Instant Genius

Instant Genius

By Immediate media

Whether you’re curious about getting healthy, the Big Bang or the science of cooking, find out everything you need to know in under 30 minutes with Instant Genius. The team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine talk to world-leading experts to bring you a bite-sized masterclass on a new subject each week.


Then when you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius. Dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.

Episodes

The nature of time, with Colin Stuart

Astronomy author and speaker Colin Stuart explains why time has an arrow, its intimate relationship with space, and why it's impossible to go back in time and kill Hitler.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/09/2127m 54s

CRISPR, with Prof Fyodor Urnov

Prof Fyodor Urnov tells us how CRISPR is already changing the lives of people with genetic disorders, and why it’s essential that gene editing therapies are accessible to all.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/09/2129m 49s

Science denial, with Lee McIntyre

Lee tells us about why science denial is on the rise, from flat-Earthers to anti-vaxxers, and where conspiracy theories come from in the first place.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/09/2130m 49s

The decline of the insects, with Prof Dave Goulson

Entomologist Dave Goulson is the author of Silent Earth: Averting the Insect Apocalypse. He tells us how we can save the bugs and why they’re so important.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/08/2128m 51s

Migraines, with Dr Katy Munro

Headache specialist, author and podcast host Dr Katy Munro tells us what goes on in your body during a migraine.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/08/2129m 23s

Procrastination, with Dr Fuschia Sirios

Dr Fuschia Sirios, well-being researcher from The University of Sheffield, unpacks the psychology of procrastination – from why we do it, to how to stop.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/08/2123m 55s

Childhood, with Dr Emma Byrne

Dr Emma Byrne, author of How to Build a Human, tells us about the hidden science of childhood.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/08/2121m 1s

Calories, with Dr Giles Yeo

Trust Me, I’m a Doctor’s Giles Yeo tells us about the history of calorie counting and whether there’s such thing as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ calories.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/08/2127m 55s

Sleep, with Dr Matthew Walker

Dr Matthew Walker, professor of neuroscience, tells us about how sleep evolved and what happens when we don’t get enough.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/07/2128m 22s

The science of pain, with Dr Monty Lyman

Dr Monty Lyman, author of The Painful Truth, tells us what pain really is, how the placebo effect works, and why our emotions have a huge effect on the pain we feel.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/07/2130m 31s

Forensic anthropology, with Prof Sue Black

Prof Sue Black explains the science behind identifying a body at a crime scene. Warning: This episode contains a frank and academic discussion about forensic investigation – how it works and what clues a dead body might leave behind – which some listeners may find uncomfortable.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/07/2132m 33s

Personality change, with Dr Christian Jarrett

Cognitive neuroscientist Dr Christian Jarrett tells us all about what forms personality traits – and the simple ways to change yours.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/07/2124m 46s

Hidden geometry, with Jordan Ellenberg

Mathematician Jordan Ellenberg tells us about his book, Shape, and why geometry is about so much more than triangles and circles.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: sciencefocus.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/06/2130m 36s

The Neanderthals, with Dr Rebecca Wragg Sykes

Dr Rebecca Wragg Sykes tells us all about Neanderthals, and reveals how they continue to shape our view about deep human history.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius. Dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: https://www.sciencefocus.com/  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/06/2136m 38s

The golden age of dinosaur discovery, with Prof Steve Brusatte

Prof Steve Brusatte tells us how the latest findings in palaeontology have turned our picture of dinosaurs on its head.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: https://www.sciencefocus.com/  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/06/2134m 8s

The Big Bang, with Prof Jim Al-Khalili

Jim Al-Khalili, a theoretical physicist and Professor of Public Engagement in Science, tells us about the origins of the Universe.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: https://www.sciencefocus.com/  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/06/2116m 30s

Your brain chemistry and you, with Ginny Smith

Science journalist and presenter Ginny Smith tells us about the chemicals that run your brain.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: https://www.sciencefocus.com/  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/06/2132m 30s

The science of cooking, with Dr Stuart Farrimond

Food scientist, doctor and TV presenter Stuart Farrimond tells us about how you can use science to upgrade your cooking.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: https://www.sciencefocus.com/  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/06/2124m 8s

The end of the Universe, with Dr Katie Mack

Theoretical astrophysicist, author and one of Twitter’s most-followed scientists Dr Katie Mack tells us about the Universe's ultimate fate.Once you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius, dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of science and technology. Only available on Apple Podcasts.Produced by the team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine. Visit our website: https://www.sciencefocus.com/  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/06/2132m 47s

Welcome to Instant Genius

The podcast that gives you the chance to be an expert in everything.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/05/2142s

How AI and androids could shape the music of the future

While Daft Punk may have sadly split, machine-created music may be about to skyrocket in popularity. Not only are artificial intelligence neural networks now capable of creating original melodies, but scientists are also developing robots capable of playing – and improvising – live music.So, will AI and androids soon top the charts? And could they even replace human musicians entirely?On this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, Prof Nick Bryan-Kinns, director of the Media and Arts Technology Centre at Queen Mary University of London, joins staff writer Thomas Ling to explain groundbreaking new music technology.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Sticher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Could these gloves be the future of music? – Imogen HeapWhy do humans make music?The psychology of the sea shanty: Why work songs are such earwormsMeet the computer scientist teaching an AI to play Dungeons and DragonsThe creator of Bellingcat on using the internet to investigate global affairsThe future of human flight, with real-life Iron Man Richard Browning  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/05/2123m 7s

Could 'counterfactuals' solve the biggest problems in physics?

Most laws of physics tell us what must happen. Throw a ball in the air and it will come back down. But physicist Chiara Marletto, a Research Fellow at the University of Oxford, says that laws like this only tell us part of the story.She believes that the rest lies in 'counterfactuals': things that could be.In her new book, The Science of Can and Can’t (£20, Allen Lane), she explains how these counterfactual properties could solve many of science’s biggest outstanding problems.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Sticher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Prof Avi Loeb on what 'Oumuamua tells us about the problem with modern physicsMarcus Chown: Does the Big Bang really explain our Universe?Dr Douglas Vakoch: Should we try to contact aliens?Katie Mack: How will the Universe end?Sonia Contera: How will nanotechnology revolutionise medicine?Everything You Wanted To Know About… Physics with Jim Al-Khalili  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/05/2126m 17s

What happens to you after 40 days with no natural light?

Around two months ago, a group of 15 people – scientists, explorers and medics – travelled deep into a cave in the south of France. The expedition descended to a point so deep that natural light could not reach them, and there the team stayed for 40 days and 40 nights without clocks, phones or anyway of telling the time.The project’s goal was to understand what happens to our brains and bodies when we’re deprived of an external measure of time and they hoped to discover how a group of people could adapt to such an extreme situation.Just two weeks ago, that team emerged from the cave, and Christian Clot, the expedition’s leader and the designer of the DEEP TIME mission, joins editor Daniel Bennett on this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast to talk about what the experiment discovered, how the expedition changed him and what ultimately happened when the team returned to the surface.Let us know what you think of the Science Focus Podcast by filling out our survey. By submitting it, you enter the prize draw to win one of seven £100 Voucher Express Gift Cards. It should take no more than five minutes. UK residents only. Full T&Cs.Take part in the surveySubscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Sticher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Why realistic humanoid robots need to learn to lip-syncThe psychology of the sea shanty: Why work songs are such earwormsMental health and your brain: What happens when it goes wrongWhy you can’t multitask (and why that’s a good thing)How to maximise your motivation, according to a neuroscientistProf John Drury: The psychology of lockdowns  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/05/2134m 35s

Why do humans make music?

Our lives are full of music, from the songs we sing along to on the radio to the orchestral scores that bring a film to life. But why is it that humans love to make music, and how did it evolve in the first place?Musicologist Prof Michael Spitzer, author of the new book The Musical Human (£30, Bloomsbury), joins BBC Science Focus online assistant Sara Rigby on this week’s episode to explain.Let us know what you think of the Science Focus Podcast by filling out our survey. By submitting it, you enter the prize draw to win one of seven £100 Voucher Express Gift Cards. It should take no more than 5 minutes. UK residents only. Full T&Cs.Take part in the surveySubscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Sticher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:The psychology of the sea shanty: Why work songs are such earwormsCould these gloves be the future of music? – Imogen HeapThe neuroscience of happiness – Dean BurnettDr Pete Etchells: Do video games encourage gambling behaviour?Why you can’t multitask (and why that’s a good thing)Phobias, paranoia and PTSD: Why virtual reality therapy is the frontier of mental health treatment  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/05/2124m 20s

The future of human flight, with real-life Iron Man Richard Browning

In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we talk to the "real-life Iron Man" – not Marvel's Tony Stark, but inventor Richard Browning.He’s the creator of the ‘Jet Suit’, which can fly one person through the air at speeds of 135km/h. He’s also founder and chief test pilot of Gravity Industries and author of new book Taking on Gravity (£20, Bantam Press).He explains his quite literal rise to success – and the future of human flight.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Sticher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Podcast: Why realistic humanoid robots need to learn to lip-syncRitu Raman: Can you build with biology?Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Meet the computer scientist teaching an AI to play Dungeons and DragonsHow virtual reality is helping patients with phobias, anxiety disorders and moreDr Pete Etchells: Do video games encourage gambling behaviour?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/04/2124m 44s

Why realistic humanoid robots need to learn to lip-sync

In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, commissioning editor Jason Goodyer speaks to Dr Carl Strathearn, a research fellow at the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University.He's currently conducting research on realistic humanoid robots, specifically on more realistically synchronising their speech and mouth movements.He tells us about how to get robots out of the Uncanny Valley, why the way a robot looks is so important, and why Data from Star Trek is an inspiration for his work.Read an edited excerpt from this interviewLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:How virtual reality is helping patients with phobias, anxiety disorders and moreDr Pete Etchells: Do video games encourage gambling behaviour?Rana el Kaliouby: What if computers could read our emotions?Ritu Raman: Can you build with biology?Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/04/2127m 3s

How to understand statistics in the news and when to trust them

In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, editor Daniel Bennett speaks to Tom Chivers and David Chivers.Tom is a veteran science journalist and author and David is lecturer in economics at the University of Durham. As well as a surname, they share a passion for statistics, or more precisely for the way that numbers are used and presented in the media. Together they’ve written a new book: How to Read Numbers: A Guide to Statistics in the News and Knowing When to Trust Them.They talk to Daniel about how to understand the sometimes confusing stats surrounding health and risk, how to spot a suspicious claim when you see one, and how to think about the current concerns surrounding the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Sir David Spiegelhalter: There's no such thing as Blue MondayMatt Parker: What happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong?Hannah Fry: How much of our lives is secretly underpinned by maths?Prof Linda Scott: Why is there still economic inequality between men and women?Hannah Fry: What's the deal with algorithms?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/04/211h 3m

The bizarre biology of the mantis shrimp

What is your favourite animal? If you know anything about the mantis shrimp, it might well be your top pick. Dwelling in shallow tropical waters, these mysterious predators not only wield one of the strongest punches in nature, but also a one-of-a-kind visual system that scientists are only just making sense of.One of these scientists is Dr Martin How from the University of Bristol. He joins us on this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast to reveal more about mantis shrimp and their remarkable abilities.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Everything you ever wanted to know about… the deep sea with Dr Jon CopleyAndrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber: Is there really no such thing as a fish?Brad Lister: Are we facing an insect apocalypse?Neil Gemmell: The genetic hunt for the Loch Ness MonsterNeil Shubin: How do big changes in evolution happen?Mark Lynas: Could leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/04/2119m 42s

The creator of Bellingcat on using the internet to investigate global affairs

In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we speak to Elliot Higgins, the founder of Bellingcat. If you haven’t heard that name before, then you might be surprised to know that Bellingcat is behind some of the biggest news revelations of the decade.They use social media and information freely available online to carry out what they call open source investigation.Their work has uncovered the use of chemical weapons in Syria, identified suspects in the Skripal poisoning in Salisbury and identified the people responsible for downing flight MH17 over Ukraine.Eliot speaks to editor Dan Bennett about his new book, We Are Bellingcat (£20, Bloomsbury), which tells the story of how a group of amateur hobbyists ended up taking on Russian spies.Read an edited excerpt of this interviewLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Julia Shaw: Why do we do bad things?Marcel Danesi: Why do we want to believe lies?Project Discovery: Could computer games help find a cure for COVID-19?Chris Lintott: Can members of the public do real science?Lara Martin: Meet the computer scientist teaching an AI to play Dungeons and DragonsRana el Kaliouby: What if computers could read our emotions?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/03/2141m 54s

Prof Avi Loeb on what 'Oumuamua tells us about the problem with modern physics

In 2017, the Pan-STARRS telescope in Hawaii spotted an interstellar object passing by Earth for the first time. Shortly after, Harvard’s Prof Avi Loeb was met with a backlash from the scientific community for suggesting it could be of alien origin.Now, several years on, he has written a book, Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth, outlining why we still can’t out rule the possibility, and why scientists should always keep an open mind.We speak to Avi on this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast. He tells us why he believes the object, 'Oumuamua, was of alien origin, and what problems this reveals about the way modern physics is conducted.Read an edited excerpt of this interviewLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Douglas Vakoch: Should we try to contact aliens?Bergur Finnbogason: Project Discovery and its search for exoplanetsDr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?What if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-KhaliliBuilding a base on the Moon, and crafting believable sci-fi – Andy WeirDr Becky Smethurst: How do you actually find a black hole?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/03/2142m 9s

Meet the computer scientist teaching an AI to play Dungeons and Dragons

Many of us have had a one-to-one interaction with artificial intelligence. Whether that’s through an automated chat service for customer service, or trying our hand at beating an AI built to play chess. But these experiences aren’t flawless, they’re not as smooth as our interactions with other human beings.One researcher trying to improve the language abilities of AI is Lara Martin, a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania. More specifically, Lara is trying teach AI to tell stories.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Rana el Kaliouby: What if computers could read our emotions?Aleks Krotoski: What happens to your data when you die?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Pete Etchells: Are video games good for us?Jamie Susskind: How technology is changing politicsJim Al-Khalili: Why AI is not the enemy  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/03/2135m 53s

International Women’s Day: The forgotten female scientists of history

Today is International Women’s Day, and in this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, online assistant Sara Rigby talks to science historians Anna Reser and Leila McNeill, authors of Forces of Nature: The Women who Changed Science (£20, Frances Lincoln).They tell us about the women who engaged in science throughout history but don’t always get remembered – the midwives, the astronomers, and the wives and sisters.Read an edited excerpt from the interviewLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Why aren't there more women in science?Angela Saini: Inequality in scienceCaroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?Kathryn D. Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?Subhadra Das: What part has science played in racism?Kevin Fong: What happened to Apollo 13?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/03/2136m 52s

How to maximise your motivation, according to a neuroscientist

As the UK enters its 13th month of lockdown restrictions and home-working, many surveys cite a slump in mental wellbeing and general productivity.But are there any scientific ways we can maximise our motivation and prevent procrastination?In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, neuroscientist Dr Gabija Toleikyte, author of Why the F*ck Can't I Change, tells us all about it.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Why you can’t multitask (and why that’s a good thing)Dean Burnett: The neuroscience of happinessDaniel Freeman: How virtual reality is helping patients with phobias, anxiety disorders and moreAnthony David: Why is there still such stigma around mental health?Pete Etchells: Are video games good for us?Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?Helen Russell: What does it mean to be happy?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/03/2126m 6s

Inside the February issue with the BBC Science Focus team

In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we chat through the February 2021 issue of the magazine, which is on sale now.Managing editor Alice Lipscombe-Southwell opens the episode by telling us why it's so important artificial intelligence learns how to tell stories.Next up is editor Dan Bennett, who tells us about the world’s first airport for drones and flying cars, which is opening in Coventry, UK.Finally, commissioning editor Jason Goodyer tells about the latest developments in the study of dark matter.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Hannah Fry: How much of our lives is secretly underpinned by maths?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Bergur Finnbogason: Project Discovery and its search for exoplanetsRitu Raman: Can you build with biology?Robin Ince: Inside the mind of a comedianFinding the fun in science – Dara Ó Briain  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/02/2132m 1s

Mental health and your brain: What happens when it goes wrong

In the UK, one in four people experience a mental health problem each year. The reality of living with common problems like depression and anxiety is increasingly well-known.But how much do you actually know about what’s going on in your brain when your mental health suffers?Neuroscientist Dean Burnett, author of the new book Psycho-logical, tells us all about it on this episode of the Science Focus Podcast.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?The neuroscience of happiness – Dean BurnettProf John Drury: The psychology of lockdownsHow virtual reality is helping patients with phobias, anxiety disorders and moreElisa Raffaella Ferrè: What happens to the brain in space?Dr Guy Leschziner: What is your brain doing while you sleep?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/02/2146m 43s

