Fresh Air

Fresh Air

By NPR

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

Episodes

Surveillance & Local Police: How Technology Is Evolving Faster Than Regulation

Journalist Jon Fasman says local police departments are able to use very powerful surveillance tools, often with little oversight. Fasman talks about license plate readers, predictive policing, facial recognition software and more. "The question is: Is it worth the cost to our privacy and liberty to implement this technology? And if so, what limits are we willing to set? What penalties do we want for failing to observe these limits?" Fasman's book is 'We See It All.'Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'The Lady and the Dale,' a docuseries on HBO.
27/01/2148m 37s

'The Human Factor' & Middle East Peace Negotiations

We get an inside look at the negotiations between Palestinian and Israeli leaders during the Clinton administration that held real promise for a peace agreement — before an assassin's bullet changed everything. We talk with filmmaker Dror Moreh about his documentary, 'The Human Factor, and with Dennis Ross, President Clinton's point man in the effort.
26/01/2148m 6s

Exploring The Human Voice

We talk with 'New Yorker' writer John Colapinto, author of 'This Is the Voice,' about how voices work, how they evolved in our prehistoric ancestors, how babies learn to vocalize words of their parents' languages so quickly, and what makes voices sexy or authoritative. Colapinto's own vocal injury led him to explore this subject.Also, we remember legendary broadcaster Larry King. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1982.
25/01/2148m 45s

Best Of: 'News Of The World' Director / Busting Myths About Exercise

News of the World' is a Western set five years after the end of the Civil War. It stars Tom Hanks as a former Confederate captain who travels from one small poor Texas town to another, reading aloud from newspapers to townspeople who gather, paying ten cents apiece to be informed and entertained by these stories. We talk with director Paul Greengrass, who also directed Hanks in 'Captain Phillips.'Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Aftershocks,' by Nadia Owusu.Paleoanthropologist Daniel Lieberman says the concept of "exercise" is a relatively new thing. His new book, 'Exercised,' examines why we run, lift and walk for a workout, when our ancestors didn't.
23/01/2150m 24s

How Tragedy & Resilience Made Joe Biden

Journalist Evan Osnos talks about President Biden's long career in the Senate, how personal tragedy changed him, and some of the political missteps he made along the way. Osnos' biography is 'Joe Biden: The Life, the Run, and What Matters Now.' (Interview was recorded before the election in Oct. 2020) Also, we remember late musician Howard Johnson, who made a place for tuba in jazz, working with Charles Mingus, McCoy Tyner, Gil Evans and others. He later expanded into rock and roll playing with Taj Mahal and The Band. He also helped create and played in the original 'Saturday Night' Live band. And Justin Chang reviews 'The White Tiger' on Netflix.
22/01/2149m 1s

Busting Myths About Exercise

Paleoanthropologist Daniel Lieberman says the concept of "exercise" is a relatively new thing. His new book, 'Exercised,' examines why we run, lift and walk for a workout, when our ancestors didn't. We'll also talk about how sitting and slouching affect our health.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the digital album 'Some Kind of Tomorrow,' recorded over Zoom.
21/01/2148m 30s

Biden's Plan To Enact A Climate Agenda

Trump called climate change a hoax. Biden calls it an existential threat. 'Washington Post' journalist Juliet Eilperin talks about how Biden might reverse his predecessor's environmental policies.John Powers reviews the Polish thriller film 'Spoor.'
20/01/2147m 52s

The Story Of The Blackwell Sisters, Pioneers Of Women In Medicine

Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to earn her medical degree​ in the United States​. Her sister Emily​ soon after​ followed in her footsteps. Janice Nimura tells the story of the "complicated, prickly" ​19th century ​trailblazers​ in her book 'The Doctors Blackwell.' ​"To me, [the Blackwells] taught me that it's really important in this moment to kind of relearn how to admire women​," Nimura says. ​Also Ken Tucker reviews 'Peter Stampfel's 20th Century' a new collection from the folk musician.
19/01/2148m 18s

The FBI's Effort To Take Down MLK

Filmmaker Sam Pollard talks about his new documentary 'MLK/FBI,' based on newly declassified documents, which exposes the ways that the FBI attempted to discredit Martin Luther King Jr. Pollard talks about how the agency bugged his phones, surveilled hotel rooms, and even sent King a letter suggesting he kill himself. Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Aftershocks' by Nadia Owusu.
18/01/2148m 2s

Best Of: Fran Lebowitz / The Legacy Of William Monroe Trotter

The Netflix docuseries 'Pretend It's a City' features iconoclastic humorist Fran Lebowitz's conversations with Martin Scorsese. Lebowitz talks about why she loves living alone, driving a cab in the '70s, and her friendship with Toni Morrison. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'Cloud Script' from Joshua Abrams' quartet.Historian Kerri Greenidge tells the story of William Monroe Trotter, a Black newspaper editor who was a forceful crusader for civil rights in the early 20th century. He built a national following in his time as a fierce advocate for the full citizenship rights that had been promised to former enslaved people after the Civil War. Greenidge's new book is called 'Black Radical.'
16/01/2149m 59s

Remembering Michael Apted, William Link And Neil Sheehan

We look back on the lives and careers of three people who have recently died. First, filmmaker Michael Apted, best-known for his documentary series, 'Up,' which followed the lives of a group of British citizens. He updated their stories with a new episode every seven years, from childhood through their 60s. Apted died last week. We also listen back to our interview with screenwriter William Link, who co-created many long-running TV series, including 'Columbo' and 'Murder She Wrote.' Also we remember Vietnam War correspondent Neil Sheehan. He broke the story of the Pentagon Papers, and wrote 'A Bright Shining Lie,' a Pulitzer-Prize winning book about the war. David Bianculli reviews 'WandaVision,' the new miniseries on Disney+.
15/01/2148m 41s

Dir. Paul Greengrass On 'News Of The World'

News of the World' is a Western set five years after the end of the Civil War. It stars Tom Hanks as a former Confederate captain who travels from one small poor Texas town to another, reading aloud from newspapers to townspeople who gather, paying ten cents apiece to be informed and entertained by these stories. We talk with director Paul Greengrass, who also directed Hanks in 'Captain Phillips.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews the new HBO documentary about the Bee Gees, and a new album by the only one of the three Bee Gee brothers still alive, Barry Gibb.
14/01/2148m 20s

The Story Of 'Black Radical' William Monroe Trotter

Historian Kerri Greenidge tells the story of William Monroe Trotter, a Black newspaper editor who was a forceful crusader for civil rights in the early 20th century. He built a national following in his time as a fierce advocate for the full citizenship rights that had been promised to former enslaved people after the Civil War. Trotter organized mass protests, confronted presidents, and openly challenged leaders such as Booker T. Washington who took a more cautious approach to Black empowerment. Greenidge's new book is called 'Black Radical.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Promising Young Woman' and 'Pieces of a Woman.'
13/01/2148m 44s

The Racist History Of The Senate Filibuster

Adam Jentleson traces the history of the filibuster, which started as a tool of Southern senators upholding slavery and then later became a mechanism to block civil rights legislation. His book is 'Kill Switch: The Rise of the Modern Senate and The Crippling of American Democracy.'
12/01/2147m 38s

Humorist Fran Lebowitz

The Netflix docuseries 'Pretend It's a City' features Lebowitz's conversations with Martin Scorsese on many topics, Manhattan in particular. "If I dropped the Hope Diamond on the floor of a subway car, I'd leave it there," she says. Lebowitz also talks about getting expelled from school, working for Andy Warhol, and why she loves living alone. Also, John Powers reviews the book 'The Liar's Dictionary' by Eley Williams.
11/01/2147m 36s

Best Of: Dr. Sanjay Gupta / Philippine Journalist Maria Ressa

CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks about how learning new skills can optimize brain health. His new book is 'Keep Sharp.' Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Outlawed,' a novel by Anna North, which she describes as 'Handmaid's Tale' meets 'Butch Cassidy.'Journalist Maria Ressa has faced criminal charges and death threats because of her coverage of the populist, authoritarian Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. We talk about her work in the Philippines and the threats she's faced. Ressa is the subject of a new PBS FRONTLINE documentary, 'A Thousand Cuts.'
09/01/2150m 16s

Remembering Nature Writer Barry Lopez

We remember the award-winning writer Barry Lopez, who wrote evocatively about nature, and in turn shed light on truths about the human experience. He died Christmas day at the age of 75. Lopez lived among the Arctic's Inuit people for five years, and raised a wolf pup for his book about the relationship between wolves and men. Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the new album by Chicago bassist Joshua Abrams. Then David Bianculli remarks on the live TV coverage of the insurrection led by Trump rioters on Wednesday.
08/01/2148m 15s

America's Pandemic Failures

The U.S. has only 4% of the world's population — and yet it accounts for 20% of all COVID deaths. 'New Yorker' writer Lawrence Wright discusses America's "plague year." We'll talk about the mishandling of the outbreak and his novel 'The End of October,' about a deadly pandemic.
07/01/2148m 3s

Journalist Maria Ressa On Standing Up To Philippine President

Journalist Maria Ressa has faced criminal charges and death threats because of her coverage of the populist, authoritarian Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. She's covered Duterte's bloody "war on drugs," his expanding grip on all parts of the government and his crackdown on the press. In 2018, she was Time Magazine's Person of the Year. Ressa is the subject of a new PBS FRONTLINE documentary, 'A Thousand Cuts,' directed by Ramona Diaz.Also book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Outlawed,' a novel by Anna North, which she describes as 'Handmaid's Tale' meets 'Butch Cassidy.'
06/01/2148m 28s

Life In China's Surveillance State

German journalist Kai Strittmatter says the Chinese state has amassed an astonishing amount of data about its citizens, which it uses to punish people for even minor offenses. We talk about facial recognition, a citizen point system, and the widespread use of barcodes. Strittmatter's new book is 'We Have Been Harmonized.'Also, David Bianculli reviews 'Mr. Mayor,' a new sitcom on NBC starring Ted Danson.
05/01/2147m 51s

Neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta On How To 'Keep Sharp'

CNN's chief medical correspondent says it's never too late to develop new brain pathways. Even small changes, like switching up the hand you hold your fork with, can help optimize brain health. We talk about the importance of learning new skills, good sleep, and how stress affects the brain. Dr. Gupta's new book is 'Keep Sharp.'
04/01/2147m 13s

Best Of: NPR's Nina Totenberg / 'Watchmen' Writer Cord Jefferson

Nina Totenberg is widely regarded as the dean of legal journalists. She started covering the Supreme Court in 1971 and became NPR's legal correspondent in 1975. We talk about breaking the Anita Hill story, her friendship with the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and being a pioneer for women in journalism.The HBO series 'Watchmen' uses sci-fi and action heroes to examine American racism. We talk with show writer Cord Jefferson, who wrote the episode of the series in which the main character narrowly survives the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, when white supremacists destroyed a prosperous Black community.
02/01/2150m 35s

Francis Ford Coppola On Making 'The Godfather'

Coppola was 29 years old when he signed on to direct a film. "I was young and had no power," he said. "So [the studio] figured they could just boss me around." But Coppola fought back. He recalled the making of his masterpiece in a 2016 interview with Terry Gross.
01/01/2149m 52s

Loudon Wainwright III & Vince Giordano In Concert

We close out the year with music from singer-songwriter Loudon Wainwright III and Nighthawks bandleader Vince Giordano. They collaborated on the 1920s and '30s style music for the series 'Boardwalk Empire' and the film 'The Aviator.' Now they've gotten together again on the new album, 'I'd Rather Lead a Band,' a collection of songs from the Great American Songbook. They talk with Terry Gross about their new record and the music of the era.
31/12/2050m 28s

Remembering Broadway Star Rebecca Luker

Luker died last Wednesday of ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease. She was 59. She had a beautiful singing voice, and received Tony nominations for her performances in 'Showboat,' 'The Music Man,' and 'Mary Poppins.' She also starred in a revival of 'The Sound of Music.' We listen back to excerpts of several Fresh Air interviews.Also, Kevin Whitehead remembers some jazz greats we lost his year.
30/12/2049m 41s

Stephen King / Sir. Patrick Stewart

Even Stephen King is feeling like he's living in a Stephen King novel these days. The author of the 1978 pandemic novel 'The Stand' says he understands why fans have said the COVID-19 pandemic feels like something out of his books. King says he doesn't feel panic or terror, but rather, a "gnawing anxiety." Patrick Stewart is back as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the CBS All Access series 'Star Trek: Picard.' He says he's changed as an actor over the years: "I am not averse to risk-taking and I don't judge myself." Stewart spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger about 'Picard,'
29/12/2050m 29s

'Queen's Gambit' Co-Creator Scott Frank

One of the most popular shows of the year is the Netflix limited series 'The Queen's Gambit,' which has been streamed by more than 62 million households. It's about an orphaned girl who becomes a chess prodigy, then a chess pro in a male-dominated world. We hear from Scott Frank, the co-creator, executive producer and director of the series. He spoke with guest contributor Arun Venugopal.John Powers reviews the new psychological thriller 'Elizabeth Is Missing' starring Glenda Jackson, which airs on PBS Masterpiece. And Clint Smith reads a poem about growing up in the shadows of Confederate statues.
28/12/2048m 7s

Best Of: 2020 In Film, TV & Music

COVID upended the movie, TV and music industries. Concerts were canceled and movie theaters were mostly closed. Still, our critics say there was some really good stuff to watch and listen to this year, and many people had more time than usual to do it. We'll hear from our TV critic David Bianculli, our rock critic Ken Tucker and our film critic Justin Chang. Also, we lost a lot of great musicians this year, our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead will pay tribute to some of them.
26/12/2050m 43s

Christmas Concert: Rosemary Clooney & Rebecca Kilgore

On a Christmas that has many of us wishing for the familiar comforts and pleasures of a holiday with family and friends, we turn to two singers whose performances have been a pleasure to return to over the years. We'll hear a 2005 interview with Rebecca Kilgore in which she sang some classic Christmas songs, and we have an excerpt of our onstage concert and 1997 interview with Rosemary Clooney.
25/12/2048m 14s

2020 In TV, Film & Podcasts

Our TV critic David Bianculli and film critic Justin Chang sit down with Terry Gross to share their favorites of the year. Also, Vulture writer Nick Quah shares some of his favorite podcasts of 2020.
24/12/2050m 44s

How The Pandemic Made The Ultra-Rich Even Richer

"You have a group of 650 people whose wealth has gone up a trillion dollars since mid-March," says Chuck Collins of the Institute for Policy Studies. Collins talks about how the richest Americans have profited from the pandemic, and his own relationship to generational wealth. Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy spoke with contributor Ann Marie Baldonado about 'The Tweedy Show,' which he does from his home, and his songwriting process.
23/12/2048m 22s

Angela Bassett

Bassett is one of the stars of the new Pixar animated film 'Soul.' She was in the Marvel blockbuster 'Black Panther' and has portrayed iconic people like Tina Turner in 'What's Love Got to Do With It,' and Betty Shabazz, Malcolm X's wife, in Spike Lee's movie 'Malcolm X. ' Early in Bassett's career, she appeared in the 1991 film 'Boyz n the Hood.' She spoke with contributor Sam Sanders about her career, and what it has been like as a Black woman in the movie industry.Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews several new Christmas songs that fit the mood of this COVID Christmas.
22/12/2050m 24s

Michael J. Fox

The 'Family Ties' star was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson's disease in 1991. He says that if he doesn't know if he can do something, he fakes it — a strategy that works 80 percent of the time. His memoir is 'No Time like the Future.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Tomorrow Will Be Better' a newly reprinted novel by Betty Smith, and Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly released album by tenor sax player George Coleman.
21/12/2047m 18s

Best Of: Riz Ahmed / Rock Photographer Bob Gruen

Riz Ahmed plays a drummer who loses his hearing in 'Sound of Metal. ' To prepare for the role, he immersed himself in deaf culture — an experience that changed the way he thought about communication and listening.Maureen Corrigan shares her favorite books of 2020. Bob Gruen has photographed countless rock stars, including John Lennon, the Rolling Stones, Chuck Berry and Tina Turner. His new memoir is 'Right Place, Right Time.'
19/12/2050m 34s

Elton John On Music, Addiction & Family

Sir Elton John spoke with Terry Gross in 2019 after the publication of his memoir, 'Me.' The book was pretty forthcoming about family, addiction and sexuality, and so was the conversation. A new CD box set collects rarities, demos, B-sides and fan favorites from his long career.Also, Justin Chang reviews 'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom' starring Chadwick Boseman in his last film before he died this year at age 43.
18/12/2049m 8s

COVID Vaccine Rollout & Where Research Fell Short

'Atlantic' science writer Ed Yong says the COVID vaccination program will be the most complicated the U.S. has ever attempted: "It's going to be a slow process, and there are a lot of possible roadblocks." We talk with Yong about what the rollout process will be like, where COVID research fell short, and what to expect for 2021.
17/12/2050m 6s

American Folk Music Curators / Comedian Amber Ruffin

Music producers Lance and April Ledbetter talk about curating their new anthology, which collects the flip sides of the 78s Harry Smith chose for his 1952 Anthology of American Folk Music. They spoke with producer Sam Briger. Also, we talk with 'Late Night with Seth Meyers' writer and performer Amber Ruffin. She's now got her own show on Peacock. "I've earned (hopefully) enough grace to do whatever I want," she tells contributor Ann Marie Baldonado.
16/12/2048m 15s

MC & Actor Riz Ahmed

Ahmed plays a drummer who loses his hearing in 'Sound of Metal. ' To prepare for the role, he immersed himself in deaf culture — an experience that changed the way he thought about communication and listening. We talk about that film, the formative experience of being racially profiled in an airport, and his breakthrough song "Post 9/11 Blues." Also, Ken Tucker shares his favorite albums of the year.
15/12/2049m 24s

