Editor's Picks from The Economist

Editor's Picks from The Economist

By The Economist

Selected articles from the audio edition of The Economist

Episodes

Editor’s Picks: August 10th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the absent student, (9:55) Beirut: a city in ruins, (19:45) and why TV from China’s Hunan province has become so popular.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/08/2027m 31s

Editor’s Picks: August 3rd 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Google: how to cope with middle age (9:15), migration as the pandemic recedes (16:25), and regional inequality in Britain. The Economist's editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, hosts.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/08/2024m 23s

Editor’s Picks: July 27th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the new era of macroeconomics; (9:25) the EU after striking a huge deal; (17:00) and the challenges for Mexico as its youth departs.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/07/2028m 2s

Editor’s Picks: July 20th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Huawei and the tech cold war; (8:55) millions of young minds are going to waste; (16:10) and a new material helps transistors become vanishingly small.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/07/2023m 58s

Editor’s Picks: July 13th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how not to tackle American racism, (10:28) a better way to contain Iran’s nuclear programme, (14:38) and the battle for low-earth orbit.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/07/2022m 27s

Editor’s Picks: July 6th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Joe Biden: Retro or radical? (9:34), the world is not experiencing a second wave of covid-19—it never got over the first (15:25), and a phoney referendum shows that Putin’s legitimacy is fading. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/07/2028m 32s

Editor’s Picks: June 29th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the next catastrophe and how to survive it; (9:40) the risks of annexation for Israel; (21:50) and the Wirecard scandal. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/06/2027m 51s

Editor’s Picks: June 22nd 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Amazon is essential, but vulnerable; (10:35) pandemic politics in Britain; (18:15) and the United Nations after 75 years. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/06/2026m 49s

Editor's Picks: June 15th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the power of protest and the legacy of George Floyd; (11:07) life in great cities after the pandemic; (17:55) and the lessons from one hundred Bartleby columns on work and management. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/06/2023m 15s

Editor’s Picks: June 8th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Police violence, race and protest in America, How will China’s Belt and Road Initiative survive? (10:30) And, Alexander Pushkin’s productive lockdown (23:10). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/06/2034m 19s

Editor’s Picks: June 1st 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the world’s most powerful country is handling covid-19, China’s decision to impose a security law on Hong Kong threatens a broader reckoning (10:04). And why mercenaries are still hired by African governments (18:30).For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31/05/2027m 52s

Editor’s Picks: May 25th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the chance to flatten the climate curve, when, why and how to lift coronavirus lockdowns (9:25) and the arrest of Africa’s most wanted man (17:25).  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/05/2022m 29s

Editor’s Picks: May 18th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, has covid-19 killed globalisation? Why the European Union is having a bad crisis (10:55) and how Mike Pompeo is confusing leadership with bashing his opponents (19:20). Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/05/2026m 44s

Editor’s Picks: May 11th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the dangerous gap between Wall Street and Main Street in America, (10:22) high-speed science—new research on the coronavirus is being released in a torrent. (21:00) And, casual sex is out, companionship is in. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/05/2029m 52s

Editor’s Picks: May 4th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, a 90% economy—life after lockdowns will be hard in ways that are difficult to imagine today. Also, a bust-up in Brasilia (10:10), and solitude is both a blessing and a curse (17:25). Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/05/2032m 30s

Editor's Picks: April 27th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how will governments cope with the expensive legacy of covid-19? (11:05), unscrupulous autocrats in the pandemic of power grabs (17:52), and, why Netflix’s success will continue. Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/04/2024m 8s

Editor's Picks: April 20th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is China the pandemic’s big geopolitical winner? (8:30) Saudi Arabia has declared a ceasefire in Yemen, but the Houthis are fighting on. (14:13) And, how Britain's glossy magazines are adjusting to a gloomy world. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/04/2017m 22s

Editor’s Picks: April 13th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the business of survival—those companies that survive the coronavirus crisis will need to master a new environment. Plus, how to reopen factories after covid-19 (9:23) and Venezuela's navy battles a cruise ship, and loses (17:41).  The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/04/2021m 33s

Editor’s Picks: April 6th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, covid-19 presents grim choices between life, death and, ultimately, the economy (11:02), lockdowns in Asia have sparked a stampede home (17:52) And, Formula 1 comes up with a breathing machine for covid-19 patients. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/04/2020m 54s

Editor’s Picks: March 30th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the role of big government in the time of covid-19, (10:20) assessing the havoc the pandemic is causing in emerging countries, (17:45) and, a guide to videoconferencing etiquette. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/03/2022m 9s

Editor’s Picks: March 23rd 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the covid-19 pandemic is shutting planet earth down (10:55) America’s financial plumbing has seized up (19:30) and the show must go on for London’s theatres. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/03/2023m 35s

Editor’s Picks: March 16th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the politics of pandemics, (09:40) stress-testing the NHS, (17:50) and, the fallout of the oil war. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/03/2024m 22s

