We'll also talk about her 2016 film 'Cameraperson,' which she's described as a memoir. She spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger.Also, Justin Chang reviews 'The Forty Year-Old Version,' a film by Radha Blank.
30/09/2048m 34s

Inside The Mueller Investigation

Andrew Weissmann, a lead prosecutor in the Mueller investigation, shares his experience with the probe and its report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. Weissmann says the constant threat that President Trump might fire Mueller and shut down the probe and the prospect of Trump granting pardons to key witnesses had an effect on Mueller and his team. Weissman believes Mueller was timid when he should have been aggressive in getting information and testimony, and he says the final report should have been far clearer in its conclusions about the president's conduct. His book, 'Where Law Ends,' takes us inside the 22-month investigation. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Leave the World Behind,' by Rumaan Alam, which she calls a signature read for 2020.
29/09/2047m 9s

The 'Secret History' Of Nuclear War

In his new book, 'The Bomb,' journalist Fred Kaplan pulls back the curtain on how U.S. presidents, their advisers and generals have thought about, planned for — and sometimes narrowly avoided — nuclear war.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the first album from an all-star band of jazz women, called Artemis.
28/09/2049m 42s

Best Of: Met Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin / Inside Trump's Businesses

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor of the Metropolitan Opera and Philadelphia Orchestra, talks about Verdi's "Requiem." He'll talk about how Verdi communicates suffering and hope through music, and how music has helped him find a sense of connection during the pandemic. Ken Tucker reviews a new EP from singer-songwriter Mickey Guyton, one of the few Black women recording country music hits.Also, we'll talk about Donald Trump's finances with 'Forbes' senior editor Dan Alexander. His new book is 'White House Inc: How Donald Trump Turned the Presidency into a Business.'
26/09/2050m 37s

Feminist Activist Gloria Steinem

The new drama 'The Glorias' is based on the feminist activist's memoir 'My Life on the Road,' and follows Steinem from ages 20 to 40. Steinem spoke with Terry Gross in 2015 about her unique childhood, the illegal abortion she had when she was 22, and how aging has been liberating. We'll also hear an excerpt of her 1987 interview, about the 15th anniversary of 'Ms.' magazine, the feminist publication which she co-founded. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the fourth season of 'Fargo,' starring Chris Rock.
25/09/2048m 27s

Met Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin On Hope & Suffering

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the young, charismatic conductor of the Metropolitan Opera and Philadelphia Orchestra, talks about Verdi's "Requiem." He chose the piece for his inaugural performance as music director of the orchestra in Philadelphia. We'll talk about how Verdi communicates suffering and hope through music, the piece's meaning in Yannick's own life, and how music has helped him find a sense of connection during the pandemic.And John Powers reviews the new Apple TV+ series 'Tehran,' about a female Israeli spy sent undercover to Iran.
24/09/2048m 30s

Political Meddling In The Fight Against COVID-19

'Politico' reporter Dan Diamond describes efforts by Trump loyalist and HHS spokesperson (currently on leave) Michael Caputo to alter weekly CDC reports and have scientists change their findings on the course of the coronavirus pandemic. "Caputo walked in the door of the health department in the middle of this once-in-a-century pandemic, having been personally recruited by the president, and the goal was very much to execute the president's agenda and to knock down any messaging, any communications that were seen as conflicting with what President Trump was saying about coronavirus."
23/09/2048m 31s

How Donald Trump Turned The Presidency Into A Business

'Forbes' senior editor Dan Alexander examines President Trump's sprawling business interests in his new book, 'White House, Inc.' Alexander says the president has broken a number of pledges he made about how he would conduct business while in office. We talk about Trump's holdings and potential conflicts of interest, and what Alexander found when he looked closely at the numbers.Also, Ken Tucker reviews Mickey Guyton's EP 'Bridges' and her single "Black Like Me."
22/09/2048m 41s

Remembering RBG / Neurologist Oliver Sacks

Legal analyst and 'New Yorker' staff writer Jeffrey Toobin spoke with Terry Gross in 2013 about his profile of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, written as she marked her 20th anniversary on the Supreme Court. We'll talk about how her work led to breakthroughs in the equal treatment of women. And Toobin will tell a touching personal story she shared with him. Ginsburg died Sept. 18 at the age of 87.A new documentary, 'Oliver Sacks: His Own Life,' chronicles the late neurologist's efforts to understand perception, memory and consciousness. Sacks spoke with Terry Gross in 2012 about how a hallucination saved his life.
21/09/2048m 46s

Best Of: The Origin Of Data Science & Elections / Novelist Ayad Akhtar

Harvard historian and 'New Yorker' writer Jill Lepore tells the story of the Simulmatics Corporation. Founded in 1959, it used a so-called "people machine," a computer program it claimed could predict the impact of political messages or advertising pitches. Her book is 'If Then.'TV critic David Bianculli reviews Ryan Murphy's new Netflix series 'Ratched,' an origin story of the notorious nurse from 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.'Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and novelist Ayad Akhtar talks about his new novel, 'Homeland Elegies,' which explores the experiences of a Muslim man who, like Akhtar, grows up in Wisconsin, the son of Pakistani immigrants.
19/09/2050m 7s

'Watchmen' Writer Cord Jefferson

The HBO series 'Watchmen' uses sci-fi and action heroes to examine American racism. We talk with show writer Cord Jefferson, who wrote the episode of the series in which the main character narrowly survives the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, when white supremacists destroyed a prosperous Black community. The series has scored 26 Emmy nominations — more than any other series.Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the grim thriller 'The Devil All the Time,' now streaming on Netflix.
18/09/2047m 33s

