The Right-To-Know Revolution

The Right-To-Know Revolution

By Stephanie Seferian

In 1986, California passed Proposition 65. The legislation forced companies that sell products with chemicals linked to cancer and birth defects to label them as such. While the legislation was originally a gigantic win for environmentalists, these days it's a running joke. Cancer warnings adorn everything from organic soaps to steering wheel covers, bikinis, parking garages, Disney Land, and much more. Proposition 65 is a case study in the ways in which good intention advocacy can go woefully wrong. Do consumers have a right to know and, if so, do we truly *want* to know? What lessons can we learn from California, and how can environmentalists both push for policy change and avoid the pitfalls associated with Prop 65? Here's a preview: [5:45] California as a leader in environmental action, plus a brief history leading up to the passage of Proposition 65  [14:00] What went wrong: 3 controversies associated with Proposition 65 [21:00] Has the law yielded any positive change at all? (Yes, here's how.)   Resources mentioned/Further reading: Leave Stephanie a voicemail! (857) 264-1967 You See The Warnings Everywhere. But Does Prop. 65 Really Protect You? (via LA Times) Prop 65 Was Meant To Protect Residents From Toxic Water. How Did Warning Stickers End Up On Everything? (via Vox)   Our Sponsors:* Thank you to LifeStraw! https://lifestraw.com/Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/sustainable-minimalists/exclusive-content
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