Short History Of...

Short History Of...

By NOISER

History is full of the extraordinary. Each week, we'll transport you back in time to witness history's most incredible moments and remarkable people. New episodes Mondays, or a week early for Noiser+ subscribers. With Noiser+ you'll also get ad-free listening and exclusive content. For more information, head to noiser.com/subscriptions For advertising enquiries, email info@adelicious.fm Hosted by John Hopkins. Production: Katrina Hughes, Kate Simants, Nicole Edmunds, Jacob Booth, Dorry Macaulay, Rob Plummer, Cody Reynolds-Shaw. Compositions by Oliver Baines, Dorry Macaulay, Tom Pink. We are sponsored by Indeed. Go to Indeed.com/shorthistory for £100 sponsored credit.

Episodes

Mahatma Gandhi

Raised in India, and trained in London as a lawyer, Mahatma Gandhi went on to lead a life that was anything but ordinary. He campaigned against unjust laws in South Africa, led the movement against British rule in India, and changed the entire nature of protest. His commitment to non-violence would inspire world leaders for generations. But how did a shy, unpromising schoolboy turn into one of the greatest leaders of the 20th century? Where did his ideals and approach to conflict come from? And why, despite his commitment to non-violence, did his own life end so suddenly? This is a Short History Of Mahatma Gandhi.  A Noiser production, written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Bindu Puri, Professor of Contemporary Indian Philosophy at Jawaharlal Nehru University, and author of ‘Gandhi for the 21st Century: Religion, Morality and Politics’.  Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
19/05/241h 3m

The Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China is one of the architectural wonders of the world. Stretching for over 21,000km - as far as London to New York and back, twice - it follows what used to be the border between China and Mongolia. Built over a period of 2,000 years by millions of conscripted workers, it’s been the subject of myths and legends for centuries. But who really built the Great Wall, and how? Is it true that those who died at the Wall were buried within it? What purpose did it serve? And can this incredible structure really be seen from space? This is a Short History Of the Great Wall of China.  A Noiser production, written by Fiona Veitch-Smith. With thanks to William Lindesay, a geographer, explorer, conservationist, and leading expert on the Great Wall of China.  Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
12/05/2458m 3s

Polynesian Exploration

Modern genetics tells us that the residents of the far-flung Polynesian islands are one of the most closely related people in the world. But, thanks to the exploration of their ancestors, they’re also the most widely dispersed. Polynesian exploration of the Pacific has been compared to humankind’s missions into space, and has led to a unique and vibrant culture for these islanders. So what do these people scattered across 1,000 islands have in common? How did the earliest pioneers survive epic journeys at sea? And what enables sailors to navigate such treacherous waters without any form of writing or physical map-making?  This is a Short History Of Polynesian Exploration. A Noiser production, written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Dr Christina Thompson, editor of the Harvard Review, and author of the book Sea People, The Puzzle of Polynesia. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
05/05/2453m 58s

The Korean War

Beginning only five years after the end of World War Two, the Korean War was an exceptionally violent conflict which led to the death of at least 2.5 million people. It became the most deadly conflict of the Cold War era, a political battle of capitalism versus communism, that almost triggered World War Three. But how was this war encouraged by American, Soviet, European, and Chinese ambitions? Was anything really achieved by the years of fighting? And what was the true aftermath of the conflict, both locally, and for the world at large? This is a Short History Of the Korean War. Written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Dr Owen Miller, a lecturer in Korean studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.  Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
28/04/2459m 45s

Ian Fleming

Ian Fleming’s most famous creation, James Bond, is a cultural icon. To paraphrase one critic, Bond is someone men want to be, and women want to be with. Although many attitudes expressed in the Bond books are out of kilter with modern ideas, Bond remains one of the most enduring fictional characters in history. But what is the story behind his creator - Ian Fleming? What inspired Fleming to write the ultimate spy novels? Did his success bring happiness? And how much of his own character did he lend to James Bond? This is a short history of Ian Fleming.  Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Edward Abel-Smith, author of ‘Ian Fleming’s Inspirations: The Truth Behind the Books.’ Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
21/04/241h 2m

Introducing: The Curious History of Your Home

Noiser presents a brand new podcast: The Curious History of Your Home. In this taster episode of Noiser’s new podcast, join domestic historian Ruth Goodman as she guides you through the surprising, often epic stories behind everyday objects in your home, starting with the wallpaper. To discover more episodes, search ‘The Curious History of Your Home’ wherever you get your podcasts or follow the link https://podfollow.com/the-curious-history-of-your-home. New episodes every Tuesday. Short History Of will be back as normal next week. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
14/04/2433m 50s

The Aztecs

Since the arrival of the Aztecs in central Mexico from the early 1300s, history has been fascinated by them. They’re widely reputed to be a savage people who left behind obsidian knives, skull racks, and disturbing remnants of human sacrifice. But in reality, the Aztecs were far more multifaceted than that. So what else has history gotten wrong about the Aztecs? Why were they so feared and reviled? How did they become so powerful? And what is the full truth about their downfall? This is a Short History Of The Aztecs. A Noiser production, written by Nicola Rayner. With thanks to Camilla Townsend, author of Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs.  Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
07/04/241h

The Battle of the Somme

The Battle of the Somme was supposed to be the joint British-French offensive that would win the First World War. A string of battles spread over five months, it involved everything from cavalry charges, poison gas, and the debut of the tank. But the Somme was anything but victorious….on the first day alone, over 19,000 British soldiers were killed and more than 57,000 wounded, making it the single bloodiest day in British military history. So what was the Allied war plan, and how did it fail so spectacularly? What was its significance to the future progress of the war? And at what cost? This is a Short History Of the Battle of the Somme. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Alex Churchill, historian, director of the Great War Group, and author of the forthcoming ‘Ring of Fire: A New People’s History of the World at War, 1914’. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
31/03/2456m 56s

The Founding Fathers of the US

The founding of the United States on July 4th, 1776, changed the world, and inspired other colonies to control their own destinies. The men responsible for writing and signing the Declaration of Independence - the Founding Fathers - have gone down in history as legends, with an almost ‘God-like status’. But nearly 250 years on, their legacy is challenged and debated. So who were the founding fathers? How did their talents, ideas and flaws shape their nation? And how do the choices they made in the 18th century still affect the world today? This is a Short History Of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. Written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Dr Lindsay M Chervinsky, a presidential historian, and author of The Cabinet: George Washingon and the Creation of an American Institution. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
25/03/241h 1m

Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt was a woman who redefined the role of the First Lady of the United States. By refusing to be merely a passive companion and wife, and choosing instead to pursue a life of activism, she was seen as an equal to her powerful husband. But what made Eleanor Roosevelt - a woman who was born an aristocrat - fight so hard for the underdog? How did she balance her commitment to social justice with family life? And what was the truth about her unconventional marriage to one of America’s most renowned presidents? This is a Short History Of Eleanor Roosevelt. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Allida Black, founder of the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project, and a distinguished fellow at the Rothermere American Institute at the University of Oxford. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
18/03/241h 2m

St Patrick (Repeat)

Though St Patrick is honoured by millions of revellers worldwide every year, few know more about him than the popular myths concerning shamrocks and snakes. The real story of St Patrick reads like an adventure story, involving kidnapping, enslavement, and daring escapes. But how did his commitment to spreading the word of God lead him to become the embodiment of all things Irish? This is A Short History Of… St Patrick. A Noiser production, written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Philip Freeman, Professor of History at Pepperdine University and author of St Patrick of Ireland: A Biography. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
17/03/2454m 47s

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

Throughout the late 17th and early 18th Century, the waters of the Caribbean were crawling with pirates. Stories about swash-buckling buccaneers, and insatiable treasure-seekers haunted the tropical islands, as navies tried in vain to put a stop to their reign of terror. But who were some of the world’s most notorious pirates? How much of what we think we know about them is real, and how much is legend? What was life like on board a pirate ship? And how were these fearsome bandits caught and brought to justice? This is a Short History Of the Real Pirates of the Caribbean. Written by Nicole Edmunds. With thanks to Ian Jay Dolin, the best-selling author of the pirate book, ‘Black Flags, Blue Waters’, as well as many other popular books on maritime history, including ‘Rebels at Sea’. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
11/03/2459m 38s

The French Revolution, Part 2 of 2

It’s simple enough to pinpoint the beginnings of the French Revolution in 1789, but far more difficult to mark its end. Following the initial outbreak of revolution, France was plunged into years of political, social and economic instability, as various new governments sought to replace the ancient monarchy. But how did the relationship between the king and his people deteriorate so badly? Who were the figures that ruled after him? And what was the lasting impact of those dark years at the end of the 18th century known as the Reign of Terror? This is Part 2 of a special two-part Short History Of the French Revolution. Written by Nicola Rayner. With thanks to Professor Marisa Linton, historian and author of ‘Choosing Terror; Virtue, Friendship, and Authenticity in the French Revolution’.  Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
06/03/2454m 39s

The French Revolution, Part 1 of 2

During the late 18th Century, a series of political, social, cultural, and economic issues reached breaking point, exploding in what is now known as the French Revolution. This unprecedented event affected not just France, but the rest of the world - reinventing centuries-old approaches to society, and introducing Europe to brand new ideas of liberty, equality, and fraternity. But how did France reach the tipping point that triggered the Revolution? Is it the most important event in Western history? And how did a movement founded on such noble principles, descend into one of the bloodiest periods in history? This is Part 1 of a special two-part Short History Of the French Revolution. Written by Nicola Rayner. With thanks to Professor Marisa Linton, historian and author of ‘Choosing Terror; Virtue, Friendship, and Authenticity in the French Revolution’. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
04/03/2455m 1s

River Nile

Snaking across 4,000 miles and 11 African countries, the River Nile is perhaps the most famous river on planet earth. The 80 billion gallons of water that flow through its banks each day give life to countless animals and ecosystems - from crocodiles and hippos, to rare species of fish, plants, and people. But who has tried to harness the power of this river, and why have so many failed? What cultures have grown from the Nile’s waters? And why are emperors, prophets, writers, Kings and Queens, drawn to its famous banks? This is a Short History Of the River Nile. Written by Paul Kerensa. With thanks to Robert Twigger, author of Red Nile: A Biography of the World’s Greatest River. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noisier.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
26/02/2454m 40s

Industrial Revolution

During the years 1760 to 1830, British industry exploded. Thanks to advances in machinery, and forward-thinking inventions, the country shifted from a predominantly agricultural nation, to a modern state. This movement has become known as the Industrial Revolution. But why did these changes take place in Britain and not somewhere else? What were its impacts at the time, and how has it come to shape the modern world? And, are we indeed still living through it? This is a Short History Of the Industrial Revolution. A Noiser production, Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Joel Mokyr, Professor of Economics and History at Northwestern University, and the Sackler Professor at the University of Tel Aviv. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
19/02/2458m 9s