Remembering Novelist (And Former Spy) John Le Carré

Best-selling novelist John Le Carré, who died Dec. 12, worked for MI5 and MI6 early in his career and later drew on that experience in thrillers like 'The Spy Who Came in from the Cold' and 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.' He spoke with Terry Gross in 1989 and 2017 about how his work for British intelligence informed his writing. Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly issued 1971 live recording by tenor saxophonist George Coleman.
14/12/2048m 20s

Best Of: Kate Winslet / Loudon Wainwright III & Vince Giordano

Kate Winslet co-stars in the new film 'Ammonite' as Mary Anning, a 19th-century paleontologist who has an intense love affair with the wife of a geologist. We talk about her new film and how things have changed for women in Hollywood.Singer-songwriter Loudon Wainwright III and Nighthawks bandleader Vince Giordano collaborated on the 1920s and '30s style music for the series 'Boardwalk Empire' and the film 'The Aviator.' Now they've gotten together again on the new album, 'I'd Rather Lead a Band,' a collection of songs from the Great American Songbook.
12/12/2050m 32s

Rachel Maddow On Spiro Agnew's Bribery Scandal

Richard Nixon's first vice president, Spiro Agnew, resigned in 1973 amidst charges of bribery and tax evasion. MSNBC host Rachel Maddow and producer Mike Yarvitz investigated the Agnew scandal in the podcast 'Bag Man.' Now their work on the podcast has been adapted into a book, 'Bag Man: The Wild Crimes, Audacious Cover-Up, and Spectacular Downfall of a Brazen Crook in the White House.' Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Farewell Amor.'
11/12/2047m 59s

NYT Reporter Maggie Haberman Unpacks The Trump Years

White House correspondent Maggie Haberman sheds light on Trump's refusal to concede."[He] can't handle the concept of the label 'loser,' " she says. "He has never before encountered a problem that he couldn't sue away through the court system or spin away." We'll also talk about what's next for the president and the frustrations of covering this particular administration.
10/12/2049m 34s

A Lawyer Combats The Mass Incarceration Crisis

Lawyer Brittany Barnett works on behalf of people sentenced to harsh sentences as a result of the war on drugs. Nine of her clients have been granted clemency. Barnett's new memoir is 'A Knock at Midnight: A Story of Hope, Justice And Freedom.' Critic John Powers shares his list of the year's best TV, books and movies.
09/12/2048m 24s

Rock & Roll Photographer Bob Gruen

Gruen has photographed countless rock stars, including John Lennon, the Rolling Stones, Chuck Berry and Tina Turner. We talk about his friendship with John Lennon, why Bob Dylan doesn't like him, and surviving the party lifestyle of the '70s. His new memoir is 'Right Place, Right Time.' Also, we remember test pilot Chuck Yeager who broke the sound barrier. He died yesterday at 97.
08/12/2050m 49s

Kate Winslet

Winslet co-stars in the new film 'Ammonite' as Mary Anning, a 19th-century paleontologist who has an intense love affair with the wife of a geologist, played by Saorise Ronan. We talk about why the role scared her, how playing an epidemiologist in the 2011 film 'Contagion' prepared her for COVID, and how 'Titanic' changed her life. Also, Justin Chang reviews 'Mank,' directed by David Fincher, now on Netflix.
07/12/2048m 35s

Best Of: Hugh Grant / The Sanitation Crisis In Rural Alabama

Hugh Grant co-stars in the HBO miniseries 'The Undoing' as a charming doctor suspected of brutally murdering his lover. We talk with Grant about the "blessed relief" of taking on darker roles.Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Ammonite,' starring Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan. MacArthur fellow Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in rural Alabama and has spent 20 years calling attention to the problem of people living with inadequate sanitation systems, resulting in human waste collecting in their yards and sometimes seeping into their homes. Her new book is 'Waste: One Woman's Fight Against America's Dirty Secret.'
05/12/2051m 21s

Celebrating Jazz Great Dave Brubeck / Best Books Of 2020

We celebrate the life and music of influential jazz pianist and composer Dave Brubeck, who was born 100 years ago. Brubeck's album 'Time Out,' released in 1959, was the first jazz album to sell a million copies. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1999. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan shares her top 10 books of the year, and David Bianculli reviews Showtime's series 'Your Honor' starring Bryan Cranston.
04/12/2049m 39s

National Security & The Final Weeks Of The Trump Administration

President Trump has ousted his secretary of defense and the head of the Pentagon's Defeat Isis Task Force. Trump has also considered striking Iran, and is expected to pull troops from Afghanistan. We talk with 'New York Times' reporter Eric Schmitt about what this may mean for American national security.
03/12/2049m 53s

Loudon Wainwright III & Vince Giordano Play From The Great American Songbook

Singer-songwriter Loudon Wainwright III and Nighthawks bandleader Vince Giordano collaborated on the 1920s and '30s style music for the series 'Boardwalk Empire' and the film 'The Aviator.' Now they've gotten together again on the new album, 'I'd Rather Lead a Band,' a collection of songs from the Great American Songbook. They talk with Terry Gross about their new record and the music of the era.
02/12/2048m 47s

Hugh Grant

Grant co-stars in the HBO miniseries 'The Undoing' as a charming doctor suspected of brutally murdering his lover. We talk with Grant about the "blessed relief" of taking a break from playing nice guys, his activism about tabloid privacy, and how 'Four Weddings and a Funeral' changed his life. ​
01/12/2050m 26s

Sen. Ted Kennedy & American Liberalism

A liberal voice in the U.S. Senate for decades, Senator Ted Kennedy led a life marked by tragedy and scandal. Historian Neal Gabler says Kennedy's career shaped the course of American liberalism. His book is 'Catching the Wind.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Happiest Season.' It stars Kristen Stewart and Mackenzie Davis as a lesbian couple trying to keep their relationship a secret during a Christmas family gathering.
30/11/2047m 50s

Best Of: Chef David Chang / Actor Gillian Anderson

Momofuku chef David Chang talks about his new memoir, 'Eat a Peach,' which details his struggle with bipolar disorder and how cooking saved his life. He also hosts the series 'Ugly Delicious' on Netflix. John Powers reviews the gripping Romanian documentary 'Collective,' about journalists uncovering a corruption scandal. 'X-Files' and 'Sex Education' actor Gillian Anderson talks about playing Margaret Thatcher in the new season of 'The Crown,' and then coaches Terry Gross on how to imitate the former prime minster's voice.
28/11/2050m 36s

Carol Burnett

The celebrated variety and sketch comedy series, 'The Carol Burnett Show' aired from 1967-1978 and won more than 20 Emmy Awards. The series is going to streaming services for the first time. Burnett talked to Terry Gross in 2003 and our TV critic David Bianculli interviewed her this year about her signature ear pull, why she didn't do topical humor, and why the show stands the test of time.
27/11/2049m 11s

Conan O'Brien

After 28 years of hosting late-night shows, O'Brien will be starting something new at HBO. He spoke to Terry Gross in 2019 about his early days as a comic and how late-night TV has changed over the years. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly discovered live recording by Sonny Rollins.
26/11/2049m 52s

Chef David Chang

Momofuku chef and 'Ugly Delicious' host David Chang talks about fatherhood, mixing culinary traditions, and how depression led him to take his biggest career risks. "Momofuku was an exercise in combating depression," he says. "Otherwise, a 26 year-old with very little experience should never open a restaurant — and that's what happened." His new memoir is 'Eat a Peach.'Also, we remember travel writer and memoirist Jan Morris. She died last week at 94.
25/11/2048m 41s

Vaccine Expert On COVID & The Year Ahead

Dr. Peter Hotez is part of a team working to develop a low-cost COVID vaccine that could be distributed globally. "Vaccines are coming," he says. "We have to get everybody through to the other side." Hotez talks about vaccine development, the anti-vax movement, and what the year ahead might look like.
24/11/2048m 34s

The Sanitation Crisis In Rural America

In a 2017 study of a rural area of Alabama, more than one in three people tested showed traces of hookworm, an intestinal parasite spread by contact with human feces, previously thought to be eradicated in the U.S. Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in Alabama, and has spent 20 years calling attention to the problem of people living with no sanitary means of human waste disposal, so it collects in their yards, and sometimes seeps into their homes. Earlier this year, she was awarded a MacArthur fellowship to support her work. Her new book is 'Waste: One Woman's Fight Against America's Dirty Secret.' Also, John Powers reviews the documentary 'Collective,' about a team of journalists investigating the aftermath of a 2015 Bucharest nightclub fire that killed 64 people
23/11/2049m 1s

Best Of: President Obama / The Chicago 7

President Barack Obama talks about birtherism and fake news, and reflects on what he misses most about being president — and why he still has faith in democracy. The first volume of his memoir about his presidency is 'A Promised Land.'Also, Justin Chang reviews 'Small Axe,' a series of five films by Steve McQueen. The Chicago 7 were anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The trial is the subject of a new movie written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. We talk with author Jon Wiener about his book, 'Conspiracy in the Streets.'
21/11/2050m 22s

The CIA's Secret Mind Control Experiments

Stephen Kinzer's book, 'Poisoner in Chief,' exposes how CIA scientist Sidney Gottlieb worked in the 1950s and early '60s to develop mind control drugs and deadly toxins that could be used against enemies of the U.S. government. Gottlieb believed the key to mind control was LSD, and is credited with bringing the drug to the U.S. He also experimented on unwitting people in prisons and detention centers in Japan, Germany, and the Philippines. (Originally broadcast Sept. 2019) Also, Justin Chang reviews, 'Small Axe,' Steve McQueen's new collection of five films set in London's West Indian community.
20/11/2048m 40s

President Barack Obama

In his first interview with Terry Gross, President Barack Obama talks about birtherism and fake news, and reflects on what he misses most about being president — and why he still has faith in democracy. The first volume of his memoir about his presidency is 'A Promised Land.'
19/11/2048m 11s

The Extraordinary 'Chicago 7' Trial / 'Alex Rider' Author Anthony Horowitz

The Chicago 7 were anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The trial is the subject of a new movie written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. We talk with author Jon Wiener about his book, 'Conspiracy in the Streets.'Anthony Horowitz's novels about Alex Rider, a reluctant teen spy, have been adapted into a TV series for Amazon. Horowitz is also the author of 'Moonflower Murders,' a mystery for adults. He spoke with producer Sam Briger.
18/11/2048m 18s

The GOP Identity Crisis Post-Trump

Donald Trump was scorned by party leaders when he ran in the 2016 primaries. But after nearly four years in office, he's so popular among Republican voters that few Republican officials dare to cross him. We talk with 'New Yorker' staff writer Nicholas Lemann about what influence Trump might have on the party going forward once he leaves the White House, and how the GOP will deal with the changes Trump has made to the party's identity and ideology. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Book Collectors: A Band of Syrian Rebels and the Stories That Carried Them Through a War' by Delphine Minoui.
17/11/2048m 1s

Gillian Anderson On 'The Crown' & 'The X-Files'

Anderson talks about playing Margaret Thatcher in the new season of 'The Crown,' and then coaches Terry Gross on how to do the former prime minster's voice. We'll also talk about Anderson's role as a sex therapist in 'Sex Education,' and her ongoing fight for equal pay for her co-starring role in 'The X-Files.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews the album 'The Otherside' from country singer-songwriter Cam.
16/11/2047m 28s

Best Of: Megan Rapinoe / The Science Of Smell

USWNT soccer star Megan Rapinoe speaks with Terry Gross about her World Cup wins, the ongoing fight for pay equality in women's sports, and being an LGBTQ activist. Her new memoir about her life on and off the field is 'One Life.'Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'We Keep the Dead Close,' by Becky Cooper, a true crime story about the murder of a Harvard student in 1969 that went unsolved until two years ago.Harold McGee is best-known for his books about food science. In his new book, 'Nose Dive,' he writes about why things smell the way they do — and the ways different chemicals combine to create surprising (and sometimes distasteful) odors.
14/11/2050m 40s

Jazz Pianist Keith Jarrett

Jarrett is one of the most celebrated pianists in jazz — a musician acclaimed for his emotionally intense and physically energetic improvised performances. He was a prodigy who started playing piano at the age of 3. Now he has a new album, 'Budapest,' which was recorded during his last European concert tour. Jarrett recently revealed he had two strokes in 2018 and now he's partially paralyzed and unable to perform. Critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the album and we listen back to our 2000 interview with Jarrett.Also, Justin Chang reviews the new film 'Ammonite,' starring Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan.
13/11/2048m 41s

What Trump Might Do With His Remaining Weeks In Office

'Politico' journalist Garrett Graff says presidents typically reserve their most controversial decisions for their last weeks in office. In a new article, Graff lays out some of the norm-busting actions President Trump may take in the days remaining in his presidency. Trump is already blocking president-elect Biden's access to classified information — and some worry he might destroy White House records and begin issuing pardons.
12/11/2048m 25s

A 'Nose Dive' Into The Science Of Smell

Harold McGee is best-known for his books about food science. In his new book, 'Nose Dive,' he writes about why things smell the way they do — and the ways different chemicals combine to create surprising (and sometimes distasteful) odors. We talk about stinky cheese, cat pee, mask breath and why cooking releases smells. Also, John Powers reviews season 4 of 'The Crown,' in which Princess Diana is introduced.
11/11/2048m 1s

Embracing Life With A Heart Condition

Writer Katherine Standefer tells us about long QT syndrome — and the implanted cardiac defibrillator that helps regulate her heart. In her new memoir, 'Lightning Flowers,' she writes about how the device changed her life, and about trying to get medical care with little income 11 years ago — just as Congress was trying to establish the Affordable Care Act. "One of the greatest gifts is to feel alive while you are alive," Standefer says.Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the new album from Susan Alcorn, a pedal steel guitarist who played in country and western bar bands. And book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'We Keep the Dead Close' by Becky Cooper, a true crime story about the murder of a Harvard student in 1969 that went unsolved until two years ago.
10/11/2048m 43s

Megan Rapinoe / Remembering Alex Trebek

The USWNT soccer star and activist spoke with Terry Gross about her World Cup wins, the ongoing fight for pay equality in women's sports, and taking a knee in solidarity with Black Lives Matter. Her new memoir about her life on and off the field is 'One Life.' Also, we remember longtime 'Jeopardy!' host Alex Trebek. He died Nov. 8.
09/11/2048m 47s

Best Of: Writer Jerald Walker / The Enduring Impact Of COVID-19

Author Jerald Walker talks about growing up on Chicago's South Side, raising his two sons in a predominantly white suburb and preventing his essays from turning into clichés about the Black experience. His new collection of essays is 'How to Make a Slave.' The title is a reference to Frederick Douglass' line, "You've seen how a man was made a slave; you shall see how a slave was made a man."Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album by cornet player Ron Miles.Nicholas Christakis is a doctor and a sociologist who has studied the science of infectious diseases and how plagues of the past have altered societies. "Everywhere you see the spread of germs, for the last few thousand years, you see right behind it the spread of lies," he says. "Denial and lies ... [are] almost an intrinsic part of an epidemic." Christakis' book is 'Apollo's Arrow: The Profound and Enduring Impact of Coronavirus on the Way We Live.'
07/11/2050m 49s

Jazz Singer Cécile McLorin Salvant

McLorin Salvant's repertoire includes jazz standards and forgotten early songs, show tunes, and originals. ​She'​s one of this year's MacArthur fellows​. We'll also listen back to our 2001 interview with dancer and choreographer Marge Champion, who died Oct. 21.
06/11/2049m 17s

Reconstructing The Presidency 'After Trump'

Jack Goldsmith, former legal counsel to George W. Bush's White House, says no matter when Trump leaves office, his successor will face tough questions about how to reconstruct the battered presidency. In his book, 'After Trump,' Goldsmith and his co-author Bob Bauer write that Trump has exposed the presidency's vulnerability to excesses of authority and weaknesses in accountability. The book details the norms Trump has violated, and recommends reforms that would hold future presidents more accountable. (Note: This interview was recorded the morning of Nov. 5)
05/11/2048m 17s

How The 2020 Election Is A 'Stress Test' Of American Democracy

'Atlantic' writer Barton Gellman returns to discuss what this election has revealed about our system's strengths and weaknesses, and what he's learned about the legal strategies the Trump and Biden campaigns are considering if the election is contested. Trump claimed victory on Election Night, and said he'd petition the Supreme Court to halt the vote counting. Gellman's latest articles are titled "The Election That Could Break America," and "How Trump Could Attempt a Coup." (Note: This interview was recorded on the morning of Nov. 4)
04/11/2048m 45s

Writer Jerald Walker On 'How To Make A Slave'

Walker talks about growing up on Chicago's South Side, raising his two sons in a predominantly white suburb and preventing his essays from turning into clichés about the Black experience. His new collection of essays is 'How to Make a Slave.' The title is a reference to Frederick Douglass' line, "You've seen how a man was made a slave; you shall see how a slave was made a man."
03/11/2048m 2s

Aaron Sorkin On 'The Trial Of The Chicago 7'

In 1968, several prominent anti-war activists were accused of conspiring to start a riot at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Aaron Sorkin, writer of 'The West Wing,' and 'The Social Network,' has a new film that follows the trial of the so-called Chicago Seven. He spoke with new 'Fresh Air' contributor Sam Sanders about parallels between the summer of '68 and 2020, and if the past year has changed his idealistic style of writing. Also, Ken Tucker reviews three new songs by Stevie Wonder, The Pretenders and Bruce Springsteen.
02/11/2048m 17s

Best Of: Inside A Pro-Trump Militia / Chef Marcus Samuelsson

'Atlantic' writer Mike Giglio profiles the Oath Keepers, a pro-Trump militia group, in a new article. They have recruited thousands of police, soldiers and veterans. We talk about what they might do on Election Day and after. Ken Tucker reviews three songs by The Pretenders, Bruce Springsteen, and Stevie Wonder.Harlem chef Marcus Samuelsson talks about his new book, 'The Rise.' It's a celebration of Black excellence in the culinary world — and the many Black cooks who have influenced American food, often without credit.
31/10/2050m 27s