Why rewilding success stories make us hopeful for the future

There are few places left on Earth that have been untouched by humans, and biodiversity is being lost at an unprecedented rate.Luckily, there are ambitious rewilding programmes around the world that aim to fix this by returning land to nature.In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we speak to Dr Andrea Perino, a scientist from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research and an expert on rewilding. She tells us about the benefits of rewilding, whether it's acres of forest or just a tiny patch in your back garden.Read more about rewildingLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Mark Lynas: Could leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals?Merlin Sheldrake: How have fungi shaped the world?Samantha Alger: What can we do to save the bees?Ross Barnett: Why should we be interested in prehistoric animals that aren’t dinosaurs?Sir David Attenborough: How can we save our planet?Brad Lister: Are we facing an insect apocalypse?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/02/2124m 8s

The psychology of the sea shanty: Why work songs are such earworms

2021 has got off to a strange start, with a surprising trend sweeping the internet: sea shanties. This ancient genre of music has exploded in popularity in recent weeks, thanks to people on social media singing them, sharing them and adding their own twists.In fact, they’ve become so popular that Bristol-based shanty band The Longest Johns have entered the top 40 in the UK singles chart.Naturally, we here at BBC Science Focus wanted to know what it was about sea shanties that makes them so catchy. So this week, we spoke to Professor Catherine Loveday of the University of Westminster. She’s a neuropsychologist who specialises in music.Read more about the science of sea shantiesLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Could these gloves be the future of music? – Imogen HeapThe neuroscience of happiness – Dean BurnettDr Pete Etchells: Do video games encourage gambling behaviour?Why you can’t multitask (and why that’s a good thing)Phobias, paranoia and PTSD: Why virtual reality therapy is the frontier of mental health treatmentHow a scientist used viruses to save her husband’s life from a superbug  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/02/2119m 37s

Team talk: Beating pandemic burnout, the seasons of you and a daring giraffe rescue

In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we chat through the January 2021 issue of the magazine, which is on sale now.Editor Dan Bennett opens the episode by talking about new research that suggests that rather than following a pattern of spring, summer, autumn and winter, our bodies may have their own seasonal fluctuations that don’t match the calendar.Next up is managing editor Alice Lipscombe-Southwell, who tells us about how we can beat the pandemic burnout.Finally, commissioning editor Jason Goodyer tells the story of a daring rescue of endangered giraffes from an island where food is slowly running out.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:End of year roundup: The non-COVID science that brought us joy in 2020Inside the December issue with the BBC Science Focus teamThe Science Focus team: What’s inside November’s issue?Why you can’t multitask (and why that’s a good thing)Prof John Drury: The psychology of lockdownsHow a scientist used viruses to save her husband’s life from a superbug  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/01/2127m 51s

Why you can’t multitask (and why that’s a good thing)

Humans' ability to turn thoughts into actions has enabled us to change the world. But we've never been great at getting two things done at once.Understanding how our brain helps us achieve our goals through something called executive function, or cognitive control, can explain why we're so bad at multitasking.According to neuroscientist Prof David Badre, when we're armed with this knowledge we can begin to work together to become a better society. Badre's new book, On Task (£25, Princeton University Press) explains the mechanisms behind cognitive control.In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast we speak to Badre to find out more about how our brains work.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dean Burnett: The neuroscience of happinessDaniel Freeman: How virtual reality is helping patients with phobias, anxiety disorders and moreAnthony David: Why is there still such stigma around mental health?Pete Etchells: Are video games good for us?Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?Helen Russell: What does it mean to be happy?Gordon Wallace: Is an implantable electronic device the future of medicine?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/01/2145m 15s

How virtual reality is helping patients with phobias, anxiety disorders and more

In the New Year issue, we cover the biggest ideas that you need to understand in 2021, and in the past few episodes of the podcast we’ve been talking to the experts who will explain these ideas in their own words.For the next in the series, we speak to Daniel Freeman, a Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Oxford. Daniel has been working with VR technology since 2001 and is a founder of Oxford VR, a University of Oxford spinout company.He tells us about using virtual reality to treat mental health problems.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription of this episode [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Anthony David: Why is there still such stigma around mental health?Pete Etchells: Are video games good for us?Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?Helen Russell: What does it mean to be happy?Gordon Wallace: Is an implantable electronic device the future of medicine?Dean Burnett: The neuroscience of happinessDr Lucy Rogers: What makes a robot a robot?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/01/2134m 42s

How a scientist used viruses to save her husband’s life from a superbug

In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we're joined by AIDS researcher Professor Steffanie Strathdee.In 2015, Strathdee's husband was infected by superbug that was resistant to every antibiotic that the doctors could throw at it, but she was able to save his life with an experimental treatment made of viruses found in sewage.In the New Year issue of BBC Science Focus Magazine, we cover the biggest ideas that you need to understand in 2021. This episode is one of a series in which we talk to the experts who will explain these ideas in their own words.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Marcus Chown: Does the Big Bang really explain our Universe?Sonia Contera: How will nanotechnology revolutionise medicine?Professor Catharina Svanborg: Is the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk?Brian Switek: How did bones evolve?Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?Dr Monty Lyman: What does our skin tell us about ourselves?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/01/2145m 3s

Marcus Chown: Does the Big Bang really explain our Universe?

In the New Year issue of BBC Science Focus Magazine, we cover the biggest ideas that you need to understand in 2021. Over the next few episodes of the Science Focus Podcast, we’ll be talking to the experts who will explain these ideas in their own words.In this episode, we talk to science writer Marcus Chown, who tells us all about the major problems in our current understanding of cosmology. We discuss the Big Bang, dark matter, inflation, and what we still don't know about the formation of our Universe.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Katie Mack: How will the Universe end?Dr Douglas Vakoch: Should we try to contact aliens?Dr Jacob Bleacher: Why do we need to go back to the Moon?Elisa Raffaella Ferrè: What happens to the brain in space?Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Kathryn D. Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/12/2046m 30s

End of year roundup: The non-COVID science that brought us joy in 2020

It’s been a long and strange year, and most of our attention has been focussed on the coronavirus. So, in this bonus episode of the Science Focus Podcast, the team talks about this year’s most interesting science that has nothing to do with COVID.We start off by talking about our favourite scientific developments of the year, and then we discuss the books and documentaries that we’ve loved.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Inside the December issue with the BBC Science Focus teamThe Science Focus team: What's inside November's issue?Dr Douglas Vakoch: Should we try to contact aliens?Dr Jacob Bleacher: Why do we need to go back to the Moon?Andy Weir: Building a base on the Moon, and crafting believable sci-fiGretchen McCulloch: How has the internet affected how we communicate?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/12/2042m 4s

Prof John Drury: The psychology of lockdowns

In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we talk to Prof John Drury, a behavioural psychologist based at the University of Sussex who specialises in studying crowds and collective behaviour.The UK recently came out of the second COVID-19 lockdown, and went into a new three-tier system, with much of the country still in in the strictest tier.John tells us about why people respond to the restrictions differently, how to ensure people follow the rules, and what the long-term effects the lockdowns will have on our psychology.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Hugo Zeberg: How could Neanderthal genes affect COVID-19?Dr Rachel Brown: Why are some COVID-19 patients suffering from neurological complications?Project Discovery: Could computer games help find a cure for COVID-19?David Halpern: Nudge theoryDr Pete Etchells: Do video games encourage gambling behaviour?Dr Julia Shaw: Why do we do bad things?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/12/2025m 20s

Dr Pete Etchells: Do video games encourage gambling behaviour?

This week on the Science Focus Podcast, we're joined by Dr Pete Etchells, a professor of psychology with a particular interest how video games affect our mood and behaviour.Pete is also the author of the book Lost in a Good Game which explores why we love video games, and what they do for us.Today we’re talking about the relationship between gambling and video games: what we know and what don’t. We want you to help us with the research, so if you want to get involved in a real-life scientific study that could shape the conversation around gaming and gambling, stayed tuned and listen in for details at the end.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Pete Etchells: Are video games good for us?Project Discovery: Could computer games help find a cure for COVID-19?The neuroscience of happiness – Dean BurnettDr Julia Shaw: Why do we do bad things?Anthony David: Why is there still such stigma around mental health?Brendan Walker: Where is the best place to sit on a rollercoaster?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/12/2040m 59s

Christmas Lectures 2020: How can we look after our planet?

Started by Michael Faraday in 1825, and now broadcast on national television, the Christmas lectures bring a science topic to our screens over three nights every year. The series of lectures has always been held within the Royal Institution in London, but this year, of course, is going to be slightly different.In this week's episode, editorial assistant Amy Barrett is joined today by three expert scientists, Tara Shine, Chris Jackson and Helen Czerski, who are going to be presenting the 2020 Christmas lectures, titled Planet Earth: A User's Guide.In lecture one, geologist Chris Jackson will reveal our Earth's climate story through the rocks and the fossil record. In lecture two, physicist and oceanographer Helen Czerski will talk about the part our oceans play in the climate crisis. And in lecture three, environmental scientist Tara Shine will talk about carbon emissions and what we're really breathing in.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Hannah Fry: How much of our lives is secretly underpinned by maths?Royal Institution Christmas Lectures past and presentSir David Attenborough: How can we save our planet?Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac: Has climate change determined our future?Everything you ever wanted to know about... the deep sea with Dr Jon CopleyMark Miodownik: Are biodegradable plastics really better than traditional plastic?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/12/2033m 25s

Inside the December issue with the BBC Science Focus team

In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we chat through the December 2020 issue of the magazine, which is on sale now.The issue is all about the search for extraterrestrial life, so managing editor Alice Lipscombe-Southwell starts us off by telling us about the most promising places in our Solar System to search for alien life.Commissioning editor Jason Goodyer tells us about a new drug delivery system that draws inspiration from parasitic hookworms, and then editorial assistant Amy Barrett brings us back around to ET by discussing why we want to believe in aliens.We close the podcast with details of our exciting new competition, judged by comedian and author Dara Ó Briain.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:The Science Focus team: What's inside November's issue?Finding the fun in science – Dara Ó BriainDr Douglas Vakoch: Should we try to contact aliens?Bergur Finnbogason: Project Discovery and its search for exoplanetsRitu Raman: Can you build with biology?Robin Ince: Inside the mind of a comedian  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/11/2032m 3s

Genes and heredity - Everything you ever wanted to know about... the biology of life with Sir Paul Nurse

For this instalment in the Everything you ever wanted to know about... series, we’ve sourced questions from Google, our listeners and the Science Focus team to put to experts and help you understand key ideas in science, in short episodes.This week, we're joined by geneticist Sir Paul Nurse, the Director of the Francis Crick Institute in London and one of the recipients of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which he shared with Leland Hartwell and Timothy Hunt.Paul has recently published a book that helps readers understand biology, called What is Life? (£9.99, David Fickling Books). He shared some of the concepts from the books with us over two quick-fire episodes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/11/2020m 54s

Cells - Everything you ever wanted to know about... the biology of life with Sir Paul Nurse

For this instalment in the Everything you ever wanted to know about... series, we’ve sourced questions from Google, our listeners and the Science Focus team to put to experts and help you understand key ideas in science, in short episodes.This week, we're joined by geneticist Sir Paul Nurse, the Director of the Francis Crick Institute in London and one of the recipients of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which he shared with Leland Hartwell and Timothy Hunt.Paul has recently published a book that helps readers understand biology, called What is Life? (£9.99, David Fickling Books). He shared some of the concepts from the books with us over two quick-fire episodes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/11/2021m 55s

Dr Douglas Vakoch: Should we try to contact aliens?

In this week’s episode, I’m talking to Dr Douglas Vakoch, President of Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence, or METI.We talk about whether we should be broadcasting messages into space to signal our existence to intelligent alien species.We also discuss how we could create a message that an unknown species of alien could understand.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Bergur Finnbogason: Project Discovery and its search for exoplanetsWhat if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-KhaliliBuilding a base on the Moon, and crafting believable sci-fi – Andy WeirDr Becky Smethurst: How do you actually find a black hole?Kathryn D. Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/11/2027m 42s

Exploring the deep sea - Everything you ever wanted to know about... the deep sea with Dr Jon Copley

Our guest this week is Dr Jon Copley. Jon is a marine biologist, specialising in the deep sea. He went on the first mini sub dive to the world’s deepest hydrothermal vents, 5km down on the ocean floor, and also took part in the firs minisub dives to 1km deep in the Antarctic.Jon is also a science communicator and writer, who worked as a science advisor on the iconic BBC series Blue Planet II. He is also an associate professor of ocean exploration and public engagement at the University of Southampton. In 2019, he also published fantastic book called Ask an Ocean Explorer which tells you all about the ocean in 25 questions.Over three quick-fire episodes, Jon tells BBC Science Focus managing editor Alice Limpscombe-Southwell about the bizarre life found on the ocean floor, the habitats where they thrive, and what it's like to explore the deep sea in a submarine.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/11/2026m 53s

Deep sea habitats - Everything you ever wanted to know about... the deep sea with Dr Jon Copley

Our guest this week is Dr Jon Copley. Jon is a marine biologist, specialising in the deep sea. He went on the first mini sub dive to the world’s deepest hydrothermal vents, 5km down on the ocean floor, and also took part in the firs minisub dives to 1km deep in the Antarctic.Jon is also a science communicator and writer, who worked as a science advisor on the iconic BBC series Blue Planet II. He is also an associate professor of ocean exploration and public engagement at the University of Southampton. In 2019, he also published fantastic book called Ask an Ocean Explorer which tells you all about the ocean in 25 questions.Over three quick-fire episodes, Jon tells BBC Science Focus managing editor Alice Limpscombe-Southwell about the bizarre life found on the ocean floor, the habitats where they thrive, and what it's like to explore the deep sea in a submarine.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/11/2032m 49s

Deep sea creatures - Everything you ever wanted to know about... the deep sea with Dr Jon Copley

Our guest this week is Dr Jon Copley. Jon is a marine biologist, specialising in the deep sea. He went on the first mini sub dive to the world’s deepest hydrothermal vents, 5km down on the ocean floor, and also took part in the firs minisub dives to 1km deep in the Antarctic.Jon is also a science communicator and writer, who worked as a science advisor on the iconic BBC series Blue Planet II. He is also an associate professor of ocean exploration and public engagement at the University of Southampton. In 2019, he also published fantastic book called Ask an Ocean Explorer which tells you all about the ocean in 25 questions.Over three quick-fire episodes, Jon tells BBC Science Focus managing editor Alice Limpscombe-Southwell about the bizarre life found on the ocean floor, the habitats where they thrive, and what it's like to explore the deep sea in a submarine.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/11/2039m 9s

The Science Focus team: What's inside November's issue?

In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast we chat through the November 2020 issue of the magazine, which is on sale now.Editor Dan Bennett explains why, this month, we’re focusing on food myths. Scientist and writer Professor Tim Spector penned our cover feature to reveal the fact and the fiction surrounding diet and nutrition, and some of his research may have results that surprise you.Talking about the amazing variety of our ocean’s other-worldly sea slugs is managing editor Alice Lipscombe-Southwell. These small marine animals might sport cute faces and bright colours, but they’re armed with an array of deadly defences too.Commissioning editor Jason Goodyer digs into our piece about algorithms, which asks, what went wrong with the A Level results algorithm? And online assistant Sara Rigby scrutinises the stats around plug-in hybrid cars to find out if they’re as eco-friendly as marketed.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Matt Parker, Helen Arney and Steve Mould: What links coffee, snowflakes and frogs?Andrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber: Is there really no such thing as a fish?Matt Parker: What happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong?Helen Russell: What does it mean to be happy?Robin Ince: What's inside the mind of a comedian?Dara Ó Briain: Can you find the fun in science?Ryan North: How do you invent everything?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/11/2043m 30s

Prof Linda Scott: Why is there still economic inequality between men and women?