The Ninja

Remembered in popular culture as the ultimate type of assassin, the Ninja were ancient masters of secrecy, operating for just 200 years in central Japan. Legends tell of them walking on water, controlling the weather, and even turning invisible. But what is the true story of the Ninja? How did this form of espionage originate? And how did Ninjas move from the shadows of folklore to the spotlight of modern culture? This is a Short History Of The Ninja. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to John Man, historian and author of the book ‘Ninja: 1,000 Years of the Shadow Warrior’. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
12/02/2450m 46s

Michelangelo

Michelangelo was one of the greatest artists of his time, with works such as the Sistine Chapel and his sculpture of David, earning him an enduring place in history. Amid the complex Italian politics of his time, Michelangelo navigated powerful dynasties, religious upheavals, and professional rivalries to ensure art was always the centre of his life. But what drove him to keep producing outrageously brilliant work? How did his relationship with superstar contemporaries like da Vinci and Raphael influence him? And what was the personal cost of his dedication to art? This is a Short History Of Michelangelo. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Bernadine Barnes, author of three books on Michelangelo, including ‘Michelangelo and the Viewer in his Time’. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
05/02/2457m 30s

Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria was Britain's longest reigning monarch until Queen Elizabeth II - her great great granddaughter. Born fifth in line to the throne, at a time when the Royal Family’s popularity was at an all time low, Victoria went on to be one of Britain’s most beloved monarchs. Today, she’s associated with an empire on which the sun never set, an overpowering love for her husband, and her crippling grief. But who was the real Victoria? What was it like for a young woman to hold so much power in a man’s world? Can she be credited with the developments of her age, or was she merely a figurehead? And how should we remember her today? This is a Short History Of Queen Victoria. Written by Nicole Edmunds. With thanks to Tracy Borman, historian, author of ‘Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth I: The Mother and Daughter Who Changed History’, and joint curator for Historic Royal Palaces. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
29/01/241h 1m

Petra

The ancient city of Petra, in south-west Jordan, is one of the world’s most famous archaeological sites. Founded over two millennia ago, it was a key location for trade between Arabia, Egypt and the Mediterranean Sea. But as the centuries passed, Petra’s glory faded and it was eventually forgotten by the world. That was, until its rediscovery over 1,000 years later by a Swiss explorer. But what led to the sudden surge of interest in the city of Petra? Why was a permanent settlement built in the middle of the desert? And what lessons can modern society learn from an ancient tribe that most westerners have never heard of? This is a Short History Of Petra. Written by Emma Christie. With thanks to Jodi Magness, archaeologist, author, and distinguished professor at the University of North Carolina. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material, and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
22/01/2455m 7s

Boudica

The legend of Boudica has survived for two millennia, although much of her life still remains a mystery - some historians dispute whether she existed at all. For those who do believe in her, she personifies liberty, defiance, and female power, while for others, she was a barbaric, blood-thirsty warrior. But what is her real story? How does modern archaeology support Boudica’s folklore? Can we really call her a feminist icon when she slaughtered women and children? And how did her actions alter the course of English and Roman history? This is a Short History Of Boudica. A Noiser production, written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Miranda Aldhouse-Green, a professor of archaeology at Cardiff University, and author of ‘Boudica Britannia’. Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
15/01/2453m 25s

Indian Ocean Tsunami

On the morning of December 26th, 2004, a massive earthquake struck the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, triggering an enormous tsunami that hit Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, Thailand, and more. Killing at least 275,000 people, and impacting 20 countries, it remains the deadliest natural disaster of the 21st Century. But what exactly caused the earthquake and subsequent tsunami? How did it hit with no warning? And has enough been done to limit the effects of such an event if it happens again? This is a Short History Of the Indian Ocean Tsunami. A Noiser production, written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Jose Borrero - a coastal and environmental scientist, and Tsunami Hazards specialist.  Get every episode of Short History Of a week early with Noiser+. You’ll also get ad-free listening, bonus material and early access to shows across the Noiser network. Click the Noiser+ banner to get started. Or, if you’re on Spotify or Android, go to noiser.com/subscriptions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
08/01/2458m 21s

The Whiskey Rebellion

Just a few years after the Declaration of Independence, an uprising against a levy on liquor became the first great test for the government of the nascent United States of America. But what drove ordinary people to take up arms against the federal government? And why did founding fathers Washington and Hamilton march an army against their own people? This is the story of a new nation trying to define its own limits and philosophy. From Noiser, this is a Short History Of the Whiskey Rebellion. Written by Dan Smith. This is a bonus episode previously available exclusively for Noiser+ subscribers. If you enjoy this episode, you can unlock more bonus episodes like this one by subscribing to Noiser+. As well as bonus episodes, Noiser+ subscribers will get ad-free listening and week early access to new episodes. For more information or to get started with a 30-day free trial, follow the link in the episode description or head to www.noiser.com/subscriptions. Short History Of continues to be available for free wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
01/01/2440m 44s

Introducing: Herod the Great Part 1: Ruler of Galilee

Noiser presents Real Dictators: The Story of Herod the Great. You may well know the name from the Nativity story. The cruel king who learns of a prophecy proclaiming a Messiah and orders the slaughter of innocent children in response. He’s become synonymous with almost pantomime villainy. At the same time, Herod changed the face of the Middle East in the 1st century BC. His reign featured dazzling architectural ventures and significant legal changes… as well as social division, political intrigue and murderous family drama. So, all in all, who really was this iconic figure of the immediate pre-Christian era? A Noiser production, written by Kate Harrison. This is Part 1 of 2. If you enjoyed this episode, you can listen to part two right away over on the Real Dictators podcast. Search Real Dictators wherever you get your podcasts and hit follow to never miss an episode. Short History Of will be back in the new year with brand new episodes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
27/12/2358m 50s

Agatha Christie (Repeat)

Retaining the title of the “Queen of Crime” to this day, Agatha Christie is the best-selling novelist of all time. Across 66 novels, 14 short-story collections, and 20 stage plays, she depicted the evil lurking in the hearts of ordinary people. But how did this homeschooled daughter of a privileged English family learn so much about poisons, psychopaths and murder? What in her personal life informed such a suspicious view of ordinary people? And how did she trigger a real-life mystery in 1926 that saw the whole country turn amateur detective? This is a Short History Of Agatha Christie. A Noiser production, written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to best-selling crime writer Sophie Hannah. New episodes of Short History Of will be back in the new year. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
18/12/2358m 59s

J.R.R Tolkien

J.R.R Tolkien is one of Britain’s most beloved authors, famous for creating the fantasy world ‘Middle Earth’ through his novels ‘The Hobbit’ and the ‘Lord of the Rings’ trilogy. What started out as a bedtime story for his young children, now captivates millions of fans across the world, who long to join his memorable characters on their epic adventures. But how did Tolkien rise from a humble Birmingham childhood to become one of the most respected literary figures of all time? What inspired him to create a detailed imaginary world? And why did it take so long for his greatest works to see the light of day? This is a Short History Of J.R.R Tolkien. A Noiser production, written by Luke Lonergan. With thanks to Dr Holly Ordway, a Tolkien scholar and award-winning author of the book, ‘Tolkien’s Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages’.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
11/12/2351m 11s

The Colosseum

Voted one of the seven modern wonders of the world, Rome’s Colosseum is an instantly recognizable building. Constructed by Emperor Flavian in the first century AD as a gift to his people, and still standing almost two millennia later, it has a rich and fascinating history. Films such as Gladiator and Spartacus popularize its reputation as home to brutal gladiator battles, but what is the real story behind the Colosseum? How did one emperor’s dream become a reality? Why was the arena abandoned for centuries? And what makes it so iconic in the 21st Century? From Noiser, this is a Short History Of The Colosseum. Written by Nicole Edmunds. With thanks to Greg Woolf, Ronald Miller Distinguished Professor of Ancient History at UCLA, and author of ‘The Life and Death of Ancient Cities’.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
04/12/2353m 36s

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill is one of the most recognizable figures of the 20th Century. Voted in 2002 as ‘the greatest Briton’, he’s remembered for his unfailing leadership throughout the Second World War, as he steered Britain through its darkest hour to eventual victory. But what is the real story behind Churchill? How did the rise of Hitler thrust him into the spotlight? What sort of controversy surrounded the famed politician? And why was he dumped by the British electorate just after winning the war in Europe? This is a Short History Of Winston Churchill. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Andrew Roberts, historian and author of ‘Churchill: Walking With Destiny’.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
27/11/2356m 48s

Highwaymen

For centuries, stories have been told about highwaymen - dangerous rogues who attacked unsuspecting travellers in the dead of night, demanding their money or their life. These robbers have been romanticised into myths, plays, films, and songs. But what’s the truth behind the legends? Who were the real men - and sometimes women - who risked death sentences for the contents of a purse? How did authorities respond to highway robbery? And do these career criminals really deserve such heroic status? This is a Short History Of Highwaymen. Written by Danny Marshall. With thanks to Fiona McDonald, author of ‘Gentlemen Rogues and Wicked Ladies: A Guide to British highwaymen and highwaywomen.’ Check out Noiser’s podcast Real Outlaws for more episodes like this one! Search for Real Outlaws wherever you get your podcasts, or follow this link www.podfollow.com/real-outlaws For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
20/11/2357m 6s

Abolition of The British Slave Trade

In the mid-17th Century, Britain dominated the Slave Trade, shipping over 3 million enslaved Africans across the Atlantic. Conditions on board slave ships were inhumane, and large numbers of enslaved men, women, and children died en-route. However, during the 18th and early 19th centuries, certain individuals started to speak up and demand an end to slavery. So who were these courageous pioneers, brave enough to challenge the status-quo? How did they fight the establishments? And what of the enslaved people who made their voices heard against all odds? This is a Short History Of the Abolition of the British Slave Trade. Written by David Jackson. With thanks to Trevor Burnard, Wilberforce Professor of Slavery and Emancipation, and Director at the Wilberforce Institute, University of Hull. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
13/11/2355m 45s

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens is considered one of the greatest novelists of the Victorian Age. His works shone a light on prevalent issues of his era, such as poverty, disease, and inequality, and called for widespread social change. Since Dickens’ time, his books have been translated into 150 languages, and have never been out of print. But how did a boy from Portsmouth turn into one of the world’s most celebrated literary figures? Why were his words so effective in sparking real societal change? And, as a pillar of Victorian society, did his private life align with his famous public image? This is A Short History Of Charles Dickens. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Lucinda Hawksley, author of ‘Dickens and Travel’, and great great great granddaughter of Charles and Catherine Dickens.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
06/11/2352m 49s

The Gunpowder Plot (Repeat)

The Gunpowder Plot is an epic tale of adventure and murderous revenge, a detective story complete with secrets, aliases, even an anonymous letter of betrayal. But who was really behind it? What drove the conspirators to attempt such an audacious act of terrorism? This is a Short History Of the Gunpowder Plot. A Noiser production, written by Kate Simants. With thanks to Jim Sharpe, historian and author of Remember Remember the Fifth of November: Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. This episode is read by Paul McGann. You can continue to hear Paul over on Noiser’s Real Dictators. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
05/11/231h 2m

