Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

By Dave Stachowiak

Leaders aren’t born, they’re made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 40 million downloads and the #1 search result for management on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to access the entire leadership and management library at CoachingforLeaders.com

Episodes

689: How to Use AI to Think Better, with José Antonio Bowen

José Antonio Bowen: Teaching With AI José Antonio Bowen has won teaching awards at Stanford and Georgetown and is past president of Goucher College. He has written over 100 scholarly articles and has appeared as a musician with Stan Getz, Bobby McFerrin, and others. He is the author of multiple books in higher education and is a senior fellow for the American Association of Colleges and Universities. He is the author with C. Edward Watson of Teaching With AI: A Practical Guide to a New Era of Human Learning*. AI will change how we work, but it’s also going to change how we think. In this conversation, José and I explore where to begin working with AI and why those who can use it will serve a critical role in shaping what’s next. Key Points Physical maps make you smarter than GPS, but GPS is more practical for daily use. AI isn’t inherently good or bad, but like the internet, it will change how we work. AI will eliminate some jobs, but it will change every job. Those who can work with AI will replace those who can’t. Rather than thinking about creativity through the lens of responses from AI, focus on bringing creativity into your prompts. Most of the AI progress for companies is coming from non-tech folks that are figuring our how specific tasks get more efficient. AI is very good at some things and not good at others. You’ll discover how this relates to your work by experimenting with different prompts. Resources Mentioned Teaching With AI: A Practical Guide to a New Era of Human Learning* by José Antonio Bowen and C. Edward Watson Example AI Prompts by José Antonio Bowen The Human Side of Generative AI: Creating a Path to Productivity by Aaron De Smet, Sandra Durth, Bryan Hancock, Marino Mugayar-Baldocchi, and Angelika Reich Moderna and OpenAI partner to Accelerate the Development of Life-Saving Treatments The State of AI in Early 2024: Gen AI Adoption Spikes and Starts to Generate Value by Alex Singla, Alexander Sukharevsky, Lareina Yee, Michael Chui, and Bryce Hall Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Make Your Reading More Meaningful, with Sönke Ahrens (episode 564) Principles for Using AI at Work, with Ethan Mollick (episode 674) How to Enhance Your Credibility (Audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
15/07/2439m 23s

688: The Power of Leadership Through Hospitality, with Will Guidara

Will Guidara: Unreasonable Hospitality Will Guidara is the former co-owner of Eleven Madison Park, which under his leadership received four stars from the New York Times, three Michelin stars, and in 2017 was named #1 on the list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants. He has co-authored four cookbooks, was named one of Crain's New York Business's 40 Under 40, and is the recipient of WSJ Magazine's Innovator Award. He is the author of Unreasonable Hospitality: The Remarkable Power of Giving People More Than They Expect*. We expect hospitality from a restaurant or hotel, but we often miss opportunities for this mindset at work. In this conversation, Will and I discuss effective leadership as an act of hospitality, not only for the organization and team — but for the leader themselves. Key Points Service is black and white. Hospitality is color. Hospitality elevates service not only for the person receiving it, but for the person delivering it. Hospitality is a dialogue, not a monologue. With employees, this means giving feedback continuously. When offering criticism, make a charitable assumption. The message is still the message, but the context matters. Giving attention to your top performers does a lot to invest others in their work. Make it cool to care. Resources Mentioned Unreasonable Hospitality: The Remarkable Power of Giving People More Than They Expect* by Will Guidara Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Lead Part-Time Staff, with Chris Deferio (episode 289) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) The Mindset to Help Your Organization Grow, with Tiffani Bova (episode 633) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
08/07/2438m 8s

687: Getting Better at Internal Communication, with Roy Schwartz

Roy Schwartz: Smart Brevity Roy Schwartz is co-founder and CEO at Axios HQ, the world’s first AI-powered internal communications management platform. He’s also the co-founder of Axios, the award-winning news organization known for its Smart Brevity writing style. He's the co-author, along with Jim VandeHei and Mike Allen of Smart Brevity: The Power of Saying More With Less*. Most organizations spend way more time and strategy on external communications than internal ones. In this conversation, Roy and I discuss how your internal strategy can reduce email, save time, and create space for innovation and insight. Key Points An effective, internal publication via email reduces the amount of total messaging people receive. Position one, big item in every publication. There should be a hierarchy of what’s important, since not everyone will read everything. Keep each topic to 200 words and under 1,000 words for the entire publication. For each topic, start with a strong, first sentence — and then provide context for why it matters. Find a word other than “newsletter” to name a regular, internal publication. Bring personality and smiles into internal publications. People will engage and look forward to reading. Done well, internal publications help inform, recognize, provide accountability, and allow leaders to focus on the human aspects of communication. Resources Mentioned Smart Brevity: The Power of Saying More With Less* by Jim VandeHei, Mike Allen, and Roy Schwartz Axios HQ: AI-powered newsletter software Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Getting Better at Reading the Room, with Kirstin Ferguson (episode 651) Get People Reading What You’re Sending, with Todd Rogers (episode 666) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
01/07/2434m 32s

686: How to Benefit from a Chief of Staff, with Laurie Arron

Laure Arron: Who Has Your Back? Laurie Arron is the founder of Arron Coaching, LLC and trusted adviser and executive coach to C-suite executives and Chiefs of Staff. She spent 30+ years climbing the corporate ladder at a Fortune 10 company in sales leadership, strategic planning, business transformation, and Chief of Staff roles. She is the author of Who Has Your Back?: A Leaders's Guide to Getting the Support You Need from the Chief of Staff You Deserve. Executive leaders need both truth-tellers and those who can manage on their behalf. Increasingly, the Chief of Staff role is becoming more prominent. In this episode, Laurie and I discuss their role, where they add value, and how they benefit the entire team. Key Points The Chief of Staff role has become a more prevalent executive role, especially in the technology, finance, and healthcare industries. A Chief of Staff is distinct from an executive assistant. A effective Chief represents the leader, manages on their behalf, and coordinates their work. Every top leader needs a truth teller. A key role of the Chief of Staff is to be up-front with the person they serve. An effective Chief is proactive in addressing issues before the leader ever knows about them. They know where messages are being lost or diluted. Ideally, the Chief of Staff helps create a climate of free expression throughout the team. Resources Mentioned Who Has Your Back?: A Leaders's Guide to Getting the Support You Need from the Chief of Staff You Deserve by Laurie Arron Let Bartlet Be Bartlet from The West Wing Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Help People Speak Truth to Power, with Megan Reitz (episode 597) How to Start Better With Peers, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 635) How to Start a Top Job, with Ty Wiggins (episode 685) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
24/06/2439m 44s

685: How to Start a Top Job, with Ty Wiggins

Ty Wiggins: The New CEO Ty Wiggins is a leadership expert who is passionate about setting up new CEOs for success. As the global lead of Russell Reynolds Associates’ CEO & Executive Transition Practice, he helps world-leading CEOs successfully transition into their roles, guiding them through their first 12-18 months as their trusted advisor. He is the author of The New CEO: Lessons from CEOs on How to Start Well and Perform Quickly (Minus the Common Mistakes)*. Taking on a top job is unique in many ways. In this conversation, Ty and I explore what new, top leaders can do to get out of the bubble and hear more truth. Plus, we discuss why the first 90 or 100 days might not be the best metric for top leaders, and how to better start with easy wins and early moves. Key Points You’ll see more in the top job, but hear less. This is even more pronounced for those promoted internally. Getting out of the bubble means spending more time with middle managers and front-line employees. Second and third time CEOs do this more from the start. Key questions that can help you hear more: (1) Tell me some of the workarounds you have in place and (2) What's the question I haven't asked you but I should? The first 90 or 100 days as a success metric is often overstated in top jobs. You’re often still learning context at an exponential rate. If it’s on fire, fix it. If it is smold­ering, leave it alone until you have more context. It’s helpful to address common pain points for easy wins. They don't have to be enormous, but they should be deliberate. Resources Mentioned The New CEO: Lessons from CEOs on How to Start Well and Perform Quickly (Minus the Common Mistakes)* by Ty Wiggins Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Genuinely Show Up for Others, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 590) How to Start a Big Leadership Role, with Carol Kauffman (episode 617) How an Executive Aligns with a Board, with Joan Garry (episode 662) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
17/06/2439m 35s

684: How to Be a Better Mentor, with Ruth Gotian

Ruth Gotian: The Financial Times Guide to Mentoring Ruth Gotian is the Chief Learning Officer and Associate Professor of Education in Anaesthesiology at Weill Cornell Medicine. She has been hailed by Nature and The Wall Street Journal as an expert in mentorship and leader­ship development. Thinkers50 has ranked her the #1 emerging management thinker in the world and she's a top LinkedIn voice in mentoring. Ruth is the author of The Success Factor and now along with Andy Lopata, The Financial Times Guide to Mentoring*. We’ve all heard about the benefits of mentoring. In addition to receiving mentoring, great leaders give back by providing it to others. In this episode, Ruth and I discuss what the research shows that the best mentors do well. Key Points Effective mentors use a combination of skills in coaching, sponsorship, role-modeling, and mentoring to support the situation. Informal mentoring tends to be more effective than formal pairings. 61% of mentoring relationships develop organically. Open up your network to your mentee. It’s an essential way to support their growth — and yours. Park your ego at the door. Instead, allow your mentee to shine. With their permission, amplify their achievements. Take the role of “sophisticated barbarian.” Approach mentee situations with knowledge and experience, but with distance and objectivity of their other, daily interactions. Document the challenges, accomplishments, and next steps during mentoring. This helps your mentee recognize accomplishments and grow their confidence. Resources Mentioned The Financial Times Guide to Mentoring by Ruth Gotian and Andy Lopata Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build a Network While Still Doing Everything Else, with Ruth Gotian (episode 591) The Art of Mentoring Well, with Robert Lefkowitz (episode 599) The Way to Get Noticed by Key Stakeholders, with Daphne E. Jones (episode 614) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
10/06/2438m 3s

683: Create Something Better Than Its Parts, with David Novak

David Novak: How Leaders Learn David Novak is Co-Founder and the retired Chairman and CEO of Yum! Brands, the world’s largest restaurant company. During his tenure as CEO, Yum! Brands became a global powerhouse, growing from $4 billion in market cap to over $32 billion. After retiring in 2016, he became Founder and CEO of David Novak Leadership, dedicated to developing leaders at every stage of life. He is the author of How Leaders Learn: Master the Habits of the World's Most Successful People. One element of powerful leadership is bringing different people and ideas together to create something entirely new. In this conversation, David and I discuss how leaders can use pattern thinking to create new value. Plus, we explore why active learning is so critical for successful leadership. Key Points Pattern thinking is 1+1 = 3. Create something bigger than its parts by pairing things not related to make something new. Be curious about the world by being an active learner. Use books, travel, listening, and hobbies to come across insights you wouldn’t normally see. Active learners seek out patterns proactively in order to create something new. Questions to ask yourself: The last time you came up with an especially creative idea or solution, what was your inspiration? What pattern were you applying and where had you discovered it? How much time do you spend exploring outside your usual work and life experiences? Where are you getting exposure to different disciplines or industries? Think of a challenge you’re facing or a problem you’ve been struggling to solve? Have you looked for patterns or ideas from unusual sources yet? If not, where could you turn next? Resources Mentioned How Leaders Learn: Master the Habits of the World's Most Successful People by David Novak Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Solve the Toughest Problems, with Wendy Smith (episode 612) Better Ways to Lead Brainstorming, with Jeremy Utley (episode 630) Doing Better Than Zero Sum-Thinking, with Renée Mauborgne (episode 641) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
03/06/2437m 16s

682: Ways to Move Forward Well, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide. Question from Qasim Qasim asked our thoughts on how to break the busy cycle and actually get started with something important. Aruj wondered how to handle a tricky situation where colleagues are gossiping lots in the office. Alice has three great opportunities in front of her was curious our advice on how to decide between them. Resources Mentioned How to Decide by Annie Duke Related Episodes How to Start a Conversation With Anyone, with Mark Sieverkropp (episode 177) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) The Power of Unlearning Silence, with Elaine Lin Hering (episode 678) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
27/05/2433m 40s

681: The Way to Handle Q&A, with Matt Abrahams

Matt Abrahams: Think Faster, Talk Smarter Matt Abrahams is an educator, author, podcast host, and coach. He is a lecturer in Organizational Behavior at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and a keynote speaker and communication consultant for Fortune 100 companies. He is the host of the popular podcast Think Fast, Talk Smart and the author of Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You're Put on the Spot*. One of the most common places leaders get put on the spot is when facilitating a question and answer session. In this episode, Matt and I discuss the mindset, preparation, and steps that will help you answer questions with confidence and increase credibility with your audience. Key Points Many presenters think about a Q&A session like playing dodgeball. It’s more helpful to frame it as dialogue. Answering questions well allows you to project authenticity, expand on key points, and resolve objections. Use the ADD framework to respond to a question. A: answer the question, D: detail an example, and D: describe the value. If helpful, adjust the order. Set boundaries for the kinds of questions you’ll answer and the timeframe for them. The audience expects you to lead the conversation. Ask yourself a question if nobody else asks one first. This might start with, “A question I’m commonly asked…” End with an exclamation point. Sticking the landing provides you confidence and shows credibility to your audience. Resources Mentioned Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You're Put on the Spot* by Matt Abrahams Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) How to Rehearse Before a Presentation, with Jacqueline Farrington (episode 645) That’s a Great Question (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
20/05/2439m 40s

680: Becoming More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier

Michael Bungay Stanier: The Coaching Habit Michael Bungay Stanier is the author of eight books, including The Coaching Habit*, which has sold more than a million copies and is the best-selling book on coaching this century. He is the founder Box of Crayons, a learning and development company that’s trained thousands of people around the world to be more coach-like. His TEDx Talk on Taming Your Advice Monster has been viewed more than a million times. One of the most common desires leaders espouse is wanting to get better at helping others grow. One great way to do that is to become more coach-like. In this conversation, Michael and I explore how we can do better at building this skill. Key Points Care deeply for others while also being disconnected from their outcomes. Give people responsibility for their own freedom. Consider asking, “How much risk are you willing to take?” Allow the other party to define the boundaries. Bring a difficult observation as a third point. Separate the message from the person and let them decide what’s true. Avoid asking “why” questions of others to avoid putting people on the defensive and trying to solve their problems. A helpful checkpoint: is this question something that’s helping me or helping the other party? Silence is a measure of success. When you ask as question that lands, people need time to answer. Your body leads your brain. Notice your physical presence and how it manifests when you’re listening well. Resources Mentioned The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Register your book receipt for bonus items from Michael Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) Leadership in the Midst of Chaos, with Jim Mattis (episode 440) How to Lead Better Through Complexity, with Jennifer Garvey Berger (episode 613) How to Help Others Be Seen and Heard, with Scott Shigeoka (episode 654) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
13/05/2438m 53s

679: Make it Easier to Discuss Hard Things, with Jeff Wetzler

Jeff Wetzler: Ask Jeff Wetzler is co-CEO of Transcend, a nationally recognized innovation organization, and an expert in learning and human potential. His experience spans 25+ years in business and education, as a management consultant to top corporations, a learning facilitator for leaders, and as Chief Learning Officer at Teach For America. He is a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network and is an Edmund Hillary Fellow. Jeff is the author of Ask: Tap Into the Hidden Wisdom of People Around You for Unexpected Breakthroughs in Leadership and Life*. Leaders are not the only people who need to have difficult conversations in the workplace. Yet, leaders set the tone for how much people are willing and able to talk about hard things. In this episode, Jeff and I discuss how leaders can make it easier for those important conversations to happen. Key Points In one study of managers, most people admitted to remaining silent with their bosses and nearly 75% said colleagues also felt uncomfortable speaking up. Meet people on their own turf. Others are more likely to speak up if they are in a setting that’s more comfortable for them. Leaders should consider shifting timing and/or medium to one that’s of the preference for the person who doesn’t have power. Explain why you’re asking about a topic and your intention for a conversation at the start. Providing context prevents people from having to guess at your agenda. Set a mutual agenda for a conversation by asking a question like, “In addition to this, what else should be part of our conversation today?” Establish a tone for open communication by radiating resilience. Words like these might help: “If I were in your shoes, I might be feeling frustrated or even resentful. If that’s how you’re feeling, I would understand completely. Please don’t hold back.” Resources Mentioned Ask: Tap Into the Hidden Wisdom of People Around You for Unexpected Breakthroughs in Leadership and Life* by Jeff Wetzler Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) How to Grow From Your Errors, with Amy Edmondson (episode 663) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
06/05/2434m 23s

678: The Power of Unlearning Silence, with Elaine Lin Hering

Elaine Lin Hering: Unlearning Silence Elaine Lin Hering is a facilitator, speaker, and writer who helps people build skills in communication, collaboration, and conflict management. She is a former Managing Partner of Triad Consulting Group and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, specializing in dispute resolution, mediation, and negotiation. She is the author of Unlearning Silence: How to Speak Your Mind, Unleash Your Talent, and Live More Fully. Those of us who have struggled to speak up have been told, “Just be more confident,” or, “Say this to get started.” As Elaine and I discuss in this conversation, there’s a larger context at play…and great power for both leaders and the people they lead, in unlearning silence. Key Points Start with why. For change to actually happen, find something that matters more than the old behavior. What seems obvious to us isn’t always obvious to others. Connecting the dots for others demonstrates the meaning you’re making. Beginning a thought with, “From where I sit…” provides an entry point for what you need to say while also acknowledging different perspectives from others. Most people want to be helpful, but don’t always know how. Tell them how they can be helpful in the moment. Resistance is part of the process of influencing others. While it doesn’t feel good in the moment, it’s often the catalyst for creating movement. Resources Mentioned Unlearning Silence: How to Speak Your Mind, Unleash Your Talent, and Live More Fully* by Elaine Lin Hering Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) The Mindset Leaders Need to Address Burnout, with Christina Maslach (episode 608) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
29/04/2438m 11s

677: How Leaders Can Better Support High-Achieving Women, with Sohee Jun

Sohee Jun: The Aligned Mindset Sohee Jun is a leadership coach for female executives, leaders, founders, and entrepreneurs. She is also a TEDx speaker, Forbes Coaches Council member, keynote speaker, leadership development expert, and author. With over twenty years in the corporate world, she has worked with Fortune 500 companies, including those in the entertainment, production, and media sectors such as Netflix, Fox, and Disney. In 2020, Sohee released her first book, Mommytracked: How to Take Authentic Risks and Find Success on Your Terms, with the goal of helping ambitious women tap into their inner core throughout the different phases of their lives. She's now the author of a second book, The Aligned Mindset: Secrets of High-Achieving Women for Navigating Work and Life*. In a world where still too few women are represented in senior leadership roles, many of us want to do whatever we can to support high-achieving women. In this conversation, Sohee and I explore what her research and experience indicates that leaders can do to better support women in their careers. Key Points Leaders can support both women and men by framing the larger “why” or North Star. Providing context helps a point of focus to emerge. Do it afraid. Provide support to work through fearful situations with success. When supporting women in building confidence, help them recognize what they’ve already achieved. Normalize the discussion about financial literacy. Opening the door to dialogue around salary negotiation helps equalize the salary gap. One question can set the tone for better work and life integration. Leaders can proactively ask about boundaries. Resources Mentioned The Aligned Mindset: Secrets of High-Achieving Women for Navigating Work and Life* by Sohee Jun Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Prioritize, with Christy Wright (episode 545) How to Protect Your Confidence, with Nate Zinsser (episode 573) The Path Towards Your Next Promotion, with Adam Bryant (episode 653) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
22/04/2439m 49s

676: How to Change People’s Minds, with Michael McQueen

Michael McQueen: Mindstuck Michael McQueen has spent the past two decades helping organizations and leaders win the battle for relevance. He specializes in helping clients navigate uncertainty and stay one step ahead of change. Michael is a bestselling author of nine books and a familiar face on the international conference circuit, having shared the stage with the likes of Bill Gates, Dr. John C. Maxwell, and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak. Having formerly been named Australia’s Keynote Speaker of the Year, he has been inducted into the Professional Speakers Hall of Fame. He is the author of Mindstuck: Mastering the Art of Changing Minds*. There’s a lot of evidence that our minds would rather feel right than be right. How then, do you influence someone when they are really convinced of their position? In this conversation, Michael and I discuss the initial steps that help in changing people’s minds. Key Points Our tendency is to convince to the inquiring mind, but we’ll do better if we speak to the instinctive mind first. Help others lessen loss and maintain dignity by preserving titles, language, and symbols in things that are new. Instead of trying making an argument, ask a question that allows the other person to listen to themselves. Ask questions that clarify points of resistance or misunderstanding. Speak like you’re right, listen like you’re wrong. Resources Mentioned Mindstuck: Mastering the Art of Changing Minds* by Michael McQueen Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500) Three Practices for Thriving in Negotiations, with William Ury (episode 669) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
15/04/2439m 11s

675: How to Be a Better Ally, with Lauren Wesley Wilson

Lauren Wesley Wilson: What Do You Need? Lauren Wesley Wilson is a leading thought leader on media relations, diversity and inclusion, and crisis communications. At 25, she became the founder and CEO of ColorComm Corporation. Prior to that, Lauren worked as a communications strategist at a prestigious crisis communications firm in Washington, D.C. Lauren has been featured in The Washington Post, Forbes, and People, as well as on MSNBC and CNBC, and more. She has been recognized by PR Week’s 50 Most Powerful in PR, Ad Age’s Women to Watch, and New York Women in Communications. She is the author of What Do You Need?: How Women of Color Can Take Ownership of Their Careers to Accelerate Their Path to Success*. Many of us wish to be good allies in the workplace, especially to those who are underrepresented. Yet, what we assume that means isn’t always what’s most wanted or needed. In this conversation, Lauren and I discuss what leaders and peers can do to be better allies. Key Points Instead of asking “How can I help?” consider, “What do you need?” That’s more likely to generate specific actions. Women of color feel like they are putting in tons of work into relationships with the majority culture, but it often feels unreciprocated. White folks think of allyship as speaking out against discrimination. Women of color say it’s way more critical to advocate for new opportunities. Tie allyship to economic goals: conference attendance, nominations for recognition, inclusion on high-profile committees, and position/promotion considerations. Make invitations to people of color to be at the table. This contributes more substantially than proclamations of support. When you make a mistake, apologize, own it, and move on. Don’t tell a story to explain yourself. Resources Mentioned What Do You Need?: How Women of Color Can Take Ownership of Their Careers to Accelerate Their Path to Success* by Lauren Wesley Wilson Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) How to Respond Better When Challenged, with Dolly Chugh (episode 615) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
08/04/2430m 52s

674: Principles for Using AI at Work, with Ethan Mollick

Ethan Mollick: Co-Intelligence Ethan Mollick is a professor of management at Wharton, specializing in entrepreneurship and innovation. His research has been featured in various publications, including Forbes, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. Through his writing, speaking, and teaching, Ethan has become one of the most prominent and provocative explainers of AI, focusing on the practical aspects of how these new tools for thought can transform our world. He's the author of the popular One Useful Thing Substack and also the author of the book, Co-Intelligence: Living and Working with AI*. Whether you’ve used it or not, you’ve heard that AI will transform how we work. Given how quickly the technology is changing, how do you start and, if you’ve started already, what’s the way to use it well? In this conversation, Ethan and I discuss the principles for using AI, even as the technology changes. Key Points GPT-4 is already passing the bar examination in the 90th percentile, acing AP exams, and even passing the Certified Sommelier Examination. Always invite AI to the table. It’s may be helpful, frustrating, or useless — but understanding how it works will help you appreciate how it may help or threaten you. Being the “human in the loop” will help you catch where AI isn’t accurate or helpful. Zeroing in on areas where you are already an expert will help you appreciate where AI is useful and where its limitation emerge. Treat AI like a person, but tell it what kind of person it is. It’s helpful to think of AI like an alien person rather than a machine. Assume this is the worst AI you will ever use. Embracing that reality will help you stay open to possibilities on how you use AI do your work better. Resources Mentioned Co-Intelligence: Living and Working with AI* by Ethan Mollick Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470) Doing Better Than Zero Sum-Thinking, with Renée Mauborgne (episode 641) How to Begin Leading Through Continuous Change, with David Rogers (episode 649) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
01/04/2428m 4s

673: The Way to Prevent Being Duped, with Mike Caulfield

Mike Caulfield: Verified Mike Caulfield is a research scientist at the University of Washington’s Center for an Informed Public, where he studies the spread of online rumors and misinformation. He has taught thousands of teachers and students how to verify claims and sources through his workshops. His SIFT methodology is taught by hundreds of research libraries across North America, and a shorter version of SIFT instruction, developed with Google, has been taught in public libraries across the world. His work on Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers, won the Merlot Award for best open learning resource in the ICT category. His work has been covered by The New York Times, the Chronicle of Higher Education, NPR, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and the MIT Technology Review. He is the author with Sam Wineburg of Verified: How to Think Straight, Get Duped Less, and Make Better Decisions about What to Believe Online*. We’ve all seen something online that we thought was true, but turned out was a hoax. Annoying, but no big deal if it’s just an internet meme from a friend or family member. But what if what you find online isn’t at all what you thought and you make decisions or take action on it that affects your professional credibility? In this conversation, Mike and I discuss how to guard yourself from being duped. Key Points Rather than asking, “Is this true?” the more useful question is, “Do I know what I'm looking at here?” The cheap signals many of us were trained to watch for (working links, attractive design, about pages, proper domains) are easy to replicate and no longer correlate to credibility. Phrase questions to search engines in neutral ways for less biased results. Instead of “Are soda taxes a good idea?” ask “Do soda taxes work?” While Wikipedia still has bias, it’s a far more credible source that many of us were taught — and a valuable source for a broad perspective of a topic or organization. Intelligent people often read vertically, to their detriment. The best fact-checkers read laterally by using the rest of the web to read the web. Watch for phrases like “sponsored content,” “brand partner,” “presented with,” “in partnership with,” “brought to you by,” “in association with,” or “hosted by.” These phrases signal advertisements. Resources Mentioned Verified: How to Think Straight, Get Duped Less, and Make Better Decisions about What to Believe Online* by Mike Caulfield and Sam Wineburg Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Get People Reading What You’re Sending, with Todd Rogers (episode 666) How to Enhance Your Credibility (audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
25/03/2439m 25s

672: Set the Tone for Speaking Up, with Mike Massimino

Mike Massimino: Moonshot Mike Massimino is a former NASA astronaut and a professor of mechanical engineering at Columbia University. He's also the senior advisor for space programs at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. He was selected as an astronaut by NASA in 1996, and is the veteran of two space flights, the fourth and fifth Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions in 2002 and 2009. Mike has made numerous television appearances, including a six-time recurring role as himself on the CBS hit comedy The Big Bang Theory. He has hosted Science Channel’s The Planets and its special Great American Eclipse. Mike is the author of the New York Times bestselling book Spaceman and now his newest book Moonshot: A NASA Astronaut’s Guide to Achieving the Impossible. Almost every leader and organization invites people to speak up and make their voice head. As we all know, that doesn’t means it happens in practice. In this conversation, Mike and I discuss how leaders can set the tone for what’s said, and what’s not. Key Points You’ll know when it’s time to speak up. Your cue is that hair-raising, sinking feeling in the moment of a high-stakes situation or the feeling of confusion in a less intense situation. Outsiders and rookies are often the most observant people in the team since they are hyper-aware of doing something new and noticing details a veteran may miss. It’s important to speak up when you see something wrong, but equally important is to speak up when you do something wrong. The only unforgivable sin at NASA is trying to cover something up. Your title or position may influence how others in the organization speak up (or don’t). When someone speaks up, saying “thank you” in the moment sets the tone for future dialogue. Reward speaking up with incentives. The Hubble Space Telescope servicing manager created challenges for people to speak up to reduce spacewalk time. Resources Mentioned Moonshot: A NASA Astronaut’s Guide to Achieving the Impossible by Mike Massimino Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546) How to Help People Speak Truth to Power, with Megan Reitz (episode 597) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
18/03/2439m 12s

671: How to Recognize Remarkable People, with Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki: Think Remarkable Guy Kawasaki is the chief evangelist of Canva and the creator of Guy Kawasaki’s Remarkable People podcast. He is an executive fellow of the Haas School of Business (UC Berkeley), and adjunct professor at the University of New South Wales. He was the chief evangelist of Apple and a trustee of the Wikimedia Foundation. He has written Wise Guy, The Art of the Start 2.0, The Art of Social Media, Enchantment, and eleven other books. He's now the author of Think Remarkable: 9 Paths to Transform Your Life and Make a Difference. We all want to be surrounded by remarkable people in our work. A key piece to building relationships with them is recognizing when they come across our radar screens. In this conversation, Guy and I explore some of the key indicators for recognizing remarkable people. Key Points Remarkable people reflect back to childhood. They recognize the experiences and people that contributed to their success. Remarkable people don’t find their passions, they develop them. They know that it’s rarely love at first sight. Remarkable people aren’t trying to save the world. They start with small and simple questions that scratch an itch. Remarkable people make themselves indispensable. The the do work nobody else wants to do which separates them from the pack. Remarkable people interact with a diverse group of people. They want to hear different perspectives and recognize the diversity makes them better. Remarkable people have overcome hardships. They’ve challenged themselves to find paths forward through the toughest situations. Resources Mentioned Think Remarkable: 9 Paths to Transform Your Life and Make a Difference* by Guy Kawasaki Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian (episode 567) How to Strengthen Your Network, with Marissa King (episode 525) Help Your Team Embrace Growth Mindset, with Eduardo Briceño (episode 644) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
11/03/2433m 25s

670: How to Connect with People Better, with Charles Duhigg

Charles Duhigg: Supercommunicators Charles Duhigg is a Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative journalist and the author of The Power of Habit and Smarter Faster Better. A graduate of Harvard Business School and Yale College, he is a winner of the National Academies of Sciences, National Journalism, and George Polk awards. He writes for The New Yorker and other publications, and is host emeritus of the Slate podcast How To! He's the author of Supercommunicators: How to Unlock the Secret Language of Connection*. We all know that we can’t lead if we don’t connect. The best leaders not do this well, but they do it consistently with all kinds of people. In this conversation, Charles and I discuss what we can learn from the best communicators to get better ourselves. Key Points Neural entrainment is when we click with someone and can finish each other’s sentences (and even our biological responses align). Supercommunicators trigger this consistently across many kinds of relationships. Supercommunicators aren’t always loudest or leading the conversation, but they ask more questions and adapt better in the moment. Make emotional replies easier for others. Instead of, “Do you have any hobbies?” ask, “If you could learn anything, what would it be?” Reciprocation of emotion is key for people to connect well. When another party is sharing something joyful, that’s an opportunity to share yourself. When something is more contentious, loop for understanding by (1) asking a deeper question, (2) repeating back in your own words, and (3) asking if you got it right. Resources Mentioned Supercommunicators: How to Unlock the Secret Language of Connection* by Charles Duhigg Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Where You May Be Provoking Anxiety, with Erica Dhawan (episode 528) The Way to Get People Talking, with Andrew Warner (episode 560) How to Help Others Be Seen and Heard, with Scott Shigeoka (episode 654) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
04/03/2440m 15s

669: Three Practices for Thriving in Negotiations, with William Ury

William Ury: Possible William Ury is one of the world’s best-known experts on negotiation, and the co-author of Getting to Yes, the all-time bestselling book on negotiation with more than 15 million copies sold. He is co-founder of Harvard’s Program on Negotiation and has served as a negotiator in many of the toughest disputes of our times. He has taught negotiation to tens of thousands, and consulted for dozens of Fortune 500 companies, the White House, the State Department, and the Pentagon. William has served as a negotiation adviser and mediator in conflicts ranging from Kentucky wildcat coal mine strikes to wars in the Middle East, Colombia, Korea, and Ukraine. He is an internationally sought-after speaker and has two popular TEDx talks with millions of views. He's also the author of Possible: How We Survive (and Thrive) in an Age of Conflict*. We often assume that conflict is bad, but William says we actually need more conflict, not less. In this conversation, we explore three practices that will help you thrive in the toughest negotiations. And no surprise — the biggest obstacle in getting what we want is almost always ourselves. Key Points We need more conflict, not less. The best decisions often emerge from a negotiation. The biggest obstacle in negotiation is ourselves. Pauses and silence prevent us from reacting without thinking. Zoom in to examine the interests that are behind your stated positions. This often elicits meaningful steps. Rarely are conflicts about surface issues. Uncovering your deeper motivations will help you approach negotiation more productively. Negotiation doesn’t only happen at one table. Zoom out to at least two other tables: the internal negotiations of both sides. Resources Mentioned Possible: How We Survive (and Thrive) in an Age of Conflict* by William Ury Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Negotiate As If Your Life Depended On It, with Chris Voss (episode 262) How to Find Confidence in Conflict, with Kwame Christian (episode 380) How to Negotiate When Others Have Power, with Kwame Christian (episode 416) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
26/02/2439m 29s

