Fresh Air

Fresh Air

By NPR

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

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Episodes

Michael McDonald

McDonald says that earlier in his career, he tended to avoid writing about himself directly in songs. He opens up about his life and career in the memoir, What a Fool Believes. He spoke with Tonya Mosley about his first band as a tween, his songwriting process, and being big in the Black community.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/05/2445m 54s

Best Of: Kathleen Hanna / Tyler James Williams

Musician, activist, and punk pioneer Kathleen Hanna talks about being at the epicenter of the '90s riot grrrl movement. She talks about the early days of Bikini Kill and writing the anthem "Rebel Girl." Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Claire Messud's new novel.Also, actor Tyler James Williams shares the motivation behind his role as a no-nonsense teacher on the hit series Abbott Elementary.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/05/2448m 23s

Remembering Filmmaker Roger Corman

Filmmaker Roger Corman, the "King of the B" movies, died last week at the age of 98. He made hundreds of films, such cult classics as Little Shop of Horrors, A Bucket of Blood, House of Usher, The Last Woman on Earth, and The Cry Baby Killer. We feature our 1990 interview with him, and with those whose careers he helped launch – including actors Peter Fonda and Bruce Dern, as well as directors James Cameron, Martin Scorsese, and Jonathan Demme. And our critic at large, John Powers, has an appreciation.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/05/2446m 32s

Writer Carvell Wallace On Pain, Processing & Letting Go

Wallace is known for his celebrity profiles, but his new memoir, Another Word For Love, is about his own life, growing up unhoused, Black and queer, and getting his start as a writer at the age of 40.David Bianculli shares an appreciation of John Mulaney's six-part live Netflix talk show, Everybody's in L.A.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/05/2443m 32s

Regional Complexities Of The Israel/Hamas War

The Economist Middle East correspondent Gregg Carlstrom explains why some Arab leaders hate Hamas, fear Iran and have some sympathy for Israel — although not for how Israel is waging the war.For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or here.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/05/2445m 44s

'Abbott Elementary' Actor Tyler James Williams

Williams was thrust into the public eye as a kid, when he starred in Everybody Hates Chris. Now, playing a teacher on Abbott Elementary, he strives to make the child actors on set feel comfortable. He spoke with Tonya Mosley about the trauma of fame as a kid, his Crohn's diagnosis, and tuning out online chatter. Justin Chang reviews the Japanese film Evil Does Not Exist, by Drive My Car director Ryûsuke Hamaguchi.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/05/2445m 38s

Kathleen Hanna's 'Rebel Girl' Life

Kathleen Hanna's band Bikini Kill was the epicenter of the riot grrrl feminist punk movement of the '90s. Their song "Rebel Girl" was the anthem. Now Hanna has a memoir (also called Rebel Girl) about her time in the punk scene, her childhood, and finding joy in expressing anger in public. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Claire Messud's new novel, This Strange Eventful History. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/05/2445m 57s

Best Of: Brittney Griner / Discovering Plant Intelligence

WNBA star Brittney Griner talks about the physical and emotional hell of her nearly 300 days in Russian prisons. Russian authorities apprehended Griner at the Moscow Airport when she was found carrying a tiny amount of medically prescribed cannabis — then charged her with drug smuggling. Her memoir is Coming Home. Jazz historian Kevin Whitehead reviews a 1959 Sonny Rollins reissue. And we'll talk about plant intelligence with climate journalist Zoë Schlanger. Her book is The Light Eaters.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/05/2448m 27s

'The Sympathizer' Author Viet Thanh Nguyen

Viet Thanh Nguyen's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Sympathizer has been adapted into a series on HBO/MAX. It's set in Vietnam during the last days of the war, and in LA, just after. The narrator becomes a consultant to a Hollywood film about the war. The novel is written from a Vietnamese perspective. "It's my revenge on Francis Ford Coppola, my revenge on Hollywood, to try to get Americans to understand that Vietnam is a country and not a war," he told Terry Gross in 2016. Nguyen's family fled their village in South Vietnam in 1975, when it was taken over by the North. Also, David Bianculli reviews Let It Be, the Beatles film restored and rereleased after being shelved for more than 50 years.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/05/2445m 23s

Remembering Minimalist Painter Frank Stella

We remember painter and sculptor Frank Stella, whose early work was considered revolutionary. He died last week at age 87. Stella became famous and controversial in the 1950s for his "black paintings," which were a stark contrast to the abstract expressionism of the time, and made him one of the fathers of minimalism. Later, we'll feature an interview with one of the most influential early rock and roll guitarists, Duane Eddy. He also died last week. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Long Island, Colm Tóibín's new sequel to his bestselling novel Brooklyn. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/05/2444m 45s

A People's History Of Black Twitter

#BlackLivesMatter. #OscarsSoWhite. #ICantBreathe. Filmmaker Prentice Penny's docuseries about Black Twitter celebrates the voices and movements that impacted politics and culture. Penny was also the showrunner of the HBO series Insecure. Also, John Powers reviews the four-part series Shardlake, based on C.J. Sansom's first novel in a series about a crime-solving lawyer in 16th-century England.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/05/2442m 47s

WNBA Star Brittney Griner Imprisonment & Release

Griner spent nearly 300 days incarcerated in Russia after authorities at the Moscow airport found two nearly empty cartridges of cannabis in her luggage. The WNBA star spoke with Terry Gross about the dehumanizing prison conditions, her release, and return to the court. Griner, who is 6'9", says she felt like a zoo animal in prison. "The guards would literally come open up the little peep hole, look in, and then I would hear them laughing." Her new memoir is Coming Home.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/05/2444m 46s

The Hidden World Of Plant Intelligence

Climate journalist Zoë Schlanger explains the fascinating science behind how plants learn, communicate, and adapt to survive. She says plants can store memories, trick animals into not eating them, and even send alarm calls to other plants. Her new book is called The Light Eaters. TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Netflix series A Man in Full, starring Jeff Daniels and Diane Lane.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/05/2445m 59s

Best Of: Jon Bon Jovi / Fantasy Writer Leigh Bardugo

In a new Hulu docuseries, Jon Bon Jovi looks back on his career and his recovery after vocal surgery. He spoke with Terry Gross about his breakthrough hit "Runaway" and how he's evolved as a musician. Also, we'll hear from fantasy author Leigh Bardugo. She's best known for her YA series Shadow and Bone. Her new adult novel, The Familiar, set in 16th century Spain, is about a young woman who can perform miracles.Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews a new collection of letters by Emily Dickinson.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/05/2449m 12s

Remembering Writer Paul Auster

The New York Times described Paul Auster as the "Patron Saint of Literary Brooklyn." He died Tuesday of complications of lung cancer. He was 77. We'll listen back to some of our interviews with him, including one about his early career when he was desperately trying to make a living as writer, and even tried writing porn.Justin Chang reviews the new film The Fall Guy, starring Ryan Gosling and Emily Blunt.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/05/2445m 44s

What Will Happen With The TikTok Ban?

Congress and President Biden say TikTok must shed its financial ties to China or face a ban in the U.S. But Washington Post tech reporter Drew Harwell says selling the company is complicated. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or here.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/05/2443m 16s

Erik Larson On The Dawn Of The Civil War

In The Demon of Unrest, author Erik Larson chronicles the five months between the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860 and the start of the Civil War, drawing parallels to today's political climate.Also, David Bianculli reviews the FX/Hulu spy thriller series The Veil, starring Elisabeth Moss.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/05/2445m 8s

Fantasy Writer Leigh Bardugo On Magic & Miracles

Leigh Bardugo is best known for her YA Shadow and Bone series. Her adult novel, The Familiar, centers on a young woman in 16th century Spain who must hide her identity as a Jew who converted to Catholicism. She spoke with producer Sam Briger. Also, jazz historian Kevin Whitehead looks at a reissue of Sonny Rollins. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or here.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/04/2446m 46s

Jon Bon Jovi

A few years ago, Bon Jovi stopped performing because of a vocal cord injury. The Hulu docuseries Thank You, Goodnight offers a career retrospective, plus a view of his surgery and return to the stage. He spoke with Terry Gross about his voice, writing "Livin' on a Prayer," and his forthcoming album, Forever.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/04/2445m 33s

Best Of: St. Vincent / Kids In An Age Of Anxiety

Songwriter, guitarist and singer St. Vincent talks about her new album, All Born Screaming. Also, we talk with child psychiatrist Harold Koplewicz. His latest book is called Scaffold Parenting: Raising Resilient, Self-Reliant and Secure Kids in an Age of Anxiety. To get staff recommendations, highlights from our archive, and intel on what's coming up on the show, subscribe to our newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/04/2448m 4s

Novelist John Green On The 'Invasive Weed' Of OCD

Green's YA novel, Turtles All the Way Down, has been recently adapted to film (on MAX May 2). Green described living with OCD, and how "one little thought" could take over his mind, in this 2017 interview with Terry Gross. Also, Justin Chang reviews Challengers, starring Zendaya and directed by Luca Guadagnino.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/04/2444m 8s

Why Writers Are Losing Out In Hollywood

Nearly a year after the Hollywood writers' strike started, the entertainment industry remains in flux. Harpers journalist Daniel Bessner says TV and film writers are feeling the brunt of the changes.Maureen Corrigan reviews a collection of Emily Dickinson letters. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at here. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/04/2444m 37s

The Life & Legacy Of 'Rulebreaker' Barbara Walters

Journalist Susan Page talks about Barbara Walters's groundbreaking career as a newswoman and her signature interview specials, which blended news and entertainment. Page was interested in understanding Walters' inner life – the source of her drive, how she navigated hostile work environments, and being teased for her speech impediment. Page's book is The Rulebreaker.Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Taylor Swift's 11th studio album, The Tortured Poets Department.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/04/2445m 20s

St. Vincent

The songwriter, guitarist and singer known as St. Vincent took her stage name from St. Vincent's Hospital in New York, where the poet Dylan Thomas died. Her seventh album, All Born Screaming, is out April 26. She spoke with Terry Gross about visiting her dad in prison, touring with her aunt and uncle as a teen, and the inspiration for her hit song "New York." For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at here.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/04/2443m 50s

How Minority Rule Threatens Democracy

Journalist Ari Berman says the founding fathers created a system that concentrated power in the hands of an elite minority — and that their decisions continue to impact American democracy today. Berman's book is Minority Rule.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/04/2445m 44s

Best Of: Salman Rushdie's Survival / A New Kind Of Whodunit

Writer Salman Rushdie talks about the knife attack that nearly killed him — and his life since then. In 2022, he was onstage at a literary event when the assailant ran up from the audience, and stabbed him 14 times. His new book is called Knife. Also, Diarra Kilpatrick talks about writing and starring in the new series, Diarra From Detroit, a dark comedy about a public school teacher who is ghosted by a Tinder date and, in her quest to find out why, investigates a decades-old mystery that takes her into the underbelly of Detroit. Ken Tucker reviews Tierra Whack's new album World Wide Whack.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/04/2448m 53s

Remembering PBS Anchor Robert MacNeil

Longtime PBS news anchor Robert MacNeil died last week at 93. He spoke with Terry Gross a few times over the course of his journalism career. We revisit those conversations. Also, we listen back to Eleanor Coppola's 1992 interview about her documentary, Hearts of Darkness. It chronicles the chaotic filming of Francis Ford Coppola's movie Apocalypse Now. She also died last week, at age 87.David Bianculli reviews HBO's The Jinx — Part Two, which picks up where The Jinx left off: With Robert Durst admitting to murder.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/04/2446m 27s

Our Fragile Food System

Fast Food Nation author Eric Schlosser says mergers and acquisitions have created food oligopolies that are inefficient, barely regulated and sometimes dangerous. His new documentary with Michael Pollan is Food, Inc. 2. Also, Justin Chang reviews the film The Beast. Keep up with Fresh Air, learn what's coming next week, and get staff recommendations by subscribing to our weekly newsletter. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/04/2444m 8s

A Death Doula Says 'Get Real' About The End

Alua Arthur works with families, caretakers, and people close to death who want to be intentional about the end of life. She's learned through her work and her own experiences with loss that facing the inevitable can help lessen the anxiety and fear so many of us have around death. Her new book is called, Briefly Perfectly Human. Also, we remember painter Faith Ringgold, who died Saturday at the age of 93.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/04/2445m 6s

Salman Rushdie On Surviving Attempted Murder

Rushdie was onstage at a literary event in 2022 when he was attacked by a man in the audience: "Dying in the company of strangers — that was what was going through my mind." His new book is Knife.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/04/2445m 38s

A First Date Turns Into A Whodunit In 'Diarra From Detroit'

Growing up, when Diarra Kilpatrick watched murder mystery shows with her grandmother, she never saw Black women driving the narrative. Her new BET+ series seeks to change that. It's called Diarra From Detroit.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/04/2444m 36s

Best Of: Andrew Scott / Women Behind The Wheel

Andrew Scott stars as a con artist with no conscience in the new Netflix series Ripley. It's an adaptation of the Patricia Highsmith novel The Talented Mr. Ripley. He spoke with Terry Gross about tapping into his darker side for the role — and playing the "hot priest" in Fleabag.Also, we hear about how cars became our most gendered technology. Women used to be considered unqualified to drive, or just terrible drivers. Glamorous women were used to advertise cars. And yet cars have been designed for male bodies, in ways that put women drivers at risk. Journalist Nancy Nichols is the author of Women Behind the Wheel. Maureen Corrigan reviews Lionel Shriver's latest novel, Mania.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/04/2445m 41s

The History Of King Kong & Godzilla

Godzilla X Kong: The New Empire is the latest film starring two of cinema's biggest monsters. Today we take a look at the first time they were introduced to audiences. Film historian Rudy Behlmer tells us about the 1933 film King Kong. And Steve Ryfle wrote a book about the making of the 1954 Japanese film Godzilla.Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews Civil War.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/04/2446m 36s

The 'Land Grab' Displacing The Maasai People

Atlantic journalist Stephanie McCrummen says foreign interests are acquiring Serengeti territory in Northern Tanzania, effectively displacing indigenous cattle-herders from their traditional grazing lands. McCrummen spoke with Dave Davies about the billionaires, conservation groups, and safari tourism in this story. Also, John Powers reviews the TV adaptation of Viet Thanh Nguyen's Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Sympathizer.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/04/2443m 58s

The High Pressure Experiments That Made D-Day

What happens to the body in the deep sea? You need oxygen to survive, but too much oxygen can be deadly. Also, if you rise to the surface too quickly, nitrogen bubbles can form in your body and kill you. We'll talk with author and scientist Rachel Lance, who has conducted research for the military, using a hyperbaric chamber in which the air and the pressure can be controlled to mimic what divers and submarines are exposed to. Her new book is about the scientists whose dangerous experiments about underwater pressure and injury were critical to the success of D-Day. It's called Chamber Divers. David Bianculli reviews the new series Franklin, starring Michael Douglas as Ben Franklin.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/04/2444m 32s

Internet Brain & The Age Of Overthinking

Linguist Amanda Montell says our brains are overloaded with a constant stream of information that stokes our innate tendency to believe conspiracy theories and mysticism. Her book is The Age of Magical Overthinking. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Lionel Shriver's new novel, Mania. Subscribe to the Fresh Air newsletter for a peek behind-the-scenes at whyy.org/freshair For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/04/2445m 11s

Andrew Scott On 'Ripley,' 'Fleabag' & More

Andrew Scott (best known as "hot priest" from Fleabag) plays con artist Tom Ripley in the Netflix adaptation of The Talented Mr. Ripley. He says his job is to advocate for his characters, not judge them. He spoke with Terry Gross about finding soul in comedy and lightness in drama. Also, Lloyd Schwartz shares a little-known history of "soundies."Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/04/2444m 56s

Best Of: Sue Bird / Sleater-Kinney

NCAA/WNBA star Sue Bird spoke with Terry Gross about her career, coming out publicly, and fighting for equity in women's sports. A new documentary about her last season on the court is Sue Bird: In the Clutch.Also, we hear from Carrie Brownstein and Corin Tucker, co-founders of the punk band Sleater-Kinney. While they were working on their latest album, Little Rope, Brownstein's mother died in an car accident. They'll talk about how the grief affected the album.Also, Ken Tucker reviews Beyonce's new album, Cowboy Carter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/04/2448m 30s