In this week’s episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we talk to Professor Linda Scott, an expert in women’s economic development and Emeritus DP World Chair for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the University of Oxford.Her book, The Double X Economy, has been shortlisted for the Royal Society Science Book Prize 2020. In it, she argues that when we economically empower women, we all succeed.Linda tells us about her work in women's economics, why the number of women joining the workforce is slowing down, and her idea for an '80 per cent Christmas' to close the gender pay gap.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Caroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?Pragya Agarwal: When does bias become prejudice?Why aren't there more women in science?Angela Saini: Is racism creeping into science?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Matt Parker: What happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/10/2040m 47s

Everything you ever wanted to know about… cancer with Dr Kat Arney

In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we talk to Dr Kat Arney about cancer. Kat is a science writer and broadcaster, and founder of the science communication consultancy First Create The Media. Her book, Rebel Cell is out now.She reveals how tissue becomes a tumour, how cells migrate to help cancer spread, and what scientists are doing right now to better understand the disease.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Matt Parker, Helen Arney and Steve Mould: What links coffee, snowflakes and frogs?Professor Catharina Svanborg: Is the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk?Is gene editing inspiring or terrifying? – Nessa CareyCan we slow down the ageing process? – Sue ArmstrongEating for your genes – Giles YeoHow to get a good night’s sleep – Alice Gregory  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/10/2042m 2s

Hugo Zeberg: How could Neanderthal genes affect COVID-19?

In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we talk to Hugo Zeberg, a geneticist working at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Hugo has just published a paper that suggests those of us with a certain set of genes inherited from Neanderthals may suffer from more severe effects of COVID-19.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Rachel Brown: Why are some COVID-19 patients suffering from neurological complications?Project Discovery: Could computer games help find a cure for COVID-19?Elisa Raffaella Ferrè: What happens to the brain in space?Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?Nessa Carey: Is gene editing inspiring or terrifying?Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/10/2013m 6s

Matt Parker, Helen Arney and Steve Mould: What links coffee, snowflakes and frogs?

Today‘s podcast episode is a special one, with not one, not two, but three fantastic guests. We’ve teamed up with the three spoken nerds – Matt Parker, Steve Mould and Helen Arney – to bring you an episode of unnecessary details all about… ice.Steve explains how instant coffee is made, Matt gets irate about eight-pointed 'snowfakes' and Helen talks cryonic freezing.To hear more from the three spoken nerds, check out their new Podcast Of Unnecessary Detail.The song was “You And Me And Walt Disney”, produced by Helen Arney and Olly the Octopus and you can download it for free along with all the songs from Unnecessary Detail podcasts at helenarney.bandcamp.comLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Andrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber: Is there really no such thing as a fish?Matt Parker: What happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong?Helen Russell: What does it mean to be happy? ?Robin Ince: What's inside the mind of a comedian?Dara Ó Briain: Can you Finding the fun in science?Ryan North: How do you invent everything?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/10/2051m 29s

Merlin Sheldrake: How have fungi shaped the world?

The fungal kingdom is vast, and yet much of it remains unknown to us – it’s estimated that only about 6 per cent of all fungal species have, so far, been described.But if fungi are all around us, why do we only know the names of a few? We might use yeast in baking, mushrooms in our cooking, or have been treated with penicillin, but biologist Merlin Sheldrake says there is much more wonder to be found in understanding our fungal friends better.His new book, Entangled Life, reveals the complexity of the fungal world. In it, he describes the fungal networks that connect trees and plants in something called the Wood Wide Web, and explains how fungi were crucial to the creation of the world we see around us today.We spoke to Merlin about this strange and wondrous lifeform.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:The Urban Birder: What wildlife can city-dwellers see?Samantha Alger: What can we do to save the bees?Mark Miodownik: Are biodegradable plastics really better than traditional plastic?Neil Shubin: How do big changes in evolution happen?Mark Lynas: Could leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals?Brad Lister: Are we facing an insect apocalypse?Neil Gemmell: The genetic hunt for the Loch Ness Monster  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/09/2038m 0s

Sue Black: What stories do our skeletons tell?

In today’s episode, we’re chatting to Professor Sue Black, an anatomist and forensic anthropologist. You might’ve seen characters doing her job on television, in shows like NCIS or Silent Witness – although, they’re not quite an accurate portrayal, as you’ll find out.Over the course of her career, Sue has worked with the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the United Nations, helping to identify victims and perpetrators from only sections of their bodies – perhaps a finger found in a bin bag, or the back of an assaulter’s hand caught on film. Her work has taken her to places such as Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Iraq.She talks to us about how science helps her piece together fragmented parts of a human jigsaw. This episode contains some graphic content, including descriptions of criminal acts and dissection, that some listeners might find upsetting.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Brian Switek: How did bones evolve?Mark O'Connell: Transhumanism: using technology to live foreverBill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?Nathan Lents: Everything that's wrong with the human bodyRitu Raman: Can you build with biology?Aleks Krotoski: What happens to your data when you die?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/09/2044m 32s

Professor Trevor Cox: Was Stonehenge an ancient acoustic chamber?

For decades, Stonehenge, the mysterious prehistoric circle of stones built on the Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, has left scientists scratching their heads. Who exactly built it and what was it used for?In the latest attempt to get to the bottom of this mystery, a team of engineers based at the University of Salford have 3D-printed a scale model of the ancient monument in order to investigate the effect its unique structure would’ve had on conversations, rituals, and even music.We spoke to Professor Trevor Cox, the acoustic engineer heading up the study, to find out more.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Trevor Cox: To become Prime Minister, change your voiceNatalie Starkey: What asteroids can tell us about our Solar SystemMike Garrett: Is there anybody out there?Colin Stuart: The most mysterious objects in the UniverseDr Lucy Rogers: What makes a robot a robot?Pete Etchells: Are video games good for us?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/09/2029m 11s

Dr Julia Shaw: Why do we do bad things?

Everyone does bad things. We know deep down are wrong, but we do them anyway. Sometimes, people do things so bad that we call them evil.Criminal psychologist Dr Julia Shaw says there’s no such thing as evil. In her book Making Evil, she argues that we should ditch the idea altogether, and try to understand so-called “evil” people.In this week’s episode of the Science Focus Podcast, she talks about psychopaths, mental illness and why we do bad things.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Jack Lewis: Sin and why we do the things we shouldn'tASMR science: are 'brain tingles' more than just a feeling?Jesse Bering: What can psychology tell us about suicide?Pete Etchells: Are video games good for us?Helen Russell: What does it mean to be happy?Gary Barker: What does it mean to be a man?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/09/2042m 48s

James Hamblin: Should we all stop showering?

We know how important good hygiene is. It protects us from viral infections and diseases, but what if, by washing, soaping and scrubbing, we’re actually damaging our health?Dr James Hamblin, journalist and professor of public health, stopped showering five years ago. In his new book, Clean (£16.99, Bodley Head), he reveals how our skin is affected by the products we apply. The overuse of soap and cosmetic products – sold to us with the promise of caring for our skin – might even be causing some of the ailments we’re using them to try to treat.It hasn’t always been this way. Historically, humans have gone from seeing bathing as something vaguely sinful and reserved for the wealthy, to a daily necessity that, if neglected, is a huge social blunder.According to James, it’s time for a whole new perspective on cleaning. One that starts with a personal reflection of our relationship with our body.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Monty Lyman: What does our skin tell us about ourselves?Phillippa Diedrichs: Is body positivity the answer to body image issues?Dean Burnett: The neuroscience of happinessPete Etchells: Are video games good for us?Sue Armstrong: Can we slow down the ageing process?Helen Russell: What does it mean to be happy?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/08/2036m 4s

Katie Mack: How will the Universe end?

The end of the Universe may be a common feature in science fiction, but this one isn’t a crisis that can be averted by a team of superheroes. The Universe really will come to an end one way or another, and we have an idea how – five ideas, actually.In this week’s episode of the Science Focus Podcast, astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack talks to us about the future of the cosmos. She dives into these five possible apocalypses, from the Universe gradually fading out to the ‘quantum bubble of death’.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Jacob Bleacher: Why do we need to go back to the Moon?Colin Stuart: The most mysterious objects in the UniverseProfessor Fay Dowker: What is the problem of quantum gravity?Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Dr Becky Smethurst: How do you actually find a black hole?Mark McCaughrean: How do you launch a successful space mission?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/08/2040m 0s

Rana el Kaliouby: What if computers could read our emotions?

For many, the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown restrictions has isolated us from the people we love, reducing our social life to screens and Zoom meetings. But even with the added visual, communicating online still isn’t as straightforward as being in-person. It can feel like jokes fall flat when everyone has their microphone off, and the jittering of poor signal can make anyone’s face hard to read.But what if our computers could read and respond to our emotions? If the engagement of a virtual meeting could be shown on-screen to generate a buzz like the one of a live audience?That’s just one possibility of a future with emotionally intelligent machines. Researcher and CEO Rana el Kaliouby believes that by teaching computers to read facial expressions, they could detect early signs of Parkinson’s, prevent drivers from getting behind the wheel when tired, or help teachers design educational programmes that keep kids engaged.Rana speaks to us about making machines empathetic, being named by Forbes as one of America's top 50 women in tech, and how her research into human emotions has affected her personal life.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcriptionThis podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Jim Al-Khalili: Why AI is not the enemyLisa Feldman Barrett: How emotions are madeAleks Krotoski: What happens to your data when you die?Jim Davies: How do you use your imagination?Caroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/08/2034m 48s

Dr Rachel Brown: Why are some COVID-19 patients suffering from neurological complications?

A recent study carried out at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, UCLH, on confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients has found neurological complications of the virus can, in some rare cases include delirium, brain inflammation, stroke and nerve damage.We spoke to Dr Rachel Brown, an MRC Clinical Research Training Fellow involved with the study to find out more.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead an edited version of the interview belowThis podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Project Discovery: Could computer games help find a cure for COVID-19?Elisa Raffaella Ferrè: What happens to the brain in space?Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?Nessa Carey: Is gene editing inspiring or terrifying?Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?COVID-19 could cause delirium, brain inflammation and strokeA study carried out on a small number of confirmed or suspected Covid-19 patients at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery has linked the coronavirus to a number of neurological conditions.Can you tell us about your research?COVID-19 is still predominantly a respiratory illness, but in a small subset of patients we’ve been seeing neurological symptoms and syndromes.Some of the early studies from Wuhan showed that around a third of patients were having neurological symptoms. In those early descriptions a lot of the symptoms that people were describing included things like headache and dizziness, loss of smell and things that could just really be attributed to viral illness.As we gained more experience, we noticed other cases appearing that looked a little bit different. We have information from...  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/08/2024m 16s

The Urban Birder: What wildlife can city-dwellers see?

Many of us have found solace in nature over the last few months, relishing our time outdoors, especially when it was limited to one form of exercise a day. A recent report by the RSPB found that people see access to nature as being important for health and wellbeing during and in recovery from the coronavirus crisis.One man who has always been connected to the natural world is David Lindo. Known by most as the Urban Birder, David is a champion for the wellbeing benefits of wildlife, encouraging us all to get outside and see what we can find, be it in the garden, the city, or the countryside.In this week’s episode of the Science Focus Podcast, David tells us about the human benefits of biodiversity, the need for conservation education, and diversity within the birding community.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Samantha Alger: What can we do to save the bees?Mark Miodownik: Are biodegradable plastics really better than traditional plastic?Neil Shubin: How do big changes in evolution happen?Mark Lynas: Could leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals?Andrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber: Is there really no such thing as a fish?Brad Lister: Are we facing an insect apocalypse?See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/08/2045m 47s

Dr Michael Mosley: Why is sleep so important?

If, like us, you love to read a good science book, (and thanks to this podcast we’ve read a fair few over the years), you’ll probably recognise the feeling of having more questions about its subject at the end of the book than before you even turned page one.It’s because of this that we decided to launch the Science Focus Book Club, where we pick out what we think is an excellent, thought provoking science book and ask your questions to its author.You can sign up for the newsletter to find out which book is coming up next, but to give you a taster, in May, our legion of science book fans read Fast Asleep, by Science Focus columnist and BBC presenter Dr Michael Mosley.In this week’s podcast we’ve selected a few of our favourite Q&As where he explains everything you need to know about sleep; from what it is, why we need it and how to get more of it.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Guy Leschziner: What is your brain doing while you sleep?Alice Gregory: How to get a good night's sleepBrian Sharpless: Exploding Head SyndromeDean Burnett: The neuroscience of happinessJohn Lennox: Is religion compatible with science?Emma WhispersRed: Why ASMR gives you tingles  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/07/2033m 27s

Ritu Raman: Can you build with biology?

If I asked you to build a robot, the first materials you would probably reach for would be some metal bits and plastic bobs.However, mechanical engineer Ritu Raman designs machines made with biological material, and has created all manner of wonderful machines, including a walking robot made with muscle tissue.In this week’s episode of the Science Focus Podcast, she tells us about how to integrate biology into engineering and what these remarkable devices can do that traditional machines can’t.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Sonia Contera: How will nanotechnology revolutionise medicine?Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?Gordon Wallace: Is an implantable electronic device the future of medicine?Professor Catharina Svanborg: Is the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk?Nessa Carey: Is gene editing inspiring or terrifying?Dr Lucy Rogers: What makes a robot a robot?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/07/2028m 16s

Project Discovery: Could computer games help find a cure for COVID-19?

In a previous episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we discovered how a team of scientists harnessed the combined power of hundreds of thousands of players of the massively multiplayer online game Eve Online to help in the search for exoplanets.Now, the next phase of this programme, called Project Discovery, is turning its sights from the stars to the coronavirus pandemic.This week we speak to scientists Ryan Brinkman and Jerome Waldispuhl, and Project Discovery’s creator Atilla Szantner about why they intend to turn gamers into citizen scientists to help find a cure for COVID-19.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcriptionThis podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Sonia Contera: How will nanotechnology revolutionise medicine?Chris Lintott: Can members of the public do real science?Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Jim Al-Khalili: Why should we care about science and scientists?Dr Tilly Blyth: How has art influenced science?John Higgs: Are Generation Z our only hope for the future?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/07/2043m 23s

Dr Jacob Bleacher: Why do we need to go back to the Moon?

In 1969, Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people ever to walk on the Moon, a feat over the next three and a half years only 10 other space explorers would go on to achieve.Now it has taken nearly 50 years, but NASA once again has ambitions to land the first woman and the next man on the Moon by 2024.The Artemis Program is a wide-reaching effort by numerous space agencies and led by NASA, with ambitions to not only put human feet on the lunar surface but to build a permanent base there, with a lunar space station in orbit around the Moon.To find out more, this week we speak to Dr Jacob Bleacher, Chief Exploration Scientist for human exploration at NASA, about how we are going to get there, what effect deep space will have on the astronauts, and why now is the time to go back to the Moon.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcriptionThis podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Elisa Raffaella Ferrè: What happens to the brain in space?Everything You Wanted To Know About… Physics with Jim Al-KhaliliDr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Kevin Fong: What happened to Apollo...  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/07/2032m 40s

Subhadra Das: What part has science played in racism?

Not so long ago, English scientists believed that they could study differences between people and that certain ethnicities were ‘better’ or ‘worse’ than others – of course, white Europeans were put at the top of any list.In the 19th Century, anthropologist and statistician Francis Galton took this even further when he coined the term ‘eugenics’, the idea that science could better the human race by promoting the spread of certain genes, deemed ‘good’, and by halting the distribution of those deemed bad.While these Victorian ideas have since been refuted and discarded by the scientific community, there are those in society that turn to race science in an attempt to justify their bigotry and racism.Subhadra Das has spent the last eight years as a museum curator for the science collections at University College London, specialising in the history of scientific racism and the history of eugenics.She tells us how Francis Galton’s idea spread through Victorian society, and why it’s important to understand science’s racist history in order for us to move forward.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcription [this will open in a new window]This podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Adam Rutherford: Can science ever be rid of racism?Pragya Agarwal: When does bias become prejudice?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Caroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?Angela Saini: Is racism creeping into science?See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/06/2030m 44s

Brendan Walker: Where is the best place to sit on a rollercoaster?

Brendan Walker originally trained and worked as an aeronautical engineer, but now has a far more thrilling job title, quite literally - he’s a thrill engineer.He’s been working with theme parks to help create the most exciting rollercoasters, using design principles to craft extreme, human emotional experiences to the rides.He tells us why people have a love/hate relationship with rollercoasters, the fine line between fun and fear, how to get your thrills in lockdown and most importantly, where the best place to sit on a rollercoaster might be.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full transcriptionThis podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorations.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Elisa Raffaella Ferrè: What happens to the brain in space?Jim Davies: How do you use your imagination?Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Matt Parker: What happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong?Kathryn D. Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?Sir David Spiegelhalter: There's no such thing as Blue Monday  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/06/2046m 36s

Leonard Mlodinow: How did Stephen Hawking make science accessible?