Remembering Country Songwriter Billy Joe Shaver

We remember the songwriter that Johnny Cash described as his favorite writer: Billy Joe Shaver. His songs have been performed by Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan and Elvis Presley. Shaver first became known as the songwriter for the country music outlaws of the '70s. He died this week at the age of 81. We'll listen back to two of his interviews with Terry Gross.Justin Chang reviews 'City Hall,' a riveting documentary about local government by filmmaker Frederick Wiseman.
30/10/2049m 6s

The Enduring Impact Of COVID-19

Nicholas Christakis is a doctor and a sociologist who has studied the science of infectious diseases and how plagues of the past have altered societies. "Everywhere you see the spread of germs, for the last few thousand years, you see right behind it the spread of lies," he says. "Denial and lies ... [are] almost an intrinsic part of an epidemic." Christakis's book is 'Apollo's Arrow: The Profound and Enduring Impact of Coronavirus on the Way We Live.'Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Jess Walter's new novel 'The Cold Millions.'
29/10/2047m 39s

Pro-Trump Militias: Election Day & Beyond

'Atlantic' writer Mike Giglio profiles the Oath Keepers, a pro-Trump militia group, in a new article. They have recruited thousands of police, soldiers and veterans. We talk about what they might do on Election Day and after. "We, as Americans, are so comfortable with the idea of sending people out into foreign wars. And now [these militia groups are] starting to look at America itself as a part of that battle space." Giglio also shares insights from covering civil wars overseas.
28/10/2048m 1s

The Personal Scars & Political Mistakes That Shaped Joe Biden

We talk with journalist Evan Osnos about the former vice president's long career in the Senate, how personal tragedy changed him, and some of the political missteps he made along the way. Osnos' new biography is 'Joe Biden: The Life, the Run, and What Matters Now.'
27/10/2048m 40s

Chef Marcus Samuelsson Writes Black People Into U.S. Food History

Samuelsson's new book, 'The Rise,' is a celebration of Black excellence in the culinary world — and the many Black cooks who have influenced American food, often without credit. He also talks about converting his Harlem restaurant Red Rooster into a community kitchen during the pandemic, and his roots in both Ethiopia and Sweden. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Witches,' an adaptation of Roald Dahl's classic children's book.
26/10/2049m 0s

Father Of The Psychedelic Movement, Timothy Leary

Psychologist Timothy Leary, who died in 1996, was the father of the psychedelic movement of the 1960s and its experiments with mind-altering drugs. In 1960, Leary joined the faculty of Harvard at the Center for Personality Research, where he analyzed the effects of psychedelics and personality. As part of his research, he introduced L.S.D. and other psychedelic drugs to many, and also used them himself. Leary was eventually asked to leave the university, and later served time in jail on drug charges. We listen back to Terry Gross' 1983 interview with Leary as well as our 1990 interview with spiritual leader Ram Dass, who joined Leary in some of his psychedelic experiments. And we'll hear from journalist Michael Pollan whose 2018 book 'How to Change Your Mind' explored the therapeutic benefits of psychedelics. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews HBO's 'The Undoing,' starring Hugh Grant and Nicole Kidman.
23/10/2048m 43s

Best Of: Novelist Rumaan Alam / 'My Octopus Teacher' Filmmaker

Rumaan Alam's novel, 'Leave the World Behind,' centers on two families — one Black and one white — who are sharing a vacation home during a mysterious disaster. It explores issues of race and class, fear, and how we respond to crisis.Ken Tucker reviews a new deluxe edition of Prince's masterpiece 'Sign O' The Times.' Craig Foster spent a year diving — without oxygen or a wetsuit — into the frigid sea near Cape Town, South Africa. One octopus began coming out of her den to hunt or explore while Foster watched. He documents their unlikely friendship in 'My Octopus Teacher,' now on Netflix.
23/10/2050m 21s

SCOTUS Correspondent Nina Totenberg

Nina Totenberg is widely regarded as the dean of legal journalists. She started covering the Supreme court in 1971 and became NPR's legal correspondent in 1975. We talk about breaking the Anita Hill story, her friendship with the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and her early career as a pioneer for women in journalism. This conversation was recorded from a live Zoom event for WHYY.
22/10/2048m 9s

Novelist Sigrid Nunez

Nunez's new novel, 'What Are You Going Through,' is about facing mortality and the relationship between a writer dying of cancer and the friend she asks to stay with her. Lloyd Schwartz reviews a collection of performances by Leontyne Price, the first Black soprano to have a major career at the Metropolitan Opera. And John Powers reviews the Netflix miniseries 'The Queen's Gambit.'
21/10/2047m 51s

Free Speech In The Age Of Disinformation

'New York Times Magazine' writer Emily Bazelon talks about how the lies and conspiracy theories sweeping through American media are leading some scholars to question our faith in free speech and in minimal government regulation of speech. Bazelon says false content moves through the Internet unchecked — undermining the political process along the way.Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'El Duelo.'
20/10/2048m 24s

John Brown, Abraham Lincoln & The Fight To End Slavery

Historian H.W. Brands' new book, 'The Zealot and the Emancipator' looks at two very different 19th century leaders, John Brown and Abraham Lincoln. Brown was a militant abolitionist who embraced violence and was hanged after he tried to spark an insurrection at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. President Lincoln resisted conflict as long as possible, hoping laws and reason would keep Southern states in the Union, and eventually bring an end to human bondage. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Martin Eden,' an adaptation of the Jack London novel.
19/10/2048m 32s

Best Of: Broadway Stars Danny Burstein & Rebecca Luker / 'Nice White Parents' Creator

Married Broadway stars Danny Burstein and Rebecca Luker both contracted COVID in the spring, just as theaters went dark. Burstein was starring in 'Moulin Rouge' at the time. Burstein's case was severe and he nearly died. Luker's case was mild, but it came soon after she had been diagnosed with ALS. They talk with Terry Gross about how their illnesses have changed their lives and careers, and their hopes for the future.Also, John Powers reviews 'David Byrne's American Utopia' on HBO, directed by Spike Lee.'This American Life' producer Chana Joffe-Walt says progressive white parents may say they want their kids to go to diverse schools — but the reality tells a different story. "I think white parents are pretty savvy at evading the explicit conversation around race, although it's clearly shaping our thoughts about schools." She examines the complicated history of gentrification in a Brooklyn school in her new podcast, 'Nice White Parents.' It's a production of 'Serial' and 'The New York Times.'
17/10/2050m 41s

How Women Have Been Left Out Of The Constitution / Remembering MLB's Joe Morgan

As a teen, Heidi Schreck debated the Constitution in competitions. Later she realized it had failed to protect four generations of women in her family. "I believed it was perfect. I believed it was a tool of justice. I did not realize as a 15-year-old girl how profoundly I had been left out of it. I didn't realize that it didn't protect me," Schreck says. Her award-winning Broadway play, 'What the Constitution Means to Me,' is now streaming on Amazon. Also, we remember Joe Morgan, one of the few second-basemen to make it into baseball's Hall of Fame. He died Oct. 11 at the age of 77. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1993.
16/10/2049m 18s

'My Octopus Teacher' Filmmaker

Craig Foster spent a year diving — without oxygen or a wetsuit — into the frigid sea near Cape Town, South Africa. One octopus began coming out of her den to hunt or explore while Foster watched. He documents their unlikely friendship in 'My Octopus Teacher,' now on Netflix. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the Netflix film, 'The Trial of the Chicago 7,' written by Aaron Sorkin.
15/10/2048m 9s

2 Broadway Stars Grapple With Illness And Uncertainty

Married Broadway stars Danny Burstein and Rebecca Luker both contracted COVID in the spring, just as theaters went dark. Burstein was starring in 'Moulin Rouge' at the time. Burstein's case was severe and he nearly died. Luker's case was mild, but it came soon after she had been diagnosed with ALS. They talk with Terry Gross about how their illnesses have changed their lives and careers, and their hopes for the future.
14/10/2049m 1s

Lessons For A Post-Pandemic World

CNN host and 'Washington Post' columnist Fareed Zakaria says COVID-19 presents a chance to make positive changes: "We could well look back on these times 10 or 20 years from now and say, 'This was the turning point.'" His new book, 'Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World' examines the way COVID-19 will change everything from our trust in government to our relationship with technology. Also, John Powers reviews 'David Byrne's American Utopia' on HBO, directed by Spike Lee.
13/10/2049m 1s

How 'Nice White Parents' Can Undermine School Integration

'This American Life' producer Chana Joffe-Walt says progressive white parents may say they want their kids to go to diverse schools — but the reality tells a different story. "I think white parents are pretty savvy at evading the explicit conversation around race, although it's clearly shaping our thoughts about schools." She examines the complicated history of gentrification in a Brooklyn school in her new podcast, 'Nice White Parents.' It's a production of 'Serial' and 'The New York Times.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews the album 'Private Lives' from Philly band Low Cut Connie.
12/10/2048m 16s

Best Of: Ethan Hawke / Lenny Kravitz

Ethan Hawke plays 19th-century abolitionist John Brown in the seven-part Showtime series, 'The Good Lord Bird.' He says Brown's story feels particularly relevant today, as America confronts systemic racism and the legacy of slavery. Also, Justin Chang reviews the film 'The Forty-Year-Old Version.' Lenny Kravitz talks about growing up the son of a Jewish father and Black mother. His new memoir about his life up until his breakout album is 'Let Love Rule.'
10/10/2050m 47s

Remembering MLB Pitcher Bob Gibson

We remember Bob Gibson, one of baseball's most intimidating pitchers. He dominated hitters from the mound for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1960s and '70s and he holds the record for most strikeouts — 17 — in a World Series game. Gibson died last week at the age of 84. First we'll listen back to Terry's 1994 interview with Gibson when he had just published his memoir. Then, in our 2009 interview with Gibson and Hall of Fame slugger Reggie Jackson, we hear him talk about the classic confrontation between the player at the plate and one on the mound. Justin Chang reviews two new documentaries, 'Totally Under Control' and 'Time.' The former is about the Trump administration's handling of the pandemic; the latter chronicles the impact of long-term incarceration on one family.
09/10/2048m 42s

The State Of The Affordable Care Act

As President Trump recovers from COVID-19 and candidates debate the issue of insurance for people with pre-existing conditions, we take stock of the nation's health care system. We talk with the 'New York Times' health policy reporter Sarah Kliff about the state of the Affordable Care Act, after 10 years of legal assaults and attempts in Congress to repeal the law. "Republicans have been trying to drive a stake into the heart of Obamacare pretty much since it was passed," Kliff says.Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'General Semantics,' by the trio Geof Bradfield, Ben Goldberg and Dana Hall.
08/10/2047m 28s

Novelist Rumaan Alam

Alam's novel, 'Leave the World Behind,' centers on two families — one Black and one white — who are sharing a vacation home during a mysterious disaster. It explores issues of race and class, fear, and how we respond to crisis. We'll also talk about Alam's upbringing as the son of Bengali immigrants and why he has hope about his children's generation.
07/10/2048m 6s

Lenny Kravitz

Kravitz talks about growing up the son of a Jewish father and Black mother, finding his musical style, and how Lisa Bonet changed him as a songwriter. His new memoir about his life up until his breakout album is 'Let Love Rule.'Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Searcher,' a suspenseful crime novel by Tana French.
06/10/2049m 45s

Ethan Hawke

Hawke plays 19th-century abolitionist John Brown in the seven-part Showtime series, 'The Good Lord Bird.' He says Brown's story feels particularly relevant today, as America confronts systemic racism and the legacy of slavery. We also talk about 'Training Day,' collaborating with filmmaker Richard Linklater, and how stage fright made him a better actor.
05/10/2049m 54s

Best Of: What If Trump Contests The Election? / Filmmaker Kirsten Johnson

'Atlantic' staff writer Barton Gellman says if President Trump claims mail-in votes are fraudulent and contests the results, Republican legislatures might then try to ignore their states' popular votes and send Trump representatives to the Electoral College. His latest article is 'The Election That Could Break America.'Kevin Whitehead reviews the first album from an all-star band of jazz women, called Artemis.After filmmaker Kirsten Johnson's father started showing signs of dementia, she had a hard time accepting that his death was getting closer. Her new Netflix film, 'Dick Johnson is Dead,' enacts his death from a series of imagined accidents.
03/10/2050m 43s

A Cave Diver On The Thrill & Terror Of Going 'Into The Planet'

Diver and photographer Jill Heinerth shares some of her most dangerous and exhilarating experiences underwater — like getting trapped inside an iceberg in Antarctica. Heinerth also explains how she stays calm when things go wrong: "I take a really deep breath and try and slow my heart, slow my breathing, and then just focus on pragmatic small steps," she says. Her book is 'Into the Planet.'David Bianculli reviews the Showtime documentary series 'The Comedy Store,' about the iconic comedy club.
02/10/2049m 7s

What Happens If Trump Contests the Election?

'Atlantic' writer Barton Gellman says the 2020 election could trigger a constitutional crisis, and if the election is close, it could take weeks to determine the results in key battleground states as mail-in ballots are scrutinized for technical flaws and counted. If President Trump cries fraud and his supporters take to the streets, state legislatures could resolve to set aside the popular vote in their states and choose their own partisan delegations to the Electoral College. "This is not going to be a normal election. ... Preserving its legitimacy is going to take extra effort," he says.
01/10/2048m 6s

Filmmaker Faces Her Dad's Mortality In 'Dick Johnson Is Dead'

After Kirsten Johnson's dad started showing signs of dementia, she had a hard time accepting that his death was getting closer. Her new Netflix documentary, 'Dick Johnson is Dead,' enacts his death from a series of imagined accidents. Johnson has been the cinematographer for over 50 documentaries, including 'Citizenfour.' We'll also talk about her 2016 film 'Cameraperson,' which she's described as a memoir. She spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger.Also, Justin Chang reviews 'The Forty Year-Old Version,' a film by Radha Blank.
30/09/2048m 34s

Inside The Mueller Investigation

Andrew Weissmann, a lead prosecutor in the Mueller investigation, shares his experience with the probe and its report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. Weissmann says the constant threat that President Trump might fire Mueller and shut down the probe and the prospect of Trump granting pardons to key witnesses had an effect on Mueller and his team. Weissman believes Mueller was timid when he should have been aggressive in getting information and testimony, and he says the final report should have been far clearer in its conclusions about the president's conduct. His book, 'Where Law Ends,' takes us inside the 22-month investigation. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Leave the World Behind,' by Rumaan Alam, which she calls a signature read for 2020.
29/09/2047m 9s

The 'Secret History' Of Nuclear War

In his new book, 'The Bomb,' journalist Fred Kaplan pulls back the curtain on how U.S. presidents, their advisers and generals have thought about, planned for — and sometimes narrowly avoided — nuclear war.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews the first album from an all-star band of jazz women, called Artemis.
28/09/2049m 42s

Best Of: Met Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin / Inside Trump's Businesses

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor of the Metropolitan Opera and Philadelphia Orchestra, talks about Verdi's "Requiem." He'll talk about how Verdi communicates suffering and hope through music, and how music has helped him find a sense of connection during the pandemic. Ken Tucker reviews a new EP from singer-songwriter Mickey Guyton, one of the few Black women recording country music hits.Also, we'll talk about Donald Trump's finances with 'Forbes' senior editor Dan Alexander. His new book is 'White House Inc: How Donald Trump Turned the Presidency into a Business.'
26/09/2050m 37s

Feminist Activist Gloria Steinem

The new drama 'The Glorias' is based on the feminist activist's memoir 'My Life on the Road,' and follows Steinem from ages 20 to 40. Steinem spoke with Terry Gross in 2015 about her unique childhood, the illegal abortion she had when she was 22, and how aging has been liberating. We'll also hear an excerpt of her 1987 interview, about the 15th anniversary of 'Ms.' magazine, the feminist publication which she co-founded. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the fourth season of 'Fargo,' starring Chris Rock.
25/09/2048m 27s

Met Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin On Hope & Suffering

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the young, charismatic conductor of the Metropolitan Opera and Philadelphia Orchestra, talks about Verdi's "Requiem." He chose the piece for his inaugural performance as music director of the orchestra in Philadelphia. We'll talk about how Verdi communicates suffering and hope through music, the piece's meaning in Yannick's own life, and how music has helped him find a sense of connection during the pandemic.And John Powers reviews the new Apple TV+ series 'Tehran,' about a female Israeli spy sent undercover to Iran.
24/09/2048m 30s

Political Meddling In The Fight Against COVID-19

'Politico' reporter Dan Diamond describes efforts by Trump loyalist and HHS spokesperson (currently on leave) Michael Caputo to alter weekly CDC reports and have scientists change their findings on the course of the coronavirus pandemic. "Caputo walked in the door of the health department in the middle of this once-in-a-century pandemic, having been personally recruited by the president, and the goal was very much to execute the president's agenda and to knock down any messaging, any communications that were seen as conflicting with what President Trump was saying about coronavirus."
23/09/2048m 31s

How Donald Trump Turned The Presidency Into A Business

'Forbes' senior editor Dan Alexander examines President Trump's sprawling business interests in his new book, 'White House, Inc.' Alexander says the president has broken a number of pledges he made about how he would conduct business while in office. We talk about Trump's holdings and potential conflicts of interest, and what Alexander found when he looked closely at the numbers.Also, Ken Tucker reviews Mickey Guyton's EP 'Bridges' and her single "Black Like Me."
22/09/2048m 41s

Remembering RBG / Neurologist Oliver Sacks

Legal analyst and 'New Yorker' staff writer Jeffrey Toobin spoke with Terry Gross in 2013 about his profile of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, written as she marked her 20th anniversary on the Supreme Court. We'll talk about how her work led to breakthroughs in the equal treatment of women. And Toobin will tell a touching personal story she shared with him. Ginsburg died Sept. 18 at the age of 87.A new documentary, 'Oliver Sacks: His Own Life,' chronicles the late neurologist's efforts to understand perception, memory and consciousness. Sacks spoke with Terry Gross in 2012 about how a hallucination saved his life.
21/09/2048m 46s