Magna Carta

Magna Carta is one of the most enduring documents from the Middle Ages. Reluctantly signed by King John at Runnymede in 1215, it forever changed society and politics in Britain, and the rest of the world. Magna Carta has been credited with inspiring the US Constitution and Bill of Rights, and providing the basis for democracy across the globe. But what does Magna Carta actually say? What events led to its creation? And how has it changed the world today? This is a Short History Of Magna Carta. Written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Dan Jones, host of the podcast ‘This is History: A Dynasty To Die For’, and author of Magna Carta: the making and legacy of the Great Charter’.  This is History Podcast: https://listen.sonymusic-podcasts.link/i_QB7rbc?c=3MuDbSuS3pG_wP1hXuXwWA&h=34a52a3614bd8b67e For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
30/10/2349m 15s

Jane Austen

Jane Austen is arguably the most famous female writer in history. Her novels have gone on to inspire countless films, plays, and dramas all over the world, and have been translated into almost 50 different languages. But how did an 18th Century woman create stories that are still loved today? What makes her characters so timeless? And, while we know all about her heroes and heroines, what do we know about the author herself? From Noiser, This is a Short History of Jane Austen.  Written by Linda Harrison. With thanks to Janine Barchas, Professor of English Literature at the University of Texas, and author of many books about Austen, including ‘The Lost Books of Jane Austen’. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
22/10/2348m 42s

Congo River

The Congo River is the world’s deepest and most powerful waterway. In its basin, a wilderness bigger than Alaska, natural resources abound - oil, gold, diamonds, rubber. But this river, more than any other, is also linked with some of the darkest times in human history – with slavery, war and corruption.     So what do we know of the early communities who lived on its shores? Why did it take Europeans so long to explore the river? And what role did the Congo play in the development of motor cars, the atomic bomb and mobile phones?    From Noiser, this is a Short History of the Congo River.    Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Tim Butcher, a travel history writer and author of Blood River, based on his journey down the Congo. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
15/10/2351m 0s

Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher was one of the most controversial figures of the 20th Century. Praised by some as a fearless leader and feminist icon, and despised by others as a heartless politician, the Iron Lady caused divisions wherever she went. But why did Britain’s first female Prime Minister inspire such extreme hatred? What policies did she implement, how did they affect the communities of Britain? And what, if anything, is her legacy today? This is a Short History of Margaret Thatcher. Written by Nicole Edmunds. With thanks to Chris Collins, historian, and editor of Margaretthatcher.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
08/10/2353m 55s

Boston Tea Party

In December, 1773, hundreds of angry Bostonians charged into the harbor at Griffin’s Wharf, and tossed over 300 chests of tea into the icy waters below. This lawlessness marked the culmination of what many Americans viewed as decades worth of oppression and exploitation by the British. Ultimately leading to the American War of Independence, this nonviolent protest has become one of the most pivotal moments in American history. But what circumstances led to the Boston Tea Party? Why was tea such a significant symbol of oppression? And why is the Boston Tea Party considered to be the single most important catalyst for the American Revolution? This is a Short History Of The Boston Tea Party. Written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Benjamin Carp, Professor of History at Brooklyn College, and author of ‘Defiance Of The Patriots: The Boston Tea Party and the Making of America’.  For ad-free listening, bonus content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
01/10/2344m 43s

Fukushima Nuclear Disaster

In 2011, Japan was hit by the worst earthquake in the country’s history. Enormous tremors caused devastation all throughout Japan, and the tsunami that followed wreaked further havoc. But the damage didn’t end there. 200 km north of Tokyo, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant was in danger. It had been so severely damaged that there were fears of a full-scale, global, nuclear melt-down…. But how close did the world really come to nuclear disaster? Whose brave actions ensured even greater devastation was avoided? And have the lessons of Fukushima been learned? This is a Short History Of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster.  Written by Danny Marshall. With thanks to Dr Edwin Lyman, Director of Nuclear Power Safety at the Union of Concerned Scientists. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
24/09/2354m 40s

Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc is a historical superstar, a peasant who rose above her rank and gender to help free France from foreign occupation. Claiming to be acting under the orders of saints and angels, she became a symbol of national freedom. But how did a near-illiterate teenage girl win the hearts and minds of soldiers and citizens alike? What was behind her angelic visions? And why was she abandoned to a brutal fate at the age of just nineteen? This is a Short History of Joan of Arc. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Kathryn Harrison, author of Joan of Arc, A Life Transfigured.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
17/09/2352m 33s

Suez Canal

The Suez Canal is one of the world’s most famous waterways - connecting the Red Sea to the Mediterranean, and opening up trade between the East and the West. But ever since its legendary construction in 1869, the Suez Canal has been at the centre of conflict and controversy. Why does a ditch in a desert spark years of political crises? Who helped turn a pharaoh’s dream into a reality? And how does a 19th Century waterway still hold the key to global trade almost 2,000 years later? This is a Short History Of The Suez Canal. Written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Sal Mercogliano, former merchant mariner and professor of history at Campbell University. And Alex Von Tunzelmann, author of ‘Blood and Sand: Suez, Hungary, And The Crisis That Shook The World’. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
10/09/2352m 56s

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe was one of the most famous screen actors of all time. Known for her charisma and beauty, her private life and turbulent health made headlines throughout her career, and her early death cemented her iconic status.  But how was she shaped by her disrupted childhood? Did she change Hollywood – or did it destroy her? And why does her legend still inspire and exert such power, 60 years after her death?  This is a Short History Of Marilyn Monroe. Written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Michelle Morgan, author of Marilyn Monroe – Private and Undisclosed. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
03/09/2352m 19s

The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial

The discovery at Sutton Hoo of the ship burial of an Anglo-Saxon king and his lavish treasure is one of the greatest archaeological finds on English soil.  But who was the man considered worthy of such a splendid burial? Why was there no trace of human remains? What lies beneath the other mounds on the site? And why bury a body in a ship?  This is a Short History of the Sutton Hoo Ship Burial. Written by Nicola Rayner. With thanks to Gareth Williams, curator at the British Museum and author of Treasures From Sutton Hoo. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
27/08/2356m 25s

Charlie Chaplin

The first truly global celebrity, Charlie Chaplin was once the most famous man in the world. The king of the silent movie, over the course of 82 films his wistful slapstick saw him light up the silver screen like no one else. But how did he leave behind the extreme poverty of his London childhood? What’s the truth about his complicated love life? And how did personal and political conflict threaten to derail one of the most celebrated careers in entertainment history? This is a Short History of Charlie Chaplin. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Lucy Moore, historian and author of Anything Goes: A Biography of the Roaring Twenties. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
20/08/2356m 45s

Women’s Football

Football is the most popular sport in the world, and is played anywhere from pitches marked out in desert dust, to warzones with helmets for goalposts. But it’s still predominantly a male sport. So what about the roots of women’s football in the UK? How did social change in the First World War contribute to its sudden growth? And after a catastrophic ban from the FA in 1921, how did the women’s game rise from the ashes? This is a Short History of Women’s Football. Written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Jean Williams, author and professor of sports history. EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal ➼ https://nordvpn.com/shorthistory Try it risk-free now with a 30-day money-back guarantee! For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
13/08/2350m 31s

Introducing: Real Survival Stories - Abandon Ship (Part 1 of 2)

Noiser presents a brand-new podcast: Real Survival Stories. Hosted by John Hopkins, the show brings you astonishing tales of ordinary people thrust into extraordinary survival situations. In this taster episode, we meet Matt Lewis - a rookie sailor who goes looking for adventure... and finds it. Joining the crew of a deep sea fishing trawler, Matt is on board as the vessel sails out of Cape Town. But far out in the South Atlantic, a polar storm will catch them all unawares. Battered by giant swells, before they know what's hit them they're taking on water. The ship is going down... If you enjoy this taster episode, search 'Real Survival Stories' in your podcast app and hit follow for weekly episodes - including Part 2 of Matt Lewis's tale. Short History Of... will be back as normal from next week. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
06/08/2331m 48s

The Battle of Britain

In the summer of 1940, the Battle of Britain saw 3,000 airmen risk their lives to defend British shores from the Nazis. But as the pilots battled overhead, what was life like for those supporting them on the ground, and the people of Britain they sought to protect? What was Hitler’s objective, and how did the British react? And what was the secret to defeating the formidable Luftwaffe? This is a Short History of the Battle of Britain. Written by Linda Harrison. With thanks to Patrick Tootal, Honorary Secretary of the Battle of Britain Memorial. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
30/07/2349m 6s

The Great Depression

The Great Depression was the worst and deepest peacetime economic shock of the twentieth century. It affected millions of lives, redefined global trade, and contributed to the drift towards the Second World War.But how were the seeds of this financial disaster sown in the First World War? What was the cost to ordinary people? And how did America and the wider world dig itself out of its financial hole? This is a Short History of the Great Depression. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to John Moser, author and chair of the Department of History and Political Science at Ashland University. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
23/07/2353m 32s

The French Resistance

During the dark years of the Nazi occupation, many French and Allied citizens risked and sacrificed their lives fighting against their oppressors. Their networks undermined the Nazis through intelligence, sabotage and guerilla tactics, and eventually grew into a huge clandestine force ready to help liberate their own country. But who were these activists? How much damage did they inflict on the occupiers? And what happened to those who fought – and those who collaborated – when the war was finally over? This is a Short History of the French Resistance. Written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Hanna Diamond, Professor of French History at Cardiff University. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
16/07/231h

Richard the Third

Richard the Third was the last English king to die in battle. A key figure in the Wars of the Roses, he is also prime suspect in the enduring mystery of the Princes in the Tower. Shakespeare’s classic villain, he is immortalized as an anti-hero, cunning and monstrous. But is his reputation fair? What was his route to the throne, and what led to his famous demise on the battlefield? And how did the excavation of an unassuming car park in Leicester see him return to the spotlight after more than 500 years? This is a Short History of Richard the Third. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Matt Lewis, mediaeval historian and author of Richard the Third, Loyalty Binds Me. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
09/07/2354m 50s

Hadrian’s Wall

Nineteen hundred years ago, Hadrian’s Wall was built to defend against the northern tribes, and mark the extent of the Roman empire in Britain. But it also performed functions of trade and communication. Entire communities, of people from all over the Roman Empire, lived and worked in its shadow. But how did the Romans undertake such an extraordinary feat of architecture? What was life like for those who built it? And once the Romans finally decided to abandon it, what role did it play for those who came next? This is a Short History of Hadrian’s Wall. Written by David Jackson. With thanks to archaeologist and museum professional, Lindsay Allason-Jones. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
02/07/2350m 13s