Two years to the day the great physicist Professor Stephen Hawking was interred at Westminster Abbey, and at the time of his death, we spoke to one of the people that knew him best, Leonard Mlodinow.Leonard is an American theoretical physicist who worked with Stephen on the books The Grand Design and A Briefer History of Time, and his own book chronicling their time together, Stephen Hawking: A Memoir of Friendship and Physics (£20, Allen Lane), will be released in September this year.In this republished interview he speaks with BBC Science Focus editor Daniel Bennett about writing together, his qualities, and what they did when they weren’t talking physics.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastThis podcast was supported by brilliant.org, helping people build quantitative skills in maths, science, and computer science with fun and challenging interactive explorationsRead more about Professor Stephen Hawking:Can you solve these deviously difficult Stephen Hawking-inspired questions?Stephen Hawking (1942-2018): the theoretical physicist's life in picturesTwitter Tributes to Professor Stephen HawkingRemembering Professor Stephen Hawking   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/06/2025m 42s

Pragya Agarwal: When does bias become prejudice?

No matter how open-minded we consider ourselves to be, all of us hold biases towards other people.Dr Pragya Agarwal is a behavioural and data scientist, ex-academic, and a freelance writer and journalist, who runs a research gender equality think tank The 50 Percent Project.Her new book, Sway: Unravelling Unconscious Bias (£16.99, Bloomsbury Sigma), unravels the way our implicit or 'unintentional' biases affect the way we communicate and perceive the world, and how they affect our decision-making, even in life and death situations.In this week’s podcast, she explains where these biases come from and why it’s important for us to recognise and unlearn them to help make the world a better, fairer place.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastWhy you should subscribe to BBC Science FocusListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Adam Rutherford: Can science ever be rid of racism?Angela Saini: Is racism creeping into science?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Caroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?Marcel Danesi: Why do we want to believe lies?Camilla Pang: How can science guide my life?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/06/2040m 53s

Anthony David: Why is there still such stigma around mental health?

Mental health has become a hot topic in recent years, with campaigns asking us to be kind on social media and to reach out to friends who are struggling.It seems now more than ever, we have a better understanding of what it means when someone is struggling with their mental health, but despite this, some people feel that the stigma surrounding it stops them from getting the help they need.Professor Anthony David is a neuropsychiatrist at University College London, whose book Into the Abyss (£14.99, Oneworld) tells the stories of patients he has treated and what their cases have taught him.He speaks to our editorial assistant Amy Barrett about why this stigma exists and whether it’s getting any better.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastWhy you should subscribe to BBC Science FocusListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?Camilla Pang: How can science guide my life?Jesse Bering: What can psychology tell us about suicide?Caroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?Adam Rutherford: Can science ever be rid of racism?Phillippa Diedrichs: Is body positivity the answer to body image issues?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/06/2036m 41s

Luck, the paranormal and the Moon landings - Everything you ever wanted to know about…. illusions, magic and the paranormal

Our guest Prof Richard Wiseman is a spectacularly creative scientist who started off his career as a magician before becoming a psychologist. Over the last few decades, Richard has studied the art of deception, parapsychology and the concept of good luck alongside many other aspects of the human mind.Richard has a hugely popular YouTube channel called Quirkology, with a mere 2.15m subscribers and has written a book called Shoot For The Moon (£20, Quercus), which takes a closer look at the psychology that achieved the Moon landings.Over two quickfire, 30-minute episodes, Richard tells BBC Science Focus magazine editor Daniel Bennett how to make himself luckier, whether magicians make the best psychologists and why the stories we tell ourselves matter.And if you enjoyed this episode and want to learn more, check out any of Richard’s books at richardwiseman.wordpress.com or follow him on Twitter @RichardWiseman.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/05/2027m 39s

Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac: Has climate change determined our future?

Christiana Figueres is the former Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, and it was her work that led to its members signing the 2015 Paris agreement.Together with Tom Rivett-Carnac, she created Global Optimism, an organization focused on bringing about environmental and social change.Their book, The Future We Choose (£12.99, Bonnier), reveals that we are on the precipice of two futures: one where net-zero emissions is achieved, and one where it is not, and this week they’re talking to our editorial assistant Amy Barrett about the Paris Climate Agreement, why we need to reduce carbon emissions, and how we all have a role to play in combating climate change.Read the edited interview –"We stand at the fulcrum between two worlds. It really is a question of choosing what future we wan"tLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastWhy you should subscribe to BBC Science FocusListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Toby Ord: What are the odds civilisation will survive the century?Mark Miodownik: Are biodegradable plastics really better than traditional plastic?Samantha Alger: What can we do to save the bees?Chris Lintott: Can members of the public do real science?John Higgs: Are Generation Z our only hope for the future?Andrew Blum: How accurately can we predict the weather?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/05/2042m 43s

Illusions and Magic - Everything you ever wanted to know about... illusions, magic and the paranormal, episode 1

Our guest Prof Richard Wiseman is a spectacularly creative scientist who started off his career as a magician before becoming a psychologist. Over the last few decades, Richard has studied the art of deception, parapsychology and the concept of good luck alongside many other aspects of the human mind.Richard has a hugely popular YouTube channel called Quirkology, with a mere 2.15m subscribers and has written a book called Shoot For The Moon (£20, Quercus), which takes a closer look at the psychology that achieved the Moon landings.Over two quickfire, 30-minute episodes, Richard tells BBC Science Focus magazine editor Daniel Bennett how to make himself luckier, whether magicians make the best psychologists and why the stories we tell ourselves matter.And if you enjoyed this episode and want to learn more, check out any of Richard’s books at richardwiseman.wordpress.com or follow him on Twitter @RichardWiseman.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/05/2024m 6s

Elisa Raffaella Ferrè: What happens to the brain in space?

Here on Earth, we take the force of gravity for granted. For years, researchers have neglected to study its influence because of this very reason, but with commercial spaceflight on the horizon, researchers are now racing to discover what living off-Earth might do to our bodies and our brains.In this week’s episode, we hear from psychologist Dr Elisa Raffaella Ferrè.She explains how her studies are revealing the impact of gravity on our cognition through her experiments in a zero-g environment aboard the so-called ‘Vomit Comet’– the aircraft used to train astronauts for the weightlessness in space.Read the edited interview - This is your brain on space: how gravity influences your mental abilitiesLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastWhy you should subscribe to BBC Science FocusListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Kathryn D. Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?Lisa Feldman Barrett: How emotions are madeBill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?Richard Wiseman: The mindset behind the Moon landing  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/05/2031m 47s

Sonia Contera: How will nanotechnology revolutionise medicine?

This week we talk to one of the world’s leading pioneers in the field of nanotechnology, Sonia Contera.Nanotechnology is the application of science at a truly nano scale. To put that in perspective, if a nanometre were the size of a cup of tea, a meter would cover the diameter of the whole Earth.Being able to control the world at such an intricate level has the potential to revolutionise medicine - enabling us to target cancer cells, deliver drugs and fight antibiotic resistance – but how do we create technology to that size?Sonia talks to our editorial assistant Amy Barret about how her work in nanotechnology began, building proteins unknown to nature, and why going nano is nothing like in the movies.Her book Nano Comes To Life (£22, Princeton University Press), is out now.Read the full transcription [this will open in a new window]Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?Jim Al-Khalili: Why should we care about science and scientists?Gordon Wallace: Is an implantable electronic device the future of medicine?Professor Catharina Svanborg: Is the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk?Nessa Carey: Is gene editing inspiring or terrifying?Dr Lucy Rogers: What makes a robot a robot?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/05/2036m 8s

Neil Shubin: How do big changes in evolution happen?

The first time a fish crawled out of the water and onto land, it was a turning point that led to brand new kinds of life. But this couldn’t happen on its own: that fish would have needed both lungs and legs.Neil Shubin, evolutionary biologist and author of Some Assembly Required (£18.99, Oneworld), says that fish didn’t evolve these traits to help them live on land. In fact, the reason they could live on land was that they repurposed the body parts they had already.The same remarkable changes have happened all through evolutionary history, from the first vertebrate life to the first flying dinosaurs.He speaks to our Online assistant Sara Rigby.Read the full transcription [this will open in a new window]Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Ross Barnett: Why should we be interested in prehistoric animals that aren’t dinosaurs?Brian Switek: How did bones evolve?Steve Brusatte: The truth about dinosaursNeil Gemmell: The genetic hunt for the Loch Ness MonsterJames Lovelock: What can the father of Gaia theory tell us about our future?Andrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber: Is there really no such thing as a fish?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/05/2035m 34s

Your questions – Everything You Wanted To Know About…Physics, episode six

Prof Jim Al-Khalili answers listeners’ questions about physics, the Universe and everything else.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/04/2032m 29s

Mysteries in physics – Everything You Wanted To Know About…Physics, episode five

Prof Jim Al-Khalili reveals some of the biggest unsolved mysteries. We talk about the plausibility of time travel, whether there are multiple universes and what we need to discover a ‘theory of everything’.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/04/2029m 56s

Energy – Everything You Wanted To Know About…Physics, episode four

Prof Jim Al-Khalili tackles thermodynamics – the study of energy. Together, we unravel the idea of entropy, talk about the direction of time and muse upon the inevitable heat death of the Universe.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/04/2027m 8s

Quantum physics – Everything You Wanted To Know About…Physics, episode three

Prof Jim Al-Khalili demystifies the strange world of quantum physics. We discuss the key experiments, how quantum effects play out in the real world and, of course, Schrödinger's infamous cat.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/04/2030m 9s

Space & Time – Everything You Wanted To Know About…Physics, episode two

Prof Jim Al-Khalili helps us get to grips with the big concepts in cosmology. We talk space time, relativity and, of course, the end of the Universe.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/04/2034m 22s

The Fundamentals – Everything You Wanted to Know About…Physics, episode one

Prof Jim Al-Khalili breaks down the building blocks of the Universe and reveals what simplicity, beauty and elegance have to do with physics.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/04/2034m 32s

Everything You Wanted To Know About Physics, with Prof Jim Al-Khalili

Let your curiosity run wild. No question is off-limits in this new podcast series from the team behind BBC Science Focus magazine. In Everything You Wanted To Know About… world-leading experts answer Google’s most searched for queries and tackle questions from our listeners.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/04/201m 23s

Sandro Galea: What is the difference between health and medicine?

This week we talk to the Sandro Galea, Dean of the school of public health at Boston University.His book, called Well: What We Need to Talk About When We Talk About Health (£18.99, OUP) takes a deep look at the differences between health and medicine, and looks at how everything from the environment, taxation, education and even luck plays a part in the overall health of a nation.Speaking before the coronavirus pandemic, he explains the surprising factors that influence public health, which countries are doing it well, and why he felt he had to write this book.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastRead the full interview transcript [opens in a new window]Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Anthony Warner: Are we really too fat?Aleks Krotoski: What happens to your data when you die?Marcel Danesi: Why do we want to believe lies?Jim Al-Khalili: Why should we care about science and scientists?Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?Caroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/04/2033m 0s

Toby Ord: What are the odds civilisation will survive the century?

This week we talk to the philosopher Toby Ord about the end of civilisation as we know it.Ok, it’s not all doom and gloom. As Toby says, he’s an optimistic person, but in his new book The Precipice (£25, Bloomsbury) he explains why we’re at a point in time where we, as a species, are teetering on the edge of extinction.We discuss how much potential us homo sapiens have, what’s putting our continued survival at risk, how civilisation as we know it could come to an end, and what are the odds we’ll see out the century.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Michio Kaku: The future of humanityWilliam Poundstone: Can we really predict when doomsday will happen?John Higgs: Are Generation Z our only hope for the future?Brad Lister: Are we facing an insect apocalypse?Randall Munroe: How do you find the worst solution to any problem?Sir David Attenborough: How can we save our planet?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/04/2032m 50s

Anthony Warner: Are we really too fat?

In this week's Science Focus Podcast chef and author of the book The Truth About Fat: Why Obesity is Not that Simple (£9.99, Oneworld), Anthony Warner chews the fat about, well, fat.Pretty much all of us have been tempted at some point in our lives to shed some weight around our midriff, especially when we see our BMI creeping over 25, but what does this actually mean, and is it really a reliable measure of general health?He speaks to our editorial assistant Amy Barrett about why the body needs fat, what influences our body shape, and why there is so much stigma about being obese.Read the full transcriptionLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Samantha Alger: What can we do to save the bees?Randall Munroe: How do you find the worst solution to any problem?Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?Phillippa Diedrichs: Is body positivity the answer to body image issues?Professor Catharina Svanborg: Is the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk?Giles Yeo: Eating for your genes  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/03/2044m 28s

Camilla Pang: How can science guide my life?

Dr Camilla Pang is a bioinformatician, who was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder when she was eight years old.Her first book, Explaining Humans (£14.99, Viking), is a guide to navigating life, love and relationships using the lessons she’s learned in her scientific career so far.In it she draws on examples from how the different proteins in the human body can reflect the different roles in a social group, to the way how light refracts through a prism helping her to break down fear into something manageable.In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, she discusses her current work using disease and cancer data, along with machine learning methods, to find patterns that can be used in healthcare and lead to the development of therapies.She also explains how her neurodiversity has affected the way she works.If you have a burning science question you want an expert to answer, send them to us on twitter at @sciencefocus, and we may answer them in a future episode.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Why AI is not the enemy – Jim Al-KhaliliWhat we got wrong about pandas and teenagersJim Davies: How do you use your imagination?Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?Dr Guy Leschziner: What is your brain doing while you sleep?Everything that's wrong with the human body – Nathan Lents  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/03/2036m 11s

Kevin Fong: What happened to Apollo 13?

This week we catch up with Kevin Fong about the new series of his award-winning podcast 13 Minutes to the Moon.Whereas the first series celebrated the 50th anniversary of one of humanity’s greatest scientific achievements, the Moon landing, the new season follows what could have been one of our worst disasters – an explosion aboard the spacecraft Apollo 13.We discuss what happened on this ill-fated mission, how it impacted the astronauts and staff at Mission Control, and whether catastrophe at space could ever happen again.If you have a burning science question you want an expert to answer, send them to us on twitter at @sciencefocus, and we may answer them in a future episode.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Kevin Fong: Why is the Moon landing still relevant 50 years on?Katherine Johnson: mathematician and NASA pioneer dies age 101Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there science in Star Trek?Dr Becky Smethurst: How do you actually find a black hole?Mike Garrett: Is there anybody out there?Monica Grady: What is the future of space science?Richard Wiseman: The mindset behind the Moon landing  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/03/2034m 33s

Aleks Krotoski: What happens to your data when you die?

What happens to all your digital data once you die? We ask social psychologist, host of BBC Radio 4's Digital Human and BBC Science Focus columnist Aleks Krotoski about life after death, and she enlightens us on how much digital data is really out there, the value of virtual gravestones and why big data firms really don’t care if you’re alive or dead.If you have a burning science question you want an expert to answer, send them to us on twitter at @sciencefocus, and we may answer them in a future episode.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Kathryn Mannix: What it’s really like to dieRobert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Gretchen McCulloch: How has the internet affected how we communicate?Caroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?John Higgs: Are Generation Z our only hope for the future?Jesse Bering: What psychology can tell us about suicide  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/03/2041m 55s

Professor Fay Dowker: What is the problem of quantum gravity?

This week, we’re going on a search for the theory of everything.The two main theories of physics are at odds with one another. Einstein's general relativity explains gravity, but it contradicts quantum theory: how we understand matter, atoms and particles.Theoretical physicist at Imperial College London Professor Fay Dowker has been working on a solution to this quantum gravity problem, and tells us why the theories are incompatible, and how she plans to bring them together.If you have a burning science question you want an expert to answer, send them to us on twitter at @sciencefocus, and we may answer them in a future episode.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there any science in Star Trek?Dr Becky Smethurst: How do you actually find a black hole?Kathryn D. Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?Hannah Fry: How much of our lives is secretly underpinned by maths?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Monica Grady: What is the future of space science?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/03/2051m 13s

Jim Davies: How do you use your imagination?

Imagine, just for one moment, that you’re flying. What can you see? How high up are you? Can you feel the rush of wind in your face? Keep these thoughts in mind while you listen to this week's podcast.Your imagination is a strange old thing, with some people experiencing vivid senses while some struggle to picture anything at all. In this episode, we speak to Jim Davies, whose book, Imagination: The Science of Your Mind's Greatest Power (£21.99, Pegasus), sheds light on this mysterious function of the brain.As you can imagine, we go deep into the neuroscience of conjuring up mental images, but we also find out why your memory doesn’t need to be perfect, the joys of playing video games after a bad day, the benefits of imaginary friends, and, rather bizarrely, how to make a better door.If you have a burning science question you want an expert to answer, send them to us on twitter at @sciencefocus, and we may answer them in a future episode.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?Gordon Wallace: Is an implantable electronic device the future of medicine?Dr Guy Leschziner: What is your brain doing while you sleep?Gustav Kuhn: Do you believe in magic?Helen Russell: What does it mean to be happy?Richard Wiseman: The mindset behind the Moon landing  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/02/2036m 10s

Mark Miodownik: Are biodegradable plastics really better than traditional plastic?