Country Musician & Historian Marty Stuart

The Grammy winning singer-songwriter started out in Lester Flatt's backup band. Now he's being inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Stuart played some of his own music in this 2014 interview, and talked about his archive of cowboy couture.
17/09/2049m 25s

COVID On College Campuses

College campuses have become the pandemic's newest hotspots, with more than 88,000 COVID cases at the nation's colleges and universities. We talk with reporter Scott Carlson about the tough decisions colleges are facing as they decide how to continue classes, test students, and quarantine the sick. We'll also talk about the financial strain these institutions were already facing before the pandemic. TV critic David Bianculli reviews Ryan Murphy's new Netflix series 'Ratched,' an origin story of the notorious nurse from 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.' And jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new release by French-Canadian clarinetist and composer François Houle.
16/09/2048m 36s

The Strange Origin Story Of Data Science & Elections

Harvard historian and 'New Yorker' writer Jill Lepore tells the story of the Simulmatics Corporation. Founded in 1959, it used a so-called "people machine," a computer program it claimed could predict the impact of political messages or advertising pitches. At the time, Simulmatics drew condemnation from scholars and political leaders who saw it as a threat to democracy. But now, 60 years later, the company's data collection practices and predictive models have become commonplace among political campaigns. Her book is 'If Then.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Sue Miller's book 'Monogamy.'
15/09/2048m 39s

Writer Ayad Akhtar On Blending Fact & Fiction

Actor, playwright and novelist Ayad Akhtar won a Pulitzer Prize for 'Disgraced,' his play about an American-born Muslim who hosts a dinner party that sparks a heated discussion of religion and politics. Akhtar's new novel, 'Homeland Elegies,' explores the experiences of a Muslim man who, like Akhtar, grows up in Wisconsin, the son of Pakistani immigrants.Also, Ken Tucker reviews the album 'What Could Be Better' by the band The Happy Fits.
14/09/2048m 37s

Best Of: Yaa Gyasi / How Torture Derailed The War On Terror

Ghanaian-American author Yaa Gyasi drew on her own ​experiences growing up in a largely white community in Alabama for her new book, 'Transcendent Kingdom.' In the novel, she explores themes of depression, addiction, religion and race. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews pastry chef Lisa Donovan's memoir, 'Our Lady of Perpetual Hunger.'Former FBI agent Ali Soufan interrogated dozens of Al-Qaida members and other extremists in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks. He says he got valuable information by preparing carefully for interviews and building rapport with his subjects. When CIA contractors used coercive techniques — like waterboarding — Soufan says subjects ceased cooperating, or gave bad information to make the torment stop. Soufan's 2011 memoir about his experiences appeared with large portions redacted by the CIA. After a legal battle, the redacted material is now restored in a new version, called 'Black Banners (Declassified).'
12/09/2050m 10s

'Devil All The Time' Novelist / 'PEN15' Creators Return To Middle School

Donald Ray Pollock worked in a paper mill and meatpacking plant for 32 years before becoming a writer. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2011 about his acclaimed gothic crime novel, 'The Devil All the Time.' The film adaptation, starring Robert Pattinson and Tom Holland, will begin streaming on Netflix on Sept. 16.Also, we listen back to an interview with Anna Konkle and Maya Erskine, creators and stars of the Hulu comedy series 'PEN15.' They play 13-year-old versions of themselves, navigating the traumas of middle school in the early 2000s. Season 2 begins next week. They spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger.Justin Chang reviews Charlie Kaufman's new Netflix film, 'I'm Thinking of Ending Things.'
11/09/2048m 57s

What Happened To The 1 Million Displaced Persons After WWII?

Historian David Nasaw tells the story of the concentration camp survivors, POWs and other displaced people who remained in Germany following the war. Many had no home to return to. Nasaw's book is 'The Last Million.'
10/09/2047m 56s

Novelist Yaa Gyasi

Ghanaian-American author Yaa Gyasi drew on her own ​experiences growing up in a largely white community in Alabama for her new book, 'Transcendent Kingdom.' In the novel, she explores themes of depression, addiction, religion and race. Her award-winning debut novel, 'Homegoing,' opens in Ghana in the 1700s and ​chronicles the legacy of slavery from the perspective of several generations of the same family. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Our Lady of Perpetual Hunger,' a memoir by pastry chef Lisa Donovan.
09/09/2048m 7s

How Torture Derailed The War On Terror After 9/11

Former FBI agent Ali Soufan interrogated dozens of Al-Qaida members and other extremists in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks. He says he got valuable information by preparing carefully for interviews and building rapport with his subjects. When CIA contractors used coercive techniques — like waterboarding — Soufan says subjects ceased cooperating, or gave bad information to make the torment stop. Soufan's 2011 memoir about his experiences appeared with large portions redacted by the CIA. After a legal battle, the redacted material is now restored in a new version, called 'Black Banners (Declassified).' Also, critic David Bianculli reviews a new Peacock documentary, 'The Sit-In,' about the week that Harry Belafonte guest-hosted 'The Tonight Show' in 1968.
08/09/2048m 27s

Celebrating Sonny Rollins / Octavia Spencer

Today is the 90th birthday of the great tenor saxophonist and improviser Sonny Rollins. We celebrate by hearing some of his music spanning five decades, with commentary from our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead. And we'll listen back to Terry Gross' 1994 interview with Rollins.Also, we revisit Terry's interview with Octavia Spencer. She's nominated for a best actress Emmy for her performance in the Netflix limited series 'Self Made,' inspired by the story of Madam C.J. Walker, who was born in 1867 to parents who had been slaves. Through marketing hair products for black women, she became the first American female self-made millionaire.
07/09/2049m 7s