Best Of: The Origin Of Data Science & Elections / Novelist Ayad Akhtar

Harvard historian and 'New Yorker' writer Jill Lepore tells the story of the Simulmatics Corporation. Founded in 1959, it used a so-called "people machine," a computer program it claimed could predict the impact of political messages or advertising pitches. Her book is 'If Then.'TV critic David Bianculli reviews Ryan Murphy's new Netflix series 'Ratched,' an origin story of the notorious nurse from 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.'Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and novelist Ayad Akhtar talks about his new novel, 'Homeland Elegies,' which explores the experiences of a Muslim man who, like Akhtar, grows up in Wisconsin, the son of Pakistani immigrants.
19/09/2050m 7s

'Watchmen' Writer Cord Jefferson

The HBO series 'Watchmen' uses sci-fi and action heroes to examine American racism. We talk with show writer Cord Jefferson, who wrote the episode of the series in which the main character narrowly survives the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, when white supremacists destroyed a prosperous Black community. The series has scored 26 Emmy nominations — more than any other series.Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the grim thriller 'The Devil All the Time,' now streaming on Netflix.
18/09/2047m 33s

Country Musician & Historian Marty Stuart

The Grammy winning singer-songwriter started out in Lester Flatt's backup band. Now he's being inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Stuart played some of his own music in this 2014 interview, and talked about his archive of cowboy couture.
17/09/2049m 25s

COVID On College Campuses

College campuses have become the pandemic's newest hotspots, with more than 88,000 COVID cases at the nation's colleges and universities. We talk with reporter Scott Carlson about the tough decisions colleges are facing as they decide how to continue classes, test students, and quarantine the sick. We'll also talk about the financial strain these institutions were already facing before the pandemic. TV critic David Bianculli reviews Ryan Murphy's new Netflix series 'Ratched,' an origin story of the notorious nurse from 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.' And jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new release by French-Canadian clarinetist and composer François Houle.
16/09/2048m 36s

The Strange Origin Story Of Data Science & Elections

Harvard historian and 'New Yorker' writer Jill Lepore tells the story of the Simulmatics Corporation. Founded in 1959, it used a so-called "people machine," a computer program it claimed could predict the impact of political messages or advertising pitches. At the time, Simulmatics drew condemnation from scholars and political leaders who saw it as a threat to democracy. But now, 60 years later, the company's data collection practices and predictive models have become commonplace among political campaigns. Her book is 'If Then.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Sue Miller's book 'Monogamy.'
15/09/2048m 39s

Writer Ayad Akhtar On Blending Fact & Fiction

Actor, playwright and novelist Ayad Akhtar won a Pulitzer Prize for 'Disgraced,' his play about an American-born Muslim who hosts a dinner party that sparks a heated discussion of religion and politics. Akhtar's new novel, 'Homeland Elegies,' explores the experiences of a Muslim man who, like Akhtar, grows up in Wisconsin, the son of Pakistani immigrants.Also, Ken Tucker reviews the album 'What Could Be Better' by the band The Happy Fits.
14/09/2048m 37s

Best Of: Yaa Gyasi / How Torture Derailed The War On Terror

Ghanaian-American author Yaa Gyasi drew on her own ​experiences growing up in a largely white community in Alabama for her new book, 'Transcendent Kingdom.' In the novel, she explores themes of depression, addiction, religion and race. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews pastry chef Lisa Donovan's memoir, 'Our Lady of Perpetual Hunger.'Former FBI agent Ali Soufan interrogated dozens of Al-Qaida members and other extremists in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks. He says he got valuable information by preparing carefully for interviews and building rapport with his subjects. When CIA contractors used coercive techniques — like waterboarding — Soufan says subjects ceased cooperating, or gave bad information to make the torment stop. Soufan's 2011 memoir about his experiences appeared with large portions redacted by the CIA. After a legal battle, the redacted material is now restored in a new version, called 'Black Banners (Declassified).'
12/09/2050m 10s

'Devil All The Time' Novelist / 'PEN15' Creators Return To Middle School

Donald Ray Pollock worked in a paper mill and meatpacking plant for 32 years before becoming a writer. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2011 about his acclaimed gothic crime novel, 'The Devil All the Time.' The film adaptation, starring Robert Pattinson and Tom Holland, will begin streaming on Netflix on Sept. 16.Also, we listen back to an interview with Anna Konkle and Maya Erskine, creators and stars of the Hulu comedy series 'PEN15.' They play 13-year-old versions of themselves, navigating the traumas of middle school in the early 2000s. Season 2 begins next week. They spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger.Justin Chang reviews Charlie Kaufman's new Netflix film, 'I'm Thinking of Ending Things.'
11/09/2048m 57s

What Happened To The 1 Million Displaced Persons After WWII?

Historian David Nasaw tells the story of the concentration camp survivors, POWs and other displaced people who remained in Germany following the war. Many had no home to return to. Nasaw's book is 'The Last Million.'
10/09/2047m 56s

Novelist Yaa Gyasi

Ghanaian-American author Yaa Gyasi drew on her own ​experiences growing up in a largely white community in Alabama for her new book, 'Transcendent Kingdom.' In the novel, she explores themes of depression, addiction, religion and race. Her award-winning debut novel, 'Homegoing,' opens in Ghana in the 1700s and ​chronicles the legacy of slavery from the perspective of several generations of the same family. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Our Lady of Perpetual Hunger,' a memoir by pastry chef Lisa Donovan.
09/09/2048m 7s

How Torture Derailed The War On Terror After 9/11

Former FBI agent Ali Soufan interrogated dozens of Al-Qaida members and other extremists in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks. He says he got valuable information by preparing carefully for interviews and building rapport with his subjects. When CIA contractors used coercive techniques — like waterboarding — Soufan says subjects ceased cooperating, or gave bad information to make the torment stop. Soufan's 2011 memoir about his experiences appeared with large portions redacted by the CIA. After a legal battle, the redacted material is now restored in a new version, called 'Black Banners (Declassified).' Also, critic David Bianculli reviews a new Peacock documentary, 'The Sit-In,' about the week that Harry Belafonte guest-hosted 'The Tonight Show' in 1968.
08/09/2048m 27s

Celebrating Sonny Rollins / Octavia Spencer

Today is the 90th birthday of the great tenor saxophonist and improviser Sonny Rollins. We celebrate by hearing some of his music spanning five decades, with commentary from our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead. And we'll listen back to Terry Gross' 1994 interview with Rollins.Also, we revisit Terry's interview with Octavia Spencer. She's nominated for a best actress Emmy for her performance in the Netflix limited series 'Self Made,' inspired by the story of Madam C.J. Walker, who was born in 1867 to parents who had been slaves. Through marketing hair products for black women, she became the first American female self-made millionaire.
07/09/2049m 7s

Best Of: Cherry Jones / The Early Years Of The CIA

Cherry Jones is nominated for an Emmy for her role in the HBO series 'Succession' as Nan Pierce, the head of a family-owned media empire. She's also known for her roles on 'Transparent,' '24,' and her career in the theater. We'll talk about these roles and growing up gay in Tennessee. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the TCM series, 'Women Make Film.'In his new book, 'The Quiet Americans,' author Scott Anderson profiles four daring and resourceful soldiers who became intelligence agents after World War II, when America was strong and respected after defeating Nazi Germany.
05/09/2050m 1s

RuPaul / Padma Lakshmi

Both RuPaul and Padma Lakshmi are nominated for Emmys in the best reality/competition category. RuPaul describes his drag persona as "one-part Cher, two-parts David Bowie, one-part Diana Ross and two heaping spoonfuls of Dolly Parton." The reality show he hosts and created, 'RuPaul's Drag Race,' has had 12 seasons. Padma Lakshmi is nominated for her role as host and executive producer on 'Top Chef.' She spoke with Terry Gross about splitting her childhood between the U.S. and India and her early modeling career. In her new Hulu series, 'Taste the Nation,' Lakshmi explores the different cultures that contribute to American cuisine.Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new live action 'Mulan.'
04/09/2048m 26s

Kerry Washington / Comic Ramy Youssef

We're revisiting some of our favorite recent entertainment interviews, as we approach the 2020 Emmy Awards. Both guests today are nominated for their lead roles. In the Hulu series 'Little Fires Everywhere,' Kerry Washington co-stars opposite Reese Witherspoon as Mia Warren, a bohemian artist single mom with a mysterious past. Washington spoke with Terry Gross about how she drew on her own mother for the role. In the semi-autobiographical Hulu series 'Ramy,' Ramy Youssef plays a first generation Muslim American who follows some — but not all — of the rules of his religion. Youssef, whose parents immigrated from Egypt, also co-created the series. He says he can relate to his character's "picking and choosing" approach to his faith. "Sometimes we would call it 'Allah carte,'" he says.
03/09/2048m 35s

The Struggle To Protect Trump From Himself

Pulitzer Prize-winning 'New York Times' reporter Michael Schmidt says it's unusual for White House officials to be so focused on preventing a president from hurting the country or breaking the law. His new book, 'Donald Trump v. The United States,' focuses on two staffers who stood up to Trump: Former FBI Director James Comey and former White House Counsel Don McGahn.
02/09/2048m 1s

Tragic Miscalculations In The Early Years Of The CIA

In his new book, 'The Quiet Americans,' author Scott Anderson profiles four daring and resourceful soldiers who became intelligence agents after World War II, when America was strong and respected after defeating Nazi Germany. The CIA then embarked on hundreds of ill-considered covert operations in Eastern Europe, and its obsession with fighting Communism propelled it into the subversion of several democratically-elected governments around the world. Anderson says the result was the loss of America's moral standing in the developing world, where many had seen the U.S. as a beacon of freedom and democracy.
01/09/2048m 16s

Actor Cherry Jones

Jones is nominated for an Emmy for her role in the HBO series 'Succession' as Nan Pierce, the head of a family-owned media empire. She's also known for her roles on 'Transparent,' '24,' and her career in the theater. We'll talk about these roles, growing up gay in Tennessee, and how she struggled with the violence in 'The Handmaid's Tale.'Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the TCM series, 'Women Make Film.'
31/08/2049m 12s

Best Of: 'Watchmen' Writer / Stephen Miller & The White Nationalist Agenda

The HBO series 'Watchmen' uses sci-fi and action heroes to examine American racism. We talk with show writer Cord Jefferson, who wrote the episode of the series in which the main character narrowly survives the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, when white supremacists destroyed a prosperous Black community. Kevin Whitehead shares an appreciation of jazz great Charlie Parker for the 100th anniversary of his birth. "It's impossible to understand the Trump era, with its unparalleled polarization, without tracing Stephen Miller's journey to the White House," journalist Jean Guerrero writes in her new book 'Hatemonger.' She describes the ideological arc of Miller's life and investigates his ties to right-wing mentors and far-right groups.
29/08/2050m 48s

Celebrating Jazz Legend Charlie Parker

Jazz saxophonist Charlie Parker created a totally new sound known as bebop, along with other virtuosos like Bud Powell, Dizzy Gillespie and Max Roach. To celebrate Parker's 100th birthday, we go to our archives for interviews with musicians who knew him and loved him: Drummer Max Roach, trumpeter Red Rodney, and alto saxophonist Jackie McLean. And our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead kicks things off with a crash course in what made Parker's playing so brilliant.
28/08/2049m 14s

Why We Need Widespread Rapid COVID Testing

'Atlantic' journalist Alexis Madrigal says millions of at-home saliva tests for COVID could be the key to life returning to normal — even if the tests are less accurate than the traditional PCR tests. We talk about the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of testing, and what it would take for the government to fund and manufacture millions of daily tests. "I think what's happened in the U.S. has been so catastrophic on so many levels — economically, psychologically, educationally — that we have to be at least willing to entertain the idea of a fairly radical plan that could work," Madrigal says.
27/08/2047m 5s

How Reagan Changed Conservatism

Historian Rick Perlstein has spent 20 years studying the roots of American conservatism. His latest book, 'Reaganland,' is about the events that propelled Ronald Reagan to the White House and made him a revered figure among Republicans. He says that "viciousness and a naked will to power" has always been part of the conservative Republican coalition.
26/08/2048m 30s

CNN's Brian Stelter On The 'Foxification' Of America

CNN media correspondent Brian Stelter says the president's "cozy" relationship with Fox News is like nothing he's seen before: "In some ways [Trump] wants to be a television producer more than a president." Stelter's new book is called 'Hoax.'
25/08/2048m 33s

How Stephen Miller Became The Architect Of Trump's Immigration Policies

"It's impossible to understand the Trump era, with its unparalleled polarization, without tracing Stephen Miller's journey to the White House," journalist Jean Guerrero writes in her new book 'Hatemonger.' She describes the ideological arc of Miller's life, investigates his ties to right-wing mentors and far-right groups, and explains his role as Trump's advisor.
24/08/2047m 31s

Best Of: Writer Carl Hiaasen / 'Immigration Nation' Filmmakers

'Miami Herald' columnist and author Carl Hiaasen talks about his new novel, 'Squeeze Me,' a hilarious mystery set in Palm Beach, featuring wealthy widows, the president and first lady, a scrappy wildlife removal specialist, and some gigantic Burmese pythons.Film critic Justin Chang reviews the unusual film 'Tesla,' starring Ethan Hawke. Documentary filmmakers Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusiau talk about their visceral portrait of the U.S. immigration system — including ICE agents, immigrants, activists and smugglers. Their six-part Netflix documentary series is 'Immigration Nation.'
22/08/2050m 32s

Remembering 'Freedom Summer'

In the summer of 1964, hundreds of student volunteers — most were white and from the North — spent weeks registering African Americans to vote in Mississippi. We hear from Stanley Nelson, director of the 2014 documentary 'Freedom Summer,' and also Charles Cobb, an organizer who was interviewed for the film.Justin Chang reviews 'Tesla,' starring Ethan Hawke.
21/08/2048m 29s

Why QAnon Is Important

QAnon, the conspiracy theory that claims President Trump is battling a deep state child sex trafficking ring run by high-profile democrats and celebrities, is the subject of a new 'Atlantic' article by Adrienne LaFrance. "It's almost like a bad spy novel," LaFrance says. QAnon adherents often appear at Trump rallies, and one supporter has won the Republican nomination to a Georgia Congressional seat.
20/08/2047m 56s

The 'Hiroshima Cover-Up' & The Journalist Who Exposed The Truth

Historian Lesley M.M. Blume's new book, 'Fallout,' tells the story of John Hersey, the young journalist whose on-the-ground reporting in Hiroshima exposed the world to the devastation of nuclear weapons. "Hersey had seen everything from that point, from combat to concentration camps," Blume says. "But he later said that nothing prepared him for what he saw in Hiroshima."Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Black Bottom Saints,' by Alice Randall.
19/08/2047m 33s

Writer Carl Hiaasen's Satirical Take On Florida Life

'Miami Herald' columnist and author Carl Hiaasen's new novel, 'Squeeze Me,' is a hilarious mystery set in Palm Beach, featuring wealthy widows, the president and first lady, a scrappy wildlife removal specialist, and some gigantic Burmese pythons. We'll also talk about politics, and battles over voting in Florida that are setting the stage for a dramatic election in November. Also John Powers reviews the documentary 'Coup 53,' about the US-supported coup which overthrew an elected government in Iran.
18/08/2048m 21s

A Portrait Of ICE & Immigration In The U.S.

Documentary filmmakers Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusiau paint a nuanced portrait of the U.S. immigration system — including ICE agents, immigrants, activists and smugglers — in their 6-part Netflix documentary series, 'Immigration Nation.' And jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews James Carney's album, 'Pure Heart.'
17/08/2047m 52s

Best Of: 'The Old Guard' Dir. / How MLK & Malcolm X Influenced Each Other

"Female characters are not [usually] the center of the story," filmmaker Gina Prince-Bythewood says. Her new movie, 'The Old Guard,' follows a diverse group of world-weary warriors who've been alive for centuries. Prince-Bythewood makes history as the first Black woman to direct a film adaptation of a comic book. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the documentary 'Boys State,' about a week-long mock political campaign for teen boys.Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X are frequently seen as opposing forces in the struggle for civil rights, but Black Power scholar Dr. Peniel Joseph says the truth is more nuanced. His new book, 'The Sword and the Shield,' braids together the lives of the two civil rights revolutionaries.
15/08/2050m 36s

Sister Helen Prejean On Fighting The Death Penalty

Prejean is best known for her 1993 memoir, 'Dead Man Walking,' about her role as a spiritual adviser to a convicted killer on death row. The story was adapted into an Oscar-winning film starring Susan Sarandon and Sean Penn. Prejean has accompanied six prisoners to their executions and has been at the forefront of activism against the death penalty. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2019. David Bianculli reviews HBO's series 'Lovecraft Country.'
14/08/2048m 25s

'Watchmen' Writer Cord Jefferson

The HBO series 'Watchmen' uses sci-fi and action heroes to examine American racism. Cord Jefferson wrote the episode of the series in which the main character narrowly survives the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, when white supremacists destroyed a prosperous Black community. In addition to writing for 'Succession,' 'The Good Place' and 'The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore,' Jefferson has also written personal essays about his mother's cancer diagnosis, donating a kidney to his father, and being biracial. We remember our longtime language commentator Geoff Nunberg. He died this week at age 75 after a long illness.
13/08/2048m 7s

How MLK & Malcolm X Influenced Each Other

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X are frequently seen as opposing forces in the struggle for civil rights, but Black Power scholar Dr. Peniel Joseph says the truth is more nuanced. His new book, 'The Sword and the Shield,' braids together the lives of the two civil rights revolutionaries. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the documentary 'Boys State,' about a week-long mock political campaign for teen boys.
12/08/2047m 53s

GOP Strategist Takes On Trump & His Party: 'It Was All A Lie'

Veteran Republican strategist Stuart Stevens says the party's support for Trump reflects the abandonment of principles it long claimed to embrace, such as fiscal restraint, personal responsibility and family values. Stevens has helped get scores of Republicans elected, including George W. Bush and Bob Dole. His new book about how Trumpism has hijacked the party is, 'It Was All A Lie.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Star Trek: Lower Decks,' a CBS All Access cartoon.
11/08/2048m 0s