You’ve probably bought something from a corner shop and taken it home in a plastic bag that says it’s biodegradable, or eaten takeaway food with a compostable fork.But when you’re done with your bag or your fork, what do you do with them? Can you put them in your food waste bin, your compost heap, or even the recycling bin?To find out, we spoke to materials scientist Professor Mark Miodownik. Mark is leading the Big Compost Experiment, a nationwide citizen science experiment to explore whether home-compostable plastics really do compost in your garden.If you sent us a question for Mark, listen out for his answer towards the end of the episode.If you have a burning science question you want an expert to answer, send them to us on twitter at @sciencefocus, and we may answer them in a future episode.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Solving the plastic problem – Mark MiodownikHow can we save our planet? – Sir David AttenboroughChris Lintott: Can members of the public do real science?Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there any science in Star Trek?John Higgs: Are Generation Z our only hope for the future?Mark Lynas: Could leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/02/2031m 50s

Dr Erin Macdonald: Is there any science in Star Trek?

This week we’re boldly going where no Science Focus Podcast has gone before.Dr Erin Macdonald is the new science consultant for the Star Trek franchise. With the release of Star Trek: Picard on Amazon Prime, she takes us through the science of both the new and classic series.She tells our production assistant and resident Trekkie Holly Spanner about supernovae, what a science consultant really does, and whether warp drive is possible.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:What if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-KhaliliBuilding a base on the Moon, and crafting believable sci-fi – Andy WeirDr Becky Smethurst: How do you actually find a black hole?Kathryn D. Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?Mark McCaughrean: How do you launch a successful space mission?Colin Stuart: The most mysterious objects in the Universe  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/02/2026m 10s

Adam Rutherford: Can science ever be rid of racism?

Adam Rutherford is a geneticist at the University College London, which has one of the most prestigious population, genetics and evolution departments in the world.However, the university was also the home of ideas such as eugenics and race science.Times have changed, and although our current understanding of genetics and biology should have consigned them to history, these insidious ideas are making their way back into the mainstream.In his new book, How to Argue with a Racist (£12.99, Weidenfeld & Nicolson), Adam wants to show his readers that what we understand as race doesn’t really hold up with the genomic data, why professional sport is not a particularly good data set for studying race, and whether we can ever truly remove racism from science.He speaks to our editorial assistant Amy Barrett.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Marcel Danesi: Why do we want to believe lies?Gaia Vince: What part does culture play in our evolution?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Caroline Criado Perez: Does data discriminate against women?Angela Saini: Is racism creeping into science?John Higgs: Are Generation Z our only hope for the future?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/02/2036m 6s

Ross Barnett: Why should we be interested in prehistoric animals that aren’t dinosaurs?

In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast we’re investigating long-extinct animals. No, not dinosaurs, they get plenty enough coverage already. Instead, we’re going to look at creatures that lived in the Pleistocene era, a period of time that covered the last known ice age.During this period enormous creatures roamed the Earth, with some surprising animals making what we now know as the British Isles their home.What makes these often-enormous animals so interesting is that they lived side-by-side humans and other early human species, which means we have more than just fossilised bone fragments to learn from - we have cave art, sculpture, tools and even cooking utensils that we can use to build our understanding.Ross Barnett is a palaeontologist, whose recent book The Missing Lynx: The Past and Future of Britain's Lost Mammals (£16.99, Bloomsbury Wildlife) explores the story of Britain’s lost megafauna.He speaks to our online assistant Sara Rigby about Britain’s biggest beasts, humans’ role in their extinction, and what they can teach us about the future of conservation.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Samantha Alger: What can we do to save the bees?Brian Switek: How did bones evolve?Mark Lynas: Could leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals?Brad Lister: Are we facing an insect apocalypse?Steve Brusatte: The truth about dinosaursNeil Gemmell: The genetic hunt for the Loch Ness Monster  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/01/2039m 38s

Samantha Alger: What can we do to save the bees?

We all appreciate the buzz of the humble bee in the garden, however, not a summer goes past without hearing news that our bee population is under threat, with the finger usually pointing at habitat loss or chemicals containing neonicotinoids.But in reality, there are a whole host of reasons why our vital bee population is in decline.And given they provide pollination services for every one in three bites of the food we eat, their survival is critical to our very way of life.In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, University of Vermont environmental scientist and pollination specialist Samantha Alger talks about her work uncovering the secret life of bees, what is causing the decline in bee numbers, and what we can do so save them.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Mark Lynas: Could leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals?Andrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber: Is there really no such thing as a fish?Brad Lister: Are we facing an insect apocalypse?Nick Lyon: Filming a DynastyNeil Gemmell: The genetic hunt for the Loch Ness MonsterSteve Brusatte: The truth about dinosaurs  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/01/2041m 35s

Marcel Danesi: Why do we want to believe lies?

We all love a good story, and sometimes a lie is more interesting to hear than the truth, but there is more to it than spinning a good yarn.According to Marcel Danesi, linguist and author of the book The Art of the Lie (£11.95, Prometheus Books), throughout history certain ‘Liar Princes’ have perfected the art of lying to gain fame, fortune and notoriety.In this week’s podcast, he explains what makes them so effective at this so-called ‘Machiavellian intelligence’, what happens in the brain when we twist the truth, and why we’re all liars in one way or another.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?Gretchen McCulloch: How has the internet affected how we communicate?Lewis Dartnell: How geology can influence electionsJamie Susskind: How technology is changing politicsJack Lewis: Sin and why we do the things we shouldn'tTrevor Cox: To become Prime Minister, change your voice  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/01/2023m 28s

Dr Becky Smethurst: How do you actually find a black hole?

By day Dr Becky, is an astrophysicist, unravelling the mysteries of supermassive black holes, but by night entertains science buffs like us on her YouTube channel.In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast she explains how to find a black hole (and why they’re actually incredibly bright), what an astrophysicist does all day, and why flooding YouTube with scientists is the best way to counteract disinformation and bogus theories.Her book Space: 10 Things You Should Know (£9.99, Orion), is out now and you can read an extract from it here.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Kathryn D. Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?Monica Grady: What is the future of space science?Mark McCaughrean: How do you launch a successful space mission?Kevin Fong: Why is the Moon landing still relevant 50 years on?Bruce Banerdt: What NASA's InSight will tell us about MarsNatalie Starkey" What asteroids can tell us about our Solar System  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/01/2046m 57s

Hannah Fry: How much of our lives is secretly underpinned by maths?

Hopefully by now the last crumbs of mince pie will be wiped clean and Grandad has woken up from his Christmas day nap.If you’re anything like us, that period between Christmas and New Year means only one thing – lazing in front of the TV and watching the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures. This institution has been sharing the wonders of science and entertaining children and adults alike for generations, and this year’s host hopes this year will be no different.Our editorial assistant Amy Barret sat down with Hannah Fry, only the fourth mathematician to deliver one of the lectures, who’ll be showing the audience how maths secretly underpins much of the world around us in her lecture series called Secrets and Lies, broadcast on BBC Four on 26-28 December at 20:00.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Aoife McLysaght: What makes me 'me'?Adam Kay: Is Christmas really the most wonderful time of the year on labour ward?Chris Lintott: Can members of the public do real science?Jim Al-Khalili: Why should we care about science and scientists?Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Hannah Fry: What's the deal with algorithms?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/12/1925m 58s

Adam Kay: Is Christmas really the most wonderful time of the year on labour ward?

If you’re stuffing your face with mince pies this Christmas Day, spare a thought for the hundreds of thousands of people working in the NHS providing vital medical support over the festive period.One person who has seen his fair share of Christmas shifts is comedian and writer Adam Kay, who in a previous life worked as a junior doctor. His new book, Twas the Nightshift before Christmas (£9.99, Harper Collins), is at times, a graphically intimate diary of what happens on a labour ward over the holidays.Our editorial assistant Amy Barrett spoke to Adam over the phone about whether Christmas is more dangerous than other seasons, some of the issues facing healthcare at this time of the year, and life after medicine.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?Sarah Harper: What does a world with an ageing population look like?Andrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber: Is there really no such thing as a fish?Matt Parker: What happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong?Robin Ince: Inside the mind of a comedianDara Ó Briain: Finding the fun in science  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/12/1924m 14s

Kathryn D Sullivan: What is it really like to walk in space?

Kathryn D Sullivan made history on 11 October 1984 when she became the first American woman to make an Extravehicular Activity, something most of us will know as a space walk, and in this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, she explains how maybe ‘walk’ isn’t the most appropriate way of describing it.She also reveals the importance of planning over plans, the influence of the Hubble Space Telescope, and whether this year’s news story about spacesuits for women was really as problematic as the headlines suggested.Let us know what you think with a review or a rating wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Mark McCaughrean: How do you launch a successful space mission?Monica Grady: What is the future of space science?Why is the Moon landing still relevant 50 years on? – Kevin FongThe most mysterious objects in the Universe – Colin StuartGaia Vince: What part does culture play in our evolution?Chris Lintott: Can members of the public do real science?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/12/1930m 58s

Brian Switek: How did bones evolve?

Brian Switek, the pen name of science writer and fossil fanatic Riley Black. This year she released a book called The Secret Life of Bones: Their Origins, Evolution and Fate (£9.99, Duckworth), which as well as explaining how and why we evolved bones, explains the relationship us humans have with these sturdy struts of osseous tissue.In this week's episode of the Science Focus Podcast, she helpfully explains what a bone is and how they turn into fossils, as well as how they revealed Richard III’s diet, were historically used to justify scientific racism, and why Hollywood is getting aliens all wrong.Let us know what you think with a review or a rating wherever you listen to your podcasts.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?Gaia Vince: What part does culture play in our evolution?Angela Saini: Is racism creeping into science?Neil Gemmell: The genetic hunt for the Loch Ness MonsterNathan Lents: Everything that's wrong with the human bodySteve Brusatte: The truth about dinosaurs   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/12/1940m 6s

Chris Lintott: Can members of the public do real science?

We’re living in the age of big data. Scientists can collect and store more information than ever before. So how can they manage it all?That’s where citizen science comes in. Members of the public can log in to the Zooniverse, the world’s largest citizen science platform, and do the hard work of sorting through the data.Whether that’s searching for alien planets or spotting penguins, the project’s co-founder Chris Lintott says that the public aren’t just helping out, but doing real science.In his new book, The Crowd and the Cosmos: Adventures in the Zooniverse (£20, OUP), Chris explains how, in just a few minutes in your lunch break, you can contribute to fields from astronomy to zoology.He speaks to BBC Science Focus online assistant Sara Rigby.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Jim Al-Khalili: Why should we care about science and scientists?Randall Munroe: How do you find the worst solution to any problem?Dr Tilly Blyth: How has art influenced science?Does data discriminate against women? – Caroline Criado PerezHow can we save our planet? – Sir David AttenboroughMonica Grady: What is the future of space science?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/11/1935m 58s

Dean Burnett: What’s going on in the teenage brain?

Why are teens so emotional? Why won’t they listen when adults depart their worldly knowledge? Why won’t they tidy their rooms?Well, there are plenty of parenting books out there that attempt to answer these questions, but in the new book Why Your Parents Are Driving You Up the Wall and What To Do About It (£8.99, Penguin) by neuroscientist, comedian and science writer Dean Burnett, for the first time, it’s teens who are getting an insight into their parents’ minds.The book is all about reverse parenting, and offers teens an answer to why their parents are always dragging them out of bed, why they’re so obsessed with asking ‘How was school?’ and other common complaints.He speaks to BBC Science Focus editorial assistant Amy Barrett.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies workAre Generation Z our only hope for the future? – John HiggsRandall Munroe: How do you find the worst solution to any problem?What we got wrong about pandas and teenagersHow emotions are made – Lisa Feldman BarrettThe neuroscience of happiness – Dean Burnett  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/11/1944m 5s

Randall Munroe: How do you find the worst solution to any problem?

If you need advice for the best way to move house, predict the weather or take a selfie, Randall Munroe, the creator of the webcomic xkcd, can’t help you.But if you’re willing to get creative, Randall’s book How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems (£16.99, John Murray Press) will show you the worst ways to solve your problems, with some help from tennis star Serena Williams and astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield along the way.In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, Randall talks to online assistant Sara Rigby about why the worst solution to a problem can be the most interesting.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?Jim Al-Khalili: Why should we care about science and scientists?Dr Tilly Blyth: How has art influenced science?Gretchen McCulloch: How has the internet affected how we communicate?Richard Dawkins: Can we live in a world without religion?Are Generation Z our only hope for the future? – John Higgs  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/11/1934m 2s

Gaia Vince: What part does culture play in our evolution?

Some scientists now believe we are living in a new epoch, the age of invention and human influence on the world, called the Anthropocene.In 2014, science journalist and broadcast Gaia Vince took readers on a journey through this new world in her award-winning book, Adventures in the Anthropocene. Documenting the startling impacts of human’s growth on Earth, Gaia opened eyes to the future that we have all but set in stone.Her new book, Transcendence (£20, Allen Lane), looks instead to our past, and how humans have evolved as much through our culture as through our genes. How did Homo sapiens out-live our hominin relatives, and what made us so different from the other primates?Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Richard Dawkins: Can we live in a world without religion?Does data discriminate against women? – Caroline Criado PerezAre Generation Z our only hope for the future? – John HiggsIs racism creeping into science? – Angela SainiWhat does a world with an ageing population look like? – Sarah HarperIs religion compatible with science? – John Lennox    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/11/1941m 51s

Jim Al-Khalili: Why should we care about science and scientists?

Every Tuesday morning, physicist and science communicator Jim Al-Khalili presents the long-running radio programme The Life Scientific on BBC Radio 4. On 5 November 2019, the show celebrates its 200th episode, so we caught up with Jim just after recording this landmark show.He talked to us about what it’s like to work on The Life Scientific, he fights the corner for creativity in science, and reveals why research and scientists keep him optimistic about the future.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Dr Tilly Blyth: How has art influenced science?Richard Dawkins: Can we live in a world without religion?Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?Gretchen McCulloch: How has the internet affected how we communicate?Monica Grady: What is the future of space science?Jim Al-Khalili: Why AI is not the enemy  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/10/1928m 38s

Bill Bryson: What should we know about how our bodies work?

In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we hear from renowned travel writer and science communicator, Bill Bryson.Beloved by readers around the world, his works have included Notes from a Small Island, an observation of life in England, and the best-selling science book A Short History of Nearly Everything.His new book is called The Body: A Guide for Occupants (£25, Doubleday), where he turns inward to look at the mechanisms that keep us alive.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Does data discriminate against women? – Caroline Criado PerezWhat does our skin tell us about ourselves? – Dr Monty LymanIs an implantable electronic device the future of medicine? – Gordon WallaceWhat does a world with an ageing population look like? – Sarah HarperWhat does it mean to be a man? – Gary BarkerIs gene editing inspiring or terrifying? – Nessa Carey  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/10/1942m 4s

Gretchen McCulloch: How has the internet affected how we communicate?

Scroll through Facebook or Twitter and you’ll notice that many people type in a particular style: full of lols and emoji, and rarely using punctuation or capital letters.Does this mean that we’re losing the ability to use our language correctly? Gretchen McCulloch, author of Because Internet (£12.99, Penguin Books), says absolutely not: in fact, internet users have collaboratively developed a style of language that makes communication much richer.Here’s Gretchen talking to BBC Science Focus online assistant Sara Rigby about how sarcasm and humour drive our use of language, the value of emoji, and the history of lol.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:To become Prime Minister, change your voice – Trevor CoxDr Tilly Blyth: How has art influenced science?Why ASMR gives you tingles – Emma WhispersRedRobert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?Monica Grady: What is the future of space science?How do you launch a successful space mission? – Mark McCaughrean  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/10/1927m 39s

Robert Elliott Smith: Are algorithms inherently biased?

In this week’s podcast, we speak Robert Elliott Smith, an expert in evolutionary algorithms and researcher of artificial intelligence.His latest book, Rage Inside the Machine: The Prejudice of Algorithms, and How to Stop the Internet Making Bigots of Us All (£20, Bloomsbury), explores how the harmful effects of bigotry, greed, segregation and mass coercion are finding their way into the AI that runs our lives, without us even realising it.He tells us how powerful algorithms have been manipulated to divide people, why algorithmic bias has a dark history in the field of eugenics, and what we can do to fight back against the insidious influences of social media.Subscribe to the Science Focus Podcast on these services: Acast, iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, OvercastLet us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:What's the deal with algorithms? – Hannah FryDoes data discriminate against women? – Caroline Criado PerezIs racism creeping into science? – Angela SainiWhat happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong? – Matt ParkerHow technology is changing politics – Jamie SusskindThere's no such thing as Blue Monday – Sir David SpiegelhalterFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/10/1936m 51s

Monica Grady: What is the future of space science?