Best Of: Cherry Jones / The Early Years Of The CIA

Cherry Jones is nominated for an Emmy for her role in the HBO series 'Succession' as Nan Pierce, the head of a family-owned media empire. She's also known for her roles on 'Transparent,' '24,' and her career in the theater. We'll talk about these roles and growing up gay in Tennessee. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the TCM series, 'Women Make Film.'In his new book, 'The Quiet Americans,' author Scott Anderson profiles four daring and resourceful soldiers who became intelligence agents after World War II, when America was strong and respected after defeating Nazi Germany.
05/09/2050m 1s

RuPaul / Padma Lakshmi

Both RuPaul and Padma Lakshmi are nominated for Emmys in the best reality/competition category. RuPaul describes his drag persona as "one-part Cher, two-parts David Bowie, one-part Diana Ross and two heaping spoonfuls of Dolly Parton." The reality show he hosts and created, 'RuPaul's Drag Race,' has had 12 seasons. Padma Lakshmi is nominated for her role as host and executive producer on 'Top Chef.' She spoke with Terry Gross about splitting her childhood between the U.S. and India and her early modeling career. In her new Hulu series, 'Taste the Nation,' Lakshmi explores the different cultures that contribute to American cuisine.Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new live action 'Mulan.'
04/09/2048m 26s

Kerry Washington / Comic Ramy Youssef

We're revisiting some of our favorite recent entertainment interviews, as we approach the 2020 Emmy Awards. Both guests today are nominated for their lead roles. In the Hulu series 'Little Fires Everywhere,' Kerry Washington co-stars opposite Reese Witherspoon as Mia Warren, a bohemian artist single mom with a mysterious past. Washington spoke with Terry Gross about how she drew on her own mother for the role. In the semi-autobiographical Hulu series 'Ramy,' Ramy Youssef plays a first generation Muslim American who follows some — but not all — of the rules of his religion. Youssef, whose parents immigrated from Egypt, also co-created the series. He says he can relate to his character's "picking and choosing" approach to his faith. "Sometimes we would call it 'Allah carte,'" he says.
03/09/2048m 35s

The Struggle To Protect Trump From Himself

Pulitzer Prize-winning 'New York Times' reporter Michael Schmidt says it's unusual for White House officials to be so focused on preventing a president from hurting the country or breaking the law. His new book, 'Donald Trump v. The United States,' focuses on two staffers who stood up to Trump: Former FBI Director James Comey and former White House Counsel Don McGahn.
02/09/2048m 1s

Tragic Miscalculations In The Early Years Of The CIA

In his new book, 'The Quiet Americans,' author Scott Anderson profiles four daring and resourceful soldiers who became intelligence agents after World War II, when America was strong and respected after defeating Nazi Germany. The CIA then embarked on hundreds of ill-considered covert operations in Eastern Europe, and its obsession with fighting Communism propelled it into the subversion of several democratically-elected governments around the world. Anderson says the result was the loss of America's moral standing in the developing world, where many had seen the U.S. as a beacon of freedom and democracy.
01/09/2048m 16s

Actor Cherry Jones

Jones is nominated for an Emmy for her role in the HBO series 'Succession' as Nan Pierce, the head of a family-owned media empire. She's also known for her roles on 'Transparent,' '24,' and her career in the theater. We'll talk about these roles, growing up gay in Tennessee, and how she struggled with the violence in 'The Handmaid's Tale.'Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the TCM series, 'Women Make Film.'
31/08/2049m 12s

Best Of: 'Watchmen' Writer / Stephen Miller & The White Nationalist Agenda

The HBO series 'Watchmen' uses sci-fi and action heroes to examine American racism. We talk with show writer Cord Jefferson, who wrote the episode of the series in which the main character narrowly survives the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, when white supremacists destroyed a prosperous Black community. Kevin Whitehead shares an appreciation of jazz great Charlie Parker for the 100th anniversary of his birth. "It's impossible to understand the Trump era, with its unparalleled polarization, without tracing Stephen Miller's journey to the White House," journalist Jean Guerrero writes in her new book 'Hatemonger.' She describes the ideological arc of Miller's life and investigates his ties to right-wing mentors and far-right groups.
29/08/2050m 48s

Celebrating Jazz Legend Charlie Parker

Jazz saxophonist Charlie Parker created a totally new sound known as bebop, along with other virtuosos like Bud Powell, Dizzy Gillespie and Max Roach. To celebrate Parker's 100th birthday, we go to our archives for interviews with musicians who knew him and loved him: Drummer Max Roach, trumpeter Red Rodney, and alto saxophonist Jackie McLean. And our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead kicks things off with a crash course in what made Parker's playing so brilliant.
28/08/2049m 14s

Why We Need Widespread Rapid COVID Testing

'Atlantic' journalist Alexis Madrigal says millions of at-home saliva tests for COVID could be the key to life returning to normal — even if the tests are less accurate than the traditional PCR tests. We talk about the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of testing, and what it would take for the government to fund and manufacture millions of daily tests. "I think what's happened in the U.S. has been so catastrophic on so many levels — economically, psychologically, educationally — that we have to be at least willing to entertain the idea of a fairly radical plan that could work," Madrigal says.
27/08/2047m 5s

How Reagan Changed Conservatism

Historian Rick Perlstein has spent 20 years studying the roots of American conservatism. His latest book, 'Reaganland,' is about the events that propelled Ronald Reagan to the White House and made him a revered figure among Republicans. He says that "viciousness and a naked will to power" has always been part of the conservative Republican coalition.
26/08/2048m 30s

CNN's Brian Stelter On The 'Foxification' Of America

CNN media correspondent Brian Stelter says the president's "cozy" relationship with Fox News is like nothing he's seen before: "In some ways [Trump] wants to be a television producer more than a president." Stelter's new book is called 'Hoax.'
25/08/2048m 33s