The Wright Brothers

As long as humans have observed creatures in flight, we have dreamed of taking to the skies ourselves. But Wilbur and Orville Wright were determined to be the ones to turn the dream into reality. So what did they need to learn from the early aviation pioneers who preceded them? And how did these two bicycle makers with no college education succeed where others had failed? This is a Short History of The Wright Brothers. Written by Linda Harrison. With thanks to Alexander Rose, author of Empire of the Sky: Zeppelins, Aeroplanes, and Two Men’s Epic Duel to Rule the World.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
25/06/2356m 26s

The Golden Age of Athens

While the Roman Republic was still in its infancy, the Greek city-state of Athens rose from the ruins of war with the Persians to become the most beautiful and powerful in the region. During this Golden Age, many Athenian citizens enjoyed unprecedented freedoms in the world’s first democracy. Architects and engineers designed buildings of unparalleled sophistication, while writers, philosophers and scientists created works that still resonate today. And after shining so brightly, Athens’ rapid decline is a lesson in how great civilisations rise and fall. This is a Short History of the Golden Age of Athens. Written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Thomas Martin, Professor of Classics at the College of the Holy Cross, and the author of Ancient Greece from Prehistoric to Hellenistic Times. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
18/06/2357m 15s

Female Spies of World War Two

During World War Two, dozens of British-trained women were deployed as spies and saboteurs, to infiltrate behind enemy lines in Nazi-controlled France. Ranging from housewives to countesses, they were trained as secret agents, and played critical roles to aid the war effort. But who were these women, and how did they find their way into espionage? What did they do undercover, and what were the consequences of capture? And how did those who made it home adjust to life when the war was won?  This is a Short History of the Female Spies of World War Two. Written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Clare Mulley, award-winning historian and broadcaster, and author of The Spy Who Loved. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
11/06/2352m 53s

The Renaissance

The Renaissance of the 15th and 16th centuries was a time of rediscovery. With Florence as its epicentre, it saw a revival of the art, culture and philosophy of ancient Greek and Rome, triggering huge shifts in creativity and thought. But what prompted such a hugely influential movement? Who drove its development, and how did its ideas spread with such unprecedented speed? And, if it weren’t for the great thinkers, artists and inventors of the Renaissance, would we still be living in the Dark Ages?  This is a Short History of the Renaissance. Written by Emma Christie. With thanks to Catherine Fletcher, Professor of History at Manchester Metropolitan University and author of The Beauty and the Terror: an Alternative History of the Italian Renaissance.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
04/06/2353m 22s

Thomas Edison

Thomas Edison was one of history’s greatest inventors, who gave the world not only electric light but other landmark innovations in sound recording and moving pictures. He accumulated more patents in his lifetime than any other, and filled over 4000 notebooks with his work. So, how did this ordinary, home-schooled boy from the American mid-West overcome ill-health and hearing loss to change the world? To what extent was he a lone genius, and how much did he rely on the work of others?  This is A Short History of Thomas Edison. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Paul Israel, director and general editor of the Thomas Edison Papers at Rutgers University and author of Edison: A Life of Invention. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
28/05/231h 1m

Angkor

Built by the Khmer kings centuries ago, Angkor in modern Cambodia had a footprint bigger than present-day New York. But after it fell into ruin, much of its unique architecture and intricate carvings were swallowed by the jungle. So, who raised this vast city, and why? What caused their civilisation to fall? And how were parts of it maintained, right up to the present day?  This is a Short History Of Angkor. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Michael Falser, architectural historian and author of Angkor Wat, a Transcultural History of Heritage. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
21/05/2352m 53s

The Soviet Union, Part 2 of 2

Despite its troubled infancy and the hardship faced during World War 2, in the second half of the 20th century the USSR became one of the world’s two superpowers. How did it manage this turn-around? What did its rise mean for its people and the rest of the world? And how did the young nation that shaped so much of the 20th century’s geopolitics eventually come crashing down? This is the second in a special 2 part Short History of… the Soviet Union. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to historian and author Professor Sheila Fitzpatrick of the Australian Catholic University and the University of Sydney. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
17/05/2359m 37s

The Soviet Union, Part 1 of 2

From its initial creation in 1922, the Soviet Union was perhaps the most ambitious political experiment in human history. But how did this superpower come about? And in its first decades, how did its founding principles of equality transform to fit a nation that became synonymous with tragedy, poverty, suppression and terror?  This is the first in a special 2-part Short History of the Soviet Union. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to historian and author Professor Sheila Fitzpatrick of the Australian Catholic University and the University of Sydney. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
14/05/2356m 57s

Alexander the Great

Though he ruled for just 13 years, Alexander the Great is as famed for his hedonistic lifestyle as his military genius. But how did he become one of the best known military leaders in history? What inspired such loyalty among his troops? And what drove this young man in his endless quest to conquer the known world? This is a Short History of Alexander the Great.  Written by Linda Harrison. With thanks to author Philip Freeman, a professor of humanities at Pepperdine University, Malibu. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
07/05/2350m 2s

The Crown Jewels

The British Crown Jewels is a priceless collection of items gathered over eight turbulent centuries. Consisting of 100 objects decorated with 23,000 gemstones, it’s held at the Tower of London, protected by guards and high-tech security. But why did one thief put the crown jewels down his trousers? Which king managed to lose his own crown? And why is one diamond so controversial that it is not invited to the coronation of King Charles III? This is a Short History of the Crown Jewels. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Anna Keay, author and former curator at the Tower of London. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
30/04/2345m 53s

The Blitz

From September 1940, Germany’s Luftwaffe subjected Britain to an intense bombing campaign lasting more than eight months. Around 43,000 civilians were killed, with many more injured or made homeless. But what led to the onslaught, and why could it not be stopped? How effective was Hitler’s campaign in achieving his aims? And how did the people of Britain react to this massive disruption to their daily lives and to the ever-present threat of death?  This is a Short History of the Blitz. Written by David Jackson. With thanks to Joshua Levine, historian and author of several books including The Secret History of the Blitz. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
23/04/2351m 2s

The Wild West

Think of the Wild West, and you’ll imagine cowboys, shootouts, bank robberies and saloons. But it was also a time of massive resettlement, new technology and communications. But what the white settlers’ westward migration mean for the native people who had lived on the land for centuries? What inspired so many to move west in the first place? And if the era only lasted a few decades, what makes it so iconic to Americans and the rest of the world?  This is a Short History of…The Wild West Written by Emma Christie. With thanks to Chris Wimmer, host and creator of the Legends of the Old West podcast. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
16/04/2352m 11s

British Castles

For over 600 years, castles played a leading role in the story of Britain. From the Norman Conquest to the English Civil War, they are woven into the tapestry of British history. But when did they start to be built, and why? How did their architecture evolve? And why did they fall out of fashion, leaving a landscape littered with crumbling ruins?  This is A Short History Of… British Castles.  Written by Joe Viner. With thanks to Marc Morris, historian and author of Castles: A History of the Buildings that Shaped Medieval Britain. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
09/04/2352m 15s

Muhammad Ali

From the day he burst onto the scene, Muhammad Ali changed boxing history. But he also influenced the American civil rights movement, the perception of Islam, the view of the war in Vietnam, and the self-branding of athletes themselves. So how did his beliefs affect his career? What drove him to keep fighting for so long – even when boxing itself was taking away the gifts that made him famous? And was he really the greatest of all time? This is a Short History of Muhammad Ali. Written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Jonathan Eig, writer of award-winning biography, Ali: A Life. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
02/04/2354m 7s

Introducing: Detectives Don’t Sleep - Murder in Paradise (Part 1 of 2)

From Noiser, comes the brand-new podcast Detectives Don’t Sleep. The show takes you beyond the police tape to shadow the real detectives who worked history’s most intriguing cases. In this taster episode, we’re in the Bahamas in 1943. One of the wealthiest men in the islands, Sir Harry Oakes, has been murdered - bludgeoned and burned in his mansion. The prime suspect is Oakes’ son-in-law, Count Alfred de Marigny. But Oakes’ daughter Nancy refuses to believe in her husband’s guilt and hires New York-based PI Ray Schindler to clear de Marigny’s name. Ray flies to the paradise island of New Providence and gets straight down to work - interviewing witnesses, following up clues, and piecing together the circumstances of Oakes’ death. Before long, he finds himself drawn into a complex mystery straight from the pages of a classic whodunnit. If you enjoy this taster episode, search ‘Detectives Don’t Sleep’ in your podcast app and hit follow to get new episodes every Tuesday. Part 2 of Murder in Paradise is live now on the Detectives Don’t Sleep podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
27/03/2347m 3s

The Dinosaur Rush

When Edward Cope and OC Marsh began their race to identify and name new species of dinosaur in the 1870s, palaeontology was still a new discipline. Before these two wealthy men entered the field, just eight species had been identified in North America. In two decades, between them they added 136 more. But how did they manage to produce such a vast body of research? And why was their earlier friendship replaced by a bitter professional feud?  This is a Short History of the Dinosaur Rush. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Lukas Rieppel, historian of science at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
26/03/2346m 55s

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo is as much a modern icon for her personal flair as she is for her paintings. But how did her style develop, and what did she intend it to communicate? What was so subversive about her work, and the subjects she chose to portray? And why is she such an enduring figurehead for feminists, women with fertility issues, the queer community, and those living with disabilities and chronic pain? This is a Short History of Frida Kahlo. Written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Circe Henestrosa, co-author of Frida Khalo: Making herself up and curator of a Frida Kahlo exhibition at London’s V&A museum. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
20/03/2355m 3s

St Patrick

Though St Patrick is honoured by millions of revellers worldwide every year, few know more about him than the popular myths concerning shamrocks and snakes. The real story of St Patrick reads like an adventure story, involving kidnapping, enslavement, and daring escapes. But how did his commitment to spreading the word of God lead him to become the embodiment of all things Irish? This is A Short History of… St Patrick. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Philip Freeman, Professor of History at Pepperdine University and author of St Patrick of Ireland: A Biography. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
13/03/2351m 47s

The Trans-Siberian Railway

The Trans-Siberian railway is the longest train line in the world, spanning 5700 miles, seven time zones, and straddling two continents. Though today’s passengers on the week-long journey can enjoy relative luxury, the route has a dark past. Who were the labourers who built it, enduring horrific conditions? How did the railroad provoke a war? And what part did the train line play in the bloody conflicts of the twentieth century?  This is a Short History of the Trans Siberian Railway. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Christian Wolmar, author of To The Edge of the World, The Story of the Trans Siberian Railway. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
06/03/2350m 9s

The Bayeux Tapestry

Since it was created 900 years ago, the Bayeux Tapestry has survived war, revolution and the ravages of time. This fragile piece of linen, almost seventy metres long, depicts the events leading up to the Norman invasion of England. But who created it, and why? What do its graphic scenes of battle and cruelty reveal about life, death and warfare in the middle ages? This is a Short History of the Bayeux Tapestry. Written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Michael Lewis, Head of Portable Antiquities & Treasure at the British Museum. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
27/02/2350m 11s