Today on the Science Focus Podcast, we’re talking to Professor Monica Grady, planetary and space scientist, ahead of World Space Week.World Space Week runs from 4 to 10 October, and this year’s theme is ‘The Moon: Gateway to the Stars’. Events to celebrate World Space Week are being held in the UK and across the world, including Monica’s talk at the Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh.Monica’s research spans to the Moon and beyond, and Asteroid 4731 is named Monicagrady, in honour of her contributions to the field.Here, she speaks to editorial assistant Amy Barrett about working in the industry and the challenges faced by current and future space scientists.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:How do you launch a successful space mission? – Mark McCaughreanWhy is the Moon landing still relevant 50 years on? – Kevin FongThe mindset behind the Moon landing – Richard WisemanWhat if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-KhaliliThe most mysterious objects in the Universe – Colin StuartWhat NASA’s InSight will tell us about Mars – Bruce BanerdtFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/10/1935m 12s

Dr Tilly Blyth: How has art influenced science?

Science and art have not always been separately defined. Leonardo Da Vinci studied anatomy, neuroscientist Cajal created beautiful drawings of the cells in the cerebellum and hippocampus, and the painter John Constable observed the skies with an almost scientific study.Though their pursuits have diverged into distinct fields, the relationship between art and science has remained tightly woven together.Documenting the history of this tumultuous relationship is The Art of Innovation. Comprised of a 20-part BBC Radio 4 series, an exhibition at the Science Museum and an accompanying book, The Art of Innovation shows how scientific discoveries have influenced, and been influenced by, artists and the general public.Editorial assistant Amy Barrett visited the Science Museum’s Dana Research Centre and Library to meet the Head of Collections & Principle Curator at the Science Museum and the co-host of The Art of Innovation radio series, Dr Tilly Blyth.The Science Museum’s major free exhibition runs from now until the 24 January 2020. You can also read 20 stories from the history of art and science in The Art of Innovation (£25, Transworld).Image: A Philosopher Giving that Lecture on an Orrery, in which a Lamp is put in the Place of the Sun, by Joseph Wright, exhibited 1776, oil on canvas © Derby Museums TrustListen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Why is Leonardo da Vinci’s scientific legacy so often overlooked? – Martin ClaytonWhat can the father of Gaia theory tell us about our future? – James LovelockRichard Dawkins: Can we live in a world without religion?Do you believe in magic? – Gustav KuhnIs religion compatible with science? – John LennoxInside the mind of a comedian – Robin InceFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/09/1938m 36s

Richard Dawkins: Can we live in a world without religion?

Richard Dawkins is considered one of the top British intellectuals of the 21st Century. He’s known for his opinions on atheism and his books on evolution. In his most recent book, Outgrowing God, he talks about his own experience with religion, and how science offers us a far more convincing and concrete view of the world we live in.We sat down with Richard to discuss his views on faith, flat-earthers and Facebook.Let us know what you think of the episode with a review or a comment wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Is religion compatible with science? – John LennoxDoes data discriminate against women? – Caroline Criado PerezWhat does a world with an ageing population look like? – Sarah HarperAre Generation Z our only hope for the future? – John HiggsIs racism creeping into science? – Angela SainiHow can we save our planet? – Sir David AttenboroughFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/09/1940m 14s

Does data discriminate against women? – Caroline Criado Perez

When Apple launched its health tracker app HealthKit in 2014, they promised users the ability to track everything from their blood pressure to their copper intake – but not their periods.This seems like a startling oversight, but Apple aren’t alone in failing to consider women’s needs. For example, it wasn’t until 2015 that the EU required new cars to be tested on a female crash-test dummy.Caroline Criado Perez, whose book Invisible Women (£16.99, Chatto and Windus) has been shortlisted for the 2019 Royal Society Science Book Prize, calls this the gender data gap, and it appears in everything from public policy to medical research.In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we talk to Caroline about the gender data gap and how it causes everything from mild inconvenience to potential fatality.She speaks to BBC Science Focus online assistant Sara Rigby.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast which we think you will find interesting:Why aren’t there more women in science?Is racism creeping into science? – Angela SainiIs religion compatible with science? – John LennoxIs body positivity the answer to body image issues? – Phillippa DiedrichsWhat makes me ‘me’? – Aoife McLysaghtInequality in science – Angela SainiFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/09/1939m 41s

How do you launch a successful space mission? – Mark McCaughrean

Launching a rocket into space doesn’t come cheap. That much won’t surprise anybody, but what goes into the planning, construction and the science before the mission even gets off the ground? And when it’s up there, what does it do, and what makes it a success?One man that knows how to put a space project together is Mark McCaughrean, senior advisor for science and exploration at the European Space Agency. During his 10 years at ESA, he’s worked on numerous projects, including the Rosetta mission to land a probe on a comet, and the enormous James Webb Space Telescope.Ahead of his talk at ESA's Space Rocks event on 21 September 2019, he talks to BBC Science Focus Online Editor Alexander McNamara about how to build a space project from start to finish, why studying space is so important for life on Earth, and reaching out through the power of rock music.We now have more than 85 episodes of the Science Focus Podcast, each of which is still well worth a listen. Here are a few that you might find interesting:What happened at Bluedot festival 2019? – Libby Jackson, Tom Shakespeare and Danielle GeorgeIs there anybody out there? – Mike GarrettWhat asteroids can tell us about our Solar System – Natalie StarkeyWhy is the Moon landing still relevant 50 years on? – Kevin FongThe most mysterious objects in the Universe – Colin StuartProject Discovery and its search for exoplanets - Bergur FinnbogasonFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/09/1950m 12s

What does our skin tell us about ourselves? – Dr Monty Lyman

The largest organ in the body isn’t the lungs or the brain, but the skin. Our skin performs a vast array of functions for us, from protecting us from disease to helping us make friends.Dr Monty Lyman, author of The Remarkable Life of The Skin (£20, Bantam Press), calls skin the ‘Swiss Army Organ’ because of all the tasks it carries out.Monty talks to BBC Science Focus Online assistant Sara Rigby about what the skin is for, why vanity is good for you, and what kind of creatures inhabit our skin.We now have more than 75 episodes of the Science Focus Podcast, each of which is still well worth a listen. Here are a few that you might find interesting:Is an implantable electronic device the future of medicine? – Gordon WallaceWhat is your brain doing while you sleep? – Dr Guy LeschzinerIs the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk? – Professor Catharina SvanborgIs gene editing inspiring or terrifying? – Nessa CareyCan we slow down the ageing process? – Sue ArmstrongIs body positivity the answer to body image issues? – Phillippa DiedrichsFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/08/1941m 28s

Are Generation Z our only hope for the future? – John Higgs

If you grew up on a steady stream of Hollywood blockbusters filled with killer robots, alien invasions and apocalyptic natural disasters, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the future looks pretty bleak. But that doesn’t necessarily mean it has to be that way.In fact, according John Higgs, a writer who specialises in finding previously unsuspected narratives hidden in obscure corners of our history and culture, the group of adults of school-leaving age might be just the sort of individuals we need if we’re going to avoid the dystopian future science fiction would have us believe inevitable.In his book, The Future Starts Here (£20, Orion), he explains why this Generation Z have inherited a world apparently on the brink of self-destruction, and why their enthusiasm for wider social networks will be key to a brighter future.He speaks to BBC Science Focus Online editor Alexander McNamara about what Star Trek can teach us about generational attitudes, the desire for meaning over stuff, and why life on Mars would be rubbish, and who kicks things off by asking him why he decided to write a book about the future.We now have more than 75 episodes of the Science Focus Podcast, each of which is still well worth a listen. Here are a few that you might find interesting:How can we save our planet? – Sir David AttenboroughThere is no Plan B for planet Earth – Lord Martin ReesWhat we got wrong about pandas and teenagersWhat does a world with an ageing population look like? – Sarah HarperCan we really predict when doomsday will happen? – William PoundstoneIs body positivity the answer to body image issues? – Phillippa DiedrichsFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/08/1938m 29s

Is an implantable electronic device the future of medicine? – Gordon Wallace

Materials scientist Gordon Wallace is the director of ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. He is developing the ‘sutrode’, a medical device made from graphene that combines the electrical properties of an electrode with the mechanical properties of a suture.The device is wrapped around damaged or malfunctioning nerve bundles and used to stimulate them and return their regular function. Though still in its early stages, the technology may one day be used to treat epilepsy, schizophrenia, and in the production of next generation prosthetics.He speaks to BBC Science Focus commissioning editor Jason Goodyer in this episode of the Science Focus Podcast.We now have more than 75 episodes of the Science Focus Podcast, each of which is still well worth a listen. Here are a few that you might find interesting:Is the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk? – Professor Catharina SvanborgIs gene editing inspiring or terrifying? – Nessa CareyCan we slow down the ageing process? – Sue ArmstrongWhat is your brain doing while you sleep? – Dr Guy LeschzinerWhat does a world with an ageing population look like? – Sarah HarperIs racism creeping into science? – Angela SainiFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/08/1918m 48s

How accurately can we predict the weather? – Andrew Blum

Hurricane Sandy hit the east coast of the United States in October 2012, causing $65bn of damage. Remarkably, weather forecasters managed to predict its impact on the US eight days in advance, when it was barely even a storm.How did forecasts get to be so good? It’s a story that begins with the invention of the telegraph and ends with supercomputers.We talk to Andrew Blum, author of The Weather Machine (£16.99, Bodley Head), about the history of weather forecasting, why we shouldn’t trust the icons on our weather apps, and whether we’ll ever have an accurate minute-by-minute forecast.He speaks to BBC Science Focus online assistant Sara Rigby.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast which we think you will find interesting:What's going on with the weather? – Dann MitchellCould leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals? – Mark LynasCan we really predict when doomsday will happen? – William PoundstoneWhat if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-KhaliliWhy is the magnetic north pole moving? – Ciaran BegganAre we facing an insect apocalypse? – Brad ListerFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and FlipboardImage: Actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio stares at a visual showing Hurricane Sandy using data from Goddard Earth Observing System Model © NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/08/1933m 23s

What happened at Bluedot festival 2019? – Libby Jackson, Tom Shakespeare and Danielle George

In mid-July this year, science and music lovers alike donned their Wellington boots and rain ponchos and made the journey to Jodrell Bank Observatory for the fourth annual Bluedot festival.The star-studded line-up included Helen Sharman; the first British astronaut, Jim Al-Khalili; science writer and author, an incredible 3-D concert experience from Kraftwerk and the post-punk sounds of New Order.We sent BBC Science Focus’ new editorial assistant Amy Barrett to the festival, where she chatted to a few of the speakers at the event. Not bad for your first week in a new job, eh?First up was, Libby Jackson, Human Exploration Programme Manager at the UK Space Agency, who took to the Mission Control stage to talk about the future of space exploration and the UK’s role in that future. While some looked back across the fifty years since the Apollo Moon Landings, she talked to Amy about advances in the space industry, human exploration and the Bluedot experience.Also in attendance at the festival was Tom Shakespeare, professor of disability research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Tom was involved in three events over the weekend, talking assistive technology, the ethics of genetics and being an activist.Finally, back at Jodrell Bank where she began her career, Danielle George brought the invisible Universe to light. She spoke to us about the Lovell Radio Telescope based at Jodrell, new endeavours such as the SKA (Square Kilometre Array telescope project) and what we can learn from looking at our skies.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast which we think you will find interesting:Why is the Moon landing still relevant 50 years on? – Kevin FongWhat asteroids can tell us about our Solar System – Natalie StarkeyIs there anybody out there? – Mike GarrettCould these gloves be the future of music? – Imogen HeapEverything that’s wrong with the human body – Nathan LentsInside the mind of a comedian – Robin InceFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/07/1933m 16s

What does a world with an ageing population look like? – Sarah Harper

We can’t reverse the slow march of time, but thanks to the wonders of technology and modern medicine, we have a lot more of it in our lives. But as people live longer, and the birth rate declines, how are we going to manage a world with an ageing population?That one of the questions Sarah Harper, Professor of Gerontology at the University of Oxford, has been trying to find an answer for.She talks to BBC Science Focus editorial assistant Helen Glenny about how we cope with dramatic shifts in population, what effect it has on natural resources and climate change, and a quirk in our retirement age that suggests we should start drawing our pension aged 103.How Population Change Will Transform Our World by Sarah Harper is available now (£9.99, OUP)Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast which we think you will find interesting:Can we slow down the ageing process? – Sue ArmstrongHow can we save our planet? – Sir David AttenboroughIs religion compatible with science? – John LennoxWhat does it mean to be happy? – Helen RussellThere is no Plan B for planet Earth – Lord Martin ReesHow emotions are made – Lisa Feldman BarrettFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/07/1933m 20s

What does it mean to be a man? – Gary Barker

In the past few years, traditional male stereotypes have come under increasing scrutiny.These stereotypes often come under the term ‘Toxic masculinity’, which has been widely used to explain certain male actions and characteristics that conform to established gender roles, which do harm to both themselves or the society that they live in.Gary Barker has a PhD in developmental psychology and studies how we raise and socialise boys and men. In the late 1990s he founded Promundo, which carries out global research into men, boys and masculinities, and recently discovered that that in the UK, this these negative stereotypes could be costing the economy an additional £3.8bn a year.He speaks to BBC Science Focus editorial assistant Helen Glenny about why these stereotypes are harmful, and what a new, progressive form of masculinity could look like.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Is racism creeping into science? – Angela SainiIs body positivity the answer to body image issues? – Phillippa DiedrichsWhat does it mean to be happy? – Helen RussellIs religion compatible with science? – John LennoxWhy aren’t there more women in science?What makes me ‘me’ – Aoife McLysaghtFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/07/1938m 38s

Dr Guy Leschziner: What is your brain doing while you sleep?