A 'Curb Your Enthusiasm' Appreciation

HBO's Curb your Enthusiasm comes to an end Sunday night, after 25 years and 12 seasons. We're featuring our interviews with cast members Larry David, Cheryl Hines, Jeff Garlin, Jeff Greene, Susie Essman and more.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/04/2446m 39s

Abortion Rights & The Fetal Personhood Movement

The Guardian's reproductive health reporter Carter Sherman says efforts are underway in a number of states to assign fetuses "some kind of rights that we would generally ascribe to a human person."Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews Ripley starring Andrew Scott. Film critic Justin Chang reviews Woody Allen's new French-language drama Coup de Chance. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/04/2445m 10s

Capt. Cook's Final Voyage

"A lot of things started going wrong from the very beginning," historian Hampton Sides says of Cook's last voyage, which ended in the British explorer's violent death on the island of Hawaii in 1779. His book is The Wide Wide Sea: Imperial Ambition, First Contact, and the Fateful Final Voyage of Captain James Cook.Ken Tucker reviews Beyoncé's album Cowboy Carter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/04/2446m 40s

'Kids Are Not OK' Says Mental Health Expert

A global pandemic, school shootings, climate change, war: Children and teenagers are experiencing and being treated for unprecedented levels of anxiety and depression. We talk with founding president of the Child Mind Institute, Dr. Harold Koplewicz, about screen time, suicidal ideation, and testing for ADHD. His latest book is Scaffold Parenting: Raising Resilient, Self-Reliant, and Secure Kids in an Age of Anxiety. Also, Justin Chang reviews the film La Chimera.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/04/2446m 9s

WNBA Star Sue Bird

Retired point guard Sue Bird holds the record for most career assists in the WNBA, with 3,234 over the course of her 19-season professional career. She's also won four WNBA championships, five Olympic gold medals and two NCAA championships. She spoke with Terry Gross about playing overseas in Russia, staying cool under pressure, and her pump-up song for games.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/04/2445m 35s

Best Of: Stories From A Hollywood Insider / Eugene Levy

If you've ever wondered how directors convince stars to appear in their films, or what they do when an actor committed to a lead role suddenly starts throwing up roadblocks, you can ask Ed Zwick. He's a writer, director and producer who's been making TV and movies for decades. His new memoir is Hits, Flops, and Other Illusions: My Fortysomething Years in Hollywood. Also, we'll hear from Eugene Levy. He's appeared in dozens of films, including four satirical movies by Christopher Guest, which he co-wrote. He also starred in the hit comedy series Schitt's Creek. Levy currently stars in The Reluctant Traveler, a series in which he visits distant lands and tastes exotic foods that aren't exactly in his comfort zone.David Bianculli will review the new documentary about Paul Simon.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/03/2447m 16s

Celebrating Country Music's Black Roots

Beyoncé's highly anticipated country album, Cowboy Carter, is out today. One of the musicians on it is fiddle and banjo player Rhiannon Giddens. We'll listen to our 2010 in-studio performance with the group she was part of then, the Carolina Chocolate Drops. They played string band and jug band music of the '20s and '30s, music most people associate with a white southern tradition. But the members of the Carolina Chocolate Drops are Black. They saw themselves as part of a little known Black string band tradition— forerunners of modern country music and bluegrass.John Powers reviews A Gentleman in Moscow, starring Ewan McGregor, which begins streaming today on Paramount+. David Bianculli reviews the new Apple TV+ documentary about Steve Martin.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/03/2446m 34s

How Cars Became A Gendered Technology

Author Nancy Nichols says that for men, cars signify adventure, power and strength. For women, they are about performing domestic duties; there was even a minivan prototype with a washer/dryer inside. Her book is Women Behind the Wheel: An Unexpected and Personal History of the Car.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/03/2445m 18s

Oregon's Drug Decriminalization Experiment

In 2020, Oregon voters overwhelmingly approved to decriminalize possession of small amounts of hard drugs, and mandate more spending on drug treatment and social services. But 3.5 years of frustration, with overdose deaths and open air drug use, has turned public opinion around, and lawmakers have restored criminal penalties. We'll speak with New Yorker contributing writer E. Tammy Kim, who traveled through the state speaking with activists, treatment providers, police, lawmakers and drug users about the experience, and the ongoing debate over how to respond to America's drug crisis.Also, Kevin Whitehead remembers classical and pop singer Sarah Vaughan on the 100th anniversary of her birth.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/03/2445m 3s

Climate-Driven Migration In America

ProPublica reporter Abrahm Lustgarten says in the coming decades it's likely tens of millions of us will relocate to escape rising seas, punishing heat, floods and wildfires due to global warming. He says nine of the ten fastest growing regions of the country are on the front lines of the most severe and fast-changing climate conditions. His book is On the Move: The Overheating Earth and the Uprooting of America.Ken Tucker has high praise for Tierra Whack's new album, World Wide Whack. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/03/2445m 20s

Sleater-Kinney

Carrie Brownstein and Corin Tucker co-founded the band Sleater-Kinney together 30 years ago, and became an important part of the 1990s feminist punk scene in Olympia, Washington. Rolling Stone once called Sleater-Kinney the best American punk rock band ever. Brownstein and Tucker just released their 11th album, called Little Rope. While they were working on the record, Brownstein's mother died in a car accident. They spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado about how the grief affected the album, and what it's like to make music together for decades.Also, David Bianculli reviews the Netflix series 3 Body Problem.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/03/2447m 6s

Best Of: The Life Of A Nun / A Foster Parent On Loving & Letting Go

Catherine Coldstream spoke with Terry Gross about her years as nun in a Carmelite monastery. She talks about what drew her to the vocation, what it was like to live a silent and obedient life, and why she ran away. Her memoir is called Cloistered.Maureen Corrigan reviews Percival Everett's new novel, James. It's a reimagining of Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. When Mark Daley and his husband became foster parents to two brothers, they fell in love with the children right away. But they also knew that their family could change at any moment. Eventually, the boys were reunified with their biological parents. Daley's memoir is Safe: A Memoir of Fatherhood, Foster Care, and the Risks We Take for Family.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/03/2448m 40s

'Tokyo Vice' Journalist On Japan's Criminal Underworld

Reporter Jake Adelstein's memoir, Tokyo Vice, is about covering the organized crime beat in Japan. The MAX series (based on the book) is now in its second season. Adelstein spoke with Dave Davies in 2009. Also, Justin Chang reviews the remake of the '80s film Road House.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/03/2445m 38s

The Chinese Mafia & The Illicit Marijuana Trade

Marijuana has been legalized in some states, but ProPublica's Sebastian Rotella says there's still a thriving illicit market in the U.S., dominated by criminals connected to China's authoritarian government.Also, John Powers reviews the Romanian film Do Not Expect Too Much from the End of the World. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/03/2444m 42s

A Former Nun On Why She 'Cloistered' And Later Ran Away

Catherine Coldstream spoke with Terry Gross about her years as nun in a Carmelite monastery. She talks about what drew her to the vocation, what it was like to live a silent and obedient life, and why she ran away. Her memoir is called Cloistered.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/03/2445m 10s

Christine Blasey Ford On Life Before And Since Testifying

Christine Blasey Ford describes what it was like to come forward and testify that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school. Her 2018 testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee threatened to derail his confirmation, but Kavanaugh succeeded in being becoming a supreme court justice. Ford still requires security for protection. After mostly avoiding the media, she's written a memoir. It's called One Way Back.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Percival Everett's new book, James, which reimagines The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from the point of view of Finn's enslaved companion. Finally, we say goodbye to producer Seth Kelley.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/03/2445m 43s

An 'Exvangelical' On Loving & Leaving The Church

NPR Politics correspondent Sarah McCammon grew up in a white evangelical church that taught her to never question her faith. She spoke with Tonya Mosley about her upbringing, how her faith was tested, and her decision to leave the church. She now reports on the Christian right and their support of Donald Trump. McCammon's book is The Exvangelicals. Also, Justin Chang reviews The Shadowless Tower. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/03/2444m 42s

Best Of: Jenny Slate / Julio Torres

Jenny Slate talks about childbirth and motherhood, the subjects of her new comedy special, Seasoned Professional. She'll do the voices of some of her animated characters, including Marcel from her Oscar-nominated film Marcel the Shell with Shoes On.Also, we hear from comic/actor Julio Torres. Growing up in El Salvador as a gay atheist he says he felt like an alien. Then he literally was labeled an "alien" when he came to the U.S. on a student visa. He's drawn on those experiences to write, direct and star in the new satirical film Problemista.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/03/2448m 56s

A Maître D' Dishes On The Restaurant Industry

Michael Cecchi-Azzolina has worked in several high-end New York City restaurants — adrenaline-fueled workplaces where booze and drugs are plentiful and the health inspector will ruin your day. His memoir is Your Table Is Ready. Also, Terry shares a remembrance of revered magazine editor William Whitworth. David Bianculli reviews Restless Dreams, a documentary about Paul Simon.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/03/2445m 50s

What Makes Propaganda Effective?

We talk with Peter Pomerantsev, whose new book, How to Win an Information War, is about the man he describes as the "forgotten genius" of propaganda. Throughout WWII, Sefton Delmer ran propaganda campaigns for the British against Hitler's regime. Some of those efforts bordered on pornography. We'll also talk about witnessing Putin's use of disinformation when Pomerantsev worked in Russia, and his work as the co-founder of a project documenting Russian war crimes in Ukraine.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/03/2444m 17s

Eugene Levy Is A 'Reluctant Traveler'

Schitt's Creek star Eugene Levy visits distant lands and tastes exotic foods as the host of the Apple TV+ series The Reluctant Traveler. Levy describes it as a show about "a guy traveling who doesn't love to travel."Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Adelle Waldman's new novel, Help Wanted, and David Bianculli reviews a TV show about the Lincoln assassination called Manhunt.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/03/2446m 30s

Jenny Slate

The comic/actor returns. Now she has a 3-year-old daughter, who she sings to in the voice of her character Marcel the Shell with Shoes On. Slate spoke with Terry Gross about finding comedy in her feelings, divorce, and growing up in a haunted house. Her new stand-up special on Amazon Prime Video is Seasoned Professional.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/03/2446m 30s

Julio Torres Spins Immigration Stress Into Satire

Comic, actor and filmmaker Julio Torres came to the U.S. from El Salvador in his 20s. His new film, Problemista, draws from his personal experience struggling to get a visa. "This movie deals with the problem of immigration, but I think of it as a very silly, happy and joyful movie," he says. Torres talks with Terry Gross about his love of difficult people, collaborating with his mom, and getting started in stand-up. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/03/2446m 56s

Best Of: Biden's Last Campaign / Trans Writer Lucy Sante

New Yorker staff writer Evan Osnos recently interviewed Biden for his new profile about the president's accomplishments and failures in office, his current face-off with Trump, and the fears of many voters that he is too old for the job. Also, we'll hear from writer Lucy Sante. She's been writing books since the 1980s, exploring everything from photography to urban history. In her latest memoir, I Heard Her Call My Name, she writes about coming out as a trans woman in her 60s. Maureen Corrigan will review Sloane Crosley's new memoir about grief. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshair Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/03/2448m 26s

Emma Stone / Mark Ruffalo

Emma Stone has two Oscar nominations for Poor Things: One for best actress and one for best picture, as a producer. She spoke with Terry Gross about working with an intimacy coordinator and why she sees her anxiety as a superpower. Mark Ruffalo plays a debauched cad opposite Emma Stone in the movie. The role was a big departure from his previous work playing real people, in dramas like Spotlight or Foxcatcher, or as the Incredible Hulk in the Marvel movies. The Oscar-nominated actor spoke with Sam Briger. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/03/2446m 5s

A Veteran Filmmaker Shares Secrets From The Set

Writer, director and producer Ed Zwick has made dozens of films and TV shows including Legends of the Fall, The Last Samurai, and Blood Diamond. In his memoir, Hits, Flops, and Other Illusions, he writes about studios, actors and the frustrations and joys of the business. John Powers reviews the pulpy noir crime film Love Lies Bleeding.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/03/2444m 30s

Biden's Last Campaign

In a wide-ranging conversation with The New Yorker, President Biden proclaimed that he is the best option to beat Donald Trump — despite polls indicating he is falling behind. We talk with Evan Osnos about Biden's outlook. Among the things that Americans are unsure of are Biden's age, his mental agility, his handling of immigration, and the war in Gaza.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/03/2445m 24s

A War Reporter Reckons With A Deadly Cancer Diagnosis

As a war correspondent, Rod Nordland faced death many times over. But in 2019, Nordland confronted a different type of danger when he was diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most lethal form of brain tumor. "I had to face the reality that my death was within a fairly short timespan, highly probable," he says. "I think it made me a better person." His new memoir is Waiting for the Monsoon. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Sloane Crosley's new memoir Grief Is For People.And David Bianculli reviews Jon Stewart's return to The Daily Show, and the new season of John Oliver's Last Week Tonight.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/03/2445m 7s

RuPaul's House Of Hidden Meanings

The Emmy-winning host of RuPaul's Drag Race describes himself as "an introvert masquerading as an extrovert." In a new memoir, he writes about growing up Black and queer in San Diego. And how he forged a new and glamorous identity in the punk rock and drag scenes of Atlanta and New York City. The memoir is titled The House of Hidden Meanings.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews a new oral history of the Village Voice.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/03/2444m 34s

Best Of: The Making Of 'Dune' / Why We Remember

Denis Villeneuve remembers watching the 1984 movie version of Frank Herbert's 1965 sci-fi novel Dune and thinking, "Someday, someone else will do it again" — not realizing he would be that filmmaker. He spoke to Sam Briger about shooting Dune in the desert and his love of silent film.Ken Tucker reviews a new solo album from guitarist Mary Timony. Neuroscientist Dr. Charan Ranganath's book is Why We Remember. We talk about how stress affects memory and what's happening in the brain when something's on the tip of your tongue.For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/03/2448m 43s

Paul Giamatti / Remembering Comic Richard Lewis

Paul Giamatti stars in The Holdovers as a pompous and disliked teacher at a boys boarding school in the '70s. He's now up for an Oscar for best actor. Giamatti spoke with Sam Briger about the role and reuniting with director Alexander Payne, 20 years after Sideways.Also, we remember comic and Curb Your Enthusiasm actor Richard Lewis, who died Feb. 27. The Brooklyn-born comic made his standup debut in 1971. His routines were full of biting takes on love, life, and physical and mental health. Lewis spoke with Terry Gross in 1988 and 2000.Also, Justin Chang reviews Dune: Part Two.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/03/2446m 0s

The Impact Of Christian Nationalism On American Democracy

Why do many Christian nationalists think Trump is chosen by God to lead the country? We talk with Bradley Onishi about the ties between Christian nationalism and political and judicial leaders. Onishi became a Christian nationalist and a youth minister in his teens and then left the church. He is the author of Preparing for War: The Extremist History of White Christian Nationalism — and What Comes Next, and he cohosts a podcast about religion and politics called Straight White American Jesus.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/02/2445m 7s

'Dune' Director Denis Villeneuve

Villeneuve remembers watching the 1984 movie version of Frank Herbert's 1965 sci-fi novel Dune and thinking, "Someday someone else will do it again" — not realizing he would be that filmmaker. He spoke to Sam Briger about shooting Dune in the desert, depicting sandworm surfing, and his love of silent film. Also, David Bianculli reviews the new CBS murder mystery series, Elsbeth. For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/02/2446m 6s

Busy Philipps

Busy Philipps plays Mrs. George, a "cool mom" seeking the approval of her teen daughter in the new movie musical version of Mean Girls. Philipps got her start in acting as a teen on the series Freaks and Geeks. She spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado about sexism in Hollywood, collaborating with Tina Fey, and the best friendship advice her mom gave her. Also, Ken Tucker reviews a new solo album from Mary Timony, and David Biacnulli reviews the series Shōgun.For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes, too — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/02/2445m 11s

Why We Remember (And Forget)

Charan Ranganath recently wrote an op-ed about President Biden's memory gaffes. He says forgetting is a normal part of aging. We also talk about PTSD, how stress affects memory, and what's happening when something's on the tip of your tongue. His new book is Why We Remember. Also, John Powers reviews Cocktails with George and Martha: Movies, Marriage, and the Making of Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf?For sponsor-free episodes of Fresh Air — and exclusive weekly bonus episodes — subscribe to Fresh Air+ via Apple Podcasts or at https://plus.npr.org/freshairLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/02/2445m 28s

