The Takeaway

The Takeaway

By WNYC and PRX

A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

Episodes

An Economic and Political Analysis of Trump's Unilateral Stimulus Measures 2020-08-10

For transcripts, see individual segment pages.
10/08/2046m 55s

Politics with Amy Walter: In Pursuit of a Coronavirus Vaccine

While many countries have curbed their total number of coronavirus cases, the US has recorded more than four and a half million, and more than 160,000 deaths. Inadequate national leadership has caused one of the easiest and simplest solutions to curbing the spread of the disease, mask wearing, to become the latest front in the culture wars  The White House has spread not only conflicting messages about the severity of the virus but also conspiracy theories about the science and the solutions to stopping the pandemic.  With no certainty to the end of the pandemic, many are relying on a vaccine as the only way back to the way things were but even a vaccine comes with its own set of issues. Finding a way to distribute hundreds of millions of doses of a vaccine in addition to convincing Americans that it is safe and effective could be an uphill battle. Communicating transparently is especially important with communities of color who have been disproportionately hurt by the coronavirus.   Guests: Umair Irfan, Staff Writer at Vox Carolyn Johnson, Science Reporter at The Washington Post Dr. Jesse Goodman, Professor at Georgetown University and the Former Chief Scientist at the Food and Drug Administration Gary A. Puckrein, PhD, President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Minority Quality Forum
08/08/2034m 58s

Politics with Amy Walter: Black Women Are Center Stage in 2020

This week, Cori Bush defeated longtime Democratic Congressman Lacy Clay, in the primary for Missouri’s first Congressional District. A safe Democratic seat, Bush is all but guaranteed to win in November when she will become the first Black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in Missouri.  Bush is one of more 100 Black women running for Congress this cycle, a record breaking number, according to an analysis by the Center for American Women and Politics.  Women of color have also become the focal point of discussions around who Joe Biden will choose as a running mate. With this attention and scrutiny has come criticism and attacks, many from within the Democratic Party itself, which fall along familiar lines of racism and sexism.  Guests: Kimberly Peeler-Allen, visiting practitioner at the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University Aimee Allison, is founder and president of She the People
07/08/2018m 20s

Mental Health Crisis Looms Large As Coronavirus Pandemic Continues 2020-08-06

Mental Health Crisis Looms Large As Coronavirus Pandemic Continues In June, more than 36 percent of U.S. adults reported symptoms of anxiety or depression, an increase of roughly 25 percent from the same time last year.  Kanye West and How Media Talks About Mental Illness Recently, Kanye West’s bipolar disorder has been in the news, and some are questioning how the media has been covering it. "My Lungs Are Still Not the Same": The Long Road to Recovery from COVID-19 The Takeaway hears from former guest David Lat on his experience recovering from COVID-19. The Revolutionary Roots of Black August This week marked the start of Black August, the month-long commemoration of Black resistance that dates back to the 1970s.  California Struggles to Fight Wildfires Admist Pandemic California is facing its largest wildfire since the deadly 2018 Camp Fire—and this time the pandemic is posing new challenges.
06/08/2053m 9s

Where the United States Postal Service Stands on Mail-In Ballots Come November 2020-08-05

Where the United States Postal Service Stands on Mail-In Ballots Come November As we move closer to November, we need to keep talking about what it looks like to vote during a pandemic. Blast Rocks Beirut on Tuesday Amid Mounting Tensions and Economic Turmoil At least 30 people were killed with thousands injured; hospitals were overwhelmed by the number of injuries. Why Are So Many Golden Age Rappers Dying Young? There is a troubling pattern of rappers that came to fame during the late 80s and 90s dying in their 30s and 40s. Activists See Progress in Fight to Halt Surgeries for Intersex Children Last week, the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago became the first major hospital in the country to officially halt genital surgeries for intersex children.   For transcripts, see individual segment pages.
05/08/2048m 56s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Path to November

This week, President Trump renewed his commitment to questioning the integrity of our election system and the Senate left town on Thursday without reaching an agreement on a new stimulus bill, leaving millions of unemployed Americans in economic limbo. At the same time, the U.S. surpassed 150,000 deaths caused by the coronavirus as confirmed cases in many states continue to climb. With less than 100 days until the general election, Jane Coaston, a senior politics reporter at Vox, and Tim Alberta, Chief Political Correspondent for Politico, share how voters are processing this moment and their options for November. Joni Ernst is a Republican Senator from Iowa whose seat was considered relatively safe until recently. Today, she’s fighting off a challenge from Democrat Theresa Greenfield, an Iowan who like Ernst has farm-girl roots. Ernst describes how campaigning has shifted as a result of COVID-19 and what she thinks of the president's response to the pandemic. You can listen to Amy's interview with Theresa Greenfield here. Check out our ongoing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic here. Check out our local leader series here.
01/08/2038m 4s

Politics with Amy Walter: Diagnosing Georgia's Primary Problems

Perhaps, no state better embodies the polarization and partisanship with which we approach election administration than Georgia. After a messy primary in June with long lines and shuttered polling locations, election officials in the state have been working to improve and restore faith in the process for what is certain to be a contentious election in November. And, in a little over a week, they’ll get another try. On August 11th, more than half of Georgia’s 159 counties will hold runoff elections giving voters and election staff another test run prior to the election.  Efforts to recruit and train more poll workers are underway and more early voting locations are open in Fulton County, the epicenter of Election Day problems. Situated in metro Atlanta, Fulton County is also the state’s most populous. 45 percent of the population there is African American. It is also heavily Democratic. Hillary Clinton carried the county with almost 70 percent of the vote and 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacy Abrams won it with 72 percent.   Guests: Robb Pitts, Chairman of the Fulton County Board of Commissioners  Evan Malbrough, a 2020 graduate of Georgia State University and founder of The Georgia Youth Poll Worker Project Stephen Fowler, a political reporter, Georgia Public Broadcasting  
31/07/2020m 15s

Politics with Amy Walter: Remembering John Lewis

Last Friday, the world learned of the death of Congressman John Lewis. A civil rights icon and hero, John Lewis was known as the "conscience of the Congress," where he served for more than 30 years. In the week following his death, we’ve seen countless tributes across social media and from his colleagues on the House floor. There is a growing movement for Alabama’s Edmund Pettus Bridge to be renamed in his honor and on Wednesday, The John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act was introduced in the Senate. Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence of Michigan, Congressman James Clyburn of South Carolina, and Congresswoman Lauren Underwood of Illinois share their remembrances and reflect on the legacy of John Lewis.  In the last year, the Congressional Black Caucus, one of the most powerful blocks in Congress, has lost three veteran members after the deaths of Elijah Cummings, John Conyers, and John Lewis. John Bresnahan, Congressional Bureau Chief at Politico, weighs in on this moment for the CBC as it sits at the forefront of the national effort to enact police reform.
26/07/2032m 23s

Politics with Amy Walter: An Unexpected Battle for the Senate

Conventional wisdom had most people thinking that any gains that Democrats made in the Senate would be nominal. But, unexpected events over the last six months have turned a long-shot into the very real possibility that Democrats take control of the Senate in November. Seats that were formerly considered safe for the GOP are now in play as a result of the Trump administration’s failure to handle the coronavirus crisis and provide a national plan for recovery while simultaneously stoking racial tensions at a moment of national reckoning. In Iowa, a state that President Trump easily won in 2016, Democrat Theresa Greenfield is challenging Republican Senator Joni Ernst, where the latest polling has her up by a few points. Greenfield shared her motivation for getting in the race and what she thinks Iowans want to see in Washington.  Senator Joni Ernst will join Politics with Amy Walter next week. Also, this week President Trump announced new guidelines for school reopenings. He said that public schools in coronavirus hotspots could delay reopening for a few weeks but ultimately that decision will fall to governors. As many schools across the country are expected to begin the academic year in the next month or so, school districts have been grappling with how to manage the reality of COVID-19 with the expectations for curriculum.   In Iowa, Republican Governor Kim Reynolds recently announced limitations on remote learning and mandated that at least 50% of the time students spend on learning core subjects must take place in-person. Grant Gerlock, a reporter for Iowa Public Radio, shares how schools are dealing with balancing the governor's latest requirements against the well-being of their students and staff. Guests: Theresa Greenfield, Democratic Candidate for Senate in Iowa Grant Gerlock, Reporter for Iowa Public Radio
24/07/2033m 47s

How Communities in Chicago Are Combating Rising Gun Violence Amid COVID-19 2020-07-23

How Communities in Chicago Are Combating Rising Gun Violence Amid COVID-19 Overall crime is down in Chicago, but homicides and shootings have increased by nearly 50 percent compared to the same time period last year. How are communities handling the increase? The Militarization of the Police Continues Mostly Unimpeded The Senate rejected a proposal on Tuesday to end a program that supplies police departments with surplus military equipment. The Border Patrol Has Been Policing U.S. Cities for Years The Trump administration wants to deploy the DHS officers to different cities around the country. The Push for More Latino Representation in Journalism Earlier this week, Latino journalists at the Los Angeles Times sent an open letter to leadership demanding better newsroom representation.
23/07/2046m 19s

Why Are People So Angry About Wearing Masks? 2020-07-22

Why Are People So Angry About Wearing Masks? On social media, videos have gone viral featuring combative scenes where people refuse to comply with masking mandates. Teachers Share Their Thoughts on the Upcoming School Year Two teachers speak with The Takeaway about returning, or not returning, to teach for the 2020 school year.  Federal Judges Face Rise in Threats Around the Country A deadly attack on the family of U.S. District Court Judge Esther Salas left her 20-year-old son Daniel Anderl dead and her husband, Mark Anderl in critical condition. Where Have All the Quiet Places Gone? Truly quiet places are becoming increasingly rare, even in some of the most remote parts of the world. 
22/07/2048m 50s

How Schools Across the Country Plan to Reopen this Fall 2020-07-21

How Schools Across the Country Plan to Reopen this Fall Plans to reopen schools vary from state to state, while school districts still have a lot of planning to do before they are ready for the 2020 school year.  How Teachers Are Feeling About a Return to In-Person Learning The Takeaway speaks with two teachers about how their districts are planning for potential in-person learning this fall and how they’re feeling heading into the school year. Puerto Rico Pulls Back on Reopening as COVID-19 Cases Spike New measures are being taken to control the rise in confirmed COVID-19 cases after the island officially reopened for tourism. How John Lewis Brought Civil Rights History to Life in Graphic Novels Just a few years ago, Rep. Lewis co-authored an autobiographical graphic novel trilogy called "March," which chronicled America’s struggle for civil rights.  
21/07/2047m 49s

Tension Between the CDC and White House 2020-07-20

Tension Between the CDC and White House The Trump administration has continued to sidestep the CDC and tensions reached a fever pitch. What's Going On in Portland? In Portland, Oregon, protests against police brutality and racism have continued for over 50 consecutive days. How Native Communities Are Dealing with COVID-19 How is Navajo Nation doing in light of ongoing tensions between cities and states in the region over masks and other COVID-19 protection measures? John Lewis and C.T. Vivian: The Loss of Two Civil Rights Giants Last Friday, Reverend C.T. Vivian and Representative John Lewis, two prominent civil rights leaders, passed away.
20/07/2044m 39s

Politics with Amy Walter: North Carolina, Up For Grabs

With its 15 electoral votes, North Carolina is one of a handful of states truly up for grabs come November. Since 2008, no presidential candidate has carried the state by more than three points. The most recent polls show Vice President Joe Biden ahead of President Donald Trump by about two points. And, only one Democrat running for president has been able to build a winning coalition in the state in the last 10 elections, and that was Barack Obama in 2008. Associate Professor, Jarvis Hall from North Carolina Central University explains North Carolina’s political geography. North Carolina is significant for another reason, it is one of a handful of states with two other top offices on the ballot; Governor, Roy Cooper, a Democrat is up for reelection as is US Senator Thom Tillis, a Republican. The race for Senate is of national prominence, Republicans are fighting to hold onto the seat and Democrats are hoping a win here puts them on the path back to majority control. Cal Cunningham, the Democrat who is challenging Tillis tells us why he thinks he’s the right choice for North Carolinians. We’ve reached out to the Tillis Campaign for an interview but have yet to receive a response.  Of course, all of this is happening amid a global health crisis, putting increased scrutiny on the voting process in every state. Legislators and election officials in North Carolina have been working to ensure a safe and accessible election, Rusty Jacobs a political reporter at WUNC explains what changes have been made to both absentee and in-person voting ahead of the election.  Finally, recent polling has put President Trump behind Joe Biden in the general and re-energized Democrats about their chances for winning both the White House and Senate. Amy talks with Jessica Taylor, Senate and Governors Editor for The Cook Political Report about this year’s competitive Senate races and what the senate map might look like come November. Some of the music on this pod by Gypsy George. 
19/07/2036m 40s

Politics with Amy Walter: A Look at the Next Stimulus Package

It’s been four months since the U.S. economy shut down as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Since then, more than three million Americans have been infected by the virus and tens of millions have lost their jobs. In March, Congress passed a $2 trillion economic relief package tasked with getting money to individuals and businesses after coronavirus brought the global economy to a halt. The CARES act expanded unemployment benefits, provided direct stimulus payments, and assistance with federal student loans. And while wishful thinking had many hoping that by now we’d have a better grip on the virus and the economic downturn, the reality is just the opposite. At the end of this month the additional $600 per week in unemployment benefits that many have come to depend on is set to expire. Congressional reporters Nick Fandos from The New York Times and Li Zhou from Vox share what we can expect as Congress prepares to return from their July recess.      
17/07/2021m 13s

Julián Castro on Black Lives Matter, Leadership within the Latino Community, and More 2020-07-16