For most of us, switching off the light and curling up in a warm, cosy bed is the welcome reward for a good day done (or much-needed respite from a bad one).But not everybody can soak up their allotted hours in joyful slumber before the alarm goes off. In fact, according to the Mental Health Foundation, it is estimated that 20 per cent of adults suffer from some form of insomnia, while many more of us experience issues like sleep walking, sleep apnoea and night terrors.Dr Guy Leschziner is a world-renowned neurologist and sleep physician, whose new book The Nocturnal Brain: Nightmares, Neuroscience and the Secret World of Sleep (£16.99, Simon & Schuster) attempts to unpick some of the mysteries around what is happening to your body whilst you doze off in the land of Nod.In this podcast, we find out what is happening in our brain while we dream, how to get a better night’s sleep, and whether sleep tech and apps are all they’re all cracked up to be.He speaks to BBC Science Focus Online Editor Alexander McNamara.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:How to get a good night's sleep – Alice GregoryExploding Head Syndrome – Brian SharplessThe neuroscience of happiness – Dean BurnettIs religion compatible with science? – John LennoxWhat it’s really like to die – Dr Kathryn MannixFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/07/1933m 42s

What can the father of Gaia theory tell us about our future? - James Lovelock

This week on the Science Focus Podcast, we spend some time with James Lovelock – the visionary scientist and environmental thinker who this month turns 100 years old.James Lovelock is best known as the creator of the Gaia hypothesis, which proposes that our planet and all the life on it functions as a single self-regulating organism.Less well known is that he also developed scientific instruments for NASA missions to Mars; he invented the electron capture detector, with which he became the first person to detect the widespread presence of CFCs in the atmosphere; and he even carried out influential work in cryopreservation, bringing frozen hamsters back to life.James Lloyd, staff writer at BBC Science Focus, visited Lovelock at his Dorset home to look back at his life and achievements.If you like what you hear, then please rate, review, and share with anybody you think might enjoy our podcast.You can also subscribe and leave us a review on your favourite podcast apps. Also, if there is anybody you’d like us to speak to, or a topic you want us to cover, then let us know on Twitter at @sciencefocus.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:How can we save our planet? – Sir David AttenboroughWhy is Leonardo da Vinci’s scientific legacy so often overlooked? - Martin ClaytonThere is no Plan B for planet Earth – Lord Martin ReesCould leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals? – Mark LynasAre we facing an insect apocalypse? – Brad ListerAir pollution is killing us, here's how you can stop it – Gary FullerFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/07/1928m 52s

Could leaving nature to its own devices be the key to meeting the UK’s climate goals? - Mark Lynas

The UK government’s official climate advisors recently reported that the country’s greenhouse gas emissions must fall to zero by 2050 in order to tackle the growing threat of manmade climate change.However, it seems unlikely that we will be able to reach this target by simply burning less fossil fuel and cutting down on international travel. So what else can be done?Environmental charity Rewilding Britain thinks that the answer is to let large areas of the country return to their pre-agricultural state to restore natural carbon sequestering environments such as peat bogs, heaths and salt marshes.In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast BBC Science Focus commissioning editor Jason Goodyer talks to environmental researcher Mark Lynas about the potential beneficial effects of rewilding.We now have more than 75 episodes of the Science Focus Podcast, each of which is still well worth a listen. Here are a few that you might find interesting:Can science explain everything? – Michael BlastlandWhat if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-KhaliliHow can we save our planet? – Sir David AttenboroughAre we facing an insect apocalypse? – Brad ListerAir pollution is killing us, here’s how you can stop it – Gary FullerThere is no Plan B for planet Earth – Lord Martin ReesFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/06/1918m 4s

Is there really no such thing as a fish? – Andrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber

We like to think our Science Focus Podcast is something really rather special (really, you should tell all your mates about it). But let’s face it, it pales in comparison to the hugely popular podcast No Such Thing As A Fish, which bagged Apple’s prestigious ‘Best New Podcast’ award in 2014.Numerous awards later, including the 2019 Heinz Oberhummer Award in science communication, they have amassed a whopping 700,000 subscribers for their irreverent podcast about the weird and wacky things they’ve discovered over the past week.We can’t resist the opportunity to get meta and do a science podcast about doing a science podcast, so we sent Online Editor Alexander McNamara to meet two of the show's stars, Andrew Hunter Murray and Dan Schreiber, where they chewed the ‘facts’ about Isaac Newton lecturing to empty theatres, meeting scientists who suggest putting fake eyes on a cow’s backside, and the logistics around building a statue out of sausages.We also put their fact-checking skills to the test with a little quiz pulled from the Q&A section of BBC Science Focus Magazine. Why don’t you play along as well and let us know how you get by tweeting us @sciencefocus.Please remember to rate and review our show wherever you download your podcasts from.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Do you believe in magic? – Gustav KuhnWhat happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong? – Matt ParkerWhat does it mean to be happy? – Helen RussellInside the mind of a comedian – Robin InceFinding the fun in science – Dara Ó BriainThis is how to invent everything – Ryan NorthFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/06/1936m 20s

Is racism creeping into science? – Angela Saini

After World War II, mainstream science denounced eugenics and the study of racial differences. Yet there remained a staunch group of scientists who continued to research race. For a few decades, these people remained on the fringes of research. Yet now, in the 21st Century, fuelled by a rise in the far right and extremist views, an increasing number of researchers are framing race as a biological construct rather than a social one.Yet even well-meaning scientists continue to use racial categories in genetics and medicine, betraying their belief that there are biological differences between us, and that race can explain differences in intelligence and disease susceptibility.In her new book, Superior, Angela Saini explores the concept of race. She interviews anthropologists, historians, social scientists and geneticists and finds that time after time, the science is retrofitted to accommodate race.Here, she talks to BBC Science Focus production editor Alice Lipscombe-Southwell.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Is body positivity the answer to body image issues? – Phillippa DiedrichsIs religion compatible with science? – John LennoxWhat makes me 'me'? – Aoife McLysaghtShould we be worried about sex robots? – Kate DevlinInequality in science – Angela SainiWhy aren't there more women in science?Follow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and FlipboardImage: Nazi officials use callipers to measure an ethnic German's nose. The Nazis developed a system of facial measurement that was supposedly a way of determining racial descent. The compiled results, based on biased samples, were used to back up the Nazi claim that Germans were a pure and superior "Aryan" race © Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/06/1942m 0s

Can we really predict when doomsday will happen? – William Poundstone

In this episode of the Science Focus Podcast, we’re going to try to guess when the end of the world will happen.Don’t worry, it’s not as gloomy as it might sound. Those people waving ‘The End is Nigh!’ placards are probably completely wrong about an immanent doomsday… Probably.There is a formula that has circulated for the last 50 years which suggests we can pinpoint the end of something with a reasonable amount of certainty. It has been used to predict any number of things, including successful stock market investments, the run of Broadway shows and even how many Harry Potter books go missing from local libraries.But since the 1990s, it has sparked considerable debate among theorists about when humanity as we know it will come to an end.We ask William Poundstone - whose new book How To Predict Everything (£12.99, Oneworld) explains the history of this enigmatic equation - how long we have left as a species on this planet, whether we can shift the odds in our favour, and how we can predict, well, pretty much everything else.How long do you think we have left, and why? Let us know on Twitter at @sciencefocus, and don’t forget to rate and review us wherever you listen to your podcasts.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:What if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-KhaliliHow can we save our planet? – Sir David AttenboroughThere is no Plan B for planet Earth – Lord Martin ReesThe future of humanity – Michio KakuAre we facing an insect apocalypse? – Brad ListerThis is how to invent everything – Ryan NorthFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/06/1936m 26s

Is body positivity the answer to body image issues? – Phillippa Diedrichs

We live in a society that values looks, but only if they fit into a restrictive set of ideals regarding size and shape, age, skin colour, as well as many other features of our bodies.The result is an immense pressure to look a certain way. According to a recent survey by the Mental Health Foundation, one in five adults in the UK had experienced shame over their body at some point in the last year.The rise of social media has provided a platform for a rebellion against these ideals in the form of body positivity, which advocates loving your body, even the parts that don’t fit the ideal standards of beauty.So, is loving your body the key to defeating body image issues? Or is it making the problem worse?In this podcast we speak to Professor Phillippa Diedrichs, a psychologist at the Centre for Appearance Research at the University of the West of England. She takes us through the importance of a healthy body image and the research into how body positivity could help or harm.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:What psychology can tell us about suicide – Jesse BeringThe neuroscience of happiness – Dean BurnettAre video games good for us? – Pete EtchellsCan we slow down the ageing process? – Sue ArmstrongWhat does it mean to be happy? – Helen RussellThere’s no such thing as Blue Monday – Sir David SpiegelhalterFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/05/1926m 52s

Why is the Moon landing still relevant 50 years on? – Kevin Fong

If you were to picture the Moon landing in your head right now, you could probably conjure up images of Neil Armstrong’s famous first steps, accompanied by his inspirational (and often misquoted) speech, despite it happening many years before most of us were even born. But this remarkable achievement did not come easily, and the decade-long mission culminated in the final nerve wracking 13 minutes it took the Moon lander to arrive safely on the surface. This moment, and the people who contributed to this landmark occasion in our quest to explore space, are the subject of a new BBC podcast series, 13 Minutes To The Moon.We caught up with the show’s host, Kevin Fong, about the show, and he tells us why the Moon landing still inspires us today, what it was like speaking to the people who ran mission control, and where our next Moon shot will be.Remember, if you like what you hear then please rate and review the episode wherever you listen to your podcasts. It really helps get the show out there, which means we can bring you even more interviews with the people at the forefront of science.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:The mindset behind the Moon landing – Richard WisemanWhat asteroids can tell us about our Solar System – Natalie StarkeyWhat NASA's InSight will tell us about Mars – Bruce BanerdtThere is no Plan B for planet Earth – Lord Martin ReesThe most mysterious objects in the Universe – Colin StuartWhat if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-KhaliliFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/05/1927m 48s

Can science explain everything? – Michael Blastland

We know a lot. In scientific studies, we can count data, observe trends, infer links and calculate risks. But we also spend a lot of time ignoring noise – the unexplained variations in our results that we can’t account for. Take smoking for example. We all know that smoking kills, but it doesn’t kill everyone, and we can’t predict which lifelong smokers will be struck down by lung cancer, and which won’t.In his new book The Hidden Half (£14.99, Atlantic Books), Michael Blastland discusses how, even in the most tightly controllable situations, we often still see variations in outcomes. He argues that our unwillingness to admit uncertainty can affect science, economics, politics and business, sometimes with disastrous consequences.But it’s not all bad news. New research that shows that admitting the extent to which we’re not sure could make us seem more trustworthy. And he explains that even though we don’t know everything, experts and the scientific method are still the most important places for us to turn to for guidance.He talks to Helen Glenny, editorial assistant at BBC Science Focus Magazine, in this week’s episode of the Science Focus Podcast.If you like what you hear, then please rate, review, and share with anybody you think might enjoy our podcast.You can also subscribe and leave us a review on your favourite podcast apps. Also, if there is anybody you’d like us to speak to, or a topic you want us to cover, then let us know on Twitter at @sciencefocus.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:What happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong? – Matt ParkerThere’s no such thing as Blue Monday – Sir David SpiegelhalterWhat’s the deal with algorithms? – Hannah FryInside the mind of a comedian – Robin InceIs the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk? – Professor Catharina SvanborgIs gene editing inspiring or terrifying? – Nessa CareyFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/05/1933m 44s

Is the cure for cancer hiding in human breast milk? – Professor Catharina Svanborg

Two decades ago a group of Swedish researchers chanced upon an intriguing compound with tumour-killing properties hidden within human breast milk. Dubbed HAMLET, short for Human α-lactalbumin, the substance has so far come through in vitro and animal trials with flying colours. With human trials currently underway, could HAMLET be the drug to finally give us the upper hand in the war against cancer?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/05/1921m 34s

Why is Leonardo Da Vinci’s scientific legacy so often overlooked? – Martin Clayton

It’s been 500 years since the death of Leonardo Da Vinci, and he’s remembered mainly for his great works of art, like The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa. But he was also a scientist, working across disciplines like anatomy, engineering, and architecture.Sadly, his scientific research was never published and his engineering ambitions went largely unrealised. However, through his sketches and drawings we can see his anatomical discoveries, his plans for machines, and his investigations into the world around him. We can see what was occupying his mind, allowing us to piece together clues about the mysteries he aspired to solve.So to mark the anniversary of his death, 200 of those drawings will go on display at the Queen’s Gallery next to Buckingham palace in the exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing. In this episode, we talked to Martin Clayton, Head of Prints and Drawings for Royal Collection Trust at Windsor Castle, about Da Vinci’s lasting scientific legacy. We ask him about the work he was doing, how he influenced the scientific disciplines he experimented with, and what we should remember him for.He speaks to BBC Science Focus editorial assistant Helen Glenny in this week’s episode of the Science Focus Podcast.If you like what you hear, then please rate, review, and share with anybody you think might enjoy our podcast.You can also subscribe and leave us a review on your favourite podcast apps. Also, if there is anybody you’d like us to speak to, or a topic you want us to cover, then let us know on Twitter at @sciencefocus.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Remembering Professor Stephen HawkingThe mindset behind the Moon landing – Richard WisemanBelka and Strelka: Russia’s canine cosmonauts – Vix SouthgateIdentifying Jack the Ripper: old clues, new scienceThis is how to invent everything – Ryan NorthIs religion compatible with science? – John LennoxFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and FlipboardImage: Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2019.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/05/1928m 10s

Is gene editing inspiring or terrifying? – Nessa Carey

In 2012, scientists developed a method to edit any part of the human genome, and the implications were astounding. Now, we’re starting to see the technology’s potential; we will soon cure previously untreatable diseases, but at the same time, rogue scientists are experimenting in ways considered unethical by the wider medical community. So where does gene editing go from here?In this week's Science Focus Podcast, Nessa Carey, author of the book Hacking the Code Of Life: How gene editing will rewrite our futures (£12.99, Icon) explains how gene editing was developed, how it works, and why it holds so much promise for medical science. We talked to her about the potential ways this technology could be mishandled, and how we should go about making ethical decisions around when and for whom gene editing is used.What does a future like where we can manipulate the human genome to any end? Should we be inspired, or terrified?She speaks to BBC Science Focus editorial assistant Helen Glenny.If you like what you hear, then please rate, review, and share with anybody you think might enjoy our podcast.You can also subscribe and leave us a review on your favourite podcast apps. Also, if there is anybody you’d like us to speak to, or a topic you want us to cover, then let us know on Twitter at @sciencefocus.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:Eating for your genes - Giles YeoCan we slow down the ageing process?What makes me 'me'? - Aoife McLysaghtThe genetic hunt for the Loch Ness Monster - Neil GemmellEverything that’s wrong with the human body - Nathan LentsTranshumanism: using technology to live forever - Mark O’ConnellFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/04/1930m 16s

What if the Earth’s magnetic field died? – Jim Al-Khalili

Theoretical physicist and science communicator Professor Jim Al-Khalili has taken a break from writing popular science books to write his first novel. Sunfall (£16.99, Bantam Press) is a science fiction thriller set in the year 2041, when the Earth’s magnetic field has started to die, leaving life on Earth vulnerable to threats from space.Scientists and engineers are thrown into a race against time to protect the Earth. All the science in the novel, from the futuristic technology to the apocalyptic event, are based on real science, as we understand it now.In this episode, Jim explains how the Earth’s magnetic field protects us, how being a scientist helped inform his writing, and why fiction can be a frontier for science communication.If you like what you hear, then please rate, review, and share with anybody you think might enjoy our podcast.You can also subscribe and leave us a review on your favourite podcast apps. Also, if there is anybody you’d like us to speak to, or a topic you want us to cover, then let us know on Twitter at @sciencefocus.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:How can we save our planet? - Sir David AttenboroughWhy is the magnetic north pole moving? - Ciaran BegganThere is no Plan B for planet Earth – Lord Martin ReesWhy AI is not the enemy – Jim Al-KhaliliIs there anybody out there? – Mike GarrettBuilding a base on the Moon, and crafting believable sci-fi – Andy WeirFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/04/1937m 34s

Are video games good for us? - Pete Etchells

In this week's Science Focus Podcast, we dive into the world of video games. Over the past couple of decades, video games have often got a bad rap, blamed for everything from aggression and violence to addiction and mental health problems.But what does the research actually say? Dr Pete Etchells is a psychologist at Bath Spa University who researches the behavioural effects of video games. In his first book, Lost in a Good Game (£14.99, Icon Books), he gets to the bottom of our relationship with games, and reveals a more positive side to our game-playing habits.He speaks to BBC Science Focus staff writer James Lloyd.If you like what you hear, then please rate, review, and share with anybody you think might enjoy our podcast.You can also subscribe and leave us a review on your favourite podcast apps. Also, if there is anybody you’d like us to speak to, or a topic you want us to cover, then let us know on Twitter at @sciencefocus.Listen to more episodes of the Science Focus Podcast:What does it mean to be happy? – Helen RussellWhy ASMR gives you tingles – Emma WhispersRedWhat we got wrong about pandas and teenagersWhat’s the deal with algorithms? – Hannah FryChanging our behaviour with virtual reality – Jeremy BailensonProject Discovery and its search for exoplanetsFollow Science Focus on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flipboard  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/04/1931m 14s

Do you believe in magic? – Gustav Kuhn

Abracadbra! Prestidigitation! We know that these words hold no intrinsic power, but when we hear them, we are instantly transported away to a land of magic and wonder; where the impossible becomes reality right before our eyes.So why, as rational human beings, are we instantly drawn to magic, and what makes us delight in seeing a rabbit pulled from a hat, despite knowing full well that we are being fooled into thinking it was never already there in the first place?Those are the sort of questions expert in cognitive psychology, magician, and author of Experiencing the Impossible: The Science of Magic (£20.00, MIT Press), Gustav Kuhn, is currently trying to solve at his Magic Lab at Goldsmith’s University.In this week’s Science Focus Podcast, he talks to sciencefocus.com editor Alexander McNamara about why we believe in magic, what actually happens in our brain when we watch tricks, and how understanding magic can help us make sense of a world filled with fake news and misinformation.Image © Getty Images  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/04/1929m 11s

How can we save our planet? - Sir David Attenborough

We speak to Sir David Attenborough, naturalist and host of the new Netflix show Our Planet, and two of the show’s producers about the essential changes we need to make to save our home.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/03/1935m 14s

Can we slow down the ageing process? - Sue Armstrong

As the size of the ageing population rises, the field of gerontology, the study of ageing, is bursting with discoveries. How and why do we age? What can be done to slow the ageing process, and how do we improve our health spans, rather than our life spans? Sue Armstrong discusses what she found when writing her book Borrowed Time: The Science of How and Why We Age.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/03/1932m 34s

Matt Parker: What happens when maths goes horribly, horribly wrong?