How Stephen Miller Became The Architect Of Trump's Immigration Policies

"It's impossible to understand the Trump era, with its unparalleled polarization, without tracing Stephen Miller's journey to the White House," journalist Jean Guerrero writes in her new book 'Hatemonger.' She describes the ideological arc of Miller's life, investigates his ties to right-wing mentors and far-right groups, and explains his role as Trump's advisor.
24/08/2047m 31s

Best Of: Writer Carl Hiaasen / 'Immigration Nation' Filmmakers

'Miami Herald' columnist and author Carl Hiaasen talks about his new novel, 'Squeeze Me,' a hilarious mystery set in Palm Beach, featuring wealthy widows, the president and first lady, a scrappy wildlife removal specialist, and some gigantic Burmese pythons.Film critic Justin Chang reviews the unusual film 'Tesla,' starring Ethan Hawke. Documentary filmmakers Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusiau talk about their visceral portrait of the U.S. immigration system — including ICE agents, immigrants, activists and smugglers. Their six-part Netflix documentary series is 'Immigration Nation.'
22/08/2050m 32s

Remembering 'Freedom Summer'

In the summer of 1964, hundreds of student volunteers — most were white and from the North — spent weeks registering African Americans to vote in Mississippi. We hear from Stanley Nelson, director of the 2014 documentary 'Freedom Summer,' and also Charles Cobb, an organizer who was interviewed for the film.Justin Chang reviews 'Tesla,' starring Ethan Hawke.
21/08/2048m 29s

Why QAnon Is Important

QAnon, the conspiracy theory that claims President Trump is battling a deep state child sex trafficking ring run by high-profile democrats and celebrities, is the subject of a new 'Atlantic' article by Adrienne LaFrance. "It's almost like a bad spy novel," LaFrance says. QAnon adherents often appear at Trump rallies, and one supporter has won the Republican nomination to a Georgia Congressional seat.
20/08/2047m 56s

The 'Hiroshima Cover-Up' & The Journalist Who Exposed The Truth

Historian Lesley M.M. Blume's new book, 'Fallout,' tells the story of John Hersey, the young journalist whose on-the-ground reporting in Hiroshima exposed the world to the devastation of nuclear weapons. "Hersey had seen everything from that point, from combat to concentration camps," Blume says. "But he later said that nothing prepared him for what he saw in Hiroshima."Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Black Bottom Saints,' by Alice Randall.
19/08/2047m 33s

Writer Carl Hiaasen's Satirical Take On Florida Life

'Miami Herald' columnist and author Carl Hiaasen's new novel, 'Squeeze Me,' is a hilarious mystery set in Palm Beach, featuring wealthy widows, the president and first lady, a scrappy wildlife removal specialist, and some gigantic Burmese pythons. We'll also talk about politics, and battles over voting in Florida that are setting the stage for a dramatic election in November. Also John Powers reviews the documentary 'Coup 53,' about the US-supported coup which overthrew an elected government in Iran.
18/08/2048m 21s

A Portrait Of ICE & Immigration In The U.S.

Documentary filmmakers Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusiau paint a nuanced portrait of the U.S. immigration system — including ICE agents, immigrants, activists and smugglers — in their 6-part Netflix documentary series, 'Immigration Nation.' And jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews James Carney's album, 'Pure Heart.'
17/08/2047m 52s

Best Of: 'The Old Guard' Dir. / How MLK & Malcolm X Influenced Each Other

"Female characters are not [usually] the center of the story," filmmaker Gina Prince-Bythewood says. Her new movie, 'The Old Guard,' follows a diverse group of world-weary warriors who've been alive for centuries. Prince-Bythewood makes history as the first Black woman to direct a film adaptation of a comic book. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the documentary 'Boys State,' about a week-long mock political campaign for teen boys.Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X are frequently seen as opposing forces in the struggle for civil rights, but Black Power scholar Dr. Peniel Joseph says the truth is more nuanced. His new book, 'The Sword and the Shield,' braids together the lives of the two civil rights revolutionaries.
15/08/2050m 36s

Sister Helen Prejean On Fighting The Death Penalty

Prejean is best known for her 1993 memoir, 'Dead Man Walking,' about her role as a spiritual adviser to a convicted killer on death row. The story was adapted into an Oscar-winning film starring Susan Sarandon and Sean Penn. Prejean has accompanied six prisoners to their executions and has been at the forefront of activism against the death penalty. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2019. David Bianculli reviews HBO's series 'Lovecraft Country.'
14/08/2048m 25s

'Watchmen' Writer Cord Jefferson

The HBO series 'Watchmen' uses sci-fi and action heroes to examine American racism. Cord Jefferson wrote the episode of the series in which the main character narrowly survives the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, when white supremacists destroyed a prosperous Black community. In addition to writing for 'Succession,' 'The Good Place' and 'The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore,' Jefferson has also written personal essays about his mother's cancer diagnosis, donating a kidney to his father, and being biracial. We remember our longtime language commentator Geoff Nunberg. He died this week at age 75 after a long illness.
13/08/2048m 7s

How MLK & Malcolm X Influenced Each Other

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X are frequently seen as opposing forces in the struggle for civil rights, but Black Power scholar Dr. Peniel Joseph says the truth is more nuanced. His new book, 'The Sword and the Shield,' braids together the lives of the two civil rights revolutionaries. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the documentary 'Boys State,' about a week-long mock political campaign for teen boys.
12/08/2047m 53s

GOP Strategist Takes On Trump & His Party: 'It Was All A Lie'