The Real Robinson Crusoe

Daniel Defoe’s 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe is one of the most widely published books in history. This story of a man stranded alone on an island is said to be second only to the Bible in its number of translations. But who was Defoe’s inspiration for creating one of the best-known protagonists in literature? And what led to this real-life sailor spending years of his life cut off from human contact? This is a Short History of the Real Robinson Crusoe. Written by David Jackson. With thanks Dr Rebecca Simon, historian and the author of Why We Love Pirates. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
20/02/2347m 11s

The Mona Lisa

Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa is the most famous painting in the world. 500 years old and just 77x53cm in size, it is kept behind bulletproof glass in the Louvre museum in Paris, where it draws 10 million visitors a year. But how did a small portrait find global fame? Who is the woman in the painting, and why is the world so intrigued by her smile? This is a Short History Of the Mona Lisa. Written by Nicola Rayner. With thanks to Donald Sassoon, historian and the author of Mona Lisa: The History of the World’s Most Famous Painting. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
13/02/2354m 50s

The Partition of India

In 1947, the British divided up its former colony of India into two provinces. What followed was confusion, chaos, and an unprecedented wave of sectarian violence that left up to a million dead. 15 million more were forced to flee their homes. So why was the country broken up? What prompted the ferocious backlash? And how do the events of 75 years ago still haunt the region, its residents and the diaspora? This is a Short History of The Partition of India. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Nisid Hajari, author of Midnight’s Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India’s Partition, and Aanchal Malhotra, author of Remnants of Partition. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
06/02/2353m 49s

D.B. Cooper

At approximately 8:13 p.m. on November 24th, 1971, a hijacker exited Northwest Airlines flight 305 at an altitude of 10,000 feet, carrying just a case, a bagful of money, and a parachute. The subsequent investigation became one of the largest and strangest in the FBI’s history. But was what the true identity of the man who called himself D.B. Cooper? And could he still out there, living among us? This is a Short History of D.B. Cooper. Written by Joe Viner. With thanks to Robert Edwards, author of the book D.B. Cooper and Flight 305 and Darren Schaeffer, host of The Cooper Vortex podcast. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
30/01/2354m 29s

Agatha Christie

Retaining the title of the “Queen of Crime” to this day, Agatha Christie is the best-selling novelist of all time. Across 66 novels, 14 short-story collections, and 20 stage plays, she depicted the evil lurking in the hearts of ordinary people. But how did this homeschooled daughter of a privileged English family learn so much about poisons, psychopaths and murder? What in her personal life informed such a suspicious view of ordinary people? And how did she trigger a real-life mystery in 1926 that saw the whole country turn amateur detective? This is a Short History Of Agatha Christie. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to best-selling crime writer Sophie Hannah. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
23/01/2359m 48s

The Irish Potato Famine

Between 1845 and 1852, Ireland suffered an appalling famine after the repeated failure of the potato crop, its national staple. But though caused by a natural blight, a combination of ancient prejudices, simmering tensions and political short-termism turned a national emergency into a disaster for the ages. So why did the authorities in Westminster seem to wash their hands of Ireland during its time of need? How did the Irish people respond to their adversity? And how did this story of betrayal and exploitation shape Ireland’s future, right down to the present day? This is a Short History of the Irish Potato Famine. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Kristina Kinealy, Director of Ireland's Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University, Connecticut. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
16/01/2357m 5s

Las Vegas

Best known for its world-class casinos and lavish hotels, the desert city of Las Vegas, Nevada has a darker side, too. For decades, connections to organised crime tarnished its reputation. Now, Las Vegas attracts tens of millions of tourists every year, many of whom come to gamble. But did games of chance really drive the transformation of this small, dusty desert town? And will it ever shed its persistent nickname of Sin City? This is a Short History Of Las Vegas. Written by Emma Christie. With thanks to Dr Michael Green, associate professor of history at the University of Nevada and Las Vegas. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
09/01/2354m 47s

Shakespeare

No single writer has shaped the way we speak and think more than William Shakespeare. Whether we’re being cruel to be kind, wearing our hearts on our sleeves, or spotting the green eye’d monster — it’s almost impossible to use the English language without quoting him. But who was Shakespeare? What vaulting ambition drove a young writer from a sleepy town to stardom in London? Was he born great or did he have greatness thrust upon him? This is a Short History of William Shakespeare. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Dr Anjna Chouhan, Senior Lecturer in Shakespeare Studies at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
01/01/2356m 27s

The Christmas Truce of 1914 (Repeat)

It’s Christmas eve, 1914. On the Western Front, a British soldier peers out across No Man’s Land. A sound catches his attention – not artillery fire, but music. The enemy are singing Silent Night. The Christmas Truce of 1914 remains a unique historical anomaly. But how did these sworn enemies set down their weapons and meet as friends? What does the truce reveal about the First World War? This is a Short History of the Christmas Truce. Written by Duncan Barrett. With thanks to Anthony Richards, Head of Documents and Sound and the Imperial War Museum, and author of The True Story of the Christmas Truce: British and German Eyewitness Accounts from World War I, and Catriona Pennell, Professor of Modern History and Memory Studies at the University of Exeter.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
25/12/2245m 56s

Pocahontas

Pocahontas is probably the best known Native American in history. But the true story of her life has been eclipsed by a fictionalised version, played out as a romance between an intrepid English captain and a wild native princess. So what is known about the real Pocahontas, and her life before the arrival of the white colonisers? How did she spearhead a period of truce between her tribe and the Europeans? And did she truly have a say in her own fate, and the fate of her people?  This is a Short History of Pocahontas. Written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Camilla Townsend, professor of history at Rutgers University, and author of Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Sponsor: Get Exclusive NordVPN deal here ➼ https://nordvpn.com/shorthistory It's risk-free with Nord's 30-day money-back guarantee! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
19/12/2256m 6s

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln’s life reads like an American folk tale. The story of a boy born into poverty, whose drive and determination saw him become the most powerful man in the nation. But how did he navigate a path for a youthful country so deeply divided over slavery? What was his role in the devastating civil war? And how did one man attract such public adoration and murderous wrath all at the same time? This is a Short History of Abraham Lincoln. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to David S Reynolds, Distinguished Professor at the City University of New York, and author of Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
12/12/221h 4m

The Rosetta Stone

In 1799, French soldiers in Egypt unearthed what would become one of the world’s most famous artefacts. After a desperate race to decipher its symbols, the Rosetta Stone provided the key to understanding Egyptian hieroglyphs, casting new light on the culture and history of this lost civilisation. But why was the Rosetta Stone made in the first place? How did it end up in the hands of the French occupiers, thousands of years after it was created? And when the battle to decode was over, what secrets did it reveal? This is a Short History of the Rosetta Stone. Written by Kate Harrison. With thanks to Richard Bruce Parkinson, Professor of Egyptology at the University of Oxford. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
05/12/2258m 55s

The Tower of London

The Tower of London has been a symbol of the authority and power of the British crown for almost a thousand years. Established by William the Conqueror, the iconic building has served as a palace and a prison; a safe and an armory; a seat of leadership and a site of torture and execution. But why was it built in the first place? How did it evolve? What are the stories of its residents, willing or otherwise? This is a Short History of the Tower of London. Written by Thomas Bickley. With thanks to Bridget Clifford, Curator Emerita at the Royal Armouries and retired Keeper of the Tower Armouries. For more information about the Royal Armouries, head to their website www.royalarmouries.org For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
28/11/2252m 29s

Easter Island

First inhabited by the Rapa Nui people a thousand years ago, Easter Island is best known for its hundreds of giant stone statues. But what inspired a group of ancient Polynesian explorers to settle in such a remote spot in the South Pacific? How did they almost bring their own community to the point of collapse? And as ancient traditions meet with modern tourism, what is the future for the Rapa Nui people? This is a Short History of Easter Island. Written by Emma Christie. With thanks to Dr. Jo Anne Van Tilburg is an American archaeologist and the Director of the Easter Island Statue Project. She’s spent three decades working on Rapa Nui. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
21/11/2254m 50s

Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh was one of the most important and influential figures in the history of art. Though he created thousands of drawings and paintings, his was a life of commercial failure, instability and unhappiness. But who was Van Gogh before he discovered his passion for art? What caused him so much suffering? And who were the people who supported him right up to his tragic death at the age of just 37? This is a Short History of Vincent van Gogh. Written by David Jackson. With thanks to Steven Naifeh, Pulitzer Prize-winning co-author of Van Gogh: The Life and Jackson Pollock: An American Saga. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
14/11/2253m 5s

The Conquistadors

From the end of the 15th century, the Conquistadors changed the face of the Americas. Invading first the Caribbean and Mexico, they then plunged on into the rest of the continent and plundered the Pacific seaboard. So what do we know of these Europeans and their quest to expand a burgeoning empire? And who were the indigenous people that resisted invasion, negotiated with strangers, and fought off barbarians?  This is a Short History of the Conquistadors.   Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Professor Matthew Restall, Director of Latin American Studies at Penn State University and author of Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest and When Montezuma met Cortez. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
07/11/2257m 10s

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein overhauled our understanding of the universe—from the sub-atomic level to beyond the edges of the cosmos. Today his ideas are in evidence everywhere, from televisions and GPS systems, to our understanding of black holes and the Big Bang. But who was Einstein as a person? What were his theories that upended established scientific beliefs? And how did his work inadvertently contribute to some of the 20th century’s most devastating acts of warfare?  This is a Short History of Albert Einstein. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to David Bodanis, author of Einstein’s Greatest Mistake, and E=mc2: A Biography of the World’s Most Famous Equation. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
31/10/2256m 14s

The Great Train Robbery

The Great Train Robbery of 1963 saw a gang of career criminals stage a daring heist of the multi-million pound cargo of a travelling Royal Mail train. The investigation that followed spanned many years and covered the globe. But how did the idea of the crime come about? What went into the planning, and who were the key players? And did any of them truly get away? This is a Short History of The Great Train Robbery. Written by Rob Parker. With thanks to film-maker and true crime researcher, Ray Rose.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
23/10/2251m 23s

Cleopatra

The last of the Ptolemaic Pharoahs, the enduring legend of Cleopatra has captivated imaginations for centuries. Though some write her off as a manipulative femme fatale, her competence as a ruler restored her country to a world superpower. But what were the early experiences that shaped her? How did she form both political and personal alliances with two great Roman generals? And what is the true story of her dramatic death?   This is a Short History of Cleopatra. Written by Lindsay Galvin. With thanks to Joyce Tyldesley, archaeologist and author of Cleopatra: Last Queen of Egypt. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
16/10/2258m 50s

The Conquest of Everest

Standing over 29,000ft above sea level, the peak of Everest is the highest point on the planet. To the sherpa people of the Himalayas it is sacred, and to foreign adventurers, it is the holy grail of climbing. But what did it take to reach the summit? Was it expertise and endurance—or simply better equipment? What was sacrificed to plant a flag on top of the world? This is a Short History Of the Conquest of Everest. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Mick Conefrey, documentary maker and author of Everest, 1922. For ad-free listening, exclusive content, and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
09/10/2252m 0s