668: How to Begin with an Executive Coach, with Scott Osman and Jacquelyn Lane

Scott Osman and Jacquelyn Lane: Becoming Coachable Scott Osman is the founder and CEO of the 100 Coaches Agency and co-designer with Jacquelyn Lane of their proprietary curation process and the company’s relationship-first philosophy. In his role as CEO, he establishes the vision for the company, leads partnerships and business development, and serves as a leading light of the 100 Coaches Community, which he cofounded with Marshall Goldsmith in 2016. Jacquelyn Lane is the president of the 100 Coaches Agency. She has been with the agency since its founding and is a critical pillar of the 100 Coaches Community. Jacquelyn comes to the world of executive coaching through her previous roles in the energy industry and lifelong commitment to improving the lives of all people by elevating the quality of leadership. Along with Scott and Marshall Goldsmith, she is co-author of Becoming Coachable: Unleashing the Power of Executive Coaching to Transform Your Leadership and Life*. Perhaps you’ve been considering working with a coach, but how do you start? In this episode Scott, Jacquelyn, and I discuss when to consider coaching, how it might help, and the best way to begin. Plus, we explore the most helpful mindsets to help you get the most out of coaching. Key Points Leaders who create value at moments of inflection really need a coach. Two common reasons leaders seek coaching: (1) getting support with an issue that’s tough to navigate and (2) accelerating their leadership growth. Interview three coach candidates and utilize those interactions to discover different ways that you may reach your goals. Coaching fees should reflect the value the organization receives from the coaching. Most high-end coaching is funded by the organization. Slow is smooth and smooth is fast. To speed up, a coach may invite you to slow down in the immediate short-term. Resources Mentioned Becoming Coachable: Unleashing the Power of Executive Coaching to Transform Your Leadership and Life* by Scott Osman and Jacquelyn Lane Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) How to Help People Engage in Growth, with Whitney Johnson (episode 576) The Art of Mentoring Well, with Robert Lefkowitz (episode 599) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
19/02/2439m 35s

667: The Way to Handle Oblivious Leadership, with Robert Sutton

Robert Sutton: The Friction Project Robert Sutton is an organizational psychologist and professor of Management Science and Engineering in the Stanford Engineering School. He has given keynote speeches to more than 200 groups in 20 countries and served on numerous scholarly editorial boards. Bob's work has been featured in The New York Times, BusinessWeek, The Atlantic, Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair, and The Washington Post. He is a frequent guest on various television and radio programs, and has written seven books and two edited volumes, including the bestsellers The No A-hole Rule, Good Boss, Bad Boss, and Scaling Up Excellence. He is the co-author with Huggy Rao of The Friction Project: How Smart Leaders Make the Right Things Easier and the Wrong Things Harder*. We’ve all worked with someone who seemed just a bit oblivious. None of us want to be that kind of leader. In this conversation, Bob and I discuss key strategies for how to stop it and also prevent it. Key Points Privilege spares you hassles, but has a cost. You risk cluelessness about troubles in the organization. Power and prestige can cause leaders to focus more on themselves, less on others, and act like the rules don’t apply to them. An antidote to oblivious leadership is less transmission and more reception. Measure two behaviors: (1) how much the leader talks vs. others in interactions and (2) the ratio of questions the leader asks vs. statements the leader makes. Either manage by walking out of the room or get into the details with ride alongs, direct help, and doing the work with folks. Be cautious about “managing by walking around” getting ritualistic. Hierarchy is inevitable and useful. The most effective leaders flex it by knowing when to collaborate and when to direct. Resources Mentioned The Friction Project: How Smart Leaders Make the Right Things Easier and the Wrong Things Harder* by Robert Sutton and Huggy Rao Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) How to Help People Speak Truth to Power, with Megan Reitz (episode 597) How to Prevent a Team From Repeating Mistakes, with Robert “Cujo” Teschner (episode 660) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
12/02/2434m 50s

666: Get People Reading What You’re Sending, with Todd Rogers

Todd Rogers: Writing for Busy Readers Todd Rogers is a professor of public policy at Harvard University, where he has won teaching awards for the past seven consecutive years. He is a behavioral scientist and the cofounder of the Analyst Institute and EveryDay Labs. His opinion pieces have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and Politico, among other outlets. He's co-author with Jessica Lasky-Fink of Writing for Busy Readers: Communicate More Effectively in the Real World*. You probably only skimmed that email I spent an hour writing. And let’s be equally honest the other way — I only skimmed the document your team worked on most of last week. This is the reality of how we all read in a busy world. On this episode, Tom and I discuss how to write so that people actually read what you send. Key Points Virtually everyone is a writer in some significant way: emails, text messages, memos, social media posts, and many other daily communications. While your writing is important to you, the audience is often trying to spend as little time as possible processing what you’ve sent. Virtually everyone skims, especially in the context of work. Using fewer words make it more likely that people will engage with the message at all, much less taken action. Addressing fewer ideas often helps people engage better. Studies show better results for calls to action when fewer ideas are presented in a single communication. Asking busy readers for more can cause them to do less. Be mindful about the number of requests you are making in writing and eliminate those which aren’t essential. Resources Mentioned Writing for Busy Readers: Communicate More Effectively in the Real World* by Todd Rogers and Jessica Lasky-Fink AI for Busy Readers (transform your writing in real-time using the science of Writing for Busy Readers) Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Surprising Truth About Influencing Others, with Daniel Pink (episode 84) Improve Your Writing With Practical Typography, with Matthew Butterick (episode 145) Make Your Reading More Meaningful, with Sönke Ahrens (episode 564) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
05/02/2439m 27s

665: How to Represent Your Team on LinkedIn, with Randelle Lenoir

Randelle Lenoir Randelle Lenior is a vice president at Fidelity Investments and a graduate of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this conversation, Randelle and I discuss how to utilize LinkedIn in order to showcase your team externally. Key Points Start small. Begin by posting about job opportunities or sharing articles and resources that will be useful for others. Even though you are also representing your organization, the relationships you build are yours and stay with you throughout your career. Establishing a larger “why” for a LinkedIn presence is important and invites others to want to join in to support the vision. Ask permission and allow team members to easily opt out — and people who don’t engage initially may decide to later. People are going to look you up anyway. By having a presence on LinkedIn, you set the narrative of what they perceive about you. Related Episodes How to Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile, with Brenda Bernstein (episode 285) How to Get Noticed on LinkedIn, with Stephen Hart (episode 495) The Way to Get Noticed by Key Stakeholders, with Daphne E. Jones (episode 614) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
03/02/2433m 32s

664: The Reason People Make Buying Decisions, with Marcus Collins

Marcus Collins: For the Culture Marcus Collins is an award-winning marketer and cultural translator. He is a recipient of Advertising Age’s 40 Under 40 award and Crain’s Business 40 Under 40 award and a recent inductee to the American Advertising Federation’s Hall of Achievement. He has worked for several top advertising agencies, and his strategies and creative contributions have led to the success of Budweiser’s Made in America music festival, the launch of the Brooklyn Nets (“Hello Brooklyn!”), and State Farm’s “Cliff Paul” campaign, among others. Prior to his advertising tenure, Marcus worked on iTunes + Nike sport music initiatives at Apple and ran digital strategy for Beyoncé. He is a marketing professor at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, and faculty director for the school’s executive education partnership with Google. Marcus delivers keynote talks across the globe for companies and conferences such as the Cannes Lions International Festival for Creativity, SXSW, Social Media Week, Adcolor, Hyper Island, TEDx, and Talks at Google. He is the author of For the Culture: The Power Behind What We Buy, What We Do, and Who We Want to Be*. Whether you’re in a sales and marketing role or not, every leader needs to appreciate the psychology of why people buy. Often we assume people buy because of what the product or service provides. But as Marcus and I discuss in this episode, people often buy because of who they are. Key Points For getting people to move, nothing is more powerful than aligning with culture. Anaïs Nin said, “We don’t see things as they are, we see them as we are.” Audiences buy because of what the product is, but congregations buy because of who they are. Many leaders assume people love their brand -- but it's not really about the brand, it's about how people view themselves. Begin with examining your own thinking and language regarding customer relationships and transactions. How you view these influences the actions of others. Resources Mentioned For the Culture: The Power Behind What We Buy, What We Do, and Who We Want to Be* by Marcus Collins Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) Serve Others Through Marketing, with Seth Godin (episode 381) The Way to Earn Attention, with Raja Rajamannar (episode 521) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
29/01/2438m 29s

663: How to Grow From Your Errors, with Amy Edmondson

Amy Edmondson: Right Kind of Wrong Amy Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at the Harvard Business School, where she studies people and organizations seeking to make a positive difference in the world through the work they do. She has pioneered the concept of psychological safety for over twenty years and is recognized as number one on the Thinkers50 global ranking of management thinkers. She also received that organization’s Breakthrough Idea Award in 2019 and Talent Award in 2017. In 2019 she was first on HR Magazine’s list of the 20 Most Influential International Thinkers in Human Resources. Her prior book, The Fearless Organization, explains psychological safety and has been translated into fifteen languages. In addition to publishing several books and numerous articles in top academic outlets, Amy has written for, or her work has been covered by, media such as The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Financial Times, and many others. Her TED Talk on teaming has been viewed more than 3 million times. She is the author of Right Kind of Wrong: The Science of Failing Well*. Many leaders espouse the value of talking about our failures. Yet, failure is a threat to our ego, so it turns out we’re better at learning from the failures of others than we are from our own. In this conversation, Amy and I explore how to do a better job of growing when we’re in the wrong. Key Points Failure is a threat to our ego. As a result, we’re more likely to learn from the failures of others than from our own failures. It’s hard to learn if you already know. If you can frame situations more helpfully, it can substantially influence your ability to grow from being wrong. Disrupt the inevitable emotional response to being wrong by asking this: how was I feeling before this happened? Challenge yourself by considering if the content of your thoughts are useful for your goal. A key question: what other interpretation of the situation is possible? Pro tip: start with the phrase, “Just for fun...” Choose to say or do something that moves you closer to your goals. This question will help: what is going to best help me achieve my goals? Consider shifting from me to we and now to later. Resources Mentioned Right Kind of Wrong: The Science of Failing Well* by Amy Edmondson Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) The Value of Being Uncomfortable, with Neil Pasricha (episode 448) How to Quit Bad Stuff Faster, with Annie Duke (episode 607) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
22/01/2439m 30s

662: How an Executive Aligns with a Board, with Joan Garry

Joan Garry: Guide to Nonprofit Leadership Joan Garry is an internationally recognized champion for the nonprofit sector and a highly sought after executive coach for CEOs at some of the largest organizations. Joan’s firm offers high-end strategic advisory services with a unique combination of coaching and management consulting. She is the founder of the Nonprofit Leadership Lab, a worldclass online educational membership organization for board and staff leaders of small nonprofits. As a columnist for the Chronicle of Philanthropy, contributor to Harvard Business Review and to Forbes, Joan is a preeminent media spokesperson and thought leader on the role of the nonprofit sector in our society and is a sought after voice on issues facing the sector today. Joan was previously executive director of GLAAD, one of the largest gay rights organizations in the United States. She is the author of Joan Garry's Guide to Nonprofit Leadership: Because the World is Counting on You*. When thinking about executives interacting with boards, the first thought I used to have was that an executive’s job is keep the board happy. In contrast, the most effective executives are intentional about creating a for framework for shared leadership. In this episode, Joan and I discuss key lessons from the non-profit world to help align better with your board. Key Points The relationship between an executive director and board chair in one of the most critical ones for an organization. Shared leadership provides more opportunity today than hierarchy. Many “type A” people are in leadership roles. Getting clear on who decides what is critical because “type A” people don’t tend to operate well with ambiguity. Focus on getting clarity and aligned on one thing at a time to avoid overwhelming the decision-making progress. Use a recent example as a catalyst to begin this process. Executive directors should encourage boards to think and work at altitude so they get beyond only doing risk management. It’s not enough to expect a board chair or member to want to “give back” — more important is to understand why they want to give back to this organization specifically. Resources Mentioned Joan Garry's Guide to Nonprofit Leadership: Because the World is Counting on You* by Joan Garry Nonprofit Leadership Lab Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Involve Stakeholders in Decisions, with Eric Pliner (episode 586) How to Start a Big Leadership Role, with Carol Kauffman (episode 617) How to Start Better With Peers, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 635) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
15/01/2438m 47s

661: How to Tell a Story About Yourself, with David Hutchens

David Hutchens: Leadership Story Deck David Hutchens helps leaders find and tell their stories. He works with leaders around the world to find, craft, and tell their most urgent stories for the purpose of creating shared meaning, preserving culture, disseminating learning, and speeding change in organizations. He has taught the Storytelling Leader program at some of the most influential organizations, including NASA, Paypal, Loreal Paris, Cisco, Walmart, Google, FedEx — and he’s written many books, including the Circle of the 9 Muses*, Story Dash*, and The Leadership Story Deck*. He is the co-creator with longtime friend of the show Susan Gerke of the GO Team program. Many of us have heard that we should be vulnerable and, at least occasionally, share a story about ourselves. But how do you tell a story about yourself without making the entire interaction about you? In this episode, David and I explore how to best utilize a personal story to help the organization move forward. Key Points While leaders more often tell stories about others, a personal story can be very powerful for relationship building. An effective, personal story is 2-3 minutes. Telling a story about yourself needs to have a leadership point. Be clear on the “so what?” once the story concludes. Even if you don’t quite capture all the emotion, say the word out loud that describes the emotion you want to convey. Share your stories with others to get objective insight to tighten your message. Resources Mentioned Leadership Story Deck by David Hutchens (use code CFL24 for a limited-time discount) To receive a free copy of the Story Canvas, David invites listeners to reach out to him directly via david@davidhutchens.com Related Episodes Ignite Change Through Storytelling, with Nancy Duarte and Patti Sanchez (episode 268) How to Start Better With Peers, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 635) What Vulnerable Leadership Sounds Like, with Jacob Morgan (episode 648) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
08/01/2439m 30s

660: How to Prevent a Team From Repeating Mistakes, with Robert “Cujo” Teschner

Robert “Cujo” Teschner: Debrief to Win Robert “Cujo” Teschner is a retired F-15 / F-22 fighter pilot. He is also a former F-15 Weapons School Instructor, F-22 Squadron Commander, senior Joint Staff officer, and combat veteran. He holds advanced degrees in Operational Art and Science and National Security Strategy and has extensive experience in tactical planning and execution, and organizational leadership. From 2004 to 2006, he served as the US Air Force’s expert in post-mission debriefing, the methodology used by high-performing military teams to self-correct and improve continuously. Cujo retired immediately after his promotion to full Colonel due to complications from cancer-related care and started an international business consulting practice based in St. Louis, MO. His company is called VMax Group. VMax Group’s mission is to teach, inspire, and nurture teams on how to really “team”, making work more fulfilling, and making teams much more effective. He is the author of Debrief to Win: How America's Top Guns Practice Accountable Leadership...and How You Can, Too!* Many of us recognize we could get better at reflecting on our team’s work, but we rarely get beyond what went well and what didn’t. One of the best ways to stop making the same mistakes is to look at the truth of what’s already happened, and learn from it. In this conversation, Cujo and I look at the value of a debrief and how to bring that practice into your organization. Key Points Saying, “We learned a lot of important lessons today,” doesn’t actually prove that any learning has happened. The context of military and civilian debriefs are both different, but the stakes are still high in both venues. A debrief is not about blame or shame. Instead, it’s an affirming, positive experience that builds future leaders. A key benefit of regular debriefs is to institutionalize the process of challenging conversations. Psychological safety is critical for this to happen well. Objectives should measurable, achievable, and time-constrained. Debrief should focus on the objectives and the decisions that were made to meet those objectives. Be cautious about outsourcing debriefing to external facilitators. An effective debrief should be led by someone who has participated in the mission or project. Resources Mentioned Debrief to Win: How America's Top Guns Practice Accountable Leadership...and How You Can, Too! by Robert “Cujo” Teschner Robert “Cujo” Teschner’s website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
18/12/2338m 52s

659: Ways to Thrive When the Ground Keeps Shifting Under You, with Jen Byyny

Jen Byyny Jen Byyny is a senior director of product design in health-tech and a graduate of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this conversation, Jen and I discuss how to handle change in your career when things keep shifting around you. Key Points It’s about people, not product. When lots of change is happening, come back to relationships and communication. Pay attention to the people who support you and the ones you look forward to working with. They will be your champions through whatever happens. Provide space for grace during times of change. Others need it as much as you do. It’s helpful to have people in your corner who are pulling for you but who are not tied to the politics or emotion of the situation. Related Episodes The Power of Weak Connections, with David Burkus (episode 347) How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) How to Quit Bad Stuff Faster, with Annie Duke (episode 607) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
16/12/2335m 58s

658: How to Help Change Happen Faster, with Frances Frei

Frances Frei: Move Fast & Fix Things Frances Frei is a professor at Harvard Business School. Her research investigates how leaders create the context for organizations and individuals to thrive by designing for excellence in strategy, operations, and culture. She regularly works with companies embarking on large-scale change and organizational transformation, including embracing diversity and inclusion as a lever for improved performance. In 2017, Frances served as Uber’s first senior vice president of leadership and strategy to help the company navigate its very public crisis in leadership and culture. Her partner Anne Morriss and her are the authors of Uncommon Service and The Unapologetic Leader’s Guide to Empowering Everyone Around You. They are also hosts of Fixable, a leadership advice podcast from the TED Audio Collective, and they are recognized by Thinkers50 as among the world’s most influential business thinkers. Their newest book is Move Fast & Fix Things: The Trusted Leader's Guide to Solving Hard Problems*. A lot of us assume that going fast is reckless. There are certainly times when that’s the case, but it’s also true that leaders going too slow at the wrong time can make things worse. In this conversation, Frances and I discuss how to do a better job of moving quickly when it’s time to address the toughest problems. Key Points Many of us believe that going fast is reckless and going slow is righteous. While there are times that is true, there are many examples where it’s not. The fastest way to speed up your company is to empower more people to make more decisions. Dare to be bad at something. Deciding what not to address allows you to go faster at what you’re best at. Two key elements of completing work are work-in-progress and cycle time. Most leaders address cycle time first and miss the more substantial work-in-progress opportunities. Create a way to fast-track projects that become important and build this into the culture of the organization. Resources Mentioned Move Fast & Fix Things: The Trusted Leader's Guide to Solving Hard Problems by Frances Frei and Anne Morriss Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Turn Followers Into Leaders, with David Marquet (episode 241) How to Solve the Toughest Problems, with Wendy Smith (episode 612) How to Approach a Reorg, with Claire Hughes Johnson (episode 621) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
11/12/2335m 57s

657: How to Increase Team Performance Through Clarity, with David Burkus

David Burkus: Best Team Ever! David Burkus is the bestselling author of four books about business and leadership which have won multiple awards and been translated into dozens of languages. His insights on leadership and teamwork have been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, USAToday, Fast Company, the Financial Times, and many other media outlets. Since 2017, David has been ranked multiple times as one of the world’s top business thought leaders. As a sought-after international speaker, his TED Talk has been viewed over two million times. He has worked with leaders from organizations across all industries, including PepsiCo, Fidelity, Clorox, Adobe, and NASA. He's the author of Best Team Ever!: The Surprising Science of High-Performing Teams*. There are many things that help teams work well together, but perhaps you haven’t thought of this one: clarity. Knowing what is being done and who’s doing it often helps a team achieve more. In this conversation, David and I discuss the practical steps to surface more clarity and drive better performance. Key Points Casting a leadership vision is important, but insufficient. It’s not helpful to expect a team to figure out roles and responsibilities on their own. Teams work best when they understand how each individual works best. Clarity increased performance. Hold huddles using these three questions: (1) What did I just complete? (2) What am I focused on next? and (3) What is blocking my progress? Consider communicating in bursts to allow for people to retreat into less interrupted time for deeper work. Establish priorities and consistently make those priorities clear so they are obvious and apparent to the team. Resources Mentioned Best Team Ever!: The Surprising Science of High-Performing Teams* by David Burkus Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes An Astronaut’s Guide to Life On Earth, with Chris Hadfield (episode 149) How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233) How Great Teams Find Purpose, with David Burkus (episode 481) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
04/12/2339m 37s

656: How to Understand People Better, with Heather Younger

Heather Younger: The Art of Active Listening Heather Younger is an experienced international keynote speaker, best-selling author, CEO, and Founder of Employee Fanatix. Known as The Employee Whisperer, Heather harnesses humor, warmth, and an instant relatability to engage and uplift audiences and inspire them into action. She is a Certified Diversity Professional, certified in Emotional and Social Intelligence and DiSC, and is also the author of three books. Her previous best-selling book, The Art of Caring Leadership: How Leading with Heart Uplifts Teams and Organizations, was praised for offering powerful insights for developing authentic, thoughtful, and purposeful leaders and change-makers. She's the author of The Art of Active Listening: How People at Work Feel Heard, Valued, and Understood*. When you know how to listen, people will share more. We may or may not always be able to resolve every concern, but we can be sure others are heard. In this conversation, Heather and I discuss how we can shift from listening for what we want to hear towards listening for what we need to learn. Key Points Some issues can only be resolved through better listening. That alone makes this a critical skill for leaders. When you know how to listen, people will bring things to you. Listen for not what you want to hear but what you want to learn. Listening is not just about what’s been said, but also about what is seen. Get beyond simply, “What I hear you saying is…” Some leaders have a fear about the direction that a response might take a conversation. Remember that often people first and foremost want to be heard, regardless of what happens next. Nobody is ready to listen at every moment. Taking time to center yourself for a conversation in a few minutes or later in the day can be helpful for both parties. Resources Mentioned The Art of Active Listening: How People at Work Feel Heard, Valued, and Understood* by Heather Younger Art of Active Listening Certification Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500) How to Help Others Be Seen and Heard, with Scott Shigeoka (episode 654) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
27/11/2337m 53s

655: How to Help Difficult Conversations Go Better, with Sheila Heen

Sheila Heen: Difficult Conversations Sheila Heen is the Thaddeus R. Beal Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School, a Deputy Director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, and a founder of Triad Consulting Group. She often works with executive teams to engage conflict productively, repair working relationships, and implement change in complex organizations. She has published articles in The New York Times and the Harvard Business Review and appeared on Oprah, CNBC’s Power Lunch, and NPR. She is coauthor along with Douglas Stone of The New York Times bestseller Thanks for the Feedback and also now, in its third edition, co-author with Douglas Stone and Bruce Patton of the iconic bestseller, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most*. When our intentions are good, it’s hard to appreciate how we could have had such negative impact on someone else. It’s equally challenging to navigate a tough conversation when someone else’s words or actions have wronged us, even if that’s not what they intended. In this conversation, Sheila and I discuss how to shift just a bit to help our difficult conversations go better. Key Points Intent does not equal impact. It’s a mistake to assume that we know the other party's intentions. It’s a mistake to assume that good intentions erase bad impact. Prevent the first mistake by attempting to separate intent from impact. Use these three questions: Actions: What did the other person actually say or do? Impact: What was the impact of this on me? Assumption: Based on this impact, what assumption am I making about what the other person intended? To present the second mistake, listen first for feelings before sharing intent. It’s helpful also to reflect on your own intent, which may not always be as pure as initially recognized. Resources Mentioned Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most* by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Get Way Better at Accepting Feedback, with Sheila Heen (episode 143) How to Begin Difficult Conversations About Race, with Kwame Christian (episode 594) How to Deal With Passive-Aggressive People, Amy Gallo (episode 595) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
20/11/2339m 20s

654: How to Help Others Be Seen and Heard, with Scott Shigeoka

Scott Shigeoka: Seek Scott Shigeoka is an internationally recognized curiosity expert, speaker, and author. He is known for translating research into strategies that promote positive well-being and connected relationships around the globe, including at the UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center and through his popular courses at the University of Texas at Austin. Scott implements his curiosity practices with leaders in the public sector, Fortune 500 companies, Hollywood, media organizations, education institutions, and small businesses. He is the author of Seek: How Curiosity Can Transform Your Life and Change the World*. Often we think about curiosity as a way to get information. And yes, it does do that, but there’s a much bigger opportunity that many leaders miss — taking the next step with curiosity to actually help connect better with others. In this episode, Scott and I highlight four phrases that will help you do that better. Key Points It’s a mistake to limit the purpose of curiosity to only information gathering. Deep curiosity can be one of the best ways to create connection. Saying, “I don’t know,” may elicit fear in a lot of us, but leaders who can do this are often perceived and more competent in their work. The invitation to, “Tell me more,” is a way to respond to a bid from someone for attention that opens to door to feeling seen and heard. Even if you don’t literally say the words, “I understand that you're more than your job,” making that clear in your conversations helps limit work-life conflict and uncovers better ways to support others. We tend to have a bias in the workplace for the people who traditionally have the “answers.” Asking, “Who else?” opens the door to surfacing the best ideas, regardless of who they originate with. Resources Mentioned Seek: How Curiosity Can Transform Your Life and Change the World* by Scott Shigeoka 4 Phrases That Build a Culture of Curiosity by Scott Shigeoka Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511) How to Inspire More Curiosity, with Shannon Minifie (episode 520) How to Genuinely Show Up for Others, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 590) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
13/11/2339m 0s

653: The Path Towards Your Next Promotion, with Adam Bryant

Adam Bryant: The Leap to Leader Adam Bryant is Senior Managing Director and Partner at the ExCo Group, where he works with hundreds of senior leaders and high-potential executives. As the creator and former author of the iconic “Corner Office” column in The New York Times, Adam has mastered the art of distilling real-world lessons from his hundreds of interviews and turning them into practical tools, presentations, and exercises to help companies deepen their leadership benches and strengthen their teams. Adam works with executive leadership teams to help drive their transformation strategies, based on a best-practices framework he developed for his widely praised book, The CEO Test. He's also the author of The Leap to Leader: How Ambitious Managers Make the Jump to Leadership*. Many of us have our career trajectories planned out in our minds. While we know it’s not going to happen exactly the way we’ve planned, it’s still jarring when we find ourselves on a different path — or presented with a different opportunity — than we anticipated. In this episode, Adam and I discuss the mindsets and actions that will help you take the next step in your career. Key Points There can be a large gap between how assertive you are and how people perceive you. Think about your career like a pyramid — building a strong foundation across many areas of practice. Bloom where you are planted. Don’t just solve the problem your manager tells you to solve. Find (and start solving) the bigger problem that isn’t even on the radar screen of senior leadership. Use these words: “I need your help.” When seeking advice in the context of someone that might mentor you, make your ask specific and then loop back to share what you did with their advice. When someone asks how you are, instead of just saying “fine,” tell a story about what you’re working on. Peer relationships are a common blind spot. Early promotions may come from your manager, but higher level promotions comes moreso from the relationships with your peers. Resources Mentioned The Leap to Leader: How Ambitious Managers Make the Jump to Leadership* by Adam Bryant Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) How to Start a Big Leadership Role, with Carol Kauffman (episode 617) How to Start Better With Peers, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 635) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
06/11/2339m 12s

652: How to Encourage Team Feedback, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Tony asked our opinion on his plan to have the team provide feedback to each other directly. Lean wondered about alternatives to the nine box talent mapping framework that some organizations use. Qasim noted that leadership can sometimes feel thankless and asked if we had any rituals to help minimize this. Resources Mentioned FeedForward: Coaching for Behavioral Change by Marshall Goldsmith What Is the 9-Box Model? by Brian Anderson Warning: This Is Not Your Grandfather’s Talent Planning featuring Kim Scott Related Episodes How to Get Way Better at Accepting Feedback, with Sheila Heen (episode 143) How to Process Your 360 Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 341) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
30/10/2339m 27s

651: Getting Better at Reading the Room, with Kirstin Ferguson

Kirstin Ferguson: Head & Heart Kirstin Ferguson is a company director, columnist, keynote speaker, and executive coach. Beginning her career as an officer in the Royal Australian Air Force, Kirstin has held roles that have included chief executive officer of an international consulting firm, and acting chair and deputy chair of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. She has sat on boards of both publicly-listed and privately-listed companies for more than a decade. Kirstin has a PhD in leadership and in 2021 was named one of Thinkers50’s top thinkers to watch. In 2023, she was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for her significant service to business and gender equality. She writes a weekly column on leadership and work in the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and is also a contributor to the Australian Financial Review and to Forbes. She is the author of Head & Heart: The Art of Modern Leadership*. It’s often apparent when someone else doesn’t a read a room, but much harder to see it in ourselves. In this conversation, Kirstin and I discuss how we can do a better job of either literally or figuratively reading the room. Plus, we explore several of the actions leaders can take to do a better job at being more proactive at moving beyond their own perspective. Key Points Memory is different than perception. A study by Adrian de Groot shows that chess grandmasters reply more on the former for reading things quickly. Perception is an ongoing process vs. something any of us arrive at. A study of medical residents shows four ways we tend to approach situations: stalled, fixated, adaptive, or vagabonds. Vagabonds in particular look at a wide range of possibilities, but don’t fully explore or rule out paths forward. Zoom out to seek broad input. That’s especially important when the stakes are high. Also important is to get perspective outside of your industry. Reading books from different disciplines is one starting point. Leaders needs to also recognize that people in the room are reading you as well. There’s an element of partnership that shapes how the room moves forward. Resources Mentioned Head & Heart: The Art of Modern Leadership by Kirstin Ferguson Head & Heart Leader Scale by Kirstin Ferguson Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Start Seeing Around Corners, with Rita McGrath (episode 430) Leadership in the Midst of Chaos, with Jim Mattis (episode 440) The Way to Get Noticed by Key Stakeholders, with Daphne E. Jones (episode 614) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
23/10/2339m 40s

650: Where Senior Leaders Can Better Support Middle Managers, with Emily Field

Emily Field: Power to the Middle Emily Field is a partner at McKinsey & Company. She works with leaders to shape data-driven organizational strategies designed to achieve business objectives, establish talent management as a distinctive advantage, and secure the human resources function as a driver of business value. Emily has worked with companies across industries, leading initiatives to transform the way organizations work. She puts particular emphasis on helping to establish a talent-first approach, instilling a high-performance culture, and adopting effective people-analytics approaches. She is the co-author along with Bill Schaninger and Bryan Hancock of Power to the Middle: Why Managers Hold the Keys to the Future of Work*. As anybody who’s worked in middle management can attest, it’s one of the hardest jobs you’ll ever have. Too often we take middle management for granted, but organizations that learn how to better support middle managers can leverage their power and expertise to do a lot of good. In this conversation, Emily and I highlight the challenges of middle management, the unique value the middle managers bring to organizations, and the steps senior leaders can take to better support middle managers. Key Points Middle managers often have less power and control than the people who report to them. This results in them not feeling like they are set up for success. The “player-coach” model of managers doing individual contributor work can be useful, but it’s critical for organizations to be mindful that the work is uniquely suited for a manager to do. Rather than promoting the best middle managers out of their roles, promote from within. Reward top middle managers who decide to make their positions a destination, not just a waypoint. As technology and AI changed the nature of work, middle managers are uniquely qualified to know how to best rebundle jobs and redistribute talent. A key question for senior leadership to answer: What do we want middle managers to be doing? Resources Mentioned Power to the Middle: Why Managers Hold the Keys to the Future of Work* by Emily Field, Bill Schaninger, and Bryan Hancock Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Multiply Your Impact, with Liz Wiseman (episode 554) How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller (episode 585) The Questions to Help Figure Out Hybrid and Remote Work, with Jim Harter (episode 646) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
16/10/2339m 23s

