Cited

Cited

By Cited Media

Experts shape our world. Sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse. In every big story, you’ll find one; you’ll find a researcher, scientist, engineer, planner, policy wonk, data nerd, bureaucrat, regulator, intellectual, or pseudointellectual. Their ideas are often opaque, unrecognized, and difficult to understand. Some of them like it that way. On Cited, we reveal their hidden stories.

Episodes

The Battle of Buxton (Rebroadcast)

The town of Buxton, North Carolina loves their lighthouse. But in the 1970s, the ocean threatened to swallow it up. For the next three decades, they fought an intense political battle over what to do. Fight back against the forces of nature, or retreat? It’s a small preview of what’s to come in a time … Continue reading The Battle of Buxton (Rebroadcast) →
27/05/2030m 17s

Secondary Symptoms #4: The Covid Kings

This week, we put the pieces together and solve a different kind of mystery at the heart of Tiger King. I liked the show so much because it felt like the escapism I needed during a brutal pandemic. But actually, it wasn’t escapist at all. Because according to our best theories, Covid-19 is the result … Continue reading Secondary Symptoms #4: The Covid Kings →
23/05/2056m 36s

#5: Made of Corn

When genetically modified corn was found in the highlands of Mexico, Indigenous campesino groups took to the streets to protect their cultural heritage, setting off a 20-year legal saga. Part two of our series on genetically modified maize. Follow Cited on Twitter, Facebook, and citedpodcast.com. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read … Continue reading #5: Made of Corn →
20/05/2042m 40s

#4: Modifying Maize

How the accidental finding of genetically modified corn in the highlands of Mexico set off a twenty-year battle over scientific methods, academic freedom, Indigenous rights, environmental law and international trade. Part one of two. Follow Cited on Twitter, Facebook, and citedpodcast.com. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.
13/05/2053m 15s

Secondary Symptoms #3: Pandemic Amnesia

Last time we opened up too fast, we paid dearly. There were celebratory parades when Americans thought the 1918 Spanish Flu was over and done with. Unfortunately, the second wave was even worse. So this week on Secondary Symptoms, the secondary symptom we’re looking at… it’s a symptom you might call pandemic amnesia. We’re asking: … Continue reading Secondary Symptoms #3: Pandemic Amnesia →
07/05/2054m 33s

#3: The Pavillion

Expo 1967 was the centrepiece of Canada’s 100th birthday. In a country of only 20 million, 50 million people attended Expo ’67. Amid the crowds and the pageantry, one building stood out. The Indians of Canada Pavilion. This was more than a tall glass tipi. It revealed (at least partly) Canada’s sordid colonial history, and … Continue reading #3: The Pavillion →
06/05/2052m 50s

Exiled: A Year in New York’s Infamous ‘Sex Offender Motel’ (Rebroadcast)

Growing up, Chris Dum has a morbid fascination with ‘deviant behavior.’ It led him down an unusual career path: he decided to study most reviled people in our society. Sex offenders. But it wasn’t enough to study them from a distance. No, abstract crime statistics or rigorously controlled laboratory experiments would not suffice. Rather, Chris … Continue reading Exiled: A Year in New York’s Infamous ‘Sex Offender Motel’ (Rebroadcast) →
29/04/2031m 41s

Secondary Symptoms #2: Not So Fast

It’s going to take a while, but we find glimmers of hope.  We speak to Guardian journalist Sumanth Subramanian. He tells the story of one lab’s push for a Covid-19 vaccine, and the promising new technology they’re using. It just might revolutionize vaccine development. But don’t get too excited, because the fastest vaccine ever… well, … Continue reading Secondary Symptoms #2: Not So Fast →
27/04/2056m 35s

#2: Repeat After Me

In 2011, an American psychologist named Daryl Bem proved the impossible. He showed that precognition — the ability to sense the future — is real. His study was explosive, and shook the very foundations of psychology. Follow Cited on Twitter, Facebook, and citedpodcast.com. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on … Continue reading #2: Repeat After Me →
22/04/2057m 47s