'The Old Guard' Dir. Gina Prince-Bythewood

"Female characters are not [usually] the center of the story," filmmaker Gina Prince-Bythewood says. Her new movie, 'The Old Guard,' follows a diverse group of world-weary warriors who've been alive for centuries. Prince-Bythewood also talks about choreographing fight scenes, and her other films 'Love & Basketball' and 'Beyond the Lights.'
10/08/2048m 20s

Best Of: America's Caste System / The Decline Of Local News

In 'Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents', Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson examines the laws and practices that created a bipolar caste system in the U.S. — and how the Nazis borrowed from it.Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two new novels: 'The Aunt Who Wouldn't Die,' and 'Blacktop Wasteland.'Since 2004, more than 2,000 American newspapers have gone out of business. 'Washington Post' media columnist Margaret Sullivan talks about the decline of local news coverage, a crisis she says is as serious as the spread of disinformation on the internet. Her new book is 'Ghosting the News: Local Journalism and the Crisis of American Democracy.'
08/08/2050m 10s

How Satchel Paige Helped Integrate Baseball

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Negro Leagues and today we remember one of baseball's greatest pitchers, Satchel Paige. We hear from Larry Tye, author of 'Satchel: The Life and Times of An American Legend.' Paige began his career pitching in the Negro leagues and later became a Major League star. In the 1930s, he made his way across the country amazing audiences with his blazing fastball and pinpoint accuracy.Also, Maureen Corrigan shares a remembrance of journalist Pete Hamill.
07/08/2048m 48s

Remembering Legendary Journalist Pete Hamill

Pete Hamill, who died Aug. 5, was a columnist and editor at the 'New York Post' and the 'New York Daily News,' covering wars, crime and the people of NYC's boroughs. He helped convince his friend Robert Kennedy to run for president, and on the night RFK was shot, helped tackle the assassin. Hamill spoke with 'Fresh Air' about RFK's assassination, giving up drinking in a boozy industry, and his work in the tabloids.
06/08/2048m 22s

Jeffrey Toobin On The 'Tragedy' Of The Mueller Report

In Jeffrey ​Toobin's new book, ​'True Crimes and Misdemeanors,​'​​ the CNN legal analyst ​examines how​ President​ Trump and his team out-maneuvered special counsel Robert Mueller. Mueller, he says, gave Trump "a free pass" on obstruction of justice.​ ​We'll also talk about the impeachment trial and the Supreme Court.
05/08/2049m 13s

Isabel Wilkerson On America's Caste System

In 'Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents', the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist examines the laws and practices that created a bipolar caste system in the U.S. — and how the Nazis borrowed from it.Also, John Powers reviews Raven Leilani's debut novel, 'Luster.'
04/08/2048m 49s

The Decline Of Local News

Since 2004, more than 2,000 American newspapers have gone out of business. 'Washington Post' media columnist Margaret Sullivan talks about the decline of local news coverage, a crisis she says is as serious as the spread of disinformation on the internet. Her new book is 'Ghosting the News: Local Journalism and the Crisis of American Democracy.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews the thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow.'
03/08/2048m 38s

Best Of: Poet Natasha Trethewey / Mike Birbiglia & Jen Stein

When Natasha Trethewey was 19, her abusive stepfather killed her mother. In the 35 years since, she says, "I wanted to forge a new life for myself that didn't include that past, but, of course, that was impossible." Her new memoir is 'Memorial Drive.' Trethewey was the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2012 and 2013.Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly unearthed recording by drummer Art Blakey and his band.When comic Mike Birbiglia and poet Jen Stein got married, they agreed they didn't want kids. But then Jen changed her mind. After their daughter Oona was born, Mike had difficulty bonding with her, and it put a strain on the marriage. In their book, 'The New One,' Mike writes "painfully true" stories about the first year of parenthood and Jen gives her perspective through poetry.
01/08/2050m 35s

Remembering Regis Philbin / Jazz Singer Annie Ross

We remember TV personality Regis Philbin, who died on July 24 at 88. He spoke with contributor David Bianculli in 2011 when his memoir, 'How I Got This Way,' came out. Also, we remember jazz singer Annie Ross, who died at 89. She sang in the trio Lambert, Hendricks & Ross and was best-known for the song "Twisted." Ross spoke with Terry Gross in 1990. David Bianculli reviews 'Muppets Now' on Disney+, and Ken Tucker reviews Taylor Swift's new album, 'Folklore.'
31/07/2048m 44s

The Legacy of White Supremacy In American Christianity

Robert P. Jones, author of the new book 'White Too Long,' talks about the history of white supremacy in American Christianity. His main focus is on the Southern Baptist Convention, the denomination in which he grew up. "There's so much work still to be done," he says. "White Christians have been largely silent ... and have hardly begun these conversations."Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two new novels: 'The Aunt Who Wouldn't Die,' and 'Blacktop Wasteland.'
30/07/2047m 59s

MLB Analyst Tim Kurkjian On Baseball During COVID

Major League Baseball is back — but for how long? About half of the Miami Marlins' roster has tested positive for COVID-19. ESPN baseball analyst Tim Kurkjian explains the challenges Major League Baseball faces as play resumes amid the pandemic.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Just Coolin'', a newly unearthed recording by drummer Art Blakey and his band.
29/07/2047m 51s

Poet Natasha Trethewey

When Trethewey was 19, her abusive stepfather killed her mother. In the 35 years since, she says, "I wanted to forge a new life for myself that didn't include that past, but, of course, that was impossible." In her new memoir, 'Memorial Drive,' Trethewey revives her mother's memory and shares stories about growing up biracial in the South. She was the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2012 and 2013.
28/07/2047m 56s

Comic Mike Birbiglia & Poet Jen Stein On 'Reluctant' Parenthood

When Mike Birbiglia and Jen Stein got married, they agreed they didn't want kids. But then Jen changed her mind. After their daughter Oona was born, Mike had difficulty bonding with her, and it put a strain on the marriage. In their book, 'The New One,' Mike writes "painfully true" stories about the first year of parenthood and Jen gives her perspective through poetry.
27/07/2047m 52s

Best Of: Michaela Coel / Justice & Faith For The Wrongly Convicted

In the HBO series 'I May Destroy You,' Michaela Coel plays Arabella, a writer in London who goes to a bar and is drugged and sexually assaulted. She then has to piece together what happened to her. The series, which Coel wrote, directed and stars in, explores issues of sexuality and consent. She talks about how she drew on personal experience.John Powers reviews Zadie Smith's new collection of essays, 'Intimations,' written during the pandemic and completed after George Floyd's murder.Jim McCloskey, a lay minister, has devoted the past 40 years of his life to seeking justice and exoneration for men and women on death row or serving life sentences for crimes they didn't commit. His memoir is 'When Truth is All You Have.'
25/07/2050m 33s

Remembering Foreign Correspondent Christopher Dickey

In a career spanning four decades, Dickey authored seven books and reported from more than 40 countries, often covering war, conflict and espionage. He died July 16 at 68. Dickey spoke with Terry Gross in 1998 and 2002.Also, Justin Chang reviews two new thriller movies about terrors within the home: 'Relic' and 'Amulet.'
24/07/2048m 9s

Mary Trump, The President's Niece

Mary Trump was devastated when her uncle was elected president. Her book, 'Too Much and Never Enough,' describes Donald Trump as a "belligerent" youth who hasn't changed since he was a teen. Mary's late father Freddy was the black sheep of the family.
23/07/2048m 30s

Michaela Coel On 'I May Destroy You'

In the HBO series 'I May Destroy You,' Michaela Coel plays Arabella, a writer in London who goes to a bar and is drugged and sexually assaulted. She then has to piece together what happened to her. The series, which Coel wrote, directed and stars in, explores issues of sexuality and consent. She talks about how she drew on personal experience. John Powers reviews Zadie Smith's new collection of essays, 'Intimations,' written during the pandemic and completed after George Floyd's murder.
22/07/2048m 0s

Faith, Justice, And Freedom For The Wrongly Convicted

Jim McCloskey, a lay minister, has devoted the past 40 years of his life to seeking justice and exoneration for men and women on death row or serving life sentences for crimes they didn't commit. "I saw firsthand how police and prosecutors manipulate evidence, coerce witnesses into giving false testimony," he says. His memoir is 'When Truth is All You Have.' Ken Tucker reviews the new album by HAIM, 'Women in Music Pt. III.'
21/07/2048m 27s

Remembering Rep. John Lewis

The towering civil rights leader John Lewis died July 17 at the age of 80. Lewis grew up the son of sharecroppers and later became an associate of Martin Luther King Jr. He co-led the 1965 civil rights march in Selma, Ala., which turned violent when state troopers beat and tear gassed the peaceful protestors. The protest became known as "Bloody Sunday." He spoke with Terry Gross in 2009. We'll also hear from the first Black lawyer in Selma, J.L. Chestnut, who shares his memories of Bloody Sunday. Maureen Corrigan reviews Emma Donoghue's new novel about the flu pandemic of 1918, 'The Pull of the Stars.'
20/07/2047m 7s

Best Of Colin Jost / Matthew Rhys

'Saturday Night Live' "Weekend Update" co-anchor Colin Jost talks about telling jokes about race with Michael Che and why he prefers writing to speaking. His new memoir is 'A Very Punchable Face.' Film critic Justin Chang says 'Palm Springs,' starring Andy Samberg and Cristin Milioti, is a perfect comedy for our current times. And Welsh actor Matthew Rhys talks about living out his boyhood fantasies in his new role as hardboiled detective Perry Mason.
18/07/2050m 21s

Charlize Theron / Danny Trejo

Charlize Theron spoke with Terry Gross last year about growing up in Apartheid-era South Africa and growing up with an abusive father. She now stars in the film 'The Old Guard' on Netflix. Also, we listen back to our 2018 interview actor Danny Trejo. He's known for playing menacing characters in 'Breaking Bad,' 'Sons of Anarchy' and 'Machete.' The documentary 'Inmate #1: The Rise of Danny Trejo' chronicles his unlikely journey from prison to stardom.
17/07/2048m 39s

Why The U.S. Prison System Makes Mental Illness Worse (And How We Might Fix It)

Dr. Christine Montross says in the U.S., people with serious mental illnesses are far more likely to be incarcerated than to be treated in a psychiatric hospital. Montross studied systemic change in the Norwegian prison system, and what the U.S. might learn from it. Her new book is 'Waiting for an Echo.'TV critic David Bianculli shares his thoughts on NBC's new streaming platform, Peacock.
16/07/2048m 8s

Jane Mayer: Trump Used Pandemic To Weaken Worker Protections

Journalist Jane Mayer reports the Trump administration has weakened federal health and safety regulations of the poultry industry as plants have become COVID-19 hotspots, and allowed managers to speed up production lines. She says the U.S. Labor Department is effectively supporting an effort at one Delaware plant — owned by a major Trump campaign donor — to expel the union that has represented workers there for decades. Her article in the current issue of the 'New Yorker' is called, "How Trump is Helping Tycoons Exploit the Pandemic."
15/07/2048m 4s

SNL's Colin Jost

The 'Saturday Night Live' "Weekend Update" co-anchor and writer Colin Jost acknowledges that his clean-cut image sometimes rubs people the wrong way. "When I get hurt or hit on camera," he says, "the audience really loves it." His new memoir is 'A Very Punchable Face.'Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Palm Springs,' a nod to 'Groundhog Day' starring Andy Samberg.
14/07/2049m 37s

Matthew Rhys

Rhys says his version of the iconic criminal defense attorney Perry Mason is more hardboiled than the one Raymond Burr played on TV: "He's a man who kind of lives on whiskey and cigarettes." We also talk about playing a spy in 'The Americans' and growing up in Wales (and masking his accent in auditions). Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire.
13/07/2048m 14s

Best Of: Padma Lakshmi / Patrick Stewart

In her new Hulu series, 'Taste the Nation,' Padma Lakshmi explores the different cultures that contribute to American cuisine. Lakshmi spoke with Terry Gross about splitting her childhood between the U.S. and India and her early modeling career.Ken Tucker reviews Bob Dylan's new album, 'Rough and Rowdy Ways.'Patrick Stewart is back as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the CBS All Access series 'Star Trek: Picard.' He says he's changed as an actor over the years: "I am not averse to risk-taking and I don't judge myself."
11/07/2050m 32s

'Moonlight' Actor André Holland

Growing up in Alabama, André Holland's parents were voting rights activists and his father was a preacher. Holland is best known for his roles in 'Moonlight' and 'Castle Rock.' Next week he'll star in a radio version of Shakespeare's 'Richard II,' a co-production of WNYC and The Public Theater. Holland spoke with Terry Gross in 2018. John Powers reviews the action movie 'The Old Guard' starring Charlize Theron.
10/07/2048m 43s

Chaos & Healing In The ER

In her memoir, 'The Beauty in Breaking,' Dr. Michele Harper writes about treating gunshot wounds, getting punched in the face, and discovering evidence of child abuse. She's also drawn insight and courage from her patients as she's struggled to overcome pain and trauma in her own life — growing up with an abusive father, and coping with the breakup of her marriage. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Mexican Gothic' by Silvia Moreno-Garcia.
09/07/2047m 21s

Why White Evangelicals Worship At The Altar Of Trump

Journalist Sarah Posner says while President Trump may not speak the language of faith and Christian values, he speaks the language of grievance — giving voice to legal, social and cultural concerns shared by the Christian right and the alt-right. Posner's book is 'Unholy.'Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews an album by drummer Chad Taylor and his trio. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the HBO documentary 'Welcome to Chechnya,' about atrocities committed against the LGBTQ community.
08/07/2048m 16s

'Demagogue' Draws Direct Line From McCarthy To Trump

Author Larry Tye chronicles Sen. Joseph McCarthy's infamous smear campaign in a new book, 'Demagogue.' He says both McCarthy and President Trump are "bullies" who exploit fears and "point fingers when they're attacked."Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Want' by Lynn Steger Strong.
07/07/2046m 35s

Padma Lakshmi

In her new Hulu series, 'Taste the Nation,' the 'Top Chef' host and executive producer explores the different cultures that contribute to American cuisine. Lakshmi spoke with Terry Gross about splitting her childhood between the U.S. and India, speaking out about sexual assault, and her early modeling career.
06/07/2048m 38s

Best Of: Lin-Manuel Miranda / Actor Christine Baranski

A film of the original Broadway production of 'Hamilton,' taped in 2016, is now streaming on Disney+. Creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, who stars in the title role, says the production is as timely as ever. "When you write a musical that brushes against the origins of this country, it's always going to be relevant," he says. "The fights we had at the [country's] origin are the fights we're still having." Christine Baranski started her career in theater and now stars as a progressive lawyer in 'The Good Fight.' "I was a passionate acting student and nothing was going to stop me," the Emmy Award-winning actor says.
04/07/2050m 25s

Remembering Carl Reiner

Performer, writer, director Carl Reiner died Monday at 98. Reiner began his career in showbiz as an actor and became second banana on Sid Caesar's 'Show of Shows' where he soon joined the writing team that included Mel Brooks, Woody Allen, and Larry Gelbart. He created 'The Dick Van Dyke Show,' one of television's most celebrated comedies. We'll listen back to our interview with Reiner, and we hear excerpts of interviews with Mary Tyler Moore who worked with Reiner on 'The Dick Van Dyke Show,' and from Mel Brooks, his longtime friend and collaborator.Also, David Bianculli reviews the film adaptation of 'Hamilton,' now streaming on Disney+.
03/07/2048m 13s

Sir Patrick Stewart On 'Star Trek: Picard'

Patrick Stewart is back as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the CBS All Access series 'Star Trek: Picard.' He says he's changed as an actor over the years: "I am not averse to risk-taking and I don't judge myself." Stewart spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger about 'Picard,' his love of Shakespeare, and his brief time as a reporter.
02/07/2049m 22s

The Militarization Of Police

Journalist Radley Balko, author of 'Rise Of The Warrior Cop,' says police departments across America are increasingly using equipment designed for use on a battlefield, including tanks, bayonets and grenades. We talk about the use of these weapons against peaceful protestors.
01/07/2048m 13s

A Doctor Confronts Medical Error

When Dr. Danielle Ofri was in medical school she missed a patient's critical brain bleed. Luckily, someone else caught the error and the patient survived, but Ofri lived with the guilt and shame for 20 years. Medical errors are very common, yet many in the medical community don't speak up. In her book, 'When We Do Harm,' Ofri looks into the flaws in the health care system that can lead to risky mistakes. Also, Ken Tucker reviews Bob Dylan's new album, 'Rough and Rowdy Ways.'
30/06/2048m 44s

'Hamilton' Creator Lin-Manuel Miranda

A film of the original Broadway production of 'Hamilton,' taped in 2016, begins streaming on Disney+ on July 3. Miranda, who stars in the title role, says the production is as timely as ever. "When you write a musical that brushes against the origins of this country, it's always going to be relevant," he says. "The fights we had at the [country's] origin are the fights we're still having." We also talk about 'In the Heights' and being productive (or not) during the pandemic.
29/06/2050m 2s

Best Of: A Call For Reparations / Treating PTSD With Psychedelics

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones says 250 yeas of slavery and 100 years of legalized segregation robbed Black Americans of the ability to accumulate wealth. Cash payments would help repair the damage. Her latest piece in the 'New York Times Magazine' is 'What Is Owed.'Ken Tucker reviews new albums by Lady Gaga and Carly Rae Jepsen.Psychiatrist Dr. Julie Holland has used psychedelic-assisted therapy to treat patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. In some cases, she says, MDMA or marijuana can help make treatment more efficient and effective. She discusses this "revolutionary way" to treat trauma. Holland's book is 'Good Chemistry.'
27/06/2050m 28s