649: How to Begin Leading Through Continuous Change, with David Rogers

David Rogers: The Digital Transformation Roadmap David Rogers is the world’s leading expert on digital transformation, a member of the faculty at Columbia Business School, and the author of five books. His previous landmark bestseller, The Digital Transformation Playbook, was the first book on digital transformation and put the topic on the map. David has helped companies around the world transform their business for the digital age, working with senior leaders at many of the largest corporations and he's been featured in The New York Times, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist. In his newest book, The Digital Transformation Roadmap*, David tackles the barriers behind the 70% of businesses that fail in their own digital efforts and offers a five-step roadmap to rebuild any organization for continuous digital change. Most of us have heard that leading change requires highlighting a problem, deciding on a clear vision, and then cascading that vision down. In this conversation, David and I discuss how those actions alone often result failed outcomes. Instead, we highlight what a shared vision really is and how we can do a better job of helping the entire organization respond better to change. Key Points Most digital transformations fail because they focus too much on technology and not enough on the actual organizational challenges. Selling a problem is negative urgency. It’s important as a component of change, but insufficient alone. Successful change leaders also embrace positive urgency. A north star helps leaders and their organizations get clear on the “why” instead of simply the “what.” Once defined, thoughtful debate on measurement brings alignment and empowerment. It’s a mistake for vision to only come from the top. Vision should exist at every level. Avoid thinking about vision as cascading down. If anything, vision should be cascade up. How conversation happens at each juncture will define how well this works — or doesn’t. Resources Mentioned The Digital Transformation Roadmap* by David Rogers The Digital Transformation Playbook* by David Rogers David Rogers on Digital newsletter Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476) Engaging People Through Change, with Cassandra Worthy (episode 571) Doing Better Than Zero Sum-Thinking, with Renée Mauborgne (episode 641) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
09/10/2338m 56s

648: What Vulnerable Leadership Sounds Like, with Jacob Morgan

Jacob Morgan: Leading With Vulnerability Jacob Morgan is a trained futurist and one of the world’s leading authorities on leadership, the future of work, and employee experience. He speaks in front of tens of thousands of people each year and his content is seen over a million times annually. He is the best-selling author of five books: The Future Leader, The Employee Experience Advantage, The Future of Work, and The Collaborative Organization. He speaks at over 50 conferences a year including TED Academy which is one of the largest TED events in the world. Jacob provides advisory and thought leadership services to organizations around the world. He has created tons of educational videos and articles found at Great Leadership With Jacob Morgan and host of the Great Leadership with Jacob Morgan podcast. He’s the author of the new book, Leading With Vulnerability: How to Unlock Your Greatest Superpower to Transform Yourself, Your Team, and Your Organization. Most of us have heard that we should show vulnerability, but we don’t necessary know how to do this in the workplace. In addition, many leaders mistakenly show vulnerability without connecting it back to leadership. In this episode, Jacob and I explore where leaders go wrong, discuss how to do better, and demonstrate exactly what real vulnerability sounds like. Key Points Vulnerability + Leadership = Vulnerable Leadership. While this equation may seem obvious, many leaders mistakingly lean into vulnerability without also articulating leadership. Vulnerability without leadership can land awkwardly and potentially calls to question your credibility as a leader. Go beyond just admitting a mistake; share what was learned from that mistake. In the same way, talk about personal challenges for the purpose of connecting, creating trust, and relating to others. Ask yourself this question as a starting point for ensuring you are also leading: “What’s my reason for sharing what I’m about to share?” Vulnerability for leaders is not the same as it is for everybody else. Resources Mentioned Leading With Vulnerability: How to Unlock Your Greatest Superpower to Transform Yourself, Your Team, and Your Organization by Jacob Morgan Great Leadership With Jacob Morgan Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) The Four Storytelling Mistakes Leaders Make, with David Hutchens (episode 553) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
02/10/2339m 3s

647: Holding People Accountable Without Authority, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Lisa asks about the best ways to hold others accountable when you don’t have positional authority. John wonders about our perspective on dealing with narcissists in the workplace. Patrick is curious how we might (or might not) mediate a conflict between two employees. Priya notices the focus on underperforms in organizations and asks how this tendency might get shifted a bit. Resources Mentioned The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen R. Covey The Success Factor* by Ruth Gotian The 6 Types of Working Genius* by Patrick Lencioni Related Episodes How to Handle a Boss Who’s a Jerk, with Tom Henschel (episode 164) How to Influence Many Stakeholders, with Andy Kaufman (episode 240) How to Benefit From Conflict, with Susan Gerke (episode 263) How to Lead Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart (episode 358) How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian (episode 567) How to Help Team Members Find the Right Work, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 610) How to Start Better With Peers, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 635) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
25/09/2336m 6s

646: The Questions to Help Figure Out Hybrid and Remote Work, with Jim Harter

Jim Harter: Culture Shock Jim Harter is Chief Scientist for the Workplace at Gallup. He has led more than 1,000 studies of workplace effectiveness, including the largest ongoing meta-analysis of human potential and business unit performance. He's the bestselling author of 12: The Elements of Great Managing, Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements, Wellbeing at Work and the #1 Wall Street Journal bestseller It’s the Manager. Jim has also published articles in many prominent business and academic journals. He's also the author now of Gallup's book with Jim Clifton titled Culture Shock: An unstoppable force is changing how we work and live. Gallup’s solution to the biggest leadership issue of our time*. Virtually every professional team is navigating some aspect of return to office and how that works best for their organization. In this conversation, Jim and I highlight the key findings from Gallup that have emerged in the data since the pandemic started. Plus, we explore the questions that managers can ask in order help this transition work better for everyone. Key Points Managers should consider these key questions to help employees and teams move towards smart autonomy: Which parts of your job can you do best at home? Which parts of your job can you do best at the office? When have you created exceptional value for our customers? When do you feel most connected to our organization’s culture? In addition: Less than 5% of people in the United States worked from home in 2019. Today the number is six times larger and nearly seven in 10 full-time employees in the United States prefer some type of remote work arrangement. Number of days in the office is important, but matters less than other factors. Most associated with high levels of employee engagement is the practice of a work team deciding together (the option companies used the least). Splitters and blenders represent two different ways of approaching work and the populate tends to divide equally on this preference (even across generations). Knowing where people land will help engage them better in the workplace. Managers account for 70% of the variance in team engagement. A key habit for a manager is one meaningful conversation per week with each employee. Less important is the time of interaction and more important it the quality. Smaller amounts of time discussion recognition, goals, and strengths can be more impactful than more time that doesn’t do this. Resources Mentioned Culture Shock: An unstoppable force is changing how we work and live. Gallup’s solution to the biggest leadership issue of our time* by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Gallup Findings on the Changing Nature of Work, with Jim Harter (episode 409) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) Effective Hybrid Team Management, with Hassan Osman (episode 570) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
18/09/2339m 35s

645: How to Rehearse Before a Presentation, with Jacqueline Farrington

Jacqueline Farrington: The Non-Obvious Guide to Better Presentations Jacqueline Farrington has over 20 years experience as a change maker, empowering leaders and their teams to spark transformation and innovation through communications. Known for her direct, yet supportive and science-backed approach, Jacqueline works with senior and board-level leaders as the founder and president of Farrington Partners. She blends her experience in the performing arts, vocal pedagogy, communications, psychology, and organizational and executive coaching to help her clients find unique communication solutions. Her clients include multinationals such as Amazon and Microsoft, as well as startups and nonprofits. She proudly served for many years as TEDxSeattle’s Senior Speaker Coach, where she sourced, vetted, and prepared speakers for yearly sold-out audiences. She was thrilled to see several speakers from that event move on to the global TED stage. In addition to teaching at Yale, she has lectured and taught at the London Business School, Rutgers University, and Imperial College. Jacqueline in the author of The Non-Obvious Guide to Better Presentations: How to Present Like a Pro (Virtually or in Person)*. We all know we should practice before a big presentation, but how you practice makes a big difference on whether you just feel more prepared…or actually are. In this episode, Jacqueline and I explore how to rehearse so you perform better. Key Points A presentation is a performance. Just like any performance, how you rehearse is critical for your success. Great presenters look relaxed and natural and unrehearsed because they have practiced over and over again. Internalizing your talk is like driving home. You know the route so well, you can take any turn you want and still arrive at the same house. Use a memory palace to recall point during your presentation. This also provides and easy path to adjust timing and content when changes inevitably come. Create controlled stress for yourself during rehearsals. This surfaces where to get better and also helps you respond more effectively when actual stresses come up when presenting. Review your work objectively to decide how to improve your message. It’s helpful to think about watching a recording of someone else so that you can better surface what to change. Resources Mentioned The Non-Obvious Guide to Better Presentations: How to Present Like a Pro (Virtually or in Person)* by Jacqueline Farrington Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Engage With Humor, with David Nihill (episode 245) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) 3 Better Ways to Start a Presentation (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
11/09/2339m 59s

644: Help Your Team Embrace Growth Mindset, with Eduardo Briceño

Eduardo Briceño: The Performance Paradox Eduardo Briceño is a global keynote speaker and facilitator who guides many of the world’s leading companies in developing cultures of learning and high performance. Earlier in his career, he was the co-founder and CEO of Mindset Works, the first company to offer growth mindset development services. Previously, he was a venture capital investor with the Sprout Group. His TED Talk, How to Get Better at the Things You Care About, and his prior TEDx Talk, The Power of Belief, have been viewed more than nine million times. He is a Pahara-Aspen Fellow, a member of the Aspen Institute’s Global Leadership Network, and an inductee in the Happiness Hall of Fame. He is the author of The Performance Paradox: Turning the Power of Mindset Into Action*. Many of us have heard the invitation in recent years to have a growth mindset — but how do you establish this for an entire team? In this episode, Eduardo and I explore his research on systemizing the learning zone to help teams perform at the highest levels. Plus, we explore tactical shifts that managers can make in order to align intention with reality. Key Points In order for teams to performance at top levels, they need to spend intentional time in both the performance zone and the learning zone. Internal competition can hold back teams from learning — and can over focusing on the present instead of the future. Systemizing the learning zone helps build a culture where this is expected and normal. Setting expectations for feedback, role plays, and study groups are a few of the many ways organizations can do this. Eliminate forced ranking systems, as they often over-perpetuate a culture of performance only vs. performance and learning together. Include learning goals in professional development, not only performance goals. This normalizes and systemizes the learning zone as a critical part of work. Resources Mentioned The Performance Paradox: Turning the Power of Mindset Into Action by Eduardo Briceño How to Get Better at the Things You Care About by Eduardo Briceño (TEDx talk) Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Six Tactics for Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) The Way to Make Struggles More Productive, with Sarah Stein Greenberg (episode 569) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
03/09/2336m 1s

643: How to Make a Better Impression on Camera, with Mark Bowden

Mark Bowden: Winning Body Language Mark Bowden is a world-renowned body language expert, keynote speaker, and bestselling author. Voted three times by Global Gurus’ as the #1 Body Language Professional in the world, Mark’s unique GesturePlane™ system of nonverbal communication helps audiences maximize the power of using their own body language to stand out, win trust, and gain credibility every time they communicate. As the founder of communication training company TRUTHPLANE®, Mark’s live and virtual keynote speeches and training prove invaluable to business leaders and teams from influential companies including Zoom, Shopify, Toyota, KPMG, American Express, the US Army and NATO; and prime ministers of G7 nations. His bestselling books on body language and human behavior are: Winning Body Language*, Winning Body Language for Sales Professionals*, Tame the Primitive Brain*, and Truth & Lies, What People are Really Thinking*. His highly acclaimed TEDx talk The Importance of Being In-Authentic continues to reach millions of people, as does his own YouTube Channel. Most professionals are on video more these days than they ever thought they would be. As a result, making the best first impression on camera is more essential to our work than ever before. In this conversation, Mark and I explore several of the key principles that will help us start better in virtual interactions. Key Points We make judgment calls very quickly depending on how someone shows up visually. It's your duty to influence and persuade — and we all do this in some way already to change outcomes. While we’re used to viewing content on screen (television, movies, YouTube) we aren’t used to interacting and collaborating on screen. Use video in short, consistent ways. Tools like Loom can help us do on camera what we already know works well in person: regular interaction. Your smile can set the tone for an interaction and it’s important to use a visual aid to remind you of this if you’re staring at black boxes on screen. Bring your gestures into the camera frame. Gestures that match the cadence and rhythm can help connect your audience with your message. Resources Mentioned Winning Body Language* by Mark Bowden Truth and Lies*: What People Are Really Thinking by Mark Bowden and Tracey Thomson The Importance Of Being Inauthentic by Mark Bowden (TEDx talk) Best Tips for Virtual Presentations by Mark Bowden (YouTube) Mark Bowden on LinkedIn Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Moving Towards Meetings of Significance, with Seth Godin (episode 632) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
28/08/2339m 43s

642: How Generational Learning and Working is Changing, with Mauro Guillén

Mauro Guillén: The Perennials Mauro Guillén is Professor of Management and Vice Dean at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert on global market trends, he is a sought-after speaker and consultant. He combines his training as a sociologist at Yale and as a business economist in his native Spain to identify and quantify the most promising opportunities at the intersection of demographic, economic, and technological developments. His online classes on Coursera and edX have attracted over 100,000 participants from around the world. He has won multiple teaching awards at Wharton, where his presentation on global market trends has become a permanent feature of over fifty executive education programs annually. His book on 2030: How Today’s Biggest Trends Will Collide and Reshape the Future of Everything was an instant Wall Street Journal bestseller and he's now the author of The Perennials: The Megatrends Creating a Postgenerational Society*. Many of us grew up in a world where life was divided into three stages: school, work, and retirement. Traditional ways of thinking about credentialing and ways to transition in the workforce are also changing. In this conversation, Mauro and I explore what has changed and how we can shift our thinking and actions to stay relevant in a new world of work. Key Points The sequential model of life is no longer as relevant as it was a generation ago. Life span, health span, and technology are massively affecting how we think about generations. It’s no longer a correct assumption that entry level positions are going to be only filled people in their twenties coming out of school. Intergenerational learning is an opportunity that many institutions and organizations still miss. Embracing this will increasingly help us stay relevant. Traditional credentials will still hold value, but it will be assessed in the context people's ability in learning how to learn. Intergenerational differences are real, they do not necessarily result in different values, attitudes, and behaviors in the workplace. There is lots of heterogeneity that our stereotypes conceal. Resources Mentioned The Perennials: The Megatrends Creating a Postgenerational Society* by Mauro Guillén Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Lead a 100-Year Life, with Lynda Gratton (episode 266) Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273) How to Help People Engage in Growth, with Whitney Johnson (episode 576) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
21/08/2337m 3s

641: Doing Better Than Zero Sum-Thinking, with Renée Mauborgne

Renée Mauborgne: Beyond Disruption Renée Mauborgne is the INSEAD Distinguished Fellow and a professor of strategy at the global business school INSEAD. She is the co-author of the 4 million copy global bestseller Blue Ocean Strategy, which is recognized as one of the most iconic and impactful strategy books ever written, and is also co-author of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Los Angeles Times bestseller Blue Ocean Shift. To date, the Blue Ocean Strategy and Blue Ocean Shift teaching materials have been adopted by over 2,800 universities across the globe. In 2022, Harvard Business Review selected Blue Ocean Strategy as one of the most influential and innovative articles published in HBR over the last 100 years. Along with her colleague W. Chan Kim, she was named the most influential management thinker in the world by Thinkers50. She is the first woman ever to secure that top spot. She is the co-author with W. Chan Kim of Beyond Disruption: Innovate and Achieve Growth without Displacing Industries, Companies, or Jobs*. Key Points Zero-sum thinking means that if we win, someone else must lose. Many of us have been conditioned to accept that this is how competition has to work. Nondisruptive creation creates new industries without leaving failed companies, lost jobs, and destroyed markets in its wake. Consider shifting focus from structure to agency. Firms that generate nondisruptive creation lead with agency. Don’t confuse the means with the ends. Technology enables, but value innovation is ultimately what creates a nondisruptive new market. Unlock the many, not just the few. Overemphasizing an entrepreneur or creative leader underemphasizes the contributions of everyone else. Resources Mentioned Beyond Disruption: Innovate and Achieve Growth without Displacing Industries, Companies, or Jobs* by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant* by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Start Seeing Around Corners, with Rita McGrath (episode 430) Help People Show Up as Themselves, with Frederic Laloux (episode 580) The Mindset to Help Your Organization Grow, with Tiffani Bova (episode 633) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
14/08/2338m 45s

640: How to Bring a Large Team Together, with Tom Burbage

Tom Burbage: F-35 Tom Burbage retired from the Lockheed Martin Corporation in 2013. He was the President of the Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems Company and the Executive VP/GM for both the USAF F-22 Raptor and the multi-service, allied next generation fighter, the F-35. Prior to joining Lockheed, Tom was a Naval Aviator, completing the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School in 1975. He has accumulated more than 3,000 hours in 38 different types of military aircraft. As a reservist he retired as a Navy Captain in 1994. Tom has received numerous industry awards, including the U.S. Naval Academy/Harvard Business Review Award for Ethical Leadership; the Aerospace Industry Personality of the Year; the Society of Automotive Engineers Leadership in Aerospace Award; and many others. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society in the United Kingdom. He is co-author along with Betsy Clark and Adrian Pitman of the book F-35: The Inside Story of the Lightning II. Sometimes we find ourselves leading a very large team that isn’t used to working together. That happened to Tom who was the general manager of the F-35 fighter jet. In this conversation, we explore how to bring together many stakeholders in order to do something bigger than any one of them could do alone. Key Points Solicit and listen to feedback on what didn’t work in past situations. Establish behavior norms and expectations and continue coming back to them. When disagreements happen, resolve them in the context of these norms. Consider including customers in major meetings, so struggles are shared transparently with all stakeholders. Behavior norms and expectations were established globally and referenced in most formal interactions. When flare ups happened, they were often settled quickly in the spirit of the norms. A “one team” concept was used to unify people from formerly competing organizations to align them to the nobler motive. Resources Mentioned F-35: The Inside Story of the Lightning II* by Tom Burbage, Betsy Clark, and Adrian Pitman Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Build a Coaching Culture, with Andrea Wanerstrand (episode 501) How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller (episode 585) How to Lead Better Through Complexity, with Jennifer Garvey Berger (episode 613) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
17/07/2339m 3s

639: Supporting Return to Work After Maternity Leave, with Danna Greenberg

Danna Greenberg: Maternal Optimism Danna Greenberg is the Walter H. Carpenter Professor of Organizational Behavior at Babson College. Her main area of research focuses on understanding the intersection between individuals' work and non-work lives as they move through their career. Her scholarship is guided by the belief that individuals can and should be able to live full lives at work and at home and that by challenging current assumptions regarding work we can find better ways for businesses, families, and communities to thrive. Her other research stream centers on the scholarship of teaching and learning. Here she is focused on the continued changing landscape of higher education as it pertains to how we teach, what we teach, and how to define the lives of academics. Danna has published more than 30 articles and book chapters in leading journals including Academy of Management Journal, Human Resource Management, and Academy of Management Learning and Education. She is the co-author with Jamie Ladge of Maternal Optimism: Forging Positive Paths Through Work and Motherhood*. When women return to work after a baby, there’s a lot our society implies about how that’s supposed to look. Danna’s research finds that this can look very different for every family. On this episode, a few things that women, their partners, and their managers can do to support a better transition in returning to work. Key Points Over 70% of mothers in the United States return to work after having children. There tends to be a “guilt and anguish” script in the popular media about women returning to work after a maternity leave. That’s absolutely true for some women (especially those with fewer resources) but other women have very different experiences. Managers can help by opening dialogue about what’s ideal to support a woman and her family during and after maternity leave. Comments like “I am so impressed by how you are going to do it all!” are often well-intended but can reinforce views that might not be true for a woman or her family. Focus praise at work on work, not parenting. Men may be more likely to listen to the challenges working mother face when other men surface them. Male managers can take the lead on this. During leave, mothers can help create a foundation of shared parenting (if that’s their choice) by engaging their partners in substantial ways in childcare and limit gatekeeping. Resources Mentioned Maternal Optimism: Forging Positive Paths Through Work and Motherhood* by Jamie Ladge and Danna Greenberg Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Reduce Drama With Kids, with Tina Payne Bryson (episode 310) Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) How to Create Inclusive Hiring Practices, with Ruchika Tulshyan (episode 589) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
10/07/2338m 42s

638: Giving Up on Getting It All Done, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Jose asked about how to balance professional and personal responsibilities and get it all done. Jordan mentioned getting passed up for a promotion twice and wondering what suggestions we have on the feedback they have received. Ahmad asked us about resources for supporting high performances and team members who are struggling. Jenna shared a distinction between tuition reimbursement and tuition assistance that Dave expanded on. Resources Mentioned Getting Things Done* by David Allen Leadership Story Deck* by David Hutchens Start With Why* by Simon Sinek Hope for the Flowers* by Trina Paulus The Empowered Manager* by Peter Block Kim Scott’s distinction on Superstars vs. Rock Stars CliftonStrengths by Gallup Related Episodes How to Get Way Better at Accepting Feedback, with Sheila Heen (episode 143) Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319) Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) The Four Storytelling Mistakes Leaders Make, with David Hutchens (episode 553) How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian (episode 567) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
03/07/2339m 54s

637: How to Handle Pushback From Difficult Askers, with Vanessa Patrick

Vanessa Patrick: The Power of Saying No Vanessa Patrick is the Associate Dean for Research, Executive Director of Doctoral Programs, a Bauer Professor of Marketing and lead faculty of the Executive Women in Leadership Program at the Bauer School of Business at the University of Houston. She has been recognized with a number of awards for both scholarship and teaching and was named one of the top 50 most productive marketing scholars worldwide by the DocSig of the American Marketing Association. Vanessa was appointed as a Fulbright Specialist (2019-24) by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. She is a prominent scholar in her field and serves on editorial and policy boards of leading academic journals. She is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Marketing Research and the Journal of Marketing and she's the author of The Power of Saying No: The New Science of How to Say No That Puts You in Charge of Your Life*. Most leaders know that it’s important to say no to requests that aren’t the right use of time and resources. But how do you navigate this when the other party is likely to respond in a difficult way? In this conversation, Vanessa and I explore the patterns of difficult askers and how we can do a better job of responding when we’re interacting with them. Key Points We all have both marigolds and walnut trees in our lives. Marigold protect and strengthen us - walnut trees crowd out our time and interfere. Difficult askers often confront us with face-to-face requests, use their home court advantage, and insist on an immediate response. Pushback is normal and expected. It’s helpful to view it as a hurdle to overcome vs. something to avoid. Either way, we will spend the energy. Resentment is a helpful indicator that difficult askers are taking too much power. Establish personal polices that provide guidelines so you can proactively come back to values when considering requests. It’s helpful to consider advance requests in the context of fulfilling the commitment immediately, otherwise we’ll continue to feel the pressure of resentment and Resources Mentioned The Power of Saying No: The New Science of How to Say No That Puts You in Charge of Your Life* by Vanessa Patrick Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Say No Without Saying No, with Lois Frankel (episode 471) How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546) How to Help People Speak Truth to Power, with Megan Reitz (episode 597) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
26/06/2336m 41s

636: The Value of Consistency Through Inflection Points, Liz Anderson

Liz Anderson: The PreSales Path Liz Anderson has extensive experience as a solutions engineering leader and is the founder of the PreSales Path. She's also an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this SaturdayCast, Liz and I discuss the inflection points she’s experienced in the past year, how intentional focus on her vision and identity helped move her forward, and the value of consistency through it all. Key Points Professional development is about finding the starting points and then adapting as you go. Once you decide on a new identity and direction, the indicators start to emerge on where to go next. When your heart and intention are in the right place, the tactical path is still not easy, but it is clearer. Resources Mentioned Liz Anderson Related Episodes How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) How to Get Moving, with Gladys McGarey (episode 631) How to Get Traction With a New Habit (audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
24/06/2332m 2s

635: How to Start Better With Peers, with Michael Bungay Stanier

Michael Bungay Stanier: How to Work with (Almost) Anyone Michael Bungay Stanier is the author of eight books, including The Coaching Habit, which has sold more than a million copies and is the best-selling book on coaching this century. Most recently he wrote How to Begin, and back in 2011 he created and edited End Malaria, a book written in partnership with Seth Godin that raised more than $400k for Malaria No More. Michael is the founder Box of Crayons, a learning and development company that’s trained thousands of people around the world to be more coach-like. He has been featured in many publications including Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Fast Company. His TEDx Talk on Taming Your Advice Monster has been viewed more than a million times. Michael's newest book is How to Work with (Almost) Anyone: Building the Best Possible Relationship*. Most leaders recognize the critical nature of healthy, peer relationships. Yet, few leaders lay an intentional foundation for success as those relationships start. In this episode, Michael and I discuss how to start with peers using the five questions in a Keystone Conversation. Key Points Nobody really like to say hello but everyone likes to be greeted. Make a decision to be the person that begins. Preparing thoughtful responses to the five questions in a Keystone Conversation will help you come to a dialogue in an authentic and vulnerable way. The responses themselves aren’t as critical as the process itself. By entering into a keystone conversation, you are laying the foundation for future dialogue and the best possible relationship. The five questions of a Keystone Conversation: The Amplify Question: What’s your best? The Steady Question: What are your practices and preferences? The Good Date Question: What can you learn from successful past relationships? The Bad Date Question: What can you learn from frustrating past relationships? The Repair Question: How will you fix it when things go wrong? Resources Mentioned Preorder Michael’s book at bestpossiblerelationship.com Bonus audio: Michael’s process for writing this book (12 minutes) Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Involve Stakeholders in Decisions, with Eric Pliner (episode 586) How to Start a Big Leadership Role, with Carol Kauffman (episode 617) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
19/06/2339m 14s

634: The Value of Bittersweet Leadership, with Susan Cain

Susan Cain: Bittersweet Susan Cain is the author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, which spent seven years on The New York Times bestseller list and has been translated into 40 languages. It was named the #1 best book of the year by Fast Company, which also named Susan one of its Most Creative People in Business. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and many other publications. Her record-smashing TED Talk has been viewed over 30 million times and was named by Bill Gates one of his all-time favorite talks. Susan has also spoken at Microsoft, Google, the U.S. Treasury, the S.E.C., Harvard, Yale, West Point, and the US Naval Academy. She received Harvard Law School’s Celebration Award for Thought Leadership, the Toastmasters International Golden Gavel Award for Communication and Leadership, and was named one of the world’s top 50 Leadership and Management Experts by Inc. She is now also the author of the bestselling book Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole*. We’ve all heard the value of positive thinking and aiming for happiness, but we don’t often think about the value of sorrow — and rarely in the context of leadership. In this conversation, Susan returns to the podcast to explore how the full spectrum of who we are can help us live — and lead - just a bit better. Key Points We espouse the value of happiness and positive thinking but don’t often recognize the value of appreciating sorrow and pain. Words like “pain” and “suffering” tend to not show up in our workplaces, even when that’s clearly what’s being experienced. Instead, these realities are often substituted with words like “anger” or “frustration.” Yes we should focus on our strengths, but beware of confusing a bittersweet temperament or sadness, with weakness. Having power or feeling superior may prevent us from seeing others sadness — or even our own. Leaders who can embrace humility often find that results follow too. The physical act of bowing can help with humility, as does capturing in writing moments of compassion (either from others or for others), as well as a focus on self-compassion. Resources Mentioned Preorder Bittersweet for a free book plate from Susan Empathy: The Human Connection to Patient Care by The Cleveland Clinic The Kindred Letters by Susan Cain Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, with Susan Cain (episode 44) Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
12/06/2337m 45s

633: The Mindset to Help Your Organization Grow, with Tiffani Bova

Tiffani Bova: The Experience Mindset Tiffani Bova is the global customer growth and innovation evangelist at Salesforce, and The Wall Street Journal bestselling author of Growth IQ. Over the past two decades, she has led large revenue-producing divisions at businesses ranging from start-ups to the Fortune 500. As a Research Fellow at Gartner, her cutting-edge insights helped Microsoft, Cisco, Salesforce, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Oracle, and many other prominent companies expand their market share and grow their revenues. She has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50 twice and she's the host of the podcast What’s Next! with Tiffani Bova. She is the author of The Experience Mindset: Changing the Way You Think About Growth*. While many organizations espouse that employees are their greatest asset, most senior leaders prioritize customer needs above all else. Data clearly shows that balancing great employee experience along with a quality customer experience drives better results. In this conversation, Tiffani and I discuss the mindset and initial steps that leaders can take to improve the experience for both employees and customers. Key Points In recent decades, we’ve been in the mindset of customer-first. Today, the biggest threat to organizations is worker unhappiness. While almost every organization espouses the importance of employees, few executive leaders can identify who “owns” the employee experience in their organization. In contrast, almost every organization has a clearly defined customer experience owner. Proper investments in technology are often an obstacle to an ideal employee experience. Getting better at this means that senior leaders in human resources, information technology, and customer experience must work together to help impact line up with intention. Three starting points for better employee experience are: reviewing data for customer experience and compare it to the trends for employee experience, utilizing employee advisory boards for a voice in emerging strategy, and reviewing employee survey results to determine what findings have been addressed. Getting better at balancing customer experience and employee experience means moving away from an expert’s mindset and towards a beginner’s mindset. Resources Mentioned The Experience Mindset: Changing the Way You Think About Growth* by Tiffani Bova Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Discover What People Want, with Tiziana Casciaro (episode 565) Gallup’s Insights on Addressing Unhappiness, with Jon Clifton (episode 601) How to Solve the Toughest Problems, with Wendy Smith (episode 612) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
05/06/2339m 8s

632: Moving Towards Meetings of Significance, with Seth Godin

Seth Godin: The Song of Significance Seth Godin is the author of 21 international bestsellers that have changed the way people think about work. His books have been translated into 38 languages. Seth writes one of the most popular marketing blogs in the world, and two of his TED talks are among the most popular of all time. He is the founder of the altMBA, the social media pioneer Squidoo, and Yoyodyne, one of the first internet companies. His blog is at seths.blog and his newest book is The Song of Significance: A New Manifesto for Teams*. Seth says that the foundation of all real skills is the confidence and permission to talk to each another. No place is that more apparent than in our meetings. On this episode, Seth returns to help us move towards meetings of significance. Key Points The song of significance is about work that matters, being part of something bigger than each one of us, and doing things we’re proud of. Many organizations and leaders hold meetings, but they are often reports and lectures. Meetings of significance are conversations. Despite knowing the critical important of conversations, we tend to resist them in our roles. Our work is to begin those conversations. Start with agreement on what a meeting is how we do work that matters through it. The problem is rarely with Zoom. The problem is how you show up to facilitate the meeting. Create the culture you need to serve people well by setting the tone for it. You have more power than you think. Resources Mentioned The Song of Significance: A New Manifesto for Teams* by Seth Godin Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) How to Lead Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart (episode 358) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
29/05/2339m 6s

631: How to Get Moving, with Gladys McGarey

Gladys McGarey: The Well-Lived Life Gladys McGarey is 102 years old and a still-practicing doctor. Recognized as a pioneer of the allopathic and holistic medical movements, she is also a founding diplomat of the American Board of Holistic Medicine. She is the cofounder and past president of the American Holistic Medical Association, as well as the cofounder of the Academy of Parapsychology and Medicine and the founder of The International Academy of Clinical Hypnosis. Gladys lives and works in Scottsdale, Arizona, where for many years she shared a medical practice with her daughter. She currently has a medical consulting practice, maintains a healthy diet, and enjoys a good piece of cake every now and then. She has spoken at TEDx and is the author of The Well-Lived Life: A 102-Year Old Doctor's Six Secrets to Health and Happiness at Any Age*. Our efforts in leadership development, personal growth, or getting better at anything, are all about starting. In this conversation, Gladys and I discuss the critical nature of movement in our lives and work. We also explore how to identify where to start and why it’s more about beginning that finishing. Key Points All life needs to move. If we're not moving, we can't function. Stuckness is an illusion. If we know what to look for, movement is all around us and within us. A flashlight in the dark can only see a few steps ahead — but that’s enough to move in the right direction and begin seeing more. Look for the trickle around the dam. Noticing where movement already is will often be the starting point to go further. Doctors don’t heal patients, only patients can heal themselves. Pay attention to beginning instead of finishing. Resources Mentioned The Well-Lived Life: A 102-Year Old Doctor's Six Secrets to Health and Happiness at Any Age* by Gladys McGarey Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Tame Your Inner Critic, with Tara Mohr (episode 232) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) How to Make Progress When Starting Something New, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 562) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
22/05/2329m 10s