The Mongol Empire

In the late Middle Ages, the Mongol Empire became the largest the world had ever seen. At its peak, maybe 100 million people lived under its banner, led by the Great Khans of the Asian steppe. But what unified the first disparate, nomadic clans? Who was the real Genghis Khan, and how did his empire fair after his death? And what caused the downfall of this once seemingly unstoppable civilisation?  This is a Short History of the Mongol Empire. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Professor Timothy May of the University of North Georgia. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
02/10/2257m 51s

The Real Peaky Blinders

Between the 1890s and 1910s, the British city of Birmingham was in the grip of a gang: the Peaky Blinders. Their crimes – from stone-throwing and petty assault to murder – were unpredictable and senseless, and the police seemed powerless to stop it. So what’s the true story behind the legend that inspired the hit TV series? Were they really champions of the working class, their activities underpinned by codes of loyalty and morality? Or was theirs simply a reign of terror, marked by dishonour and violence? This is a Short History of The Real Peaky Blinders. Written by Luke Kuhns. With thanks to Professor Carl Chinn, social historian and author of Peaky Blinders: The Real Story For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
25/09/2242m 1s

Queen Elizabeth the Second, Part 2 of 2 (Repeat)

To mark the passing of the Queen, Noiser brings you this episode from the archive of Short History Of… As the Queen’s family life became more complex, the relationship between palace and press intensified. But balancing the need for security and privacy against her very public responsibilities was never simple. So who was the real woman beneath the crown? How did she respond to the dark years of her reign, or the grief of losing her beloved husband? And how will history remember her? A Noiser production, written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Dr Tracy Borman, author of Crown and Sceptre; and Dr Tessa Dunlop, author of Army Girls Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
09/09/2254m 38s

Queen Elizabeth the Second, Part 1 of 2 (Repeat)

To mark the passing of the Queen, Noiser brings you this episode from the archive of Short History Of… Spanning seventy years, Queen Elizabeth II’s reign saw the world change beyond recognition. And from her earliest public appearances representing the King to her roles as sister, wife, mother and mother-in-law, she was never far from the headlines. But what was life like for the young princess, who dreamed of a baby brother to take the throne instead? How did she modernise an ancient role to fit a changing world, while managing a family so often overshadowed by scandal? A Noiser production, written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Dr Tracy Borman, author of Crown and Sceptre; and Dr Tessa Dunlop, author of Army Girls. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
09/09/2257m 27s

The Wars of the Roses, Part 3 of 3

After the death of King Edward IV, the heir to the throne, Edward V, is left under the protection of the late king’s brother Richard. But what lay in store for the 12 year old king? Will Richard honour his brother’s will? And when the Wars of the Roses finally end, how do the rival houses of Plantagenet unite once and for all? This is part three of a special three-part Short History of the Wars of the Roses. Written by Danny Marshall. With thanks to Michael Hicks, historian and author of The Wars of the Roses; and Lauren Johnson, historian and author of The Shadow King – The Life and Death of Henry VI, and an upcoming book on Tudor matriarch Margaret Beaufort. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+, now available on Apple Podcasts. All shows are also available for free. If you’re listening on Apple Podcasts, press the ‘+’ icon to follow the show for free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
08/09/2252m 40s

The Wars of the Roses, Part 2 of 3

With his father Richard of York’s head now on a spike, Edward’s determination to snatch the crown from Henry VI is stronger than ever. But how will he build support for his cause and assert his rights? Can he outmanoeuvre the formidable Queen Margaret, who will stop at nothing to see her own son on the throne? And is there any way to heal England’s bitter rifts and create a lasting peace? This is part two of a special three-part Short History of the Wars of the Roses. Written by Danny Marshall. With thanks to Michael Hicks, historian and author of The Wars of the Roses; and Lauren Johnson, historian and author of The Shadow King – The Life and Death of Henry VI, and an upcoming book on Tudor matriarch Margaret Beaufort. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+, now available on Apple Podcasts. All shows are also available for free. If you’re listening on Apple Podcasts, press the ‘+’ icon to follow the show for free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
07/09/2254m 40s

The Wars of the Roses, Part 1 of 3

Almost 600 years ago, two rival branches of the ruling house of Plantagenet dragged England into unprecedented bloodshed in what became known as the Wars of the Roses. But what were the causes of the conflict? Who were its key players, the powerful men and women who wreaked such havoc on the country? And how did one couple unite the warring factions and bring an end to the carnage? This is part one of a special three-part Short History of the Wars of the Roses. Written by Danny Marshall. With thanks to Michael Hicks, historian and author of The Wars of the Roses; and Lauren Johnson, historian and author of The Shadow King – The Life and Death of Henry VI, and an upcoming book on Tudor matriarch Margaret Beaufort. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+, now available on Apple Podcasts. All shows are also available for free. If you’re listening on Apple Podcasts, press the ‘+’ icon to follow the show for free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
04/09/2253m 52s

Introducing: Napoleon

Noiser presents Napoleon, a new podcast examining the life and times of one of history’s most intriguing figures. You’ve heard the name Napoleon Bonaparte. But who was he, really? How did he become the most powerful man on Earth? And why didn't he stop, even once he had it all? A Noiser production, written by Jeff Dawson. Search ‘Napoleon’ wherever you get your podcasts and hit follow to listen to the rest of the Napoleon story. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
28/08/2253m 41s

The Spanish Armada

The defeat of the Spanish Armada by the English navy is often recounted as a ‘David and Goliath’ tale in which one tiny country overcame a huge and formidable empire. It secured the continuance of Protestant rule in England and was a defining moment in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. But why did this confrontation ever take place? Was England’s success due entirely to its naval prowess, or did other factors play a part? And could the outcome have easily been drastically different? This is a Short History of the Spanish Armada. Written by David Jackson. With thanks to Geoffrey Parker, Professor of History at Ohio State University, and co-author of Armada: The Spanish Enterprise and England’s Deliverance in 1588. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
21/08/2252m 38s

Stonehenge

Older than the pyramids and just as cryptic, the prehistoric British site of Stonehenge has dominated its landscape for thousands of years. But what is Stonehenge? A celestial clock? An ancient computer to predict eclipses? Was it a temple, a cemetery, or a site of execution? And who were the people who lived and died to create this Stone Age masterpiece? This is a Short History of Stonehenge. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Julian Richards, archaeologist, broadcaster and author of the official Stonehenge guidebook. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
14/08/2259m 2s

Amelia Earhart

As one of the great pioneers of air travel, Amelia Earhart was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic. She pushed aviation technology to its limits, broke countless records, and became world-famous for her skill, bravery and determination. But what prompted her to dare to take to the skies despite the overwhelming risks? Who was the real person behind the legend? And what happened on her final fateful flight—an enduring mystery that has spawned countless conspiracy theories? This is a Short History of Amelia Earhart. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Susan Butler, author of East to the Dawn, the Life of Amelia Earhart. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
07/08/2256m 58s

Marco Polo

In the thirteenth century, Marco Polo spent decades travelling the world. His adventures took him from his home in Venice as far east as the Yellow Sea, where he was a valued courtier of the legendary Mongol emperor Kublai Khan. Later, in prison, he wrote the world’s first travel book. But how did his name become synonymous with adventure? What compelled him to stay away for so long? And why is his story still remembered almost eight centuries later? This is a Short History of Marco Polo. Written by Chris McDonald. With thanks to Denis Belliveau: author and Emmy-nominated filmmaker of In The Footsteps of Marco Polo. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
31/07/221h 1m

The Spartans

In 480BC, the Spartans secured their place in history when 300 of their soldiers fought to the death against the mighty Persian army at Thermopylae. Their reputation for brutal decisiveness and simple living have been admired for thousands of years. But what about the darker side of Spartan ideology, a society that culled weak babies, forced children to fight, and enslaved its neighbours? Was Sparta really a utopia? Or was Aristotle right when he said that Spartans simply made men into machines? This is a Short History of the Spartans. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Dr Andrew Bayliss, Associate Professor of Greek History at the University of Birmingham, UK, and author of The Spartans: A Very Short Introduction. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
24/07/2252m 10s

Machu Picchu and the Inca Trail

Covering thousands of miles in the Andes, the Inca Trail was the backbone of the ancient empire, connecting the millions of people who lived under its rule. The jewel in its crown, Machu Picchu, was recently named one of the seven wonders of the modern world. But who were the Incas? What was the purpose of their complex road system? And why did they build a stone citadel on a mountain ridge, only to abandon it a century later?  This is a Short History of Machu Picchu and the Inca Trail. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Javier Puente, associate professor of Latin American studies at Smith College in Massachusetts. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
17/07/2258m 2s

The Great Fire of London

In September 1666, the Great Fire of London consumed hundreds of acres of houses, shops, churches, and government buildings. But what effect did politics and memories of a recent civil war have on the spread of the fire, and the hunt for someone to blame? And once the flames had died down, how did the people of the city rebuild what they’d lost? This a Short History of the Great Fire of London. Written by Danny Marshall. With thanks to Rebecca Rideal, historian and author of 1666: Plague, War, and Hellfire. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
10/07/2257m 42s

Queen Elizabeth the Second, Part 2 of 2

As the Queen’s family life becomes more complex, the relationship between palace and press intensifies. But balancing the need for security and privacy against her very public responsibilities is never simple. So who is the real woman beneath the crown? How does she respond to the dark years of her reign, or the grief of losing her beloved husband? And as she approaches her Platinum Jubilee, how will history remember her reign? This is the second in a special two-part Short History of Queen Elizabeth the Second. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Dr. Tracy Borman, author of Crown and Sceptre; and Dr. Tessa Dunlop, author of Army Girls.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
05/06/2256m 21s

Queen Elizabeth the Second, Part 1 of 2

Spanning seventy years, Queen Elizabeth II’s reign has seen the world change beyond recognition. And from her earliest public appearances representing the King to her roles as sister, wife, mother, and mother-in-law, she is never far from the headlines. But what was life like for the young princess, who dreamed of a baby brother to take the throne instead? How did she modernize an ancient role to fit a changing world, while managing a family so often overshadowed by scandal?  This is the first in a special two-part Short History of Queen Elizabeth the Second. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Dr. Tracy Borman, author of Crown and Sceptre; and Dr. Tessa Dunlop, author of Army Girls. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
29/05/2258m 51s

The Terracotta Army

After its initial discovery in 1974, the Terracotta Army became the unofficial eighth wonder of the world. Comprising an estimated 8,000 statue warriors buried as part of the First Emperor of China’s tomb complex, experts are still unearthing its secrets. But what was the purpose of so many clay soldiers? How were they made, and by whom? And what do we know about the Emperor considered so important that his death demanded a project on this scale? This is a Short History of the Terracotta Army. Written by Duncan Barrett. With thanks to Eugene Wang, Professor of Asian Art at Harvard University; and Andrew Bevan, Professor of Comparative Archaeology at University College London. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
22/05/2241m 7s