Editor’s Picks: March 5th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the covid-19 pandemic threatens an economic crisis as well as a health crisis. Both need fixing. (9:16) The battle for liberty in Africa—across the continent, young protesters are standing up to ageing autocrats. (17:06) And, how Jack Welch, former boss of GE, transformed American capitalism.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/03/2028m 5s

Editor’s Picks: February 27th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what can be done about the viral pandemic that is sweeping the world (9:07), the dangerous consequences of forcing Americans to choose between Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump (16:56), and three lessons from Bob Iger, the king of Disneyland. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/02/2024m 43s

Editor’s Picks: February 20th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to make sense of the latest tech surge, (10:20) examining Jeff Bezos’s $10bn promise to fight climate change (15:30) and, Bagehot on Boris - the imperial prime minister. Zanny Minton-Beddoes, The Economist’s Editor-in-chief hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/02/2022m 25s

Editor's Picks February 13th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week Irish unification is becoming more likely, (09:40) Angela Merkel’s presumed successor quits as party boss (16:30) and, looking at the world through the eyes of options traders Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/02/2021m 59s

Editor’s Picks: February 6th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the state of the Democrats. (10:20) What does it take to be a CEO in the 2020s? (18:40) And, QE or not QE? The Economist‘s editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
06/02/2024m 38s

Editor’s picks: January 30th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, will the Wuhan virus become a pandemic? (09:40) The United Kingdom leaves the European Union. (17:55) And, drugs offered to transgender children need to be used more cautiously.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/01/2022m 23s

Editor’s Picks: January 23rd 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Narendra Modi and the ruling BJP are sowing division in India. (10:06) Investors at home and abroad are piling into American government debt. (16:31) And, the similarities between Britain’s queen and Sir Alex Ferguson. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/01/2020m 23s

Editor’s Picks: January 16th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the consequences of the West's obsession with homeownership. (8:58) Vladimir Putin’s power grab. (14:08) And, Harry, Meghan and Marx—why Brand Sussex represents the biggest threat to the monarchy so farPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/01/2021m 27s

Editor’s Picks: January 9th 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the fallout from the killing of Qassem Suleimani. (09:30) Can a new boss salvage the reputation of Boeing? (17:47) And, a right-royal shake-up Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/01/2020m 59s

Editor’s Picks: January 2nd 2020

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, don’t be fooled by the phase one trade deal between China and America. (10:20) Finding new physics requires a new particle collider. (30:52) And, a dispute over racism roils the world of romance novelists Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/01/2035m 56s

Editor’s Picks: 26th December 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the holiday issue of The Economist. This week, visiting the most diverse district in Africa, (17:30) meeting the Cockneys of Thetford, (34:22) and the tangled history of California’s eucalyptus trees.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26/12/1949m 7s

Editor’s Picks: December 19th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the holiday issue of The Economist. This week, the phenomenon of technological pessimism (08:23), how to cut homelessness in the world’s priciest cities (12:51), and how China made the piano it’s ownPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/12/1929m 14s

Editor’s picks election special: December 13th 2019

A UK election special featuring a selection of three essential articles from our coverage of the night, read aloud. Victory for Boris Johnson’s all-new Tories. Why not to expect the Labour Party to move back to the centre quickly (08:50). And, why markets surged after the Conservative victory (16:31)Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/12/1920m 23s

Editor’s picks: December 12th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, President Trump deserves to be removed for attempting to tip the 2020 election. (11:37) A long-promised pension reform in France will coddle the old and squeeze the young. (17:20) And, how grime is helping Britain’s left-behindPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12/12/1920m 59s

Editor’s picks: December 5th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, an electoral nightmare before Christmas for Britain. (10:10) China’s behind-the-scenes battle for influence in the United Nations. (18:10) And, how to make a small supercomputer with a really big chipPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/12/1922m 33s

Editor’s picks: November 28th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, inequality could be lower than you think (11:20), Britain’s Labour Party plans to redistribute political power as well as income (17:30), and Mexico’s President is using a crusade against corruption to take controlPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/11/1925m 39s

Editor’s picks: November 21st 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Hong Kong is not the only part of China’s periphery to resent the heavy hand of the Communist party. (9:20) What happens when McKinsey, the high priesthood of management consultancy, is itself disrupted? (16:51) And, if disaster strikes, the Swiss want to be caffeinated____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer____________________  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
21/11/1920m 6s

Editor’s picks: November 14th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Democrats want impeachment hearings to change the public’s view of Donald Trump. That will be difficult. (10:50) The tangled politics surrounding a killing and its aftermath in Gaza. (16:30) And, for aircraft-carriers, bigger isn’t betterPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14/11/1921m 39s

Editor’s picks: November 7th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Emmanuel Macron warns that Europe is “on the edge of a precipice”. (9:20) Bashing billionaires is misguided. (15:40) And, could the internet splinter along nation-state lines? ____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer____________________  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/11/1928m 15s