630: Better Ways to Lead Brainstorming, with Jeremy Utley

Jeremy Utley: Ideaflow Jeremy Utley is the Director of Executive Education at the Stanford d.school, and an Adjunct Professor at Stanford’s School of Engineering, where he has earned multiple favorite professor distinctions from graduate programs. He co-teaches two celebrated courses, Leading Disruptive Innovation (d.leadership) and LaunchPad, which focus on creating real-world impact with the tools of design & innovation. He is also on the teaching teams of d.org, an organizational design course, and Transformative Design, a course that turns the tools of design onto graduate students’ lives. One of the most prodigious collaborators at the d.school, Jeremy has taught alongside the likes of Lecrae, Dan Ariely, Laszlo Bock, and Greg McKeown. He is the author along with Perry Klebahn of Ideaflow: The Only Business Metric That Matters. Brainstorming sessions often emerge to address a problem requiring new ideas or innovation. However, the way many of us approach brainstorming vastly limits what’s possible for our teams and organizations. In this conversation, Jeremy and I discuss where leaders go wrong and some of the most helpful mindsets and tactics to do better. Key Points We tend to like cognitive closure. That often stops us from moving forward more substantially during brainstorming. The Idea Ratio shows that 2000 ideas are needed for every one idea that goes to market. Most teams and organizations vastly underestimate this. Set the expectation that brainstorming is a process, not a single event. That will help you surface vastly more useful ideas. Gather initial suggestions before a session to avoid favoring extroverts and early anchoring on what’s said initially. A useful way to make this is ask the language, “How might we…?” Warm-up exercises can substantially help put team members in the right mindset for creativity, especially for those with busy schedules moving between contexts. Resources Mentioned Ideaflow: The Only Business Metric That Matters by Jeremy Utley and Perry Klebahn Jeremy Utley's website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Be Present, with Dan O’Connor (episode 399) The Way to Nurture New Ideas, with Safi Bahcall (episode 418) How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
15/05/2339m 48s

629: How to Grow Your Business, with Donald Miller

Donald Miller: How to Grow Your Small Business Donald Miller is The New York Times bestselling author of Building a StoryBrand and Business Made Simple. He has helped thousands of businesses grow with his powerful framework. In 2010, Don started the business he’d always dreamed of. Although his business was doing ok, he quickly realized it wasn’t what he thought it would be. Everything depended on him, and he was drowning in the mundane day-to-day. For years, his business struggled to produce dependable, predictable results. Over years of fits and false starts, Don grew his business from nothing to nearly $20 million. In the end, he realized there were six key parts of a business, and if they were managed well, the business would fly far and fast. He’s captured those lessons in his book How to Grow Your Small Business: A 6-Step Plan to Help Your Business Take Off*. A huge percentage of businesses fail before they have any significant success. One key trigger is failure to market the business effectively. In this conversation Donald and I discuss how to power the marketing engine of your business by using the key elements of the StoryBrand framework. Key Points Most small businesses think more about how their marketing will look rather than what their marketing will say. People are attracted to what helps them survive and thrive…and it helps to communicate those message simply. People buy products and services to solve problems, not because they care that much about the business. The customer is the hero. Never play the hero; always play the guide. People who are insecure talk about themselves. People who are confident talk about others. Talk about yourself only in the context of how it helps the customer. Resources Mentioned How to Grow Your Small Business: A 6-Step Plan to Help Your Business Take Off* by Donald Miller Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Serve Others Through Marketing, with Seth Godin (episode 381) How Leaders Build, with Guy Raz (episode 491) How to Quit Bad Stuff Faster, with Annie Duke (episode 607) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
08/05/2339m 25s

628: How to Read an Income Statement, with Brian Feroldi

Brian Feroldi: Financial Statements Explained Simply Brian Feroldi is a financial educator, YouTuber, and author. He has been intensely interested in money, personal finance, and investing ever since he graduated from college. His mission statement is to spread financial wellness. He loves to help other people do better with their money, especially their investments. Brian has written more than 3,000 articles on stocks, investing, and personal finance for The Motley Fool. In 2022, Brian’s book Why Does The Stock Market Go Up? was published. The mission of the book is to demystify the stock market. It was written to explain how the market works in plain English. He's also the co-creator of the course, Financial Statements Explained Simply. Most of us are not accountants, but whether you work in a small business, a large corporation, a non-profit, or a government agency, the numbers define what resources that we have. Being able to understand and speak the language of financial statements is essential for leaders who want to influence decisions. In this episode, Brian and I review how to understand and read one of the most important reports for any organization: the income statement. Key Points A few hours of focus on the fundamentals of financial statement can provide you understanding and influence throughout your career. An income statement (also called a profit and loss statement or P&L) shows revenue, expenses, and profit over a period of time. It’s similar to your personal budget. Revenue minus cost of goods sold is gross profit. Subtracting operation expenses from gross profit give you an organization’s operating income or EBIT (earnings before income and taxes). Depreciation spreads out the cost of tangible assets (equipment, vehicles, buildings) their useful lives. Amortization does the same thing for intangible assets (loans, copyrights, patents). The “bottom line” is literally the bottom line at the end, either net income or net loss. Resources Mentioned Brian Feroldi’s newsletter Financial Statements Explained Simply (course) Related Episodes Improve Your Financial Intelligence, with Joe Knight (episode 244) How to Approach Corporate Budgeting, with Jody Wodrich (episode 355) Dumb Things Smart People Do With Money, with Jill Schlesinger (episode 396) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
01/05/2338m 44s

627: How to Influence Through Your Questions, with Kwame Christian

Kwame Christian: American Negotiation Institute Kwame Christian is a best-selling author, business lawyer, and CEO of the American Negotiation Institute. Following the viral success of his TED talk, Kwame released his best-seller Finding Confidence in Conflict: How to Negotiate Anything and Live Your Best Life back in 2018. He’s also a regular Contributor for Forbes and the host of the number one negotiation podcast in the world, Negotiate Anything, which currently has over 5 million downloads worldwide. Under his leadership, the American Negotiation Institute has coached and trained several Fortune 500 companies on applying the fundamentals of negotiation to corporate success. He's also the author of the book How to Have Difficult Conversations About Race and the creator of Negotiable, an Online Community to Learn to Negotiate Anything. We often think about questions as a way to discover more — but have you also considered how your questions might influence? Kwame Christian and I discuss three key steps in order to persuade better through your intentional questions. Key Points Rapport questions help you make a connection with the other party and establish a baseline for how they communicate. A helpful place to begin on rapport is noticing something that you genuinely admire or are curious about in the other party. When gaining information, start broadly and then pull the thread when the other party leads you down a path. Beware that your role/positions can cause people to say more than they otherwise might. “What would it take?” is often a helpful way to illuminate a path forward. Even if you ultimately are more directive, laying the foundation through questions allows the other party to be heard and understand. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
24/04/2339m 23s

626: The Starting Point for Repairing Trust, with Henry Cloud

Henry Cloud: Trust Henry Cloud is an acclaimed leadership expert, clinical psychologist and a New York Times bestselling author. His 45 books, including the iconic Boundaries, have sold nearly 20 million copies worldwide. He has an extensive executive coaching background and experience as a leadership consultant, devoting the majority of his time working with CEOs, leadership teams, and executives to improve performance, leadership skills, and culture. Henry's work has been featured and reviewed by The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Publisher’s Weekly, Los Angeles Times, and many other publications. Success Magazine named him in the top 25 most influential leaders in personal growth and development, alongside Oprah, Brené Brown, Seth Godin and others. He is a frequent contributor to CNN, Fox News Channel, and other national media outlets. Henry is the author of Trust: Knowing When to Give It, When to Withhold It, How to Earn It, and How to Fix It When It Gets Broken*. When someone betrays your trust, what do you do next? In this conversation, Henry and I explore the five factors of trust and the importance of each one of them in our relationships. Then, we look at the starting point for rebuilding trust after a betrayal, beginning with you and your own support network. Key Points Five factors are key for trust: understanding, motive, ability, character, and track record. Repairing trust is not clean or orderly. The first step is about you, not the person who betrayed you. Leaders who have a support network already in place are better able to take a pause and work through emotion and anger. An authentic apology from someone should articulate the event itself, demonstrate their empathy for how the event felt to you, and appreciate the consequences of their actions. Forgiving someone does not mean you trust them. Resources Mentioned Trust: Knowing When to Give It, When to Withhold It, How to Earn It, and How to Fix It When It Gets Broken* by Henry Cloud Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Art of Constructing Apologies, with Sandra Sucher (episode 535) The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 539) How to Approach a Reorg, with Claire Hughes Johnson (episode 621) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
17/04/2338m 15s

625: How to Release Some Control, with Morra Aarons-Mele

Morra Aarons-Mele: The Anxious Achiever Morra Aarons-Mele is the host of The Anxious Achiever, a top-10 management podcast that helps people rethink the relationship between their mental health and their leadership. Morra founded Women Online and The Mission List, an award-winning digital-consulting firm and influencer marketing company dedicated to social change, in 2010 and sold her business in 2021. She helped Hillary Clinton log on for her first internet chat and has launched digital campaigns for President Obama, Malala Yousafzai, the United Nations, the CDC, and many other leading figures and organizations. She is the author of The Anxious Achiever: Turn Your Biggest Fears into Your Leadership Superpower*. In this conversation, Morra and I discuss some key tactics that help leaders release just a bit of control. Since control is often driven by fear, we can let go of some control by making small shifts in our practices, awareness, and planning. We also explore how to set boundaries that will help us lead in ways that are more helpful to others — and ourselves. Key Points Control is often caused by fear. Optimism can be a bit of an antidote to it. Adopt a practice mindset by making small shifts to endure uncomfortable things. Practice open awareness throughs surrender; the opposite of controlling and micromanaging. Get clear on scheduling, deadlines, longer term career goals. Those provide a healthy illusion of control. Create a distinction between having an emotion and being the emotion. Begin setting boundaries by noticing when you are moving from comfort to discomfort. Resources Mentioned The Anxious Achiever: Turn Your Biggest Fears into Your Leadership Superpower* by Morra Aarons-Mele The Anxious Achiever podcast Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297) Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
10/04/2336m 18s

624: How to Make Smarter Investments in Your Learning, with Jill Schlesinger

Jill Schlesinger: The Great Money Reset Jill Schlesinger is an Emmy Award winning Business Analyst for CBS News. She appears on CBS radio and television stations nationwide covering the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign. Jill is the host of the Jill on Money podcast and of the nationally syndicated radio show, Jill on Money, which won the 2018 and 2021 Gracie Award for Best National Talk Show. Jill is a frequent speaker on a variety of topics, including macroeconomic, market and demographic trends; workplace issues for women and LGBT employees in financial services; and how to create authentic branding. She is the author of The Dumb Things Smart People Do With Their Money and her most recent book, The Great Money Reset: Change Your Work, Change Your Wealth, Change Your Life*. In this conversation, Jill and I examine the decision-making process that many of us use when considering advanced degrees or certifications. We discuss some of the common missteps that people make in educational investments and identity three key steps that can help us do better. Plus, we encourage leaders to get clear on their goals and outcomes and alternative ways to fund major educational investments. Key Points Every situation is different. Examining your situation is more helpful than relying on an assumption that all educational investments are wise. Identify the precise skills, knowledge, or credential you hope to gain by going back to school and how your career with benefit. Remember that the cost of tuition does not always reflect the full cost such as lost salary or time out of the workforce. Explore cheaper options if they still archive your overall objectives. A cheaper degree from a less prestigious university may meet 95% of the outcomes you want. Consider how your employer may support your educational investments. Some companies will consider sponsoring some of your educational expenses if you make a formal request. Resources Mentioned The Great Money Reset: Change Your Work, Change Your Wealth, Change Your Life* by Jill Schlesinger Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Four Rules to Get Control of Your Money, with Jesse Mecham (episode 356) Dumb Things Smart People Do With Money, with Jill Schlesinger (episode 396) The Way Into Better Conversations About Wealth, with Kristin Keffeler (episode 606) Seven Steps to Landing Professional Development Funding (MemberCast) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
03/04/2340m 6s

623: How to Align an Employee to a Role, with Jonathan Raymond

Jonathan Raymond: Good Authority Jonathan spent 20 years building careers in business development and personal growth before realizing he could have the best of both worlds by starting his own company. Now, he uses those skills to advise CEOs and organizational leaders on how to create a people-first culture that drives results. As the founder of Refound, his goal is to provide clients with a partner they can trust and programs that gives managers an experience of how they can make work a better place, one conversation at a time. He’s the author of the book Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For*. He's also the creator of the Accountability Dial, used daily by many of our members and listeners to open up more healthy dialogue inside of their teams and organizations. It may seem like you’ve had the same conversation about 17 times, but again you have an employee asking you, “Wait? Is this thing we’re talking about supposed to be part of my job?” You again clarify their role, but you’re also thinking in the back of your mind, “Really? We’re having this conversation again?” In this episode, Jonathan and I discuss four questions to ask of yourself — and your employee — to align them with the role. Key Points Mangers often complain that employees do not have clarity on their roles. Separate the role from the person. Depersonalizing the role actually helps you to have a better alignment conversation. What do you want employees to be owning, thinking about, and worrying about? Those are windows into the Soul of the Role. There are three steps to role alignment: defining the role, aligning the role with the employee, and sustaining the dialogue about the role. Four questions that will help you define a role: What is the purpose of this role? What makes someone successful in this role? What are three priorities for this role in the next 90 days? Where are their decision-making rights? Resources Mentioned Refound Academy: Good Authority, Good Alignment, and Good Accountability courses Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For* by Jonathan Raymond Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian (episode 567) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
27/03/2339m 12s

622: The Way to Manage an Over-Confident Team Member, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide. Listener Questions Susan asked about assessing the difference between an employee who has addressable gaps in their skills and knowledge versus when they are in over their head. Elizabeth asked our advice on managing a team member who appears over-confident in their abilities…and how to hold them accountable. Steve wondered how we handle household tasks between the two of us in the midst of our busy schedules. Resources Mentioned Analyzing Performance Problems* by Robert Mager and Peter Pipe The Alignment Problem by Brian Christian Wonder Tools by Jeremy Kaplan The Home Edit by Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin Related Episodes The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284) How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
20/03/2335m 4s

621: How to Approach a Reorg, with Claire Hughes Johnson

Claire Hughes Johnson: Scaling People Claire Hughes Johnson is a corporate officer and advisor for Stripe, a global technology company that builds economic infrastructure for the internet. She previously served as Stripe’s Chief Operating Officer, helping the company grow from fewer than 200 employees to more than 8,000. Prior to Stripe, Claire spent 10 years at Google leading various business teams, including overseeing aspects of Gmail, Google Apps, and consumer operations. She is a board member at Hallmark Cards, The Atlantic, Ameresco, and HubSpot. Claire also serves as a trustee and the current board president of Milton Academy. She is the author of Scaling People: Tactics for Management and Company Building*. You are charged with leading a reorg, but do you know the mindset, actions, and steps to take? In this conversation, Claire and I explore some of the key lessons she’s discovered as an executive leader in a quickly growing enterprise. We discuss the key triggers for a reorg, the three phases of reorganization, and common pitfalls leaders should avoid. Key Points Reorganizations or restructurings and often seen as a sign of a problem, but that's not always the case. Why reorganize? Two triggers: (1) your team structure doesn't match your strategy and/or (2) you have a talent issue. While there are times to go slower, the bias should be to move with haste. Don't leave ice cream on the counter for too long. Be very cautious about creating structure around a single individual. Three phases of a reorg: Phase 0: Decide whether you need a reorg and determine your new structure. Phase 1: Get buy-in from the key people who need to be involved. Phase 2: Create a communications plan and inform all of those affected. Resources Mentioned Scaling People: Tactics for Management and Company Building* by Claire Hughes Johnson Transitions* by William Bridges Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Manage Former Peers, with Tom Henschel (episode 257) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) How to Solve the Toughest Problems, with Wendy Smith (episode 612) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
13/03/2339m 37s

620: How to Respond When You Get Triggered, with Sally Helgesen

Sally Helgesen: Rising Together Sally Helgesen has been cited by Forbes as the world’s premier expert on women’s leadership. She is a best-selling author, speaker and leadership coach. She has been named by Thinkers50 as one of the world’s top 20 coaches and ranked number 6 among the world’s thought leaders by Global Gurus. She is the author of several books, including The Female Advantage: Women’s Ways of Leadership and The Female Vision: Women’s Real Power at Work. Her book The Web of Inclusion: A New Architecture for Building Great Organizations, was cited in The Wall Street Journal as one of the best books on leadership of all time and is credited with bringing the language of inclusion into business. She co-authored How Women Rise, with executive coach Marshall Goldsmith, examining the behaviors most likely to get in the way of successful women. Her newest book is Rising Together: How We Can Bridge Divides and Create a More Inclusive Workplace*. When we get triggered, our default response tends to be either venting about it to others or suffering in silence. In this conversation, Sally and I explore how to respond in a more useful way. She invites us to consider being less invested in our initial response, creating an alternative script, and finding a path forward to influence different behavior. Key Points When we get triggered, our tendency is to either vent about it or suffer in silence. Being overly invested in our first response limits our ability to respond better. This is the authenticity trap. Create an alternative, positive script that helps your own mental well-being and precipitates a more helpful action. Whether the alternative script is true or not isn’t the point. The aim is to find the line between not humiliating the other party and also not letting a poor behavior be unaddressed. Wisdom from Sun Tzu: indirection or redirection to disarm an opponent is preferable to the direct engagement of combat. Resources Mentioned Rising Together: How We Can Bridge Divides and Create a More Inclusive Workplace by Sally Helgesen Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) How to Create Inclusive Hiring Practices, with Ruchika Tulshyan (episode 589) How to Respond Better When Challenged, with Dolly Chugh (episode 615) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
06/03/2337m 14s

619: Finding Leadership Confidence Through Diverse Perspectives, with Kathy Fiddler

Kathy Fiddler: TidalHealth Kathy Fiddler is the Vice President of Population Health for TidalHealth, a non-profit two hospital health care system on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She has been instrumental in building community programs supporting improved access to healthcare services on the lower shore. Kathy is a registered nurse and a retired Major in the United States Air Force Reserve. She served for 26 years in the US and abroad and supported Operation Restore Hope, Operation Desert Storm, and Operation Enduring Freedom. She is also a lifetime member of the Reserve Officers Association and a board member for the United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore. In 2019, she was recognized as one of the Top 100 Women in Maryland. She's also an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this conversation, Kathy and I discuss her career growth over time from mostly clinical and operational work to leading at the executive level. We explore how being intentional about surrounding oneself with a diverse set of voices helps to both build confidence and surface better outcomes. Finally, we look at how working through discomfort in service of others can help us to make the world better through our work. Key Points The work of a leader is very different than the operational and technical work most of us did earlier in our careers. Having a smaller meeting before a larger meeting can help a more introverted leader engage in the way they want. We sometimes sell ourselves short by concluding we won’t add value. By leaning into that discomfort, we find it’s often the case that others struggle with similar fears. Shifting from having the right answers to asking the right questions will help a leader to uncover what may have been unsaid that’s critical. Finding communities of other leaders helps you to find the diversity of perspective to support you building your own confidence. Related Episodes Create Margin Through Intentional Leadership, with Amy McPherson (episode 429) Personal Leadership is a Journey, with Michal Holliday (episode 436) Lead Best by Being You, with Elena Kornoff (episode 474) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
04/03/2337m 24s

618: Leadership Through the Complexity of Current Events, with Adi Ignatius

Adi Ignatius: Harvard Business Review Adi Ignatius is Editor in Chief of the Harvard Business Review Group, where he oversees the editorial activities of Harvard Business Review, hbr.org, and HBR’s book-publishing unit. Prior to joining Harvard Business Review in 2009, he was the No. 2 editor at TIME. He is the editor of two books: President Obama: The Path to the White House and Prisoner of the State: The Secret Diaries of Premier Zhao Ziyang. Both made The New York Times Bestseller List. Adi lived and worked for nearly 20 years overseas. He was Editor of Time’s Asian edition and earlier served as Beijing Bureau Chief and Moscow Bureau Chief for The Wall Street Journal. He is also host of the HBR Channel. It is the 100th anniversary of Harvard Business Review. Should leaders and organizations take a stand on current events, politics, or causes? Adi and I discuss this tough question in detail. While the answer will be different for every leader, we invite you to begin thinking about how you might approach this in your work. Key Points The traditional advice of “Don’t talk about politics and religion” is still the norm in some places, but increasingly leaders and being more vocal. Silence used to be the default. Silence now many send a message that leaders and organizations don't intend to convey. While every leader needs to decide how they will navigate this, beware your feelings of certainty. Resources Mentioned Harvard Business Review Related Episodes Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos (episode 581) How to Begin Difficult Conversations About Race, with Kwame Christian (episode 594) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
27/02/2334m 46s

617: How to Start a Big Leadership Role, with Carol Kauffman

Carol Kauffman: Real-Time Leadership Carol Kauffman is an international leader in the field of coaching and has more than 40,000 hours of practice. Her clients are C-level leaders and their teams or elite athletes and creatives. She was shortlisted by Thinkers 50 as one of the top eight coaches around the globe for her thought leadership, entrepreneurial spirit, and contribution to coaching best practices. She is a founding member of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches and ranked the number one leadership coach in the world. She founded the Institute of Coaching with a $2 million gift from the Harnisch Foundation. Carol is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, a visiting professor at Henley Business School, and a senior leadership adviser at Egon Zehnder. At Harvard she launched the annual Coaching in Leadership and Healthcare Conference, one of the school's most highly attended events. Her professional development program, Leader as Coach, won Harvard’s inaugural Program Award for Culture of Excellence in Mentoring and has been rolled out throughout the United States. She was also the founding editor-in-chief of Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research, and Practice. Carol is co-author with David Noble of Real-Time Leadership: Find Your Winning Moves When the Stakes are High*. In this conversation, Carol and I explore the mindsets and tactics that are helpful when taking on a new, big leadership role. We discuss how vision, resolution, scope, and altitude play a key role in your success early on. Plus, we invite listeners to consider the importance of peer relationships and recognizing how others see you as your role begins. Key Points Having the right altitude often means looking much more broadly at the organization and moving past a subconscious bias towards your old role or department. The “subject matter expert trap” is a common one. Your awareness will help you avoid it — or recognize it faster. Good peer relationships are one of the strongest predicators of success in a new role. Make time to build these critical connections. Learning to accept recognition is a key competency for an executive leader. Treat it as you would receiving any kind of gift. Have an enterprise mindset and remember that people perceive you as representing the organization vs. just yourself. Thinking like the entity can help you show up in the way you intend. Resources Mentioned Real-Time Leadership: Find Your Winning Moves When the Stakes are High* by Carol Kauffman and David Noble Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Manage Former Peers, with Tom Henschel (episode 257) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) How to Genuinely Show Up for Others, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 590) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
20/02/2339m 24s

616: How to Discover What Others Value, with Joe Hart

Joe Hart: Take Command Joe Hart began his career as a practicing attorney. After taking a Dale Carnegie Course, Joe reassessed his career path and future, ultimately leaving the practice of law, going to work for a top real estate company, and then founding an innovative e-learning company and serving as president of health and wellness company. In 2015, Joe was named president and CEO of Dale Carnegie. The CEO Forum Group named Joe as one of twelve transformative leaders, giving him the Transformative CEO Leadership Award in the category of the People. He is the host of a top global podcast, Take Command: A Dale Carnegie Podcast, and he speaks around the world on topics such as leadership, resilience, and innovation. He is the author with Michael Crom of Take Command: Find Your Inner Strength, Build Enduring Relationships, and Live the Life You Want*. In this conversation, Joe and I explore how to discover another person’s values through meaningful conversation. We examine three types of questions to ask that gradually illuminate what’s important to another person. By knowing what to ask and what to listen for, we can uncover values without asking a more awkward question like, “What are your values?” Key Points Dale Carnegie invited us to, “Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.” Use three types of questions to frame a conversation that uncovers another person’s values: Examples of factual questions: How did you first find out about…? What keeps you busy during the week? What do you like to do for fun? What hobby or activity holds your interest? Examples of causative questions: What got you interesting in doing this kind of work? How did you get involved in that hobby? What do you like about…? What caused you to enter into this industry? Examples of values-based questions: Tell me about someone who’s had a major impact on your life. If you had to do it over again, what — if anything — would you do differently? Tell me about a turning point in your career. Tell about about something that you look back on as a high point or moment of pride. How did you get through a major challenge in the past? How would you describe your personal philosophy in a sentence or two? Resources Mentioned Take Command: Find Your Inner Strength, Build Enduring Relationships, and Live the Life You Want* by Joe Hart and Michael Crom Related Episodes Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) Discover Who You Are, with Hortense le Gentil (episode 459) How to Genuinely Show Up for Others, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 590) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.
13/02/2336m 48s

615: How to Respond Better When Challenged, with Dolly Chugh

Dolly Chugh: A More Just Future Dolly Chugh is a social psychologist and management professor at the New York University Stern School of Business where she teaches MBA courses in leadership and management. She was one of six professors chosen from thousands at NYU to receive the Distinguished Teaching Award in 2020 and one of five to receive the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award in 2013. She has been named an SPSP Fellow, received the Academy of Management Best Paper award, and been named one of the top 100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics by Ethisphere Magazine. Her first book, The Person You Mean to Be has received rave praise from Adam Grant, Angela Duckworth, Liz Wiseman, Billie Jean King, and many others. She is the author of A More Just Future: Psychological Tools for Reckoning with our Past and Driving Social Change. All of us know that we will be challenged by others. Sometimes how we see ourselves limits what we could do to change our behavior. In this conversation, Dolly and I discuss how we can do better and the mindset and actions that will help us move forward. Key Points There’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing. Nostalgia feels good to many of us, but can get in the way of us seeing the “ands” in situations and experiences. When we are challenged, especially in the context of identity, our tendency is either to deny, distance, or dismantle. Feeling of guilt and shame are indicators that there is an opportunity to change. The goal is not to avoid them, but to use them as a starting point for different behavior. Use values affirmations to give you a booster shot to prepare for the inevitable challenges ahead. These affirmations will help you respond in a more healthy way for everyone. Resources Mentioned Dear Good People newsletter by Dolly Chugh TED talk: How to let go of being a "good" person -- and become a better person by Dolly Chugh The Person You Mean to Be* by Dolly Chugh A More Just Future* by Dolly Chugh Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) How to Help People Engage in Growth, with Whitney Johnson (episode 576) How to Solve the Toughest Problems, with Wendy Smith (episode 612) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
06/02/2337m 53s

614: The Way to Get Noticed by Key Stakeholders, with Daphne E. Jones

Daphne E. Jones: Win When They Say You Won't Daphne E. Jones has 30 years of experience in general management and executive level roles at IBM, Johnson & Johnson, Hospira, and General Electric but began her career as a secretary. At GE, she served as Senior Vice President for Future of Work, Senior Vice President & Chief Information Officer for Product Engineering, Imaging, and Ultrasound, and as Senior Executive & Chief Information Officer for Global Services, all of which composed a $13 billion segment of GE Healthcare. She serves on the board of directors for AMN Healthcare, Inc., Barnes Group Inc., and Masonite International Corp. She is the recipient of numerous domestic and international awards and recently started a company that teaches leaders how to prepare to serve on boards. She is the author of Win When They Say You Won't: Break Through Barriers and Keep Leveling Up Your Success*. In this conversation, Daphne invites us to look at ourselves through the lens of a product, just as others will view us. We discuss the three critical elements of how stakeholders view you. Plus, Daphne and I explore the steps you can take to improve how you’re perceived through the different lenses that stakeholders see us through. Key Points Stakeholders are crucial for your success and it’s helpful for you to view yourself in their eyes (and yours) as a product. Three elements are key: performance is doing your job well, image is how people describe you, and exposure is who knows you. When you get radio silence in the context of happenings inside of your organization, that’s an indicator you are underexposed. Caution: you can also be overexposed. Map your stakeholders in the context of their influence in your work and their interest in how it supports their own objectives. Mentors will make suggestions of things you should try. Find the part that will work for you and move on the advice. Resources Mentioned Win When They Say You Won't: Break Through Barriers and Keep Leveling Up Your Success* by Daphne E. Jones To receive a free workbook, send receipt of your book purchase to daphne@daphneejones.com Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) How to Support Women of Color, with Minda Harts (episode 506) The Art of Mentoring Well, with Robert Lefkowitz (episode 599) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
30/01/2339m 34s

613: How to Lead Better Through Complexity, with Jennifer Garvey Berger

Jennifer Garvey Berger: Unleashing Your Complexity Genius Jennifer believes that leadership is one of the most vital renewable resources in the world. She designs and teaches leadership programs, coaches senior teams, and supports new ways of thinking about strategy and people. In her three highly acclaimed books, Unlocking Leadership Mindtraps, Simple Habits for Complex Times (co-authored with Keith Johnston), and Changing on the Job, she builds on deep theoretical knowledge to offer practical ways to make leaders’ work more meaningful and their lives more fun. She has worked with senior leaders in the private, non-profit, and government sectors around the world with organizations like Novartis, Google, KPMG, Intel, Microsoft, Wikimedia, and the New Zealand Department of Conservation. Jennifer also supports executives one-on-one as a leadership coach. Over the last decade, she has developed the Growth Edge Coaching approach. She supports clients to find their current growing edge and then make choices about how they want to develop. She teaches coaches around the world transformational and developmental coaching approaches in her Growth Edge Coaching certification series. Jennifer speaks at leadership and coaching conferences, and she offers courses for coaches at universities all over the world. She is the co-author with Carolyn Coughlin of Unleash Your Complexity Genius: Growing Your Inner Capacity to Lead*. In this conversation, Jennifer and I discuss the reality that most of us don’t like uncertainty. That makes experimenting with new ideas and actions in complex environments very challenging. We uncover several practices that can help us benefit from experimentation in the midst of complexity and grow from these experiences. Key Points Complicated situations are hard, but have a clear answer (such as how to send humans to the moon). In contract, complex situations are dynamic; yesterday’s answer may not work tomorrow. Most of us really dislike complexity, to the extent that that people with terminal diseases are happier than those who will likely recover. Step-by-step approaches don’t work in very complex situations. Instead, take action through thoughtful experimentation. When experimenting, release your attachment to outcomes. Lean into humility and don’t shy away from endings. Putting end dates on experiments helps us move forward — and sometimes remove what isn’t working. Resources Mentioned Unleash Your Complexity Genius: Growing Your Inner Capacity to Lead* by Jennifer Garvey Berger and Carolyn Coughlin Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273) How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476) Help Your Brain Learn, with Lisa Feldman Barrett (episode 513) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
23/01/2337m 47s

612: How to Solve the Toughest Problems, with Wendy Smith

Wendy Smith: Both/And Thinking Wendy Smith is the Dana J. Johnson Professor of Management and faculty director of the Women’s Leadership Initiative at the Lerner College of Business and Economics, University of Delaware. She earned her PhD in organizational behavior at Harvard Business School, where she began her intensive research on strategic paradoxes—how leaders and senior teams effectively respond to contradictory, yet interdependent demands. She has received the Web of Science Highly Cited Research Award for being among the 1 percent most-cited researchers in her field and received the Decade Award from the Academy of Management Review for the most cited paper in the past 10 years. Her work has been published in such journals as Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Harvard Business Review, Organization Science, and Management Science. She has taught at the University of Delaware, Harvard, and Wharton while helping senior leaders and middle managers all over the world address issues of interpersonal dynamics, team performance, organizational change, and innovation. She is the author with Marianne Lewis of Both/And Thinking: Embracing Creative Tensions to Solve Your Toughest Problems. In this episode, Wendy and I discuss the dangers of either/or thinking and how that tendency limits our effectiveness. We explore how to shift to both/and thinking in order to resolve the most challenging problems. Plus, we share key tactics that will help us do this in more practical ways. Key Points Framing a decision as an either/or will often minimize short-term anxiety, but limits creative and innovative long-term possibilities. While easy to see both/and opportunities for others, we’re likely to approach things as either/or when it’s ourselves. An outside perspective from someone who’s not emotionally connected is helpful. Changing the question we are asking is the most powerful to navigate paradoxes. Moving up a level when facing tough decisions can help us see the big picture. Consider shifting from “making a choice” to “choosing” in order to lead us towards better outcomes. Resources Mentioned Both/And Thinking: Embracing Creative Tensions to Solve Your Toughest Problems* by Wendy Smith and Marianne Lewis Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) The Leadership Struggles We See, with Muriel Wilkins (episode 559) How to Quit Bad Stuff Faster, with Annie Duke (episode 607) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
16/01/2337m 20s