Sums are hard, but imagine the consequences when getting the wrong answer leads to disaster. Comedian and maths whizz Matt Parker explains what happens when rounding errors and miscalculations get the better of our equations.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/03/1928m 49s

Why is the magnetic north pole moving? - Ciaran Beggan

The Earth’s magnetic north pole is rocketing towards Siberia at 50 kilometres per year, making the maps of the magnetic field out of date faster than expected. Why is it moving, what does this mean for us, and what can we expect it to do in the future?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/03/1926m 46s

Are we facing an insect apocalypse? - Brad Lister

When Professor Brad Lister returned to Puerto Rico to track insect populations, he found he was only catching a fraction of the amount he’d seen 40 years ago. When he analysed what he’d caught, he saw a 98 per cent decline in insects on the ground. What’s causing this huge loss, and what does it mean for the future of our planet?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/02/1934m 36s

Is religion compatible with science? - Professor John Lennox

This week, we delve into the complex relationship between science and religion. Why invoke a god to explain the world, the argument goes, when science does a perfectly good job? Professor John Lennox, however, begs to differ.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/02/1932m 51s

What does it mean to be happy? - Helen Russell

What does it mean to be happy? The pleasure of doing nothing, the sense of community from performing a haka, or drinking in your pants? Helen Russell, author of The Atlas of Happiness, explains what happiness means to different people around the world.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/02/1930m 14s

How geology can influence elections - Lewis Dartnell

Astrobiologist Lewis Dartnell is here to talk about how the Earth's ancient geography has influenced the development of human civilisations, and how it still affects our behaviour today.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/02/1922m 45s

The mindset behind the Moon landing – Richard Wiseman

The men and women of the Apollo program needed a particular mindset to land astronauts on the Moon – Richard Wiseman explains how you can harness this mentality to achieve your own Moon shots.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/01/1936m 7s

How technology is changing politics – Jamie Susskind

Jamie Susskind explains how the politics of the future will be shaped by the technology influencing our lives today.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/01/1935m 4s

There’s no such thing as Blue Monday - Sir David Spiegelhalter

Statistician and Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge Sir David Spiegelhalter explains the pseudoscience behind Blue Monday, the power of numbers, and how to spot a dodgy stat.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/01/1921m 3s

The most mysterious objects in the Universe - Colin Stuart

From 'Oumuamua to Planet Nine, astronomy writer and Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society Colin Stuart counts down the five strangest cosmic enigmas.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/01/1920m 34s

Eating for your genes - Giles Yeo

Dr Giles Yeo studies the relationship between our genetic make-up and how we’re eating, and knows that poor self-control isn’t entirely to blame for the obesity epidemic. He’s here to talk about how our genes influence how hungry we feel and how much we eat, and what we should do about it.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/01/1938m 2s

What makes me 'me'? - Aoife McLysaght

Evolutionary geneticist Aoife McLysaght is joining Alice Roberts as a guest at this year’s Royal Institution Christmas Lectures. Together, they’re exploring where we come from, what makes us human, and what makes each of us unique.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/12/1827m 41s

Why ASMR gives you tingles – Emma WhispersRed

We chat to YouTuber Emma WhispersRed ASMR about how she got into making the videos, why she thinks people find them so soothing, and why she wants to get the phenomenom officially recognised as a form of therapy  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/12/1818m 3s

Air pollution is killing us, here’s how you can stop it – Gary Fuller

Pollution scientist Gary Fuller explains how bad our air is, what causes it, and how we can stop this invisible killer.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/12/1853m 4s

Should we be worried about sex robots? – Kate Devlin

AI ethicist Dr Kate Devlin has done a deep dive into intimacy with machines for her new book Turned On: Science, Sex and Robots. She’s looked into society’s gradually changing attitudes towards sex tech and visited the companies making the world’s most advanced sex robots, and she’s here to tell us what it all means.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/12/1829m 9s

Filming a Dynasty - Nick Lyon

The latest Sir David Attenborough-narrated BBC Natural History Unit Landmark Series is called Dynasties, and it tracks power struggles within animal groups. We talk to Nick Lyon, the producer of an episode about Zimbabwe’s Painted Wolves, to see how he captured an incredible fight for dominance in the wild.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/11/1842m 12s

There is no Plan B for planet Earth – Lord Martin Rees

Astronomer Royal Lord Martin Rees explains how unless we make significant changes now, the prospects for the human species are beginning to look bleak.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/11/1830m 15s

What NASA’s InSight will tell us about Mars - Bruce Banerdt

By drilling into the surface of Mars, NASA’s InSight mission could help us discover more about the structure of the Red Planet, and maybe help us understand the formation of other planets.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/11/1824m 38s

The genetic hunt for the Loch Ness Monster - Neil Gemmell

Professor Neil Gemmell on his project to survey the genetic diversity of Loch Ness using cutting-edge environmental DNA techniques, and maybe find clues about the Loch Ness Monster.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/11/1820m 3s

Robin Ince: Inside the mind of a comedian

Comedians often take to the stage to talk about the quirks of the human race, and comedian Robin Ince has years of experience in that area. In his new book, he’s adding insights from neuroscientists and psychologists to talk about creativity, imagination, trauma and why people become comics in the first place.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/10/1840m 31s

How to get a good night’s sleep - Alice Gregory

Sleep psychologist Prof Alice Gregory on the science behind a satisfying slumber  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/10/1825m 20s

What makes a robot a robot? – Dr Lucy Rogers

This week we speak to Dr Lucy Rogers, who casts aside any Hollywood depictions of skull-crushing Terminators, and look at the real-life robots that are making a positive impact in our lives.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/10/1837m 1s

Finding the fun in science - Dara Ó Briain

Comedian Dara Ó Briain thinks the word nerd has been co-opted by too many people who don’t deserve it: Infinity Wars fans, for example. Studying maths and mathematical physics at university, he’s a true nerd, with a favourite science joke that backs that up. He’s released his second science book for kids, so we’re talking to him about his career, communicating science to children, and what really happened to the Brontosaurus.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/10/1824m 10s

The psychology of suicide - Jesse Bering

Psychologist and science writer Jesse Bering explains the factors that lead someone to take their own life, and how we might be able to help those who are at risk.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/10/1835m 9s

What we got wrong about pandas and teenagers

Scientists Lucy Cooke and Sarah-Jayne Blakemore’s books have been shortlisted for the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize. They tell us the unexpected truth about animals and the secret life of the teenage brain.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/09/1835m 36s

How to invent everything - Ryan North

How helpful would you be if you were stranded in the past? Ryan North imagined telling people how cool computers are, but if they asked him how to make one, he’d be stumped. So he did some research, and in his hilarious new book he’s teaching us how to invent everything.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/09/1823m 24s

Why aren't there more women in science?

Girls are not picking as many STEM A-levels as boys, while professional female scientists are dropping out of the field. Is it time for change? In this episode we talk to four women currently working in STEM about their experiences, the problems faced by women and girls, and how we can fix the issues.The panel:Dr Suzie Imber - Associate professor of planetary science at the University of Leicester. Last year she won the BBC Two series Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?Angela Saini - Award-winning science journalist who wrote Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong.Dr Aoife Hunt - Associate director and mathematician at Movement Strategies, which is a company that specialises in crowd flow planning.Dr Jess Wade - Physicist at Imperial College London. This year she won the Daphne Jackson prize from the Institute of Physics.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/09/1842m 28s

Identifying Jack the Ripper - David Wilson

Five violent murders were committed by a man dubbed ‘Jack the Ripper’ between August and November 1888 in Whitechapel. Criminologist David Wilson and actor Emilia Fox, with the help of the country’s leading criminal investigators, apply the latest scientific techniques to the case in a new BBC Science documentary. We asked Wilson if they identified the killer.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/09/1826m 18s

Why AI is not the enemy - Jim Al-Khalili

Jim Al-Khalili explains how artificial intelligence has changed the world, who benefits from it, and why we probably shouldn’t be afraid of it destroying humanity.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/08/1835m 27s

Could these gloves be the future of music?

Imogen Heap has pushed the creative boundaries in the creation of electronic music, but now she is using technology a different way that she hopes will create a fairer and more inclusive future for musicians. She talks to us about how blockchain could revolutionise the music industry, and how her innovative mi.mu gloves are changing the way we create and perform electronic music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/08/1826m 59s

What's going on with the weather? - Dann Mitchell

This summer has been one of the hottest on record, so we asked climate change researcher Dann Mitchell what has caused the summer heatwave, can we expect more, and is there anything we can do about it?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/08/1816m 12s

What asteroids can tell us about our Solar System

What asteroids can tell us about our Solar System  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/08/1840m 46s

Wildfires: past, present and future

Geologist Prof Andrew Scott on our complex relationship with wildfires  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/08/1825m 34s

Inequality in Science

Women are underrepresented in science, and some experts are asking whether there are biological reasons why. Meanwhile, racial studies are creeping back into mainstream science. We talk to Angela Saini about the science of gender and race, and about how to even the playing field.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/07/1848m 54s

What’s the deal with algorithms?

Algorithms are everywhere. They can make our lives easier, by curating our Twitter feeds and Netflix suggestions. But they can also be bad. They lack empathy and we can become too reliant on their logical abilities, putting ourselves and others at risk. Here we talk to mathematician Hannah Fry, who tells us all about the good, the bad and the downright ugly of the algorithms that surround us.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/07/1827m 5s

Mike Garrett: Is there anybody out there?

There are 100 billion stars in our Galaxy – surely we can’t be the only intelligent lifeform out there? In this week’s Science Focus Podcast we speak to Mike Garrett, the Director of Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, about the search for extraterrestrial life, what we’ll do if we find them, and what it means for us as humans.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/07/1841m 18s

Russia's canine cosmonauts

Russian space dogs paved the way to sending humans into the cosmos. By studying how space flight affected dogs, scientists could establish whether it was safe to blast humans into space too. In this episode, we talk to Vix Southgate, who has just written a children’s book about the dogs Belka and Strelka – the first two creatures to go into orbit and return safely back to Earth.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/07/1822m 57s

Sin: Why we do the things we shouldn’t

Whether it’s cheating on our spouse, slacking off at work, or eating too much junk, we all occasionally do things we shouldn’t. Jack Lewis talks to us about the neuroscience of sin, how we can resist it, and the wacky experiments that test our ability to behave.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/06/1833m 56s

Solving the plastic problem

It’s estimated that there are currently more than 6 billion tonnes of plastic waste buried in land fill sites or floating on the surface of the ocean. Clearly something needs to be done but what exactly should we be doing? We speak to materials scientist Mark Miodownik about the growing problem of plastic waste, what we should be doing about it, and why plastic isn’t always bad for the planet.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/06/1828m 16s

Everything that's wrong with the human body

We like to think of ourselves as highly evolved, well-adapted creatures, but our retinas face backwards, we have too many bones in our wrists, and at least half our genome is junk. Biologist Nathan Lents explains what we can learn from our flaws.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/06/1831m 56s

How to keep yourself busy in space

Chris Hadfield has been to space three times, completed two spacewalks and visited two different space stations, but for many, he is best known for his rendition of David Bowie’s Space Oddity performed aboard the International Space Station. We find out how close the late songwriter’s vision of space was to reality, the life of a retired astronaut, and keeping yourself entertained on the ISS.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/06/1820m 40s

The truth about dinosaurs

The image of dinosaurs as drab, slow-witted reptilians is slowly being overturned thanks to exciting new fossil discoveries and advances in the technology used to analyse them. We talk to palaeontologist Steve Brusatte about palaeontology’s emerging golden age that is revealing what dinosaurs really looked like and why they were much smarter than we used to think.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/05/1831m 8s

To become Prime Minister, change your voice

Your voice – its pitch, intonation and accent – is a huge part of your personal identity. Trevor Cox is talking to us about the full range of human speech, and how technology’s changing the conversation.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/05/1842m 59s

The neuroscience of happiness

Everyone wants to be happy, it’s an inbuilt part of being human, but what exactly is going on in our brains when we feel happy and what can we do to ensure we live as happy a life as possible? We talk to neuroscientist, comedian and science writer Dean Burnett to find out.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/05/1846m 36s

Changing our behaviour with virtual reality

VR can be used for so much more than cheap thrills and casual gaming. Jeremy Bailenson tells us how he is using VR to change the way we perceive racism, highlight the impact of climate change, and help us step into the shoes of our sporting heroes.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/05/1831m 2s

What it’s really like to die

People used to die at home and everybody recognised the process, and now people die in hospital largely with doctors and nurses trying to stop it from happening. So we don’t see how gentle the normal process of a life winding to an end can be.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/04/1832m 43s

How to push the limits of human endurance

Ahead of the London Marathon, we talk to Alex Hutchinson, author and former long-distance athlete about what it takes to push the human body to its limits.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/04/1833m 52s

Transhumanism - using technology to live forever

We talk to Mark O’Connell about transhumanism, a movement whose aim is to use technology to control the future evolution of our species – to improve our flawed biology, and to enable us to live forever.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/04/1828m 30s

Nudge theory

How much difference can a small change make? When it comes to changing habits, convincing someone to do something or affecting the behaviour of people without them even knowing about it, quite a lot, as we have seen with the recent Facebook scandal, where data firm Cambridge Analytica used personal data influence the way people vote.  In this week's Science Focus Podcast, BBC Focus commissioning editor Jason Goodyer speaks to David Halpern, Chief Executive of the Behavioural Insights team, about nudge theory – a psychological tool used in behavioural science to subtly influence peoples’ decisions.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/04/1829m 25s

Project Discovery and its search for exoplanets

We talk to Bergur Finnbogason, Development Manager for Project Discovery, which uses players of the Massively Multiplayer Online game EVE Online to help search for exoplanets.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/03/1825m 17s

Remembering Stephen Hawking - the Galaxy's best known scientist

In this episode, we chat to four scientists who spent time with Professor Stephen Hawking, to find out more about his life, his work, and his legacy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/03/1854m 57s

Exploding Head Syndrome

We talk to professor Brian Sharpless about a little-known sleep disorder called Exploding Head Syndrome and the research that hopes find a treatment.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/03/1823m 12s

Adventures in brain enhancement

This week, we chat to author David Adam about his adventures in brain enhancement, finding out whether smart drugs and electrical brain stimulation could really be a shortcut to a sharper, more focused mind.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/03/1844m 50s

The future of humanity

This week, we chat to theoretical physicist Michio Kaku about the future of humanity, how we're going to terraform Mars, why the modern space race will change life on Earth, and why aliens probably won't bother to destroy us.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/02/1838m 30s

How emotions are made

This week, we chat to neuroscientist Lisa Feldmann Barrett about what happens in our brains when we create emotions, how to control them, and what this means for the future of artificial intelligence.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/02/1840m 5s

The London Fatberg + Why you should break up with your phone

This month, we’re talking about how the Museum of London acquired a piece of the London Fatberg as their new exhibit, and asked them how they’ll keep it “fresh”. We also talk to author Catherine Price about the science that inspired her to break up with her phone.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/02/1841m 0s

How plants can survive space missions and Chernobyl

The world seems to be going ever more nuclear, but what effect could radiation – from bombs or nuclear meltdowns – have on animals and plants?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/02/1823m 11s

Christmas lectures past and present

Since they were launched by Michael Faraday in 1825, the Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures have become as synonymous with the festive season as mince pies and sherry. In this month’s podcast we look back at classic lectures from Christmases past, and catch up with this year’s presenter, neuroscientist Sophie Scott.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/12/1743m 23s

Building a base on the Moon, and crafting believable sci-fi

If you love science fiction then you’re in for a treat. This month, we pick the brain of Andy Weir, author of the best-selling novel and film The Martian, about his new creation Artemis and how he crafts believable sci-fi worlds. In Artemis Weir has swapped Mars, NASA and the All-American hero Mark Watney for something a little more realistic: a privatised moonbase that’s home to small time smuggler Jazz Bashira. What the books do have in common is a love for the transformative science that will one day help humans live on distant worlds.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/12/1733m 24s

Why we love pets and why strangers help each other

When she was 19, a stranger saved Dr Abigail Marsh’s life. Because of that moment, Dr Marsh work studies the psychology of people who help total strangers. We talked to her about the real-life superheroes who were the subject of her new book Good For Nothing. Also in the episode, we hear from Dr John Bradshaw, an anthrozoologist, about how deep our connection to our pets really goes…  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/11/1739m 18s

Psychosis, realism and video games

In the first half of this episode we ask Dr Stephen Hall, a climate and infrastructure researcher, whether the 2040 petrol and diesel car ban will really clean up the air we breathe. In the second part, we talk to neuroscientist Professor Paul Fletcher about the game Hellblade and how it tried to present a scientifically accurate portrayal of psychosis.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/10/1742m 9s
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