Editor’s picks: November 1st 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Islamic State after the death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. (11:12) The reinvention of the MBA for the next business revolution. (22:33) And, why Donald Trump’s hostile reception at the World Series was a defining moment in his presidencyFor full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/11/1929m 48s

Editor’s picks: October 24th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why Elizabeth Warren’s plan for American capitalism is not the answer to the country’s problems. (10:30) Russia’s increasing influence in Africa (21:20) And, IPOs are a racket but try finding something better  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24/10/1928m 46s

Editor’s picks: October 17th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Donald Trump’s betrayal of the Kurds is a blow to America’s credibility. (09:40) The proposed Brexit agreement is different to anything advertised during the referendum. (14:40) And the Japanese royal family has little room to make itself more relevant. Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
17/10/1922m 3s

Editor’s picks: October 10th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the strange new rules of the world economy. (9:40) A long-feared clash between Turkey and Syria’s Kurds will have consequences across the Middle East. (17:00) And, a tale of adventure in a library of ice  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
10/10/1925m 9s

Editor’s picks: October 3rd 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, computers will increasingly call the shots in financial markets. (10:00) China’s nationalism is the world’s problem. (17:30) And, how to reinforce the border wall with a gator-infested moat  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
03/10/1921m 37s

Editor’s picks: September 27th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the promise and the perils of impeachment. (9:10) China’s repression of Islam is spreading beyond Xinjiang. (21:22) And, proof has emerged that a quantum computer can outperform a classical one  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27/09/1929m 20s

Editor’s picks: September 19th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, climate change must be tackled urgently and clear-headedly. (12:50) Israel’s prime minister has lost his majority. (19:00) And, why Russia is ambivalent about global warming  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19/09/1926m 32s

Editor’s picks: September 13th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the “internet of things” revolution is about to go into overdrive. Europe’s best hope of economic revival lies in its neglected single market (09:29). And, Neanderthals and the consequences of chronic earache (18:02)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/09/1922m 13s

Editor’s picks: September 5th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, President Assad clings to power in Syria. (10:40) The Conservatives tightening embrace of populism has set up Britain for a dangerously polarised election. (15:20) And, Americans are paying more for their lobster sandwiches  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
05/09/1918m 16s

Editor’s picks: August 29th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, after Boris Johnson announced he will temporarily suspend Parliament, how can MPs stop a no-deal Brexit? The conflict between Israel and Iran is widening (10:00). And, vertical farming is on the up (16:40)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29/08/1926m 28s

Editor’s picks: August 22nd 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, our cover story on what companies are for (12:20) Also, Matteo Salvini hopes elections will make him Italy’s prime minister. (18:40) And how Burgundy wine investors have beaten the stock market  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22/08/1923m 17s

Editor’s picks: August 15th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, markets are braced for a global downturn. (10:00) Bernie Sanders could hand the Democratic ticket to a moderate. (18:02) And, investors are growing disenchanted with Narendra Modi  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
15/08/1931m 2s

Editor’s picks: August 8th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, China’s response to the protests in Hong Kong could have global repercussions.  The British government claims it is too late for MPs to prevent the country leaving the EU on October 31st. Yet many are determined to try (9:12). And, Norway has had its fillet of fish-smugglers (16:33)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
08/08/1919m 47s

Editor’s picks: August 1st 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the collapse of the Amazon, which is home to 40% of Earth’s rainforest, would be felt far beyond Brazil’s borders. America’s central bank has cut rates for the first time in more than a decade (9:40). And, meal delivery is anything but a tasty business (15:20)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
01/08/1923m 36s

Editor’s picks: July 25th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, to stop a no-deal Brexit, moderate Tory MPs must be ready to bring down Boris Johnson. The growing friendship between Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping is much better for China than it is for Russia (8:50). And, the business of live music – how big stars maximise their take from tours (16:30)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/07/1920m 36s

Editor’s Picks: July 18th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Donald Trump’s re-election campaign is likely to be even more racially divisive than his first. WhatsApp has become Africa’s most popular messaging platform but also a political tool to spread misinformation (8’22). And, drag performers in China are adapting to their socially conservative society (16’17).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/07/1921m 52s

Editor’s picks: July 11th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: could America’s longest economic expansion on record be coming to an end? How India’s hunt for “illegal immigrants” is aimed at Muslims, including many citizens (09:20). And, employers are wrongly looking for superhero candidates (14:30).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/07/1919m 27s

Editor’s picks: July 4th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the global crisis in conservatism. Royal Dutch Shell’s boss delivers some hard truths on oil and climate change (10:18). And, insects become fish food (18:00)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/07/1927m 39s

Editor’s picks: June 28th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how should the world contain Iran? Reparations for slavery is a morally appealing but flawed idea (9:08). And, Europe heroically defends itself against veggie burgers (16:30)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/06/1921m 16s