LGBTQ Activist Cleve Jones / Novelist Marijane Meaker

After the AIDS epidemic hit San Francisco, gay activist Cleve Jones co-founded the San Francisco AIDS Foundation and started the AIDS Memorial Quilt. "I have these memories of great struggle and great pain and great loss, but I also in my lifetime have seen extraordinary progress and amazing change," he says. His memoir, 'When We Rise,' was published in 2016.Marijane Meaker wrote the lesbian pulp novel 'Spring Fire' in 1952, and was surprised when it sold 1.5 million copies. She went on to write other lesbian-themed books under pen names. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2003. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews Jon Stewart's political satire film 'Irresistible.'
26/06/2049m 5s

Actor Christine Baranski

Baranski started her career in theater and now stars as a progressive lawyer in 'The Good Fight.' "I was a passionate acting student and nothing was going to stop me," the Emmy Award-winning actor says. She talks about singing Sondheim, 'Mamma Mia,' and her grandmother who performed in the Polish theater.
25/06/2047m 35s

A Call For Reparations: Nikole Hannah-Jones On The Wealth Gap

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones says 250 yeas of slavery and 100 years of legalized segregation robbed Black Americans of the ability to accumulate wealth. Cash payments would help repair the damage. Her latest piece in the 'New York Times Magazine' is 'What Is Owed.'
24/06/2047m 43s

From 'Empty' To Satisfied: A Lifelong Struggle With Eating Disorders

For nearly 30 years, 'This American Life' producer Susan Burton kept her binge eating disorder a secret. "As long as I was bingeing, I didn't have to think. I didn't have to think about any loss or pain or wanting or yearning." Burton also had anorexia, though that was harder to hide. She talks about her difficult relationship with food and work toward recovery. Burton's memoir is 'Empty.' Ken Tucker reviews Lady Gaga's 'Chromatica' and Carly Rae Jepsen's 'Dedicated Side B.' And book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the memoir 'All The Way to Tigers' by Mary Morris.
23/06/2048m 38s

Treating PTSD With Psychedelics

Psychiatrist Dr. Julie Holland has used psychedelic-assisted therapy to treat patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. In some cases, she says, MDMA or marijuana can help make treatment more efficient and effective. She discusses this "revolutionary way" to treat trauma. Holland's book is 'Good Chemistry.' Also, John Powers shares his favorite espionage thriller series, a French show called 'The Bureau.'
22/06/2047m 23s

Best Of: The 1919 Chicago Race Riots / Parenting 'Without Perfection'

Eve Ewing's poetry collection '1919' looks back on a century-old riot in Chicago, set off after Eugene Williams, a black teen, drowned because he was stoned by white people on the beach. Police refused to make an arrest. Ewing connects the systemic racism that plagued the U.S. then to what we see happening now.Kevin Whitehead talks about a film genre that many jazz fans gripe about — the jazz biopic. Blogger and licensed family therapist Kristen Howerton talks about how raising two white biological daughters and two black adopted sons helped her understand white privilege. Her new memoir is 'Rage Against the Minivan.'
20/06/2050m 45s

Rhiannon Giddens Sings Slave Narratives / Freedom Singer Bernice Johnson Reagon

Singer and banjo player Rhiannon Giddens' 2017 album 'Freedom Highway' includes songs based on slave narratives. She notes that the modern banjo draws from the African instrument known as the akonting, which is made from a gourd. "In the first 100 years of its existence, the [American] banjo was known as a plantation instrument, as a black instrument," she says.During the civil rights movement, Bernice Johnson Reagon sang freedom songs from jail, in marches and churches. She was a founding member of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee's Freedom Singers in the '60s. She spoke with Terry Gross in 1988 about the songs she sang as an activist.
19/06/2049m 6s

Kristen Howerton On 'Parenting Without Perfection'

Blogger and licensed family therapist Kristen Howerton talks about how raising two white biological daughters and two black adopted sons helped her understand white privilege. She reflects on motherhood, miscarriage, divorce and faith. Her new memoir is 'Rage Against the Minivan.'David Bianculli reviews HBO's new take on the courtroom drama 'Perry Mason,' starring Matthew Rhys.
18/06/2047m 50s

Assessing COVID-19 Risk As The U.S. Reopens

With certain states loosening restrictions — and others partially in lockdown — there's a lot of widespread confusion about COVID-19 risks. We talk with University of Minnesota epidemiologist Michael Osterholm about the safety concerns in terms of protests, indoor gatherings, touching surfaces, and why the antibody test is so flawed.
17/06/2048m 14s

The Lasting Effects Of Having — Or Being Denied — An Abortion

Dr. Diana Greene Foster interviewed 1,000 women over 10 years who either had or were denied abortions. Her study looked at the women's mental, physical and economic health. Foster says the data reveal, "95 percent of women who receive an abortion later report that it was the right decision for them." Her book is 'The Turnaway Study.' Kevin Whitehead says, while jazz fans like to hate on jazz biopics, there are plenty of interesting details embedded in the messy stories.
16/06/2048m 6s

Poet Eve Ewing Connects 1919 Chicago Riots To Today

Ewing's poetry collection '1919' looks back on a century-old riot in Chicago, set off after a black teen drowned while being stoned by white people. Police refused to make an arrest. Ewing connects the systemic racism that plagued the U.S. then to what we see happening now. Ewing teaches at the University of Chicago's Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.Also, John Powers reviews a reissue of the novel 'The End of Me' by Alfred Hayes.
15/06/2048m 51s

Best Of: Jamiles Lartey On Racism In Policing / Pete Davidson & Judd Apatow

Journalist Jamiles Lartey ​writes about criminal justice, race and policing for the non-profit news organization 'The Marshall Project.' ​Terry Gross spoke with Lartey about systemic racism in American policing and how we might begin to rethink these systems. "Policing wasn't always this way. It wasn't always this big. It wasn't always this bureaucratic," he says. "Sometimes as a society, you need to rethink institutions."Film critic Justin Chang reviews Spike Lee's new movie, 'Da 5 Bloods,' a twist on a Vietnam War saga. It's now on Netflix.'SNL' castmember Pete Davidson plays a fictionalized version of himself in the new movie 'The King of Staten Island.' The film, directed by Judd Apatow, draws on Davidson's real life experience of losing his own father, a 9/11 First Responder. Davidson and Apatow spoke with Terry Gross about the film and healing from trauma.
13/06/2049m 5s

James Baldwin / Filmmaker Raoul Peck / Black Athletes & Social Justice

'I Am Not Your Negro' is the documentary about James Baldwin, one of the most influential black writers to emerge during the civil rights Era and address racial issues head on. We listen back to Terry Gross' 1986 interview with Baldwin, and we'll hear an excerpt of an interview with the director of the documentary, Raoul Peck. He was born in Haiti and was influenced by Baldwin as a young man. In 2016, 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the National Anthem in protest against police shootings and racial inequality, essentially putting an end to his football career. Journalist Howard Bryant's book, 'The Heritage,' is about the history of African American athletes taking stands for social justice. Bryant spoke with Dave Davies in 2018.
12/06/2048m 50s

Pete Davidson & Judd Apatow On 'The King Of Staten Island'

'SNL' castmember Pete Davidson plays a fictionalized version of himself in the new movie 'The King of Staten Island.' The film draws on Davidson's real life experience of losing his own father, a 9/11 First Responder. Filmmaker Judd Apatow and Davidson talk about being comedy nerds, grappling with their parents' divorces, and the importance of talking about feelings. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews Spike Lee's new movie, 'Da 5 Bloods,' a twist on a Vietnam War saga.
11/06/2047m 32s

Rethinking American Policing

We talk with ​journalist ​Jamiles Lartey about systemic racism in American policing​. ​He writes about criminal justice, race and policing for the non-profit news organization 'The Marshall Project.' ​"Policing wasn't always this way. It wasn't always this big. It wasn't always this bureaucratic," he says. "Sometimes as a society, you need to rethink institutions."
10/06/2047m 41s

The Trump Administration's Response To DC Protests

'Washington Post' reporter Matt Zapotosky talks about Attorney General William Barr's role in the Trump administration's forceful response to the largely peaceful George Floyd protests in Washington, DC.
09/06/2048m 34s

The Brutal History Of The Texas Rangers

Their exploits are portrayed in countless movies and TV shows, but author Doug Swanson says the law enforcement agency has a dark history of abuse and officially-sanctioned racial oppression — including burning villages, hunting runaway slaves and murdering Mexicans and Mexican-Americans. Swanson's book is 'Cult of Glory.' Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead looks at what he calls the "stock jazz-movie ending," a basic plot element subject to many variations.
08/06/2048m 18s

Best Of: The 'New Science' Of Breathing / The Migration Of All Living Things

Humans typically take about 25,000 breaths per day — often without a second thought. We talk with journalist James Nestor about how breath work can affect your overall health. His book is 'Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art.'Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead looks at what he calls the "stock jazz-movie ending," a basic plot element subject to many variations.When living things cross into new territory, they are often viewed as threats. But science writer Sonia Shah, who has written a new book — 'The Next Great Migration' — says the "invaders" are just following biology.
06/06/2050m 19s

The 'Unresolved Legacy' Of Reconstruction

In the period after the Civil War, former slaves were made promises of equality and citizenship by the federal government. Historian Eric Foner analyzes the fate of those promises and how the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments relate to current issues around voting rights, mass incarceration and reparations for slavery. His new book is 'Forever Free.' (Originally broadcast 2006) Also, we remember award-winning author Robb Forman Dew, who died May 22. She wrote about intimate family life. Dew spoke with Terry Gross in 1994.
05/06/2048m 33s

Why GOP Leaders Back Trump's 'Proto-Authoritarian Cult'

Journalist Anne Applebaum says President Trump's threat to deploy the military on peaceful protestors is straight out of an authoritarian playbook. The 'Atlantic' staff writer says Trump has built a proto-authoritarian cult in the White House, with little to no dissent from the GOP. "There is nothing about our democracy that is magic. A person who is determined to destroy it can destroy it — unless people can fight back." Her new article is 'History Will Judge the Complicit.' Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Shirley,' an unusual biopic about writer Shirley Jackson starring Elisabeth Moss.
04/06/2047m 26s

Wes Moore On Freddie Gray & George Floyd: It's Time To 'Change The Systems'

In his book 'Five Days,' author Wes Moore chronicles the uprising that occurred in 2015 in Baltimore following Freddie Gray's death. "We're basically reliving history right now," he says of George Floyd's death at the hands of police. Moore talks about the systemic injustices that have converged to create the crisis we're in right now.
03/06/2048m 29s

Rethinking The Migration Of All Living Things

When living things cross into new territory, they are often viewed as threats. But science writer Sonia Shah, who has written a new book — 'The Next Great Migration' — says the "invaders" are just following biology. Shah talks about the migration of people, animals and plants (especially due to climate change), and our misconceptions about "belonging."
02/06/2047m 26s

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams On George Floyd Protests & Police Reform

At 15, Eric Adams was beaten by police. The traumatizing incident inspired him to become a police officer to help reform NYC policing from the inside. He co-founded 100 Blacks In Law Enforcement Who Care, and after 22 years on the force, he retired as a captain. Now the Brooklyn Borough President, Adams talks about police reform and the protests against brutality and systemic racism happening across America. "Hitting the streets and showing your outrage and [that you're] not comfortable is something that's as part of America as apple pie and Chevrolet. We need to continue to hit the streets to move America where it ought to go." Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'The Vanishing Half,' by Brit Bennett. And David Bianculli shares his first impressions of HBO Max.
01/06/2048m 15s

Best Of: Comic Hannah Gadsby / Inside The Snowden Story

Since her explosive 2018 Netflix special, 'Nanette,' comic Hannah Gadsby has been trying to adjust to her newfound success. We talk about being diagnosed with autism and growing up in Tasmania. Her new special is 'Douglas.'Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the road-trip novel 'St. Christopher On Pluto.'Journalist Barton Gellman shares a Pulitzer for his reporting about former NSA contractor Edward Snowden and the U.S. government's secret surveillance program. Gellman talks about his tense relationship with Snowden and getting hacked. His new book is 'Dark Mirror.'
30/05/2050m 20s

Margo Price / Remembering AIDS Activist Larry Kramer

Nashville singer-songwriter Margo Price spoke with 'Fresh Air' in 2017 when her album 'All American Made' was released. She plays songs off her two records, and talks about the heartache and beauty of growing up on a farm in a small town in Illinois.AIDS activist Larry Kramer, who died May 27, was an early advocate for aggressive research into the HIV virus. He co-founded both the Gay Men's Health Crisis and the protest group ACT UP. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1992.
29/05/2048m 53s

Inside New York's Citywide Effort To Bury Its Dead

In just a two month period, New York City had 20,000 COVID deaths. What happens to the bodies? 'TIME' reporter W.J. Hennigan visited the disaster morgues set up around the city, and spoke with the death care workers on the front lines. "The scale of it is incomparable to anything that we've seen," he says. Also, John Powers reviews the new AMC limited series 'Quiz,' about a British couple suspected of cheating at a game show.
28/05/2047m 24s

Deep Breaths: How Breathing Affects Sleep, Anxiety & Resilience

Humans typically take about 25,000 breaths per day — often without a second thought. But the COVID-19 pandemic has put a new spotlight on respiratory illnesses and the breaths we so often take for granted. We talk with journalist James Nestor about why breathing through your nose is better than breathing through your mouth, snoring, and how breath work can affect your overall health. His book is 'Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art.' Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album of Transylvanian folk songs by the trio Lucian Ban, John Surman and Mat Maneri.
27/05/2048m 16s

Comic Hannah Gadsby

Since her explosive 2018 Netflix special, 'Nanette,' Gadsby has been trying to adjust to her newfound success. We talk about her autism diagnosis, growing up in Tasmania, and her new special, 'Douglas.' Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Nancy McKinley's road trip novel 'St. Christopher on Pluto.'
26/05/2049m 6s

Winston Churchill & Fearless Leadership In Crisis

In 'The Splendid And The Vile,' author Erik Larson details Churchill's first year in office, during which England endured a Nazi bombing campaign that killed more than 44,000 civilians. Larson says Churchill told his citizens the truth and inspired them to resist. (Originally Broadcast March, 2020)Lloyd Schwartz shares a collection of songs by Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong that's particularly soothing right now.
25/05/2048m 4s

Best Of: Janelle Monáe / Meditation For Pandemic Anxiety

Musician and actor Janelle Monáe talks about the concept behind her 2018 album 'Dirty Computer,' and her identity as a queer woman in the entertainment industry. She now stars in the second season of the thriller series 'Homecoming,' as a veteran who wakes up in a rowboat and is unable to remember who she is or how she got there.John Powers reviews a recent restoration of 'Tokyo Godfathers,' a 2003 anime film by Satoshi Kon, about three social outcasts who find an abandoned baby. ABC News correspondent Dan Harris was broadcasting live in 2004 when he experienced a panic attack. He talks about how meditation helps him work through his anxiety and shares meditation practices for the pandemic. He's the co-founder of the meditation podcast and app '10 Percent Happier.'
23/05/2050m 16s

Remembering Beatles Photographer Astrid Kirchherr / Comedy Actor Fred Willard

German photographer Astrid Kirchherr, who died May 12, took the very first publicity photos of the then little-known Liverpool band, "The Beatles." She also gave the group their signature "mop-top" haircuts. Kirchherr spoke with Terry Gross in 2008 when a book of her Beatles photographs was published. John Powers reviews a new restoration of 'Tokyo Godfathers,' a 2003 anime film by Satoshi Kon about three social outcasts who find an abandoned baby. Comedy actor and improviser Fred Willard died May 15 at age 86. He was known for his scene-stealing roles in the Christopher Guest films 'Best in Show' and 'Waiting for Guffman,' and later films like 'Anchorman' and the series 'Modern Family.' He spoke with Terry Gross in 1997.Film critic Justin Chang reviews the comedy 'The Trip to Greece,' starring Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon, a poignant end to their anthology of travel films.
22/05/2048m 55s

How The Pandemic Reveals Gender Inequality In The Household

For many couples, the pandemic has exposed inequality in the home: Many women take on twice as much housework and childcare as their male partners, even when both partners are home full time. We talk with Brigid Schulte about women's visible (and invisible) labor, and how to create a more equitable household. Schulte is a journalist and author and the founder of the Better Life Lab. Also, we remember filmmaker Lynn Shelton. She died suddenly last Saturday at age 54. She wrote and directed the award-winning indie films 'Humpday,' 'Your Sister's Sister,' and 'Touchy Feely.' She spoke with Terry Gross in 2012.
21/05/2048m 21s

Breaking The Edward Snowden Story

Journalist Barton Gellman shares a Pulitzer for his reporting about former NSA contractor Edward Snowden and the U.S. government's secret surveillance program. Gellman talks about his tense relationship with Snowden, getting hacked, and Snowden's lasting impact on privacy and security. His new book is 'Dark Mirror.'
20/05/2047m 57s

How Meditation Can Ease Pandemic Anxiety

ABC News correspondent Dan Harris was broadcasting live in 2004 when he experienced a panic attack. He credits meditation with helping him work through his anxiety — both then and now. He's the co-founder of the meditation podcast and app '10 Percent Happier.' "Meditation doesn't make the uncertainty go away. It's not like I meditate and I'm walking through this pandemic like a unicorn barfing rainbows all the time." Rather, Harris says, meditation allows people to "relax into the uncertainty."
19/05/2047m 19s

Janelle Monáe

The musician and actor spoke with us about the concept behind her 2018 album 'Dirty Computer,' her identity as a queer woman in the entertainment industry, and making her acting debut in the Oscar-winning film 'Moonlight.' She now stars in the second season of the thriller series 'Homecoming' as a veteran who wakes up in a rowboat and is unable to remember who she is or how she got there.
18/05/2047m 56s

Best Of: John Moe On Depression / Alia Volz On Growing Up 'Home Baked'

In his podcast, 'The Hilarious World of Depression,' John Moe talks with his guests (mostly comics) about their experiences with mental illness. We talk about his own depression (especially during the pandemic) and how humor gives him relief.Also, Ken Tucker reviews the new album, 'Alphabetland,' from the band X.Growing up in San Francisco in the '70s, Alia Volz's family ran a booming weed brownie business, back when growing a single cannabis plant was a felony. "I had this understanding of my family as an outlaw family from the very beginning," she says. Her memoir is 'Home Baked.'
16/05/2050m 28s

Remembering Actor Jerry Stiller / Cellist Lynn Harrell

Actor and comedian Jerry Stiller, who died May 11, was part of a comic duo with his wife Anne Meara and later played George Costanza's hot-headed father on 'Seinfeld.' He spoke to 'Fresh Air' in 1993. Also, we remember award-winning cellist Lynn Harrell. He joined the the Cleveland Orchestra when he was 18 and went on to perform as a soloist with orchestras around the world. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1987.TV critic David Bianculli reviews the genre-bending series 'The Great' on Hulu.
15/05/2047m 28s

What We Might Learn From The 1918 Flu Pandemic

John Barry's 2004 book about the 1918 influenza pandemic is a current bestseller. Barry talks about the parallels that are relevant to today's COVID-19 crisis. In both cases, he says, "the outbreak was trivialized for a long time." Also, we remember eccentric pop music figure Ian Whitcomb. Many people knew him for his 1965 novelty song 'You Turn Me On,' which was a top 10 hit. He died last month at 78.And classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz shares what he's been listening to during these difficult times.
14/05/2047m 31s

Doctor With Rare Disease Decides To Find His Own Cure

David Fajgenbaum was diagnosed with Castleman disease as a medical student and nearly died several times. In 'Chasing My Cure,' he recounts crowd-sourcing his own treatment with a global network of doctors, scientists and patients.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Benjamin Taylor's book about his friendship with Philip Roth, 'Here We Are.'
13/05/2048m 8s

Writer Michael Arceneaux Worries, 'I Don't Want To Die Poor'

Michael Arceneaux graduated from Howard University in 2007 with more than $100,000 of private student loan debt. His new essay collection, 'I Don't Want to Die Poor,' recounts how that debt has shaped his life. "I became a 'New York Times' bestselling author the same week I lost my health insurance," he says. "I do have a foot in both worlds, because I just really know how difficult it is to attain social mobility." Also, Ken Tucker reviews the new album, 'Alphabetland,' from the band X.
12/05/2048m 2s

How Will The Pandemic Affect Voting?