611: The Power of Courage in Leadership Growth, with Jorge Alzate

Jorge Alzate Jorge Alzate is a senior R&D manager at PepsiCo, an active leader in Toastmasters, and an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this conversation, Jorge and I discuss what brought him to the podcast, how he utilized the Academy to help his career move forward, and the critical nature of courage for leadership growth. Key Points One action a day (the blue marbles for Jorge) is the way to create a new habit that can develops into a skill. Accountability is key to move us forward, even if it does not feel comfortable in the moment. Courage is the ability to act in spite of fear — and almost always necessary before confidence. Resources Mentioned Feel the Fear...and Do It Anyway* by Susan Jeffers Winning Conditions: How to Achieve the Professional Success You Deserve by Managing the Details That Matter* by Christine Hofbeck Related Episodes Leadership Through Consistency, with Joseph Getuno (episode 490) How to Build Confidence, with Katy Milkman (episode 533) How to Protect Your Confidence, with Nate Zinsser (episode 573) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
14/01/2333m 35s

610: How to Help Team Members Find the Right Work, with Patrick Lencioni

Patrick Lencioni: The 6 Types of Working Genius Patrick Lencioni is founder and president of The Table Group, a firm dedicated to protecting human dignity in the world of work, personal development, and faith. Pat’s passion for organizations and teams is reflected in his writing, speaking, executive consulting, and most recently his three podcasts, At the Table with Patrick Lencioni, The Working Genius Podcast, and The Simple Reminder. Pat is the author of twelve best-selling books with over seven million copies sold. After twenty years in print, his classic book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team remains a weekly fixture on national best-seller lists. He has been featured in numerous publications, including the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, USA Today, Inc. magazine, and Chief Executive magazine. He is the author of The 6 Types of Working Genius: A Better Way to Understand Your Gifts, Your Frustrations, and Your Team. Many of us have heard the invitation from Jim Collin’s book Good to Great to get the right people on the bus. But once the right people are on the bus, how to do you find the right seat for each person? On this episode, Pat and I discuss how to utilize the Working Genius model to find the right work for the right team members. Key Points When addressing burnout, the type of work someone does is more significant than the volume of work. Three stages of work are present for almost every team: ideation, activation, and implementation. A cup of coffee in an excellent thermos can stay hot an entire day — that’s true of us when we’re aligned with our working geniuses. Finding the right work for a team member is far easier than finding the right person culturally. Before you look elsewhere, be sure they are in the right seat. To fill gaps in your team’s geniuses, you can hire, borrow, or find people where competence will suffice for now. Resist the temptation to immediately jump to hiring. Resources Mentioned The 6 Types of Working Genius assessment The 6 Types of Working Genius: A Better Way to Understand Your Gifts, Your Frustrations, and Your Team by Patrick Lencioni Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 301) How to Lead an Offsite, with Tom Henschel (episode 377) The Mindset Leaders Need to Address Burnout, with Christina Maslach (episode 609) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
09/01/2339m 13s

609: How Proactive Leadership Can Navigate Inflation, with Ram Charan

Ram Charan: Leading Through Inflation Ram Charan is a bestselling author, teacher, and world-renowned advisor to CEOs and other business leaders of some of the world’s best-known companies. His work is often behind the scenes and focused on highly sensitive and fate-making issues. Fortune magazine published a profile of Ram in which it called him “the most influential consultant alive.” His book Execution, lauded for its practicality, spent more than 150 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Ram’s energetic, interactive teaching style has won him several awards, including from GE’s famous Crotonville Institute and Northwestern. Ram was elected a Distinguished Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources and was named one of the most influential people in corporate governance and the board room by Directorship magazine. He has served on the Blue Ribbon Commission on Corporate Governance and serves or has served on a dozen boards in the U.S., Brazil, China, India, Canada, and Dubai. He is the author with Geri Willigan of Leading Through Inflation: And Recession And Stagflation. In this conversation, Ram and I explore the changing macroeconomic environment and what leaders can do to address it. We discuss the importance of managing cash well and how pricing decisions can be made effectively. Plus, we discuss the critical nature of partnerships throughout the supply chain — and where the opportunities may be in the midst of challenge. Key Points Inflation consumes cash. Cash management is the number one risk to an organization during this time. The way to get ahead of the curve is to be predictive vs. reactive. This may be a time the existing business model needs to change. Inflation creates an illusion of growth. It’s important to adjust for this in all reporting and planning. Work with all sides of the value chain. Help customers deal with rising costs while also working closely with suppliers. Regular communication is essential. Smaller, regular price adjustments are better than less frequent, larger increases. Resist the temptation to offer less for the same price. Resources Mentioned Leading Through Inflation: And Recession And Stagflation* by Ram Charan and Geri Willigan. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Improve Your Financial Intelligence, with Joe Knight (episode 244) How to Approach Corporate Budgeting, with Jody Wodrich (episode 355) How to Multiply Your Impact, with Liz Wiseman (episode 554) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
19/12/2225m 2s

608: The Mindset Leaders Need to Address Burnout, with Christina Maslach

Christina Maslach: The Burnout Challenge Christina Maslach is the pioneer of research on job burnout, producing the standard assessment tool called the Maslach Burnout Inventory, award-winning articles, and several books, beginning with Burnout: The Cost of Caring, in 1982. Her research achievements over the past five decades have led to multiple awards from the National Academy of Sciences, Western Psychological Association, Society for Personality and Social Psychology, and many others. Christina has received awards for her outstanding teaching, including USA Professor of the Year in 1997. She has been a Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley since 1971. Christina is now a core researcher at the Healthy Workplaces Center, at Berkeley, and the author along with Michael Leiter of The Burnout Challenge: Managing People's Relationships With Their Jobs*. In this conversation, Christina and I address the reality that burnout is often perceived as an issue with just the individual. We explore how leaders can begin to look at the larger picture: context, culture, and management, in order to address burnout more proactively. We discuss key mindsets that will help and a few tactics that almost every leader can use to get started. Key Points The canary in the coal mine is an indicator of a problem, not the source of it. Our tendency is to focus on the person (the figure) and to miss all the context and environment factors (the ground). Burnout is first and foremost a management issue. “Fixing” the person should not be the focus — instead, get curious about where there is a mismatch. Instead of focusing on what’s wrong with the person, shift to what may be wrong in the relationship between the person and situation. Ensure you have a plan for communicated survey results. If you’d done surveys previously, share those results and also the actions the organization had taken before engaging in more surveys. Resources Mentioned The Burnout Challenge: Managing People's Relationships With Their Jobs* by Christina Maslach and Michael Leiter Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Gallup Findings on the Changing Nature of Work, with Jim Harter (episode 409) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) How to Compare Yourself to Others, with Mollie West Duffy (episode 582) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
12/12/2238m 46s

607: How to Quit Bad Stuff Faster, with Annie Duke

Annie Duke: Quit Annie Duke is an author, corporate speaker, and consultant in the decision-making space, as well as Special Partner focused on Decision Science at First Round Capital Partners, a seed stage venture fund. Her previous book, Thinking in Bets, is a national bestseller. As a former professional poker player, she has won more than $4 million in tournament poker. During her career, Annie won a World Series of Poker bracelet and is the only woman to have won the World Series of Poker Tournament of Champions and the NBC National Poker Heads-Up Championship. She retired from the game in 2012. Prior to becoming a professional poker player, she was awarded a National Science Foundation Fellowship to study Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Annie is the co-founder of The Alliance for Decision Education, a non-profit whose mission is to improve lives by empowering students through decision skills education. She is a member of the National Board of After-School All-Stars and the Board of Directors of the Franklin Institute. She also serves on the board of the Renew Democracy Initiative. Annie is the author of Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away*. We’ve all heard the lie that, “Winners never quit and quitters never win.” In reality, one of the best practices to develop is how to recognize more quickly when you should quit something that’s not working. In this conversation, Annie and I discuss how to set kill criteria for yourself and frame goals in more helpful ways to know when quitting is the best answer. Key Points Kenny Rogers was right; professional poker players know that a big part of success is quitting approximately 75% of the time. “Quit while you’re ahead” is often poor advice since we tend to quit too early when good things are happening. On the contrary, we tend to quit too late when we’ve accumulated sunk cost. Determine kill criteria in advance when you’re not as likely to be swayed by the emotions of the moment. The best criteria contain both a state and a date. Find someone who loves you but doesn’t care about your feelings. Trust and permission are essential to open up these kinds of conversations. Effective goals include at least one “unless…” Resources Mentioned Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away* by Annie Duke Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) How to Build Confidence, with Katy Milkman (episode 533) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
05/12/2238m 45s

606: The Way Into Better Conversations About Wealth, with Kristin Keffeler

Kristin Keffeler: The Myth of the Silver Spoon Kristin Keffeler is a thought leader and consultant at the forefront of a global shift in family wealth advising, known as Wealth 3.0. She guides affluent and enterprising families, the rising generation, and the professionals who support them in embracing the positive power of wealth, aligning their vision with their impact. As the founder of Illumination360, she specializes in human motivation and behavioral change, family dynamics, family governance, rising generation education and development, and intergenerational collaboration. She is the Dean of Positive Psychology for the Purposeful Planning Institute, sits on the Board of Advisors for the Bailey Program for Family Enterprise at the University of Denver, is a faculty member with the Ultra-High Net Worth Institute, a certified trainer with 21/64, a national nonprofit for advancing multigenerational philanthropy, and is the co-founder of Beneficiary Bootcamp. She is the author of The Myth of the Silver Spoon: Navigating Family Wealth & Creating an Impactful Life*. In this conversation, Kristin and I discuss a reality that’s true for almost every leader: whether we have wealth ourselves, almost all of us interact with wealthy people. We explore some of the myths of wealth to understand the psychological challenges that wealth often brings. Plus, we learn from what works (and doesn’t) for wealthy families so that we can have better conversations about wealth in our own families. Key Points While wealth brings resources, it also brings psychological challenges for many people with wealth. More money doesn't equal happiness. Small inheritances can increase happiness, but large ones do not. Many people with wealth find close relationships a bit of a struggle. While our perception may be that the most wealthy are selfish and greedy, more often individuals (especially next generations) tend to under-identify with family wealth. Ground decisions in values that align with a vision of thriving. There’s a huge difference in the next generation having a little bit of ownership in a financial event vs. not having any ownership. Resources Mentioned The Myth of the Silver Spoon: Navigating Family Wealth & Creating an Impactful Life* by Kristin Keffeler Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Reduce Drama With Kids, with Tina Payne Bryson (episode 310) Dumb Things Smart People Do With Money, with Jill Schlesinger (episode 396) The Way to Build Wealth, with Chris Hogan (episode 502) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
28/11/2235m 37s

605: How to Discover Self-Awareness Through Enneagram, with Ian Morgan Cron

Ian Morgan Cron: The Road Back to You Ian Morgan Cron is a bestselling author, speaker, trained psychotherapist, songwriter, and Episcopal priest, but he may be best known for popularizing the Enneagram. The Enneagram is a personality typing system identifying nine types of people and how they relate to one another and the world. His popular Enneagram book, The Road Back to You* gave fresh language and interest in this assessment. Ian enjoys sharing about the Enneagram with audiences of all sizes because of its power for igniting personal growth, and how it can enrich our personal and professional lives. His newest book The Story of You* helps people go a step further, using Enneagram wisdom to uncover and rewrite our own false narratives so we can live life more fully. In this conversation, Ian and I look at the core aspects of the Enneagram model and how it can help us understand ourselves better so we can also support others more effectively. We highlight the nine Enneagram types and their key traits and distinctions. Then, we discuss how the first steps leaders might take in order to start raising their own self-awareness. Key Points Too often we believe that how we see the world is “normal” instead of recognizing that there are many normal ways to see the world. Personality is like the rooms of our home. We have a favorite room but we still use all the other rooms when its appropriate. The 9 Enneagram Types The Perfectionist - Ethical, dedicated and reliable, they are motivated by a desire to live the right way, improve the world, and avoid fault and blame. The Helper - Warm, caring and giving, they are motivated by a need to be loved and needed, and to avoid acknowledging their own needs. The Performer (or Achiever) - Success-oriented, image-conscious and wired for productivity, they are motivated by a need to be (or appear to be) successful and to avoid failure. The Romantic (or Individualist) - Creative, sensitive and moody, they are motivated by a need to be understood, experience their oversized feelings and avoid being ordinary. The Investigator - Analytical, detached and private, they are motivated by a need to gain knowledge, conserve energy and avoid relying on others. The Loyalist - Committed, practical and witty, they are worst-case-scenario thinkers who are motivated by fear and the need for security. The Enthusiast - Fun, spontaneous and adventurous, they are motivated by a need to be happy, to plan stimulating experiences and to avoid pain. The Challenger - Commanding, intense and confrontational, they are motivated by a need to be strong and avoid feeling weak or vulnerable. The Peacemaker - Pleasant, laid back and accommodating, they are motivated by a need to keep the peace, merge with others and avoid conflict. Resources Mentioned The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery* by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile The Story of You: An Enneagram Journey to Becoming Your True Self* by Ian Morgan Cron Take the Integrative Enneagram iEQ9 Typology Institute Enneagram courses Related Episodes Enhance Your Self-Awareness, with Daniel Goleman (episode 353) The Way to Be More Self-Aware, with Tasha Eurich (episode 442) Discover Who You Are, with Hortense le Gentil (episode 459) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
21/11/2237m 13s

604: How Remote Teams Build Belonging, with Gustavo Razzetti

Gustavo Razzetti: Remote Not Distant Gustavo Razzetti is the CEO and founder of Fearless Culture, a culture design consultancy that helps teams do the best work of their lives. For more than 20 years, he has helped leaders from Fortune 500s, startups, nonprofits, and everything in between. He is also the creator of the Culture Design Canvas, a framework used by thousands of teams and organizations across the world to map, assess, and design their culture. In addition to his consulting work, Gustavo regularly speaks with leaders and teams about culture change, teamwork, and hybrid workplaces. He is the author of four books on culture change. His most recent book is Remote Not Distant: Design a Company Culture That Will Help You Thrive in a Hybrid Workplace*. In this conversation, Gustavo and I explore the critical nature of trust for building belonging on hybrid and remote teams. We examine the principles of psychological safety and how this matters just as much in digital collaboration. Perhaps most importantly, we look at several tactics to open up trust that will help us pave the ways towards team belonging. Key Points Hybrid work environments have the potential to be the best of both words, but in some places it is now worse. Trust is between individuals. Psychological safety is about how safe we feel with a team. It’s helpful to think of building psychological safety like climbing a ladder. Ironically, the higher you go on the ladder, the safer you feel taking risks. Welcoming questions such as “What's your superpower?” and “What's your kryptonite?” can be useful starting points for building trust. Metaphors are often a powerful way to entire into more complex, emotional discussion without feeling unsafe. Resources Mentioned Remote Not Distant: Design a Company Culture That Will Help You Thrive in a Hybrid Workplace* by Gustavo Razzetti Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
14/11/2237m 29s

603: Where to Start When Inheriting a Team in Crisis, with Lynn Perry Wooten

Lynn Perry Wooten: The Prepared Leader Lynn Perry Wooten is a seasoned academic and an expert on organizational development and transformation. She became the ninth president of Simmons University on July 1, 2020 and is the first African American to lead the university. Her research specializes in crisis leadership, diversity and inclusion, and positive leadership—organizational behavior that reveals and nurtures the highest level of human potential. Lynn has also had a robust clinical practice, providing leadership development, education, and training for a wide variety of companies and institutions, from the Kellogg Foundation to Harvard University’s Kennedy School, and to Google. She is the coauthor of Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership and the coeditor of Positive Organizing in a Global Society: Understanding and Engaging Differences for Capacity Building and Inclusion. She is also the author with Erika James of The Prepared Leader: Emerge from Any Crisis More Resilient Than Before*. In this conversation, Lynn and I discuss why crises are not isolated events, even through they are often treated that way. We explore the critical nature of trust and how to build it quickly in crisis. We then detail three key areas of trust that will help leaders begin to support a team shift towards better outcomes. Key Points Crises are not single events. They happen again and again, necessitating leaders preparation for them. In normal times, trust is key. In a time of crisis, it’s essential. Regular communication is essential in a crisis. Avoid the tendency to downplay risks. In fact, it’s useful to paint a picture of the worst case scenario. Leaders need to determine is there is a strong sense of a contractual obligation between them and their teams. It’s critical for leaders to assess the competence of their team to be able to respond to the crisis at hand. Frequent, high performance meetings are essential during a time of crisis. Resources Mentioned The Prepared Leader: Emerge from Any Crisis More Resilient Than Before* by Lynn Perry Wooten and Erika James Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Lead in Crisis, with Carol Taylor (episode 55) How to be Diplomatic, with Susan Rice (episode 456) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) The Starting Point for Inclusive Leadership, with Susan MacKenty Brady (episode 584) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
07/11/2236m 0s

602: Moving from Doing to Leading, with Gemma Aguiar

Gemma Aguiar: Design Like Whoa Gemma Aguiar is the CEO of Design Like Whoa. Her firm helps brands like Sephora, Meta, the Golden State Warriors, and Spotify amplify their brand and strengthen their culture through sustainably focused apparel, accessories, and gifts. Her team serves clients by curating meaningful, high-quality products through partnership with local, minority-owned, sustainable, and mission-driven businesses. She's also an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this episode, Gemma and I discuss the transition she made of doing it all herself early on in the business to now empowering a large team. We detail how she made this change tactically through calendar blocking, regular delegation, and intentional outcomes. Plus, we explore how asking for help is a critical muscle for all leaders to develop. Key Points Gemma didn’t see the growth potential in her traditional role, so she started her own, sustainable business. Being able to do lots of things well can be a trap for leaders. Shifting to delegate effectively is key. Getting clear on how time is used through planning and calendar blocking is essential. The responsibility of leadership changes over time. It’s key to be able to learn and adapt as the organization demands a different skillset. Asking for help is a critical competency for leaders. Getting better at this opens tons of doors. Resources Mentioned Design Like Whoa hello@designlikewhoa.com Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) The Way to Capture the Power of Moments, with Chip Heath (episode 329) Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431) How to Define a Role, with Pat Griffin (episode 517) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
05/11/2233m 38s

601: Gallup’s Insights on Addressing Unhappiness, with Jon Clifton

Jon Clifton: Blind Spot Jon Clifton is the CEO of Gallup. His mission is to help 7 billion citizens be heard on their most pressing work and life issues through the Gallup World Poll, a 100-year initiative spanning over 150 countries. He is a nonresident senior fellow at Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion and serves on the boards of directors for Gallup and Young Professionals in Foreign Policy. Jon has been interviewed on BBC News, Axios, C-SPAN’s “Washington Journal,” and Al-Jazeera, and he has testified in front of the U.S. Congress on the state of American small business and entrepreneurship. He is a frequent contributor on Gallup.com and has written for The Hill, The Diplomatic Courier, and The Global Action Report. He is the author of Blind Spot: The Global Rise of Unhappiness and How Leaders Missed It. In this conversation, Jon and I discuss why many objective numbers like GDP appear positive and yet don’t correlate to wellbeing and happiness. We examine how to think about more subjective measures and ways for leaders and organizations to gain insight. Plus, we dialogue about what managers can do to help make genuine connections in the workplace. Key Points While objective trends worldwide such as GDP and the Human Development Index have been positive for decades, people are angrier, sadder, and more worried than ever. There’s a key distinction between how someone sees their life and how someone lives their life. Money does not buy happiness, but it is hard to be happy without it. Frequent conversations, listening, and framing work around strengths are key actions managers can take to address unhappiness with employees. Examples of questions/survey topics to ask of customers to gain insight into emotional attachment: Company always delivers on what they promise. I feel proud to be a Company customer. Company is the perfect company for people like me. Examples of questions/survey topics to ask of suppliers to to gain insight into emotional attachment: Company always treats me with respect. Company is easy to do business with. Company always does what they say they will do. Resources Mentioned Blind Spot: The Global Rise of Unhappiness and How Leaders Missed It* by Jon Clifton CliftonStrengths (formerly StrengthsFinder) assessment Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293) How to Help People Thrive, with Jim Harter (episode 532) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
31/10/2237m 57s

600: How to Discover Meaningful Work, with Scott Anthony Barlow

Scott Anthony Barlow: Happen to Your Career Scott Anthony Barlow wants you to find work you love. He is CEO of Happen To Your Career and host of the Happen to Your Career podcast, which has been listened to over 3 million times across 159 countries and is the largest career change podcast in the world. As a former HR leader, Scott has interviewed over two thousand people for jobs and completely rejects the way most organizations choose to do work. He’s a nerd for self development, human behavior, and ice hockey. He's the author of the book Happen to Your Career: An Unconventional Approach to Career Change and Meaningful Work*. In this conversation, Scott and I discuss the assumptions that many of us bring to finding career happiness — and where those assumptions might lead us astray. We also explore in detail the process that Scott and his team use with clients: career experimenting. In addition, Scott and I share how we’ve used experimenting in our own careers to align with meaning. Key Points People assume that you start with clarity. In actuality, you start with declaring priorities, which is what eventually creates clarity. Taking vacation or an extended break from work is important for many reasons, but it’s not often the activity that creates clarity. Movement and experimenting is the way you move from declaring your priorities to creating clarity. Use career experiments as a way to begin surfacing interests and relationships that will help you to find clarity. Leaders should open the door to career experimentation to support employees in developing themselves inside the organization — or potentially moving onto other opportunities. Resources Mentioned Happen to Your Career: An Unconventional Approach to Career Change and Meaningful Work* by Scott Anthony Barlow Finding the Career That Fits You (Scott’s FREE 8-Day Video Course) Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) Ten Years of Leadership, with Dave Stachowiak (episode 541) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
24/10/2239m 46s

599: The Art of Mentoring Well, with Robert Lefkowitz

Robert Lefkowitz: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Stockholm Robert Lefkowitz is James B. Duke Professor of Medicine and Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry at the Duke University Medical Center. His group spent 15 difficult years developing techniques for labeling the receptors with radioactive drugs and then purifying the four different receptors that were known and thought to exist for adrenaline. In 1986 Bob and his team transformed the understanding of what had become known as G protein coupled receptors, when he and his colleagues cloned the gene for the beta2-adrenergic receptor. Today, more than half of all prescription drug sales are of drugs that target either directly or indirectly the receptors discovered by Bob and his trainees. These include amongst many others beta blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers or ARBs and antihistamines. He has received numerous honors and awards, including the National Medal of Science, the Shaw Prize, the Albany Prize, and the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the author with Randy Hall of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Stockholm: The Adrenaline Fueled Adventures of an Accidental Scientist*. In this conversation, Bob and I explore the important nature of mentoring in his success — and how he has in turn utilized mentoring to support so many colleagues and students. We discuss the importance of building careers around problems versus techniques and other key principles that effective mentors adopt. Plus, we explore the key of ownership of work and using fun as an indicator to follow. Key Points Success is rarely accidental. Most people with extraordinary accomplishments had outstanding mentors along the way. Teach people to build their careers around problems, not techniques. The crucial job of a mentor is to keep things in focus for the person you are mentoring — both in their current work and their careers. People achieve the most motivation when they have ownership over their work. A key measure of striking the right guidance between ownership and guidance is whether or not everybody is having fun. Resources Mentioned A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Stockholm: The Adrenaline Fueled Adventures of an Accidental Scientist* by Robert Lefkowitz Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian (episode 567) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
17/10/2239m 59s

598: The Assumptions That Stop Us From Listening Well, with Oscar Trimboli

Oscar Trimboli: How to Listen Oscar Trimboli is an author, host of the Apple award-winning podcast Deep Listening and a sought-after keynote speaker. He is passionate about using the gift of listening to bring positive change in homes, workplaces, and cultures around the world. Through his work with chairs, boards of directors, and executive teams, Oscar has experienced firsthand the transformational impact leaders and organizations can have when they listen beyond the words. Oscar is a marketing and technology industry veteran with over 30 years experience across general management, sales, marketing, and operations for Microsoft, PeopleSoft, Polycom, Professional Advantage, and Vodafone. He is the author of the book, Deep Listening and now, his newest book, How to Listen: Discover the Hidden Key to Better Communication*. In this conversation, Oscar and I explore several of the assumptions that tend to get in our way of listening well. Oscar highlights distinctions that will be useful mindsets for you in showing up better in future conversations. Plus, we discuss how listing goes far beyond simply asking questions. Key Points Before we begin listening, it is helpful to tune…much like as orchestra. We can’t always give our full attention, but we can make the choice as to whether we are paying attention or giving attention. As much as we intend otherwise, sometimes we listen less well in our closest relationships. Aim to be curious instead of drawing conclusions. Asking questions does not necessarily mean you are listening well. Aimless and arbitrary questions are everywhere. Resources Mentioned How to Listen: Discover the Hidden Key to Better Communication* by Oscar Trimboli Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458) Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500) How to Genuinely Show Up for Others, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 590) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
10/10/2239m 14s

597: How to Help People Speak Truth to Power, with Megan Reitz

Megan Reitz: Speak Up Megan Reitz is Professor of Leadership and Dialogue at Hult International Business School where she speaks, researches, consults and supervises on the intersection of leadership, change, dialogue and mindfulness. She is on the Thinkers50 ranking of global business thinkers and is ranked in HR Magazine’s Most Influential Thinkers listing. She has written Dialogue in Organizations and Mind Time. She is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review and her research has recently featured in Forbes, on the BBC, in TEDx talks, and in numerous academic and practice-based journals. Her latest research on employee activism was nominated for the Thinkers50 Breakthrough Idea Award. Her most recent book with John Higgins is titled Speak Up: Say What Needs to Be Said and Hear What Needs to Be Heard*. Many leaders consider what they need to do in order to speak truth to others, but rarely focus on how to make it easier for people to speak to them. In this conversation, Megan and I explore what leaders can do in order to hear what needs to be heard. We share several tactics that will make it easier for others to surface what you need to hear. Key Points Speaking up and listening up go hand in hand. Power always affects what gets said and what gets heard. A key checkpoint is whether or not you really value the opinion of others. Where you have conversations can make a massive difference on how comfortable the other party is in surfacing an important message for you to hear. Leaders who have margin in their daily schedules create space for the right moment to hear truth. Proactively invite challenge and debate through specific invitations. One example: “What do you know that I need to know, but will never be told?” Resources Mentioned Speak Up: Say What Needs to Be Said and Hear What Needs to Be Heard* by Megan Reitz and John Higgins Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
03/10/2238m 12s

596: The Ways Leadership Can Derail Us, with Bill George

Bill George: True North Bill George is executive fellow at Harvard Business School, where he has taught leadership since 2004. He is the author of four best-selling books: Authentic Leadership, True North, Discover Your True North, and 7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis. He was chair and CEO of Medtronic, the world’s leading medical technology company. Under his leadership, Medtronic’s market capitalization grew from $1.1 billion to $60 billion, averaging 35 percent a year. Bill has served as a director of Goldman Sachs, ExxonMobil, Novartis, Target, the Mayo Clinic, and World Economic Forum USA. He has been named one of the Top 25 Business Leaders of the Past 25 Years by PBS, Executive of the Year by Academy of Management, and Director of the Year by National Association of Corporate Directors. He is the author with Zach Clayton of True North: Leading Authentically in Today's Workplace, Emerging Leader Edition*. We’ve all seen leadership go badly and most of us struggle with tendencies to get pulled off course. In this conversation, Bill and I explore the five most common archetypes that tend to derail leaders and the antidote that prevents them. We also discuss how we can recognize these tendencies in ourselves so that we can do better for others. Key Points Five archetypes of leadership derailment: Imposters: political animals who figure out who their competitors and then eliminate them. Rationalizers: masters of denial who don’t take responsibility themselves. Glory seekers: motivated by the acclaim of the world. Loners: they believe they can make it on their own and reject feedback. Shooting stars: they build shallow foundations and move on quickly to the next things, often avoiding commitment. Antidotes to leadership derailment: Write down the most difficult ethical dilemma you are currently facing and chronicle the “least generous” interpretation of your actions. Project forward a decade and assume the worst: you have derailed in a major failure. Envision the situation in which you could lose your way. Resources Mentioned True North: Leading Authentically in Today's Workplace, Emerging Leader Edition* by Bill George and Zach Clayton Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Discover Your True North, with Bill George (episode 225) Leadership Lies We Tell Ourselves, with Emily Leathers (episode 479) How to Help Your Manager Shine, with David Gergen (episode 588) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
26/09/2234m 24s

595: How to Deal With Passive-Aggressive People, Amy Gallo

Amy Gallo: Getting Along Amy Gallo is an expert in conflict, communication, and workplace dynamics. She combines the latest management research with practical advice to deliver evidence-based ideas on how to improve relationships and excel at work. In her role as a contributing editor at Harvard Business Review, Amy writes about interpersonal dynamics, communicating ideas, leading and influencing people, and building your career. Amy is co-host of HBR's Women at Work podcast and author of both the HBR Guide to Dealing with Conflict and Getting Along: How to Work with Anyone (Even Difficult People)*. In this conversation, Amy and I discuss one of the most common questions she receives from leaders: how do I handle a colleague who’s passive aggressive? We examine what causes this behavior, how to respond to it, and what to avoid that could worsen the relationship. Plus, we discuss the intention that leaders can bring in responding to passive-aggressive behavior that will help everybody move forward. Key Points Don’t use the “passive-aggressive behavior” to label someone. It rarely helps and often results in more defensiveness. Focus on the other person’s underlying concern or question rather than how they are expressing it. Not everyone is able to discuss thoughts and feelings openly. Consider doing hypothesis testing to determine what’s next. Language like, “Here’s the story I’m telling myself…” can help everyone move forward without assigning blame. When making a direct request, stick to the facts. Review past behavior like you’re a referee vs. a fan. Artificial harmony is a danger spot for teams and leaders. Setting norms can help to reduce passive-aggressive behavior. Resources Mentioned Getting Along: How to Work with Anyone (Even Difficult People)* by Amy Gallo Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500) How to Prepare for Conflict, with Amy Gallo (episode 530) The Way to Get People Talking, with Andrew Warner (episode 560) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
19/09/2239m 53s

594: How to Begin Difficult Conversations About Race, with Kwame Christian

Kwame Christian: How to Have Difficult Conversations About Race Kwame Christian is a best-selling author, lawyer, professor, and the Managing Director of the American Negotiation Institute. He has conducted countless specialized trainings worldwide and is a highly sought after keynote speaker. His best-selling book, Finding Confidence in Conflict has helped countless individuals overcome the fear, anxiety, and emotion associated with difficult conversations. The book was inspired by Kwame’s TED Talk with the same name that has over 250,000 views. He’s also host of the Negotiate Anything Podcast, the most popular negotiation podcast in the world. Kwame was the recipient of the John Glenn College of Public Affairs Young Alumni Achievement Award in 2020 and the Moritz College of Law Outstanding Recent Alumnus Award 2021. Additionally, Kwame is a business lawyer at Carlile, Patchen & Murphy LLP and serves a professor for The Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law in its top-ranked dispute resolution program and Otterbein University’s MBA program. He is also a Contributor for Forbes and his LinkedIn Learning course, How to Be Both Likable And Assertive, was the most popular course on the platform in July of 2021. He is the author of How to Have Difficult Conversations About Race: Practical Tools for Necessary Change in the Workplace and Beyond*. In this conversation, Kwame and I discuss how to begin a difficult conversation about race. We explore the key questions that each of us should ask ourselves so that we can determine in advance what we want to gain from a tough conversation. Finally, we look at the three critical things to say in the first 30 seconds that will help you start an important conversation that helps everybody move forward. Key Points It's hard for someone else to appreciate how much of a person's identity affects every other area of their lives until you've lived it. People explain away racism because they don’t like it and don’t want it to be true. Whether you think a conversation is about race or not, if it’s about race for the other person then you’re having a conversation about race. There questions to ask yourself before a conversation: What do I hope to accomplish in this conversation? Given what I know about them and the situation, what is likely to be their goal? What are three questions I can ask them that will help me to understand their position? Use situation, impact, and invitation as the starting point for a difficult conversation. Usually this is less than 30 seconds. “Naked facts” reduce the likelihood that someone will dispute the premise of what you are addressing. Resources Mentioned How to Have Difficult Conversations About Race: Practical Tools for Necessary Change in the Workplace and Beyond* by Kwame Christian Negotiate Anything podcast Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way Into Difficult Conversations, with Kwame Christian (episode 497) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
12/09/2239m 18s