Veteran Republican strategist Stuart Stevens says the party's support for Trump reflects the abandonment of principles it long claimed to embrace, such as fiscal restraint, personal responsibility and family values. Stevens has helped get scores of Republicans elected, including George W. Bush and Bob Dole. His new book about how Trumpism has hijacked the party is, 'It Was All A Lie.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Star Trek: Lower Decks,' a CBS All Access cartoon.
11/08/2048m 0s

'The Old Guard' Dir. Gina Prince-Bythewood

"Female characters are not [usually] the center of the story," filmmaker Gina Prince-Bythewood says. Her new movie, 'The Old Guard,' follows a diverse group of world-weary warriors who've been alive for centuries. Prince-Bythewood also talks about choreographing fight scenes, and her other films 'Love & Basketball' and 'Beyond the Lights.'
10/08/2048m 20s

Best Of: America's Caste System / The Decline Of Local News

In 'Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents', Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson examines the laws and practices that created a bipolar caste system in the U.S. — and how the Nazis borrowed from it.Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two new novels: 'The Aunt Who Wouldn't Die,' and 'Blacktop Wasteland.'Since 2004, more than 2,000 American newspapers have gone out of business. 'Washington Post' media columnist Margaret Sullivan talks about the decline of local news coverage, a crisis she says is as serious as the spread of disinformation on the internet. Her new book is 'Ghosting the News: Local Journalism and the Crisis of American Democracy.'
08/08/2050m 10s

How Satchel Paige Helped Integrate Baseball

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Negro Leagues and today we remember one of baseball's greatest pitchers, Satchel Paige. We hear from Larry Tye, author of 'Satchel: The Life and Times of An American Legend.' Paige began his career pitching in the Negro leagues and later became a Major League star. In the 1930s, he made his way across the country amazing audiences with his blazing fastball and pinpoint accuracy.Also, Maureen Corrigan shares a remembrance of journalist Pete Hamill.
07/08/2048m 48s

Remembering Legendary Journalist Pete Hamill

Pete Hamill, who died Aug. 5, was a columnist and editor at the 'New York Post' and the 'New York Daily News,' covering wars, crime and the people of NYC's boroughs. He helped convince his friend Robert Kennedy to run for president, and on the night RFK was shot, helped tackle the assassin. Hamill spoke with 'Fresh Air' about RFK's assassination, giving up drinking in a boozy industry, and his work in the tabloids.
06/08/2048m 22s

Jeffrey Toobin On The 'Tragedy' Of The Mueller Report

In Jeffrey ​Toobin's new book, ​'True Crimes and Misdemeanors,​'​​ the CNN legal analyst ​examines how​ President​ Trump and his team out-maneuvered special counsel Robert Mueller. Mueller, he says, gave Trump "a free pass" on obstruction of justice.​ ​We'll also talk about the impeachment trial and the Supreme Court.
05/08/2049m 13s

Isabel Wilkerson On America's Caste System

In 'Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents', the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist examines the laws and practices that created a bipolar caste system in the U.S. — and how the Nazis borrowed from it.Also, John Powers reviews Raven Leilani's debut novel, 'Luster.'
04/08/2048m 49s

The Decline Of Local News

Since 2004, more than 2,000 American newspapers have gone out of business. 'Washington Post' media columnist Margaret Sullivan talks about the decline of local news coverage, a crisis she says is as serious as the spread of disinformation on the internet. Her new book is 'Ghosting the News: Local Journalism and the Crisis of American Democracy.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews the thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow.'
03/08/2048m 38s

Best Of: Poet Natasha Trethewey / Mike Birbiglia & Jen Stein

When Natasha Trethewey was 19, her abusive stepfather killed her mother. In the 35 years since, she says, "I wanted to forge a new life for myself that didn't include that past, but, of course, that was impossible." Her new memoir is 'Memorial Drive.' Trethewey was the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2012 and 2013.Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly unearthed recording by drummer Art Blakey and his band.When comic Mike Birbiglia and poet Jen Stein got married, they agreed they didn't want kids. But then Jen changed her mind. After their daughter Oona was born, Mike had difficulty bonding with her, and it put a strain on the marriage. In their book, 'The New One,' Mike writes "painfully true" stories about the first year of parenthood and Jen gives her perspective through poetry.
01/08/2050m 35s

Remembering Regis Philbin / Jazz Singer Annie Ross

We remember TV personality Regis Philbin, who died on July 24 at 88. He spoke with contributor David Bianculli in 2011 when his memoir, 'How I Got This Way,' came out. Also, we remember jazz singer Annie Ross, who died at 89. She sang in the trio Lambert, Hendricks & Ross and was best-known for the song "Twisted." Ross spoke with Terry Gross in 1990. David Bianculli reviews 'Muppets Now' on Disney+, and Ken Tucker reviews Taylor Swift's new album, 'Folklore.'
31/07/2048m 44s

The Legacy of White Supremacy In American Christianity

Robert P. Jones, author of the new book 'White Too Long,' talks about the history of white supremacy in American Christianity. His main focus is on the Southern Baptist Convention, the denomination in which he grew up. "There's so much work still to be done," he says. "White Christians have been largely silent ... and have hardly begun these conversations."Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two new novels: 'The Aunt Who Wouldn't Die,' and 'Blacktop Wasteland.'
30/07/2047m 59s

MLB Analyst Tim Kurkjian On Baseball During COVID

Major League Baseball is back — but for how long? About half of the Miami Marlins' roster has tested positive for COVID-19. ESPN baseball analyst Tim Kurkjian explains the challenges Major League Baseball faces as play resumes amid the pandemic.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Just Coolin'', a newly unearthed recording by drummer Art Blakey and his band.
29/07/2047m 51s