Assuming the pandemic has not ended by Election Day, will you be able to vote by mail? And if not, are you willing to risk your health? We talk with journalist Emily Bazelon about her new 'NYT Magazine' article titled, "Will Americans Lose the Right to Vote in the Pandemic?" She focuses on the financial and political obstacles that are likely to prevent many Americans from voting by mail. Bazelon writes, "The U.S. prides itself on its democracy in theory, but this year, not necessarily in practice."
11/05/2048m 41s

Best Of: Tim Gunn / Chef Tom Colicchio

Longtime fashion expert and mentor Tim Gunn returns to 'Fresh Air' to talk about how the pandemic has changed his mind about comfy clothes and his new competition series, 'Making the Cut.' David Bianculli recommends the 90th birthday salute to Broadway icon Stephen Sondheim, available online.'Top Chef' judge Tom Colicchio spoke with Terry Gross about broken food supply chains, food waste, and what the future of the restaurant industry might look like due to COVID-19. Colicchio helped form the Independent Restaurant Coalition to lobby Congress for relief for the industry.
09/05/2050m 29s

Steve Martin

We're revisiting one of our favorite interviews from our archive, with comic Steve Martin from when his memoir 'Born Standing Up' was released in 2008. When he started doing comedy in the 1970s, his audiences often didn't know what to make of him. His material was somewhere between vaudeville and performance art. As a kid, he sold guide books in Disneyland, and hung out in magic shops while spending hours working up a magic act. Martin tells us about his years as a stand up comic—and why he ended that part of his career. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the recent 90th birthday salute to Broadway composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim, which is available online.
08/05/2048m 38s

Chef Tom Colicchio On How To Save The Restaurant Industry

The 'Top Chef' judge spoke with Terry Gross about broken food supply chains, food waste, and what the future of the restaurant industry might look like due to COVID-19. Colicchio helped form the Independent Restaurant Coalition to lobby Congress for relief for the industry. "We're really looking at saving every restaurant, because we think that every restaurant needs to be there," he says.Justin Chang reviews 'Driveways,' starring late actor Brian Dennehy.
07/05/2047m 54s

Understanding Speaker Nancy Pelosi

'Time' correspondent Molly Ball says the key to the speaker's success is her mastery of the inside game in politics — building relationships, counting votes, plotting strategy and working around the clock. Ball's book is 'Pelosi.' Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'Liberty' from the Dayna Stephens Trio.
06/05/2049m 22s

Exploring 'The Hilarious World Of Depression' With John Moe

In his podcast, 'The Hilarious World of Depression,' John Moe talks with his guests (mostly comics) about their experiences with mental illness. We talk about his own depression (especially during the pandemic), losing his brother to suicide, and how humor gives him relief.
05/05/2048m 34s

Fashion Guru Tim Gunn

The longtime fashion expert and mentor returns to 'Fresh Air' to talk about his new competition series, 'Making the Cut,' how to give constructive feedback, and why he's moved to tears by beautiful things.
04/05/2049m 25s

Best Of: Mindy Kaling / 'Notes From An Apocalypse'

Mindy Kaling's new Netflix comedy series, 'Never Have I Ever,' is based on her own experiences as a nerdy, confident teen who pined for a boyfriend. We talk about why she was hesitant to relive her high school years through the show, and why she wanted to put a different kind of nerd onscreen. John Powers reviews Hulu's TV adaptation of the Sally Rooney novel, 'Normal People.' Mark O'Connell went on what he calls "a series of perverse pilgrimages" while researching people who are preparing for doomsday. He talks about prairie bunkers in South Dakota, Mars as a "backup planet," and catastrophe tourism. O'Connell's book is 'Notes from an Apocalypse.'
02/05/2050m 21s

Remembering Bollywood Icon Irrfan Khan / Michael Cogswell

Irrfan Khan, one of India's most beloved film stars, died this week at 53 from cancer. He became internationally known for his work in films like 'Slumdog Millionaire,' 'Life of Pi,' and 'The Darjeeling Limited.' He spoke with Terry Gross in 2012. Also, we remember Michael Cogswell, whose life work was preserving the legacy of Louis Armstrong. Cogswell was executive director of the Louis Armstrong House Museum which archives thousands of artifacts including journals, trumpets, tapes and photographs.TV critic David Bianculli reviews Greg Daniels' new sci-fi comedy series 'Upload,' on Amazon Prime Video.
01/05/2047m 49s

Who's Benefiting From The Coronavirus Economic Relief Package?

As small businesses and individuals struggle to obtain federal aid, the wealthiest are poised to reap tens of billions of dollars in tax savings. That's what 'New York Times' investigative business reporter Jesse Drucker says. Drucker explains how the economic rescue package is benefiting the rich.French guitarist Stephane Wrembel talks about jazz great Django Reinhardt and plays songs from his new album, 'Django L'Impressionniste.' He spoke with producer Sam Briger.
30/04/2049m 17s

What The U.S. Might Learn From China's Approach To COVID-19

'New York Times' health and science reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr. points to China as a model of how to stop a fast moving pandemic in its tracks. "We're reluctant to follow China, but they did it," he says. McNeil talks about the challenges facing the U.S. as states move to reopen. "We're nowhere near getting on top of this virus," he says. Also, John Powers reviews Hulu's TV adaptation of Sally Rooney's novel 'Normal People.'
29/04/2049m 8s

Inside One Family's Marijuana Brownie Business

Growing up in San Francisco in the '70s, Alia Volz's family ran a booming weed brownie business, back when growing a single cannabis plant was a felony. "I had this understanding of my family as an outlaw family from the very beginning," she says. Her memoir is 'Home Baked.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Sigh, Gone: A Misfit's Memoir of Great Books, Punk Rock, and the Fight to Fit In' by Phuc Tran.
28/04/2048m 48s

Mindy Kaling

Kaling's new Netflix show, 'Never Have I Ever,' is based on her own experiences as a nerdy, confident teen who pined for a boyfriend. We talk about the new series, how being a diversity hire at 'The Office' inspired her movie 'Late Night,' and how the grief of losing a parent has impacted her as a mother.
27/04/2048m 57s

Best Of: Zoe Kazan / Trans Activist Jennifer Finney Boylan

Zoe Kazan co-stars in HBO's limited series 'The Plot Against America,' an adaptation of Philip Roth's 2004 novel. We talk about encountering sexism in Hollywood, how the new series made her think about her family history differently, and her experience with depression and an eating disorder. Maureen Corrigan shares some book recommendations for these challenging times. Transgender activist Jennifer Finney Boylan spoke with Terry Gross about finding her identity as a woman, the evolution of her marriage, and the dogs she loved along the way. Her memoir is 'Good Boy: My Life in Seven Dogs.'
25/04/2050m 54s

Remembering Actor Brian Dennehy / Catherine Russell In Concert

The notable character actor Brian Dennehy died April 15 at age 81. He was a recognizable face in numerous movies and TV shows, but he was best known for his work in the theater, earning Tony Awards for his leading roles in 'Death of a Salesman' and 'Long Day's Journey Into Night.' He spoke with 'Fresh Air' in 1999. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead shares a remembrance of trailblazing saxophonist Lee Konitz. He died April 15. We revisit a concert from blues and jazz singer Catherine Russell, who sang songs from her solo album, 'Strictly Romancin',' in 2012. Russell's latest album is called 'Alone Together.' Justin Chang reviews two movies that riff on real-life crime: HBO's 'Bad Education' and 'True History of the Kelly Gang.'
24/04/2049m 21s

Jane Mayer On How Mitch McConnell Became Trump's 'Enabler-In-Chief'

'New Yorker' staff writer Jane Mayer talks about how the Senate majority leader has thrown his support behind the President, and allowed the president to diminish congressional power — in spite of the fact that Trump and McConnell are opposites in several ways. Mayer says McConnell's refusal to rein in Trump is looking riskier than ever.Also, TV critic David Bianculli bids farewell to 'Homeland' and welcomes back 'Penny Dreadful' on Showtime.
23/04/2048m 54s

Author Shares His 'Notes From An Apocalypse'

Mark O'Connell went on what he calls "a series of perverse pilgrimages" while researching people who are preparing for doomsday. He talks about prairie bunkers in South Dakota, Mars as a "backup planet," and catastrophe tourism. O'Connell's book is 'Notes from an Apocalypse.' Also, critic John Powers tells us why he's been bingeing 'The Good Fight' and 'Bosch' while sheltering at home.
22/04/2049m 4s

Transgender Activist & Author Jennifer Finney Boylan

Jennifer Finney Boylan came out as transgender in her 40s. She describes her new book, 'Good Boy,' as a "memoir of masculinity, kind of told the way an expatriate might speak of the country of their birth." Boylan talks about finding her identity as a woman, the evolution of her marriage, and the dogs she loved along the way. Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Dua Lipa's second album, 'Future Nostalgia,' a disco throwback that's perfectly timely and bursting with joyfulness.
21/04/2047m 36s

Actor Zoe Kazan

Kazan co-stars in HBO's limited series 'The Plot Against America,' an adaptation of Philip Roth's 2004 novel. It imagines a world in which aviator Charles Lindbergh defeated Franklin D. Roosevelt in the race for the presidency, moving the country toward fascism. We talk about encountering sexism in Hollywood, and how the HBO series made her think about her family history differently. Kazan also starred in 'The Big Sick,' 'Ruby Sparks,' and she co-wrote 'Wildlife' with her partner Paul Dano.
20/04/2048m 35s

Best Of: Sam Sifton On Quarantine Cooking / Jason Bateman

Sam Sifton, founder of NYT Cooking, talks about how to make meals that stretch, improvising with less-than-ideal ingredients, and the best vegetable for quarantine cooking. His new cookbook is 'See You on Sunday.'Film critic Justin Chang recommends some movies to watch at home while sheltering in place. Jason Bateman stars in the Netflix series 'Ozark' as a financial manager who has become the money launderer for Mexico's second biggest drug cartel. We'll talk about embracing his darker side on 'Ozark,' and his experience directing 'The Outsider,' HBO's adaptation of Stephen King's novel.
18/04/2050m 31s

Singer-Songwriter Iris DeMent

DeMent describes herself as extremely shy, but says that "when the songs started coming to me, I felt I didn't have the option to hide and avoid" the stage. She spoke with Terry Gross (and played songs in-studio) in 2015.
17/04/2048m 25s

How Dr. Fauci 'Changed Medicine In America Forever'

The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced millions of Americans to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. 'New Yorker' staff writer Michael Specter has known Fauci and covered his work for decades. Specter talks about Fauci's trail-blazing work during the AIDS epidemic, why Trump can't fire Fauci, and the structural changes and research that Specter says would make us more prepared for the next pandemic.
16/04/2046m 31s

The FBI, CIA & The Truth About America's 'Deep State'

'New Yorker' online executive editor David Rohde refutes Trump's claims about a "deep state" — and argues that the president is the one creating a parallel shadow government filled with like-minded loyalists. His new book is 'In Deep.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli shares what's on his current watch list.
15/04/2048m 27s

Jason Bateman / Remembering LGBTQ Pioneer Phyllis Lyon

Jason Bateman stars in the Netflix series 'Ozark' as a financial manager who has become the money launderer for Mexico's second biggest drug cartel. We'll talk about embracing his darker side on 'Ozark,' and his experience directing 'The Outsider,' HBO's adaptation of Stephen King's novel. Also, we remember one of the mothers of the gay rights movement, Phyllis Lyon. She died April 9 at 95. Lyon and Del Martin co-founded the first national lesbian group in the U.S., Daughters of Bilitis. In 2008 they became the first gay couple to legally marry in California. Terry Gross interviewed them in 1992. Film critic Justin Chang recommends some movies to watch at home while sheltering in place: 'Sorry We Missed You,' 'Green for Danger,' and 'My Neighbor Totoro.'
14/04/2048m 38s

The 'Big Business' Of Inequality

Nelson Schwartz, author of 'The Velvet Rope Economy,' says special privileges for the super-rich are dividing America: "The result is less sympathy, less empathy and a sort of a harder-edge society." Schwartz talks about private helicopter rides to the airport, concierge doctors, and elite college counseling — and their impact on our society. Schwartz writes about economics for the 'New York Times.' Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan recommends a few titles for troubled times: 'The Women in Black,' 'The Colossus of New York,' 'Last Night at the Lobster,' 'Are You An Echo?' and 'Everything Is Under Control.'
13/04/2048m 12s

Best Of: Kerry Washington / Stephen King

In the Hulu series 'Little Fires Everywhere,' Kerry Washington co-stars opposite Reese Witherspoon as Mia Warren, a bohemian artist/single mom with a mysterious past. Washington spoke with Terry Gross about how she drew on her own mother for the role. Even Stephen King is feeling like he's living in a Stephen King novel these days. The author of the 1978 pandemic novel 'The Stand' tells Terry Gross he understands why fans have said the COVID-19 pandemic feels like something out of his books.
11/04/2050m 29s

Remembering John Prine

Legendary songwriter, singer and guitarist John Prine died Tuesday from complications of the coronavirus. He was 73. Prine's best-known songs include "Angel from Montgomery," "Paradise," "Sam Stone," and "Hello in There." Among the many people who recorded his songs are Johnny Cash, Bonnie Raitt, and Bette Midler. Last year he was inducted into the Songwriting Hall of Fame. Terry Gross spoke to him in 2018 after the release of his album 'The Tree of Forgiveness,' his first album of new songs in 13 years. He was touring at the time, and had made a remarkable comeback from two bouts with cancer. We begin with rock critic Ken Tucker's salute to Prine.
10/04/2049m 14s

How San Francisco's D.A. Is Decreasing The Jail Population Amid COVID-19

San Francisco's new District Attorney Chesa Boudin's own father is 75 and in prison in New York. In 1981, his parents, who were radical leftists, were imprisoned for being getaway drivers in a politically-motivated armed robbery. "My earliest memories are going through prison gates and metal detectors," he says. Boudin is part of a movement of progressive prosecutors working for criminal justice reform. We talk about the spread of COVID-19 in prisons and jails, and the measures he's taking to reduce the number of people incarcerated. Since he took office in January, he's reduced the county jail population by nearly 40%.
09/04/2049m 0s

Stephen King

Even Stephen King is feeling like he's living in a Stephen King novel these days. The author of the 1978 pandemic novel 'The Stand' says he understands why fans have said the COVID-19 pandemic feels like something out of his books. King says he doesn't feel panic or terror, but rather, a "gnawing anxiety." He talks about his new book, 'If It Bleeds.' and how the current crisis is changing his writing.
08/04/2049m 14s

Cooking In The Time Of COVID-19

Former 'New York Times' food editor (and founder of NYT Cooking) Sam Sifton says the resurgence of family meals is one of the "precious few good things" that's come from the pandemic. Sifton talks about how to make meals that stretch, improvising with less-than-ideal ingredients, and the best vegetable for quarantine cooking. His new cooksbook is 'See You on Sunday.'Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews bassist Lisa Mezzacappa's album 'Cosmicomics.'
07/04/2047m 44s

Kerry Washington

In the Hulu series 'Little Fires Everywhere,' Kerry Washington co-stars opposite Reese Witherspoon as Mia Warren, a bohemian artist single mom with a mysterious past. Washington spoke with Terry Gross about how she drew on her own mother for the role, her 'Scandal' audition, and playing Anita Hill in 'Confirmation.'Also, critic John Powers recommends Netflix's 'Unorthodox,' the Hulu series 'Baghdad Central,' and the novel 'Abigail' by Magda Szabo.
06/04/2048m 43s