Best Of: Mark Ruffalo / Jeffrey Wright

Mark Ruffalo is nominated for an Oscar for best supporting actor for his role in Poor Things. He plays a hilarious debauched lawyer who seduces Emma Stone's character. Ruffalo has also appeared in Marvel movies as the Incredible Hulk. For that role he had to act in a motion capture suit. "It's the man-canceling suit. It makes you look big where you want to look small, and small where want to look big," he says. Also, we hear from Jeffrey Wright. He's up for an Oscar for best actor for his role in American Fiction, where he plays a novelist who's frustrated with the publishing industry's expectations of Black authors. He cynically writes a book under a pseudonym that's full of clichés, like violence and poverty — and it's a hit. Maureen Corrigan reviews an off-beat bestselling Japanese mystery series.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/02/2448m 32s

Bradley Cooper & Conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin

In his Oscar-nominated biopic Maestro, Bradley Cooper was determined not to imitate the legendary Leonard Bernstein. Instead, the actor worked with conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin to find his own rhythm. They spoke with Terry Gross about conducting, Bernstein's legacy, and playing with batons when they were kids. Also, Justin Chang reviews Italy's submission for best foreign film, Io Capitano.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/02/2446m 31s

Trump's Legal Challenges, Explained

As Donald Trump seeks to gain the Republican presidential nomination, he faces 91 felony charges across four states and several lawsuits, many with dates in court that run right up to the election. We talk with reporter Alan Feuer, who is part of the team at the New York Times covering Trump's legal battles. The first of four criminal case trials is expected to start on March 25.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/02/2445m 9s

Writer Lucy Sante On Transitioning In Her Late 60s

Lucy Sante has been writing books since the 1980s, exploring everything from photography to urban history. In a new memoir, she shares her story of transition from male to female at 67 years old. "I am lucky to have survived my own repression," Sante says. "I think a lot of people in my position have not." The book is titled I Heard Her Call My Name: A Memoir of Transition.Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Apple TV+ series Constellation.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/02/2445m 49s

Jeffrey Wright, From 'Basquiat' To 'American Fiction'

Wright is up for an Oscar for best actor this year for the film American Fiction, where he plays a novelist who's frustrated with the publishing industry's expectations of Black authors. He cynically writes a book under a pseudonym that's full of clichés, like drug abuse, violence, and poverty — and it's a hit. Wright's first starring role was in the 1996 film Basquiat. He talks with us about his big break in the play Angels in America, and the time early in his career when he was acting opposite Sidney Poitier and asked for advice on acting.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/02/2444m 48s

The History Of The Oscars

From relentless campaigning to snubs and speeches, the Academy Awards have often reflected a cultural conflict zone. Michael Schulman sifts through the controversies in his book, Oscar Wars. Maureen Corrigan reviews The Kamogawa Food Detectives by Hisashi Kashiwai.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/02/2444m 41s

Best Of: Molly Ringwald / Busy Philipps

Actress Molly Ringwald came to represent '80s teen angst after starring in Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, and Pretty in Pink. She's now in the new series Feud: Capote vs. The Swans, about the high society women that Truman Capote loved and betrayed.Also, we hear from another actor who got her start as a teen — Busy Philipps. In the '90s, she played tough girl Kim Kelly in Freaks and Geeks. Philipps' latest project is the movie musical Mean Girls where she plays a mom trying to be young and cool.John Powers reviews the new Vim Venders film Perfect Days.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/02/2448m 42s

Sterling K. Brown / Colman Domingo

Sterling K. Brown won an Emmy for his portrayal of Christopher Darden in The People v. O.J. Simpson, and another for This Is Us. He's now nominated for an Oscar for his performance in American Fiction.Colman Domingo is also nominated, for his role in the biopic Rustin as Bayard Rustin, the civil rights leader responsible for organizing the 1963 March on Washington. Rustin was forced into the background because he was gay. Justin Chang reviews Drift, starring Cynthia Erivo. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/02/2446m 4s

The Migrant Crisis In NYC

How is New York City coping with the 175,000 migrants from the Southern border? New York Times reporter Andy Newman says the city's legal mandate to provide shelter to any who need it is being tested by a stream of migrants — some of whom were sent on buses by Southern governors.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Francis Spufford's Cahokia Jazz.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/02/2445m 15s

Remembering Longtime NPR Host Bob Edwards

We remember Peabody award-winning broadcast journalist Bob Edwards, who died on Saturday at the age of 76. He was the first and longest-serving host of NPR's Morning Edition, from the show's inception in 1979 until 2004. Terry Gross recorded two interviews with Edwards. Also, John Powers review Perfect Days, the new film from director Wim Wenders.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/02/2446m 16s

Mark Ruffalo

Ruffalo plays a debauched cad in Yorgos Lanthimos' bawdy, dark comedy Poor Things. The role was a big departure from his previous work playing real people in dramas like Spotlight or Foxcatcher, or as the Incredible Hulk in the Marvel movies. The Oscar-nominated actor spoke with Sam Briger about these roles, how he got his start in acting, and how a brain tumor changed his life.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/02/2445m 33s

Molly Ringwald

Molly Ringwald became a film icon in the '80s after starring in a trio of films: Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, and Pretty in Pink. "I don't like to use the word iconic because it's overused — but they really are. Those films are really iconic," she tells Tonya Mosley. Now she's in the new Ryan Murphy series Feud: Capote vs. The Swans, about the high society women that novelist Truman Capote loved and betrayed.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/02/2445m 36s

Best Of: The Race Card Project / The Early AIDS Crisis

Journalist Michele Norris has spent the last 14 years collecting what she describes as "an archive of the human experience" with The Race Card Project. She wanted to see how Americans really talk and think about race, so she asked people to share their thoughts in six words. Norris adapted the project into a memoir called Our Hidden Conversations. Also, we'll hear from Kai Wright, host of the WNYC podcast Blindspot: The Plague in the Shadows about the early years of the AIDS epidemic, when so little was known about HIV, and so much was misunderstood.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/02/2448m 39s

Remembering MC5 Guitarist Wayne Kramer / Carl Weathers

We remember Wayne Kramer, the guitarist of the late '60s proto-punk band MC5. The revolutionary band's idols were the Black Panther party, Malcolm X and John Coltrane. Kramer died last week at 75. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2002.Also we listen back to our 1988 interview with actor Carl Weathers, who played Apollo Creed in the Rocky movies. He died at 76. Justin Chang reviews the French film The Taste of Things.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/02/2446m 37s

The Surprisingly Lax Regulation Of Our Railroads

Award-winning ProPublica reporter Topher Sanders has spent the last two years investigating America's aging freight train system. He says the Federal Railroad Administration monitors "less than 1% of what's happening on the rails." Sanders talks about the toxic East Palestine, OH derailment, the prevalence of blocked railroad crossings, and why railway safety legislation is yet to be passed. Also, rock critic Ken Tucker shares three new songs. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/02/2445m 37s

The Life and Legacy Of Medgar & Myrlie Evers

The civil rights leader Medgar Evers is maybe more known for his assassination in 1963 than the work he did to fight for voting rights and desegregation. MSNBC host Joy-Ann Reid tells the story of Medgar and his wife Myrlie in a new book. Evers was the NAACP field secretary in Mississippi, a state that lynched more Black people than any other. The risks of the job created a lot of tension in their marriage — and after Medgar's death, Myrlie's fury drove her to be an activist herself.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/02/2446m 38s

A Foster Parent On Loving & Letting Go

When Mark Daley and his husband, Jason, became foster parents to two brothers, they fell in love with the children right away. But Daley and his husband also know that their family could change at any moment. Eventually, the boys were reunified with their biological parents. Daley's memoir is Safe: A Memoir of Fatherhood, Foster Care, and the Risks We Take for Family. Daley talks about the foster care system at large, as well as the joy and pain he and Jason experienced as foster parents.Also, TV critic David Bianculli reflects on Curb Your Enthusiasm, as it enters its 12th and final season.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/02/2446m 28s

What Americans Really Think About Race

Journalist Michele Norris has spent the last 14 years collecting what she calls "an archive of the human experience." She wanted to see how Americans really talk and think about race, so she asked people to share their thoughts in six words. The results were overwhelming. Eventually, the project moved online and got more than half a million entries from over 100 countries. Norris turned the project into a new book called Our Hidden Conversations. Also, John Powers reviews a biography of Frantz Fanon, by Adam Shatz.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/02/2445m 56s

Best Of: Emma Stone / The Birth Of Psychedelic Science

Emma Stone is nominated for an Oscar for her starring role in Poor Things. She spoke with Terry Gross about the film and her relationship to her anxiety. David Bianculli reviews Ryan Murphy's FX anthology series Feud: Capote vs. The Swans. Also, Benjamin Breen talks about his book, Tripping on Utopia: Margaret Mead, the Cold War, and the Troubled Birth of Psychedelic Science. It's about the pioneering work anthropologists Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson did on the use of psychedelics as a way to expand consciousness, and how that later connected to government research on the use of psychedelics as a weapon.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/02/2447m 49s

'Oppenheimer' Dir. Christopher Nolan / Mark Ronson On The 'Barbie' Soundtrack

Oppenheimer and Barbie have been nominated for 13 and 8 Oscars, respectively. We feature our interview with Christopher Nolan, who wrote and directed Oppenheimer, about the making of the atomic bomb. Also, we hear from prolific music producer Mark Ronson about the soundtrack and score of Barbie. He co-wrote one of the songs that's been nominated for an Oscar and a Grammy, "I'm Just Ken."David Bianculli reviews the latest installment of Ryan Murphy's FX anthology series Feud, this time about Truman Capote.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/02/2446m 42s

The Forgotten Heroes Of The AIDS Crisis

Kai Wright's WNYC podcast, Blindspot, revisits the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, focusing in particular on populations that are frequently overlooked — including the pediatric patients at Harlem Hospital.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/02/2444m 57s

Emma Stone

Stone has two Oscar nominations for Poor Things: One for best actress and one for best picture, as a producer. She spoke with Terry Gross about working with an intimacy coordinator, why she sees her anxiety as a superpower, and how Superbad changed her life.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/01/2444m 51s

Unpacking The Immigration Crisis

Hundreds of thousands of people, mostly from Central America, arrive at the U.S.-Mexico border every year. What to do with these migrants is one of the most divisive issues in Washington. New Yorker staff writer Jonathan Blitzer says the crisis is partially the result of decades of American policy. Blitzer's new book is called Everyone Who is Gone is Here. He also recounts the stories of those attempting to cross the border.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/01/2446m 7s

Inside A Jim Crow-Era Asylum

NBC journalist Antonia Hylton spent more than a decade piecing together the history of Maryland's first segregated asylum, where Black patients were forced into manual labor. Her new book is Madness: Race and Insanity in a Jim Crow Asylum. Also, Ken Tucker reviews the new album The Interrogator from The Paranoid Style.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/01/2445m 53s

Best Of: Tracee Ellis Ross / Racism In Medicine

Tracee Ellis Ross co-stars in the new movie American Fiction, which is nominated for five Oscars, including Best Picture. For eight seasons, she starred in the ABC comedy series Black-ish. Ross played the mother, Bow, and she worked with the writers to make sure her character wasn't just what she calls "wife wallpaper." She spoke with Tonya Mosley about those roles. Also, Dr. Uché Blackstock talks about her new book, Legacy: A Black Physician Reckons With Racism In Medicine. Maureen Corrigan reviews the debut novel Martyr! from Iranian American poet Kaveh Akbar.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/01/2448m 44s

Remembering Composer Peter Shickeley / Shangri-Las Lead Mary Weiss

We remember composer and classical music satirist Peter Schickele, whose alter ego was "P.D.Q. Bach." His comic music arrangements were funny, but the level of musicianship was no joke. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1985. Also, we remember Mary Weiss, lead singer of the Shangri-Las, the girl group whose biggest hit was "Leader of the Pack." From working-class Queens, they acquired a tough girl image, in contrast to the glamor girl groups of the era. Weiss was on Fresh Air in 2007 when she released a solo album. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews Masters of the Air, the new World War II series from Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks on Apple TV+. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/01/2446m 19s

How The War Between Israel And Hamas Is Widening

New York Times correspondent David Sanger says that Iran and its proxies are posing new challenges: "We're seeing outbreaks of low-level but highly damaging conflict all over the region."Also, John Powers reviews the new Mexican film Tótem. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/01/2445m 22s

Tracee Ellis Ross

Tracee Ellis Ross co-stars in the Oscar-nominated movie American Fiction. For eight seasons, she starred in the ABC comedy series Black-ish. We talk about her new projects, her superstar mother, Diana Ross, and forging her own path outside of her mother's success. We also talk about how she's come to embrace, at 51, never having children or being married.Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new Vietnamese drama Inside the Yellow Cocoon Shell and book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Kahveh Akbar's debut novel Martyr! Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/01/2445m 41s

How War Changed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy

Time correspondent Simon Shuster has been interviewing Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy since 2019, when Zelenskyy was still a famous entertainer and satirist. Shuster talks about Zelenskyy's rise to power, the infamous call with Trump that led to Trump's first impeachment, and how the war with Russia has changed him. Shuster's new book is The Showman.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/01/2446m 0s

Reckoning With Racism In Medicine

Dr. Uché Blackstock was one of the first doctors to raise the alarm that COVID-19 was disproportionately impacting Black people. She spoke with Tonya Mosley about how medical schools contribute to inequities in health care, and what we can do about it. Her book is Legacy: A Black Physician Reckons with Racism in Medicine. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/01/2445m 55s

Best Of: 'Origin' Dir. Ava DuVernay / How Algorithms 'Flatten' Culture

Ava DuVernay's new film Origin explores a new way to consider the historical subjugation of Black people in America: as the adverse result of a caste system. The film is inspired by Isabel Wilkerson's book Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents. In the movie, Wilkerson embarks on a journey to learn about caste, traveling to Germany and India to get to the root of the Black experience in America.Also, we'll talk about how algorithms flatten culture with journalist Kyle Chayka. He says algorithms affect every aspect of our lives — from what we watch on Netflix, what songs are at the top of the charts, to what our local coffee shop looks like. His book is Filterworld.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/01/2448m 6s

A 'Succession' Appreciation

HBO's Succession swept at the Emmys, winning six awards for its fourth and final season. We compiled interviews with show creator/head writer Jesse Armstrong and actors Kieran Culkin and Matthew Macfadyen. Also, David Bianculli reflects on the 25th anniversary of The Sopranos.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/01/2446m 57s

The Home Schooling Surge

Home schooling is now America's fastest growing form of education, but Washington Post reporter Peter Jamison tells Dave Davies, "It's remarkable how little oversight there is of home-schooled children." Also, we remember TV critic Tom Shales.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/01/2446m 0s

How Algorithms 'Flatten' Culture

Filterworld author Kyle Chayka examines the algorithms that dictate what we watch, read and listen to. He argues that machine-guided curation makes us docile consumers. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews You Only Call When You're in Trouble, a new novel from Stephen McCauley.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/01/2445m 12s

The Birth Of Psychedelic Science

You may have heard about the pioneering research of anthropologist Margaret Mead, but do you know about her work with psychedelics? Mead and her husband, Gregory Bateson, thought psychedelics might reshape humanity by expanding consciousness. We'll speak with author Benjamin Breen about that research and how it led to the CIA's secret experiments in the '50s and '60s, using psychedelics in interrogation. He also shares with us details about a NASA-funded experiment to try to get dolphins to talk by giving them LSD. His book is Tripping on Utopia.Also, John Powers reviews the Apple TV+ series Criminal Record.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/01/2446m 11s

Ava DuVernay Illuminates America's Caste System with 'Origin'

Award-winning director Ava DuVernay's new film Origin explores a new way to consider the historical subjugation of Black people in America: As the adverse result of a caste system.The film is inspired by Isabel Wilkerson's book Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents. In the movie, Wilkerson embarks on a journey to learn about caste - traveling to Germany and India to get to the root of the Black experience in America. DuVernay also directed 13th, When They See Us, and Selma.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/01/2445m 34s

Best Of: Sterling K. Brown / Paul Giamatti

Actor Sterling K. Brown co-stars in the new film American Fiction. We'll talk about his role in that, as well as playing O.J. Simpson prosecutor Christopher Darden. Also, we'll hear from Paul Giamatti. He just won a Golden Globe for his role in The Holdovers, as a pompous and disliked teacher at a boys boarding school. The Holdovers is the second collaboration between Giamatti and director Alexander Payne. The first was the surprise hit movie Sideways.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/01/2448m 11s