Editor’s Picks: June 20th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Boris Johnson is the favourite to become Britain's next Prime Minister (8:23). America’s future will be written in the two mega-states—California and Texas (16:50). And, pets have gained the upper paw over their so-called owners  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
20/06/1921m 59s

Editor’s Picks: June 13th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, huge demonstrations in Hong Kong have rattled the territory’s government. (8:50) America’s biggest defence merger highlights the changing nature of war (17:11) And, why Australia’s pioneering image cloaks a nanny state  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
13/06/1923m 11s

Editor’s Picks: June 7th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the second half of humanity is joining the internet. Citizens of the emerging world will change the web and it will change them. Next, could the slaughter of pro-democracy protesters in Khartoum be Sudan’s Tiananmen? (7:43) And, why baseball reflects America’s desire to be different (14:39)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07/06/1922m 11s

Editor’s Picks: May 30th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Britain’s constitutional time-bomb. Brexit is already a political crisis—sooner or later it will become a constitutional one too. How floods and storms in the Midwest are altering American attitudes to climate change (9’24). And, 30 years after the Tiananmen Square massacre, many Chinese know little about the bloodshed (18’07)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30/05/1926m 1s

Editor’s Picks: May 23rd 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata party has won a second landslide victory. The prime minister, Narendra Modi, should make better use of his latest triumph. Can China, home to half the world’s pigs, curb the epidemic of African swine flu (6’28)? And Brazil faces painful disagreement over how to commemorate its history of slavery (12’54)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23/05/1923m 26s

Editor’s Picks: May 16th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, as the rivalry between China and the United States grows, surging sanctions create both risks and unexpected business opportunities. Why the feeble Afghan government is losing the war against the Taliban (10’23). And a tale of golden fleeces—why people in Senegal pay a fortune for fancy sheep (20’19)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16/05/1923m 43s

Editor’s Picks: May 9th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, our cover story reports on the brewing conflict between America and Iran. Both sides need to step back. Also, why the Mexican-American population is shrinking, despite headlines from the southern border (10:05). And, what the latest trends in baby names say about how France is changing (17:34)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
09/05/1921m 2s

Editor’s Picks: May 2nd 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the fight against jihadists is moving to Africa. Despite Western help, governments in the Sahel are struggling to beat back violent extremists. Next, the Democrats and American foreign policy—a chance for radical rethinkers (12:43). And, Netflix and pills—why the drugs industry should take inspiration from the entertainment industry (23:38)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
02/05/1928m 28s

Editor’s Picks: April 25th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to stop the rot in South Africa. The liberal opposition cannot win the elections on May 8th, so the president must clean up his own party. Next, why Britain’s artful compromise on Huawei and 5G is a model for other countries (10:17). And, geoengineering could alleviate climate change, but with politically explosive consequences (14:54)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25/04/1922m 35s

Editor’s Picks: April 18th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the trouble with tech unicorns. These billion-dollar businesses seem to have it all—except a path to high profits. Next, why did a fire at Notre Dame cathedral provoke more global grief than the recent deadly floods in Mozambique? (9:54) And, why Pakistan risks exterminating a bird that lays golden eggs (15:23)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18/04/1919m 39s

Editor’s Picks: April 11th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, mass protests have ousted Sudan’s dictator. The big question now is who will succeed him. Our Lexington columnist argues that Donald Trump is a pro wrestler masquerading as commander-in-chief (7:54). And kidney donors are wanted, dead or alive—we consider how to persuade more of the living to donate (15:39)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
11/04/1928m 2s

Editor’s picks: April 4th 2019

A selection of three defining articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the promise and perils of synthetic biology—the nascent human capacity to redesign life. Now that Algeria’s President Abdelaziz Bouteflika has resigned, the real battle to overhaul the system begins (9:24). And, where a rejuvenated Tiger Woods ranks on The Economist’s forecast for the golf Masters (14:58).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
04/04/1920m 9s

Editor’s picks: March 28th 2019

A selection of three defining articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Binyamin Netanyahu, prime minister of Israel, provides a parable of modern populism. Flaws in Bitcoin suggest that a lasting revival of cryptocurrencies is unlikely (9:20). And, why museums should return stolen art, but accept donations from almost anyone (18:57)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
28/03/1924m 14s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Mar 23rd-29th 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
21/03/1936m 30s

The future of big tech: Why big tech should fear Europe

To understand the future of Silicon Valley, cross the Atlantic
21/03/197m 59s

White-nationalist terrorism: No safe places

A solitary killer in Christchurch is part of a global movement 
21/03/1919m 46s

Free exchange: Natural talent

Alan Krueger, a quiet revolutionary of economics, died on March 16th 
21/03/196m 48s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Mar 16th-22nd 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
14/03/1926m 2s

Oh **UK! What next for Brexit?: A country in chaos

When historians come to write the tale of Britain’s attempts to leave the European Union, this week may be seen as the moment the country finally grasped the mess it was in. Parliament was so scornful of the exit deal that Theresa May had spent two years negotiating in Brussels that MPs threw it out for a second time, in the fourth-biggest government defeat in modern parliamentary history. Then they rejected what had once been her back-up plan of simply walking out without a deal. The prime minister has lost control. Cabinet ministers are defying her and both main parties are splintering into ever-angrier sub-factions. And all this just two weeks before exit day. The chaos demands something better. Our cover this week sets out what that should be
14/03/197m 53s

Boeing and autonomous systems: The computer in the cockpit

Partial automation can be more dangerous than none at all 
14/03/198m 57s

Free exchange: Magic or logic?