Julián Castro on Black Lives Matter, Leadership within the Latino Community, and More The Takeaway speaks to Julián Castro, former HUD Secretary under the Obama Administration and previous Democratic presidential candidate. Trump Rolls Back Environmental Protections; Biden Plans for Expanded Clean Energy In the same week that President Trump announced revisions to the National Environmental Policy Act, Biden announced a $2 trillion climate plan. What Vogue's Latest Cover Tells Us About Diversity in Photography Earlier this week, the magazine Vogue came under fire for the cover of its August issue, which features the celebrated gymnast Simone Biles photographed by Annie Leibovitz.   New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy Outlines His State's Path Forward Amid the Pandemic New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy joins The Takeaway to discuss his state's reopening plans, how he’s handling the current economic crisis, and police funding in New Jersey.    
16/07/201h 2m

Why Is the U.S. Lagging Behind on COVID-19 Testing? 2020-07-15

Why Is the U.S. Lagging Behind on COVID-19 Testing? With cases on the rise across much of the country, COVID-19 testing remains critical, but still not widely available. How U.S. Heat Waves Are a Challenge for COVID-19 Heat waves throughout the Southwest could be contributing to the spread of the coronavirus. Breaking Down Tuesday's Election Results for Alabama, Maine, and Texas On Tuesday, elections were held to determine Senate candidates for important races in Alabama, Texas, and Maine. The Takeaway recently convened five voices—across law enforcement, advocacy, academia—and asked them to come together to talk about the way forward.
15/07/2049m 2s

Why Arizona's Latino Communities Are Being Hit Hard by COVID-19 2020-07-14

Why Arizona's Latino Communities Are Being Hit Hard by COVID-19 In Arizona’s Maricopa County, Latino residents have been twice as likely to become infected with COVID-19 as non-Latino residents. “I’m Desperate for Hopeful Signs”: Phoenix Mayor on Arizona's Rapid Rise of COVID-19 Cases Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego speaks on the difficulties Arizona faces as it becomes a new epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. Do We Need to Reform Death Investigation in the U.S.? Medical examiners and coroners can sometimes minimize police responsibility during incidents of misconduct.  Finding Joy in a Brooklyn Outdoor Dance Party The Vill family has been organizing socially-distant dance parties, bringing joy to their community.
14/07/2043m 24s

Understanding the Supreme Court's Ruling on Tribal Sovereignty in Eastern Oklahoma 2020-07-13

Understanding the Supreme Court's Ruling on Tribal Sovereignty in Eastern Oklahoma Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that the Muscogee (Creek) Nation still has criminal jurisdiction over Eastern Oklahoma, land that was designated to them through treaties in the 1800s. Descendants of Confederate and Colonial Leaders Call for Their Memorials to be Taken Down The descendants of both General Robert E. Lee and Thomas Jefferson want the full history of the United States to be brought to light. New Documentary 'Through the Night' Highlights the Essential Nature of Child Care In 2016, director Loira Limbal started making a film about Dee's Tots, a 24-hour child care center, to highlight the essential caregiving that frequently goes undervalued in the U.S. What Has COVID-19 Meant for Children's Mental Health? As the new school year approaches, there are growing concerns about what this crisis has meant for children’s mental and developmental health. Florida Reports Highest Single-Day Increase in Confirmed COVID-19 Cases  Florida has been leading the nation in new cases of the coronavirus in recent weeks, followed by California, Texas, and Arizona.
13/07/2053m 36s

Politics with Amy Walter: How Cities Across the U.S. are Responding to Demands for Police Reform

Lately, President Donald Trump’s speeches and tweets have become more pointed and divisive as he attempts to appeal to members of his base. There are four crucial months until election day and the president is spending them emphasizing racial divisions and defending symbols of white supremacy. The move is at odds with a cultural moment of awareness about systemic racism and police brutality. Maya King, campaign 2020 reporting fellow at POLITICO, David Nakamura, White House reporter for The Washington Post, and Clare Malone, senior political writer at FiveThirtyEight share what they've observed in their reporting on the President's reelection bid. The killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis sparked an uprising for racial justice and renewed demands for police reform. Across the U.S., calls to defund the police and reinvest the funds into schools and mental health services have grown louder as the mission of police departments is reconsidered. Daniel Nichanian, founding editor, The Appeal: Political Report, shares where these proposals are taking place and whether or not it’s just a liberal city phenomenon. Plus, Cincinnati Council Member Chris Seelbach and founder of the Cincinnati Black United Front, Iris Roley reflect on the state of policing in their city and how effective their community-based model has been since it was enacted in the early 2000s. Check out our ongoing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic here.  Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcast via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go. Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page, Twitter or Instagram.
10/07/2046m 37s

Reckoning with Race in Public Media 2020-07-09

Reckoning with Race in Public Media In the midst of a nationwide push for racial justice, public media is having a reckoning of its own. What Does the Latest SCOTUS Decision Mean for Birth Control Access? In a 7-2 decision, the court upheld a Trump administration regulation allowing employers to deny contraceptive coverage to workers based on religious or moral grounds.  SCOTUS Rules Against Trump on Tax Returns Case State prosecutors in New York will get what President Trump has long refused to give up voluntarily: his tax returns. What is the Business Side of Developing a Vaccine? The world is waiting for a COVID-19 vaccine and the US government is spending billions of dollars to develop one.  'Much Mucho Amor' Director on the Life of Legendary Astrologer Walter Mercado Cristina Costantini, co-director of a new documentary about Walter Mercado, joins The Takeaway to discuss the famed astrologer's life and legacy.
09/07/2050m 16s

What Will COVID-19 Mean for Higher Education in the Fall? The Takeaway-2020-07-08

What Will COVID-19 Mean for Higher Education in the Fall? Colleges and universities across the U.S. are grappling with when and how to reopen in the upcoming school year, amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.   Judges Around the Country Have Troubling Records, Yet They Still Serve on the Bench A new Reuters investigation looks at the lack of accountability judges face for misconduct. How Has Social Media Become So Divisive? Shoshana Zuboff, author of “The Age of Surveillance Capitalism," joined the Takeaway to discuss the role of social media in society and how it became the juggernaut it is today.  Will Coronavirus Put a Stop to the 2020 Baseball Season? Major League Baseball's opening day is fast approaching but will the virus keep that from happening?  
08/07/2049m 27s

COVID-19 Presents Major Economic Burden for Domestic Workers 2020-07-07

COVID-19 Presents Major Economic Burden for Domestic Workers In recent months, even as some industries have gradually reopened, many domestic workers are still losing jobs and wages due to the pandemic. A Look at the U.S. Labor Market as Emergency Unemployment Benefits Are Set to Expire Halfway through the year and more than three months into the coronavirus pandemic, The Takeaway looks into how the US labor market is faring. Restrictions on Beach and Pool Access Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic Places of public recreation, including pools and beaches, have long been flashpoints of race and class conflict.  Judge Orders Shut Down of the Dakota Access Pipeline in a Major Blow to the Trump Administration The Trump administration was dealt a major blow on Monday when a district court said the Dakota Access Pipeline must shut down by August 5th. The Power of Fiction By and About Black People Best-selling author Jasmine Guillory joined The Takeaway to discuss the sudden interest in antiracism texts, the power of fiction, celebrating about Black lives, and more.
07/07/2052m 14s

Parenting Challenges in the Era of COVID-19: Balancing Work and Kids 2020-07-06

Parenting Challenges in the Era of COVID-19: Balancing Work and Kids Many parents across the country have gone months without childcare, juggling the tasks of being a parent with those of learning how to home-school on the fly. Vanessa Guillén Disappearence Raises Question About Sexual Assault in the Military Army specialist and Houston native Vanessa Guillén disappeared from her Texas base in April, and police now say she was brutally killed. What Does Annexation Mean for Palestinians in the West Bank? What does annexation mean for Palestinians in the West Bank? And how has U.S. public opinion shifted on Israeli policies? What a National Reckoning Over Inequality in the Workplace Means for the Girlboss Movement #Girlboss became the template for women in the workplace hoping to take back some of the power in corporate America.
06/07/2043m 29s

Politics with Amy Walter: What it's Like to Start a Career During the Pandemic

When the COVID-19 swept the U.S. in March, it was hard to fully understand how society would fundamentally change. Since then, more than 40 million Americans have filed for unemployment. As states grapple with the uncertainty that comes with reopening their economies, Politics with Amy Walter returns to a conversation from April about what it's like to be entering the workforce at this time. Hannes Schwandt, assistant professor at Northwestern University School of Education and Social Policy, shares how cohorts unlucky enough to join the workforce during a recession see a loss in lifetime earnings. Amanda Mull, a staff writer at The Atlantic, describes how disasters like pandemics alter the worldview of those transitioning into adulthood and how the current economic downturn has the potential to do the same for Generation C.  Judah Lewis was finishing the second semester of his senior year at Howard University when COVID-19 caused the school to close and classes to move online. The path to his last semester was not an easy one and now he feels like the rug has been pulled out from underneath him. Lewis talks to us about how the pandemic has jeopardized his post-graduation prospects and provides an update on his career plan. In May, activist and playwright Larry Kramer died at age 84. He'd devoted his life to advocating for the gay community during the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Kramer was an outspoken critic of the government's response to the crisis and famously criticized Dr. Anthony Fauci, who at the time was the face of the federal government's response, in the pages of the San Francisco Examiner. Dr. Fauci reflects on his friendship with Larry Kramer and how their bond influenced the rest of his career in public health. 
03/07/2050m 41s

Miami Mayor Francis Suarez on his Approach to Flattening the Curve 2020-07-02

Miami Mayor Francis Suarez on his Approach to Flattening the Curve We speak to Miami, Florida's Mayor Francis Suarez about his plans to stop the spread of the virus. How Are Educators Rethinking U.S. History Education? The recent uprisings for racial justice have shed light on how the teaching of U.S. history has been lacking in the past and how we can fix it. Trump Administration Makes Sweeping Changes to International Media Outlets Voice of America, and other government-funded international media outlets, have been in a state of chaos since controversial Trump pick took over last month. Summer in the Age of COVID-19 How are you spending your summer?
02/07/2052m 17s

Growing Ad Boycotts Are Pressuring Facebook to Stop Misinformation and Hate Speech 2020-07-01

Growing Ad Boycotts Are Pressuring Facebook to Stop Misinformation and Hate Speech Over 100 companies have pledged to pull their ads from Facebook, causing Facebook's stock to fall.  Puerto Rico's Domestic Violence Epidemic is Only Getting Worse As millions around the world face increased rates of domestic abuse amid the COVID-19 pandemic, in Puerto Rico, the pandemic of violence against women goes back for years. Artist Shaun Leonardo Wants to Expand the Conversation on Police Brutality Through His Work In March, the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland canceled an exhibition by artist Shaun Leonardo that depicted incidents of police violence. Now, Leonardo is speaking out. Is Contact Tracing Working in the U.S.? With more and more states continuing to reopen their economies, contact tracing is expected to play a critical role in slowing the spread of COVID-19.
01/07/2058m 15s

Arizona and COVID-19: A Doctor on the Front Lines 2020-06-30

Arizona and COVID-19: A Doctor on the Front Lines As COVID-19 cases in Arizona explode, we hear from a doctor in Phoenix. The Pandemic Has led to Fewer Parents Vaccinating Their Kids for Preventable Diseases There is a decline in vaccine administration due to COVID-19, which could lead to an outbreak of preventable diseases.  "Unacceptable": Rep. Deb Haaland on the Federal Response to COVID-19 in Tribal Communities Representative Haaland, one of the first two Native American congresswomen, talks to The Takeaway about COVID-19 in Indigenous communities in New Mexico. Comedian Ramy Youssef on Hollywood's Response to the Racial Justice Movement Comedian Ramy Youssef discusses racism within the non-Black Arab community, the entertainment industry's response to the uprisings for racial justice, and more. 
30/06/2056m 47s

In Texas, A New Surge of COVID-19 Cases 2020-06-29

In Texas, A New Surge of COVID-19 Cases Texas was hurrying to get back to normal. Then, new confirmed cases of COVID-19 exploded. Plano, Texas Mayor on Recent Uptick in COVID-19 Cases How will local Texas leaders address and respond to the increase in confirmed COVID-19 cases? Judge Sets July 17th Deadline for ICE to Release Migrant Children from Detention On Friday, a U.S. district court judge in California ordered ICE to release migrant children who have been detained by the agency for longer than 20 days by July 17th. Following the Killing of George Floyd, Public Murals On Display in Communities Across the U.S. These public artworks are more than just tributes to the Black lives lost. They’re part of a deeper history of public displays of Black mourning in the United States.
29/06/2044m 12s

Politics with Amy Walter: What a Surge in Absentee Ballots Means for November 2020