Josh Groban's Sweeney Todd

The Grammy-Award winning baritone first auditioned to play the Demon Barber of Fleet Street back in high school. He didn't get the part then; but he starred in in the latest Broadway revival. Groban will leave the role this month. He spoke with Fresh Air's Ann Marie Baldonado about his affinity for Stephen Sondheim, poking fun at his own image on TV, and starting his singing career as a teen. Also, Justin Chang reviews the new film Memory.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/01/2446m 11s

The Movement To Dismantle Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Initiatives

Washington Post reporter Julian Mark talks about the resignation of Harvard President Claudine Gay, and the broader movement to dismantle DEI practices in academia and corporate America. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews Monsieur Spade, starring Clive Owen on AMC.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/01/2445m 40s

Paul Giamatti On 'The Holdovers'

Giamatti says his latest movie, filmed at various prep schools in Massachusetts and directed by Alexander Payne, triggered memories of the time he spent as a day student at a private school. He spoke with Sam Briger about his reunion with Payne after 20 years, Billions, and what he loves about acting.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/01/2445m 18s

The Long Recovery Back From Traumatic Brain Injury

Annie Liontas experienced three brain injuries in the span of one year, which led to dizziness, memory fog and anger — and impacted Liontas' marriage and sex life. Their memoir is Sex with a Brain Injury: On Concussion and Recovery. Also, David Bianculli reviews HBO's True Detective: Night Country starring Jodie Foster Kali Reis.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/01/2446m 8s

Sterling K. Brown

Brown won an Emmy for his portrayal of Christopher Darden in The People v. O.J. Simpson, and another for This Is Us. He now appears in the film American Fiction. He spoke with Terry Gross about losing his father, how his feelings about the O.J. Simpson case changed, and prejudice he faced in Hollywood.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/01/2445m 55s

Best Of: Making 'Maestro' / A Restaurateur's Journey

Bradley Cooper talks about writing, directing, and starring in the new film Maestro, in which he portrays conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein. Also with us is conducting consultant Yannick Nézet-Séguin, who conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. The film focuses on Bernstein's music and his relationship with his wife, including the friction caused by his affairs with men. Also, we hear from restaurateur Rose Previte, author of the new cookbook Maydān: Recipes from Lebanon and Beyond. And Justin Chang reviews Memory, starring Peter Sarsgaard and Jessica Chastain.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/01/2448m 36s

Remembering The Smothers Brothers, Who Changed TV

We remember Tom Smothers, of the comic folk duo the Smothers Brothers, who died last week at the age of 86. Their popular TV variety show in the late 1960s captured the spirit of the counterculture, and was often censored by network execs. We feature our interview with Tom and Dick Smothers and have an appreciation by TV critic David Bianculli.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/01/2447m 43s

The Ozempic Revolution

Bloomberg News reporter Emma Court explains how these so-called "miracle" weight loss drugs work, and discusses side effects, long-term impacts, and what it all means for the body positivity movement.Also, John Powers reviews Michelle Yeoh's Netflix comedy-thriller series The Brothers Sun.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/01/2444m 43s

Restaurateur Rose Previte's Lessons Learned From Around The World

In her new cookbook, Maydān: Recipes from Lebanon and Beyond, Rose Previte writes about what it's like to be a women restauranteur in a male-dominated industry, and what it was like to grow up in rural Ohio in a Sicilian-Lebanese household. She shares her mother's staple recipes and dishes she learned from other women from around the world. Also, we remember Full Monty actor Tom Wilkinson, who died on last week at the age of 75.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/01/2446m 9s

Bradley Cooper & Yannick Nézet-Séguin On 'Maestro'

In his new biopic Maestro, Bradley Cooper was determined not to imitate the legendary Leonard Bernstein. Instead, the actor worked with conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin to find his own rhythm. They spoke with Terry Gross about conducting, Bernstein's legacy, and playing with batons when they were kids.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/01/2444m 51s

Barbra Streisand

We start the new year with Barbra Streisand, and listen back to the interview we recorded in November. Throughout her career, her mother would send her bad reviews of her performances. The intention was to prevent Barbra from getting a "swelled head," but they also served as fuel for a woman who was determined to be a star. Later, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Prophet Song, the novel that won the 2023 Booker Prize.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/01/2447m 21s

Taraji P. Henson / Pianist Brad Mehldau

Taraji P. Henson stars as jazz singer Shug Avery in the new musical adaptation of The Color Purple. She spoke with Tonya Mosley about what the play means to her. Also, we'll hear from Brad Mehldau, one of the most acclaimed and influential jazz pianists of his generation. He joins us at the piano, for music and conversation. And Justin Chang will share his list of the best movies of 2023.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/12/2348m 35s

Jazz With The EarRegulars

Our dark week continues with a performance by and conversation with two of the best traditional jazz musicians around, trumpeter Jon-Erik Kellso and guitarist Matt Munisteri. In 2007, they founded the band The EarRegulars which plays Sunday nights at a very old bar in Greenwich Village called the EAR inn. They spoke with Fresh Air producer Sam Briger.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/12/2347m 57s

Roots Co-Founder, Black Thought (Tariq Trotter)

We continue our series of some of our favorite interviews of the year with co-founder and lead MC of the Roots, Tariq Trotter, a.k.a. Black Thought. When Trotter was a teen, he experienced one of the biggest tragedies of his life, the murder of his mother, and it was his friend and creative partner Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson who took him in. Together they co-founded The Roots. We talk about growing up in Philly and landing the house band gig at The Tonight Show. His memoir is called The Upcycled Self.Later, critic Nick Quah takes a look back at the year in podcasts.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/12/2346m 49s

Brooke Shields

When Shields was 11 months old, she was in soap commercials and print ads. At the age of 12, she starred as a child prostitute in the film Pretty Baby. In her teens, she modeled jeans for Calvin Klein and became a household name. A Hulu documentary examines how she was sexually objectified as a child and teen actress. She spoke with Tonya Mosley about her life and career. Rock critic Ken Tucker shares two great albums that he feels were overlooked this year.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/12/2345m 15s

Allison Russell's Road To Self-Love

Canadian musician Allison Russell talks and sings about the abuse she endured from her racist adoptive father — and about how she learned she was worthy of being loved. Her 2023 album is The Returner. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/12/2347m 27s

Merry Questlove Christmas

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson has put together a playlist of some of his favorite Christmas recordings. Questlove is co-founder of The Roots, which is among other things, is the house band for The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. Also, roots and rockabilly musician JD McPherson plays some of his own Christmas tunes.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/12/2347m 31s

Best Of: David Byrne's Xmas Playlist / Nicolas Cage

It's a David Byrne Christmas. The cofounder and frontman of Talking Heads has put together a playlist of his favorite Christmas songs for us. Also, we'll hear from actor Nicolas Cage. In the new movie Dream Scenario, he plays a college professor who becomes a star on the internet after he mysteriously appears in the dreams of millions of people. He talks about how that relates to his own experience of becoming an internet meme.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/12/2348m 45s

Timothy Olyphant On 'Justified'

From now until the end of 2023, we're listening back to some stand-out interviews from this year. Timothy Olyphant is best known for portraying lawmen in cowboy hats. He reprises the role of U.S. marshal Raylan Givens in the eight-part sequel, Justified: City Primeval, based on Elmore Leonard's novel. He also played Sheriff Seth Bullock in Deadwood. He spoke with Dave Davies about the roles. Film critic Justin Chang reviews The Zone of Interest.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/12/2345m 41s

Nicolas Cage

Cage has been acting for almost 45 years, and has appeared in more than 100 films. Dream Scenario is one of five scripts he's encountered in his career that he knew, immediately upon reading, he had to take on. He spoke with Dave Davies about becoming a meme, changing his name from Coppola to Cage, and maybe breaking into TV. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead remembers composer Carla Bley, who died this year.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/12/2346m 16s

A David Byrne Christmas Special

The singer-songwriter and Talking Heads frontman presents some of his favorite holiday music — including songs by The Pogues, James Brown, LCD Soundsystem and Paul Simon. The playlist on Apple MusicThe playlist on Spotify Also, David Bianculli shares highlights from TV this year.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/12/2347m 26s

Remembering Actor Andre Braugher

Braugher died of lung cancer last week at age 61. He's best known for his portrayals of police in two opposite genres: in the comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which lampooned cop shows, and in the drama series Homicide: Life on the Street. We have two interviews with him — one from 1995 and one from 2006.Also, Kevin Whitehead shares a remembrance of jazz musicians who died this year. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/12/2346m 17s

Taraji P. Henson On 'The Color Purple'

This Christmas, the film adaptation of the musical The Color Purple hits the big screen. For award-winning actress Taraji P. Henson, starring as Shug Avery in the American classic is a full circle moment. Henson first saw Steven Spielberg's film version as a high schooler in D.C., and knew from then on that she wanted to be an actor. "I just remember going to the movies, seeing all those Black people on the screen and I was like, 'Oh my God. I want to do that.' " She spoke with Tonya Mosley about the musical, playing Cookie on Empire, and how her acting training at Howard prepared her for Hollywood.Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews two new Christmas albums.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/12/2346m 33s

David Sedaris Can't Wait To Watch You Panic Shop This Week

Humorist and author David Sedaris is a public radio regular – his 'Santaland Diaries' first aired on NPR's Morning Edition in 1992 and has gone on to become a holiday staple. He also is a regular Fresh Air guest, and in a first, we're sharing an exclusive bonus episode with Sedaris – normally only available for our Fresh Air+ supporters – with everyone. If you're not already a Fresh Air+ supporter, enjoying weekly bonus episodes like this and sponsor-free listening on all our episodes, you can find out more at https://plus.npr.org. You can hear all of Sedaris' 1997 interview here https://n.pr/4agJKmN. Sedaris' 'Santaland Diaries': https://n.pr/3TswxkO. Sedaris in 2022: https://n.pr/3Tm2qvf. Sedaris in 2018: https://n.pr/3Tsevz0. Sedaris in 2017: https://n.pr/48jrebn. Sedaris in 2013 https://n.pr/3GNj937. Sedaris in 2008: https://n.pr/3GL1wks. Sedaris in 2004: https://n.pr/47TsaDA. Sedaris in 2000: https://n.pr/48lw8oy. Sedaris in 1996: https://n.pr/41nfz98. Sedaris in 1994: https://n.pr/3Nw7V6W. Sedaris in 1993 https://n.pr/3Nv0FIf. Hear all 40+ years of Fresh Air's archives: https://FreshAirArchive.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/12/237m 20s

Best Of: Colman Domingo On 'Rustin' / Cord Jefferson On 'American Fiction'

Colman Domingo stars in the biopic Rustin as Bayard Rustin, the civil rights leader responsible for organizing the 1963 March on Washington. Rustin was forced into the background because he was gay. Domingo is also starring in The Color Purple, as Mister, the abusive husband. Maureen Corrigan shares her picks for the 10 best books of the year.Also, writer and director Cord Jefferson talks about his new satirical film American Fiction. It's about a Black writer who can't get his novel published because it's not considered "Black enough." Under a pseudonym, he writes the kind of Black novel publishers seem to want.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/12/2346m 59s

Remembering Norman Lear

The towering TV writer/producer died last week at 101. He created All in the Family, Sanford and Son, The Jeffersons, Good Times, Maude, and a lot more. His TV shows used humor to address subjects not typical for television: racism, homophobia, politics, and generational conflicts. His most enduring character, Archie Bunker, the bigoted father of a working class family in Queens – was partly based on Lear's own father. We'll listen back to our interview with Lear, as well as with Esther Rolle. Initially, she was reluctant to play the role of the maid, Florida, on Maude, but that led to her own spinoff series, Good Times. And we also hear from TV director John Rich, who directed All in the Family.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/12/2347m 26s

Why A Second Trump Term May Be More Radical

New York Times reporter Charlie Savage says Trump has a plan — and potentially the backing — to purge the federal bureaucracy, which he disparages as "a deep state that's filled with villains." Also, film critic Justin Chang shares his top 10 films of the year.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/12/2344m 54s

Facing Death, A Poet Searches For Meaning

Poet and memoirist Christian Wiman has had a rare form of cancer for 18 years. "When death hangs over you for a while, you start to forget about it," he says. Wiman's new book is Zero at the Bone: Fifty Entries Against Despair. Also, David Bianculli reviews the return of Monk in a new movie on Peacock.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/12/2345m 33s

Cord Jefferson Finds Catharsis With 'American Fiction'

The movie American Fiction is a satire about a Black writer who can't get his latest book published because it's not "Black" enough. He decides to write a book with every offensive Black stereotype he can think of — and gets a $1 million book deal. Screenwriter/director Cord Jefferson says he experienced something similar as a writer in Hollywood. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from tenor saxophonist Jerry Bergonzi.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/12/2344m 32s

Actor Colman Domingo

Colman Domingo stars in two big films this year, in very different roles. In "Rustin," he plays the civil rights leader Bayard Rustin. In the new musical adaptation of "The Color Purple" he plays Mister, a cruel and abusive husband. "I think as artists, as actors, we are always watching," Domingo tells Terry Gross. "We're watching heroes. We're watching ordinary people do extraordinary things every single day. We're watching horrible people do terrible things and be committed to it. ... For me, I didn't build outside of myself, modeling on somebody who did some vicious things or abusers. I have to look within."Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/12/2346m 39s

Best Of: Liz Cheney / Dave Davies

Former congresswoman Liz Cheney says a second Trump presidency would be an "existential threat" to democracy: "There's simply no defense, no excuse for putting that power back in the hands of Donald Trump." Her new memoir is Oath and Honor. Also, Terry Gross interviews Dave Davies, Fresh Air's longtime fill-in host. He's cutting back on his workload at the show. We're paying tribute to him by listening to clips of some of his memorable interviews.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/12/2348m 21s

Barry Manilow

Barry Manilow recently broke Elvis' record for performances in Las Vegas, and he has a new Broadway musical called Harmony. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2002 about his hits of the '70s and '80s and writing advertising jingles early in his career. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the new film Poor Things, starring Emma Stone and Willem Dafoe.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/12/2345m 55s

SNL's Kenan Thompson

In his new book, Kenan Thompson shares stories from his life and career, like his early days at SNL, his estrangement from his longtime co-star Kel Mitchell, and how he was conned by an accountant, lost all of his Nickelodeon money and had to file for bankruptcy. "It's humbling when people in the McDonald's drive-thru line recognize you, and then they also recognize that you're paying for a meal with change," he tells Tonya Mosley. His new book is When I Was Your Age. Also, John Powers reviews the documentary Anselm.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/12/2344m 12s

Breaking The Menstruation Taboo

More than half of the population menstruates, and yet there is still so much shame and stigma surrounding what is a normal part of life. We talk with filmmaker Lina Lyte Plioplyte about her new documentary Periodical. The film looks at the origins of the cultural stigma around periods. We also talk about period poverty, taxation on menstrual products, and reframing how we think about menopause. The documentary is streaming on Peacock and airing on MSNBC. 
Also, Maureen Corrigan shares her picks for the 10 best books of the year.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/12/2346m 22s

Liz Cheney's Mission To Stop Trump

The former representative says a second Trump presidency would be an "existential threat" to democracy: "There's simply no defense, no excuse for putting that power back in the hands of Donald Trump."Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/12/2345m 40s

Dave Davies Reflects On His Career In Radio & Reporting

Dave Davies, Fresh Air's longtime fill-in host, is cutting back workload on the show. Today we're paying tribute to him — by listening to clips of some of his memorable interviews. And we'll talk about his reporting career in Philadelphia and the odd jobs he had along the way.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/12/2346m 11s

Best Of: AI's Prejudices / UFOs & Gov't Conspiracies

Computer scientist Joy Buolamwini coined the term the "coded gaze" while in grad school at MIT. As a brown-skinned woman, the facial recognition software program she was working on couldn't detect her face until she put on a white mask. She's written a book about the potential harms of AI — which include the social implications of bias and how it affects everyone. Also, we'll talk about UFO conspiracy theories with journalist Garrett Graff. He talks with us about how they've led to other conspiracy theories about the government.And Justin Chang will review the latest film by Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki, The Boy and the Heron.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/12/2347m 57s