Best Of: Author Max Brooks / Playwright Terrence McNally

Author Max Brooks became an expert on disaster preparedness — from pandemics to nuclear war — through researching for his books, 'World War Z,' 'Germ Warfare' and the forthcoming 'Devolution.' Classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz recommends some music to listen to that feels right for this moment: A compilation of all the songs Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong recorded together. It's called 'Cheek to Cheek.' We remember Broadway playwright Terrence McNally, who died March 24 due to complications related to COVID-19. He won Tony awards for 'Kiss of the Spider Woman,' 'Ragtime' and 'Master Class.' McNally was openly gay and wrote about the lives of gay men in his plays. He spoke with 'Fresh Air' in 1993.
04/04/2051m 7s

Remembering Bucky Pizzarelli, Adam Schlesinger, Ellis Marsalis

Today we remember three people from the music world who died this week of COVID-19. First, we'll listen back to two interviews with the great jazz guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli. He was 94. Then we'll hear an interview with Adam Schlesinger, who was 52. He co-founded the band Fountains of Wayne, wrote songs for the movies 'Thing You Do!' and 'Music and Lyrics,' and won three Emmys for his songs for the TV series 'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.' Later, we'll hear what jazz musicians Wynton and Branford Marsalis said about their father, pianist and educator Ellis Marsalis, who has died at age 85.
03/04/2051m 17s

A 'War Doctor' Shares Stories From The Front Line

Trauma surgeon Dr. David Nott has spent decades volunteering in war and disaster zones all over the world. Now he's advising doctors on how to treat COVID-19. He spoke with Terry Gross about how fighting the pandemic is similar to working in a war zone, and shares harrowing stories from his time in the field. His book is 'War Doctor.'
02/04/2048m 45s

Masks, Vaccines & How COVID-19 Might End

Two years ago, 'Atlantic' science writer Ed Yong predicted a new global pandemic and how we might be caught unprepared. Now that so much of what he warned about in his reporting has come true, he's been covering how and why we failed to stop the spread of COVID-19, why the virus has been so successful in spreading, how the pandemic might end, and what the aftermath might be.
01/04/2048m 6s

Understanding The Origin Of 'Heaven And Hell'

Religion scholar Bart Ehrman says the notion of eternal rewards and punishments isn't found in the Old Testament or in the teachings of Jesus. Ehrman traces the origin of these ideas in his new book, 'Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife.'
31/03/2047m 37s

Winston Churchill & Fearless Leadership In Times Of Crisis

In 'The Splendid And The Vile,' author Erik Larson details Winston Churchill's first year in office, during which England endured a Nazi bombing campaign that killed more than 44,000 civilians. Larson says Churchill told his citizens the truth and inspired them to resist. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Glass Hotel' by Emily St. John Mandel.
30/03/2048m 54s

Best Of: Marc Maron / Hank Azaria

Comic and 'WTF' podcast host Marc Maron named his new Netflix stand-up special 'End Times Fun' before the COVID-19 pandemic started — but now the title feels eerily apt. He talked with Terry Gross about how he's handling the crisis as a "recovering hypochondriac." Hank Azaria plays a colorful baseball announcer in the IFC comedy series 'Brockmire,' which is now in its 4th and final season. Azaria spoke with Dave Davies about the series, and why he doesn't voice the Indian American convenience store owner Apu on 'The Simpsons' anymore.
28/03/2050m 25s

Stephen Sondheim - Part 2

Sondheim, who turned 90 on March 22, composed the music and wrote lyrics for 'Sweeney Todd,' 'Into the Woods,' 'Company' and other Broadway shows. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2010 about his career in musical theater. (Part 1 of this interview was released on March 20.)
27/03/2053m 54s

Trump's 'War' On The Presidency / Remembering Playwright Terrence McNally

Journalist Benjamin Wittes spoke with Terry Gross about how President Trump has changed the presidency fundamentally — and how we're seeing the impact during the COVID-19 pandemic. He is the author, with Susan Hennessey, of 'Unmaking the Presidency.'We remember Broadway playwright Terrence McNally, who died March 24 due to complications related to COVID-19. He won Tony awards for 'Kiss of the Spider Woman,' 'Ragtime' and 'Master Class.' He spoke with 'Fresh Air' in 1993.
26/03/2047m 34s

Michael Pollan On The Drug We Use Every Day: Caffeine

'Omnivore's Dilemma' author Michael Pollan talks about his audiobook, 'Caffeine: How Coffee and Tea Created the Modern World.' He describes caffeine as the world's most widely-used psychoactive drug. (Originally broadcast Feb. 2020)Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from guitarist Jeff Parker.
25/03/2049m 17s

How The Government Can Mobilize In A Pandemic

Author Max Brooks became an expert on disaster preparedness — from pandemics to nuclear war — through researching for his books, 'World War Z,' 'Germ Warfare' and the forthcoming 'Devolution.' He spoke with Terry Gross about how the federal government is designed to respond to crises like COVID-19 — and what is preventing the tasks forces from being deployed. He'll also explain why "panic is not preparation," and how to have good "fact-hygiene."
24/03/2047m 34s

Comic Marc Maron On 'End Times Fun'

Maron named his new Netflix comedy special 'End Times Fun' before the COVID-19 pandemic started — but now the title feels eerily apt. He talked with Terry Gross about how he's handling the crisis as a "recovering hypochondriac," and what he's doing to pass the time in isolation. Maron co-stars in the Netflix series 'GLOW' and hosts the interview podcast 'WTF.'
23/03/2048m 44s

Best Of: Octavia Spencer / Conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Octavia Spencer stars in the new Netflix limited series 'Self Made' as Madam C.J. Walker, America's first black, female, self-made millionaire. She sold hair and makeup products to black women in the early 1900s. John Powers reviews the Hulu series 'Little Fires Everywhere,' starring Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon.The Philadelphia Orchestra has shuttered its doors in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin reflects on their final performance in an empty concert hall, which was livestreamed for more half a million viewers at home.
21/03/2050m 18s

Happy Birthday, Stephen Sondheim

Broadway is dark because of the virus, but that doesn't need to stop us from celebrating the 90th birthday of Broadway's best living composer and lyricist—and one of the best in the history of Broadway, Stephen Sondheim. His 90th birthday is Sunday. We're listening back to our interview from 2010, which we recorded on the occasion of his 80th birthday. He wrote the songs for 'Sweeney Todd,' 'Follies,' 'Into the Woods,' 'Sunday in the Park with George' and 'Merrily We Roll Along.' Revivals of two of his shows had to go dark because of the virus: 'West Side Story,' for which he wrote the lyrics, and 'Company.'
20/03/2049m 11s

How One Orchestra, Faced With A Pandemic, Played On

The Philadelphia Orchestra has shuttered its doors in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin reflects on their final performance in an empty concert hall, which was livestreamed for more half a million viewers at home. He spoke with Terry Gross about the unusual performance and how music comforts us in troubling times. Also, we'll hear an excerpt of our interview with the conductor from last year.
19/03/2049m 15s

The Case For Abolishing The Electoral College

Jesse Wegman, author of 'Let the People Pick the President,' says the Electoral College's winner-take-all rule is not mandated by the Constitution: "There's nothing keeping us from changing it." Wegman talks about how winner-take-all came to be, attempts to change it, and how the Electoral College disproportionately affects people of color.
18/03/2049m 54s

'Simpsons' Voice Actor Hank Azaria

Azaria plays a colorful baseball announcer in the IFC comedy series 'Brockmire,' which is now in its 4th and final season. Azaria spoke with 'Fresh Air' about sobriety, his flamboyant character in 'The Birdcage,' and why he doesn't voice the Indian American convenience store owner Apu on 'The Simpsons' anymore.Also, John Powers reviews the Hulu series 'Little Fires Everywhere,' starring Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon.
17/03/2048m 41s

Octavia Spencer

Spencer stars in the new Netflix limited series 'Self Made' as Madam C.J. Walker, America's first female self-made millionaire. She sold hair and makeup products to black women in the early 1900s. Spencer talks about Walker's legacy, playing a maid in'The Help,' and learning to speak up for better pay in Hollywood. Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the K-pop group BTS' new album 'Map of the Soul.'
16/03/2049m 3s

Best Of: Writer James McBride / RuPaul

James McBride's new novel, 'Deacon King Kong,' takes place in 1969, in a Brooklyn housing project similar to the one he grew up in. "In this book and in this community, people generally love each other," he says.RuPaul describes his drag persona as "one-part Cher, two-parts David Bowie, one-part Diana Ross and two heaping spoonfuls of Dolly Parton." The reality show he hosts and created, 'RuPaul's Drag Race,' is now in its 12th season on VH1.
14/03/2051m 20s

Philip Roth On 'The Plot Against America'

Roth's 2004 novel, 'The Plot Against America,' is an alternative history which imagines Nazi sympathizer Charles Lindbergh beats FDR in the 1940 presidential election and the U.S. sides with the Germans in WWII. We'll listen back to Terry Gross' interview with Roth about the novel, and TV critic David Bianculli will review the new HBO miniseries that's based on the book. Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Never Rarely Sometimes Always' about a teenage girl in small-town Pennsylvania who decides to have an abortion.
13/03/2048m 13s

How Trump's Mismanagement Helped Fuel Coronavirus Crisis

​Politico reporter Dan Diamond says dysfunction within the White House, infighting and the need to flatter Trump have caused distractions that have slowed the response to the new pandemic.​
12/03/2048m 51s

The Untold Story Of Saudi Crown Prince MBS

'New York Times' Beirut Bureau Chief Ben Hubbard says Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is full of contradictions: He ended a ban on women driving, but his agents also carried out the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Hubbard's book, 'MBS,' tells the story of the enigmatic leader. Hubbard says MBS could rule the country for the next 50 years.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Writers & Lovers' by Lily King.
11/03/2049m 0s

RuPaul

RuPaul describes his drag persona as "one-part Cher, two-parts David Bowie, one-part Diana Ross and two heaping spoonfuls of Dolly Parton." The reality show he hosts and created, 'RuPaul's Drag Race,' is now in its 12th season on VH1. He talks with Terry Gross about his early punk style of drag, becoming a "glamizon," and the best advice his mother gave him. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead shares a remembrance of legendary pianist McCoy Tyner. He died last Friday at 81.
10/03/2050m 36s

Writer James McBride

James McBride's new novel, 'Deacon King Kong,' takes place in 1969, in a Brooklyn housing project similar to the one he grew up in. "In this book and in this community, people generally love each other," he says. McBride is best known for his '95 memoir 'The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews Best Coast's new album, 'Almost Tomorrow.'
09/03/2048m 51s

Best Of: Author Louise Erdrich / 'Watergate Girl' Jill Wine-Banks

Louise Erdrich talks about her new novel, 'The Night Watchman.' It was inspired by her grandfather, a chairman of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa who fought a Congressional initiative to move indigenous peoples off their land and into cities. Critic John Powers reviews the genre-bending film 'Bacurau,' about a small Brazilian town grappling with a series of mysterious events.In her memoir, 'The Watergate Girl,' Jill Wine-Banks talks about confronting Nixon White House insiders on the witness stand and enduring sexism in the courtroom.
07/03/2051m 0s

Biographer Robert Caro

Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Robert Caro was never interested in only telling the stories of great men. Instead, he says, "I wanted to use their lives to show how political power worked." He talks about his two most famous works — biographies of Lyndon Johnson and New York City planner Robert Moses. Caro's memoir about his process, 'Working,' is now out in paperback. He spoke with Dave Davies last year.Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews two new sci-fi/fantasy shows — 'Devs' on Hulu and 'Amazing Stories' on Apple TV+.
06/03/2048m 46s

Uncovering The CIA's Operation To Steal State Secrets

For 50 years, countries all over the world bought encryption technology from a Swiss company, called Crypto AG, to protect their communications with diplomats, soldiers and spies. What they didn't know is that the firm was actually owned by the CIA and German intelligence, which rigged the encryption products so they could spy on the countries that bought them. 'Washington Post' reporter Greg Miller tells the story. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the Western 'First Cow.'
05/03/2049m 18s

Author Louise Erdrich On Native Peoples' 'Long, Brutal Fight For Survival'

Erdrich's new novel, 'The Night Watchman,' was inspired by her grandfather, a chairman of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa who fought a Congressional initiative to move indigenous peoples off their land and into cities. Erdrich says the policy amounted to tribal termination. "Termination was a way to finally resolve what Congress thought of as 'the Indian problem,'" she says.Also, critic John Powers reviews the genre-bending film 'Bacurau,' about a small Brazilian town grappling with a series of mysterious events.
04/03/2048m 28s

A Father Searches For His Son And Answers In The Costa Rican Jungle

In 2014, the 27-year-old son of adventurer Roman Dial walked alone into the Costa Rican wilderness. "I'm planning on doing 4 days in the jungle," he wrote in an email before leaving. "It should be difficult to get lost forever." Then he vanished. Dial talks about his frantic search for his son — and for answers to what happened. His book is 'The Adventurer's Son.' Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Scratched,' Elizabeth Tallent's new memoir about perfectionism.
03/03/2049m 17s

Former Parole Officer On 'Hardship & Hope After Prison'

As a parole officer in New Orleans, Jason Hardy was responsible for 220 individuals — four times the recommended caseload. He says the parole and probation system fails the most vulnerable.Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album of ballads from trumpeter Jeremy Pelt.
02/03/2047m 55s

Best Of: Actor Ben Mendelsohn / Trump's 'Hit List'

In the HBO series 'The Outsider,' which was adapted from a Stephen King novel, Australian actor Ben Mendelsohn plays a detective trying to solve a murder — and resisting the idea that the killer may be a supernatural entity. Also, Ken Tucker reviews a newly released live album from Bryan Ferry, best-known as the lead man of Roxy Music.Axios reporter Jonathan Swan says the president has "crossed a psychological line" since impeachment, developing a list of disloyal officials to oust — and suggesting loyalists to replace them. "Experience matters far, far less to Trump than loyalty," Swan says. "It's not even close."
29/02/2051m 9s

Aidy Bryant On 'Shrill'

Bryant co-writes and stars in the comedy series 'Shrill,' based on Lindy West's book about identifying as fat and a feminist. Bryant is also a cast member on 'Saturday Night Live.' (Originally broadcast March 2019) Also, we listen back to excerpts of interviews with rhythm guitarist Marty Grosz. Now 90, he tells his story in the memoir, 'It's a Sin to Tell a Lie.' He spoke with Terry Gross in 1984 and 2004 and also played some of his music. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the dystopian novel, 'The Resisters.'
28/02/2049m 39s

Understanding Trump's 'Hit List'

Axios reporter Jonathan Swan says the president has "crossed a psychological line" since impeachment, developing a list of disloyal officials to oust — and suggesting loyalists to replace them. "Experience matters far, far less to Trump than loyalty," Swan says. "It's not even close."
27/02/2050m 9s

Actor Ben Mendelsohn On 'The Outsider'

In the HBO series, which was adapted from a Stephen King novel, the Australian actor plays a detective trying to solve a murder — and resisting the idea that the killer may be a supernatural entity. He talks about masking his accent, acting with his eyes and how his role on 'The Outsider' is a departure from the "baddies" he's played in the past. Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Wendy,' a loose retelling of 'Peter Pan,' directed by Benh Zeitlin.
26/02/2049m 34s

Facebook: The Inside Story

How can one company be so wildly successful — and so thoroughly distrusted? 'Wired' Editor-at-Large Steven Levy reflects on Facebook's enigmatic leader and its reckless drive for expansion in his new book, 'Facebook: The Inside Story.'Also, Ken Tucker reviews a newly released live album from Bryan Ferry, best-known as the lead man of Roxy Music.
25/02/2048m 31s

The Supreme Court's Battle For A 'More Unjust' America

In his new book, 'Supreme Inequality,' lawyer/journalist Adam Cohen makes the case that the Supreme Court has been "a right-wing court for 50 years," siding with corporations and the wealthy — and against the poor.And jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Life Goes On,' a record by Carla Bley's trio.
24/02/2047m 59s

Best Of: Claire Danes / Rachael & Vilray Sing Swing Standards

Claire Danes has played CIA agent Carrie Mathison on 'Homeland' for 8 seasons. As the last season begins on Showtime, she looks back on the series. She also spoke with Terry Gross about her break-out role on 'My So-Called Life' when she was a teen.Critic John Powers reviews the French film 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire.' The music duo Rachael & Vilray perform songs from their self-titled debut album, which draws on the music of the '30s and '40s. Rachael Price is also the lead singer of Lake Street Dive. They spoke with producer Sam Briger.
22/02/2051m 1s

Writer Recalls Her Mother's Secret Gambling Enterprise

Growing up, Bridgett M. Davis' mother booked and banked bets from their home in Detroit. She writes about her experience — and the role of "the numbers" in the black community — in her memoir, 'The World According to Fannie Davis.' (Originally broadcast Feb. 2019) TV critic David Bianculli reviews the latest season of 'Better Call Saul.'
21/02/2049m 24s

Claire Danes

Danes has played CIA agent Carrie Mathison on 'Homeland' for 8 seasons. As the last season begins on Showtime, she looks back on the series. She also spoke with Terry Gross about her break-out role on 'My So-Called Life' when she was a teen. "I remember just being amazed ... that somebody out there had been able to articulate what I was going through so, so perfectly," she says. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new adaptation of Jane Austen's 'Emma.'
20/02/2048m 49s

Chaos, Corruption & Trump's Secrets At Deutsche Bank

In his book 'Dark Towers,' David Enrich traces Deutsche Bank's shadowy practices, from laundering money for Russian oligarchs to the violation of international sanctions. Enrich, who is the finance editor at the 'New York Times,' also talks about the bank's long relationship with Donald Trump, and the suspicious activity that has gone unchecked. Also, critic John Powers reviews the Amazon series 'Hunters' starring Al Pacino.
19/02/2049m 3s

Rachael & Vilray Sing Swing Standards

The music duo perform songs from their self-titled debut album, which draws on the music of the '30s and '40s. "There is a timeless quality to these old standards," Vilray says. Rachael Price is also the lead singer of Lake Street Dive. They spoke with producer Sam Briger. Also, we remember Ernest Hemingway biographer A. E. Hotchner. He died Feb. 15. Hotchner spoke with Terry Gross in 1999.
18/02/2048m 18s
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