The uncertainty caused by COVID-19 has resulted in a record number of people requesting to vote-by-mail. While increased access to mail ballots will stem the spread of the disease, waiting for ballots to arrive will delay the final result. Kentucky and New York are among the states that hosted primaries this week. In both states, several candidates of color, many who ran on progressive platforms, had strong performances. While officials wait for absentee ballots to arrive so they can provide a final tally, the delayed outcome has raised questions about future elections. Amy Gardner, National Political Reporter at The Washington Post and Astead Herndon, National Political Reporter at The New York Times, share how Tuesday's elections bode for November. The general election will likely come down to a handful of swing states. In Pennsylvania, where a primary was held on June 2, the process of counting votes lasted until days after. Montgomery County Commissioner Ken Lawrence weighs in on the looming pressure regarding the upcoming presidential contest. Plus, Democratic Congressman Conor Lamb flipped his seat from red to blue in a special election in 2018. A pro-second amendment, pro-fracking moderate, Lamb was cautious to weigh in on President Trump in a district he'd won in 2016. Congressman Lamb describes how his campaign has shifted its messaging for 2020. The ongoing protests against police brutality have prompted a national reexamination about the role of the police. In Philadelphia, Larry Krasner was elected as District Attorney in 2017. He ran as a reform candidate and promised to reduce the number of people in jail by overhauling the sentencing process and the bail system, in addition to holding officers accountable for misconduct. He weighs in on the culture of policing and police unions as we move towards a national tipping point. As protesters continue to demand justice for George Floyd and accountability for police brutality, public symbols of white supremacy have become a target. Confederate statues have long held the ire of those who’ve said they elevate those who fought (and lost) to keep slavery alive. As the demands to remove public reverence to confederate generals become more widespread, historians are requesting that schools modify textbooks that romanticize what confederates were fighting for. James W. Loewen, historian, sociologist, and author of "Lies My Teacher Told Me," and Keisha N. Blain, Associate Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh, join Politics to discuss. Check out our ongoing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic here.  Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcast via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go. Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page, Twitter, or Instagram.
26/06/2046m 44s

Who Does the Acronym "BIPOC" Actually Serve? 2020-06-25

Who Does the Acronym "BIPOC" Actually Serve? How do major movements like the one we are seeing now change the language we use and how we talk about our identities? Georgia Passes States First Hate Crimes Bill On Tuesday, Georgia lawmakers passed the state’s first hate-crimes legislation. How American Families Are Facing the Brunt of Deportations Julia Preston profiled three separate families, whose loved ones were deported from the United States.
25/06/2044m 29s

Will COVID-19 Worsen the Housing Crisis? 2020-06-24

Will COVID-19 Worsen the Housing Crisis? Evictions and foreclosures are looming large across the U.S., as state and federal protections for renters and homeowners are quickly expiring.  All Eyes on Kentucky's Primary Election A look at Kentucky's primary election: high voter turnout and expanded vote-by-mail. Official New York Primary Results Are Absent as Absentee Ballots Wait to be Counted New York saw an unprecedented number of absentee ballots mailed in for Tuesday's primary, but counting these ballots won't begin until next week.  How a Lengthy Delay in COVID-19 Stimulus Funding Impacted Tribal Governments Months after the CARES Act was signed into law, some of the money has still not been distributed to tribal government hoping to soften the financial damage from COVID-19.
24/06/2045m 44s

Police Killing of Andres Guardado Highlights State Brutality on Latino Community 2020-06-23

Police Killing of Andres Guardado Highlights State Brutality on Latino Community Latino and Black people are shot by police at a disproportionate rate. WNBA Star Renee Montgomery Skipping the Season to Fight for Social Justice We sit down the WNBA’s Renee Montgomery who is sitting out this season to focus on social justice. Interest in Gardening Blooms Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic The Takeaway talks to Ron Finley, a community activist and self-proclaimed “Gangster Gardener,” about making gardening more accessible to communities of color. 
23/06/2042m 24s

What the Supreme Court's Decision Means for DACA Recipients 2020-06-22

What the Supreme Court's Decision Means for DACA Recipients Last Thursday, the Supreme Court ruled against the Trump administration’s attempt to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, also known as DACA.  How Bill Barr's Messy Ouster of Geoffrey Berman Fits into His Tenure as Attorney General Over the weekend, Attorney General Bill Barr ousted Geoffrey Berman, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, in a messy back and forth that played out publicly. Do Major Sports Leagues Really Support the Racial Justice Uprising? The NFL, MLB, NBA, WNBA, and even NASCAR have all made statements in support of Black Lives Matter. But whether leagues are planning to back up those words with action is another matter. Abdul Ali: How Therapy Helped Me Understand My Complicated Relationship with My Father Writer Abdul Ali shares how therapy has helped him work through his relationship with his dad.
22/06/2045m 37s

Politics with Amy Walter: A National Reckoning

In the weeks since George Floyd was killed by police officers in Minneapolis, we’ve been watching uprisings take place against police brutality. What many Americans have finally woken up to is what Black Americans have known for years: That it’s impossible to separate police brutality from the racism that is baked into the structure of every American institution. Institutions, like schools, healthcare, housing, and policing have failed to give Black Americans a level playing field.  99 years ago, Tulsa, Oklahoma was the site of one of the deadliest and most destructive race massacres in U.S. history. On that day, violent white people took it upon themselves to murder Black Americans and loot their businesses. Black homes, churches, restaurants, drugstores, and doctors offices were razed. In the end, Black Wall Street, one of the most prosperous Black communities, was destroyed.  At a time when Americans are grappling with the role white supremacy played in shaping modern society, President Donald Trump chose to hold a rally in Tulsa during the weekend of Juneteenth. We take look at how the holiday resonates differently this year.  Guests:  Karlos K. Hill, Chair of the African and African American studies department at the University of Oklahoma RJ Young, Host of the RJ Young Show. Excerpts from his audio diary were provided to us by KOSU. RJ's story is part of the America Amplified initiative.    How Progressive District Attorneys Are Approaching Criminal Justice Reform It’s been almost a month since George Floyd was brutally killed by police officers in Minneapolis. Protester's demands for police accountability have not waned, forcing officials to address the role of racism in policing and policy. As calls to defund the police grow louder, mayors, police chiefs, and local law enforcement step into the spotlight. At the same time, officials that attempt to reprimand officers for misconduct must face the wrath of powerful police unions. We speak with Kimberly Gardner, the Chief Prosecutor for the City of St. Louis, who was elected on the promise of reform on what it's like to go toe-to-toe with the police.  Guest: Kimberly Gardner, Chief Prosecutor for the city of St. Louis    How the Economy Fails Black Americans Not only has the coronavirus pandemic disproportionately hurt Black Americans who've been infected at a higher rate, but the economic uncertainty it's created has set them back in terms of employment. Black Americans are concentrated in parts of the economy that have been designated as essential, like grocery store workers and transit operators. Still, Black unemployment almost tripled from February to May to almost 17 percent. Today, Black households have one-tenth of the wealth compared to white families and are much less likely to own their homes. Historically, recovering from recessions is tougher for Black people. We sit down for a conversation about the unemployment rate for Black Americans and what an economic recovery might look like. Guest: Amara Omeokwe, Economics Reporter at The Wall Street Journal
19/06/2046m 8s

Relationship Between Police and Media Grows Increasingly Tense 2020-06-18

Relationship Between Police and Media Grows Increasingly Tense As the uprising for racial justice continues around the country, journalists in the United States are increasingly the targets of direct and hostile confrontations with law enforcement. Why Are States Criminalizing Fossil Fuel Protests? Some states have been quietly passing laws to criminalize fossil fuel protests amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.   COVID19 Budget Cuts Prevent Many from Accessing Subsidized Summer Programs New York City's budget proposal has $235 million worth of cuts to public summer programs. Many low income families could be affected without access to these programs.  What Juneteenth Means At this Moment Juneteenth commemorates the day when enslaved people in Texas learned about their emancipation, two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation.
18/06/2056m 27s

Calls for Financial Transparency Grow as Money Pours Into Racial Justice Organizations 2020-06-17

Calls for Financial Transparency Grow as Money Pours Into Racial Justice Organizations People have been donating to racial justice organizations as calls to give to these causes continue online. But not everyone eagerly donating may know exactly where that money is going. Listeners Tell Us: Creating Joy in This Moment What small things are you doing to create joy in this moment? Postpartum Mental Health During a Global Pandemic As the coronavirus pandemic continues, some experts worry about the impact it will have on the mental health of new parents, especially those who have recently experienced childbirth. Delroy Lindo on Starring in Spike Lee's 'Da 5 Bloods' and Engaging with Today's Racial Justice Uprising The Takeaway speaks with actor Delroy Lindo about his role in Spike Lee's 'Da 5 Bloods,' and how he’s getting involved in today’s racial justice uprising. 
17/06/2051m 50s

Progress for LGBTQ+ Rights in the Supreme Court 2020-06-16

Progress for LGBTQ+ Rights in the Supreme Court On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark decision protecting LGBTQ-plus employees from discrimination on the basis of their sexual orientation or gender identity. GBI: The Agency Investigating Police-Involved Killings in Georgia The Georgia Bureau of Investigation is looking into the killings of Ahmaud Arbery and Rayshard Brooks. The agency has a complicated history in Georgia. Music Behind Bars: How BL Shirelle Helps Incarcerated People Craft Their Art BL Shirelle's new album speaks of her 10 years in prison.
16/06/2047m 40s

Deaths of Rayshard Brooks, Robert Fuller, and Malcolm Harsch Underscore Nationwide Anger with Law Enforcement 2020-06-15

Deaths of Rayshard Brooks, Robert Fuller, and Malcolm Harsch Underscore Nationwide Anger with Law Enforcement The killing of Rayshard Brooks in Georgia and the deaths of Robert Fuller and Malcolm Harsch in California underscore systemic issues that demonstrators are marching against nationwide. Amid Civil Unrest, Police Fatally Shoot Latino Man Two weeks ago, Sean Monterrosa was shot and killed by police in Vallejo, California. "I'm Not OK": Rep. Terri Sewell of Alabama on Racism and Sickness in Her State Rep. Terri Sewell of Alabama says it's time for her state to stop celebrating confederate leaders, and to really hear its Black constituents. The Overlooked Reality of Police Violence Against Disabled Black Americans Amidst national protests for racial justice the reality of police violence against disabled people—especially Black people—is rarely discussed.
15/06/2051m 2s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Politics of "Defund the Police"

Georgia’s Primary, George Floyd’s Funeral, and Congress’ Approach to Police Reform As the coronavirus pandemic has created uncertainty for the upcoming general election, many Americans are reconsidering how they’ll cast their ballots. This week, many primary voters in Georgia were greeted by long lines and malfunctioning voting machines. The chaos surrounding Georgia’s recent election has raised questions about whether or not the same issues will reoccur in November.  Also, George Floyd was laid to rest in Houston following weeks in which thousands of Americans took to the streets to decry police brutality in his name. Meanwhile, Congress is reckoning with how to respond to the protests and calls for police accountability. Two national reporters join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the Justice in Policing Act of 2020, how Republicans are responding to calls for police accountability, and Georgia’s flawed elections.  Guest Host: Matt Katz, WNYC Guests: Nick Fandos, Congressional Correspondent for The New York Times Laura Barron-Lopez, National Political Reporter at POLITICO  Congressman James Clyburn on his Time in the Civil Rights Movement and Addressing Systemic Racism  This week, Democrats introduced the Justice in Policing Act on Capitol Hill.  If passed, the bill would prohibit chokeholds, ban some no-knock warrants, track police misconduct at the national level, and make it easier to pursue legal and civil action against the police. The momentum for the bill stems from the uprisings against police brutality after George Floyd was brutally killed by police officers in Minneapolis. Congressman James Clyburn of South Carolina reflects on his time in the civil rights movement and what he hopes to accomplish through the Justice in Policing Act.  Guest: James Clyburn, Congressman from South Carolina’s 6th Congressional District and Majority Whip How “Defund the Police” has Become More Palatable to the Mainstream The killing of George Floyd by police officers in Minneapolis has shifted the way Americans see policing. Recent polling from The Washington Post found that 69 percent of Americans found “the killing of Floyd represents a broader problem within law enforcement.” While many high-ranking members of the Democratic Party don’t support calls to defund the police entirely, the notion of some form of defunding is picking up traction. A conversation about the politics of defunding the police. Guests: Alex Vitale, Author of "End of Policing" and Professor of Sociology and Coordinator of The Policing and Social Justice Project at Brooklyn College Andrea Ritchie, Researcher at the Interrupting Criminalization Initiative and author of "Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color" How Minneapolis Plans to Dismantle Their Police Department Minneapolis has been in the national spotlight since George Floyd was killed by police on video. Although the events there sparked protests across the nation, the city is also a catalyst for change. One progressive city leader, Steve Fletcher, has been working on police reform since he took office in 2018. He was among nine members of the Minneapolis city council that recently announced their commitment to dismantling the city’s police department.  Guest:  Steve Fletcher, Minneapolis City Council, Ward 3
12/06/2041m 59s

Does Objectivity in Journalism Exist? 2020-06-11

Does Objectivity in Journalism Exist? Reporters of color have long disputed the notion of objectivity in journalism.  Georgia Primaries Were a Mess. Will We See the Same Later This Year? Communities of color were disproportionately affected by long lines and equipment malfunctions. COVID-19 Cases Are on the Rise in Nearly Two Dozen States While the world’s eyes have been turned to the uprising against racism and police violence, some parts of the country are seeing new upticks in confirmed COVID-19 cases. Popular Police Reality Shows Canceled Amid Protests Against Police Brutality The long-running show "Cops" and the highly-rated "Live PD" have both been canceled as calls for police reform intensify. 
11/06/2050m 4s

The Value and the Toll of Documenting Police Brutality 2020-06-10

The Value and the Toll of Documenting Police Brutality As more and more deaths of Black people at the hands of police are caught on film, The Takeaway looks at the responsibility, legality, and consequences of documenting police brutality. Is Camden, New Jersey the Prototype for National Police Reform? The city disbanded its police department and replaced it with a new one in 2013. Seven years later, the department's reforms seem to be working. The Uprising and Its Leadership: What Does it Look Like in This Moment? How can leadership lead a social movement to victory?
10/06/2056m 16s

Small Towns and Cities Protest Against Police Brutality Across the U.S. 2020-06-09