593: How to Start Finding Useful Stories, with David Hutchens

David Hutchens: Story Dash David Hutchens helps leaders find and tell their stories. He works with leaders around the world to find, craft, and tell their most urgent stories for the purpose of creating shared meaning, preserving culture, disseminating learning, and speeding change in organizations. He has taught the Storytelling Leader program at some of the most influential organizations — and he’s written many books, including the Circle of the 9 Muses and The Leadership Story Deck. He is the co-creator with longtime friend of the show Susan Gerke of the GO Team program. He's also the author of the new book, Story Dash: Find, Develop, and Activate Your Most Valuable Business Stories…In Just a Few Hours. In this conversation, David and I discuss how to find stories that you can use in your organization. We reflect on the reality that we both hear many leaders say to us: “How do I find the right stories?” David then shares the key principles and steps that every leader can take to surface and curate the best stories. Key Points The “Us At Our Best” taxonomy is what it looks like when are are delivering with energy and excellence. A recent Southwest Airlines story is an example of this. Find the area the area of your work where you need to influence the emotional system. Trust stories about small moments. Don’t attempt to create an epic drama of huge importance. The best stories are individual incidents that send a bigger message. Formal story mining can be done alone or as team building. Institutionalizing practices like story sharing can help this happen regularly and naturally. When informally collecting stories, listen for time, place, and person as signals that a story is beginning. Resources Mentioned Download a free set of Story Deck cards or… Reach out to David directly at david@davidhutchens.com for more free resources Purchase the full set of Leadership Story Deck by David Hutchens Related Episodes How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350) Three Stories to Tell During Uncertainty, with David Hutchens (episode 486) The Way to Earn Attention, with Raja Rajamannar (episode 521) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
05/09/2240m 0s

592: How to Change the Way You Think, with Ari Weinzweig

Ari Weinzweig: A Lapsed Anarchist’s Approach to The Power of Beliefs in Business In 1982, Ari, along with his partner Paul Saginaw, founded Zingerman’s Delicatessen with a $20,000 bank loan, a Russian History degree from the University of Michigan, 4 years of experience washing dishes, cooking, and managing in restaurant kitchens and chutzpah from his hometown of Chicago. Today, Zingerman’s Delicatessen is a nationally renowned food icon and the Zingerman’s Community of Businesses has grown to 10 businesses with over 750 employees and over $55 million in annual revenue. Besides being the Co-Founding Partner and being actively engaged in some aspect of the day-to-day operations and governance of nearly every business in the Zingerman’s Community, Ari is also a prolific writer. His most recent publications are the first 4 of his 6 book series Zingerman’s Guide to Good Leading, including A Lapsed Anarchist’s Approach to The Power of Beliefs in Business. In this conversation, Ari and I explore how the power of our beliefs show up in virtually every one of our daily actions. We examine how to begin looking at what isn’t working and how to start examining our beliefs. When those beliefs aren’t working, Ari shares several, critical steps we can take to begin to change our thinking. Key Points Our beliefs, many of which we may not be consciously aware of, are often calling the shots in our daily actions and behaviors. Start examining a belief by picking a current problem to address. Listen carefully to your internal voices to identify the language showing up. Notice places especially where you frame things as facts, certitudes, thoughts, theories, norms, shoulds, and should nots. Examine how you came to the beliefs that you uncover. Then, confront your cannons. Change now, find facts later. Most people do that the opposite way. Resources Mentioned A Lapsed Anarchist's Approach to the Power of Beliefs in Business by Ari Weinzweig Humility: A Humble, Anarchistic Inquiry by Ari Weinzweig Schein On, You Crazy Diamond by Ari Weinzweig Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) How to Help People Engage in Growth, with Whitney Johnson (episode 576) Help People Show Up as Themselves, with Frederic Laloux (episode 580) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
29/08/2235m 3s

591: How to Build a Network While Still Doing Everything Else, with Ruth Gotian

Ruth Gotian: The Success Factor Ruth Gotian has been hailed by the journal Nature and Columbia University as an expert in mentorship and leadership development. Recently, she was named as the #1 emerging management thinker in the world by Thinkers50. She was a semi-finalist for the Forbes 50 Over 50 list and has coached and mentored hundreds of people throughout her career. In addition to being published in academic journals, she is a contributor to Forbes and Psychology Today, where she writes about optimizing success. She is the Chief Learning Officer in Anesthesiology and former Assistant Dean of Mentoring and Executive Director of the Mentoring Academy at Weill Cornell Medicine, where she is a faculty member. She is the author of The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance*. In this conversation, Ruth and I explore her research on how high achievers build their networks — and also what works for us both in our personal practices. We discuss several tactics that most leaders can use to strengthen existing networks. Plus, we examine the mindsets that tend to lead to success in professional relationships, in spite of busy schedules. Key Points High achievers are always seeking perspective, insight, and inspiration from people in many different career stages and disciplines. Use the 24/7/30 rule when making new connections. Reach out within 24 hours, again in 7 days, and also at 30 days. Almost always there is a way you can add value to another person, even if they are at the top of professional game. Find that way to help. When you create content on social media, you emerge as one of the 1% of professionals who choose to do this. Give without expectation of anything in return. Resources Mentioned The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance* by Ruth Gotian How Do You Find a Decent Mentor When You’re Stuck at Home? by Ruth Gotian Networking for Introverted Scientists by Ruth Gotian Conversation Starters by Ruth Gotian Related Episodes The Power of Weak Connections, with David Burkus (episode 347) How to Strengthen Your Network, with Marissa King (episode 425) How to Get Noticed on LinkedIn, with Stephen Hart (episode 495) How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian (episode 567) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
22/08/2238m 40s

590: How to Genuinely Show Up for Others, with Marshall Goldsmith

Marshall Goldsmith: The Earned Life Marshall Goldsmith is one of the world’s leading executive coaches and the New York Times bestselling author of many books, including What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, Mojo, and Triggers. In his coaching practice, he has advised more than 150 major CEOs and their management teams, including clients like Alan Mulally, Frances Hesselbein, and Hubert Joly. His newest book is The Earned Life: Lose Regret, Choose Fulfillment*. We’ve all heard about the benefits of empathy and most of us assume that more empathy for the people we lead is always better. In this conversation, Marshall and I look at the different types of empathy and explore the downsides of leaning into empathy too much. Plus, we discuss how singular empathy can help busy leaders stay present in the midst of their busy schedules. Key Points There are multiple types of empathy — and each of them bring challenges along with their positive attributes. We often hit the reset button successfully at work, but then neglect it in our personal relationships. Singular empathy helps us to stay present with people and to move between the multiple spaces and situations that most leaders find themselves in daily. A key question for us all to ask ourselves: am I being the person I want to be right now? Resources Mentioned The Earned Life: Lose Regret, Choose Fulfillment* by Marshall Goldsmith Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284) Getting Better at Empathy, with Daniel Goleman (episode 391) The Way to Be More Self-Aware, with Tasha Eurich (episode 442) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
15/08/2235m 9s

589: How to Create Inclusive Hiring Practices, with Ruchika Tulshyan

Ruchika Tulshyan: Inclusion on Purpose Ruchika Tulshyan is the founder of Candour, a global inclusion strategy firm. She is a regular contributor to The New York Times and Harvard Business Review. As a keynote speaker, Ruchika has addressed organizations like NASA, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the United States Congress. Ruchika is the author of The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality in the Workplace, and most recently, Inclusion on Purpose: An Intersectional Approach to Creating a Culture of Belonging at Work*. She is on the Thinkers50 Radar list and named as one of Hive Learning's Most Influential D&I Professionals for the past two years. In this conversation, Ruchika and I discuss how leaders can adapt their hiring practices to attract more diverse candidates — and ultimately support inclusion inside their organizations. We discuss the importance of what to both include and avoid in job postings. Plus, we examine how well-intended interview practices can sometimes have unintended results on supporting diversity and inclusion. Key Points Make the hiring process transparent from start to finish. Include an authentic equal opportunity statement. Refrain from using certain words in job listings. Examples include: rockstar, ninja, hacker, guru, manage, build, aggressive, fearless, independent, analytic, and assertive. Emphasize skills and experience over professional degrees. Avoid panel interviews and refrain from asking questions or having conversations about culture fit. Resources Mentioned Inclusion on Purpose: An Intersectional Approach to Creating a Culture of Belonging at Work* by Ruchika Tulshyan Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 301) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
08/08/2236m 38s

588: How to Help Your Manager Shine, with David Gergen

David Gergen: Hearts Touched With Fire David Gergen has served as a White House adviser to four US presidents of both political parties: Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton. He then served as the editor of US News & World Report. For the past two decades, he has served as a professor of public service and founding director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School. David is also a senior political analyst for CNN, where he is a respected voice in national and international affairs. He is the author of Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders Are Made*. In this conversation, David and I discuss his years working in the White House for four different presidents. We explore what worked for David to be able to support a powerful person in being the best version of themselves. Plus, we discuss how to speak truth to power, the strategy of playing to strengths, and the critical importance of staying aligned with the big picture. Key Points Speaking up means you ensure that your manager has considered alternate perspectives. Be aware of your own shortcomings so you do not bias your own advice. You made need to help a manager overcome their own challenges. Help them play to their strengths. Beware of managing up with arrogance. Instead, create zones and pathways that can help a manager make tough calls. Making a suggestion in a short note can be one way to open up a tough conversation. Keep the bigger, nobler motive in mind at all times. Advocate for that larger vision. Resources Mentioned Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders Are Made* by David Gergen The Bin Laden Raid: Inside the Situation Room Photo Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) Leadership in the Midst of Chaos, with Jim Mattis (episode 440) How to be Diplomatic, with Susan Rice (episode 456) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
01/08/2228m 46s

587: Enhancing Teamwork and Confidence, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Margaret is wondering what resources we’d recommend for her team to identify different communication styles. Jeff asked us what steps we might take to help someone increase their confidence. Christopher mentioned a prior episode and is seeking our advice on what to do when challenging authority is ignored. Resources Mentioned GO Team Resources by Susan Gerke and David Hutchens Creative Acts for Curious People* by Sarah Stein Greenberg Emergent Strategy* by adrienne maree brown StrengthsFinder Dignity: Its Essential Role in Resolving Conflict* by Donna Hicks Related Episodes How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293) How to Lead an Offsite, with Tom Henschel (episode 377) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) The Way to Make Struggles More Productive, with Sarah Stein Greenberg (episode 569) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
04/07/2239m 57s

586: How to Involve Stakeholders in Decisions, with Eric Pliner

Eric Pliner: Difficult Decisions Eric Pliner is chief executive officer of YSC Consulting. He has designed and implemented leadership strategy in partnership with some of the world’s best-known CEOs and organizations. Eric’s writing has been featured in Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Forbes, and Fast Company. A member of the Dramatists’ Guild of America, Eric is co-author of the U.S. National Standards for Health Education and Spooky Dog & the Teen-Age Gang Mysteries (with Amy Rhodes), an Off-Broadway theatrical parody of television cartoons for adults. He is a board director with Hip Hop Public Health. He is also the author of Difficult Decisions: How Leaders Make the Right Call with Insight, Integrity, and Empathy*. In this conversation, Eric and I discuss the difficult and sometimes awkward moments when we engage other stakeholders in our decisions. We explore the language to use when discussing a stakeholder’s role in a decision. Plus, Eric details how to establish clear expectations about involvement in decisions to avoid sending messages that we otherwise don’t intend. Key Points Clarify who you will engage and how you intend to do so. Before discussing a decision with a stakeholder, explain how the decision is going to be made. Make it clear if you’re offering them a views, a voice, a vote, or a veto. Standardize your individual and team processes for decision-making. Ask the stakeholder for input — and go deeper with a second or third question to appreciate what’s behind what they’ve said. Remind stakeholders how the decision will be made when you conclude. Don’t underestimated the importance of this step. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Influence Many Stakeholders, with Andy Kaufman (episode 240) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos (episode 581) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
27/06/2233m 7s

585: How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller

Scott Keller: CEO Excellence Scott is a senior partner in McKinsey’s Southern California office. He co-leads the firm’s global CEO Excellence service line and is the author of six books, including the bestseller Beyond Performance. Scott spent his early consulting years working on business strategy and operational topics until his life was turned upside down when his second child was born with profound special needs. After taking time off to attend to his family, Scott returned to McKinsey with the desire to bring the best of psychology, social science, and the study of human potential into the workplace. He is a cofounder of Digital Divide Data and one of a few hundred people in history known to have traveled to every country in the world. His most recent book written with Carolyn Dewar and Vikram Malhotra is titled CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest*. In this conversation, Scott and I examine McKinsey’s research on what the top CEOs do (and avoid) when building great teams. We look at a few of the key mindsets that the best CEOs bring to their organizations — and how teamwork plays into this. Plus, we explore some of the key questions top leaders should ask when determining if it’s time to exit someone from the team. Key Points Top leaders staff for both aptitude and attitude. The have an eye to both the short and long term. The most successful CEOs have a mindset of “first team” and expect leaders in the organization to prioritize serving the whole team/organization over any functional area. New CEOs are often known for acting quickly on staffing, but the most successful leaders also temper this with fairness. They use the four questions below to act with both fairness and speed. Top leaders stay connected with people throughout the organization, but also keep some distance. There’s a key distinction between being friendly and making friends. The best CEO’s ensure that they have positively addressed all four questions below before removing somebody: Does the team member know exactly what’s expected of them: i.e., what the agenda is and what jobs need to be done to drive that agenda? Have they been given the needed tools and resources, and a chance to build the necessary skills and confidence to use them effectively? Are they surrounded by others (including the CEO) who are aligned on a common direction and who display the desired mindsets and behaviors? Is it clear what the consequences are if they don’t get on board and deliver? Resources Mentioned CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest* by Carolyn Dewar, Scott Keller, and Vikram Malhotra The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate - Discoveries from a Secret World* by Peter Wohlleben Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Sell Your Vision, with Michael Hyatt (episode 482) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
20/06/2239m 46s

584: The Starting Point for Inclusive Leadership, with Susan MacKenty Brady

Susan MacKenty Brady: Arrive and Thrive Susan MacKenty Brady is the Deloitte Ellen Gabriel Chair for Women and Leadership at Simmons University and the first Chief Executive Officer of The Simmons University Institute for Inclusive Leadership. As a relationship expert, leadership wellbeing coach, author, and speaker, Susan educates leaders and executives globally on fostering self-awareness for optimal leadership. Susan advises executive teams on how to work together effectively and create inclusion and gender parity in organizations. She is the coauthor, along with Janet Foutty and Lynn Perry Wooten, of The Wall Street Journal bestselling book, Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership*. In this conversation, Susan and I discuss the reality that while we may intend well on inclusion, real change starts with us first. We explore how implicit bias assessments can be useful in discovering where they bias is that we don’t see in ourselves. Plus, we examine some of the key actions we can take on relationship building and repair in order to get better. Key Points Most of us intend well, but we often miss the opportunity to move from being an ally (alignment) to being an upstander (taking action in the moment). Utilizing an assessment can help us understand where our implicit biases diverge from our conscious thoughts. Curiosity and relationship-building isn’t just for the moment — it’s the before, during, and after of conversations to discover how we get better. When we make a misstep, move quickly and purposefully to repair the relationship. Resources Mentioned Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership* by Susan MacKenty Brady, Janet Foutty, and Lynn Perry Wooten The Inclusive Leader's Playbook by Susan MacKenty Brady, Elisa van Dam, and Loe Lee Project Implicit: Implicit Association Tests Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
13/06/2238m 3s

583: How to Give Feedback, with Russ Laraway

Russ Laraway: When They Win, You Win Russ has had a diverse 28 year operational management career. He was a Company Commander in the Marine Corps before starting his first company, Pathfinders. From there, Russ went to the Wharton School, and then onto management roles at Google and Twitter. He then co-founded Candor, Inc., along with best selling author and past guest Kim Scott. Over the last several years, Russ served as the Chief People Officer at Qualtrics, and is now the Chief People Officer for the fast-growing venture capital firm, Goodwater Capital, where he is helping Goodwater and its portfolio companies to empower their people to do great work and be totally psyched while doing it. He's the author of the book When They Win, You Win: Being a Great Manager Is Simpler Than You Think*. It’s the job of every leader to give feedback. In this episode, Russ and I discuss what to say and what to avoid when giving feedback. Plus, we explore how to think about truth and the most effective ways to start and close feedback conversations in order to help everybody move forward. Key Points Avoid spending too much time talking about the impending conversation and just have the conversation. Use language like this: “I think I’m seeing some behavior that I believe is getting in your way. Are you in a spot where you can hear that right now?” Use the framework of situation, behavior/work, and impact in order to organize your feedback. Invite dialogue by asking: “What are your thoughts about that?” Avoid framing feedback discussions around “the truth” — there are always multiple truths in every discussion like this. You are offering them what you see. Resources Mentioned When They Win, You Win: Being a Great Manager Is Simpler Than You Think* by Russ Laraway When They Win, You Win website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
06/06/2238m 25s

582: How to Compare Yourself to Others, with Mollie West Duffy

Mollie West Duffy: Big Feelings Mollie West Duffy is an expert in organizational design, development, and leadership coaching. She previously was an organizational design lead at global innovation firm IDEO. She’s helped advise and coach leaders and founders at companies including Casper, Google, LinkedIn, Bungalow, and Slack. She’s experienced in designing talent processes and systems, as well as organizational structures and behaviors, cultural values, and learning and development programs. She's written for Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Entrepreneur, Quartz, and other digital outlets. She co-founded the Capital Good Fund, Rhode Island's first microfinance fund. She is the co-author with Liz Fosslien of the Wall Street Journal bestseller No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work and now their second book Big Feelings: How To Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay*. We’ve all heard the well-intended advice that we should not compare ourselves to others. In this conversation, Mollie and I explore why that's almost impossible to do and how we can cooperate a bit more with the inevitable and make our comparisons more useful. We highlight some of the key ways that comparison can help us and where leaning in may actually be useful in your own happiness and development. Key Points It’s a myth that the less you compare yourself to others, the better. Often, the opposite is true: we don’t compare ourselves enough. We tend to compare our weaknesses to other people's strengths. Finding ways to curate our inputs is often much more useful. Shifting from malicious envy to benign envy is helpful. Thoughts such as “I’m inspired by what they’ve done…” or “I haven’t done what they’ve done…yet,” can move us to a healthier place. We see the best of people on social media. It’s helpful to piece together the missing footage by comparing some of the nitty gritty. Compare present you against past you. Resources Mentioned Big Feelings: How To Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay* by Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy How to Manage Your Anger at Work by Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297) What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
30/05/2238m 54s

581: Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos

Nick Timiraos: Trillion Dollar Triage Nick Timiraos has been the chief economics correspondent at The Wall Street Journal since 2017, where he is responsible for covering the Federal Reserve and other major developments in U.S. economic policy. He joined the Journal in 2006 and previously covered the 2008 presidential election. He wrote about U.S. housing markets and the mortgage industry as a reporter based in New York. His coverage included the government’s response to the foreclosure crisis and the takeover of finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Nick is the author of Trillion Dollar Triage: How Jay Powell and the Fed Battled a President and a Pandemic -- and Prevented Economic Disaster*. Key Points Some of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome “Jay” Powell’s core skills have helped him navigate difficult stakeholders: He’s highly regarded as a good listener with excellent emotional intelligence. He’s intentional about creating strong teams and espoused the value of teamwork regularly. He is mindful of daily events, but is always playing the long game. He speaks in plain language that makes sense to many people, regardless of their education level. Specifically, four unwritten rules of dealing with a difficult stakeholder like Donald Trump emerged in Nick’s analysis of Jay Powell’s public appearances: Don’t talk about Trump. When provoked, don’t return fire. Stick to the economy, not politics. Develop allies outside the Oval Office. Resources Mentioned Trillion Dollar Triage: How Jay Powell and the Fed Battled a President and a Pandemic -- and Prevented Economic Disaster* by Nick Timiraos Nick Timiraos website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91) How to Handle a Boss Who’s a Jerk, with Tom Henschel (episode 164) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
23/05/2236m 19s

580: Help People Show Up as Themselves, with Frederic Laloux

Frederic Laloux: Reinventing Organizations Frederic is the author of Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness*. The book is a global word-of-mouth bestseller with over 850,000 copies sold in 20 languages. Frederic’s work has inspired the founders of Extinction Rebellion, the Sunrise Movement, and Project Drawdown, as well as countless corporate leaders and faith movements. In a past life, he was an associate principal with McKinsey & Company. He's also the creator of the Insights for the Journey video series. In this conversation, Frederic and I explore a place where almost every leader can have a meaningful impact: helping people show up as their whole selves. We discuss how critical it is for leaders to lead the way in doing this — and how storytelling can be an important entry point. We look at some of the practical actions leaders can take to enter into a place of wholeness, including elevating beyond content, using everyday language, and integrating with the work at hand. Key Points As a leader, wholeness begins with you. Exploring wholeness yourself sets the stage for everyone else to be able to engage more fully. Rather than talking lots about wholeness, it’s often helpful just to begin modeling it. When you do, everyday language us useful to help others engage. Your personal history, the history of the organization, and the organization’s purpose are often helpful stories to share that open up a space for wholeness. You can turn any conversation into a moment of wholeness. One invitation for leaders is to stop talking about content and elevate the dialogue to “what’s happening” overall. Resist any temptation to disconnect wholeness from the work at hand. Bringing these together helps people to show up at work more authentically. Resources Mentioned Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness* by Frederic Laloux Reinventing Organizations: An Illustrated Invitation to Join the Conversation on Next-Stage Organizations* by Frederic Laloux Insights for the Journey video series by Frederic Laloux Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stay Grounded, with Parker Palmer (episode 378) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 539) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
16/05/2237m 47s

579: How to Pitch Your Manager, with Tom Henschel

Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. As an internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. In this conversation, Tom and I explore the sometimes awkward moment of needing to get buy-in from your manager on a next step, proposal, or funding. We detail three considerations and how attention to them can help you frame this conversation better. Plus, we share tactics such as making the business case, telling a story, and past interactions — in order to help you get forward movement. Key Points Three lenses of consideration are helpful when considering how to pitch you manager: purpose, preference, and protocol. When framing your purpose in making a pitch, it’s helpful to be able to change altitude. Consider “clicking out” on a map to frame the bigger picture. To be purposeful, make sure you are making the business case for whatever you are pitching. Anger and emotion can be sentinels that you might not have moved past thinking about it personally or framed the business context fully. Consider past interactions with your manager on how they prefer to receive information. The way you pitch them should begin with their preferences, not yours. Get intel in advance from other stakeholders, if practical. They can help you see the variables that might be clouding your judgement if you’re too close to the situation. Clearly frame the problem and examples of it. Consider strutting your pitch in the framework of The Want, The Obstacle, and The Resolution (see PDF below). Resources Mentioned Storytelling: A Three-Part Model by Tom Henschel (PDF download) Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
09/05/2238m 10s

578: Leadership When Others Know More Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Allison asked for resources on how to lead others who are more knowledgeable than you in the field of work. Everett wondered how he can navigate a situation where accents make it difficult to understand interview candidates. Stephen asked about motivating people independent of incentives. Resources Mentioned The Empowered Manager: Positive Political Skills at Work* by Peter Block Drive* by Daniel Pink Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process* by Hassan Osman The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Humble Leadership* by Edgar Schein and Peter Schein HBO Max Presents Brené Brown: Atlas of the Heart Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People* by Donna Hicks On the folly of rewarding A while hoping for B by Steven Kerr Related Episodes How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel (episode 190) How to Motivate People, with Dan Ariely (episode 282) The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
02/05/2237m 16s

577: The Path Towards Joy in Your Career, with David Novak

David Novak: Take Charge of You David Novak is Co-Founder, retired Chairman and CEO of Yum! Brands, the world’s largest restaurant company with over 45,000 restaurants in more than 135 countries and territories. During his tenure as CEO, Yum! Brands became a global powerhouse, growing from $4 billion in revenue to over $32 billion. After retiring in 2016, he became Founder and CEO of David Novak Leadership, dedicated to developing leaders at every stage of life. David is also the host of the top-ranked podcast, How Leaders Lead and founder of the leadership development platform of the same name. An expert on leadership and recognition culture, David is also a New York Times bestselling author. His books include Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make Big Things Happen, O GREAT ONE! A Little Story About the Awesome Power of Recognition, and his latest book with Jason Goldsmith, Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career*. In this conversation, David and I discuss the importance of finding joy in our careers. David highlights several of the key questions that he utilizes when helping others to uncover how joy can show up their work. He encourages us to surface the single biggest thing that’s important right now in order to get immediate traction. Key Points Sometimes your best (and only) coach is yourself. Use joy as your destination finder. Find your joy blockers by asking yourself: what’s getting in the way of my joy? Your worst days often provide insight on this. Discover your joy builders by asking yourself: what would grow your joy personal and professionally? Your most memorable days are starting points for answers here. Your goal is to surface your single biggest thing. This changes over time, but ideally is only one thing, one at a time. That’s how you gain traction. Resources Mentioned Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career* by David Novak and Jason Goldsmith Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Find Your Calling, with Ken Coleman (episode 352) Align Your Work With Your Why, with Kwame Marfo (episode 542) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
25/04/2236m 47s

576: How to Help People Engage in Growth, with Whitney Johnson

Whitney Johnson: Smart Growth Whitney Johnson is CEO of the tech-enabled talent development company Disruption Advisors, an Inc. 5000 fastest-growing private company in America. As one of the top ten business thinkers in the world as named by Thinkers50, Whitney is an expert at smart growth leadership. She has worked at FORTUNE 100 companies, and as an award-winning equity analyst on Wall Street. Whitney co-founded the Disruptive Innovation Fund with the late Clayton Christensen. She has coached alongside Marshall Goldsmith, selected by him in 2017 as a Top 15 Coach out of a pool of more than 17,000 candidates. She is the author of Disrupt Yourself and the host of the podcast of the same name. She is also the author of Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company*. In this conversation, Whitney and I explore a big reality of growth; it’s often slow at the start. We discuss three practical steps that leaders can take for both themselves and others to stay engaged during the early stages of growth. Key Points Auditing some of your roles, secrets, beliefs, values, and boundaries will help you move forward along the growth path. Listen to the stories that others tell and help them link past experiences with what’s important today. Images are a critical entry point to growth. Utilize them in addition to the new behavior itself to begin to frame your thinking and identity. Circle back after receiving feedback and show others what you’ve learned from it and how it’s changed your behavior. That motivates them to stay invested. Use “I am” statements that have a noun rather than a verb. Instead of “I run,” consider saying, “I am a runner.” Resources Mentioned Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company* by Whitney Johnson Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Motivate Leaders, with John Maxwell (episode 452) How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
18/04/2238m 6s

575: Make It Easier to Challenge Authority, with Richard Rierson

Richard Rierson: Dose of Leadership Richard Rierson has over 30 years of real-world, practical leadership experience as a United States Marine Corps officer, professional aviator, and corporate executive. His philosophy is that our leadership challenges should be met with the lifelong dedication and pursuit of becoming composed, confident, consistent, courageous, and compassionate. In addition to being a sought after speaker, coach, and consultant, he is the host of the Dose of Leadership podcast. He's also a commercial airline pilot, currently flying as a first officer on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. In this conversation, Richard and I explore how professional aviation emerged from the accidents of the 1970’s to improve challenging authority inside the cockpit. We discuss the principles of crew resource management (CRM) and how more structure and intention between crew members vastly reduced the number of aviation accidents. We examine what leaders can do to use similar principles to support appropriately challenging authority inside their organizations. Key Points Almost every accident is a chain of events. The key is to have self awareness in the chain and to interrupt it. Making the invitation to challenge before the work begins makes it far more likely that another party will speak up when they see something. Pilots use green, yellow, and red as simple and immediate indicator to others in the cockpit how much stress they are holding. Three steps are use to pilots to escalate challenging a more senior pilot: ask a question, make a suggestion, take control i.e. “my aircraft.” Resources Mentioned Sully with Tom Hanks The Crash of Flight 401, and the Lessons for Your Company by Dave Yarin The Evolution of Airline Crew Resource Management by Jean Dennis Marcellin Related Episodes The Way to Turn Followers Into Leaders, with David Marquet (episode 241) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Talk to People Who Have Power, with Jordan Harbinger (episode 343) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
11/04/2236m 58s

574: How to Reduce Frictions That Slow Good Intentions, with Deepa Purushothaman

Deepa Purushothaman: The First, The Few, The Only Deepa is the co-founder of nFormation, a company which provides a brave, safe, and new space for professionals who are women of color. She spent more than twenty years at Deloitte and was a first herself: an Indian American woman and one of the youngest people to make partner in the company’s history. In her time there, she helped grow Deloitte's Social Impact Practice, served as a National Managing Partner of Inclusion, and served as the Managing Partner of WIN—the firm’s renowned program to recruit, retain, and advance women. Deepa speaks extensively on women and leadership. She has been featured at national conferences and in publications including Bloomberg BusinessWeek, The Huffington Post, and Harvard Business Review. She is the author of The First, The Few, The Only: How Women of Color can Redefine Power in Corporate America*. Key Points The corporate space has not fostered true equity. Often, many of us don’t see the systemic examples each day of friction. “We can’t find you,” is an often believed delusion when companies intend to attract more women of color. “I don’t see color,” is often a well-intended belief, but in practice often marginalizes the lives experiences of women of color. “DEI will fix it all,” is an illusion. We all should be supporting peers in formal DEI roes to volunteer, show up, and be key partners in the work that benefits all of you. “You got white-manned,” reflects the belief that the world has to be a zero-sum competition. Resources Mentioned The First, The Few, The Only: How Women of Color can Redefine Power in Corporate America* by Deepa Purushothaman Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) Overcome Resistance to New Ideas, with David Schonthal (episode 557) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
04/04/2240m 0s

573: How to Protect Your Confidence, with Nate Zinsser

Nate Zinsser: The Confident Mind Nate Zinsser is an expert in the psychology of human performance. He has been at the forefront of applied sport psychology for over thirty years. He has been a regular consultant to the Philadelphia Flyers and New York Giants as well as a consultant for the FBI Academy, the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, the U.S. Army Recruiting Command, and the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit. Since 1992 he has directed a cutting edge applied sport psychology program at the United States Military Academy’s Center for Enhanced Performance, personally conducting over seventeen thousand individual training sessions and seven hundred team training sessions for cadets seeking the mental edge for athletic, academic, and military performance. His most recent book is titled The Confident Mind: A Battle-Tested Guide for Unshakable Performance*. In this conversation, Nate and I explore the reality that almost every leader faces: continual challenges to our own confidence. We examine some of the misconceptions around confidence and how those misperceptions tend to limit us. Then, we discuss the most effective practices you can use to maintain — and improve — the confidence that you’ve already built. Key Points It’s a misconception that once you become confident, you’ll stay that way forever. Confidence has little to do with what happens to you and tons to do with how you think about what happens to you. For a more constructive attitude when bad things happen, use these three elements: decide that it’s temporary, limited, and non-representative. To win the battle with your own negative thinking, acknowledge the negativity, silence it, and then replace it with something better to get the last word. Protecting your confidence is an ongoing practice. You’ll never stop doing it — but the good news is that it will give you an edge if you can develop this practice. Resources Mentioned The Confident Mind: A Battle-Tested Guide for Unshakable Performance* by Nate Zinsser Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) How to Build Confidence, with Katy Milkman (episode 533) How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
28/03/2238m 44s

572: The Key Indicators of Team Resilience, with Keith Ferrazzi

Keith Ferrazzi: Competing in the New World of Work Keith Ferrazzi is the founder and chairman of Ferrazzi Greenlight, a management consulting and coaching company that works to transform many of the largest organizations and governments in the world. A graduate of Harvard Business School, Keith rose to become the youngest chief marketing officer of a Fortune 500 company during his career at Deloitte and later became CMO and head of sales at Starwood Hotels. He has contributed to Harvard Business Review, Forbes, Fortune, and The Wall Street Journal and is The New York Times number one bestselling author of Who’s Got Your Back, Never Eat Alone, and Leading Without Authority. He is the co-author with Kian Gohar and Noel Weyrich of Competing in the New World of Work: How Radical Adaptability Separates the Best from the Rest*. In this conversation, Keith and I discuss what his team and him have learned from the most resilient teams they’ve supported. We explore some of the most useful strategies to build a more resilient team and highlight key actions that will help leaders and teams through challenging times. Key Points Resilient teams have compassion and empathy for each other. They show care through both success and failure. Humility is the ability to ask for help. Resilient teams have a culture that supports and encourages this. Many leaders espouse candor for their teams, but far less actually have teams with candor. Resilient teams speak truth — and it’s up to leaders to show them the way. Resourceful teams develop solutions at a higher velocity. They use systems and structures to move past challenges and doubts more quickly. Resources Mentioned Competing in the New World of Work* by Keith Ferrazzi, Kian Gohar, and Noel Weyrich 7 Strategies to Build a More Resilient Team* Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How Great Teams Find Purpose, with David Burkus (episode 481) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
21/03/2235m 0s

