Next Year in Moscow

Next Year in Moscow

By The Economist

Arkady Ostrovsky travels across Europe and the Middle East speaking to free-thinking Russians who left when the shelling of Ukraine began in 2022 in this eight-part series. For them the war meant the future of Russia itself was now in doubt. Now they have to rebuild their lives and their hopes for Russia from exile. Can they get their country back?


Their stories help solve the mystery of why this senseless war began – and how it might end.


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Episodes

Next Year in Moscow 9: Life and fate

A year on from our last episode, Alexei Navalny, Russia’s most prominent opposition leader, is dead. Hope for the “wonderful Russia of the future” he imagined from his prison cell in Siberia is all but extinguished. How are the Russians who oppose Vladimir Putin’s war enduring these dark times? Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you’ll have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription.For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
02/03/24·51m 58s

Next Year in Moscow: Update

Alexei Navalny’s death has had a shattering effect on the people featured in this podcast - and on the idea of a free and peaceful Russia. We had planned to publish a new episode today, on the second anniversary of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. But we will continue our reporting for an extra week. Episode 9 will be published here on Saturday 2nd March. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
24/02/24·1m 49s

Next Year in Moscow 2: A beautiful life

A decade ago Russia's middle class was larger and richer than it had ever been. “Russians are OK” was the title of a popular YouTube channel. But Vladimir Putin’s return to power sparked unprecedented protests as two very different visions of Russia vied for dominance. New episodes will be released weekly on Saturdays.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/moscowoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
04/03/23·34m 39s

Next Year in Moscow 1: This damn year

For Russians opposed to Vladimir Putin, everything changed the moment they awoke to news of the invasion of Ukraine a year ago. They felt a range of emotions: pain, fury and shame. And they had to figure out what to do next. The Economist’s Arkady Ostrovsky has been speaking to them, because their stories help solve the mystery of why this senseless war began – and how it might end.New episodes will be released weekly on Saturdays.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/moscowoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22/02/23·34m 45s

Next Year in Moscow: Trailer

When the shelling of Ukraine began a year ago, free-thinking Russians faced a fateful choice: lie low, resist or flee. Hundreds of thousands decided to leave. For them the war meant the future of Russia itself was now in doubt.The Economist's Arkady Ostrovsky finds out what happened to these exiles for a new podcast series. Their stories help solve the mystery of why this senseless war began – and how it might end. New episodes will be released weekly on Saturdays.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/moscowoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/02/23·3m 48s
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