America's WWII-Era Fight Against Fascism

Maddow's new book, Prequel, chronicles the the ultra right-wing groups that sided with Hitler's Germany and plotted to overthrow the U.S. government before World War II. The plot led to the largest sedition trial in American history. The book is also about sitting members of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives who colluded with a Nazi agent to spread Nazi propaganda to millions of Americans with the help of American taxpayers money. Prequel is based on Maddow's hit podcast series, Ultra.Also, Justin Chang reviews The Boy and the Heron, by Hayao Miyazaki.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/12/2345m 7s

The Gutting Of The Voting Rights Act

Journalist Ari Berman says both the Supreme Court and the lower courts are working to dismantle the 1965 law that's considered one of the most effective pieces of civil rights legislation ever enacted in the U.S. "It's precisely because it worked and because it worked so well that there has been such a dedicated effort for 50 plus years to try to weaken and nullify it," Berman says. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews two mysteries: Alexis Soloski's Here in the Dark and The Mystery Guest by Nita Prose.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/11/2345m 22s

How Trump Is Dividing The Evangelical Church

Journalist Tim Alberta grew up in a conservative, republican, evangelical church, where his father was the pastor. He wanted to know why so many evangelical Christians had become extremists, and ardent supporters of Trump. Over the past 4 years, he traveled to churches around the country, reporting on pastors and congregants who backed Trump, and those who felt forced out of their church because they couldn't support him. His new book is The Kingdom, the Power, and the Glory. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/11/2345m 16s

Unmasking AI's Racism And Sexism

Computer scientist and AI expert Joy Buolamwini warns that facial recognition technology is riddled with the biases of its creators. She is the author of Unmasking AI and founder of the Algorithmic Justice League. She coined the term "coded gaze," a cousin to the "white gaze" or "male gaze." She says, "This is ... about who has the power to shape technology and whose preferences and priorities are baked in — as well as also, sometimes, whose prejudices are baked in."Also, we remember former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, who died at age 96 last week. She spoke with Terry Gross in 1984.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/11/2347m 5s

UFOs: Conspiracy Theories, Secrets & Mysteries

We talk with journalist Garrett Graff about his new book, UFO: The Inside Story of the U.S. Government's Search of Alien Life Here – and Out There. It's about reported sightings, how they've been investigated by the military, what secrets the military keeps and why, and the scientific search for extraterrestrial intelligence. He says that the government is absolutely covering up information about what's in the skies, but not for the reasons you may think. Later, John Powers reviews the new romantic comedy, Fallen Leaves.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/11/2344m 57s

Best Of: The EarRegulars / Playwright Larissa FastHorse

We hear some live music and conversation from two of the best traditional jazz musicians around, trumpeter Jon-Erik Kellso and guitarist Matt Munisteri. In 2007, they founded the band The EarRegulars, who play Sunday nights at a very old bar in Greenwich Village called the EAR Inn. They have a new live album.David Bianculli reviews the new season of Fargo. Then we hear from playwright Larissa FastHorse. She's the first known Native American woman to have a show on Broadway with The Thanksgiving Play. It's a satire that pokes fun at political correctness and the way we talk – and think about – indigenous people in America.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/11/2348m 29s

Comic Leslie Jones

Leslie Jones says performing stand-up for the first time as a freshman in college felt like putting on a shirt that fit perfectly: "It was just so natural." She spoke with Tonya Mosley about the best advice she got, her bittersweet time at SNL, and why she loves physical comedy. Her memoir is Leslie F*cking Jones.Also, Justin Chang reviews the Leonard Bernstein biopic Maestro, starring Bradley Cooper and Carey Mulligan.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/11/2344m 6s

Revisiting The Music Of The Harlem Hellfighters' Regimental Band

Pianist Jason Moran talks jazz and plays selections from his latest recording, which borrows from the music of James Reese Europe, the composer and musician who led the all-Black Harlem Hellfighters regiment band during WWI. Moran's new album is called From the Dancehall to the Battlefield, and it features Moran's take on Europe's compositions and pop music of that time.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/11/2344m 48s

Traditional Jazz With The EarRegulars

In 2007, trumpeter Jon-Erik Kellso and guitarist Matt Munisteri founded the band The EarRegulars, who play Sunday nights at a very old bar in Greenwich Village called the Ear Inn. But don't let the word "traditional" fool you. Although some of the songs they play are a hundred years old, the way they play is vibrant and exciting. They brought their instruments to the studio to play us some tunes.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/11/2347m 33s

Lakota Playwright Larissa FastHorse

Larissa FastHorse's satire, The Thanksgiving Play, focuses on four well-meaning white people trying to put on a politically correct school production for Native American history month. She spoke with Tonya Mosley about diversifying Broadway, her rewrite of Peter Pan, and changes she suggested for the Macy's Thanksgving Day Parade.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/11/2344m 55s

'Maid' Author Stephanie Land On 'Class'

Stephanie Land's 2019 memoir Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay and a Mother's Will to Survive was a visceral portrait of living in poverty as a single mom, cleaning houses. It was a bestseller and later adapted into a critically acclaimed Netflix series. Now Land has a new book, Class, about her experience juggling college, motherhood, and work. During that time she experienced food insecurity, and struggled to get government assistance. "I see such a lack of empathy toward people who live in the margins of society," she tells Tonya Mosley. Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the new album from guitarist Marnie Stern, and David Bianculli reviews the latest season of Fargo.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/11/2345m 21s

Best Of: What's Next For Fox News? / Sofia Coppola

This week, Rupert Murdoch stepped down from his position as chair and CEO of Fox, and his son Lachlan replaced him. How might Fox change under Lachlan's leadership? And how has it already changed since Tucker Carlson was fired? Brian Stelter, author of the book Network of Lies, explains. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the black comedy May December, directed by Todd Haynes. Sofia Coppola talks about her new movie, Priscilla. It portrays the relationship between Priscilla and Elvis Presley — from Priscilla's point of view. The two met when she was 14 and he was 24. Coppola makes films about the internal lives of young women, including The Virgin Suicides, Marie Antoinette, and Lost in Translation. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/11/2347m 50s

Filmmaker Albert Brooks

Comic, actor, screenwriter and director Albert Brooks is the subject of a new HBO documentary called Defending My Life. It examines his career from his standup in the late '60s to his films including Real Life, Modern Romance, and Lost in America. It's directed by Brooks' longtime friend Rob Reiner. Brooks spoke with Terry Gross in 1996. Also, Justin Chang reviews May December, directed by Todd Haynes, which dramatizes a '90s tabloid story.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/11/2346m 18s

What Does China's Inner Turmoil Mean For The World?

New Yorker writer Evan Osnos explains the contentious relationship between China and the U.S. and discusses the significance and possible results of Wednesday's meeting between Biden and President Xi.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/11/2345m 41s

The Mental Health Crisis Affecting Black Men & Boys

In The Invisible Ache, actor Courtney B. Vance and psychologist Dr. Robin L. Smith examine the mental health crisis affecting Black men and boys. According to the CDC, the rate of suicide among Black men and boys "is accelerating faster than any other group in the United States," Dr. Robin says. She attributes the rise to historical racial trauma, compounded by the current nationwide epidemic of loneliness and isolation. Vance lost both his father and his godson to suicide. He has spent years trying to understand the pain his father suffered in silence, and to heal the generational trauma.Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album by pianist Angelica Sanchez.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/11/2345m 11s

What's Changing At Fox News?

This week, Rupert Murdoch steps down from his position as chair and CEO of Fox, and his son Lachlan replaces him. How might Fox change under Lachlan's leadership? And how has it already changed since Tucker Carlson was fired? Today we discuss that with Brian Stelter, author of the new book Network of Lies: The Epic Saga of Fox News, Donald Trump, and the Battle for American Democracy. Also, David Bianculli reviews the mini-series The Curse, starring Emma Stone and the series co-creators Nathan Fielder and Benny Safdie.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/11/2344m 53s

Life & Death In A Ukrainian War Zone

We go inside the first days of Russia's invasion of Ukraine with journalist Mstyslav Chernov. He and his team were the only international journalists to spend the first 20 days covering the siege of the city of Mariupol. "I just understood that we need to record everything. Every frame, every second."A new PBS FRONTLINE documentary features their images — the constant shelling of the city, mass graves, and graphic images of women and children who are suffering and dying. Chernov is a video journalist for the Associated Press. He and his team won a Pulitzer Prize for their work in Mariupol.Later, Maureen Corrigan reviews a new short story collection by Claire Keegan.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/11/2344m 8s

Best Of: Barbra Streisand / Tariq Trotter (Black Thought)

Throughout her career, Barbra Streisand's mother would send her bad reviews of her performances. The intention was to prevent her daughter from getting a "swelled head," but they also served as fuel for a woman who was determined to be a star. The EGOT-winning icon spoke with Terry Gross about her career and her memoir, My Name is Barbra.Co-founder of The Roots, Tariq Trotter (aka Black Thought), reflects on his difficult childhood in Philly, his decades-long friendship with Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, and 50 years of hip-hop. Trotter's new memoir is The Upcycled Self.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/11/2348m 57s

A Marine Reflects On War & Finding Purpose / The Black Experience Of WWII

For Veterans Day we're revisiting two interviews about war. Elliot Ackerman served five tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, during which time, he says, he witnessed the absolute worst — as well as the absolute best — that human beings are capable of. Ackerman is also a journalist, novelist, memoirist and National Book Award nominee. His Silver Star is for leading a platoon in the Battle of Fallujah in Iraq.Historian Matthew Delmont talks about the more than one million Black people who served in the military in WWII, the contributions they made and discrimination they faced, and those who struggled for equality in civilian life. Delmont's book is Half American.Film critic Justin Chang reviews David Fincher's new thriller, The Killer.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/11/2346m 58s

Examining The Divisions Within Israel

Before the war between Israel and Hamas, it sometimes looked as if Israel might be headed toward a civil war. At least that's what New York Times correspondent Isabel Kershner thought. She covers Israeli and Palestinian politics and society and has been covering the current war. A few months before the war, she published a book about divisions within Israel resulting from ideological, religious, ethnic, and generational differences, and how those differences help explain Israel's shift to the right. Her book is called The Land of Hope and Fear: Israel's Battle for Its Inner Soul.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/11/2345m 44s

Barbra Streisand

Throughout her career, Barbra Streisand's mother would send her bad reviews of her performances. The intention was to prevent her daughter from getting a "swelled head," but they also served as fuel for a woman who was determined to be a star — despite all the forces in her life telling her no. "I don't know if it was like, 'I'll prove you wrong,' because [my mother] kept telling me to get a job as a secretary," Streisand says. "I just somehow always saw my future." The EGOT icon spoke with Terry Gross about her career and her memoir, My Name is Barbra. Also, John Powers reviews the new Australian romantic comedy series Colin from Accounts on Paramount+. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/11/2346m 33s

Tariq Trotter (Black Thought), Co-Founder Of The Roots

Tariq Trotter, aka Black Thought, reflects on his difficult childhood in Philly, his decades-long friendship with Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, and 50 years of hip-hop. Trotter's new memoir is The Upcycled Self.Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews Rob Reiner's new HBO documentary about Albert Brooks.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/11/2346m 11s

Sofia Coppola On 'Priscilla'

Sofia Coppola's new movie is about the relationship between Priscilla and Elvis Presley -- from Priscilla's point of view. The two met when she was 14 and he was 24. Coppola makes films about the internal lives of young women, including The Virgin Suicides, Marie Antoinette, and Lost in Translation, which she won an Oscar for in 2003. This fall she published her first book, Archive, which covers her career in film. Also, rock critic Ken Tucker has an appreciation of a musician you may never have heard of: singer-songwriter Dwight Twilley.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/11/2346m 16s

Best Of: David Byrne / Inside The AI Company That Knows Your Face

David Byrne talks about his life and music. The Talking Heads movie Stop Making Sense – which many people consider the best concert film ever made – has been restored and remastered for its 40th anniversary. Also, we'll talk about the capabilities and consequences of facial recognition technology with New York Times tech reporter Kashmir Hill. Her book is called Your Face Belongs to Us.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/11/2348m 48s

Matthew Perry / Lisa Kudrow

We remember actor Matthew Perry, who died last week at age 54. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2007 about auditioning to play Chandler Bing on Friends, and how overnight fame changed his life. And we'll listen back to our 2003 interview with his Friends co-star, Lisa Kudrow, about her time on the show. Justin Chang reviews Priscilla, directed by Sofia Coppola.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/11/2347m 10s

How Did Israel Fail To Detect Hamas' Invasion?

New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti says prior to Oct. 7, Israel's leadership was focused on an attack by Iran and its proxies —not Hamas. "They were ... myopic about what the true threat was."TV critic David Bianculli reviews the Netflix miniseries adaptation of All the Light We Cannot See.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/11/2346m 5s

David Byrne On 'Stop Making Sense'

It's the 40th anniversary of Talking Heads' masterpiece concert film, Stop Making Sense. A24 remastered and rereleased the movie, bringing it to new audiences and longtime fans. Talking Heads frontman David Byrne returns to Fresh Air to speak with Terry Gross about songwriting, dancing, and yes, the big suit.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/11/2347m 43s

Rep. Adam Kinzinger On The GOP & The Jan. 6th Committee

The former Illinois congressman reflects on confronting the "fanaticism of the hardcore" of the GOP. Kinzinger served on the House committee investigating the Jan. 6th attack on the Capitol. His book is Renegade.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/10/2346m 27s

How A Black Socialite Raised Millions For Civil Rights

Historian Tanisha Ford tells Tonya Mosley the story of Harlem activist Mollie Moon, credited with raising millions to build economic and racial equality in the U.S. Ford's new book is Our Secret Society. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Alice McDermott's new novel, Absolution. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/10/2345m 56s

Best Of: Werner Herzog / Greta Lee

Werner Herzog talks with Terry Gross about the curiosity that's fueled his career. The filmmaker and writer is drawn to extremes: extreme characters, extreme settings, extreme scenarios. His new memoir is Every Man for Himself and God Against All. Ken Tucker reviews the new album from The Rolling Stones. In Past Lives, Greta Lee stars as a playwright caught between two men she loves. Lee says the film allowed her to explore the immigrant experience in a way that felt vulnerable — and personal. She spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/10/2349m 7s

Spy Novelist (And Former Spy) John Le Carré

The author of such spy novels as The Spy Who Came In From The Cold, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and The Night Manager is the subject of a new documentary by Errol Morris called The Pigeon Tunnel. It features the final interviews with le Carré who died in 2020. It details his life as a writer and his earlier work as a spy for Britain's domestic and foreign intelligence services. We'll listen back to the interviews Terry Gross recorded with him in 1989 and 2017.Also, Justin Chang reviews Alexander Payne's new comedy film The Holdovers.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/10/2346m 22s

What Do We Know About House Speaker Rep. Mike Johnson?

New Yorker writer Jonathan Blitzer gives a deeper lens into Johnson, a conservative who refused to certify the 2020 election results. Blitzer also talks about the influence of Rep. Jim Jordan. Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from big band composer Darcy James Argue.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/10/2345m 23s

Werner Herzog

Herzog reflects on the curiosity that's fueled his career in the new memoir, Every Man for Himself and God Against All. The filmmaker and writer is drawn to extremes: extreme characters, extreme settings, extreme scenarios. But don't mistake him for a mad man like some of his film subjects: "You have to control what is wild in you. You have to be disciplined. And people think I'm the wild guy out there but I'm a disciplined professional," he tells Terry Gross. Later, Lloyd Schwartz reviews new releases that celebrate the late opera star Maria Callas's singing and acting.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/10/2346m 36s

The Accusations That Sent Charlie Chaplin Into Exile

Author Scott Eyman explains how silent film actor Charlie Chaplin was smeared in the press, scandalized for his affairs with young women, condemned for his alleged communist ties and banned from returning to the U.S. His book is Charlie Chaplin vs. America. Also, Ken Tucker reviews The Rolling Stones' new album, Hackney Diamonds.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/10/2347m 36s

Mitt Romney's Reckoning

Atlantic staff writer McKay Coppins shares a moderate Republican's startling account of dysfunction in the Senate, and the dangerous drift toward extremism in the GOP voting base. Coppins spent countless hours with Utah Senator Mitt Romney, reflecting on his long career that includes a term as governor of Massachusetts and two runs for the White House. Romney, who's not seeking re-election, gave McKay hundreds of pages of personal journals, private correspondence and emails detailing his interactions with other political actors, including Donald Trump, and sharing candid opinions about his experiences. The result is McKay's new biography: Romney: A Reckoning.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/10/2345m 34s

Best Of: Jada Pinkett Smith / Keegan-Michael Key

Jada Pinkett Smith spoke with Tonya Mosley about growing up in Baltimore, her career in Hollywood, and her friendship with Tupac. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Justin Torres' long awaited second novel, Blackouts, which has been shortlisted for the National Book Award.Also, we'll hear from Keegan-Michael Key. Along with Jordan Peele, Key was half of the sketch comedy duo Key & Peele. He's now co-written The History of Sketch Comedy.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/10/2348m 52s

'Killers Of The Flower Moon' Author David Grann

Martin Scorsese's film, based on David Grann's 2017 book, tells the true story of white men in the 1920s who married into and systematically murdered Osage families to gain claims to their oil-rich land. Grann spoke with Dave Davies about this story when the book came out. Also, Justin Chang shares his review of the movie.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/10/2346m 33s

Greta Lee On 'Past Lives'

In Past Lives, Greta Lee stars as a playwright caught between two men she loves. Lee says the film allowed her to explore the immigrant experience in a way that felt vulnerable — and personal. She spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado about speaking Korean for the film, her mother's reaction to the film, and the muscle movies that made her want to act. David Bianculli reviews the revival of Frasier.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/10/2344m 35s

What's Next For The Group That Overturned 'Roe'?