Poet Natasha Trethewey

When Trethewey was 19, her abusive stepfather killed her mother. In the 35 years since, she says, "I wanted to forge a new life for myself that didn't include that past, but, of course, that was impossible." In her new memoir, 'Memorial Drive,' Trethewey revives her mother's memory and shares stories about growing up biracial in the South. She was the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2012 and 2013.
28/07/2047m 56s

Comic Mike Birbiglia & Poet Jen Stein On 'Reluctant' Parenthood

When Mike Birbiglia and Jen Stein got married, they agreed they didn't want kids. But then Jen changed her mind. After their daughter Oona was born, Mike had difficulty bonding with her, and it put a strain on the marriage. In their book, 'The New One,' Mike writes "painfully true" stories about the first year of parenthood and Jen gives her perspective through poetry.
27/07/2047m 52s

Best Of: Michaela Coel / Justice & Faith For The Wrongly Convicted

In the HBO series 'I May Destroy You,' Michaela Coel plays Arabella, a writer in London who goes to a bar and is drugged and sexually assaulted. She then has to piece together what happened to her. The series, which Coel wrote, directed and stars in, explores issues of sexuality and consent. She talks about how she drew on personal experience.John Powers reviews Zadie Smith's new collection of essays, 'Intimations,' written during the pandemic and completed after George Floyd's murder.Jim McCloskey, a lay minister, has devoted the past 40 years of his life to seeking justice and exoneration for men and women on death row or serving life sentences for crimes they didn't commit. His memoir is 'When Truth is All You Have.'
25/07/2050m 33s

Remembering Foreign Correspondent Christopher Dickey

In a career spanning four decades, Dickey authored seven books and reported from more than 40 countries, often covering war, conflict and espionage. He died July 16 at 68. Dickey spoke with Terry Gross in 1998 and 2002.Also, Justin Chang reviews two new thriller movies about terrors within the home: 'Relic' and 'Amulet.'
24/07/2048m 9s

Mary Trump, The President's Niece

Mary Trump was devastated when her uncle was elected president. Her book, 'Too Much and Never Enough,' describes Donald Trump as a "belligerent" youth who hasn't changed since he was a teen. Mary's late father Freddy was the black sheep of the family.
23/07/2048m 30s

Michaela Coel On 'I May Destroy You'

In the HBO series 'I May Destroy You,' Michaela Coel plays Arabella, a writer in London who goes to a bar and is drugged and sexually assaulted. She then has to piece together what happened to her. The series, which Coel wrote, directed and stars in, explores issues of sexuality and consent. She talks about how she drew on personal experience. John Powers reviews Zadie Smith's new collection of essays, 'Intimations,' written during the pandemic and completed after George Floyd's murder.
22/07/2048m 0s

Faith, Justice, And Freedom For The Wrongly Convicted

Jim McCloskey, a lay minister, has devoted the past 40 years of his life to seeking justice and exoneration for men and women on death row or serving life sentences for crimes they didn't commit. "I saw firsthand how police and prosecutors manipulate evidence, coerce witnesses into giving false testimony," he says. His memoir is 'When Truth is All You Have.' Ken Tucker reviews the new album by HAIM, 'Women in Music Pt. III.'
21/07/2048m 27s

Remembering Rep. John Lewis

The towering civil rights leader John Lewis died July 17 at the age of 80. Lewis grew up the son of sharecroppers and later became an associate of Martin Luther King Jr. He co-led the 1965 civil rights march in Selma, Ala., which turned violent when state troopers beat and tear gassed the peaceful protestors. The protest became known as "Bloody Sunday." He spoke with Terry Gross in 2009. We'll also hear from the first Black lawyer in Selma, J.L. Chestnut, who shares his memories of Bloody Sunday. Maureen Corrigan reviews Emma Donoghue's new novel about the flu pandemic of 1918, 'The Pull of the Stars.'
20/07/2047m 7s

Best Of Colin Jost / Matthew Rhys

'Saturday Night Live' "Weekend Update" co-anchor Colin Jost talks about telling jokes about race with Michael Che and why he prefers writing to speaking. His new memoir is 'A Very Punchable Face.' Film critic Justin Chang says 'Palm Springs,' starring Andy Samberg and Cristin Milioti, is a perfect comedy for our current times. And Welsh actor Matthew Rhys talks about living out his boyhood fantasies in his new role as hardboiled detective Perry Mason.
18/07/2050m 21s

Charlize Theron / Danny Trejo

Charlize Theron spoke with Terry Gross last year about growing up in Apartheid-era South Africa and growing up with an abusive father. She now stars in the film 'The Old Guard' on Netflix. Also, we listen back to our 2018 interview actor Danny Trejo. He's known for playing menacing characters in 'Breaking Bad,' 'Sons of Anarchy' and 'Machete.' The documentary 'Inmate #1: The Rise of Danny Trejo' chronicles his unlikely journey from prison to stardom.
17/07/2048m 39s

Why The U.S. Prison System Makes Mental Illness Worse (And How We Might Fix It)

Dr. Christine Montross says in the U.S., people with serious mental illnesses are far more likely to be incarcerated than to be treated in a psychiatric hospital. Montross studied systemic change in the Norwegian prison system, and what the U.S. might learn from it. Her new book is 'Waiting for an Echo.'TV critic David Bianculli shares his thoughts on NBC's new streaming platform, Peacock.
16/07/2048m 8s

Jane Mayer: Trump Used Pandemic To Weaken Worker Protections

Journalist Jane Mayer reports the Trump administration has weakened federal health and safety regulations of the poultry industry as plants have become COVID-19 hotspots, and allowed managers to speed up production lines. She says the U.S. Labor Department is effectively supporting an effort at one Delaware plant — owned by a major Trump campaign donor — to expel the union that has represented workers there for decades. Her article in the current issue of the 'New Yorker' is called, "How Trump is Helping Tycoons Exploit the Pandemic."
15/07/2048m 4s

