639: Dealing with Your Darling's DID (Dissociative Identity Disorder) | Feedback Friday

639: Dealing with Your Darling's DID (Dissociative Identity Disorder) | Feedback Friday

By Jordan Harbinger

The Jordan Harbinger Show

Friday, 18 March

Your significant other has DID (Dissociative Identity Disorder), a mental health condition where a person has two or more separate identities. These personalities, or “alters” control the person’s behavior at different times, and each alter often has its own history, traits, likes, and dislikes. It's a very complex disorder — one that clinicians are still coming to understand — and it makes relationships quite hard. So what can you do to be supportive to your loved one as well as yourself? We'll try to find an answer to this and more here on Feedback Friday!

And in case you didn't already know it, Jordan Harbinger (@JordanHarbinger) and Gabriel Mizrahi (@GabeMizrahi) banter and take your comments and questions for Feedback Friday right here every week! If you want us to answer your question, register your feedback, or tell your story on one of our upcoming weekly Feedback Friday episodes, drop us a line at friday@jordanharbinger.com. Now let's dive in!

Full show notes and resources can be found here: jordanharbinger.com/639

On This Week's Feedback Friday, We Discuss: What can you do to empower your significant other as she struggles with DID (Dissociative Identity Disorder), while ensuring you're not neglecting your own needs in the process?? You never took the chance to communicate with someone you matched with on a dating app a few years back, but now you see them on LinkedIn and would like to make a networking connection. How can you do so without being awkward about it? You're losing respect for the person you once saw as future spouse material because their tendency to procrastinate is derailing and delaying their academic and career paths and straining your finances. On top of the frustration this makes you feel, you've recently been diagnosed with bipolar II. How do you walk the line between being caring partner while also maintaining your own mental health and financial well-being? You're only 16 years old, and your dad's work has relocated your family 10 times. You've never really settled anywhere long enough to build strong friendships or feel like you can call anywhere "home" until you arrived at your current residence. Now, it's your mother who's rallying to move again after some disagreements with the neighbors. What can you do to convince your parents to come to an agreement with the neighbors and just stay put? Your grandmother has always been verbally and physically abusive to your mom, going as far as faking heart attacks whenever the inheritance your grandfather left behind when he passed away 30 years ago is brought up. You think the healthiest thing to do would be to cut her out of your life completely, but your mother pleads with you to maintain a connection. What's the right call here? Have any questions, comments, or stories you'd like to share with us? Drop us a line at friday@jordanharbinger.com! Connect with Jordan on Twitter at @JordanHarbinger and Instagram at <a href="https://www.instagram.com/jordanharbinger" target="_blank"...
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