Secondary Symptoms #1: Tin Foil Hats Stop Covid

We never planned for this. Cited was going to just make documentaries for you this season, but then the whole world changed. So, we had to change too. For at least the next two months, we’ll be releasing a weekly news-magazine style show about the Covid-19 pandemic. We’re calling it Secondary Symptoms. In medicine, secondary … Continue reading Secondary Symptoms #1: Tin Foil Hats Stop Covid →
22/04/2058m 20s

Secondary Symptoms #1: Tin Foil Hats Stop Covid

We never planned for this. Cited was going to just make documentaries for you this season, but then the whole world changed. So, we had to change too. For at least the next two months, we'll be releasing a weekly news-magazine style show about the Covid-19 pandemic. We're calling it Secondary Symptoms. In medicine, secondary symptoms (sometimes called 'secondary complications') are symptoms that might arise from the disease, but are not directly of the disease. We'll be talking about the secondary symptoms of Covid-19. Not so much the disease itself, and what it does to one's respiratory tract; rather, what other things Covid-19 is doing to all of us--what it is doing to our politics, our economy, and our social fabric. On this episode, we continue the theme of Cited's first documentary, "the Science Wars." The secondary symptoms of today's episode are misinformation, distrust, and conspiratorial thinking. Guests include: John Horgan, writer at Scientific American and author of the book the End of Science. James Ball, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and global editor of The Bureau of Investigative Journalism. Dr. Ariel Lefkowitz, doctor at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Professor Stephan Lewandowski, a cognitive psychologist who specializes in misinformation, distrust, and conspiratorial thinking. This episode was hosted by Gordon Katic and produced by Jay Cockburn, with original score from Mike Barber. Follow Cited on Twitter, Facebook, and citedpodcast.com. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca--we might just read it on the show.
17/04/2058m 20s

#1: The Science Wars

Before there was the War on Science, there were the Science Wars. In the 1990’s, the Science Wars were a set of debates about the nature of science and its place in a democratic society. This little-known and long-forgotten academic squabble became surprisingly contentious, culminating in an audacious hoax. Today, some scholars say the Science … Continue reading #1: The Science Wars →
22/04/201h 5m

#1: The Science Wars

Before there was the War on Science, there were the Science Wars. In the 1990's, the Science Wars were a set of debates about the nature of science and its place in a democratic society. This little-known and long-forgotten academic squabble became surprisingly contentious, culminating in an audacious hoax. Today, some scholars say the Science Wars might just explain how we got our 'post-truth' moment. To figure out if they're right, we go back to the beginning. Follow Cited on Twitter, Facebook, and citedpodcast.com. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca--we might just read it on the show.
15/04/201h 5m

#0: Technocracy and its Discontents (Season Preview)

The Obama years were the closest thing we’ve had to technocracy. The President and his administration celebrated science and expertise, and they gave enormous regulatory powers to ‘the smartest people.’ During these years, the prevailing posture — culturally, politically, and within academia — suggested that the public was dim-witted and irrational, but well-meaning experts could … Continue reading #0: Technocracy and its Discontents (Season Preview) →
22/04/2010m 11s

#0: Technocracy and its Discontents (Season Preview)

The Obama years were the closest thing we’ve had to technocracy. The President and his administration celebrated science and expertise, and they gave enormous regulatory powers to ‘the smartest people.’ During these years, the prevailing posture -- culturally, politically, and within academia -- suggested that the public was dim-witted and irrational, but well-meaning experts could fix things. As you know, that didn’t didn’t last. With Trump and Brexit came post-truth and a revolt against scientific and scholarly expertise. How do we get out of this mess? Is the choice merely between centrist technocrats and reactionary post-truthers, or is there another way? This season, we investigate. Our stories will ask some simple questions: what is an expert, who do they work for, and can they be trusted? Episodes start April 15th, 2020, and they air weekly. Follow Cited on Twitter, Facebook, and citedpodcast.com for additional content. And send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca.
09/04/2010m 11s

Introducing Crackdown, plus an update

Introducing our new show, Crackdown. Plus, a Cited update.
19/11/1939m 10s

Update: Cited is on Break

We would usually be back in the fall for a new season. However, we're not coming back this time. We're taking a break. We'll be back fall 2019.
10/10/182m 23s