SNL's Colin Jost

The 'Saturday Night Live' "Weekend Update" co-anchor and writer Colin Jost acknowledges that his clean-cut image sometimes rubs people the wrong way. "When I get hurt or hit on camera," he says, "the audience really loves it." His new memoir is 'A Very Punchable Face.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Palm Springs,' a nod to 'Groundhog Day' starring Andy Samberg.
14/07/2049m 37s

Matthew Rhys

Rhys says his version of the iconic criminal defense attorney Perry Mason is more hardboiled than the one Raymond Burr played on TV: "He's a man who kind of lives on whiskey and cigarettes." We also talk about playing a spy in 'The Americans' and growing up in Wales (and masking his accent in auditions). Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire.
13/07/2048m 14s

Best Of: Padma Lakshmi / Patrick Stewart

In her new Hulu series, 'Taste the Nation,' Padma Lakshmi explores the different cultures that contribute to American cuisine. Lakshmi spoke with Terry Gross about splitting her childhood between the U.S. and India and her early modeling career.Ken Tucker reviews Bob Dylan's new album, 'Rough and Rowdy Ways.'Patrick Stewart is back as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the CBS All Access series 'Star Trek: Picard.' He says he's changed as an actor over the years: "I am not averse to risk-taking and I don't judge myself."
11/07/2050m 32s

'Moonlight' Actor André Holland

Growing up in Alabama, André Holland's parents were voting rights activists and his father was a preacher. Holland is best known for his roles in 'Moonlight' and 'Castle Rock.' Next week he'll star in a radio version of Shakespeare's 'Richard II,' a co-production of WNYC and The Public Theater. Holland spoke with Terry Gross in 2018. John Powers reviews the action movie 'The Old Guard' starring Charlize Theron.
10/07/2048m 43s

Chaos & Healing In The ER

In her memoir, 'The Beauty in Breaking,' Dr. Michele Harper writes about treating gunshot wounds, getting punched in the face, and discovering evidence of child abuse. She's also drawn insight and courage from her patients as she's struggled to overcome pain and trauma in her own life — growing up with an abusive father, and coping with the breakup of her marriage. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Mexican Gothic' by Silvia Moreno-Garcia.
09/07/2047m 21s

Why White Evangelicals Worship At The Altar Of Trump

Journalist Sarah Posner says while President Trump may not speak the language of faith and Christian values, he speaks the language of grievance — giving voice to legal, social and cultural concerns shared by the Christian right and the alt-right. Posner's book is 'Unholy.'Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews an album by drummer Chad Taylor and his trio. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the HBO documentary 'Welcome to Chechnya,' about atrocities committed against the LGBTQ community.
08/07/2048m 16s

'Demagogue' Draws Direct Line From McCarthy To Trump

Author Larry Tye chronicles Sen. Joseph McCarthy's infamous smear campaign in a new book, 'Demagogue.' He says both McCarthy and President Trump are "bullies" who exploit fears and "point fingers when they're attacked."Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Want' by Lynn Steger Strong.
07/07/2046m 35s

Padma Lakshmi

In her new Hulu series, 'Taste the Nation,' the 'Top Chef' host and executive producer explores the different cultures that contribute to American cuisine. Lakshmi spoke with Terry Gross about splitting her childhood between the U.S. and India, speaking out about sexual assault, and her early modeling career.
06/07/2048m 38s

Best Of: Lin-Manuel Miranda / Actor Christine Baranski

A film of the original Broadway production of 'Hamilton,' taped in 2016, is now streaming on Disney+. Creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, who stars in the title role, says the production is as timely as ever. "When you write a musical that brushes against the origins of this country, it's always going to be relevant," he says. "The fights we had at the [country's] origin are the fights we're still having." Christine Baranski started her career in theater and now stars as a progressive lawyer in 'The Good Fight.' "I was a passionate acting student and nothing was going to stop me," the Emmy Award-winning actor says.
04/07/2050m 25s

Remembering Carl Reiner

Performer, writer, director Carl Reiner died Monday at 98. Reiner began his career in showbiz as an actor and became second banana on Sid Caesar's 'Show of Shows' where he soon joined the writing team that included Mel Brooks, Woody Allen, and Larry Gelbart. He created 'The Dick Van Dyke Show,' one of television's most celebrated comedies. We'll listen back to our interview with Reiner, and we hear excerpts of interviews with Mary Tyler Moore who worked with Reiner on 'The Dick Van Dyke Show,' and from Mel Brooks, his longtime friend and collaborator.Also, David Bianculli reviews the film adaptation of 'Hamilton,' now streaming on Disney+.
03/07/2048m 13s

Sir Patrick Stewart On 'Star Trek: Picard'

Patrick Stewart is back as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the CBS All Access series 'Star Trek: Picard.' He says he's changed as an actor over the years: "I am not averse to risk-taking and I don't judge myself." Stewart spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger about 'Picard,' his love of Shakespeare, and his brief time as a reporter.
02/07/2049m 22s

The Militarization Of Police

Journalist Radley Balko, author of 'Rise Of The Warrior Cop,' says police departments across America are increasingly using equipment designed for use on a battlefield, including tanks, bayonets and grenades. We talk about the use of these weapons against peaceful protestors.
01/07/2048m 13s