The Alliance Defending Freedom is a Christian conservative legal group that has won 15 Supreme Court cases, including overturning Roe v. Wade. We talk with David Kirkpatrick, who wrote about the group in a New Yorker article titled "The Next Targets for the Group that Overturned Roe." Those next targets include further restricting or banning the abortion pill mifepristone, and limiting LGBTQ rights. We'll also talk about Kirkpatrick's recent interview with a senior political leader of Hamas.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/10/2345m 57s

Jada Pinkett Smith

Jada Pinkett Smith dominated headlines with the news that she and her husband, famed actor Will Smith, have been separated for 7 years. It was one of several explosive revelations in her new memoir Worthy. She spoke with Tonya Mosley about her unconventional marriage, life growing up in Baltimore, and her acting career. She also shares intimate details about her childhood friendship with the late rapper Tupac Shakur and the infamous slap at the Oscars.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/10/2345m 52s

Lawrence Wright On 'Mr. Texas'

Lawrence Wright, who is known for best selling books about Al Qaeda and Scientology, has a new novel about the colorful world of Texas politics. In Mr. Texas, a naive rancher lucks into a seat in the state legislature, where he meets lobbyists, influence peddlers, conspiracy mongers and power brokers. Wright spoke with Dave Davies about their home state.Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Blackouts by Justin Torres.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/10/2346m 6s

Best Of: Filmmaker Maryam Keshavarz / TOKiMONSTA

Iranian American filmmaker Maryam Keshavarz was banned from returning to Iran after the release of her first feature, Circumstance, about Iran's youth underground culture, and two young women who fall in love. That film and her new one, The Persian Version, won the Audience Award at Sundance. She spoke with Terry Gross about her family and sneaking American pop music into Iran as a kid. Ken Tucker will review a new Joni Mitchell box set of rare recordings from the early '70s. Also, we'll hear from electronic music producer and DJ Jennifer Lee, better known as TOKiMONSTA. In 2016 she was diagnosed with a rare brain disease that required two surgeries — leaving her without the ability to hear sound or speak. She spoke with Tonya Mosley about her recovery and relearning the language of music.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/10/2349m 4s

Actor Patrick Stewart

Patrick Stewart is best known for starring as Jean-Luc Picard in two Star Trek series, 30 years apart. In his new memoir, Making It So, he shares details of his life growing up in working class in England. At 15, he left school and went on to become a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company. He spoke with Sam Briger in 2020 about those early years. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new film Anatomy of a Fall, which won the top prize at Cannes. And Ken Tucker reviews Volume 3 of the Joni Mitchell archive series from 1972-1975.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/10/2346m 17s

Marty Baron, Former 'Post' Exec. Editor

Baron joined The Washington Post in 2013 – just months before the paper was acquired by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. He led coverage of major news events including Donald Trump's election and presidency, the document leak describing the NSA's surveillance operations, and the murder of George Floyd. His new book is Collision of Power. Also, John Powers reviews two books by Helen Garner.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/10/2344m 56s

How Was Hamas Able To Launch Such A Devastating Attack On Israel?

We'll talk with terrorism expert Daniel Byman about the deadly foundations of the war between Israel and Hamas, and where the war may lead. Byman has written extensively about the Middle East. His books include A High Price: The Triumphs and Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism. He's a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a professor at Georgetown University.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/10/2346m 1s

Keegan-Michael Key On The History Of Sketch Comedy

The Key & Peele and Schmigadoon! star explains why he loves sketch comedy — watching it, performing it and writing about it. His book, with writing partner Elle Key, is The History of Sketch Comedy.David Bianculli reviews Wes Anderson's adaptation of Roald Dahl short stories, now on Netflix.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/10/2345m 16s

Iranian American Filmmaker Maryam Keshavarz

Loosely based on Maryam Keshavarz's own life, The Persian Version centers on an Iranian American woman who identifies as bisexual and whose mother entered into an arranged marriage as a teen. Both this film and her 2011 movie Circumstance won the Audience Award at Sundance.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/10/2346m 20s

Best Of: Allison Russell / The Evolution Of Female Bodies

Musician Allison Russell talks and sings about the physical and sexual abuse she endured from her racist adoptive father — and about how she learned she was worthy of being loved. Her new album is The Returner.David Bianculli reviews Wes Anderson's adaptations of Roald Dahl short stories, now on Netflix. Also, Cat Bohannon talks about her new book Eve, which explores the development of the female body-- from its ability to produce milk to why women menstruate — and why women's bodies for so long have been left out of biological and medical research.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/10/2349m 5s

Cold Case Investigator Paul Holes

Holes spent more than 20 years investigating crimes in California and played a critical role in identifying the so-called Golden State Killer. His memoir Unmasked is out in paperback.Also, John Powers reviews The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/10/2346m 15s

The Big Shift To Clean Energy

Huge swaths of the country are pivoting from fossil fuels, toward wind, solar and other renewables. New York Times climate reporter Brad Plumer discusses this progress and the roadblocks that lie ahead.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/10/2344m 23s

Poet Safiya Sinclair On Her Rastafari Roots

Poet and writer Safiya Sinclair grew up in a devout Rastafari family in Jamaica where women were subservient. When she cut her dreadlocks at age 19, she became "a ghost" to her father. Her new memoir is How to Say Babylon.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/10/2345m 31s

Putting Female Bodies At The Center Of Evolution

When it comes to biological and medical research, female bodies have historically been under-studied. Author Cat Bohannon traces the female body through evolutionary history in her new book, Eve. She talks about how women process opioids and painkillers differently, human menstruation, and the difference between male and female brains.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/10/2345m 50s

Producer/DJ TOKiMONSTA

Music producer and DJ Jennifer Lee — aka TOKiMONSTA — underwent two brain surgeries in 2016 that temporarily stripped her of her ability to understand words or music. She spoke with Tonya Mosley about that life-altering experience and being in the male-dominated field of electronic music. Also, Kevin Whitehead shares an appreciation of tenor saxophonist Von Freeman.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/10/2345m 58s

Best Of: Leslie Jones / Kerry Washington

In her new memoir, comedian Leslie Jones writes about being on Saturday Night Live – and the years she spent working odd jobs to get by before she was famous. Ken Tucker reviews Allison Russell's new album, The Returner. Award-winning actor, producer, and activist Kerry Washington also has a new memoir. In Thicker Than Water, she examines her life, career and the discovery of a secret about her origins that her parents revealed to her just a few years ago.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/09/2348m 40s

Remembering Actor David McCallum / Allen Ginsberg

Scottish actor David McCallum played an eccentric medical examiner on the CBS crime series NCIS, but he found fame nearly 60 years ago in his role as Russian agent Illya Kuryakin on the TV series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. He died Sept. 25 at age 90. Also, we feature our interview with Allen Ginsberg. A tribute album of musical interpretations of his poems will be released next week. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the new futuristic action thriller The Creator.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/09/2346m 59s

Inside The Secretive AI Company That Knows Your Face

The secretive company Clearview AI scans unidentified faces, and finds a match in their database of billions of photos. The pics are scraped from websites and apps, including Google, Facebook, and LinkedIn, without the companies' permission. NYT tech reporter Kashmir Hill found that once your face is identified for a client, Clearview can quickly connect the client to a lot of information about you. Chances are your face is in Clearview's database, without your knowledge or permission. Clearview's clients include many police departments and some government agencies. Hill says it could spell the end of privacy. Her new book is Your Face Belongs To Us.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/09/2343m 38s

Musician Allison Russell

Russell talks and sings about the physical and sexual abuse she endured from her racist adoptive father — and about how she learned she was worthy of being loved. Her new album is The Returner. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/09/2347m 7s

How Roads & Highways Affect Wildlife

Environmental journalist Ben Goldfarb says cars are killing animals, while highways cut off them off from their food sources and migration paths. His new book about road ecology is Crossings.Maureen Corrigan reviews C Pam Zhang's Land of Milk and Honey.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/09/2346m 23s

Kerry Washington's Self-Discovery

Award-winning actor and producer Kerry Washington was an adult when she learned that she had been conceived via artificial insemination and the man she considered her father was not her biological dad. Her new memoir about her journey of self-discovery is Thicker than Water. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead celebrates Sam Rivers on what would've been his 100th birthday.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/09/2346m 17s

Best Of: Casting Dir. Allison Jones / The Nazi's Jazz Propaganda

Casting director Allison Jones is considered one of the greatest comedy casting directors of our time. Her credits include films and TV shows like Freaks and Geeks, The Office, Veep, Curb Your Enthusiasm, The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Bridesmaids, and now Barbie. She spoke with Terry Gross about some of these projects. Maureen Corrigan reviews Lauren Groff's new novel, The Vaster Wilds. Also, NPR's Scott Simon gives the history of why jazz was banned in Hitler's Germany, and how it was repurposed as propaganda on shortwave radio. His new audiobook is Swingtime for Hitler.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/09/2348m 23s

Actor Billy Crudup

Billy Crudup stars in The Morning Show, now back for its third season. We also talk about going to rock star camp for his role in Almost Famous and his iconic Mastercard commercials.Also, Justin Chang reviews A Haunting in Venice.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/09/2346m 26s

Leslie Jones

Leslie Jones says performing stand-up for the first time as a freshman in college felt like putting on a shirt that fit perfectly: "It was just so natural." She talks with Tonya Mosley about the best advice she got, her bittersweet time at SNL, and why she loves physical comedy. Her memoir is Leslie F*cking Jones.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Lauren Groff's new novel, The Vaster Wilds.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/09/2344m 11s

How The Nazis Used Jazz As A Propaganda Tool

Hitler's Germany banned jazz because it was deemed degenerate music made by Jews and Black people. But NPR host Scott Simon says the Nazis used it abroad to weaken British and American resolve. His new audiobook about this history is Swingtime for Hitler.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/09/2344m 54s

Comic Aparna Nancherla

Comedian, writer, and actor Aparna Nancherla has starred in the TV shows BoJack Horseman, Master of None, and Corporate. She's written for Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell, and Late Night with Seth Meyers, and has comedy specials on Netflix and Comedy Central. She spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado about her anxiety, depression, and imposter syndrome, despite her career success. Her new book is Unreliable Narrator.John Powers reviews the Paramount TV+ heist drama series The Gold.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/09/2346m 15s

How Saudi Arabian Oil Money Is Influencing Men's Pro Golf

New York Times reporter Alan Blinder says the kingdom poured millions into a pro golf circuit to rival the PGA. The two sides recently announced a joint venture, raising anti-trust issues. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new season of The Morning Show.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/09/2345m 48s

Best Of: 'Barbie' Music Producer Mark Ronson / Model Bethann Hardison

Grammy and Oscar-winning music producer Mark Ronson is known for his party hits, pop songs, soulful arrangements, and producing for stars like Amy Winehouse, Lady Gaga, and Adele. His latest project is the Barbie soundtrack and score.We talk with Bethann Hardison about her 50+ year career as a trailblazer in the fashion world. She started modeling in the late '60s during the height of the Black is Beautiful movement. There's a new documentary about her life and career called Invisible Beauty.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/09/2349m 12s

Does China Have Hollywood In An Economic Muzzle?

Wall Street Journal reporter Erich Schwartzel says that film studios increasingly rely upon Chinese audiences to break even — which can result in self-censorship. His book is Red Carpet. Also, Justin Chang reviews the film Cassandro.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/09/2345m 46s

Inside The Biden White House

Atlantic staff writer Franklin Foer tells stories behind some of the Biden administration's biggest successes and failures. Foer's new book is The Last Politician.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/09/2344m 55s

The Military's Struggle To Modernize

The Army and Navy are testing weapons with remarkable capabilities, using cutting edge technology and AI. Terry Gross spoke with Eric Lipton of the New York Times about his investigation into the weapons, the need to modernize, and the obstacles in the way.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/09/2346m 28s

Hollywood Casting Director Allison Jones

The Barbie movie is just the latest example of why Allison Jones is considered one of the greatest comedy casting directors of our time. She casted films and TV shows like Freaks and Geeks, The Office, Veep, Curb Your Enthusiasm, The 40 Year Old Virgin, Superbad and Bridesmaids. We talk about casting Steve Carell in The Office, auditioning Jason Segel as a teenager, and what she's learned about acting from doing cameos of herself. Also, Ken Tucker reviews Allison Russell's new album, The Returner.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/09/2346m 31s

Trailblazing Black Model Bethann Hardison

We talk with Bethann Hardison about her 50+ year career as a trailblazer in the fashion world. She started modeling in the late '60s during the height of the Black is Beautiful movement. With her brown skin and short afro, Hardison describes herself as being the first "Black Black" looking model. Later, she was one of the first Black women to own a modeling agency. There's a new documentary about her life and career called Invisible Beauty.John Powers reviews two films about the 1973 coup in Chile.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/09/2345m 17s

Best Of: Zadie Smith / Maria Bamford

Zadie Smith talks about her new book, The Fraud. It's a historical novel, but its themes of gender inequality, class, and the enduring damages of slavery, are very connected to the present. David Bianculli reviews the new Apple+ series The Changeling, starring LaKeith Stanfield. Comic Maria Bamford's new memoir, Sure, I'll Join Your Cult, is about the lengths she's taken to fit in — from self-help books, to 12-step programs — and why making fun of her anxiety, depression, and OCD has been a powerful medicine.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/09/2347m 51s

Writer Hua Hsu On Friendship, Grief & Pop Culture

The son of Taiwanese immigrants, New Yorker staff writer Hua Hsu defined himself as a teen by the music he loved. The murder of a close friend when he was in college changed the course of his life. He tells this story in his memoir, Stay True, which won a Pulitzer this year.David Bianculli reviews the new Apple+ series The Changeling, starring LaKeith Stanfield.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/09/2345m 12s

Mark Ronson On The 'Barbie' Soundtrack & Score

Grammy and Oscar-winning music producer Mark Ronson is known for his party hits, pop songs, and soulful arrangements, producing for stars like Amy Winehouse, Lady Gaga, and Adele. His latest project is the Barbie soundtrack and score. We talk about the year he and his collaborator Andrew Wyatt spent conceptualizing, producing, and composing songs for the album which features Nicki Minaj, Sam Smith, Billie Eilish, and Dua Lipa. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews The Wren, The Wren by Anne Enright.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/09/2346m 4s

Comic Maria Bamford Will Join Your Cult

Comic Maria Bamford talks about — and jokes about — serious and dark topics like her anxiety, depression, and intrusive thoughts from OCD. Her new memoir is about the lengths she's gone to fit in, from self-help books to 12-step programs. It's called Sure, I'll Join Your Cult. Also, John Powers reviews the Danish crime series Face to Face.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/09/2343m 59s

Zadie Smith On 'The Fraud'

Zadie Smith is known for her essays and novels about contemporary life and art. But her new book, The Fraud, is a historical novel, set in Victorian England. Her characters are dealing with some of the same issues we face today — gender inequality, class divisions, and the perpetual consequences of slavery. Smith spoke with Terry Gross about the novel, aging, history, and how writing is an exercise in control rather than creativity.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/09/2345m 42s