#64: Site C and High Modernity

In British Columbia, energy experts want to transition off of fossil fuels. We look at B.C.’s indigenous history to ask whether the province can decarbonize and decolonize at the same time.
07/09/181h 5m

#63: The Battle of Buxton

The town of Buxton, North Carolina loves their lighthouse. But in the 1970s, the ocean threatened to swallow it up. For the next three decades, they fought an intense political battle over what to do. Fight back against the forces of nature, or retreat?
07/09/1829m 16s

#62: The Invisible Climate Migrants

On today’s show we meet two Bangladeshi Canadians whose stories speak to the unequal way climate change is felt around the world. UPenn Sociologist Daniel Aldana Cohen talks about his hopes and fears for a warming planet.
07/09/1835m 26s

#61: The Ongoing Cultural Genocide of Indigenous Canadians

Many indigenous leaders say Canada’s foster care system is a continuation of cultural genocide against their people. We tell the story of one BC community’s struggle to wrest control from the government, and reinstall indigenous child welfare.
07/09/1852m 26s

#60: The Spotted Owl or: How the Right Won the Working Class

Judi Bari’s effort to ally forest workers and environmentalists could have changed the course of climate activism forever. Could her parable help us today?
07/09/1858m 33s

#59: Why are Vancouver's Hospitals Getting More Violent?

This week Cited partners with Travis Lupick, reporter and editor with The Georgia Straight, to uncover a worrying trend in Vancouver’s health care system.
07/09/1852m 7s

#58: Stanford Seniors Village: The Patients And The Profit

More and more, Canada is outsourcing its elder care to for-profit companies. On this week’s episode, Sam goes to Stanford Seniors Village to investigate what that means for some of the country’s most vulnerable citizens.
07/09/1857m 18s

#57: Just a Theory: Theoretical Physics' Crisis of Evidence

An Austrian philosopher wants to change the scientific method, removing the need for experimental evidence in certain cases. Not everyone is a fan of his ideas.
07/09/1853m 17s

#56: ‘Managed Retreat’ from the Rising Seas

Finn Slough is on the front lines of climate change. Nestled on the banks of the Fraser River, this community will eventually be overcome by flooding as sea levels rise. But the people of Finn Slough are doing what they can to stay put.
07/09/1845m 36s

#55: The Story Behind America's Mass Incarceration Experiment

In the late 1960s, criminologists like Todd Clear predicted America would soon start closing its prisons. They couldn’t have been more wrong.
07/09/181h 4m

#54: Are We Alone?

Jill Tarter has spent her career on a question she may never solve: are we alone in the universe?
07/09/1842m 25s

#53: What are Canadian Police Trying to Hide?

Researchers and activists say the racial discrimination within the Canadian criminal justice system could be just as bad as the United States. Canadian police forces refuse to provide the statistics to find out. What are they hiding?
07/09/1851m 15s

#52: (In)secure: The Future of Working

Gordon moderates a live panel about precariousness, millennials, and the future of work in North America. Special guests: Henry Siu, Ashley Proctor, Rod Mickleburgh, Ambrosia Vertesi, and Byron Cruz.
07/09/1859m 55s

#51: Women Engineers and What They Put Up With (Collaboration with Inquiring Minds)

This week, Alex and Indre Viskontas (from Inquiring Minds) survey the state of women in engineering with Andrea Beaty, Amy Bix, Monique Ross, and Patricia Galloway.
07/09/1847m 49s

#50: Plumbing STEM's Leaky Pipeline (Collaboration with Inquiring Minds)

There are too few women in STEM fields. We’ve known that for a long time, but we don’t really know why that is.
07/09/1856m 44s

#49: Into the House of Old

Gordon talks to Andrew Longhurst, research associate at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, about austerity and seniors care in British Columbia. Then, Megan Davies on the history of old folks homes.
07/09/1850m 59s

#48: How To Buy A Politician

The New York Times has called British Columbia “The Wild West of Political Cash.” On the verge of a provincial election, any corporation, union or individual in the world can give however much money they want to BC's provincial political parties.
07/09/1850m 33s

#47: Are job stealing robots good or evil?