Small Towns and Cities Protest Against Police Brutality Across the U.S.  From Portland, Maine, to Carrollton, Texas, communities are coming together against racism like never before. George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery: Where Do Their Cases Stand? We check in on developments in response to nationwide protests. White Parents Need to Talk to Their Kids About Race Today, while more white parents might finally want to have conversations about race with their young children, they don’t necessarily know where to start. 
09/06/2048m 41s

The Racial Justice Uprising in the U.S. is Taking Hold Overseas 2020-06-08

The Racial Justice Uprising in the U.S. is Taking Hold Overseas Many foreign leaders have condemned the killing of George Floyd, but demonstrators outside of the U.S. are also attempting to call attention to racial injustice within their own borders. Calls to Defund the Police Are Gaining Traction As protests continue over the killing of black people by police, calls to defund police departments are gaining traction.  What Are You Angry About Right Now? We asked listeners what they’re angry about right now. Here’s what they said. What Does Celebrating Pride Month Look Like at This Moment? For members of the black LGBTQ+ community, this moment has been a reminder of the parallels between what we’re seeing today and the early days of the LGBTQ+ rights movement.
08/06/2048m 55s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Tipping Point for the End of Systemic Racism in Policing

How a Legacy of Racist Policies and Police Brutality Contributed to the Mass Disenfranchisement of Black People The death of George Floyd, an African American man, at the hands of police officers in Minneapolis has ignited protests and conversations surrounding the mistreatment of Black Americans at the hands of the state against the backdrop of a pandemic that is disproportionately affecting Black people. Americans in every state have taken to the streets to protest police brutality and chant "Black Lives Matter." A look at the history of Black disenfranchisement, failures in leadership and policy, and the role ongoing protests will play in the general election.   Guests: Adam Serwer, Staff Writer at The Atlantic covering politics Elizabeth Hinton, incoming Professor of History, law and African-American studies at Yale and the author of “From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America” Carol Anderson, Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies at Emory University and author of "White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide" Mayors, Past and Present Since George Floyd was killed by police officers in Minneapolis, demonstrations against police brutality have taken place across the United States. For mayors, listening to the protester's grievances and balancing them against the responsibility of engaging with police chiefs is a challenging task.  A conversation with Michael Tubbs, the first Black Mayor of Stockton, California, about addressing police brutality at the local level and what he hopes will come from the protests. Plus, a conversation with former San Antonio Mayor, Julián Castro. As a candidate for the Democratic nomination, Castro spoke often about the pattern of police brutality and how bias in the criminal justice system disproportionately impacts Black Americans. He reflects on his time as mayor, ending police brutality, and the future of the movement.  Guests:  Michael Tubbs, Mayor of Stockton, California Julián Castro, former Mayor of San Antonio and former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development How Demonstrations Across the U.S. have changed the Vice Presidential Selection Process A national conversation about race and the lack of police accountability has shifted the trajectory of the VP selection process for the Biden campaign. With the disparities in health care that coronavirus has underscored and the brutal killing of George Floyd, the selection process faces heightened scrutiny.  Guests:  David Siders, National Political Correspondent at Politico
05/06/2048m 39s

The Toll of Covering Police Brutality as a Black Journalist 2020-06-04

The Toll of Covering Police Brutality as a Black Journalist For black journalists, this moment is especially complex, with the weight of having to cover the brutality they’re seeing while also being black in America. The Lack of Attention for Violence Against Black Trans People As people around the country protest the killing of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and others, another case of alleged police brutality is emerging in Tallahassee, Florida. Are Corporate Statements of Solidarity More Than Just PR? There has been an outpouring of corporate support for Black Lives Matter and racial equality, but are any of these companies actually helping to institute change?
04/06/2047m 4s

How Police Are Responding to Uprisings Across the Country 2020-06-03

How Police Are Responding to Uprisings Across the Country For the past week, protests against police violence following the killing of George Floyd have been taking place around the country.  Why Police Unions Have So Much Power In some cases, these unions have pushed back against reforms meant to increase transparency. Momentum Builds in New York to Overhaul One of the Nation's Strictest Police Privacy Laws In New York, state legislators appear to have the votes to overhaul one of the strictest police privacy laws in the country, a decades-old statute known as 50-A.  Despite Rising Death Toll, Mexico is Beginning to Reopen, Placing Workers at Risk In the north of the country, Mexican factory workers are dying at a disproportionate rate. Hundreds of Minor League Baseball Players Released Amid Pandemic COVID-19 could alter baseball for years to come. 
03/06/2052m 3s

President Trump Deflects Attention from Racial Justice Demonstrations by Invoking Far Left Groups 2020-06-02

President Trump Deflects Attention from Racial Justice Demonstrations by Invoking Far Left Groups  President Trump has pushed the inaccurate message that far left activists are leading demonstrations around the country to distract from the real issues behind the uprisings. How QAnon Conspiracy Theorists Are Influencing U.S. Politics On May 19th, Jo Rae Perkins, an avowed supporter of the far-right QAnon conspiracy theory, won the Republican primary race for U.S. Senate in Oregon, with nearly 50 percent of the vote.  Former Felons in Florida May Finally Have Their Voting Rights Restored A recent ruling by a federal judge declared a Florida law restricting former felons from registering unconstitutional. After Nearly Three Decades, a Florida Man's Voting Rights Will Be Restored Eugene Williams was released from prison in 2011 after serving 18 years in Florida’s Department of Corrections for armed robbery. What Does White Allyship Look Like at this Moment? As uprisings spread across the U.S, white people are trying to figure out their role in the fight against police brutality and racism more broadly.
02/06/2050m 15s

Understanding the Pain Fueling Nationwide Demonstrations 2020-06-01

Understanding the Pain Fueling Nationwide Demonstrations While George Floyd’s killing galvanized many of this weekend's protests, his death was the latest in a series of events that make this such a painful moment for black Americans. How Do We Mourn as a Nation? President Trump has yet to suggest any kind of official collective grieving or day of remembrance. 
01/06/2044m 29s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Future of the Democratic Party

The Future of the Democratic Primary At the beginning of the Democratic nominating contests, the party faced a number of challenges. The field being crowded with candidates with such varied politics demonstrated that there were different visions for the future of the party. And today, while Joe Biden is the presumed nominee, there is concern that he won't drive excitement and turnout in the way a candidate like Senator Bernie Sanders might've been able to. The Democratic Party's foremost goal is to remove President Donald Trump from office, but they'll need to respond sufficiently to questions surrounding racial and economic inequality in addition to the fault lines exposed by the coronavirus pandemic. A roundtable discussion about the future of the Democratic Party and the role progressive candidates will play within the larger institution.  Also, a conversation about the killing of George Floyd during an arrest in Minneapolis and how Trump's response demonstrates his need to exploit division. Guests: Joel Payne, former aide to Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign and host of "Here Comes the Payne" Maya King, Campaign 2020 Reporting Fellow at Politico Dave Weigel, National Political Reporter at The Washington Post Jamaal Bowman, Democratic Primary Candidate for New York’s 16th Congressional District  The Legacy of Larry Kramer with Dr. Anthony S. Fauci This week, activist and playwright Larry Kramer died at age 84. He devoted his life to advocating for the gay community during the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Kramer was an outspoken critic of the government's response to the crisis and famously criticized Dr. Anthony Fauci, who at the time was the face of the federal government's response, in the pages of the San Francisco Examiner. Dr. Fauci reflects on his friendship with Larry Kramer and how their bond influenced the rest of his career in public health.  Guest: Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
29/05/2052m 14s

"Quarantine Fatigue" and Navigating the Risks of Expanding Our Bubbles 2020-05-28

"Quarantine Fatigue" and Navigating the Risks of Expanding Our Bubbles Lockdown measures are becoming harder to follow as the weather warms up and people are increasingly feeling the mental and emotional strain of isolation. Justice Department Drops Charges on Three Senators Who Allegedly Violated Insider Trading Rules Investigations on three senators were dropped, but Sen. Burr will continue to be investigated. Birdwatching While Black Earlier this week, a viral video showed Christian Cooper, a black man, being threatened by a white woman, Amy Cooper, while he was birdwatching in Central Park. What the Viral Video in Central Park Says About White Privilege The viral video raises questions about who can or cannot weaponize the police in the U.S.   Comedian Tawny Newsome Enlists in Netflix's 'Space Force' Comedian Tawny Newsome joins The Takeaway to discuss her role on the Netflix's 'Space Force,' and what the pandemic means for her comedy going forward.
28/05/201h 13m

His Name is George Floyd 2020-05-27

His Name is George Floyd A deadly Minneapolis encounter between a police officer and an unarmed black person sparks calls for justice. Meat Plant Workers Are Falling Ill with Coronavirus — But We Don't Know the Scale Meat plants around the country rely on immigrant labor in their facilities. The Present and Future of Air Travel The Takeaway talks to air travel experts about how the airline industry is changing due to the pandemic. Thousands of Cruise Crew Members Stuck at Sea Because of COVID-19 Pandemic Some workers aren’t being paid, and in many cases, they don’t yet know when they can go home.  What to Read for a Great Escape This Summer With travel plans foiled for the summer because of COVID-19, many of us will be turning to novels for an escape. Vox's Constance Grady joins The Takeaway with her recommendations. 
27/05/2053m 18s

Coastal Communities Weigh Health Risks as Public Beaches Open 2020-05-26

Coastal Communities Weigh Health Risks as Public Beaches Open As beaches and other outdoor spaces around the country open to the public, it's worth asking: is there a way to enjoy these spaces responsibly during a pandemic? What COVID-19 Looks Like in Indonesia We head over to Indonesia, where the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 has been steadily growing, while cases in other parts of Southeast Asia have been decreasing.   COVID-19 Gives New Urgency to Doctors Running for Office COVID-19 has given us all a newfound appreciation for health care workers. But could that kind of enthusiasm translate into votes?
26/05/2045m 4s

The Military's Role During COVID-19 2020-05-25

The Military's Role During COVID-19 Can the Department of Defense effectively battle a virus while maintaining U.S combat capabilities?  How We Remember Those We've Lost The Takeaway, along with Death, Sex & Money, asked for listener memories and stories about the people they’ve lost during the COVID-19 crisis. The Art of the Obituary in the Age of COVID-19 In the absence of traditional mourning rituals like funerals, the obituary pages are becoming a communal space for us to grieve together in this moment.  If you are a veteran and you need help, you can call the Veterans Crisis Line by dialing 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1 to talk to someone.
25/05/2044m 59s

Politics with Amy Walter: How Social Psychology Influences Political Behavior

How Political Identities Have Become About What We Hate Instead of What We Love Individual reactions to the coronavirus pandemic and the public health restrictions that have accompanied it have underscored how powerful negative partisanship can be in the formation of political opinions. In past crises, national shocks have urged partisans to put aside their personal grievances in pursuit of the greater good, but today, that doesn't seem to be the case.  A look at how the perception of risk influences our political behavior and the impact it has on public opinion. Guests: - Jonathan Haidt, social psychologist and Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University’s Stern School - Lynn Vavreck, Hoffenberg Professor of American Politics and Public Policy at UCLA and contributor to The Upshot at The New York Times Georgia's Reopening Last month, Georgia became one of the first states to begin easing restrictions associated with COVID-19. The decision was criticized by health officials as moving too quickly and risking a potential surge in cases. Across the state, citizens, business owners, and mayors hold mixed feelings regarding how Governor Brian Kemp has approached the public health crisis. While many governors across the U.S. have seen a bump in approval for their handling of the crisis, just 39% approved of Governor Kemp's handling of the pandemic.  A look at how Georgia residents and business owners are navigating the reopening and what they need to see before they decide to participate.  Guests: - Andra Gillespie, Associate Professor of Political Science at Emory University and Director of the James Weldon Johnson Institute - David Bradley, President and CEO of the Athens Chamber of Commerce  Back to School Parents can't go back to work if they're also responsible for co-teaching and childcare throughout the day. Any return to normalcy for families across the U.S. will be impossible without schools reopening. And while online learning has become the norm, it's exacerbated inequality as having a computer and reliable internet access have become precursors to learning from home.  A look at how schools in Colorado are approaching what a return might look like and the steps that would be necessary to get students back in the classroom.  Guest: Katy Anthes, Commissioner of Education for the State of Colorado
22/05/2050m 33s

Essential Workers Are Already Starting to Lose Their Hazard Pay 2020-05-21

Essential Workers Are Already Starting to Lose Their Hazard Pay Major companies like Amazon and Kroger will soon end the hazard pay raises they have been giving to essential workers.  Dating in the Time of COVID-19 As many parts of the country begin reopening, people are making new risk calculations in the name of love. What does dating look like in the age of COVID-19? EPA Rushing to Finalize Rule Change on Lead in Drinking Water The Environmental Protection Agency is rushing to finalize a major regulation that could leave millions of Americans exposed to potentially hazardous levels of lead. "All We Can Do Is Stay Positive": How Chicano Batman Connects with Fans in Quarantine The L.A.-based band, Chicano Batman, discusses their new album "Invisible People."
21/05/2058m 37s

Is COVID-19 Complicating Disaster Preparedness? 2020-05-20

Is COVID-19 Complicating Disaster Preparedness? As the U.S. struggles to get the coronavirus pandemic under control, experts worry about the impact on disaster preparedness as hurricane and wildfire seasons approach.   Why Are Insurers Denying Claims from Struggling Businesses? Business interruption insurance claims are being denied by insurers causing business owners to file lawsuits and look to state governments for help. How Contact Tracing Can Help Contain the Spread of COVID-19 Health officials have stressed that in order to reopen states safely, the number of contact tracers in the U.S. needs to increase drastically. Understanding New Zealand's Effective COVID-19 Response New Zealand has been heralded as a success story in how it's handled COVID-19, but its success is hard to replicate elsewhere.
20/05/2045m 3s