571: Engaging People Through Change, with Cassandra Worthy

Cassandra Worthy: Change Enthusiasm Cassandra Worthy enables organizations and individuals to grow through major change and significant shift by harnessing the power of emotion. Whether undergoing a merger, acquisition, start-up, explosive growth, or significant contraction, the strategies and tools of Change Enthusiasm are motivating and energizing workforces worldwide. Her consulting firm was birthed from the pain and challenges she overcame as a corporate executive. Cassandra’s client base spans the Fortune 500, including Procter & Gamble, Allstate, Jones Lang LaSalle, Centene Corporation, ConferenceDirect, and WeWork. She's a chemical engineer by training and also brings over a decade of M&A experience distilled down into the critical leadership traits required to lead with exception during times of change and trans-formation. She's the author of Change Enthusiasm: How to Harness the Power of Emotion for Leadership and Success*. In this conversation Cassandra and I explore the critical importance of emotion in the change process. We detail some of the key places where leaders often miss opportunities to prioritize employee well-being. Then, Cassandra shares some practical steps leaders can take that will help employees better recognize signal emotions so they can eventually find opportunity and choice during the change process. Key Points Many leaders tend to diminish or ignore negative emotions during change. Actively doing that may prevent employees in getting to a place where they see opportunity — and eventually choice. Beware focusing too much attention on vision, roles, and responsibilities — and not enough on employee well-being and fulfillment. The change process is like driving in a car. The structure of the process is the vehicle itself and the people are their fuel. Have discussion about handling change a regular item in 1:1 agendas and team meetings. Leaders can enter into the opportunity that change provides by sharing their own emotions. One way to do this is to be explicit in conversation about what is genuinely inspiring you about the change. Resources Mentioned Change Enthusiasm: How to Harness the Power of Emotion for Leadership and Success* by Cassandra Worthy Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) The Way Innovators Get Traction, with Tendayi Viki (episode 512) Overcome Resistance to New Ideas, with David Schonthal (episode 557) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
14/03/2237m 54s

570: Effective Hybrid Team Management, with Hassan Osman

Hassan Osman: Hybrid Work Management Hassan Osman is a director at Cisco Systems (his views are his own) where he leads a team of project and program managers on delivering complex projects across the world. He’s also served as a management consultant at EY, where he led projects and programs for the largest enterprises. Hassan the author of several Amazon bestselling books about team management, including his most recent book, Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team in the New Workplace*. In this conversation, Hassan and I examine the new reality and popularity of the hybrid workforce. Many leaders are now managing teams that are both co-located and remote, with individual team members regularly migrating between the two. We explore useful practices that will help you support effective teamwork and progress, regardless of physical location. Key Points Recent statistics from many sources are indicating that a majority of employees desire (and are beginning to expect) some kind of hybrid work arrangement. Lead with a remote first culture so that there isn’t a two-tier class of employees in your organization. Conduct all meetings online, regardless of the location of attendees. Use technology to provide a seamless experience whether somebody is co-located or remote. Batch meetings together and, if possible, align work days to allow from in person interactions, when ideal. Be cognizant of offline decisions. Involve remote employees in conversation that start offline and inform them about updates and decisions that might have occurred outside virtual interactions. Resources Mentioned Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team in the New Workplace* by Hassan Osman Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team (Udemy course) The Couch Manager (Hassan's site) Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Transitioning to Remote Leadership, with Tammy Bjelland (episode 509) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) Hyflex Learning (Teaching in Higher Ed podcast) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
07/03/2239m 33s

569: The Way to Make Struggles More Productive, with Sarah Stein Greenberg

Sarah Stein Greenberg: Creative Acts for Curious People Sarah Stein Greenberg is the Executive Director of the Stanford d.school. She leads a community of designers, faculty, and other innovative thinkers who help people unlock their creative abilities and apply them to the world. She speaks regularly at universities and global conferences on design, business, and education. Sarah holds an MBA from Stanford's Graduate School of Business and also serves as a trustee for global conservation organization Rare. She is the author of the book Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways*. In this conversation, Sarah and I discuss the reality that all of us face with real learning: uncomfortable struggle. We detail some of the typical pattens that occur with struggle and how we can almost predict it at certain points. Plus, we discussed what Sarah and her colleagues have discovered about we can do to make the most of the struggles we regularly face. Key Points Part of the process of creativity almost always feels terrible. The “trough of despair” is hard, but also essential. Struggle helps us learn better. There’s a sweet spot between what you already know well and what seems impossible. That middle zone is productive struggle. It’s helpful to set expectations in advance when innovating or creating that discomfort is an indicator that you’re moving forward. When people are in the midst of struggle, shifting the focus from thinking and talking to actually doing can often illuminate the best, next step. Productive struggle often comes at predictable moments. When it does, scaffolding and models can help move us along to get to where we need to go. Resources Mentioned Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways* by Sarah Stein Greenberg Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Growth Mindset Helps You Rise From the Ashes, with Jeff Hittenberger (episode 326) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) The Value of Being Uncomfortable, with Neil Pasricha (episode 448) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
28/02/2237m 39s

568: How to Attract Attention, with Michael F. Schein

Michael F. Schein: The Hype Handbook Michael F. Schein is the founder and president of MicroFame Media, a marketing agency that specializes in making ideabased companies famous in their industries. His writing has appeared in Fortune, Forbes, Inc., Psychology Today, and Huffington Post, and he is a speaker for international audiences spanning from the US to China. He is also the creator of the popular Hype Book Club, which provides regular recommendations of books about hype artists and hype strategies. Michael is the author of The Hype Handbook: 12 Indispensable Success Secrets From the World's Greatest Propagandists, Self-Promoters, Cult Leaders, Mischief Makers, and Boundary Breakers*. In this conversation, Michael and I explore his research on hype and how we can benefit from lessons throughout the history of human influence. We examine what we can learn from both positive and negative examples to discover how to brand ourselves better. Michael then invites us to frame the messaging about our own work to align with these human tendencies though a lens of genuine care and authenticity. Key Points We've evolved through history to seek guidance from those who appear miraculous. Surprise and worthiness are two indicators of what people perceive as miraculous vs. simply chance. The elements of your narrative are faders on a mixing board. Raise and lower different elements of the story to get the right mix. Make a list of strengths and weaknesses and don’t mention your weaknesses for a week. Reframe how some of your weakness might be strengths. Develop your story using the elements of theatre. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148) Get Noticed Without Selling Out, with Laura Huang (episode 480) How to Actually Get Traction From Leadership Books, with Nicol Verheem (episode 549) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
21/02/2236m 33s

567: How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian

Ruth Gotian: The Success Factor Ruth Gotian has been hailed by the journal Nature and Columbia University as an expert in mentorship and leadership development. In 2021, she was selected as one of 30 people worldwide to be named to the Thinkers50 Radar List, where she was described as a “Prolific mentor and educator, leading important research into the secrets of success.” She is a semi-finalist for the Forbes 50 Over 50 list and has coached and mentored hundreds of people throughout her career. In addition to being published in academic journals, Ruth is a contributor to Forbes and Psychology Today, where she writes about optimizing success. She is the Chief Learning Officer in Anesthesiology and former Assistant Dean of Mentoring and Executive Director of the Mentoring Academy at Weill Cornell Medicine, where she is a faculty member. Ruth is the author of The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance*. In this conversation, Ruth and I discuss how leaders can genuinely connect with (and retain) their top performers. We explore the difference these employees make in organizations and what’s unique about how they approach work and their careers. Ruth then suggests a number of practical steps to engage high performers genuinely to develop them well and benefit the entire organization. Key Points High achievers can produce up to 400 percent more than the average employee. Promotions, diplomas, and awards may be starting points for high performers, but they are not ending points. Leading high performers well requires you to align with their intrinsic motivation. Offer high performers opportunities for exposure with visibility to senior leadership, strengths assignments, and decision-making. Provide autonomy to high performers. For them, the chase is as exciting as the win. They fear not trying more than failing. Recognize that internal professional development programs may not be sufficient for the demands of high performers. Support external opportunities they identify and connect with them during and after those experiences to further their learning (and yours). Bonus Audio How to maximize the benefit of sending high achievers to conferences Resources Mentioned The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance* by Ruth Gotian Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Six Ways Teaching Adults is Different than Teaching Kids (episode 3) What High Performers Aren’t Telling You, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 466) How to Multiply Your Impact, with Liz Wiseman (episode 554) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
14/02/2238m 50s

566: Ways to Pay Attention Better, with Amishi Jha

Amishi Jha: Peak Mind Amishi Jha is Director of Contemplative Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology at the University of Miami. With grants from the Department of Defense and several private foundations, she leads research on the neural bases of attention and the effects of mindfulness-based training programs on cognition, emotion, resilience, and performance in education, corporate, elite sports, first-responder, and military contexts. She launched the first-ever study to offer mindfulness training to active duty military service members as they prepared for deployment. Her work has been featured in many outlets including TED, NPR, and Mindful Magazine. In addition, she has been invited to present her work to NATO, the UK Parliament, the Pentagon, and at the World Economic Forum. She is the author of Peak Mind: Find Your Focus, Own Your Attention, Invest 12 Minutes a Day*. In this conversation, Amishi and I explore the importance of our attention and why harnessing it is essential for leaders. We dive into the neuroscience and how our brain is similar to a computer in how much we can hold at one time. Plus, Amishi provides us several practical starting points if we wish to do a better job of placing our attention in the most useful places. Key Points Attention is powerful, fragile, and trainable. Our working memory is like the RAM inside a computer — there’s only so much we can hold at a time. You experience what’s in your working memory, even if that doesn’t correlate to what’s right in front of you. If your working memory is full, it blocks the ability to encode or whatever you are trying to learn. A key tactic is to be aware of what’s in your working memory — and what you choose not to rewrite. Mindfulness practice can provide the white space for the space in our working memory that we need. Resources Mentioned Peak Mind: Find Your Focus, Own Your Attention, Invest 12 Minutes a Day* by Amishi Jha Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511) Help Your Brain Learn, with Lisa Feldman Barrett (episode 513) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
07/02/2238m 56s

565: How to Discover What People Want, with Tiziana Casciaro

Tiziana Casciaro: Power, for All Tiziana Casciaro is a professor of organizational behavior at the Rotman School of Management of the University of Toronto. Her research on interpersonal and organizational networks and power dynamics has received distinguished scientific achievement awards from the Academy of Management and has been covered in the New York Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, and many other outlets. Tiziana advises organizations and professionals across industries and has been recognized by Thinkers50 as a management thinker most likely to shape the future of how organizations are managed and led. She is the author with Julie Battilana of Power, for All: How It Really Works and Why It's Everyone's Business*. In this conversation, Tiziana and I explore the reality that many leaders face: the desire to discover what people want — but the challenge of actually determining this. Even when intentions are good, employees may not have the self-awareness to articulate what they what. We detail what the research shows us about what most people care about — and the practical steps we can all take in our organizations to surface this through familiarity and similarity. Key Points To be powerful in a relationship, it means having control over resources the other person values. Even if asked, people don’t always tell you what they need — either because they don’t trust you or because they aren’t self-aware. Much of the research literature concludes that almost all people have two basic needs: safety and self-esteem. To discover what people want, you need to earn trust. Competence and warmth two ways this happens. When forced to choose between the two, most people prefer warmth. To build warmth (and trust) use two key sources of interpersonal liking: familiarity and similarity. The six resources that address our basic needs of safety and self-esteem: Material resources Morality Achievement Status Autonomy Affiliation Resources Mentioned Power, for All: How It Really Works and Why It's Everyone's Business* by Julie Battilana and Tiziana Casciaro Power, for All website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
31/01/2238m 43s

564: Make Your Reading More Meaningful, with Sönke Ahrens

Sönke Ahrens: How to Take Smart Notes Sönke Ahrens is the creator of Take Smart Notes, a project dedicated to helping students, academics and nonfiction writers get more done - ideally with more fun and less effort. He has spent years researching and experimenting with different note-taking systems and his settled on a methodology called Zettlekasten. Sönke is a writer, coach, and academic -- and also the author of the bestselling book, How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking - for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers*. In this conversation, Sönke and I discuss how to move past the practice of simply reading and highlighting by beginning to seek meaning. We explore how you might create a system for doing this and how external scaffolding can help. Plus, we explain what notes might look like and how you can use them for an ongoing conversation with yourself — and perhaps others. Key Points Move past details and look for meaning. As we become familiar with something, we may start believing we understand it. Real thinking requires external scaffolding. It's not so much about saving information, but in making connections between the information. Your notes need not be long or numerous, but should spark (and continue) future conversations with yourself. Resources Mentioned How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking - for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers* by Sönke Ahrens Take Smart Notes Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How To Create a Personal Knowledge Management System, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 129) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) How to Use Cognitive Psychology to Enhance Learning (Teaching in Higher Ed) How to Enhance Your Credibility (audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
24/01/2236m 54s

563: When You Need to Fire Someone, with Alisa Cohn

Alisa Cohn: From Start-Up to Grown-Up Alisa Cohn has been named the Top Startup Coach in the World by the Thinkers50 Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards and has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. She was named the number one “Global Guru” of startups in 2021, and has worked with startup companies such as Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, and many more. Marshall Goldsmith selected Alisa as one of his Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches – a gathering of the top coaches in the world – and Inc. named Alisa one of the top 100 leadership speakers. Her articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Inc. and she has been featured as an expert on Bloomberg TV, the BBC World News and in The New York Times. She is the author of From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business*. In this conversation, Alisa and I discuss the difficult reality that most leaders need to face: saying goodbye to an employee. We detail the mindset you need in preparation for letting someone go. Alisa also helps us with specific language that will help you follow-though on a conversation and help everybody move on — and move forward. Key Points Our human tendency is often to side-step problems that we need to address. By the time you take action to fire somebody, you are likely months late. Just because someone was effective in the role previously (or in the last role) doesn’t mean their role is right for them today. It’s helpful to be prescriptive in conversations leading up to firing on exactly your expectations — and the actions the other party has agreed to. There’s no way to fire someone without it being awkward and painful. You’ll need to make peace with that before you take action. Resources Mentioned From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business* by Alisa Cohn Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
17/01/2233m 33s

562: How to Make Progress When Starting Something New, with Michael Bungay Stanier

Michael Bungay Stanier: How to Begin Michael Bungay Stanier distills big, complex ideas into practical, accessible knowledge for everyday people so they can be a force for change. His books have sold over a million copies, and The Coaching Habit was a Wall Street Journal bestseller. His TEDx Talk on Taming Your Advice Monster has been viewed more than a million times. Michael is the founder of Box of Crayons, a learning and development company that helps organizations transform from advice-driven to curiosity-led action. His new book is titled How to Begin: Start Doing Something That Matters*. In this conversation, Michael and I discuss how to make progress when starting something new. We explore the value in looking back at what you’ve already done to support you on what’s next. Plus, Michael highlights the key principles in running effective experiments that transition into new practices. Key Points Fire bullets at the start. Then, fire cannonballs. Discover what your history reveals about your future self. It will open up a window to who you are that will help you when moving on something new. When experimenting, don’t make the experiment bigger or more complex than it needs to be. Avoid putting too much risk in the experiment or investing too much in its success. We have the most learning when we’re struggling with something. Resources Mentioned How to Begin by Michael Bungay Stanier How to Begin overview Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284) How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
10/01/2237m 59s

561: How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss

Jennifer Moss: The Burnout Epidemic Jennifer Moss is an award-winning journalist, author, and international public speaker. She is a nationally syndicated radio columnist, reporting on topics related to happiness and workplace well-being. She is also a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in HuffPost, Forbes, the Society for Human Resource Management, Fortune, and Harvard Business Review. Jennifer’s prior book, Unlocking Happiness at Work, received the distinguished UK Business Book of the Year Award. She also sits on the Global Happiness Council. She is the author of The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It*. In this conversation, Jennifer and I explore a few misconceptions about burnout — and also how curiosity and empathy can help to reduce it. We discuss a few key questions leaders can ask to gain insight on how to help. Plus, we detail how to avoid confirmation bias through generic interactions. Key Points Self-care doesn’t cure burnout. Curiosity increases empathy — and empathy from leaders is a fabulous antidote to burnout. There are two kinds of curiosity, epistemic and perceptual. True empathy comes from a focus on epistemic interactions. Go beyond the generic, “How are you?” and instead get more specific with a request like, “Name a high — and a low.” Doing these with a team can help surface how to help. Assume the best. It’s ok to say, “Thank you for sharing this with me. I don’t have any advice. I just want to listen and learn.” Resources Mentioned The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It* by Jennifer Moss Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
03/01/2236m 50s

560: The Way to Get People Talking, with Andrew Warner

Andrew Warner: Stop Asking Questions Andrew Warner is an entrepreneur and host of the Startup Stories podcast, where he uncovers the secrets of the world’s best founders. Over the course of 2,000+ episodes, Andrew has interviewed everyone from Barbara Corcoran, to Gary Vaynerchuk, to the founders of Airbnb. After building two startups of his own—one successful and one that failed—Andrew started Mixergy as a way to learn from other entrepreneurs. Today, Mixergy is a place where successful people teach ambitious upstarts through interviews, courses, masterclasses, and events. He is the author of Stop Asking Questions: How to Lead High-Impact Interviews and Learn Anything from Anyone*. In this conversation, Andrew and I discuss what he’s learned about getting people to talk from thousands of hours of interviews and research. We explore some of the key tactics that he uses to help people open up in a genuine way. Plus, we discuss some common questions to avoid that may work against your goal to connect well with the other party. Key Points Help others get comfortable talking about themselves by revealing something about yourself first. They may not reciprocate immediately, but it often opens the door for future depth. Just a word or two can open up an entire new level of a conversation. Try using “Because?” or “How so?” as ways to hear more. People expect leaders to show up and have a direction for the conversation. Not everything needs to be phrased as a question — you may consider making requests like, “Tell me more,” to direct to conversation. Avoid asking questions that try to get people to articulate “most” or “best” answers. People spend too much mental bandwidth trying to rank-order instead of just engaging with the dialogue. When potentially uncomfortable situations come up, allow people an easy way out by giving them two paths they can go down. Resources Mentioned Stop Asking Questions: How to Lead High-Impact Interviews and Learn Anything from Anyone* by Andrew Warner Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
27/12/2136m 42s

559: The Leadership Struggles We See, with Muriel Wilkins

Muriel Wilkins: Coaching Real Leaders Muriel Wilkins is Managing Partner and Co-founder of Paravis Partners. She is a C-suite advisor and executive coach with a strong track record of helping already high performing senior leaders take their effectiveness to the next level. She is also the host of the Harvard Business Review podcast, Coaching Real Leaders and is the co-author, with Amy Su of Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership Presence*. Prior to entrepreneurship, she served on the senior team of U.S. News & World Report and also did marketing and strategy work at Accenture and The Prudential. Muriel has been recognized by the Washington Business Journal as one of Metro-DC area’s Top Minority Business Leaders. In this conversation, Muriel and I reflect on our recent client work in order to surface some of the current struggles leaders are facing. We discuss a few trends we’re seeing in relation to diversity, the great resignation, binary thinking, and human relations. Plus, we make a few practical invitations to leaders in order to avoid some common missteps. Key Points Leaders are making the shift from explanation to inquiry in relations to diversity, equity, and inclusion. The next step for many leaders is to consider how they use their power to affect change to the system in the organization. Many leaders are considering the, “Should I stay or should I go?” question without the full context of impact and feeling. Begin by considering the impact you wish to have before making a major change. Beware the trap of binary thinking. Often leaders get fixated on “OR thinking” without considering the opportunity for “AND thinking.” If you catch yourself thinking in “ors” consider how you might bring in some “ands.” Leaders who inherently see value in people development can tend to write off other leaders who they see as only focused on the numbers. It’s helpful to realize that the larger objective is often shared, but style is different. Meet people on their terms with their language. Resources Mentioned Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership Presence* by Muriel Wilkins Coaching Real Leaders podcast Related Episodes Enhance Your Executive Presence, with Muriel Wilkins (episode 272) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
20/12/2139m 36s

558: Drawing the Line Between Friend and Manager, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Lucus asked us for advice on his reading habits as he makes the transition to CEO. Elizabeth wondered the best way to address issues where experienced employees appear resentful about her giving them direction. Beth sent us a question about drawing the line between being a friend and a manager. Resources Mentioned 13 Crucial Books That Every Leader Should Know Drive* by Daniel Pink Readwise Day One Seven Principles for Leading People Older Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 59) How to Manage Former Peers, with Tom Henschel (episode 257) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) Related Episodes Three Steps to Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107) How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233) Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435) How to Help People Thrive, with Jim Harter (episode 532) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
13/12/2136m 49s

557: Overcome Resistance to New Ideas, with David Schonthal

David Schonthal: The Human Element David Schonthal is an award-winning Professor of Strategy, Innovation & Entrepreneurship at the Kellogg School of Management where he teaches courses on new venture creation, design thinking, healthcare innovation and creativity. In addition to his teaching, he also serves as the Director of Entrepreneurship Programs and the Faculty Director of the Zell Fellows Program. Along with his colleague Loran Nordgren, David is one of the originators of Friction Theory – a ground-breaking methodology that explains why even the most promising innovations and change initiatives often struggle to gain traction with their intended audiences – and what to do about it. He is the author with Loran of The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas*. In this conversation, David and I discuss how leaders can do a better job at helping others overcome resistance to a new idea. We explore the distinction between friction and fuel — and why leaders tend to miss opportunities to reduce friction. David also shares several, practical strategies that almost all of us can use to reduce the weight of friction with those we are trying to influence. Key Points When introducing something new, we tend to think more about fuel than we do about friction. Both are essential for traction. Repetition is missed opportunity in most organizations. Leaders tend to want to perfect the details too much. Start small with a beacon project to prototype the value change may bring to the organization. Leaning in on making a new idea prototypical will help it be more familiar to those you are trying to influence. Emphasize what is similar — not just what is new. Analogies can help bridge the gap between the new and the familiar. Use an analogy the audience can relate to. Adding an extreme option and/or an undesirable can help transform inertia from a friction into a fuel. Resources Mentioned The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas* by Loren Nordgren and David Schonthal Related Episodes How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249) How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476) The Way Innovators Get Traction, with Tendayi Viki (episode 512) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
06/12/2139m 36s

556: End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey

Jodi-Ann Burey: End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace Jodi-Ann Burey is a sought-after speaker and writer who works at the intersections of race, culture, and health equity. Her TED talk, “The Myth of Bringing Your Full Authentic Self to Work,” embodies her disruption of traditional narratives about racism at work. Jodi-Ann is also the creator and host of Black Cancer, a podcast about the lives of people of color through their cancer journeys. She is the author, with Ruchika Tulshyan, of two recent Harvard Business Review articles: Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome and End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace. In this conversation, Jodi-Ann and I challenge that notion that imposter syndrome is something that an individual should address alone. Instead, we invite managers and organizations to begin to consider their own contributions to “imposter syndrome” and how we can work together with employees to help everybody move forward. We highlight several key actions that managers can take to begin to end imposter syndrome inside of their organizations. Key Points Managers and organizations tend to address the symptoms of imposter syndrome, but not the source. Those who experience imposter syndrome often feel like it is “death by a thousand paper cuts.” Managers can help by reinforcing an employee’s belief in their abilities and chances of success. Listen for what employees are asking for — and explore when they are silent. Managers should be transparent about an organization’s locked doors — and demonstrate that they are also willing to be vulnerable. In private conversations, managers should redirect perceptions and language that do not accurately reflect the value of their employees. Resources Mentioned Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome by Jodi-Ann Burey and Ruchika Tulshyan End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace by Jodi-Ann Burey and Ruchika Tulshyan Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
29/11/2139m 10s

555: How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy

Sukhinder Singh Cassidy: Choose Possibility Sukhinder Singh Cassidy is a leading technology executive and entrepreneur, board member, and investor with twenty-five years of experience founding and helping to scale companies, including Google, Amazon, and Yodlee. Most recently, she served as president of StubHub, which thrived under her leadership and sold in 2020 right before the pandemic for $4+ billion. She is the founder and chairman of the Boardlist and has been profiled in Fortune, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and The New York Times, among others. She has been named one of Elle’s Power Women, one of the Most Creative People in Business by Fast Company, and one of the Top 100 People in the Valley by Business Insider. She is the author of Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)*. In this conversation, Sukhinder and I discuss how to handle a transition in a way that works for both you and the organization you’re leaving. We discuss the value of proactive communication and clear timelines — plus some of the hidden costs of transitioning poorly. Finally, we made the invitation to consider transitions in the context of your long-term career goals. Key Points Don’t leave before you leave. Putting in maximum effort until you’re gone protects your reputation and the impact you’ve worked to achieve. Beware the cost of lingering. You likely know the right timeframe for your departure — use that to frame your transition. Leave opportunity in your wake. Use remaining time to set the team up for success, provide coaching and mentoring, and make it an easier transition for others. Tie up loose ends before you depart. Leave the team an organization in a place you would want to inherit if you were the new leader coming in. Take small steps, middle steps, and big steps. Avoid fixating on the myth of the single choice. Careers come together with many choices, over time. Resources Mentioned Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)* by Sukhinder Singh Cassidy Related Episodes How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
22/11/2131m 45s

554: How to Multiply Your Impact, with Liz Wiseman

Liz Wiseman: Impact Players Liz Wiseman is a researcher and executive advisor. She is the author of the New York Times bestseller Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter*, The Multiplier Effect: Tapping the Genius Inside Our Schools*, and Wall Street Journal bestseller Rookie Smarts*. She is the CEO of The Wiseman Group, a leadership research and development firm headquartered in Silicon Valley. Her clients include: Apple, Disney, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Tesla, Twitter, and many others. Liz has been listed on the Thinkers50 ranking and named one of the top 10 leadership thinkers in the world. She is a former Oracle executive, who worked over the course of 17 years as the Vice President of Oracle University and as the global leader for Human Resource Development. Liz is the author of Impact Players: How to Take the Lead, Play Bigger, and Multiply Your Impact*. In this conversation, Liz and I discuss the mindset that’s most useful in making real traction in an organization. Plus, we explore practical steps that you can take to think bigger and get noticed for your work. Key Points The #1 thing managers appreciate: when employees do things that need doing without being asked. Upward empathy is the ability to consider what the bosses situation feels like — and what they need from you. Pursuing your passion sounds nice in a commencement speech, but can get in the way of what the organization actually needs. A job description might be a starting point, but it’s almost never the ending point. Beware of becoming the foosball player that does hard work in one spot, but misses the bigger picture. Become a nimble midfielder who plays where they are most needed. Resources Mentioned Impact Players: How to Take the Lead, Play Bigger, and Multiply Your Impact* by Liz Wiseman The Wiseman Group Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Benefit of Being a Rookie, with Liz Wiseman (episode 340) Influence Through Overlapping Networks, with Sandie Morgan (episode 422) How to Motivate Leaders, with John Maxwell (episode 452) Keep Your Ideas From Being Stolen (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
15/11/2137m 39s

553: The Four Storytelling Mistakes Leaders Make, with David Hutchens

David Hutchens: Story Dash David Hutchens helps leaders find and tell their stories. He works with leaders around the world to find, craft, and tell their most urgent stories for the purpose of creating shared meaning, preserving culture, disseminating learning, and speeding change in organizations. He has taught the Storytelling Leader program at some of the most influential organizations — and he’s written many books, including the Circle of the 9 Muses* and The Leadership Story Deck*. He is the co-creator with longtime friend of the show Susan Gerke of the GO Team program. He's also the author of the new book, Story Dash: Find, Develop, and Activate Your Most Valuable Business Stories...In Just a Few Hours*. In this conversation, David and I revisit the power of storytelling and highlight where many leaders go wrong. We explore the common mistakes that David sees in his work all over the world. Plus, we invite listeners into a few practical actions that will help stories land with better impact. Key Points Four mistakes that leaders make: They are not storytelling, sometimes because they don’t see themselves as storytellers or feel like they are performing. They don’t connect the story to the strategic intent but never clearly answering the “why am I telling this story?” question. They avoid emotional content of stories because they either don’t want to be emotional or are presenting to a “numbers person.” They expect it to just happen, instead of making intentional effort to make it happen. Resources Mentioned To receive David Hutchen’s Story Canvas, reach out to him at david@davidhutchens.com and tell him one valuable tip you gained from this episode. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Earn Attention, with Raja Rajamannar (episode 521) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
08/11/2140m 18s

552: The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts

Minda Harts: Right Within Minda Harts is the founder and CEO of The Memo and an advocate for women of color in the workplace. She is a sought-after speaker and thought-leader, frequently speaking on topics of advancing women of color, leadership, diversity, and entrepreneurship. She was named a LinkedIn Top Voice for Equity in the Workplace and was honored as one of BET’s Future 40. She has been a featured speaker at TEDx Harlem, Nike, Levi's, Bloomberg, Google, SXSW, and many other places. She is an adjunct assistant professor of public service at NYU. She also hosts Secure the Seat, a career podcast for women of color. Minda is the author of the bestselling book The Memo* and now her new book Right Within: How to Heal From Racial Trauma in the Workplace*. In this conversation, Minda and I discuss the daily actions that managers can do to support inclusion in the workplace, especially for women of color. We explore the unfortunate realities of systemic racism that still show up in many workplaces and how we can all do better. Plus, Minda invites us to consider the Manager’s Pledge and six key ways we can bring more equity into our organizations. Key Points The State of Black Women in Corporate America report finds that in 2020, Black women held 1.6 percent of vice president roles and 1.4 percent of executive suite positions. When someone says something racially charged, one of two things tend to happen: laugher or silence. We can do better. You don’t need to be the hero, but you do have a responsibility to start. All of us will mess up. Take inspiration from the Japanese art of Kintsugi, where the broken pieces reassembled become more beautiful than the original. We often miss the opportunities that are right in front of us. Starting there is how each of us bring justice into the world. Resources Mentioned Right Within: How to Heal From Racial Trauma in the Workplace* by Minda Harts Minda’s website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Support Women of Color, with Minda Harts (episode 506) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
01/11/2136m 30s

551: How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns

Vanessa Bohns: You Have More Influence Than You Think Vanessa Bohns is a social psychologist, an award-winning researcher and teacher, and a professor of organizational behavior at Cornell University. Her writing and research has been published in top academic journals in psychology, management, and law and has also been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, and NPR's Hidden Brain. Her book is titled You Have More Influence Than You Think: How We Underestimate Our Power of Persuasion, and Why It Matters*. In this conversation, Vanessa and I explore the conclusions of research: we often don’t recognize our own power. We detail some of the common patterns that leaders should watch for in their work. Most importantly, we discuss the practical steps that almost anybody can take to use power more responsibly. Key Points Power can lead people to underestimate their words and actions. A powerful person's whisper can sound more like a shout to the person they have power over. Power tends to lead people to ignore the perspective of others and to feel freer to do whatever they want. The effects of power are not inevitable. You can do better for others by thinking about power as responsibility. Adopt the lens of a third party in order to see the impact of your actions on others. To feel your impact better, ask people what they aren thinking of feeling, rather than simply imagining or assuming. One way to experience your influence by taking action to give positive recognition and feedback. Resources Mentioned You Have More Influence Than You Think: How We Underestimate Our Power of Persuasion, and Why It Matters* by Vanessa Bohns Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker (episode 395) How to Negotiate When Others Have Power, with Kwame Christian (episode 416) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
18/10/2137m 37s