Chernobyl

In 1986, the Chernobyl power plant became the site of the worst nuclear disaster in history. Poisonous radiation caused over 100,000 casualties, and cost billions of dollars to clean up. Even now, the exclusion zone is one of the most polluted and heavily-patrolled regions in the world.   But what caused the catastrophe in the first place? Why did the Soviet Union try to keep it a secret? And what is its lasting impact on the region, and the wider world?  This is A Short History of Chernobyl.  Written by Chris McDonald. With thanks to Professor Serhii Plokhy, author of Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy.   For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
15/05/2259m 45s

Henry VIII

In 1509, at just seventeen years old, Henry VIII was crowned King of England. Over the next four decades, he would burn through six marriages, bankrupt his nation, and vandalise his country’s cultural heritage in his quest for supreme power. But how did England’s most eligible bachelor degenerate into a bloated despot, and one of the worst husbands in history? Was the king a psychopath, or a complex character who dragged Britain from the Dark Ages into the modern era? This is a Short History of Henry VIII. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Dr Tracy Borman, historian and author of Crown and Sceptre. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
08/05/2259m 7s

Pearl Harbor, Part 3 of 3

As the smoke clears after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the blame game begins. President Roosevelt knows that military and intelligence heads must roll, but questions remain about who should be held to account. So what were the longer term consequences of the attack? How did life change for Japanese-Americans, and what fates awaited the Japanese servicemen on their return? And as the memory of Pearl Harbor fades, what lessons were learned?  This is the last episode in this special 3-part Short History of Pearl Harbor. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Professor Phillips O’Brien, author of How The War Was Won; Dr Takuma Melber, author of Pearl Harbor; and Steve Twomey, author of Countdown to Pearl Harbor.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
01/05/2259m 41s

Pearl Harbor, Part 2 of 3

Chaos reigns in the immediate aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. While the true extent of the damage to personnel and fleet is still uncertain, those on the ground work tirelessly to help the wounded. But what is the response of those in charge? What are the stories of servicemen who face incredible odds to save their vessels, retaliate, or flee? And who were the people who risked their lives to save others?  This is episode 2 of a special 3-part Short History of Pearl Harbor. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Professor Phillips O’Brien, author of How The War Was Won; Dr Takuma Melber, author of Pearl Harbor; and Steve Twomey, author of Countdown to Pearl Harbor.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
27/04/2254m 21s

Pearl Harbor, Part 1 of 3

On December 7th 1941, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, changed the course of the Second World War. Forcing the United States into a conflict they were reluctant to enter, the attack killed over 2,500 people. But was it an act of aggression, or desperation? How did the Japanese pull off such an audacious stealth attack? And how were the Americans so unprepared? This is episode 1 of a special 3-part Short History of Pearl Harbor. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Professor Phillips O’Brien, author of How The War Was Won; Dr Takuma Melber, author of Pearl Harbor; and Steve Twomey, author of Countdown to Pearl Harbor.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
24/04/2249m 11s

The Russian Revolution

In 1917, revolution changed Russia forever. Putting an end to 300 years of the Romanov dynasty, it made way for what ordinary Russians believed would be a fairer, more egalitarian system. But what sparked the rebellion? What was it like to witness the collapse of the autocracy? And once the smoke had cleared, what happened to the promise of a new socialist utopia?  This is a Short History of the Russian Revolution. Written by Kate Simants. With thanks to Dr Helen Rappaport, historian and author of Caught in the Revolution and After the Romanovs.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
17/04/2259m 53s

The Titanic

The Titanic was the largest moveable object in history: almost 900 feet long, and holding over two thousand passengers. But just four days into its maiden voyage, a collision with an iceberg was enough to send her to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. So what made the famously ‘unsinkable’ ship anything but? Who was responsible for so many deaths? And what was it like to witness the disaster first hand? This is a Short History of The Titanic Written by Duncan Barrett. With thanks to Susie Millar, President of the Belfast Titanic Society.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
10/04/2252m 59s

The Vikings

Viking exploration changed the course of history in the northern hemisphere. As raiders and pirates, they dominated the seas of northern Europe for centuries. Their fearless and brutal reputations struck fear into hearts from Constantinople to Canada, while their folklore and mythology continues to inspire to this day. But who were the mortal men and women behind the immortal legends of the Norsemen? This is a Short History Of the Vikings. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Lars Brownworth, author of Sea Wolves, A History of the Vikings, and to William Fitzhugh, author of Vikings, The North Atlantic Saga. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
03/04/2256m 2s

The Knights Templar

For almost two hundred years, the Knights Templar were one of the most fearsome military forces in the world. Despite their strict vows of individual poverty, the Order was a global financial powerhouse, with valuable holdings across Europe and the Middle East. Even today, the myth of the Templars endures. But who were the men who devoted themselves to the mysterious order? And how did such a powerful international organisation find itself suddenly brought down? This is a Short History of The Knights Templar. Written by Duncan Barrett. With thanks to Thierry Do Espirito, author of The Knights Templar for Dummies, and to Michel Carnet, voice of the French nobleman.  For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
27/03/2256m 28s

Prohibition

For thirteen years from 1920, the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcoholic drinks was banned in the USA. The age of prohibition was a rowdy time: enlivened by jazz and wild parties; darkened by violence and lawlessness. But how did it come about? Who were its heroes and villains? And how did it change the face of the country it sought to purify? This is a Short History of Prohibition. Written by Danny Marshall. With thanks to Daniel Okrent, author of Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
21/03/221h 3m

The Watergate Scandal

When five men are caught inside a Washington DC office block in June 1972, it’s noted in police records simply as a ‘burglary’. So how does this bungled break-in go on to unravel a web of corruption and conspiracy, shatter America’s trust in its leadership, and topple President Richard Nixon, the most powerful man in the world? This is a Short History of the Watergate Scandal. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Michael Dobbs, author of King Richard: Nixon and Watergate, an American Tragedy. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
14/03/2249m 43s

The Suffragettes

While British women had been requesting the right to vote for decades, in the early 1900s, the Suffragettes refused to take no for an answer. But despite their PR expertise, as their methods became more violent, theirs was a movement that divided the nation. But what radicalized them? Were they revolutionaries? Terrorists? Or simply an oppressed majority with no legitimate way to protest? This is a Short History of the Suffragettes. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Helen Pankhurst, author of Deeds Not Words: The Story of Women’s Rights Then and Now, and to Dr Diane Atkinson, author of Rise Up Women: The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
07/03/2254m 44s

The Berlin Wall

On the border between the Western world and the Soviet Union, the Berlin Wall was a symbol of the Cold War. Starting out as a simple barbed wire fence, it would grow in scale and complexity to become a 27-mile concrete edifice, incorporating watchtowers, trenches, electric fences, and landmines. But what was its purpose? How did it impact the people whose city it divided? And what did it take, in the end, to bring it down? This is a Short History of the Berlin Wall. Written by Duncan Barrett. With thanks to Iain MacGregor, author of Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, The Berlin Wall, and The Most Dangerous Place on Earth. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
28/02/2250m 53s

The Ottoman Empire

For over six hundred years the Ottoman Empire ruled swathes of the Middle East, North Africa, and Southern Europe. As an Islamic superpower centred on what is now Turkey, theirs is a story of surprising alliances and enemies, trade, war and progress. But who were its leaders? How did it become so powerful? And after its eventual collapse, what legacy did it leave behind? This is a Short History of the Ottoman Empire. Written by Danny Marshall. With thanks to Professor Marc David Baer, author of The Ottomans: Khans, Caesars, and Caliphs. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
21/02/221h 1m

The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad helped up to 100,000 enslaved people to freedom. It was America’s first civil rights movement, operated by Black and white people united in their abhorrence of slavery. But how was it established? Who were its passengers, and the people risking everything to assist them? And what part did it play in America’s descent into civil war? This is a Short History of the Underground Railroad. Written by Kate Simants. Special thanks to historian Fergus Bordewich, author of Bound for Canaan; and to public historian and lecturer Christopher Miller of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Centre in Cincinnati, Ohio. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
14/02/221h

Apollo 13

April 13th, 1970. 200,000 miles from Earth, three astronauts are approaching lunar orbit when they hear a noise. Deep in the spacecraft, a tiny wiring fault has caused an entire oxygen tank to explode. Now, it’s a race against time to save the lives of the crew of Apollo 13. It could have been the worst disaster in the history of manned space exploration. So how did things go so wrong? And who truly deserves the credit for the efforts to get the three men home again? This is a Short History of Apollo 13. Written by Duncan Barrett. Special thanks to Ben Feist of NASA, creator of the interactive multimedia website, ApolloinRealTime.org; and historian Rob Godwin, author of Apollo 13, The NASA Mission Reports. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
07/02/2256m 42s

Bonnie and Clyde

Forged by the Great Depression, Bonnie and Clyde became icons of lawlessness, thrilling and shocking America with their crime sprees and doomed romance. But what drove them to lives of such violence? And with the full might of the police against them, how did it all end?  This is a Short History of Bonnie and Clyde. Written by Danny Marshall, with thanks to Paul Schneider, journalist and author of Bonnie and Clyde – The Lives Behind The Legend. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
31/01/221h 1m

Ernest Shackleton

Antarctica, October 1915. 1200 miles from civilisation, Ernest Shackleton watches from the ice as his ship finally crumples. To survive, he and his 27 men must now undertake an epic, death-defying journey, amid impossibly harsh conditions. Shackleton’s expedition is one of history’s greatest tales of human endurance. But what went so badly wrong? And with no hope of rescue, how will they make it home to tell the tale? This is a Short History of Ernest Shackleton. Written by James Benmore. With special thanks to Dr. Stephanie Barczewski, Professor of History at Clemson University and author of Antarctic Destinies: Scott, Shackleton, and the Changing Face of Heroism. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
20/12/211h

The Christmas Truce

It’s Christmas eve, 1914. On the Western Front, a British soldier peers out across No Man’s Land. A sound catches his attention – not artillery fire, but music. The enemy are singing Silent Night. The Christmas Truce of 1914 remains a unique historical anomaly. But how did these sworn enemies set down their weapons and meet as friends? What does the truce reveal about the First World War? This is a Short History of the Christmas Truce. Written by Duncan Barrett. With thanks to Anthony Richards, Head of Documents and Sound and the Imperial War Museum, and author of The True Story of the Christmas Truce: British and German Eyewitness Accounts from World War I, and Catriona Pennell, Professor of Modern History and Memory Studies at the University of Exeter. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
13/12/2143m 53s

The Roman Republic

March 15th, 44BC. Despite ill omens, Julius Caesar approaches the Theatre of Pompey. But the men inside have sworn an oath. To save the Republic from the hands of this self-styled ‘perpetual dictator', Caesar must die. But where did the Republic start? How did it transform Rome from a small town into a superpower? And what made its government, so determinedly against autocracy, pass the tipping point into a dictatorship? This is a Short History of the Roman Republic. Written by Kate Simants. With thanks to Dr. David Gwynn, Professor of Roman History at Royal Holloway University. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
06/12/211h