Modern monetary theory is gaining in popularity. Eminent economists think it’s nuts 
14/03/197m 11s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Mar 9th-15th 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
07/03/1931m 9s

A new scramble for Africa could bring huge benefits for Africans

Our cover this week reports on the new scramble for Africa. The 19th-century contest was for land and plunder; the cold-war one was over ideology. Today, countries including China, Turkey and India are rushing to strengthen diplomatic, strategic and commercial ties, drawn by Africa’s growing population as much as its resources. From 2010 to 2016 more than 320 new embassies were set up in Africa in probably the biggest diplomacy-boom ever. Foreigners are building ports and factories, selling insurance and banking and bringing technology for mobile phones and e-commerce. The foreigners expect to do well from all this, but Africans themselves could do best of all.
07/03/197m 38s

Texas politics: Twilight in Austin

Humbled Republicans are trying to maintain their longtime grip over the Lone Star state by focusing on bread-and-butter issues 
07/03/199m 26s

Russia: Putin tries to build an internyet

As Russian television viewers shift online, the state tries to maintain control 
07/03/1911m 57s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Mar 3rd-8th 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
28/02/1922m 21s

Modi’s dangerous moment: India and Pakistan should stop playing with fire

Our cover this week looks at the most dangerous confrontation between Pakistan and India since they went to war in 1971. A suicide-bombing in Kashmir, followed by tit-for-tat sorties by Indian and Pakistani warplanes, has left the two nuclear-armed powers on the brink of a catastrophic escalation. In the long run, stability depends on Pakistan ending its indefensible support for terrorism. Its prime minister, Imran Khan, is urging dialogue and, in a placatory gesture, has promised to return a captured Indian pilot. But the responsibility to stop a rush to war also lies with India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi. Because he faces an election in April, he faces the hardest and most consequential calculations. They could come to define his premiership.
28/02/198m 3s

The Trump-Kim summit: Walk on down

Talks end without a deal. It could be a lot worse 
28/02/194m 53s

The parable of 3G Capital: Bad recipe

The problems of the investment firm that controls Kraft, Heinz and other brands provide a timely reminder that cost-cutting, deals and debt go only so far  
28/02/197m 11s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Feb 23rd - March 1st 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
21/02/1930m 17s

Pandas can fly: The struggle to reform China’s economy

Our cover argues that President Xi Jinping should reform the economy—both to calm the trade war with America and to make China richer. After decades of economic progress, growth is slowing, the private sector is stifled by state-owned enterprises, the working-age population is shrinking and debt has surged. Meanwhile other countries complain that state-capitalism makes China a bad economic actor and a security threat. Mr Xi needs to let the market allocate capital, temper his industrial policy and uphold the rights of foreign firms. If so, China would end up richer and make fewer enemies
21/02/198m 17s

Hatred in France: Spreading like poison

A nasty brew—anti-Semitic, anti-black, anti-elite—is bubbling
21/02/197m 47s

Business and climate change: After the deluge

Some businesses are getting to grips with the effects of global warming. Most are ignoring the problem
21/02/1912m 17s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Feb 16th - 23rd 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
14/02/1924m 56s

The resurgent left: Millennial

After three decades in the wilderness, socialism is back. Our cover this week assesses a movement that is resurgent—especially among millennials in America and Britain. Millennial socialists think that inequality has spiralled out of control and that the economy is rigged in favour of vested interests. They yearn for government to take the environment seriously and for society and the economy to be “democratised”. Are they right?
14/02/199m 38s

Spanish politics: Sánchez touches the void

The fraught Catalan issue pushes Spain to the brink of its third general election since 2015 
14/02/195m 45s

American banks: Bigger is beautiful

American banking’s biggest merger since the financial crisis may herald further consolidation. Good ­
14/02/197m 52s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Feb 9th -15th 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
07/02/1922m 53s

The truth about Big Oil and climate change

Our cover this week focuses on the oil industry. In a year blighted by wildfires and polar freezes, climate change is becoming hard to ignore. Yet demand for oil is rising and the energy industry is planning multi-trillion-dollar investments to satisfy it. No firm embodies this strategy better than ExxonMobil, the giant that rivals admire and green activists love to hate. It plans to pump 25% more oil and gas in 2025 than in 2017. If the rest of the industry pursues even modest growth, the consequences for the climate could be grave.
07/02/198m 2s

The INF treaty: Trick or treaty?