Can the Restaurant Industry Recover from COVID-19? 2020-05-19

Can the Restaurant Industry Recover from COVID-19? Restaurants in some states are reopening for dine-in service, but ongoing shifts in how they do business are resulting in massive losses for the food service industry. What Images Will Define the COVID-19 Pandemic? Each day, we’re confronted by numbers, information, and images reminding us of the infectious disease’s toll around the world.  Locusts, Floods, and Coronavirus: The Crises in East Africa The swarms of locusts are leading to fears of famine in the region, where response to COVID-19 is already stretched thin. Treating Patients and Engaging in Activism: A Doctor's Balancing Act Activists, attorneys, and doctors ring the alarm on dangerous conditions in ICE custody.
19/05/2047m 59s

Trump Administration Puts a Strain on Health Care Systems Abroad by Continuing Deportations 2020-05-18

Trump Administration Puts a Strain on Health Care Systems Abroad by Continuing Deportations Even as immigration into the U.S. has virtually ground to a halt, the Trump administration has continued deporting large numbers of ICE detainees. How Quarantine Could Be Affecting Your Sleep Changes in your circadian rhythm, anxiety, sense of isolation, and lack of a normal routine could all be leading to your irregular sleep. The Loved Ones Supporting Essential Workers As essential workers continue to keep us all going, we hear from a few people who are supporting them. Sweden's Coronavirus Strategy Sweden has taken a different approach than most countries to the coronavirus  outbreak and has avoided large shutdowns. How is that strategy working?
18/05/2046m 14s

Politics with Amy Walter: How California is Preparing for the General Election During the Pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has taken a serious toll on not only our health, but on the economic well-being of cities and states across the country. As leaders grapple with how best protect the health of their constituents in addition to mitigating the economic fall out caused by stay-at-home orders, preparation for future elections is in front of mind. Recently, California became the first state to modify its plans for the general election after Governor Gavin Newsom issued an executive order that said the state's 20 million-plus registered voters would receive ballots in the mail. California Secretary of State Alex Padilla explains the logistics behind getting ballots to voters and what precautions will be taken for those who need to vote in person. John Myers, the Sacramento Bureau Chief of the Los Angeles Times, shares why it's so easy to vote absentee in the state. David Wasserman, House editor for The Cook Political Report, dissects what a primarily vote-by-mail election looks like and uses the special election in the state's 25th District as a case study.  In April, Wisconsin held its primary and local elections in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. Many voters who did not receive their absentee ballots in time had to choose between risking their health to vote in person or not voting at all. This week, the state's Supreme Court struck down the stay-at-home order signed by Democratic Governor Tony Evers in March. Amy shares her thoughts on the partial reopening. Heather Long, economics correspondent at The Washington Post, and Betsey Stevenson, Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the University of Michigan, explain what the economic downturn means for small businesses and the American middle class long-term. 
15/05/2041m 20s

Pregnant People Are Turning to Midwives During Pandemic 2020-05-14

Pregnant People Are Turning to Midwives During Pandemic Midwives are seeing a surge in demand across the country, but in some states, there are restrictions in place preventing people from accessing their services.   Major League Baseball Owners Push to Play Ball in Early July This week, reports emerged that Major League Baseball is hoping to start its season in early July, meaning players and ballpark staff may have to weigh significant health concerns.  What the Poll Numbers Mean for Trump and November Amy Walter, host of Politics with Amy Walter from The Takeaway, helped break down the latest approval rating polls.  First-Generation Graduates Take the Virtual Stage During a global pandemic, with stay-at-home orders in place, graduation this year is looking quite different.
14/05/2053m 4s

How Labor Organizing Can Help Women and People of Color Unemployed Due to COVID-19 2020-05-13

How Labor Organizing Can Help Women and People of Color Unemployed Due to COVID-19 The economic crisis has disproportionately hurt women and people of color. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock on Reopening and What's Next Denver Mayor Michael Hancock explains what precautions were taken into consideration before beginning to reopen the city last week.  Is the U.S. Experiencing a Megadrought? Some scientists warn that for the first time in centuries, the southwestern U.S. is in the midst of a megadrought. 'I Can't Imagine Not Having Live Theater': Local Theaters Chart Plans for Survival Amid COVID-19 Communities that depend on local performing arts theaters have temporarily lost essential spaces to come together and interact with one another.
13/05/2048m 23s

Combating the Virtual Spread of COVID-19 Misinformation 2020-05-12

Combating the Virtual Spread of COVID-19 Misinformation The spread of misinformation at a time like this can be costly. DeVos Quietly Releases New Rules on Campus Sexual Assault Amid Pandemic Many advocacy organizations are unsurprisingly concerned about the impact this will have on survivors coming forward. Why Maternity Wards Are Disappearing from Black Neighborhoods Experts worry that as the coronavirus pandemic continues, maternity care deserts could become a nationwide trend. Movie Therapy for the Soul Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer, co-hosts of Movie Therapy, share their recommendations to soothe and distract us right now.
12/05/2059m 5s

What Happens to Unsheltered People When the Pandemic Has Passed? 2020-05-11

What Happens to Unsheltered People When the Pandemic Has Passed?  The fixes cities are implementing, including moving people who are experiencing homelessness to hotels, are largely temporary. What Little Richard, Andre Harrell, and Betty Wright Meant for the Music Industry The music industry was dealt a serious blow this weekend with the loss of three icons. 'Economic Viruses Were Already at Work Before Coronavirus': A Conversation with Dr. Cornel West Dr. Cornel West discusses COVID-19, the shooting of Ahmaud Arbery, and the 2020 elections.
11/05/2051m 31s

Politics with Amy Walter: A Look at Phase One of North Carolina's Plan to Reopen

The White House has deferred to states about reopening their economies. This week, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper announced that his state would move to phase one of their plan to reopen. Phase one will begin at 5 p.m. on Friday, May, 8th. While the stay-at-home order will still be in effect, there will no longer be a distinction between essential and non-essential businesses.  Dr. Mandy Cohen, Secretary of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, shares what metrics the state used to determine that it's the right time to begin phase one.  Phase one of North Carolina’s reopening includes a relaxation of restrictions on social gatherings, including worship services. Services with more than 10 people can take place as long they are outside and social distancing is respected. Spence Shelton, lead pastor at Mercy Church in Charlotte, North Carolina, shares what it's like to lead group worship remotely and how he's navigating phase one.  Dr. Lucian Conway is a professor of Social Psychology at the University of Montana studying what shapes human thoughts and communications at the Political Cognition Lab. He shares what's driving the gap between what liberals and conservatives think about how seriously to take the threat of COVID-19 and how the government should respond to it. Small business owners have been saddled with the enormous responsibility of managing their businesses during the pandemic. They've seen a sharp decline in sales with no end to the public health crisis in sight. This week, we hear from two small business owners trying to navigate the new normal. Lenore Estrada is the owner of Three Babes Bakeshop in San Francisco and Abigail Opiah is the cofounder of Yeluchi by Unruly, a mobile hairstyling service.  This week, the Justice Department announced that they were dropping the criminal case against Michael Flynn, President Trump’s first national security adviser. Flynn had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI twice regarding conversations he’d had with a Russian diplomat in 2016. Katie Benner, who covers the Justice Department for The New York Times, shares how the decision came about and whether or not it undermines the credibility of the Russia investigation. 
08/05/2049m 36s

COVID-19 Protesters: A Look at the American Legacy of Demanding Freedom at the Expense of Others 2020-05-07

COVID-19 Protesters: A Look at the American Legacy of Demanding Freedom at the Expense of Others  Protesters are calling for their freedom to be restored, while disregarding how this could impact the vulnerable communities that have been hit the hardest by COVID-19.  How to Talk to Your Kids About COVID-19 Although many kids seem to avoid serious cases of COVID-19, they aren’t immune to the psychological effects of the crisis. Kids Tell Us: What's Hard and What's Great About Being Home So Much We heard from kids around the country, and there was a resounding theme: they miss their friends. Spain Takes Steps Toward Reopening The country has had more than 220,000 confirmed cases and around 26,000 deaths. In Missouri, the Shows Will Go On, Eventually While the state of Missouri may be allowing concerts and live events to resume, local leaders and musicians are exercising caution. 
07/05/2055m 9s

How Social Distancing is Exacerbating Feelings of Loneliness for Some Elderly Americans 2020-05-06

How Social Distancing is Exacerbating Feelings of Loneliness for Some Elderly Americans For many elderly people living in long-term care facilities or on their own, social distancing rules are likely leading to increased feelings of loneliness.  Lessons Learned from the 1918 Flu Pandemic It’s the deadliest pandemic in recent history, with at least 50 million deaths worldwide.  Brazil’s President is Actively Undermining Public Health Efforts to Fight COVID-19 For weeks, since COVID-19 began spreading in Brazil, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has dismissed its seriousness.  Reopening Hollywood: A Look at How the Industry Can Reboot Post-Pandemic As some parts of the country start to reopen, Hollywood is looking ahead to how studios will eventually reopen, too.
06/05/2056m 14s

More and More People in Jails and Prisons Are Dying of COVID-19 2020-05-05

More and More People in Jails and Prisons Are Dying of COVID-19 Testing in facilities is inconsistent around the country. But the majority of those tested are positive for the virus. Private Prison Company's Special Operations Unit Pepper Sprayed Immigrant Detainees. They Joked About it Online. The immigrant detainees were pepper-sprayed twice in a two-week timespan amid the pandemic. What U.S. States Can Learn from Georgia's Reopening More and more states are relaxing measures put in place because of COVID-19.  Keep or Ditch: How Our Lives Will Change After COVID-19 Shaking hands? Canceled.  
05/05/2045m 56s

Is the U.S. Ready to Reopen? 2020-05-04

Is the U.S. Ready to Reopen? Across the country, states are starting to relax restrictions put in place because of COVID-19, even as the death toll surpasses 67,000. Biden Responds to Sexual Assault Allegations After Weeks of Silence It’s been one month since Tara Reade, a former Senate staffer, publicly accused Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden of sexually assaulting her in 1993.  Why COVID-19 is So Deadly in Long-Term Care Facilities More than 16,000 residents and staff of long-term care facilities have died in the U.S. of COVID-19. Navajo Nation is Being Hit Hard By COVID-19 Densely populated states like New York and New Jersey have been hit hard by COVID-19, the area with the third highest infection rate in the country is Navajo Nation.
04/05/2044m 47s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Return of Big Government

The Great Depression, 9/11, and the 2008 financial crisis dealt serious shocks to the nation and resulted in the expansion of government.  When a crisis happens, leaders in Washington try to mitigate financial ruin and to boost morale which often results in the creation of programs that have a lasting impact. The creation of Homeland Security, unemployment benefits, and new regulations on banks have stemmed from national disasters. The coronavirus pandemic is no exception as more than 30 million Americans have applied for unemployment insurance over the last six weeks.   This week, Politics with Amy Walter examines how the government response to the coronavirus pandemic compares to dilemmas of the past. Tony Fratto, deputy assistant to President George W. Bush and Jason Furman, top economic adviser to President Barack Obama share what it was like to lead the country through an unprecedented shock. Jerry Seib, the executive Washington editor of The Wall Street Journal, explains why there’s more widespread support for government intervention today versus during the 2008 financial crisis.  Erica Werner, a congressional reporter for The Washington Post, describes how members of Congress have been working together on multiple COVID-19 recovery packages and how likely it is that the partnership lasts. Annie Linskey, a national political reporter at The Washington Post, shares how Joe Biden’s campaign is adjusting to the realities of campaigning from home as a result of the pandemic. Finally, Mayor Quentin Hart of Waterloo, Iowa shares how his constituents are dealing with the coronavirus outbreak and how a local outbreak is tied to the city's Tyson Foods plant. 
01/05/2046m 5s

How Big Tech is Thriving During COVID-19 2020-04-30

How Big Tech is Thriving During COVID-19 While most financial sectors have been devastated by COVID-19, big tech companies like Google, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft are weathering the storm pretty well. Cannabis Companies Struggling During COVID-19 Are Ineligible for Federal Relief One industry that is not feeling the benefits of that bailout is the cannabis industry. How will the industry survive the pandemic? Grief is Everywhere in the Age of COVID-19 People often think about grief in response to the death of someone, but it can happen with any kind of loss.  Becoming a Mother During a Pandemic Takeaway host Tanzina Vega is home with her newborn. Guest host Lizzie O'Leary is 30 weeks pregnant. They talk about beginning motherhood at this remarkable moment.
30/04/2046m 27s

The Challenges of Parenting During a Pandemic 2020-04-29

The Challenges of Parenting During a Pandemic  Parents are feeling a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety from having to manage working from home while also homeschooling and entertaining their children. Jackson, Mississippi Mayor on Reopening and Suspending Open Carry Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba joined us to talk about Jackson's approach to reopening and why he made an executive order to suspend the open carry of firearms in the city. Ohio Voters Head to the Mailbox Instead of Ballot Box In the first election of its kind, almost everyone in the state was required to vote-by-mail. Federal Court Rules Detroit Students Were Denied Constitutional Right to Basic Education Last week, a federal court ruled that Detroit public school students had their constitutional rights violated when they were denied access to basic education. Remembering Richard Hake: Longtime WNYC Host, Colleague and Friend On Friday, the Takeaway and WNYC family lost a friend and beloved co-worker, Richard Hake. He died in his home from natural causes at age 51.
29/04/2050m 33s