Hip-Hop Week: Jay-Z

We wrap up our hip-hop history series with our 2010 interview with Sean Carter, A.K.A. Jay-Z, one of the most successful rappers of all time. He's won 24 Grammys and holds the record for the most No. 1 albums by a solo artist on the Billboard 200. In 2019 he became the first hip-hop billionaire.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/09/2345m 25s

Hip-Hop Week: Questlove / Chuck D / Diddy

Our celebration of the 50th anniversary of hip-hop continues with Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, drummer and co-founder of The Roots. He was born in 1971 and says he and hip-hop grew up together. Also, Public Enemy's Chuck D talks about the song "Fight the Power" and the powers they were fighting. And we'll listen back to a conversation with Sean "P. Diddy" Combs, A.K.A. Puff Daddy. He made his name—or names—in the hip-hop world as a record producer and rapper.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/09/2347m 51s

Hip-Hop Week: The RZA / André 3000

We continue our celebration of the 50th anniversary of hip-hop and feature interviews from our archive with the RZA from the Wu-Tang Clan, and André Benjamin, A.K.A. André 3000, from Outkast. Both have done solo work and have acted in films.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/09/2346m 43s

Hip-Hop Week: De La Soul / Beastie Boys

Our hip-hop history week continues, with interviews with two groups known for their clever lyrics and inventive use of samples. First, De La Soul, a group from Long Island, that sampled music from Schoolhouse Rock to James Brown, for their 1989 album, 3 Feet High and Rising. We'll hear our interview from 2000 with De La Soul's Vincent Mason and the late Dave "Trugoy" Jolicoeur. Also from our archive, a 2006 interview with the Beastie Boys: Mike Diamond, Adam Horovitz (Ad-Rock), and Adam Yauch. They had the first hip-hop album to reach number 1 on the pop chart. Yauch died in 2012.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/08/2347m 34s

Hip-Hop Week: Ice-T / Queen Latifah

Our hip-hop history series continues, featuring interviews from our archive with Ice-T, one of the early gangsta rappers. He went on to star as a detective in Law & Order: SVU. Also, Queen Latifah, the first female rap solo artist to earn a gold album. She now stars in the TV series The Equalizer. Ice-T spoke with Terry Gross in 1994 and Queen Latifah in 1999.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/08/2346m 57s

Hip-Hop Week: Darryl McDaniels (DMC) / LL Cool J

We continue our celebration of the 50th anniversary of hip-hop with Darryl McDaniels, co-founder of one of rap's oldest groups, Run-DMC. We'll also hear from LL Cool J, and from record producer Nile Rodgers, the guitarist and co-founder of the disco group Chic. He'll talk about coming up with the bass line for the song "Good Times" which was used in Sugar Hill Gang's "Rapper's Delight."Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/08/2346m 10s

Hip-Hop Week: DJ Kool Herc / Grandmaster Flash

This week we're celebrating the 50th anniversary of hip-hop. We'll hear interviews with some of the most influential rappers and DJ's of the past few decades. Today, we kick things off with three hip-hop pioneers. First, DJ Kool Herc, who is considered the first DJ to isolate the breaks — the most danceable beats in a record — and repeat them to keep the dancers going.Then, Grandmaster Flash, who was one of the first DJ's to make successful recordings. He'll describe some of the turntable techniques he developed.Finally, we'll hear from Melle Mel, the rapper with Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. Their record "The Message" was the first successful rap record that offered social commentary.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/08/2345m 43s

Best Of: 'Louder Than A Riot' Hosts / Biggie's Legacy

For years, hip-hop has been dominated by men and hyper-masculine lyrics. That's changing. "The girls and the gays are running things. They're the cultural crusaders at this point," says Sidney Madden. She co-hosts the NPR podcast Louder Than A Riot with Rodney Carmichael. They'll both join us to discuss the podcast's second season, which focuses on hip-hop's strain of misogyny and homophobia, and how a new generation of women and queer artists are refusing to stand for it. We'll also revisit the legacy of the late rapper Biggie Smalls with journalist Justin Tinsley.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/08/2348m 49s

David Bowie

It's been 50 years since David Bowie retired his famous alter-ego Ziggy Stardust onstage, stunning his fans and some of his bandmates. The film capturing that performance, Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, has been restored and reissued. Bowie spoke with Terry Gross in 2002. Lloyd Schwartz reviews a new album of Verdi choruses, and Justin Chang reviews Bottoms.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/08/2344m 53s

Ronan Farrow On Elon Musk's Influence In Ukraine

The New Yorker writer says Elon Musk's Starlink satellites are key to providing internet to Ukraine in its war with Russia, giving Musk an influence that's "more like a nation state than an individual." Farrow won a Pulitzer for his 2017 exposé of Harvey Weinstein.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/08/2345m 38s

Biggie's Life & Legacy

Journalist Justin Tinsley discusses the life and legacy of Biggie Smalls, a.k.a. the Notorious B.I.G., who was killed in 1997: "You can't talk about the story of hip-hop without mentioning the name Biggie Smalls." Tinsley's book is It Was All A Dream: Biggie and the World That Made Him.And John Powers reviews the Japanese TV series Midnight Diner.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/08/2346m 16s

Historian & Former Harvard President Drew Gilpin Faust

Growing up in the South, Drew Gilpin Faust rejected the narrative she was fed about slavery and the Civil War. She writes about her journey to activism and becoming the first woman president of Harvard University in Necessary Trouble. She spoke with Terry Gross about being groomed to be a Southern lady, affirmative action, and why we need to confront our uncomfortable past.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/08/2345m 26s

'Louder Than A Riot' Co-Hosts Examine Misogyny In Hip-Hop

As hip-hop marks its 50th anniversary, Sidney Madden and Rodney Carmichael, the co-hosts of the NPR podcast Louder Than A Riot, are taking a hard look back — and ahead — at a genre that male artists and hyper-masculine lyrics once dominated. The first season of Louder Than A Riot investigated the connection between hip-hop and mass incarceration. In its second and final season, the podcast examines the misogynoir that has long plagued the genre— and highlights artists that are pushing back. Carmichael says the topic is "well past due, but also right on time."Also, Ken Tucker reviews Bush Tetras' album They Live In My Head.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/08/2346m 25s

Best Of: Christopher Nolan / R. Eric Thomas

Christopher Nolan's new film Oppenheimer is about the man who's known as the father of the atomic bomb, J. Robert Oppenheimer. "Like it or not, we live in Oppenheimer's world and we always will," Nolan says.We also hear from humorist R. Eric Thomas. His new book of essays is called Congratulations, the Best Is Over! In it, Thomas explores what it's like to move back to his hometown of Baltimore as a middle-aged man. Later, Maureen Corrigan reviews the new novel by James McBride.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/08/2349m 0s

'Reservation Dogs' Co-Creator Sterlin Harjo / Remembering William Friedkin

The FX/Hulu series Reservation Dogs follows four teens on an Oklahoma Indian reservation who are frustrated and alienated, caught between what's left of traditional Native culture on the reservation and the broader pop culture. Co-creator and showrunner Sterlin Harjo spoke with Terry Gross last year about his own upbringing in Indian Territory. The show is now in its third and final season. Also, we listen back to an archival interview with Exorcist director William Friedkin. He died August 7th. Also, Justin Chang reviews The Adults starring Michael Cera.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/08/2346m 58s

Prisoners Find Rehabilitation & Redemption Through Music

Criminal justice reporter Maurice Chammah recently wrote an op-ed for the New York Times about the power of music programs in prison. He says at a time when the criminal system is at an impasse, music, and art can cultivate hope and dignity for prisoners and possibly change how we think about the people who make it. "It allows you to really hold in your mind anger about a crime, and then separately an understanding that this is a human being and there's more to say about them than their crime." Chammah also talks with us about the rich history of prison music in the U.S., dating all the way back to the 1930s.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/08/2344m 13s

Humorist R. Eric Thomas Wonders If The 'Best Is Over'

Playrwright and humorist R. Thomas' new book, Congratulations, the Best Is Over!, is about middle age, and what it was like to reluctantly return to his hometown of Baltimore as an adult — when both he and the city had changed. He spoke with Tonya Mosley about life transitions, church, and why he doesn't want to talk about The Wire. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new Blue Note box set by pianist Sonny Clark.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/08/2344m 41s

School Integration & The Achievement Gap In Shaker Heights

Washington Post reporter Laura Meckler tells the story of Shaker Heights, Ohio, a town with high-performing, diverse schools — and also a pronounced achievement gap between white and Black students. Meckler's book is Dream Town.John Powers reviews Naomi Hirahara's mystery novel Evergreen.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/08/2345m 40s

Christopher Nolan On 'Oppenheimer'

Christopher Nolan talks about writing and directing the new film Oppenheimer, about the man who's known as the father of the atom bomb, J. Robert Oppenheimer. Nolan also directed the WWII movie Dunkirk, The Dark Knight, and Inception. The film is about Oppenheimer's leading role in the race to develop the bomb before the Nazis. But after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, he became an arms control advocate, opposed building the hydrogen bomb, and was targeted during the anti-communist witch hunts of the 1950s.Later, Maureen Corrigan reviews the new novel by James McBride.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/08/2346m 33s

Best Of: Pianist Jason Moran / Author Andre Dubus III

Pianist Jason Moran joins us at the piano to play his take on the WWI-era music of James Reese Europe. And we'll hear from writer Andre Dubus III. His new novel, Such Kindness, asks how a person gets on with life after an accident that leads to disability and flames of chronic pain.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/08/2348m 34s

Looking Back On The U.S. Bombing Of Hiroshima & Nagasaki

78 years ago this week atomic bombs destroyed the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki — and questions linger about the U.S. decision to use the weapons. For the anniversary, we're revisiting archival interviews about the bombings. Author and psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton says American justifications are based on a myth. Writer Evan Thomas concludes using the weapons likely saved countless lives — including Japanese soldiers and civilians. And Lesley M.M. Blume focuses on what U.S. military censors hid from the American public about the effects of the bombs.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/08/2345m 1s

Uncovering The Story Of An Institutionalized Family Member

Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Jennifer Senior shares the pain of her family in a new piece for The Atlantic titled, "The Ones We Sent Away." In it, Senior tells the story of her Aunt Adele, who was institutionalized for her entire life because of her intellectual and developmental disability, beginning at 21 months old. Senior found out about her aunt when she herself was 12, believing up until then that her mother was an only child.Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new season of Only Murders in the Building.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/08/2346m 1s

A Memoir Of Kidnapping

When Shane McCrae was 3, his maternal grandparents, who were white supremacists, kidnapped him from his father, who is Black. His new memoir is Pulling the Chariot of the Sun.Also, Ken Tucker reviews MeShell Ndegeocello's album The Omnichord Real Book.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/08/2344m 59s

Reflecting On The End Of Sight

Andrew Leland started losing his sight 20 years ago. He's now legally blind, although he still has a narrow field of vision, which allows him to see about 6% of what a fully-sighted person sees. In his new memoir, The Country of the Blind, he explores different kinds of perception, and shares his experience adapting to his new reality. Also, Justin Chang reviews the film Passages.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/08/2345m 49s

Jason Moran At The Piano

Moran talks jazz and plays selections from his latest recording, which borrows from the music of James Reese Europe, the composer and musician who led the Harlem Hellfighters regiment band during WWI. Moran's new album is called 'From the Dancehall to the Battlefield,' and it features Moran's take on Europe's compositions and pop music of that time. It's available only on Bandcamp.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/08/2344m 57s

Best Of: Actor Richard E. Grant / Comic Leanne Morgan

Richard E. Grant (Withnail & I, Can You Ever Forgive Me?) was married to Joan Washington, an acclaimed dialect coach, for 35 years. He writes about their relationship and her death from cancer in the new memoir, A Pocketful of Happiness.Also, podcast critic Nick Quah reviews Dreamtown. Comic Leanne Morgan calls herself the "Mrs. Maisel of Appalachia." She says she's interested in speaking to an audience that she says gets forgotten — middle-aged women, mothers, and people in rural America. She has a new Netflix special called I'm Every Woman.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/08/2347m 25s

Remembering Pee-Wee Herman Actor Paul Reubens

Actor Paul Reubens, who created the character Pee-wee Herman, died July 30 at age 70. His joyful, odd and subversive CBS TV show, Pee-wee's Playhouse, was loved by children and adults alike. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2004. We'll also hear from Laurence Fishburne and S. Epatha Merkerson, who appeared on his show. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reflects on the WGA and SAG-AFTRA strikes and what to watch while Hollywood production is halted.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/08/2346m 45s

Novelist Andre Dubus III

How do you get on with life after an accident that leads to disability and chronic pain? That's the central question in Andre Dubus III's new novel, Such Kindness. He talks about the injuries he faced when he was a carpenter, and how his relationship changed with his father after the senior Dubus was struck by a car and never walked again. His previous books include Townie and House of Sand and Fog.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/08/2345m 58s

Congress's New Rebel Faction

House Speaker Kevin McCarthy has faced rebellions in his chamber, from the ultra conservative Freedom Caucus. Another hard right group, "the Twenty," is even more disruptive. These groups could lead us to a government to shutdown in the fall. Terry Gross spoke with New York Times congressional correspondent Annie Karni.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
02/08/2345m 36s

Actor Richard E. Grant On Living After Loss

Richard E. Grant (Withnail & I, Can You Ever Forgive Me?) was married to Joan Washington, an acclaimed dialect coach, for 35 years. He writes about their relationship and her death from cancer in the new memoir, A Pocketful of Happiness. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/08/2345m 6s

Comic Leanne Morgan

The self-described "Mrs. Maisel of Appalachia" set out to speak to an audience that she says gets forgotten — middle-aged women, mothers, and people in rural America. Morgan spoke with Tonya Mosley about breaking out in comedy later in life, and feeling like an outsider in the industry. She has a new Netflix special called I'm Every Woman. Also, podcast critic Nick Quah recommends Dreamtown.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
31/07/2346m 2s

Best Of: Writers Colson Whitehead / S.A. Cosby

After writing two Pulitzer Prize-winning novels, The Underground Railroad and The Nickel Boys, Colson Whitehead started writing crime novels set in Harlem. His new one, Crook Manifesto, is an entertaining read about crime at every level–from small-time crooks, to revolutionaries, cops, politicians and Harlem's elite. Also, we hear from crime writer S. A. Cosby. His new novel, All the Sinners Bleed, is about the first Black Sheriff in a Southeast Virginia county who is trying to stop a serial killer. Cosby talks about his novel and growing up in the South, haunted by the confederacy.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
29/07/2347m 49s

Pediatric Neurosurgeon Tells Stories From The O.R.