America calls time on a cold-war pact, ushering in a new age of missiles 
07/02/197m 26s

France: Macron’s great debate

An unloved president is trying to turn a crisis into an opportunity 
07/02/195m 36s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Feb 2nd -8th 2019 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
31/01/1921m 53s

The anointing of Juan Guaidó: The battle for Venezuela’s future

The world’s democracies are right to seek change in Latin America’s worst-governed country
31/01/198m 12s

The war in Afghanistan: Talking to the Taliban

A deal to end the Afghan insurgency would be wonderful—as long as it is not a figleaf to cover an American retreat
31/01/195m 19s

Taxing the rich: A way through the warren

How to raise money, reduce inequality and limit the economic damage 
31/01/196m 16s

Slowbalisation: The steam has gone out of globalisation

Our cover this week looks at a new pattern of world commerce, which we call Slowbalisation. In the past decade globalisation has decelerated from light speed to a snail’s pace. The cost of moving goods in ships and planes has stopped falling. Multinational firms have found that global sprawl burns money and that local rivals often eat them alive. Activity is shifting towards services, which are harder to sell across borders. As President Donald Trump pursues his trade offensive, commerce and investment are suffering and rules on data and privacy are splintering. Slowbalisation need not be a disaster, but it will be meaner and less stable than its predecessor
24/01/199m 20s

The Economist - Editor's picks -Jan 26th-Feb 1st 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
24/01/1927m 52s

Venezuela: Removing Maduro

This week an incompetent dictatorship tottered 
24/01/194m 53s

Reliance Jio: A new Jiography

Indians are getting onto the internet faster than ever, thanks mostly to the ambitions of Mukesh Ambani
24/01/1911m 37s

Britain’s crisis: Brexit, mother of all messes

Solving the crisis will need time—and a second referendum
17/01/198m 27s

Peak smartphone: Bad news for Apple. Good news for humanity

The maturing of the smartphone industry should be celebrated, not lamented 
17/01/195m 2s

Buttonwood: How the mighty fall

A brawl is brewing over presidential authority
17/01/196m 26s

The Economist - Editor's picks -Jan 19th-25th 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
17/01/1921m 54s

The Economist - Editor's picks -Jan 12th-18th 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
10/01/1919m 40s

Red moon rising: How China could dominate science

China’s moonlanding on January 3rd signalled the soaring ambition of its science. Our cover this week looks at whether the world should be worried by the prospect of a scientific superpower wrapped up in a one-party dictatorship. China is pouring billions of dollars into research across a vast range of disciplines—its scientists published more papers than those of any other country in 23 of the 30 busiest fields. President Xi Jinping is counting on being able to harness leading-edge research even as the Communist Party tightens its stranglehold on politics. Amid the growing rivalry between China and America, many in the West fear that he will succeed.
10/01/198m 2s

Politics in Washington: How America’s shutdown ends

A brawl is brewing over presidential authority 
10/01/194m 57s

Peak smartphone: Bad news for Apple. Good news for humanity

The maturing of the smartphone industry should be celebrated, not lamented 
10/01/194m 41s

The Economist - Editor's picks -Jan 5th-11th 2019

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
03/01/1928m 34s

American politics: The Trump Show, season two

Our first cover of 2019 looks at the Donald Trump Show as it enters its next season. In the first two years of his presidency, Mr Trump was lucky. A roaring economy and surging financial markets gave him an air of invulnerability despite the chaos and sleaze in the White House. Now the weather has changed. The sugar-high from the tax cut is fading. Markets are volatile. His conduct, already being scrutinised by a special counsel, will be probed by Democrats now running the House of Representatives. What does that mean for a president who operates through confusion, destruction and norm-breaking? 
03/01/198m 23s

Brazil’s new president: Out with the old

Voters hope that Jair Bolsonaro will be transformational. He may do grave harm
03/01/1910m 57s

Markets and the economy: Whoosh!

What the end-of-year turmoil means for 2019
03/01/197m 12s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Dec 22nd-Jan 4th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
18/12/1824m 32s

Looking back: The world is fixated on the past

How to get the best from an outbreak of nostalgia
18/12/187m 21s

Saudi Arabia: A prince fails to charm

The country's economic reforms are not attracting investors or creating jobs
18/12/187m 30s

Peace offering: China plays nice

Tariff cuts and policy changes are designed to sustain the trade truce with America
18/12/187m 48s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Dec 15th-21st 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
13/12/1824m 31s

Very rocky: The real lesson from Theresa May’s bruising week

Safe from further coups, the prime minister should put her plan to a vote—and then to a referendum
13/12/187m 41s

Investing and the super-rich: How the 0.001% invest

The family offices through which the world’s wealthiest 0.001% invest are a new force in global finance that few have heard of
13/12/187m 37s