Puerto Rico Still Lagging Behind on Coronavirus Testing 2020-04-28

Puerto Rico Still Lagging Behind on Coronavirus Testing Puerto Rico currently has the lowest per capita testing rate, compared with any U.S. state. Tampa Mayor Jane Castor on her Approach to Flatten the Curve As one of the hardest-hit states, Florida had a delayed response in issuing a statewide stay-at-home order.  Grieving in the Time of COVID-19 Of all the things we're trying to adapt to in isolation, grieving might be the most difficult. We’ve asked our listeners to share their stories of loss and grief with us. What COVID-19 Looks Like in the Occupied Palestinian Territories While COVID-19 has been kept relatively under control in the occupied Palestinian territories, a move severe outbreak could threaten an already strained medical system. Why Is There So Much Pressure to Be Productive During the Pandemic? Mental strain from quarantine is making daily life harder as traditional and social media pressure people to self-improve and be productive during this time.
28/04/2048m 58s

For Black Men, Complying with Face Mask Guidelines Comes with Racial Profiling Risks 2020-04-27

For Black Men, Complying with Face Mask Guidelines Comes with Racial Profiling Risks The CDC is urging all Americans to wear face masks when leaving the house. But that’s proved to be a difficult and sometimes dangerous choice for black men in particular. Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall Urges Caution Amid Utah Governor's Plans to Reopen Economy Utah Governor Gary Herbert plans to slowly reopen his state in early May. Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall joins The Takeaway to respond to the governor's approach. Ramadan in the Era of Social Distancing This year, Ramadan, the Islamic holy month known for its dawn to dusk fasts, falls in the midst of a global pandemic. What does that mean for Ramadan's communal traditions? How Universities Across the United States Profited from Indigenous Land A recent investigation from High Country News reveals how indigenous land was turned into seed money for many U.S. colleges. How Language Experts Are Helping the Public Make Sense of COVID-19 As the COVID-19 pandemic adds new terms into our everyday vocabularies, online dictionaries have become a reliable source for people hoping to better understand the jargon.
27/04/2050m 53s

Politics with Amy Walter: Social Distancing on the Campaign Trail

Rallies, conventions, and press conferences were once the primary method for campaigns to connect with voters. The coronavirus pandemic has forced politicians and strategists to rethink how they approach campaigning. Stephanie Cutter, deputy campaign manager for President Barack Obama in 2012, and Matt Rhoades, campaign manager for Mitt Romney in 2012, share how campaigns will need to rely heavily on digital efforts. Recent graduates seeking to get involved in field campaigns have also had to shift expectations. Sam Aleman, a digital organizer for the Democratic National Committee, and Kiran Menon, a senior at the University of Virginia studying politics, discuss what it's like to pursue campaign jobs during the pandemic.  States have scrambled to adjust long-planned elections because of the public health risk posed by COVID-19. Earlier this month, the governor of Wisconsin attempted to postpone in-person voting but was ultimately unsuccessful. So on April 7, Wisconsin voters stood six feet apart in long lines to cast their ballots while respecting social distancing. Since then, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel investigation found systemic problems with the state's absentee ballot request process. Reporter Daphne Chen described the electoral shortfalls.  Also, Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose describes how he's navigating the changes of the state's upcoming all vote-by-mail primary. As part of our series on governing during a pandemic, we spoke to Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry. He shared how his constituents are holding up and how he's advising the governor on reopening the state.     Music by J. Cowit. Additional music by Gypsy George and Lisa Ekdahl. Check out our ongoing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic here.
24/04/2049m 21s

What Happens to Health Care Workers Who Speak Out? 2020-04-23

What Happens to Health Care Workers Who Speak Out? In the U.S., some hospitals are disciplining health care workers who speak publicly about their concerns. The Mayor of Savannah Opposes Georgia Governor's Aggressive Reopening Plan Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has announced a slew of businesses will be able to reopen as soon as Friday. Mayor Van Johnson believes that is far too soon. Environmental Justice in the Age of COVID-19 For years, black people in the U.S. have been dealing with environmental justice issues.  Joking from a Distance: Samantha Bee and 'Full Frontal' Writer Kristen Bartlett on Making a Late Night Show from Home The Takeaway speaks with Samantha Bee and Kristen Bartlett about how they're putting together a new show every week.
23/04/201h 2m

San Francisco Mayor London Breed Discusses the City's Response to COVID-19 2020-04-22

San Francisco Mayor London Breed Discusses the City's Response to COVID-19 We spoke with the mayor of San Francisco, London Breed, about the tough choices ahead. Former Climate Skeptic on How Disinformation on COVID-19 Was Paved by Years of Climate Denial Decades of undermining science related to pollution and climate change has paved the way for the denial of COVID-19. Immigration Ban: How Trump is Using COVID-19 to Further Restrict Entry into the U.S. The latest ban on green card holders is just the latest move to restrict migration by the Trump administration. "The Quietest Earth Day That I Have Had in Fifty Years": Earth Day Turns Fifty at a Strange Time Earth Day began as an environmental teach-in half a century ago in 1970. Every year since, it has adapted according to what's happening in the world.
22/04/2049m 4s

Ten Years After Deepwater Explosion, the U.S. Isn't Equipped to Handle Another Disaster of its Magnitude 2020-04-21

Ten Years After Deepwater Explosion, the U.S. Isn't Equipped to Handle Another Disaster of its Magnitude On April 20th, 2010, a drilling rig exploded off the coast of Louisiana and spilled millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.  Montana Judge Revokes Permit on Controversial Keystone XL Pipeline A judge in Montana has canceled a key permit for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline that’s expected to stretch from Canada to Nebraska. The Paycheck Protection Program is Failing to Help Many Small Businesses The program ran out of the money last Thursday and stopped taking loan applications from small business owners. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot Addresses Racial Disparities in her City's COVID-19 Outbreak Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot joins The Takeaway to discuss racial disparities in her city's coronavirus cases and how her government is responding.
21/04/2046m 15s

How the Spread of COVID-19 Could Impacted the Treatment of Other Global Diseases 2020-04-20

How the Spread of COVID-19 Could Impacted the Treatment of Other Global Diseases As the treatment of COVID-19 takes precedent throughout the world, some experts worry that other global health initiatives will fall to the wayside.  The Pandemic is a Mass Traumatic Event The coronavirus pandemic could leave millions of people with post-traumatic stress disorder, from first responders on the ground to those forced to quarantine at home. Does Biden's Climate Plan Go Far Enough To Win Over Progressives? Biden’s climate platform was consistently ranked lower by environmental groups compared to progressive candidates. Environmentalsts are now asking Biden to shift left on climate. In the Midst of a Global Pandemic, Tornado Outbreaks Devastate the South Storms continue to strike the south leaving destruction in their wake.  How will they fare while also dealing with a pandemic? Writer Jason Reynolds on Engaging Kids Through Literature from Home As parents and guardians across the country know, it’s not always easy to keep kids engaged through online and distance learning. But writer Jason Reynolds wants to help.
20/04/2052m 9s

Politics with Amy Walter: How Coronavirus Will Hurt those Attempting to Enter the Workforce

It's hard to know how the coronavirus pandemic will permanently alter the fabric of society. So far, 22 million Americans have filed for unemployment over the last month of social distancing. This week, Politics with Amy Walter looks at the impact the economic downturn caused by COVID-19 will have on a generation that was just starting to find their footing.  Hannes Schwandt, Assistant Professor at Northwestern University School of Education and Social Policy, shares how cohorts unlucky enough to join the workforce during a recession see a loss in lifetime earnings in addition to other less desirable life outcomes.  Amanda Mull, a staff writer at The Atlantic, describes how disasters like pandemics alter the worldview of those transitioning into adulthood. The economic fallout from the Great Recession made it difficult for millennials to start stable careers causing them to protest the institutions and policies that contributed to their struggle. The current economic downturn has the potential to do the same for Generation C.  Judah Lewis was finishing the second semester of his senior year at Howard University when COVID-19 caused the school to close and classes to move online. The path to his last semester was not an easy one and now he feels like the rug has been pulled out from underneath him. Lewis talks to us about how the pandemic has jeopardized his post-graduation prospects and his job with Teach for America.  Heather Long, an economics reporter at The Washington Post, shares an update on who is left out when it comes to the $1,200 government stimulus checks meant to soften the blow from the economic downturn. As part of our continuing look at how mayors across the country are tackling this pandemic, Mayor Linda Gorton of Lexington, Kentucky describes the measures she's taken to fight COVID-19. Check out our ongoing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic here. Check out our local leader series here.
17/04/2046m 46s

The Past, Present, and Future of the U.S. Postal Service 2020-04-16

The Past, Present, and Future of the U.S. Postal Service What could become of the USPS during this pandemic if they're not bailed out? Frustrations Mount as Cuomo and De Blasio Publicly Disagree Over NYC School Closures On Sunday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced his city's school system would remain closed for the rest of the academic year, reopening a feud with Governor Andrew Cuomo. Tara Reade's Sexual Assault Allegations Against Joe Biden Explained Tara Reade, a former Senate aide, has accused Joe Biden of sexually assaulting her in 1993. Outdated Software Complicates Efforts to Keep State Unemployment Systems Running A new investigation from The Verge found that more than a dozen state unemployment websites run on a decades-old software. Why Puzzles Are So Popular During the Pandemic Like toilet paper, canned goods, and hand sanitizer, jigsaw puzzles have been flying off the shelves in recent weeks. 
16/04/2048m 3s

False-negatives from COVID-19 Tests are Not Just About Testing Accuracy 2020-04-15

False-negatives from COVID-19 Tests are Not Just About Testing Accuracy False-negatives can be caused by a host of factors, including the best practices for administering them.  State Policies May Give People with Disabilities Lower Priority for COVID-19 Care A new investigation from the Center for Public Integrity shows that people with disabilities may not be able to access ventilators amid the pandemic. 2020 WNBA Virtual Draft: Everything You Need to Know This Friday, ESPN will host the WNBA draft on its main channel for the first time.  Showrunner Dahvi Waller Explores a Counterrevolution in 'Mrs. America' The new FX show 'Mrs. America' tells the story of conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, who worked to halt the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s.
15/04/2047m 51s

Farmers Scramble to Stay Profitable Amid Disruptions to the Food Industry 2020-04-14

Farmers Scramble to Stay Profitable Amid Disruptions to the Food Industry Many farms around the country are still producing plenty of food but with restaurants closed or scaled back, farmers are figuring out how to sell their product to stay afloat. Farmworkers Keeping America Fed During COVID-19 are Worried About Their Health Farmworkers are put in a precarious position by COVID-19. Workers around the country are worried about their own health and safety, as they continue to harvest the food we eat. How Coronavirus Has Hit Local News The news industry has been struggling to stay afloat for years. But local news has been hit particularly hard by COVID-19. Is Social Media the Future of Epidemiology? News and social media are changing the way we learn about and track the spread of infectious diseases.
14/04/2046m 25s

When Home Isn't Safe: Shelter-In-Place for Victims of Domestic Violence and Child Abuse 2020-04-13

When Home Isn't Safe: Shelter-In-Place for Victims of Domestic Violence and Child Abuse  We’re staying home to keep ourselves and each other safe. But what if home isn’t safe at all? What Does Recovery from COVID-19 Mean? As thousands of people around the world continue to get sick from COVID-19, many are also recovering. FDA Relaxes Blood Donation Restrictions for Men Who Have Sex With Men Amid COVID-19 The FDA has reduced the amount of time men have to wait to donate blood after having sex with another man.  Joking from a Distance: Aparna Nancherla on Finding Humor in our Collective Anxiety Joking about living with anxiety has been central to Aparna Nancherla’s material for years now, making her brand of humor particularly well suited to this current moment.
13/04/2043m 40s

Politics with Amy Walter: React or Prepare? How to Handle a Crisis

The scale of the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented but history is often a helpful guide. Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services for the Obama administration, and Andy Card, Secretary of the Department of Transportation for President George H.W. Bush and White House Chief of Staff for President George W. Bush, describe what it's like to govern during a crisis. Plus, former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Executive Director of the Bipartisan Commission on Biodefense Dr. Asha George chronicle the political challenges to preparedness. A handful of rural states are without statewide stay-at-home orders and Arkansas is one of them. Marco McClendon is the Mayor of West Memphis, Arkansas, a town located just across the Mississippi River from downtown Memphis, Tennessee. Mayor McClendon shares the measures he's implementing in his town to contain COVID-19. This week, Senator Bernie Sanders ended his bid for the Democratic nomination. Ruby Cramer has been covering the Sanders campaign for BuzzFeed News. She shares what his legacy might look like and which factors contributed to his shift from frontrunner to dropout.  Check out our ongoing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic here. Check out our local leader series here.
10/04/2049m 13s

Privacy Concerns Mount as Coronavirus Spreads 2020-04-09

Privacy Concerns Mount as Coronavirus Spreads Around the world, privacy advocates are sounding the alarm on heightened surveillance measures that have popped up amid the ongoing pandemic.  Senator Bernie Sanders is Out of the Race. What Does This Mean for November? Vice President Joe Biden is likely to become the Democratic Party's nominee for the presidential race. In New Jersey, COVID-19 Cases Continue to Rise The Takeaway speaks to New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy about how COVID-19 is playing out in his state.  Nightly Gratitude and Applause for Health Care Workers Around the World All over the world, people have been clapping and cheering for health care workers in a nightly ritual to celebrate those on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. Number of COVID-19 Deaths in New York City May Actually Be Even Greater Than Reported A significant rise in the number of at-home deaths suggests that the city is not counting everyone dying from COVID-19. Alan Yang and Tzi Ma Peel Back the Layers of an Immigrant's Story in 'Tigertail' Alan Yang is best known as the co-creator of 'Master of None,' but for 'Tigertail,' his first film as a writer and director, he decided to tell a more dramatic personal story.
09/04/2056m 24s