Sam visits Yusuf Altintas’s manufacturing automation lab at the University of British Columbia and then talks to Matt Bruenig (@MattBruenig) about automation, inequality and the future of work.
07/09/1848m 17s

#46: The End of Civilization Ecovillage

Gordon is an environmentalist, but he doesn’t get out of the city very much. So he boarded a ferry and went to a farming co-op on an island off the coast of BC. He found people that say civilization is doomed, so they decided to escape.
07/09/1844m 25s

#45: Sea Level Rise is the 'Slow Motion Disaster' We Aren't Ready For

The seas are rising, but we can’t seem to care. Gordon talks to John Clague “AKA Dr. Doom” about the latest projections, and he talks to Stephen Sheppard about how showing evocative images might help.
07/09/1848m 5s

#44: Everyone Already Knows About Climate Change

Alex talks with Dan Kahan, professor of law and psychology, at Yale Law School.
07/09/1853m 27s

#43: Are Racists Crazy?

Gordon talks with Sander Gilman, a Professor of Psychiatry, at Emory University and the author of Are Racists Crazy?
07/09/1856m 53s

#42: In Those Genes

For years humanities scholars have avoided talking about genes. But now, in the midst of a social genomics revolution, Professors Dalton Conley and Jason Fletcher say it’s time for social scientists to join the conversation.
07/09/1846m 28s

#41: The Heroin Clinic

At Crosstown Clinic, doctors are turning addiction treatment on its head: they’re prescribing heroin-users the very drug they’re addicted to. This is the story of one clinic’s quest to remove the harms of addiction, without removing the addiction itself.
07/09/1849m 14s

#40: The Activist in the Ivory Tower

This week we talk to two community organizers who work from within academia. Gordon talks to Matt Hern about his book What a City Is For and Alex talks to Funmilola Fagbamila about Black Lives Matter and being an Activist-in-Residence at UCLA.
07/09/1857m 43s

#39: American Eugenics and the Tragedy of Carrie Buck

In 1927, the Supreme Court of the United States decided certain “undesirables” could be sterilized against their will. And American academics were all for it.
07/09/1849m 52s

#38: The Conservative War Against Liberal Sex Education

Another chapter in the continuing battle between wonks and Christian conservatives, this time in Canada.
07/09/1844m 37s

#37: Lawrence Krauss and Carl Zimmer on science in the "post-truth" era

Sam asks theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss about the difference between a good and a bad public intellectual. Alex talks to science journalist Carl Zimmer about tough choices in science storytelling.
07/09/1853m 29s

#36: What would our world be like without numbers?

What are numbers? Did we make them, or were we given them? How do they affect us? Are there people who do not have numbers?
07/09/1840m 7s

#35: Can Democrats win back the white working class?

The Democrats used to count on the white working class. Now they have to fight to win them back.
07/09/1852m 7s

#34: Nature is Not Natural: Climate Change's Challenge to Democracy

It’s the first episode of 2017. Happy new year! Alex interviews Duke University law professor Jedediah Purdy about the political history of nature and its uncertain future.
07/09/1846m 37s

#33: How Online Retailers Ripped You Off These Holidays

Thanks to online marketplaces, consumers are no longer limited to a few brick-and-morter stores to buy their holiday gifts. Now, they can order practically any item from any corner of the Earth. Surely this increased competition means better prices?
07/09/1854m 28s

#32: The Forgotten Stories of Native London

Sam interviews Coll Thrush, Professor of History at the University of British Columbia, about his new book, Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire.
07/09/1847m 45s

#31: A Proud Benchwarmer–Kaye Kaminishi & the Vancouver Asahi

Kaye Kaminishi is the last surviving member of the Vancouver Asahi, a Japanese Canadian baseball club. The team was disbanded 75 years ago today, when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor.
07/09/1843m 23s

#30: Exiled Part 2--The Mennonites and the Sex Offenders

Across Canada, Mennonite-volunteers are helping high-risk sex-offenders reintegrate after they’re released from prison. Sam Fenn goes to Regina to meet a sex offender and the group of untrained volunteers who spend their free time with him.
07/09/1859m 19s

#29: Exiled Part 1 -- A Year In New York’s Infamous ‘Sex Offender Motel'

Sex offenders are the most reviled and abused criminals in prison. But eventually, most of them will get out. So, what happens next?
07/09/1848m 48s
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