Saffron stumble: India’s moribund opposition shows signs of life

Congress wrests three state assemblies from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party 
13/12/187m 0s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Dec 8th-14th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
06/12/1822m 19s

The case for a second referendum: The best way out of the Brexit mess

Parliament cannot agree on what kind of Brexit the people want. Rather than guess, it should ask them
06/12/187m 17s

US-China trade: A truce appears over as soon as it began

The arrest of Meng Wanzhou of Huawei looks like a resumption of hostilities 
06/12/184m 49s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Dec 1st-7th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
29/11/1841m 47s

Chip wars: China, America and silicon supremacy

As the presidents of America and China square up over tariffs at the G20 in Buenos Aires, our cover this week looks at a fundamental battleground in the superpowers’ growing trade conflict: semiconductor chips. China’s pretensions to being a superpower will look hollow as long as it lags behind America and its allies. America has legitimate concerns about the national-security implications of becoming dependent on Chinese chips and vulnerable to Chinese hacking. But what lengths should America should go to in order to stay ahead? 
29/11/187m 54s

Russia and Ukraine: Sea of troubles

What lies behind Russia’s attack on Ukrainian ships near the Sea of Azov?
29/11/188m 1s

Mexico: AMLO will be the most powerful Mexican president in decades

Even before he formally takes office this weekend, Andrés Manuel López Obrador has retreated from pragmatism. The markets are worried 
29/11/186m 53s

In a hole: Glencore’s attempt at reinventing mining has run into trouble

Mining’s most risk-hungry company is under pressure to change its culture
29/11/1816m 54s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Nov 24th-Dec 1st 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
22/11/1825m 29s

Staying alive: Why suicide is falling around the world, and how to bring it down more

Around the world, suicide rates are falling as a result of urbanisation, greater freedom and some helpful policies. America is the notable exception: since 2000, its suicide rate has risen by 18%, compared with a 29% drop in the world as a whole. It could learn from the progress made elsewhere, and more lives could be saved globally with better health services, labour-market policies and curbs on booze, guns, pesticides and pills
22/11/187m 25s

Britain and the EU: The truth about a no-deal Brexit

It is time to debunk the last and most dangerous of the Brexit fantasies: the idea that, if all else fails, Britain can prosper outside the European Union without signing an exit deal. The reality is that "no deal" amounts to a very bad deal that would cause chaos and affect daily life like nothing outside wartime. So far the decision to leave the EU has slowed Britain down, rather than derailing it, but a no-deal exit could result in a wreck
22/11/188m 15s

Demographics in America: Baby bust

The economy has bounced back since 2007, but the birth rate has continued to fall. Why?
22/11/187m 42s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Nov 17th-23rd 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
15/11/1824m 16s

Britain and the European Union: Into the Brexit endgame

In Britain we consider the beginning of the Brexit endgame, now that a draft divorce deal has been agreed between Britain and the European Union. It has prompted several ministerial resignations, and getting it through Parliament looks like a tall order. Having spent the past two years arguing about the national interest, politicians must now decide where they think it lies
15/11/187m 4s

Competition: The next capitalist revolution

Capitalism has a real problem, we argue—just not the one that protectionists and populists like to talk about. Life has become far too comfortable for some firms in the old economy, and in the new economy, tech giants have amassed formidable market power. A revolution is needed to unleash competition, force down abnormally high profits and ensure that innovation can thrive. A competition revolution could also help restore the public’s faith in capitalism
15/11/188m 34s

Wildfires in California: The new abnormal

California faces the most destructive fire in its history
15/11/186m 44s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Nov 10th-16th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
08/11/1838m 58s

After America’s elections: The mid-terms produce a divided government for a divided country

A recipe for gridlock, poor governance and disenchantment with the political system
08/11/187m 40s

Charlemagne: Reflections on Armistice Day

No continent, even one as old as Europe, can truly master its history
08/11/187m 43s

Gene drives: Extinction on demand

The promise and peril of a new genetic-engineering technology
08/11/1821m 32s

The Economist - Editor's picks - November 3rd-9th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
01/11/1825m 4s

America divided: Why America's mid-term elections matter

Our cover this week looks at what is at stake in America’s mid-term elections on November 6th. The country is more divided and angry than it has been in decades. Politicians routinely treat each other as rogues, fools or traitors; pipe bombs and a mass-shooting at a synagogue have tainted the close of the campaign. Toxic federal politics prevents action on vital issues, from immigration to welfare; it erodes Americans’ faith in their government; and it dims the beacon of American democracy abroad. The mid-term elections are a chance to stop the rot—and even to begin the arduous task of restoring faith
01/11/187m 58s

This is the end: Angela Merkel will step down as CDU party leader in December

She hopes to stay on as chancellor till 2021, but probably cannot
01/11/186m 47s

Schumpeter: Big Tech’s sell-off

The shares of the world’s tech giants have sunk by a sixth in a month. Wobble or wipe-out?
01/11/188m 22s