"In a Strange Way It's More Intimate": Recovery From Addiction During COVID-19 2020-04-08

"In a Strange Way It's More Intimate": Recovery From Addiction During COVID-19 People in recovery from addiction have seen their support systems, including meetings like Alcoholics Anonymous, disappear or change. Wisconsin Voters Head to the Polls Despite Coronavirus Concerns For weeks, Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers tried to postpone the elections and extend the deadline for mail-in ballots.  How to Get Unemployment Benefits During the COVID-19 Pandemic Feeling frustrated? We talk to a legal aid attorney who helps citizens get the benefits they need. Distance Learning Presents Unique Set of Challenges for Students with Disabilities For many students in public schools receiving special education services, switching to distance learning has meant the loss of face to face learning that can’t be replicated remotely.
08/04/2046m 17s

COVID-19: Detroit's Black Community is Disproportionately Falling Ill and Dying 2020-04-07

COVID-19: Detroit's Black Community is Disproportionately Falling Ill and Dying A journalist and Detroit native tells us about this moment in her city. Trump Continues to Promote Hydroxychloroquine as a Treatment for COVID-19 Despite Lack of Evidence White House health adviser and infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci has called the evidence supporting the use of the drug "anecdotal." COVID-19 is Changing How We Mourn Around the country, the funeral industry is struggling to keep up with the growing number of deaths from COVID-19.
07/04/2044m 41s

What COVID-19 Means for the American South 2020-04-06

What COVID-19 Means for the American South What was initially contained to the coasts is now starting to engulf the rest of the country, including states like Louisiana, Mississippi, and Georgia.  COVID-19 Is Not An Equalizer: Early Data Shows African Americans Are Dying at Higher Rates Early data shows black people are being infected and dying at higher rates than other communities. Joking from a Distance: Ziwe Fumudoh on Processing Trauma Through Comedy Ziwe Fumudoh, a writer for Showtime’s Desus & Mero, joins The Takeaway to talk about where she's looking for levity in this very serious moment. Listeners Tell Us: Housing Costs Hit Hard During COVID-19 Pandemic We asked listeners if COVID-19 was affecting their ability to pay for housing, and where they are turning for help.
06/04/2046m 28s

Politics with Amy Walter: A Primary Election During a Pandemic

The Latest:  BREAKING: Wisconsin's Democratic Gov. Tony Evers issues order delaying Tuesday’s presidential primary election until June because of the coronavirus pandemic; court challenge expected. https://t.co/9l3Ui0tZZ4 — The Associated Press (@AP) April 6, 2020 NOTE: This is an evolving story, our Politics host Amy Walter be keeping up with it and tweeting her analysis throughout the weekend. You can find Amy at @amyewalter or click her Twitter thread below for all of the latest:  Just now: WI Gov. Evers (D) calls for special session to turn the 4/7 primary into all vote-by-mail. According to MKE Journal’s @MollyBeck , GOP legislature has rejected it & “WI polls will be open on Tues. & people will be voting in person.” 1/ — amy walter (@amyewalter) April 3, 2020 On Tuesday, April 7th, Wisconsin will hold its primary election in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. While 15 states have postponed their primaries, officials in Wisconsin have decided to move forward with the race rather than leave local elected positions in limbo. Patrick Marley from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, State Representative Tyler August, and Congresswoman Gwen Moore join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the decision to host an election during the coronavirus pandemic.   Also, Austin Mayor Steve Adler shares what it's like to govern during a pandemic in a blue city within a red state.  Finally, Chryl Laird, Assistant Professor of Government at Bowdoin College and author of "Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior," shares why Black Americans are such a loyal voting bloc for Democrats.  Check out our ongoing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic here. Check out our local leader series here.
03/04/2047m 4s

Coronavirus Exposes Public Health Inequities in Indigenous Communities 2020-04-02

Coronavirus Exposes Public Health Inequities in Indigenous Communities In American Indian communities, the coronavirus outbreak has exposed a number of longstanding public health inequities. What's the Role of Palliative Care During a Pandemic? Before the spread of COVID-19, palliative care was already in short supply.  The Challenges India Faces Amid Coronavirus Lockdown Last week, India followed the lead of many countries facing the coronavirus pandemic by locking down the country.  Joking from a Distance: Stand-Up Comedian Dan Ahdoot on Social Distancing with His Parents Comedian Dan Ahdoot was about to get his big break on the Netflix sitcom ‘The Crew’ when filming was halted in March. Since then, he’s been staying with his parents on Long Island.
02/04/2046m 46s

"An Open License To Pollute": EPA Relaxes Regulations Citing Coronavirus 2020-04-01

"An Open License To Pollute": EPA Relaxes Regulations Citing Coronavirus  The Environmental Protection Agency announced last week it is relaxing environmental regulations for companies including factories and power plants. How African Americans, and African Immigrants, Are Fighting Against Undercounts The 2020 census will have a significant impact on the distribution of political, and economic, resources for years to come. But the rollout has been mired in controversy and confusion. In Latest Move to Push for Power Transition, Justice Dept. Charges Venezuela's Maduro with "Narco-Terrorism" The charges allege Maduro has been leading the "Cartel of the Suns" in Venezuela, to traffic cocaine into the United States. Joking from a Distance: Karen Chee on Writing for Late Night from Bed 'Late Night with Seth Meyers' writer Karen Chee returns to The Takeaway to discuss how she's adjusting to creating new material without leaving her room.
01/04/2045m 45s

The Looming Crisis of COVID-19 in America's Jails and Prisons 2020-03-30

The Looming Crisis of COVID-19 in America's Jails and Prisons  A coronavirus outbreak in the correctional system could cause chaos for thousands of inmates across the country. Emissions Are Going Down Because of the COVID-19 Pandemic, What Does That Mean for Climate Change? Are there unintended climate benefits from the coronavirus pandemic? Or is this just a temporary dip in emissions that will be inconsequential in the long run? Joking from a Distance: Roy Wood Jr. on Fundraising for Comedy Venues During COVID-19 Stand-up comic and Daily Show correspondent Roy Wood Jr. joins The Takeaway to talk about using Instagram Live to raise money for comedy clubs during the COVID-19 pandemic. 
30/03/2039m 23s

Politics with Amy Walter: How COVID-19 has Changed Small Business

The coronavirus pandemic has taken a toll on every aspect of life. Hospitals and health care workers are overwhelmed as the number of those infected grows every day. The global economy has been upended and entire industries have come to a halt leaving millions without jobs. As Americans wait for a coordinated federal response, small business owners are running out of resources to keep their livelihoods afloat and their employees on the payroll. Lenore Estrada is the founder of Three Babes Bakeshop in San Francisco and the Executive Director of SF New Deal. She's had to lay off most of her employees and lost hundreds of thousands of dollars in business. She joined Politics to share how things have changed since the start of the economic downturn.  Congressman Colin Allred of Texas weighs in on the $2 trillion stimulus package out of Washington this week. Among many things, the stimulus package is supposed to provide relief for small businesses struggling to adapt to the loss in traffic. The Washington Post's Paul Kane covered the 2008 financial crisis in addition to the ongoing one. He joins Amy Walter to analyze the details of the stimulus package and how Democrats are working to ensure there are checks on assistance for large corporations.  First responders are putting their lives on the line throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. James Augustine is the Medical Director of South Fulton, Georgia. He describes how first responders are adjusting to the realities of the pandemic.  Finally, Anita Dunn, senior adviser to former Vice President Joe Biden, shares how campaigning has changed as a result of the pandemic. 
27/03/2046m 58s

Faith Communities Find Creative Ways to Congregate Amid Pandemic 2020-03-26

Faith Communities Find Creative Ways to Congregate Amid Pandemic Places of worship are transitioning to creative ways of holding services that protect their congregations from the spread of the coronavirus. What COVID-19 Means for VA Clinics in the U.S. For years, the Department of Veterans Affairs has had to deal with crisis after crisis. As COVID-19 spreads across the country, the VA is once again finding itself in hot water.  Joking from a Distance: Maria Bamford on Workshopping New Material Online As part of a series of check-ins with different comedians, The Takeaway speaks with stand-up comic Maria Bamford about workshopping her material in a moment of social distancing.
26/03/2037m 46s

The Big Challenges Latin America Faces with Coronavirus 2020-03-25

The Big Challenges Latin America Faces with Coronavirus In Latin America, the reported number of cases has remained low, and not all governments are taking precautions. Some leaders don’t seem to be taking the risks very seriously, either.  How Coronavirus is Affecting the Primaries As the coronavirus pandemic continues, so does the campaign for President of the United States. But it looks different than just a few weeks ago. Online Games Like Animal Crossing are Giving People Ways to Still Gather and Socialize Video games like Nintendo's, Animal Crossing: New Horizons, are giving people opportunities to hang out in virtual spaces when they can't in real life.  Bonus: What PG&E's Involuntary Manslaughter Guilty Plea Means for the Company's Future On Monday, California utility company Pacific Gas and Electric announced that they’ll plead guilty to 84 counts of involuntary manslaughter for their role in the 2018 Camp Fire.
25/03/2030m 18s

How Effectively is the Media Covering Trump's Handling of COVID-19? 2020-03-24

How Effectively is the Media Covering Trump's Handling of COVID-19? Most television and radio news outlets are airing President Trump's coronavirus press briefings, despite the president's tendency to put out misleading information. Immigration Advocates Call on ICE to Release Detainees Immigration advocates and attorneys have called on ICE to release migrants and asylum seekers who are at risk of contracting COVID-19.  Nurses Call for More Protective Gear, Training in the U.S.  In some parts of the country, nurses are already struggling to secure the equipment and training they need to safely care for their patients.  Takeaway Host Tanzina Vega on Motherhood and Social Isolation Host Tanzina Vega gives us an update from her home in Queens, New York, where she is on maternity leave.
24/03/2044m 46s

Across the Globe, Health Care Workers Are On the Front Lines of Pandemic 2020-03-23

Across the Globe, Health Care Workers Are On the Front Lines of Pandemic In the U.S., health care workers are sounding the alarm on severe equipment shortages in the country. COVID-19: Are Rural Hospitals Prepared for the Pandemic? For years, rural healthcare facilities have struggled to stay afloat. How COVID-19 is Putting More Strain on Homeless Shelters The rapid acceleration of coronavirus is stressing an already overcrowded shelter system.  How Sex Workers Are Impacted by COVID-19 A look at how sex workers are impacted by COVID-19.
23/03/2038m 15s

Politics with Amy Walter: Governing, the Economy, and Coronavirus

This week, a look at the way coronavirus is reshaping our worldview. Louisiana was the first state to postpone their primary contest as a result of the ongoing public health pandemic. Several states have since followed its lead. Louisiana's Secretary of State R. Kyle Ardoin joins Politics to explain the reasoning behind the decision to move their primary. The global economy has slowed considerably as communities attempt to contain the spread of coronavirus. Economist and Howard University professor Andria Smythe describes the tools that policymakers are using to soften the economic blow.  Wendy Parmet, professor of law and the director of Northeastern University's Center for Health Policy and Law in Boston, discusses the power that state and local governments have to deal with a public health crisis.  During times of crisis, people look to the President. A strong show of leadership has the power to calm nerves and reassure audiences that everything will be okay. Professor Barbara Perry is the Presidential Studies Director at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center. Professor Perry weighs in on what the role of the president has been historically and what lessons can be applied to the ongoing pandemic.  Check out our ongoing coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here. 
20/03/2047m 20s

Amazon's Sales Are Up But Their Workers Don't Feel Safe 2020-03-19

Amazon's Sales Are Up But Their Workers Don't Feel Safe Americans are hunkering down to slow the spread of the coronavirus. As people spend more time at home trying to avoid contact, they’re also shopping online more. In Africa, Number of Reported Coronavirus Cases is On the Rise On Wednesday, the World Health Organization said Africa should “prepare for the worst” as the disease continues to spread across the region. Keep Calm and Stream On Let’s talk about entertainment in the age of COVID-19.
19/03/2040m 1s

Puerto Rico's Response to the Coronavirus Pandemic 2020-03-18

Puerto Rico's Response to the Coronavirus Pandemic Governor Wanda Vazquez has issued stricter guidelines to citizens on the island than we have seen anywhere on the mainland U.S., with a curfew from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. How Much Will Workers Benefit from a Congressional Stimulus Package? From paid sick leave to $1,000 checks, The Takeaway looks at what potential stimulus packages from Congress could mean for workers across the country. DOJ Drops Charges Against Russian Firms Implicated in 2016 Election Interference You might have missed what the Department of Justice did this week: they dropped charges against two Russian firms accused of funding efforts to interfere in the 2016 election. U.S. Soccer President Resigns Following Equal Pay Backlash The U.S. women's soccer team filed a gender discrimination lawsuit, and the Soccer Federation's response has left them in hot water.  
18/03/2037m 30s

The Takeaway Answers Your Coronavirus Questions 2020-03-17

The Takeaway Answers Your Coronavirus Questions The Takeaway gave your questions to two people who have been following this pandemic closely.  Keep Calm and Shop On People across the nation may be noticing empty shelves in supermarkets, but experts say don't panic, there's enough food for all. The Best Artists Who Won't Get Their Big Breaks at This Year's SXSW Austin’s South by Southwest festival is one of many cultural events that was called off this year due to COVID-19, meaning that a number of artists won't get to break out this year. Primaries Still Held in Three States Today Despite Coronavirus Concerns Arizona, Illinois, and Florida held primary elections today as the nation shuts down to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.
17/03/2036m 13s