550: How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark

Dorie Clark: The Long Game Dorie Clark has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50, and was recognized as the #1 Communication Coach in the world by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards. She is a consultant and keynote speaker and teaches executive education at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School. Dorie is the author of the bestselling books Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. Magazine. She has been described by the New York Times as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives.” She is a frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review and is now the author of her latest book, The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World*. In this conversation, Dorie and I discuss how to win the long game, even when things look bleak today. We examine the typical timelines that most professionals should expect in order to get traction on their work. Plus, we highlight three key questions to ask yourself during the toughest times. Key Points It’s often 2-3 years of sustained work before you see noticeable progress. To become a recognized expert, you should expect at least five years of consistent effort. People revisit strategy too often when instead they should often continue to follow their action plan. Even if you end up “losing,” strategize up front how the time and effort you put in is still a win. When times are toughest, ask three questions: Why am I doing this? How has it worked for others? What do my trusted advisors say? Resources Mentioned The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World* by Dorie Clark Long Game Strategic Thinking Self-Assessment Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Value of Being Uncomfortable, with Neil Pasricha (episode 448) How to Find Helpful Advisors, with Ethan Kross (episode 516) Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
11/10/2138m 59s

549: How to Actually Get Traction From Leadership Books, with Nicol Verheem

Nicol Verheem: Teradek Nicol Verheem is a globally recognized leader and innovator, senior business executive, serial entrepreneur, and prolific angel investor. He has been recognized for his impact in the film industry with a lifetime achievement award from the Society of Camera Operators and an Academy Award for Sciences and Engineering, also known as a Technical Oscar. He was also recently recognized with the Innovator of the Year Award from the leading business journal in Orange County, California. Nicol currently serves on the Executive Management Board of The Vitec Group, as the Divisional CEO of Creative Solutions, and as the CEO of Teradek. As a technology leader, his is responsible for the strategy, roadmap, and execution of Teradek’s highly recognized high tech video products driving more than $100M annual revenue -- with dominant market share across the globe. He is also a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this conversation, Nicol and I discuss how to take the ideas you hear in books, presentations, and podcasts — and make them your own. Nicol shares many examples of how he has done this in his organization in order grow a team that was ultimately recognized with an Academy Award. Plus, we discuss some of his mindsets that have helped drive the success of Teradek over the years. Key Points Leadership models aren’t always molded to your organization or situation. Adapt the idea to make it a better fit for you. Well intended language by an expert might not match the culture of your organization. Don’t hesitate to change a word or phrase to make sense to your team. Build relationships today with the people who will grow with you throughout your career. That’s “networking for commoners.” When interviewing, ask people about their hobbies or interests in order to discover if you can lead them to live out their passions. Resources Mentioned We'd Like to Thank the Academy by Teradek Coaching for Leaders Academy Related Episodes How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
09/10/2135m 31s

548: The Power in Empowering Differences, with Ashley Brundage

Ashley Brundage: Empowering Differences Ashley Brundage is the Founder and President of Empowering Differences. She's overcame homelessness, harassment, and discrimination and then, while seeking employment at a major financial institution, she self-identified during the interview process as a male to female transgender woman and subsequently was hired. She was offered a position and started as a part time bank teller and worked in various lines of business before moving to VP of Diversity & Inclusion in less than 5 years. Since beginning transitioning in 2008, she has worked tirelessly to promote awareness and acceptance of gender identity and expression. She serves on the Corporate Advisory Council for the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce. In 2019, she was voted on the National Board of Directors for GLAAD and has also been named one of Florida’s Most Powerful and Influential Women from the National Diversity Council. She is the author of Empowering Differences: Leveraging Differences to Impact Change*. In this conversation, Ashley and I discuss her experience in the working world as a transgender woman. We highlight key language that every leader should be aware of to support the differences of others. Plus, we discuss the initial steps that leaders can take in the workplace, especially related to gender identity. Key Points The harassment and discrimination that transgender people experience also finds its way into the workplace. Respect people’s pronouns — and leaders can highlight their own in order to create a safe space for others. Comfort and ability to use the restroom is something that organizations should address. A helpful starting point is dialogue and conversation. Beware of binary thinking in relation to gender — and many other ways we identify ourselves. Expand your horizon on the gender continuum. Resources Mentioned Empowering Differences: Leveraging Differences to Impact Change* by Ashley Brundage Empowering Differences Self Assessment Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
04/10/2134m 53s

547: How to Limit Time With the Wrong People, with Carey Nieuwhof

Carey Nieuwhof: At Your Best Carey Nieuwhof is a former lawyer, a bestselling leadership author, a podcaster, and the CEO of Carey Nieuwhof Communications. He speaks to leaders around the world about leadership, change, and personal growth. He writes a widely read leadership blog at CareyNieuwhof.com and also hosts the top-rated Carey Nieuwhof Leadership podcast. He’s the author of At Your Best: How to Get Time, Energy, and Priorities Working in Your Favor*. In this conversation, Carey and I explore the reality that so many of us face in both our personal and professional lives: spending time with the wrong kind of people. We discuss how to notice we’re not helping, how to limit time, and what to do when a conversation needs to happen. Plus, we make the invitation to proactively do what often gets missed: spending time with the right people more consistently. Key Points The people who want your time are rarely the people who should have your time. Many leaders give too much time and attention away to people who aren’t helped by the interaction. Having a frank conversation with a person who you’re not helping is usually good for both of you. If you’re not able to limit interactions with the wrong kind of person, line up those interactions outside of your key energy times. A key way to do better at limiting time with the wrong people is to affirmatively decide to spend time with the right people. Resources Mentioned Burnout Quiz At Your Best Today At Your Best: How to Get Time, Energy, and Priorities Working in Your Favor* by Carey Nieuwhof Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233) The Scientific Secrets of Daily Scheduling, with Daniel Pink (episode 332) How to Prepare for Conflict, with Amy Gallo (episode 530) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
27/09/2139m 18s

546: How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke

Connson Locke: Making Your Voice Heard Connson Locke is Professor (Education) of Management at the London School of Economics, where she teaches Leadership, Organizational Behaviour, and Negotiation and Decision Making. She has over 30 years experience as an educator, coach, and consultant working all around the world. Her highly popular Guardian Masterclass Developing Your Presence, Power and Influence regularly sells out. Connson is the recipient of a number of teaching awards from the London School of Economics. She's also the author of Making Your Voice Heard: How to Own Your Space, Access Your Inner Power, and Become Influential*. In this conversation, Connson and I explore the challenging situation that many professionals experience: speaking up. We discuss several key tactics that she has surfaced in her research to do this more effectively. Plus, we highlight several of the lessons Connson has discovered in her own experience that will help us (and others) do this with more success. Key Points Managing your negative emotions can help create movement for you. Reflecting or journaling is a key starting point. Change your attitude about failure by framing a growth mindset. Move away from repetition and towards deliberate practice. Instead of focusing on power difference, zero in on the other person’s role in helping you achieve a greater good. Plan free time around learning a new skill or helping others instead of watching Netflix or sitting on the beach. Resources Mentioned Making Your Voice Heard: How to Own Your Space, Access Your Inner Power, and Become Influential* by Connson Locke Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) Get Noticed Without Selling Out, with Laura Huang (episode 480) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Jumping In (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
20/09/2137m 43s

545: How to Prioritize, with Christy Wright

Christy Wright: Take Back Your Time Christy Wright is a #1 bestselling author, personal growth expert, and host of The Christy Wright Show. She’s also the founder of Business Boutique, which equips women to make money doing what they love. She loves helping women chase their version of success. She's the author of Take Back Your Time: The Guilt-Free Guide to Life Balance*. In this conversation, Christy and I explore how to get practical about what’s important, each day. We discuss effectives ways to use timeframes to establish priorities for ourselves — and how those same timeframes can help us turn off work. Key Points Establishing priorities moves you from a place of feeling like a failure to a place of feeling real success. Most of us are clear on our fixed priorities, but we’re less intentional about the flexible priorities that tend to be more practical in daily life. Consider establishing priorities through the timeframes of seasons, weeks, and days. Having clear priorities helps you not only be productive — but makes it easier to turn it off when it’s time to stop. Resources Mentioned Take Back Your Time: The Guilt-Free Guide to Life Balance* by Christy Wright Related Episodes The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319) Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431) How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
13/09/2139m 28s

544: Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr.

Johnny Taylor, Jr.: Reset Johnny Taylor, Jr. is President and CEO of SHRM, the Society for Human Resource Management. Johnny is frequently asked to testify before Congress on critical workforce issues and authors a weekly column, "Ask HR," in USA Today. Johnny was chairman of the President's Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities and served as a member of the White House American Workforce Policy Advisory Board during the Trump Administration. He is the author of the new book Reset: A Leader’s Guide to Work in an Age of Upheaval*. In this conversation, Johnny and I highlight the current challenges in discovering talent and the populations that have been historically overlooked. We discuss what SHRM’s research and experience are showing to help leaders make better decisions on finding talent. Plus, we explore how to best handle incentives, so that we create the kind of culture that we will value inside our organizations. Key Points Both line managers in organizations and human resource professionals agree: finding a deep enough talent pool is a big problem. Historically, attracting overlooked talent felt right, but may not have been essential to be competitive. Those times are ending for most organizations. Studies show that organizations who discover talent in older workers, differently abled workers, veterans, the formerly incarcerated, people of color, and LGBTQ populations see positive, long-term results. The incentives for finding overlooked talent often are transactional. To ensure sustainability, leaders must establish this as a value in their organizations. Resources Mentioned Reset: A Leader’s Guide to Work in an Age of Upheaval* by Johnny Taylor, Jr. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 301) Hire the Formerly Incarcerated, with Shelley Winner (episode 447) How to Support Women of Color, with Minda Harts (episode 506) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
06/09/2139m 55s

543: Leadership Lessons from NASA, with Dave Williams

Dave Williams: Leadership Moments from NASA Dave is an astronaut, aquanaut, jet pilot, emergency physician, scientist, CEO, and bestselling author. He is the former Director of Space & Life Sciences at NASA’s Johnson Space Center and has flown in space twice on Space Shuttles Columbia and Endeavour. Dave holds the Canadian spacewalking record and was the first Canadian to live on the world’s only undersea research habitat. He is the recipient of six honorary degrees, the Order of Canada, and the Order of Ontario. Along with Elizabeth Howell, he is the author of Leadership Moments from NASA: Achieving the Impossible*. In this conversation, Dave and I discuss some of the key events from NASA’s history since its inception. We highlight three principles that Dave has uncovered in his research of interviews with NASA leaders over the years. Plus, a few practical tips that can help all of us lead teams more effectively. Key Points Introspection is a key and necessary practice for all leaders to hold — and often pays off in unexpected ways. Speaking up and listening up are critical values that helped support many of the NASA successes over the years. Cultural norms, such as senior leaders showing up regularly at all levels of the organization, can help ensure that communication is actually happening. NASA is an example of the movement away from a single, heroic leader and towards leadership, followership, and teamwork. Resources Mentioned Leadership Moments from NASA: Achieving the Impossible* by Dave Williams and Elizabeth Howell Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth, with Chris Hadfield (episode 149) Find Courage to Speak When It Matters Most, with Allan McDonald (episode 229) The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 539) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
30/08/2135m 41s

542: Align Your Work With Your Why, with Kwame Marfo

Kwame Marfo Kwame Marfo is a director at Genentech in the San Francisco area. He is a graduate of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. He joins me in this episode to share how personal values can align intentionally with career choices. Key Points Kwame’s dad inspires the work he does today for others. An effective way to connect with others is to ask what books and podcasts they are listening to. This value of curiosity also came from Kwame’s dad. Getting diversity of leadership experience is useful to expand beyond an industry perspective. Establishing a vision gives clarity to what’s most important. Journaling has helped Kwame reflect on his life and illuminate gaps that lead to action. Don’t trust the summary. Resources Mentioned UnCommon Law Related Episodes Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) Craft a Career to Fit Your Strengths, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 424) How to Create Your Personal Vision (free membership required) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
28/08/2136m 49s

541: Ten Years of Leadership, with Dave Stachowiak

Dave Stachowiak: Coaching for Leaders In August of 2011, I started Coaching for Leaders as a small, side project. Ten years later, the show — and the community around it — have grown beyond my wildest expectations. In this conversation, my friend Scott Anthony Barlow of Happen to Your Career celebrates the 10-year anniversary of Coaching for Leaders by interviewing me about my journey. Key Points I originally started the podcast as a side project to support a future transition into academia. Three things that I focused on at the start that are still central today: useful conversations, audio quality, and consistency. Focusing on quality and depth of conversations is more valuable than trying to hit everything. I realized at some point that I needed to make an affirmative choice to grow the side project into a business. Although I had considered a transition away from Dale Carnegie for years, my actual departure was (ironically) a non-event. Behavior change is a painful but necessary step in the learning process. There are two ways to bring light into the world. One is to be the light — the other is to reflect it. Bonus Audio What I've Learned About Learning Resources Mentioned Happen to Your Career Related Episodes How to Transform Your Limitations Into Advantages, with Mark Barden (episode 207) Tom Henschel Interviews Dave (episode 300) What High Performers Aren’t Telling You, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 466) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
23/08/2138m 44s

540: How to Create Space, with Juliet Funt

Juliet Funt: A Minute to Think Juliet Funt is a renowned keynote speaker and tough-love advisor to the Fortune 500 who is regularly featured in top global media outlets, including Forbes and Fast Company. She is the founder and CEO of The Juliet Funt Group, helping business leaders and organizations to unleash their full potential by unburdening talent from busywork. She has earned one of the highest ratings in the largest leadership event in the world, and she has worked with brands such as Spotify, National Geographic, Costco, Pepsi, Nike, and many more. Her new book is titled, A Minute to Think: Reclaim Creativity, Conquer Busyness, and Do Your Best Work. In this conversation, Juliet and I explore the four assets that many leaders bring to the workplace — and when taken too far, how these assets become risks. Juliet shares four questions we can ask of ourselves (and perhaps of others) that will surface where to start with finding space. Plus, we discuss some of the practical steps leaders can take to influence a culture of margin with their teams. Key Points The science is showing what many of us have experienced intuitively: space itself helps us to explore and expand possibility. Key assets can, if overused, become risks. These risks manifest in four ways: overdrive, perfectionism, overload, and frenzy. Four questions are useful starting points for controlling risk: When the risk is overdrive, the question is: Is there anything I can let go of?  When the risk is perfectionism, the question is: Where is ‘good enough’, good enough? When the risk is overload, the question is: What do I truly need to know? When the risk is frenzy, the question is: What deserves my attention? Resources Mentioned The Busyness Test A Minute to Think: Reclaim Creativity, Conquer Busyness, and Do Your Best Work* by Juliet Funt Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Power of Solitude, with Mike Erwin (episode 308) How to Change Your Behavior, with BJ Fogg (episode 507) How High Achievers Begin to Find Balance, with Michael Hyatt (episode 522) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
16/08/2139m 27s

539: The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein

Edgar Schein and Peter Schein: Humble Inquiry Edgar Schein is Professor Emeritus of MIT's Sloan School of Management. He is the recipient of the Distinguished Scholar Practitioner Award from the Academy of Management, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Leadership Association, and the Lifetime Achievement Award in Organization Development from the International OD Network. Peter Schein is COO of the Organizational Culture and Leadership Institute. He provides counsel to senior management on organizational development challenges facing private and public sector entities worldwide. He is a contributing author to the 5th edition of Organizational Culture and Leadership and co-author of Humble Leadership and The Corporate Culture Survival Guide. The pair co-founded the Organizational Culture and Leadership Institute and have written several books together, including two in the Humble Leadership series. They’ve recently released the second edition of Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling*. In this conversation, Edgar, Peter, and I explore the four relationship levels and invite leaders to move professional relationships from level 1 to level 2. A key entry point for this is to artfully reveal some of the things we tend to conceal. We discuss some practical steps to take — and the benefit for leaders and organizations. Key Points The four relationship levels: Level –1: Domination/exploitation Level 1: Transactional (professional distance) Level 2: Personal (openness and trust) Level 3: Intimacy We all conceal things. A useful way to build a relationship is for people to open up more of their concealed selves. A relationship is dance — improv if you will. We need to be willing to share the mic with the other party. Open-ended questions like, “What’s different today?” can help people to show up in the way they want to. Traditionally, we expected the person with more status to take the first step. That doesn’t necessarily need to be the case. Notice your own motivations, interventions, and contributions to the relationship. Resources Mentioned Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling* by Edgar Schein and Peter Schein The Organizational Culture and Leadership Institute Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
09/08/2138m 26s

538: Help a Know-It-All Behave Better, with Mark Goulston

Mark Goulston: Talking to Crazy Mark Goulston is a Founding Member of the Newsweek Expert Forum and a Marshall Goldsmith MG100 Coach, who works with founders, entrepreneurs and CEOs in dealing with and overcoming psychological and interpersonal obstacles to realizing their full potential. He is the host of the My Wakeup Call podcast and was a UCLA professor of psychiatry for more than twenty years and is also a former FBI hostage negotiation trainer. One of his many bestselling books is Talking to 'Crazy': How to Deal with the Irrational and Impossible People in Your Life*. In this conversation, Mark and I discuss some of the key principles that are effective in diffusing difficult or irrational behavioral. When that behavior is coming from someone who seems to be a know-it-all, we explore three steps that will help you guide them towards better behavior. Key Points In his book, Mark writes about know-it-alls: They don’t say, “People think I’m a jerk, and I need to change my behavior.” Instead, they say, “People dislike me because they’re stupid and incompetent.” This convinces the know-it-alls that they need to double down on quashing the spirits of their victims. If you treat people like they are nuts are you are not, they will just bite down deeper on their thinking. Lean into their irrationality to change the dynamic. Most people react to know-it-alls by becoming defensive or sullen. You’re better to take to opposite approach. Start by genuinely recognizing the talents and know-it-all brings to the workplace. Lead a conversation about behavior change with them by first leading with a genuine compliment about their talents. Once that is established, describe how their actions are self-defeating in a way that reinforces the strength you’ve highlighted. Resources Mentioned Talking to 'Crazy': How to Deal with the Irrational and Impossible People in Your Life* by Mark Goulston My Wakeup Call podcast with Mark Goulston Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91) How to Manage Abrasive Leaders, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 290) Where You May Be Provoking Anxiety, with Erica Dhawan (episode 528) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
02/08/2132m 31s

537: How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley

Tsedal Neeley: Remote Work Revolution Tsedal Neeley is a professor at the Harvard Business School. Her work focuses on how leaders can scale their organizations by developing and implementing global and digital strategies. She has published extensively in leading scholarly and practitioner-oriented outlets and her work has been widely covered in media outlets such as the BBC, CNN, Financial Times, NPR, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist. She was named to the Thinkers50 On the Radar list for making lasting contributions to management and is the recipient of many other awards and honors for her teaching and research. She is the author of Remote Work Revolution: Succeeding from Anywhere*. In this conversation, Tsedal and I explore what the research shows us about productivity and fear around remote work. We highlight three key principles that leaders can lean in on in order to engage remote teams better. Plus, Tsedal provides practical examples on how almost any leader can put these principles into action. Key Points The research has been clear for decades that employees are more productive working remotely. Surveillance software and services are almost always a poor direction for leaders and organizations. Leaders should structure unstructured time for informal interactions — and should be the ones who initiate these conversations. Emphasize individuals and individual differences, even more so than you might in person. Avoid referring to people by their membership in subgroups. In addition to not shutting down conflict, leaders in remote settings need to force it, so the best ideas can emerge on the team. Resources Mentioned Remote Work Revolution: Succeeding from Anywhere* by Tsedal Neeley Tsedal Neeley’s website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) Transitioning to Remote Leadership, with Tammy Bjelland (episode 509) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
26/07/2136m 38s

536: How to Make One-on-Ones Valuable, with Jonathan Raymond

Jonathan Raymond: Good Authority Jonathan Raymond is the founder of Refound, where he and his team work with organizations to create a company culture based in personal growth. He’s the author of the book Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For*. He's also the creator of the Accountability Dial and the courses Good Accountability and Good Alignment. In this conversation, Jonathan and I discuss the importance of starting with the purpose for a role when considering how to approach one-on-ones. We frame the importance of elevation and linking professional activities with personal growth. Plus, we invite leaders to begin with a few, practical steps. Key Points Begin with the purpose of the role. Clarity on expectations and personal growth will both come from there. Utilize curiosity to begin to align on expectations and what’s next. Elevation is a key competency for managers in one-on-ones. Help employees link what the role needs and how their personal growth aligns to it. Be willing to stay flexible on how often and how long you meet for. There are times when more interaction may be wise, but one-on-ones should not take over your professional life as a manager. Few managers do this well. Even small movement to get better at supporting your employees can provide big returns in retention. Resources Mentioned Good Alignment course* Good Accountability course* Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For by Jonathan Raymond Related Episodes How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Define a Role, with Pat Griffin (episode 517) How to Help People Thrive, with Jim Harter (episode 532) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
19/07/2137m 19s

535: The Art of Constructing Apologies, with Sandra Sucher

Sandra Sucher: The Power of Trust Sandra Sucher is an internationally recognized trust researcher and professor of management practice at Harvard Business School. She studies how organizations build trust and the vital role leaders play in the process. Before joining Harvard, she was a business executive for 20 years, served on corporate and nonprofit boards, and has been Chair of the Better Business Bureau. As an advisor to the Edelman Trust Barometer, her research has been featured in several national publications. She is the author with Shalene Gupta of the book, The Power of Trust: How Companies Build It, Lose It, Regain It*. In this conversation, Sandra and I explore the three elements of a good apology in the professional setting. We also look at additional elements the research suggests may be useful in many places in our lives. Finally, Sandra highlights some ways we can do better on empathy in order to avoid situations where we destroy trust. Key Points Combine three elements for a good apology, especially in a professional setting: Acknowledgment of responsibility: The offender makes a statement that demonstrates they understand their part in the trust betrayal. Explanation: The offender describes the reasons for the problem. Offer of repair: The offender offers a solution for rebuilding trust. In addition, consider three more elements for apologies in any scenario: Expression of regret: The offender expresses how sorry they are. Declaration of repentance: The offender promises not to make the same mistake again. Request for forgiveness: The offender explicitly asks for pardon. To interrupt the reality that leaders tend to struggle with empathy: Reflect in writing with as much detail as possible about the people and situation in question. Ask yourself, “Am I being fair?” Resources Mentioned The Power of Trust: How Companies Build It, Lose It, Regain It* by Sandra Sucher and Shalene Gupta The Power of Trust website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) The Choice for Compassion, with Edith Eger (episode 336) The Way Into Difficult Conversations, with Kwame Christian (episode 497) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
12/07/2138m 20s

534: How to Deal With an Unsupportive Colleague, with Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Mark asked our advice on how to navigate a sensitive situation with an unsupportive colleague. Geraldine wondered about how to implement management accountability with public sector employees. Samuel asked about building personal capacity. James asked if we were aware of resources for a leadership body of knowledge. Resources Mentioned 7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey Getting Things Done* by David Allen Center for Creative Leadership Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership How to Win Friends and Influence People* by Dale Carnegie The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations* by James Kouzes and Barry Posner Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Related Episodes Eight Ways To Use Power For Good (episode 154) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Say No Without Saying No, with Lois Frankel (episode 471) How to Create Your Personal Vision (free membership required) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
05/07/2139m 54s

533: How to Build Confidence, with Katy Milkman

Katy Milkman: How to Change Katy Milkman is an award-winning behavioral scientist and professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She hosts Charles Schwab’s popular behavioral economics podcast Choiceology, and is the co-founder and co-director of The Behavior Change for Good Initiative. Katy has worked with or advised dozens of organizations on how to spur positive change and her research is regularly featured in major media outlets such as The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and NPR. She is the author of the book, How to Change: The Science of Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be*. In this conversation, Katy and I explore the research on confidence. We highlight some of the key tactics we can use to enhance our own feelings of confidence. Plus, we explore some of the ways that leaders may be able to support confidence-building in others. Key Points Self doubt affects our ability to take action. Our expectations shape reality. How we think about something affects how it is. Leaders can support those with less confidence by inviting them to be a mentor or coach for others. Set ambitious goals, but allow yourself a limited number of emergency passes when you slip up. Focus on personal experiences that make you feel successful or proud. Resources Mentioned How to Change: The Science of Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be* by Katy Milkman Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Make New Behaviors Stick, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 196) The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458) How to Change Your Behavior, with BJ Fogg (episode 507) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
28/06/2139m 42s

532: How to Help People Thrive, with Jim Harter

Jim Harter: Wellbeing at Work Jim Harter is Chief Scientist for Gallup’s workplace management and wellbeing practices. He has led more than 1,000 studies of workplace effectiveness and is the bestselling coauthor of It’s the Manager, 12: The Elements of Great Managing, and Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements. Jim has also published articles in many prominent business and academic journals and he's the author with Jim Clifton of Wellbeing at Work: How to Build Resilient and Thriving Teams*. In this conversation, Jim and I discuss Gallup’s recent research findings on what managers and organizations can do to support wellbeing at work. We highlight the five key elements of wellbeing from the research and the obstacles that managers and organizations face in supporting these. Plus, we share practical steps that each of us can take to support wellbeing among the people in our organizations. Key Points People report that their strongest links to net thriving are “my job” and “my manager.” The five key elements of wellbeing are, in this order: Career, Social, Financial, Physical, and Community. Many people report that “time with a manager” is the worst part of the day. To support better wellbeing, make it a part of regular career conversations. Have open conversations about pay philosophies. Data shows this is even more important than the actual salary. Giving meaningful feedback every week is a basic requirement of management. Gallup’s data shows that only half of employees worldwide know what is expected of that at work, a significant contributor to stress and anxiety. Resources Mentioned Wellbeing at Work: How to Build Resilient and Thriving Teams* by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) How to Manage Abrasive Leaders, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 290) How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) Gallup Findings on the Changing Nature of Work, with Jim Harter (episode 409) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
21/06/2139m 59s

531: Make Your Vision a Reality, with Manu Mazzanti

Manu Mazzanti Manu Mazzanti is an energy giver who brings focus and resilience to bold and daring transformative journeys. As a regional talent development leader for a global consulting firm, Manu is committed to enabling talent potential through coaching, facilitation, and leadership development. He is out there to make an impact as a father, conscious leader, and marathon runner. Manu is also an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. Key Points Ken Coleman’s analogy of climbing the mountain (and realizing you might be on the wrong one) was helpful to identify what was next. Keith Ferrazzi says that leadership starts with us. In addition, we all have the opportunity to do a lot of leading without authority. James Clear’s work was helpful to make habit changes easily instead of trying to make major changes, at all at once. The Academy helped provide a framework for the 2-3 year vision and take daily actions to bring it into reality. Resources Mentioned Manu Mazzanti on LinkedIn Coaching for Leaders Academy Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World* by Carley Hauck Create a World That Works: Tools for Personal and Global Transformation* by Alan Seale and Cheryl Dorsey Related Episodes How to Find Your Calling, with Ken Coleman (episode 352) How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
19/06/2137m 10s

530: How to Prepare for Conflict, with Amy Gallo

Amy Gallo: HBR Guide to Dealing with Conflict Amy Gallo is an expert in conflict, communication, and workplace dynamics. She combines the latest management research with practical advice to deliver evidence-based ideas on how to improve relationships and excel at work. She is the author of the Harvard Business Review Guide to Dealing with Conflict*, a how-to guidebook about handling conflict professionally and productively. In her role as a contributing editor at Harvard Business Review, Amy writes frequently about a range of topics with a focus on interpersonal dynamics, communicating ideas, leading and influencing people, and building your career. She is also co-host of Harvard Business Review’s Women at Work podcast, which is in its sixth season. In this conversation, Amy and I discuss some of the key strategies that have emerged from her research on the most effective ways to prepare for conflict. We explore why a larger strategy is more important than a script, how to plan out your message, and the value of taking the other side’s perspective. Key Points Be honest with yourself that a conversation may be difficult, but also seek a constructive way to frame it. Take your counterpart’s perspective, but don’t assume you know everything they are thinking. Plan your message by appealing to a shared goal. Focus your efforts on framing the larger strategy and outcome rather than a specific script or phrases. Avoid scripting out a conversation, but have clarity on how you will start and the 2-3 points you need to convey. When conflict emerges in the organization, leaders are wise to lean into it rather than shutting it down in the moment. Resources Mentioned Harvard Business Review Guide to Dealing with Conflict* by Amy Gallo Harvard Business Review’s Women at Work podcast Amy Gallo’s website Related Episodes How to Manage Abrasive Leaders, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 290) The Way Into Difficult Conversations, with Kwame Christian (episode 497) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
14/06/2138m 32s

529: The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley

Amanda Ripley: High Conflict Amanda Ripley is an investigative journalist and a New York Times bestselling author. She’s spent her career trying to make sense of complicated human mysteries, from what happens to our brains in a disaster to how some countries manage to educate virtually all their kids to think for themselves. Her first book, The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes—and Why*, was published in 15 countries and turned into a PBS documentary. Her next book, The Smartest Kids in the World—and How They Got That Way*, was a New York Times bestseller. Her most recent book is High Conflict: Why We Get Trapped and How We Get Out*. In this conversation, Amanda and I discuss the distinction between good, healthy conflict — and high conflict that becomes unproductive for almost everybody. We discuss how humiliation is often such a strong catalyst for high conflict. Finally, we explore many of the practical steps to take in order to avoid the worst conflicts and do better for ourselves and our organizations. Key Points Good conflict often brings surprises, but high conflict is surprisingly predictable. Humiliation is one of the most powerful fire starters in triggering high conflict. Limit humiliation by avoiding attacks on someone’s identity, especially in a public forum. Distancing yourself from “conflict entrepreneurs” can help provide the space to emerge from high conflict. Resist binaries and us vs. them language. When people get sorted into two groups, that can lay a foundation for high conflict. Slowing down conflict can often provide the opportunity to emerge with productive dialogue. Resources Mentioned High Conflict: Why We Get Trapped and How We Get Out* by Amanda Ripley Related Episodes How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Find Confidence in Conflict, with Kwame Christian (episode 380) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
07/06/2137m 39s

528: Where You May Be Provoking Anxiety, with Erica Dhawan

Erica Dhawan: Digital Body Language Erica Dhawan is a globally recognized leadership expert and keynote speaker helping organizations and leaders innovate faster and further, together. Named as one of the top management professionals around the world by Global Gurus, she is the founder and CEO of Cotential, a company that has helped leaders and teams leverage twenty-first-century collaboration skills. Erica’s writing has appeared in dozens of publications, including Fast Company and Harvard Business Review. She is the co-author of Get Big Things Done* and the author of the new book, Digital Body Language: How to Build Trust and Connection, No Matter the Distance*. In this conversation, Erica and I highlight common missteps that cause leaders to generate unnecessary anxiety from their communication. We discuss how brevity, response time, passive aggressiveness, and formality can work against us — and what we can adjust on our own behaviors to do better. Key Points In a way, all of us are now immigrants, processing more interactions in a digital world that is less familiar. Excessive brevity may save a few keystrokes or seconds in the moment, but can generate lots of extra work for the team and organization. Reduce anxiety by being explicit about our expectations on response time and teaching others what to expect from us. Changing tone and formality without explanation can be jarring. Seemingly unimportant choices like who we list first on emails can generate assumptions from those we’re communicating to. Resources Mentioned Digital Body Language: How to Build Trust and Connection, No Matter the Distance* by Erica Dhawan The Digital Body Language Expert Course Related Episodes How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Run an Online Meeting, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 472) How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
31/05/2137m 26s

527: The Ways to Pay it Forward, with Glenn Parker

Glenn Parker: Positive Influence Glenn Parker is a team building and organizational consultant to many of the world's leading corporations, including Novartis, Merck, Lucent, and Accenture. He is the author of 15 books, including the bestsellers, Team Players and Teamwork: New Strategies for Developing Successful Collaboration* and Cross-Functional Teams: Working with Allies, Enemies, and Other Strangers*. Glenn's assessment survey, the Parker Team Player Survey, published by CPP, has sold more than one million copies. He is the author with his son Michael Parker of the book, Positive Influence: The Leader Who Helps People Become Their Best Self*. In this episode, Glenn and I discuss the importance of leaders recognizing the contributions of other leaders in our careers — and the ways we can become positive influences for others. We detail the four different ways to be a supportive leader and the first steps that each of us can take to do this more consistently. Key Points Four different ways to be a leader who has a positive influence on others: The Supportive Positive Influence Leader: the one who believes in you The Teacher Positive Influence Leader: the one who helps you develop the skills you need The Motivating Positive Influence Leader: the one who shows you why you need to do something and helps you believe that you can do it The Role Model Positive Influence Leader: the one who demonstrates through their actions how you can be successful Resources Mentioned Positive Influence: The Leader Who Helps People Become Their Best Self* by Glenn Parker and Michael Parker Related Episodes Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
24/05/2135m 37s