The Economist - Editor's picks - October 27th-November 2nd 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
25/10/1821m 18s

The showdown nears: The European Commission rejects Italy’s budget

But it gives the country’s leaders three weeks to think again 
25/10/186m 37s

Brazil’s elections: Containing Jair Bolsonaro

A probable president with authoritarian instincts must be challenged by a united democratic opposition
25/10/185m 22s

Aussie rules: What the world can learn from Australia

Our cover this week holds out Australia as an example for the world. Rising incomes, low public debt, an affordable welfare state, popular support for mass immigration and a broad political consensus: in most of the rich world such blessings are a distant dream, in Australia they are a proud reality. The country has been growing for 27 years without a recession. The public finances are in excellent long-term shape. Half of Australians are either immigrants or the children of immigrants. What is Australia’s secret?
25/10/187m 27s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Oct 20th-26th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
19/10/1819m 35s

China v America: How the world’s superpowers have become rivals

Our cover this week looks at the growing rivalry between China and America. For the past 25 years America has believed that economic integration would make China not just wealthier but also more liberal, pluralistic and democratic. Today, however, America has come to see China as a strategic rival—a malevolent actor and a rule-breaker. President Donald Trump is right to think that a strong America needs to challenge China’s behaviour. But to avoid a vicious cycle of belligerence he also needs to honour America’s values and work with its allies
19/10/187m 51s

Germany: Not so grand

Recent elections show that Angela Merkel’s coalition is in deep trouble. That means Europe is in trouble, too
19/10/184m 32s

Criminal justice: No pessimism over prisons

There is nothing inevitable about America’s over-reliance on locking people up
19/10/185m 24s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Oct 13th-19th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
11/10/1818m 58s

The next recession

As financial markets take fright, our cover this week looks at the next recession. Last year growth was accelerating around the world. Today, America alone is booming. As interest rates diverge, emerging markets will find it harder to service dollar debts—which could blow back to the rich world. Although a re-run of the crisis of 2008 is unlikely, many economies are ill-prepared to deal with even a mild recession. Central banks do not have much room to cut interest rates and politicians may balk at unconventional monetary policy, deficit spending or co-ordinated international action. The time to prepare is now
11/10/187m 40s

Saudi Arabia: The fate of a journalist

If Saudi Arabia has murdered Jamal Khashoggi, an exiled journalist, the world will conclude that the crown prince is becoming an old-fashioned despot
11/10/184m 23s

Financial markets: Baiting bears

Short-sellers are much maligned, but they are good for markets
11/10/184m 50s

The Economist - Editor's picks - Oct 6-12 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
04/10/1824m 30s

Italy’s new budget: Luigi Di Maio tries to take charge

More spending for his supporters is a way of countering the rise of Matteo Salvini. But Brussels does not like it
04/10/187m 16s

Geopolitics and investment

China has designs on Europe. Here is how Europe should respondAs Chinese investment pours into the European Union, the Europeans are beginning to worry
04/10/187m 58s

General Electric: Blame game

John Flannery could not reverse the mistakes of former GE chiefs rapidly enough. Will Larry Culp do better?
04/10/187m 11s

The Economist - Editor's picks - September 22-28th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
20/09/1824m 4s

Emerging markets: Asia is not immune to woe

Although growth rates are solid, currencies and stockmarkets have tumbled. How bad will it get?
20/09/187m 47s

Japanese politics: A long haul

Shinzo Abe this week won his party’s backing to remain prime minister until 2021. He needs to set records for productivity, not just longevity
20/09/186m 36s

Trade war: Tit for tat

With this week’s threats, America and China are now embroiled in a proper trade war
20/09/187m 17s

The Economist - Editor's picks - September 15th-21st 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
13/09/1848m 53s

A manifesto for renewing liberalism

Success turned liberals into a complacent elite. They need to rekindle their desire for radicalism
13/09/1817m 20s

How America’s Supreme Court became so politicised

And what you can expect it to do next
13/09/1820m 40s

China’s tech founders mostly keep an iron grip over their firms

Jack Ma’s graceful exit from Alibaba is unusual
13/09/188m 49s

The Economist - Editor's picks - September 8th-14th 2018

A must-read selection of articles from this week's issue of The Economist, straight from the desk of Zanny Minton Beddoes
06/09/1828m 13s

Has finance been fixed? The world has not learned the lessons of the financial crisis

Banks are safer, but too much of what has gone wrong since 2008 could happen again
06/09/187m 36s

Banyan: Malaysia can’t pay

The problem, for all sides, of the “debt-trap diplomacy” in China’s Belt and Road Initiative
06/09/187m 14s

Technology companies and censorship: The deciders

Social-media platforms have travelled farther than users realise down the road of censoring what people say and see 
06/09/1811m 28s
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