A Doctor Confronts Medical Error

When Dr. Danielle Ofri was in medical school she missed a patient's critical brain bleed. Luckily, someone else caught the error and the patient survived, but Ofri lived with the guilt and shame for 20 years. Medical errors are very common, yet many in the medical community don't speak up. In her book, 'When We Do Harm,' Ofri looks into the flaws in the health care system that can lead to risky mistakes. Also, Ken Tucker reviews Bob Dylan's new album, 'Rough and Rowdy Ways.'
30/06/2048m 44s

'Hamilton' Creator Lin-Manuel Miranda

A film of the original Broadway production of 'Hamilton,' taped in 2016, begins streaming on Disney+ on July 3. Miranda, who stars in the title role, says the production is as timely as ever. "When you write a musical that brushes against the origins of this country, it's always going to be relevant," he says. "The fights we had at the [country's] origin are the fights we're still having." We also talk about 'In the Heights' and being productive (or not) during the pandemic.
29/06/2050m 2s

Best Of: A Call For Reparations / Treating PTSD With Psychedelics

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones says 250 yeas of slavery and 100 years of legalized segregation robbed Black Americans of the ability to accumulate wealth. Cash payments would help repair the damage. Her latest piece in the 'New York Times Magazine' is 'What Is Owed.'Ken Tucker reviews new albums by Lady Gaga and Carly Rae Jepsen.Psychiatrist Dr. Julie Holland has used psychedelic-assisted therapy to treat patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. In some cases, she says, MDMA or marijuana can help make treatment more efficient and effective. She discusses this "revolutionary way" to treat trauma. Holland's book is 'Good Chemistry.'
27/06/2050m 28s

LGBTQ Activist Cleve Jones / Novelist Marijane Meaker

After the AIDS epidemic hit San Francisco, gay activist Cleve Jones co-founded the San Francisco AIDS Foundation and started the AIDS Memorial Quilt. "I have these memories of great struggle and great pain and great loss, but I also in my lifetime have seen extraordinary progress and amazing change," he says. His memoir, 'When We Rise,' was published in 2016.Marijane Meaker wrote the lesbian pulp novel 'Spring Fire' in 1952, and was surprised when it sold 1.5 million copies. She went on to write other lesbian-themed books under pen names. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2003. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews Jon Stewart's political satire film 'Irresistible.'
26/06/2049m 5s

Actor Christine Baranski

Baranski started her career in theater and now stars as a progressive lawyer in 'The Good Fight.' "I was a passionate acting student and nothing was going to stop me," the Emmy Award-winning actor says. She talks about singing Sondheim, 'Mamma Mia,' and her grandmother who performed in the Polish theater.
25/06/2047m 35s

A Call For Reparations: Nikole Hannah-Jones On The Wealth Gap

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones says 250 yeas of slavery and 100 years of legalized segregation robbed Black Americans of the ability to accumulate wealth. Cash payments would help repair the damage. Her latest piece in the 'New York Times Magazine' is 'What Is Owed.'
24/06/2047m 43s

From 'Empty' To Satisfied: A Lifelong Struggle With Eating Disorders

For nearly 30 years, 'This American Life' producer Susan Burton kept her binge eating disorder a secret. "As long as I was bingeing, I didn't have to think. I didn't have to think about any loss or pain or wanting or yearning." Burton also had anorexia, though that was harder to hide. She talks about her difficult relationship with food and work toward recovery. Burton's memoir is 'Empty.' Ken Tucker reviews Lady Gaga's 'Chromatica' and Carly Rae Jepsen's 'Dedicated Side B.' And book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the memoir 'All The Way to Tigers' by Mary Morris.
23/06/2048m 38s

Treating PTSD With Psychedelics

Psychiatrist Dr. Julie Holland has used psychedelic-assisted therapy to treat patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. In some cases, she says, MDMA or marijuana can help make treatment more efficient and effective. She discusses this "revolutionary way" to treat trauma. Holland's book is 'Good Chemistry.' Also, John Powers shares his favorite espionage thriller series, a French show called 'The Bureau.'
22/06/2047m 23s

Best Of: The 1919 Chicago Race Riots / Parenting 'Without Perfection'

Eve Ewing's poetry collection '1919' looks back on a century-old riot in Chicago, set off after Eugene Williams, a black teen, drowned because he was stoned by white people on the beach. Police refused to make an arrest. Ewing connects the systemic racism that plagued the U.S. then to what we see happening now.Kevin Whitehead talks about a film genre that many jazz fans gripe about — the jazz biopic. Blogger and licensed family therapist Kristen Howerton talks about how raising two white biological daughters and two black adopted sons helped her understand white privilege. Her new memoir is 'Rage Against the Minivan.'
20/06/2050m 45s

Rhiannon Giddens Sings Slave Narratives / Freedom Singer Bernice Johnson Reagon

Singer and banjo player Rhiannon Giddens' 2017 album 'Freedom Highway' includes songs based on slave narratives. She notes that the modern banjo draws from the African instrument known as the akonting, which is made from a gourd. "In the first 100 years of its existence, the [American] banjo was known as a plantation instrument, as a black instrument," she says.During the civil rights movement, Bernice Johnson Reagon sang freedom songs from jail, in marches and churches. She was a founding member of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee's Freedom Singers in the '60s. She spoke with Terry Gross in 1988 about the songs she sang as an activist.
19/06/2049m 6s

Kristen Howerton On 'Parenting Without Perfection'

Blogger and licensed family therapist Kristen Howerton talks about how raising two white biological daughters and two black adopted sons helped her understand white privilege. She reflects on motherhood, miscarriage, divorce and faith. Her new memoir is 'Rage Against the Minivan.'David Bianculli reviews HBO's new take on the courtroom drama 'Perry Mason,' starring Matthew Rhys.
18/06/2047m 50s
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Heart UK
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