Pediatric neurosurgeon Jay Wellons regularly feels the exhilaration of saving a child from near certain death — and sometimes the anguish of failing to prevent it. He's operated on various parts of the pediatric central nervous system, including performing spine surgery on an in-utero fetus. His memoir is All That Moves Us. (Originally broadcast in 2022) Justin Chang reviews The Haunted Mansion and Talk to Me.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/07/2344m 39s

Hubert Humphrey's Fight For Civil Rights

If you have any impression of LBJ Vice President Hubert Humphrey, it might be that of an establishment politician who defended an unpopular war in Vietnam and led the Democratic Party to defeat in 1968. But writer Samuel Freedman says the young Hubert Humphrey was a man of true principle and rare talent, fighting bigotry as mayor of Minneapolis, and waging a courageous battle to get the party to embrace civil rights. Freedman's book is Into the Bright Sunshine.John Powers reviews the new season of the Navajo police drama Dark Winds.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/07/2346m 32s

Remembering Tony Bennett

The legendary crooner, who died July 21, told Terry Gross in 1991 he never got tired of singing "I Left My Heart in San Francisco": "I'm very grateful for that song."Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/07/2346m 13s

Crime Writer S.A. Cosby

In S.A. Cosby's novel All the Sinners Bleed, a Black sheriff in a Southern town is tracking down a serial killer who preys on Black children. The author spoke with producer Sam Briger about how the story was inspired by the George Floyd uprising, and his own feelings about his Southern identity. Also, critic Maureen Corrigan reflects on her childhood playing with Barbies.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
25/07/2347m 3s

Colson Whitehead On 'Crook Manifesto'

"My early '70s New York is dingy and grimy," the Pulitzer Prize-winning author says. Whitehead's new sequel to Harlem Shuffle, Crook Manifesto, centers on crime at every level, from small-time crooks to Harlem's elite. Later, TV critic David Bianculli reviews two new books about TV.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/07/2346m 44s

Best Of: Timothy Olyphant / Understanding The Crack Era

Timothy Olyphant is best known for portraying lawmen in cowboy hats. He reprises the role of U.S. marshal Raylan Givens in the eight-part sequel, Justified: City Primeval, based on Elmore Leonard's novel. He also played Sheriff Seth Bullock in Deadwood."We won't heal until we make sense of the crack epidemic," Donovan X. Ramsey says. His book, When Crack Was King, examines the drug's destructive path through the Black community.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/07/2349m 11s

Remembering André Watts / USWNT Star Megan Rapinoe

We remember classical pianist André Watts, who died last week at the age of 77. He became famous overnight after performing with Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic at the age of 16. Soccer star Megan Rapinoe is playing in her last Women's World Cup this month. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2020 for her memoir, One Life. Justin Chang reviews Barbie and Oppenheimer.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/07/2346m 59s

The Changing Hollywood Landscape

The entertainment industry is in upheaval. Streamers are reckoning with not being profitable, and writers and actors are on strike. Bloomberg reporter Lucas Shaw talks about what viewers can expect. Maureen Corrigan reviews two summer reads: Do Tell and The Stolen Coast.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/07/2345m 50s

How 'Toxic Fashion' Can Make Us Sick

In 2018, Delta airlines unveiled new uniforms made of a synthetic-blend fabric. Soon after, flight attendants began to get sick with rashes, hair loss, and brain fog. Alden Wicker explains how toxic chemicals get in clothes in To Dye For. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly unearthed recording from tenor saxophonist Clifford Jordan.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/07/2345m 59s

'Justified' Star Timothy Olyphant

Olyphant is best known for portraying lawmen in cowboy hats. He reprises the role of U.S. marshal Raylan Givens in the eight-part sequel, Justified: City Primeval, based on Elmore Leonard's novel. He also played Sheriff Seth Bullock in Deadwood.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
18/07/2345m 14s

The Threat Of Deadly Fungal Pathogens

Science writer Emily Monosson says fungi and fungus-like pathogens are the most devastating disease agents on the planet, causing the extinction or near extinction of species of trees, bananas, bats, frogs and more. We also talk about life threatening fungal infections that affect the immunocompromised. Her book is Blight: Fungi and the Coming Pandemic. Also, David Bianculli reviews the reboot of FX's Justified. Ken Tucker reviews two music books: Robert McCormick's Biography of a Phantom: A Robert Johnson Blues Odyssey and Robert Mugge's Notes from the Road: A Filmmaker's Journey Through American Music.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/07/2347m 16s

Best Of: Meeting Tonya Mosley/Rising Temperatures

Terry Gross interviews co-host Tonya Mosley about her life and work, and how they intersect in the current season of her podcast Truth Be Told. It focuses on the therapeutic use of psychedelic mushrooms to heal racial trauma. Later, Tonya talks about how rising temperatures and extreme heat will change our lives. Her guest is Jeff Goodell, author of The Heat Will Kill You First: Life and Death on A Scorched Planet. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the new film Joy Ride.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/07/2348m 50s

David Sedaris' War with His Father

"My father was not a good person, but he was a great character," Sedaris says. The humorist writes about his efforts to make peace with his memories of his late father in Happy-Go-Lucky. (Originally broadcast May 2022)Also, Justin Chang reviews Mission: Impossible — Dead Reckoning Part One.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/07/2345m 48s

The History Of The Crack Era From People Who Lived Through It

"We won't heal until we make sense of the crack epidemic," Donovan X. Ramsey says. His book, When Crack Was King, examines the drug's destructive path through the Black community.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/07/2345m 54s

Life, Death & Rising Temperatures

Author Jeff Goodell warns a new climate regime is coming: "We don't really know what we're heading into and how chaotic this can get." His new book is The Heat Will Kill You First.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the memoir Through the Groves by Anne Hull.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/07/2344m 41s

Getting To Know Co-host Tonya Mosley

Terry Gross interviews new Fresh Air co-host Tonya Mosley about growing up in Detroit, her career in news, and healing racial trauma with psychedelics.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
11/07/2346m 7s

The Legacy Of Baseball's 'Negro League'

In his documentary The League, Sam Pollard tells the story of the Negro National League: "They brought a different kind of style ... a kind of baseball which Major League Baseball is trying to bring back." Also, Kevin Whitehead reflects on box set of Charles Mingus.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/07/2345m 52s

Best Of: 'Every Body' & Intersex Identity / The Threat Of AI

Alicia Roth Weigel is one of three activists profiled in Julie Cohen's new documentary, Every Body. She says intersex is an umbrella term for people whose "anatomy doesn't fit super neatly into a binary box." Artificial intelligence experts recently signed an open letter warning that AI could destroy humanity. New York Times technology reporter Cade Metz explains why we are at a turning point with this technology.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/07/2349m 12s

Ringo Starr / Remembering Alan Arkin

Actor Alan Arkin, who died June 29, got his start creating comic characters with the comedy troupe Second City and later won an Oscar for his role in Little Miss Sunshine. He spoke with Fresh Air in 1989. Also, we listen back to our interview with Ringo Starr on the occasion of his 83rd birthday. The Beatle told Terry Gross that he made his first drum kit out of "biscuit tins and firewood." Justin Chang reviews the comedy Joy Ride.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/07/2346m 41s

A Recap Of The Supreme Court Term

New York Times legal reporter Adam Liptak says the Supreme Court's liberal members have accused the conservative supermajority of engaging in politics and not applying established law to the questions before them. We'll talk about how the Court ended affirmative action in college admissions, limited the rights of gay people, and ended the Biden administration's student loan forgiveness program, as well as the major ethical questions have been raised about several conservative justices.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/07/2345m 18s

'Every Body' Documentary Explores The Intersex Experience

Alicia Roth Weigel is one of three activists profiled in Julie Cohen's new documentary, Every Body. She says intersex is an umbrella term for people whose "anatomy doesn't fit super neatly into a binary box."Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
05/07/2344m 57s

Janelle Monáe

Monáe is known for her Afro-futurist funk, soul and hip hop sound. She's been nominated for 8 Grammys, and last month she released her 4th album, The Age of Pleasure, where she explores lusty romance and both masculine and feminine energies. Recently Monáe came out as non-binary, using she/they pronouns. In addition to her music, she's also forged a successful career in movies, co-starring in films like Knives Out: Glass Onion, Hidden Figures and Moonlight. In 2020 Monáe spoke with Terry Gross about how she grew up wanting to be on Broadway, her life as a Black queer artist, and working with Prince.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
04/07/2346m 45s

Neil Diamond / Remembering Glenda Jackson

We go into our archive to feature our 2005 interview with Neil Diamond. The new Broadway show A Beautiful Noise is based on his life and features his songs. Some of his most famous songs include Sweet Caroline, Solitary Man, and Girl, You'll be A Woman Soon. We'll also remember two-time Oscar-winner Glenda Jackson, who died June 15th. She was 87. Terry Gross spoke with her in 2019 when she was starring on Broadway in a production of King Lear, as Lear. Jackson also served in British Parliament for over two decades.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
03/07/2346m 1s

Best Of: Laura Dern / Jeremy O. Harris

Actor Laura Dern and her mother Diane Ladd have always shared a profession. But when Ladd was diagnosed with lung disease, the two started sharing so much more. Their new book is Honey, Baby, Mine. Award-winning playwright of Slave Play, Jeremy O. Harris, helped bring Lorraine Hansberry's The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window to Broadway. "This play is telling us, in every scene, that no matter how much capitalism corrupts the world of our politics, we cannot lose our ideals," Harris says. "We cannot stop fighting."Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
01/07/2348m 38s

Remembering Broadway Lyricist Sheldon Harnick

Harnick, along with composer Jerry Bock, wrote the enduring music for Fiddler on the Roof, as well as Fiorello and She Loves Me. He died June 23 at the age of 99. Originally broadcast in 1988, 2004 and 2014. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
30/06/2345m 49s

How To Support Trans Kids In School

Aidan Key explains why U.S. schools are seeing an increase in transgender students and how educators can respond to anti-LGBTQ curriculum measures. His book is Trans Children in Today's Schools.TV critic David Bianculli shares his concern about the future of Turner Classic Movies.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
28/06/2345m 13s

Playwright Jeremy O. Harris

The award-winning playwright of Slave Play helped bring Lorraine Hansberry's The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window to Broadway. "This play is telling us, in every scene, that no matter how much capitalism corrupts the world of our politics, we cannot lose our ideals," Harris says. "We cannot stop fighting."Maureen Corrigan reviews two roadtrip novels: Richard Ford's Be Mine and Lorrie Moore's I Am Homeless If This Is Not My Home. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
27/06/2345m 54s

Laura Dern

Actor Laura Dern and her mother Diane Ladd have always shared a profession. But when Ladd was diagnosed with lung disease, the two started sharing so much more. Their new book is Honey, Baby, Mine. Dern talks with Terry Gross about growing up with actor parents, encountering predatory behavior in Hollywood, and accessing rage for some of her hot-headed roles.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
26/06/2344m 22s

Best Of: The Shakur Family Legacy / Birder Christian Cooper

Tupac Shakur — who was killed at 25 in 1996 — would have turned 52 this year. His mother, Afeni Shakur, was an activist and a central figure in the Black Panthers. Author and historian Santi Elijah Holley's new book, An Amerikan Family, follows the Shakur family tree and their work in the Black Liberation Movement.Ken Tucker reviews Janelle Monáe's new album, The Age of Pleasure.Christian Cooper was birdwatching in Central Park in 2020 when a white woman falsely accused him of threatening her. The video went viral. His memoir, Better Living Through Birding, chronicles life as a Black birder, gay activist and Marvel comic book writer and editor.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
24/06/2347m 40s

Remembering Daniel Ellsberg, Who Leaked Pentagon Papers

We remember Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers to the press in 1971, in hopes they would help end the Vietnam War. He died last week at the age of 92. We'll listen to our 2017 interview with him. "I identify more with Chelsea Manning and with Edward Snowden than with any other people on earth," he told Dave Davies. "We all faced the same question which is, who will put this information out if I don't?" Also New York Times correspondent Charlie Savage shares a story about Ellsberg continuing to battle government secrecy when he was 90.Also, David Bianculli reviews the new reality TV competition show Morimoto's Sushi Master on the Roku channel.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
23/06/2345m 40s

Classroom Culture Wars & Teacher Burnout

Washington Post reporter Hannah Natanson explains how the debates over teaching race, racism, gender identity and sexuality have put pressure on teachers who were already overworked and underpaid.Kevin Whitehead reviews composer and saxophonist Henry Threadgill's new album and book.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
22/06/2345m 16s

Remembering Legendary Editor Robert Gottlieb

Gottlieb, who died last week at age 92, edited Joseph Heller, Toni Morrison, John le Carré and, for more than 50 years, Robert Caro. He went on to become editor of The New Yorker. We'll listen to our recent interview with Gottlieb, and we'll hear some of our interview recorded in 2000 with Gottlieb and musical theater expert Robert Kimball. They co-authored a book on some of the best lyricists of the last century.Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Brandon Taylor's, The Late Americans, and Andre Dubus III's novel, Such Kindness. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
21/06/2346m 1s

The Countdown To End WWII

Author Evan Thomas tells the story of American leaders wrestling with the terrifying dilemmas of nuclear weapons and of determined Japanese leaders confronting the humiliating prospect of defeat. His book is Road to Surrender: Three Men and the Countdown to the End of World War II. John Powers reviews the novel Kairos by Jenny Erpenbeck.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
20/06/2345m 41s

Celebrating America's Black Working Class

In Black Folk, Award-winning historian Blair LM Kelley portrays generations of Black workers — Pullman porters, domestic laborers, USPS employees, COVID-19 essential workers — whose work has been vital to the nation's prosperity. Ken Tucker reviews Janelle Monáe's new album, The Age of Pleasure.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
19/06/2345m 46s

Best Of: Writer Kwame Alexander / Chef Lidia Bastianich

Kwame Alexander's new memoir is Why Fathers Cry at Night. It started as a book of love poems, but ended up being a book of essays and poems about falling in love, the end of his two marriages, raising two children. He is best known for his children's books, including The Undefeated, which won the Caldecott Medal.Also, we'll hear from chef Lidia Bastianich. She's won James Beard Awards, hosted a long-running TV series, and written cookbooks. She'll talk about how she built her career after fleeing the chaos in Europe with her family following World War II.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
17/06/2347m 52s

John Mellencamp

We're revisiting Terry Gross's 2009 interview with musician John Mellencamp. He's got a new album called Orpheus Descending out this month. Mellencamp's big hits in the 1980s included "Jack and Diane" and "Small Town." Film critic Justin Chang reviews Wes Anderson's new movie, Asteroid City, and David Bianculli reviews the new season of the Netflix anthology series Black Mirror.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
16/06/2347m 24s

Could Artificial Intelligence Destroy Humanity?

Artificial intelligence experts recently signed an open letter warning that A.I. could destroy humanity. New York Times technology reporter Cade Metz explains why we are at a turning point with this technology.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
15/06/2346m 55s

The Shakur Family Legacy, Tupac & Beyond

Tupac Shakur — who was killed at 25 in 1996 — would have turned 52 this year. His mother, Afeni Shakur, was an activist and a central figure in the Black Panthers. Author and historian Santi Elijah Holley's new book, An Amerikan Family, follows the Shakur family tree and their work in the Black Liberation Movement.John Powers reviews the final season of the British detective series Endeavour.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
14/06/2346m 34s

How The Catholic Church Profited From Slavery

"You don't hear about enslaved people at Mass or in Sunday school," says author Rachel Swarns. Her new book tells the story of 272 enslaved people sold in 1838 to help save what is now Georgetown University.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
13/06/2345m 28s

Christian Cooper On Life As A Black Birder

Cooper was birdwatching in Central Park in 2020 when a white woman falsely accused him of threatening her. The video went viral. His memoir, Better Living Through Birding, chronicles life as a Black birder, gay activist and Marvel comic book writer and editor. Cooper now hosts a National Geographic birdwatching show.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
12/06/2346m 8s

Best Of: 'Succession' Creator Jesse Armstrong / Actor Elliot Page

Succession creator, showrunner and head writer, Jesse Armstrong has been reluctant to reveal much about creating the characters, their motivations and plotlines in the past — but now that the series is over, he's ready to talk. Also with us is executive producer Frank Rich, who was instrumental in getting the series made. Maureen Corrigan recommends two new suspense novels that overturn the age-old "woman-in-trouble" plot: My Murder and Beware the Woman.Also, we'll hear from actor Elliot Page. He's best known for his roles in Juno, Inception and X-Men. In 2020, he came out as a trans man — and soon after his character on Netflix series The Umbrella Academy, also transitioned. Page's new memoir is called Pageboy.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
10/06/2348m 10s

Remembering '60s Pop Songwriter Cynthia Weil

Songwriter Cynthia Weil, along with her writing partner and husband Barry Mann, wrote the 1960s hits You've Lost that Loving Feeling, Uptown, On Broadway, and We've Got to Get Out of This Place. We'll listen to our 2000 archival interview with them. She died last week at 82. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews Past Lives.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
09/06/2346m 45s

Parkland Survivor & March For Our Lives Co-Founder David Hogg

On Feb. 14, 2018, David Hogg was in his AP Environmental Sciences class at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., when he heard gunshots. It was the beginning of one of the deadliest school shootings in American history. 17 people were murdered. Hogg is a co-founder of the youth-led gun reform movement March for Our Lives. He talks about advocacy, finding common ground with opponents and the importance of making time for joy amid the pain. Also, Ken Tucker reviews new albums by Jason Isbell and Rodney Crowell.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
08/06/2344m 38s

Elliot Page

For much of his life, the Canadian actor (Juno, X-men, The Umbrella Academy) experienced gender dysphoria that made him extremely uncomfortable in his own body. "It's like a constant noise," he says. His new memoir is called Pageboy.Maureen Corrigan reviews two suspense novels: My Murder by Katie Williams and Beware the Woman by Megan Abbott.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
07/06/2344m 19s

The SCOTUS Conservative 'Supermajority'

Constitutional lawyer and Brennan Center for Justice President Michael Waldman says there's a growing divide between the electorate and the Supreme Court: "the country is moving in one direction ... the Court is moving fast in another direction." His book is The Supermajority.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
06/06/2345m 54s
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