The Pirate Queen

It’s November 28th, 1809. The Imperial fleet in Tung Chung Bay is aflame. But the crew of Zheng I Sao’s ship watch on and cheer. This is the greatest victory of the Pirate Queen, scourge of the South China Sea. At its peak, her fleet was more than twice the size of the Spanish Armada. But who was Zheng I Sao? How did she become one of the most successful pirates of all time? And why did she go under the radar for so long? This is a Short History of The Pirate Queen. Written by Joel Duddell. With thanks to Dian Murray, historian, and author of Pirates of the South China Coast. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
29/11/2146m 32s

Pyramids

Sakkara, Egypt, 2,630BC. A man stands atop a structure of dizzying height as the final block grinds into place. For Imhotep, it is the culmination of his life’s work: a mountain made by man. He checks the joint while his workers wait in silence. Then, he gives a barely perceptible nod. It is done. Imhotep’s pyramid is the first, but more will come. Bigger pyramids, more beautiful pyramids, tombs filled with treasure, chambers inscribed with complex, sacred writings. But what motivated these ancient people to toil for decades over their vast monuments? What purpose did the structures serve? And what mysteries might still remain inside? This is a Short History of Pyramids. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Salima Ikram, Professor of Egyptology at the American University of Cairo. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
22/11/2157m 28s

William Wallace

Despised by the English, mistrusted by the Scottish nobles, and revered by his countrymen: William Wallace is synonymous with the battle for Scottish freedom. But scratch away at the legend, and even the most basic details are disputed. Where he was born, who he married, and what he did after his famous battle at Stirling Bridge. Thanks to the brutal nature of his death, he doesn’t even have a grave. What can we really know about the man immortalised by the poets? Was he anything like the warrior depicted in ‘Braveheart’? And what does his legacy tell us about the people of Scotland who idolize him to this day? This is a Short History of William Wallace. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Graeme Morton, Professor of Modern History and Director of the Centre for Scottish Culture at the University of Dundee, and author of William Wallace: Man and Myth. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
15/11/2145m 31s

The Samurai

After a bloody battle on September 22nd, 1877, Saigo Takamori and his loyal warriors pause on a hillside overlooking Kagoshima. They’ll never surrender, but they’re wounded, exhausted, and massively outnumbered, and Saigo already knows how this will end. Because his noble Samurai army aren’t just fighting the Emperor’s gun-wielding forces. They’re fighting progress itself. And that’s a battle they cannot win. But were the Samurai really a class of elite martial artists, driven by unbreakable codes of chivalry and loyalty? Or, behind the propaganda, just a self-important militia of romanticised thugs? This is a Short History of the Samurai.  Written by Joe Viner. With thanks to Jonathan Clements, historian, and author of A Brief History of the Samurai. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
08/11/2154m 45s

The Gunpowder Plot

One night in November 1605, a man is discovered underneath England’s Houses of Parliament. And he’s got enough gunpowder with him to reduce it to rubble, with the King, his sons, and the entire government inside it. The Gunpowder plot is an epic tale of adventure and murderous revenge, a detective story complete with secrets, aliases, even an anonymous letter of betrayal. But who was really behind it? What drove the conspirators to attempt such an audacious act of terrorism? This is a Short History of the Gunpowder Plot. Written by Kate Simants. With thanks to Jim Sharpe, historian and author of Remember Remember the Fifth of November: Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
01/11/211h 2m

Rosa Parks

By the time she died in 2005, Rosa Parks was known around the world as an icon of activism. Her act of defiance one ordinary Thursday afternoon in Montgomery, Alabama catapulted her to the forefront of the battle for racial equality in America. But what was her story before that fateful moment in 1955? What course did her life take afterward? This is a Short History of Rosa Parks. Written by Kate Simants. With thanks to Dr. Danielle McGuire, historian, and author of At the Dark End of the Street, and Kim Trent, President of the Rosa Parks Foundation. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
24/10/211h 1m

Alcatraz

Cloaked in secrecy, discussed by even the most hardened criminals as a place of terror, US Penitentiary Alcatraz is the most feared institution in the American penal system. From 1934 to 1963 more than 1500 prisoners pass through its gates, including Machine-Gun Kelly and Scarface himself, Alphonse Capone. But how did this island rock capture the public imagination? What was life really like inside? This is a Short History of Alcatraz. Written by Kate Simants. With thanks to Jolene Babyak, Alcatraz Historian and author of Breaking the Rock: The Great Escape from Alcatraz. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
17/10/2159m 11s

The Maya

In 1511, a Spanish lifeboat makes land on the Yucatán coast in modern-day Mexico. Thirteen days ago, the crew's caravel was wrecked on a reef. But their adventure is far from over. Now, they are about to become some of the first Europeans to make contact with the Maya. Custodians of an ancient civilisation, at one time tens of millions of Maya people inhabited a swathe of the Americas. But who were they and what did they do? Where did they go once their society collapsed? And how are their modern-day descendants beginning to bring the past back to life? This is a Short History of the Maya. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to David Stuart, Professor of Mesoamerican Art and Writing at the University of Texas at Austin. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
10/10/2156m 31s

The Moon Landing

After multiple coups by the Soviet Union, astronaut Alan B. Shepard has just become the first American in space. But this is only the beginning. Now, NASA have the moon in their sights, but it's still a long way off. For either the USA or the USSR to succeed, they'll need newer and better technology. The 1960s are about to become the defining decade in space exploration. Who will touch down first on Earth's nearest neighbour? This is a Short History of the Moon Landing. Written by Luke Kuhns. With thanks to Robert Godwin, Historian, and author of multiple books on the Space Race. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
03/10/2156m 27s

The Space Race

Humanity has always looked to the heavens, pondering what is really out there. But how did space travel turn from fantasy into reality? In the aftermath of World War Two, a group of scientists from Nazi Germany arrives in the United States. Their task? To kickstart America's space program. Meanwhile, in the Soviet Union a covert team of engineers begins work on a series of rockets and satellites. The starting gun has been fired. Who will make it up there first? This is a Short History of the Space Race. Written by Luke Kuhns. With thanks to Robert Godwin, historian, and author of multiple books on the Space Race. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
26/09/2152m 57s

The Black Death

In October 1347, a ghostly fleet of trading ships docks at a port in Sicily. The crew members – dead already, or well on their way – bear bubonic plague. The ‘Great Pestilence’ will ravage the populations of three continents over the next decade. What changes to society will result from this, the most devastating pandemic in history? How will people make sense of the terrible scenes before them? Are their methods of dealing with disease really as misguided as they seem? This is a Short History of the Black Death. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Dr. Eleanor Janega, teacher of medieval history at the London School of Economics. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
19/09/2152m 22s

Tutankhamun

In November 1922, in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, a young water boy called Hussein Abdul Rasoul makes a remarkable discovery. A set of stone steps lies concealed beneath the desert sand - a staircase leading to a long-lost tomb. The mummified pharaoh within will capture the imagination of generations to come, becoming the very embodiment of Ancient Egypt. What do we know of this boy king and his premature end? And why the extraordinary opulence of his burial chamber? This is a Short History of Tutankhamun. Written by Luke Kuhns. With thanks to Dr. Chris Naughton, Egyptologist and author of King Tutankhamun Tells All! For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
12/09/2152m 35s

Pompeii and the Vesuvius Eruption

What happens when a volcano erupts just six miles from a bustling city? In 79 AD Mount Vesuvius is regarded as a source of bounty by those who live in its shadow. But one of history’s most infamous natural disasters soon unfolds. How did the lucky ones make their escape? And how did this Roman settlement become such an extraordinary archaeological site? This is a Short History of Pompeii and the Vesuvius Eruption. Written by Dan Smith. With thanks to Kevin Dicus, Professor of Classical Archeology at the University of Oregon. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
05/09/2146m 5s

The California Gold Rush

On January 24th, 1848, a carpenter from Coloma plunges a hand into the American River and pulls out gold. This discovery triggers an explosion of findings, as people flock to the region seeking fortune and reinvention. But what were the chances of striking gold? What obstacles did would-be prospectors encounter along the way? And did the rush to the American West ever really end? This is a Short History of the California Gold Rush. Written by Luke Kuhns. With thanks to Dr. Malcolm Rohrbough, Professor of History at the University of Iowa and author of Days of Gold: The California Gold Rush and the American Nation. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
29/08/2157m 15s

Blackbeard the Pirate

In the early 18th century, one man makes his name as the most notorious pirate of all time. The legend of Edward Thatch has spawned television shows, novels, and major motion pictures. Stories abound of his wild eyes striking fear into enemy hearts, of the six pistols strapped to his chest, and of his arrival in battle with his jet-black beard set ablaze. But how much is fact and how much fiction? This is a Short History of Blackbeard the Pirate. Written by Luke Kuhns. With thanks to Colin Woodard, author of The Republic of Pirates: Being the true and surprising story of the Caribbean pirates and the man who brought them down. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
22/08/2159m 36s

The Cuban Missile Crisis, Part 2 of 2

On October 16th, 1962, John F. Kennedy discovers that the Soviet Union has successfully planted ballistic missiles on Cuban soil. The United States is now in Moscow's crosshairs. How will the President respond? How far will Khrushchev and Castro push him? This is a Short History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Part 2. Written by Joel Duddell. With thanks to Philip Brenner, Professor Emeritus at the American University School of International Service. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
15/08/2149m 32s

The Cuban Missile Crisis, Part 1 of 2

In October 1962, three men – Kennedy, Khrushchev, and Castro – hold the fate of the planet in their hands. A dispute over Soviet missiles in Cuba spirals out of control. Officials in the USA and the USSR prepare for a war that would end life on Earth as we know it. How exactly did it come to this? And just how close will the world come to nuclear Armageddon? This is a Short History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Part 1. Written by Joel Duddell. With thanks to Philip Brenner, Professor Emeritus at the American University School of International Service. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
10/08/2157m 32s

The Gladiators

In the first-ever episode of Short History Of… we take a trip back in time to Ancient Rome, to discover the bizarre and barbaric world of the gladiators. But who were these mysterious warriors? And how much truth lies behind the legends? Take your seat in the Roman Colosseum, the games are about to begin. This is a Short History of the Gladiators. Written by Addison Nugent. With thanks to Dr. Neville Morley, historian and author of The Roman Empire: Roots of Imperialism. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
08/08/2148m 23s

Trailer: Short History Of...

Each week, Short History Of... gives you a front-row seat as history’s most extraordinary moments play out right before you. You’ll be up close with the gladiators and the Mongols, unearthing the Terracotta Army, setting sail in Blackbeard’s pirate ship, watching on as the Cold War hots up. These are the stories beyond the headline names, stories that are amazing because they really did happen. Hit follow for weekly episodes. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Click the Noiser+ banner on Apple or go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
27/07/211m 59s
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