Can Travel Bans Slow the Spread of the Coronavirus? 2020-03-16

Can Travel Bans Slow the Spread of the Coronavirus?  What the Coronavirus Pandemic Means for Our Mental Health As the U.S. and other countries struggle to contain COVID-19, there’s an epidemic of another sort taking place: mass anxiety. Local Officials Ease Water Shut-off Rules Amid Coronavirus Pandemic As the spread of the coronavirus continues across the U.S., leaders in some cities are taking action to make sure all residents have access to running water. NASA is Accepting Applications for New Astronauts: Extensive Travel Required  NASA is taking applications for astronauts for the first time in four years. These new astronauts are likely to be part of future expeditions to the Moon and Mars. Bonus: How is the Coronavirus Impacting the 2020 Census? To find out how the coronavirus could impact the census count, The Takeaway speaks wither with census expert Terri Ann Lowenthal.
16/03/2039m 37s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Politics of Coronavirus

Coronavirus has caused the cancellation of major sporting events, religious services, and other mass gatherings. It's even forced presidential contenders to rethink the way they campaign as people begin self-isolating. This week, Politics with Amy Walter takes a look at how the pandemic is reverberating across politics. Michigan will have an outsized role come November. This is why Biden's performance in the swing state mattered a great deal during Tuesday's primary where he won every county in the state. Maya King of Politico, Ruby Cramer of BuzzFeed News, and Democratic strategist Joel Payne join us to discuss the primary results and what it means for the future of Bernie Sanders' campaign.  Mayor Michael Taylor of Sterling Heights in Macomb County Michigan has voted for Republicans his whole life, but that changed ahead of his state's primary. Although Macomb County supported President Obama twice, it flipped for Trump in 2016. The county has traditionally been a bellwether in elections: whoever wins this blue-collar county wins the state. Mayor Taylor shares why he can no longer support Trump. In the midst of election season, Jessica Huseman of ProPublica's Electionland project analyzes what about the election process has changed since 2016 and how that will affect turnout.   Plus, Reid Wilson, national correspondent at The Hill and author of "Epidemic: Ebola and the Global Scramble to Prevent the Next Killer Outbreak," joins Politics to discuss the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus pandemic.  Check out our ongoing coverage of the coronavirus outbreak here.
13/03/2045m 14s

As the Threat of the Coronavirus Grows, President Trump Addresses the Nation 2020-03-12

As the Threat of the Coronavirus Grows, President Trump Addresses the Nation President Trump addresses the nation as the threat of the coronavirus grows. For Low-Income Americans, Coronavirus is Difficult to Avoid Though nobody is immune to coronavirus, it is expected to have a disproportionate impact on lower-income communities.  How the Coronavirus is Affecting Washington's Homeless Population Washington State is dealing with one of the most serious COVID-19 outbreaks in the country. One population is especially vulnerable, those experiencing homelessness. Bonus: Trump Endorses Jeff Sessions' Opponent in Alabama Senate Race President Trump has endorsed former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville over his former Attorney General.  "Democracy Can Be Lost": Writer David Simon on Adapting 'The Plot Against America' in 2020 The political ascendancy of Donald Trump convinced writer David Simon that Philip Roth's 2005 novel "The Plot Against America" was worth adapting for television. 
12/03/2034m 6s

Italy Issues Nationwide Lockdown Amid Growing Coronavirus Outbreak 2020-03-11

Italy Issues Nationwide Lockdown Amid Growing Coronavirus Outbreak The death toll there has now reached more than 600, with a total of roughly 10,000 cases. Is the Coronavirus Changing How We Look At Public Spaces? More public spaces and events continue to close as the number of coronavirus cases increase, creating a fearful atmosphere in these areas. Primary Results Are In and Joe Biden Leads Joe Biden once again has a stellar turnout, this could almost ensure his nomination as the Democratic candidate. Former Houston Mayor Annise Parker Sees a Changing Landscape for LGBTQ Politicians The Takeaway speaks with former Houston Mayor Annise Parker about her experience as an openly gay mayor in a red state and how she's thinking about this moment in American politics.
11/03/2042m 3s

Bernie Sanders Dominates in the Muslim Vote 2020-03-10

Bernie Sanders Dominates in the Muslim Vote  It’s the second big contest of the Democratic primary and there’s a lot at stake. For Bernie Sanders, it’s a chance to show that he’s still competitive in this primary.  'A Day Without Us': Mexican Women Strike to Protest Femicide Women in Mexico's capital turned out for one of the largest protests in years on International Women's Day to call attention to gender-based violence. The Environmental Impact of Plastic Bag Bans On Sunday, New York’s ban on plastic bags went into effect. The Takeaway speaks with two experts about how effective plastic bag bans are for the environment and consumer waste habits. Bonus: The High-Stakes in the L.A. County District Attorney Race L.A. County is home to the largest prosecutor's office in the U.S., and its district attorney race has high-stakes for criminal justice reform in the area.  U.S. in Midst of Major School Nurse Shortage More than half of U.S. schools no longer have a full-time school nurse. 
10/03/2035m 17s

Communities of Faith Grapple With the Coronavirus 2020-03-09

Communities of Faith Grapple With the Coronavirus As the coronavirus continues to spread around the country and the world, places of worship are grappling with how to continue their services, while also protecting their congregations. Trump Appoints Rep. Mark Meadows to Chief of Staff Outgoing Representative Mark Meadows of North Carolina will take over as chief of staff, replacing Mick Mulvaney who has been acting in that role since January 2019.  What Elizabeth Warren Means for the Future of Women in Politics  Senator Elizabeth Warren ended her presidential bid last Thursday. 
09/03/2043m 7s

Politics with Amy Walter: Super Tuesday and Beyond

Joe Biden, the one-time frontrunner turned underdog is now the frontrunner again. While Bernie Sanders, the one-time underdog turned frontrunner, is once again in the fight for his political survival. We hear from various constituencies across the Democratic spectrum about how they're feeling now that the race has narrowed. Our voices include Aimee Allison, founder of She the People, Domingo Garcia, national president of LULAC, Lanae Erickson, senior vice president at Third Way, and Aracely Jimenez, deputy communications director of Sunrise Movement.  While the attention has been on the fight happening on the Democratic side, President Trump certainly hasn't been sitting on the sidelines. Politico's Alex Isenstadt discusses Trump's reelection strategy. Also on the show, a look at the Trump administration's handling of the coronavirus outbreak with Yasmeen Abutaleb, a health policy reporter at The Washington Post. Plus, a conversation with Joshua Geltzer of Georgetown's Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection about the lost words of the 14th Amendment and what they could mean for voting rights in this country.   
06/03/2046m 38s

How Will the Coronavirus Affect Schools? 2020-03-05

How Will the Coronavirus Affect Schools? Some countries have already shut school doors and sent all students home to wait out the virus. Can closing schools help contain this outbreak?  As October Deadline Approaches, U.S. Residents Scramble to Get Real IDs U.S. residents will need a Real ID, or another form of federally compliant identification, to fly domestically or to enter federal buildings starting this October.  In Developing Countries, Space Programs Take Flight Countries like Ethiopia, India, Angola, and South Africa have begun launching objects into space. Bonus: UC Santa Cruz Graduate Students Fight for Higher Wages Graduate students at the University of California at Santa Cruz are striking for higher wages. Last Friday, the university responded by firing dozens of the students. Obama Era Policy Made Surge in Deportation of Cubans Under Trump Possible The Obama administration's decision to end the decades-old wet foot, dry foot policy paved the way for the rising numbers of deported Cuban nationals.
05/03/2032m 40s

Super Tuesday Brings Democratic Primary into Sharper Focus 2020-03-04

Super Tuesday Brings Democratic Primary into Sharper Focus Joe Biden had a dominant showing on Super Tuesday, meaning that the shape of the race for the Democratic nomination is finally coming into focus. Abortion Is Back Before the Supreme Court Today, oral arguments begin in the Supreme Court for June Medical Services v. Russo. Census 2020: How Native American Officials Are Working Towards an Accurate Count During the 2010 census, Native Americans living on tribal lands were dramatically undercounted. The Takeaway speaks with two tribal citizens working to prevent an undercount in 2020. Bonus: Will the Interest Rate Cut Stem a Potential Coronavirus Recession? The hope of the interest rate cut was to boost spending and counteract the potential economic downturn from the coronavirus. But there’s no guarantee it will work. Texas Has Closed More Polling Stations Than Any Other State The closure of polling stations across Texas has disproportionately affected voters of color.
04/03/2032m 21s

What Pete Buttigieg's Candidacy Means for LGBTQ Representation 2020-03-03

What Pete Buttigieg's Candidacy Means for LGBTQ Representation On Sunday, former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg left the presidential race.  Why Many Restaurant Workers Will Go to Work Sick   For many restaurant workers, taking a sick day could mean losing wages, or worse. What Does the U.S.-Afghanistan Peace Deal Mean for Afghan Women's Rights?  The U.S. signed a deal with Afghanistan over the weekend that signals the end of the longest war in American history. 18-years of conflict in the region may soon be over.
03/03/2030m 39s

The Coronavirus Keeps Spreading, So Does the Misinformation 2020-03-02

The Coronavirus Keeps Spreading, So Does The Misinformation The coronavirus keeps spreading. The first two U.S. deaths from COVID-19 were confirmed over the weekend in Washington State. A Census Expert Answers Your Questions  The nationwide rollout of the 2020 census is just weeks away. The Takeaway answers your lingering questions.  Why Aren't More Jewish Voters Supporting Bloomberg and Sanders? It is the first time in history there are two Jewish candidates running for president, yet neither Mike Bloomberg or Bernie Sanders are leading with the Jewish vote. Filmmaker Kelly Reichardt Tells a Story of Friendship in the Oregon Territory in 'First Cow' 'First Cow,' a new film from director Kelly Reichardt, is set in the Oregon territory in the 1820s, but its subtle approach sets it apart from the conventional Hollywood western. 
02/03/2042m 9s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Final Early State

On Saturday, primary voters in South Carolina will decide which nominee has earned their votes. While Vice President Joe Biden is polling ahead of his rivals in the state, his lackluster performance in Iowa and New Hampshire has called into question his electability. Just a few days later, national attention will shift toward the 14 states casting ballots on Super Tuesday. Darren Sands of BuzzFeed News, Clare Malone of FiveThirtyEight, and Meg Kinnard of AP join Politics to discuss. Voters in Texas will choose their candidate on Super Tuesday. Abby Livingston of The Texas Tribune weighs in on how some Democrats are feeling about the likelihood of Bernie Sanders as the nominee.  Plus, Ellen Nakashima of The Washington Post provides analysis regarding reports of Russian interference in the 2020 election process. Finally, a look at the impact of coronavirus on global markets with Reuters' Heather Timmons. 
28/02/2044m 41s

How President Trump Fits into the Global Rise of Authoritarian Leaders 2020-02-27

How President Trump Fits into the Global Rise of Authoritarian Leaders The term “authoritarian” is being used to describe President Trump more frequently in some U.S. media. But is that an appropriate label? Why Innocent People Admit to Crimes They Didn't Commit Wrongful convictions and false confessions are more common than we think.  Census 2020: Addressing Cybersecurity Threats to the First Online Census 2020 will be the first time ever that most people will use digital technology to fill out the census, opening up the process to a number of potential cybersecurity threats.
27/02/2035m 1s

Emergence of Sanders as Front-Runner Highlights Potential Fractures on the Left 2020-02-26

Emergence of Sanders as Front-Runner Highlights Potential Fractures on the Left After a dominant win in Nevada, Bernie Sanders is the candidate to beat in the primaries. But his current strength has also highlighted potential fractures within the Democratic Party.  Supreme Court Rules Border Patrol Agent Can't Be Sued for Killing A Mexican Teenager The court ruled that allowing the family of 15-year-old Sergio Hernandez to sue the Border Patrol agent that shot him could undermine border security. Local News Rethinks Its Use of Mugshots For the last decade, online mugshot galleries have become an easy source of revenue for struggling newsrooms. Top U.S. Officials Send Mixed Messages on Risk of Coronavirus As verified cases across the Middle East and Europe, officials in the U.S. are not only figuring out how to address the virus, but how to address the public.
26/02/2027m 53s

What Harvey Weinstein's Rape Conviction Means for the #MeToo Movement 2020-02-25

What Harvey Weinstein's Rape Conviction Means for the #MeToo Movement Weinstein’s case has become synonymous with the #MeToo era. Yesterday’s verdict is a historic moment for the women at the center of this trial and survivors everywhere. Guns and Domestic Violence: Lisette Johnson's Testimony Lisette Johnson was shot four times by her husband in 2009 and survived, and has since become an advocate for victims and survivors of domestic violence.  Remembering the First Civil Rights Era Sit-in in Alabama The Takeaway speaks with St. John Dixon, who took part in the first sit-in against segregation in the state of Alabama on February 25, 1960. Appalachia Grapples with Extreme Flooding The region is also still recovering from some of the worst flooding on record from 2016. 
25/02/2041m 42s

Trump Administration Targets U.S. Intelligence Community 2020-02-24

Trump Administration Targets U.S. Intelligence Community Last week, President Donald Trump announced Richard Grenell, the U.S. ambassador to Germany, as the acting director of national intelligence.  Census 2020: Making Latino Communities Heard in Texas Texas lawmakers declined to fund census outreach efforts in their state, which could lead to an undercount in 2020, particularly among Latino communities. Guns and Domestic Violence: Overview In the United States, domestic violence incidents involving guns are on the rise, and women are especially vulnerable. Can Baseball Survive This Cheating Scandal? The Houston Astros were caught using cameras to read opposing teams' signs to give their hitters an advantage.
24/02/2039m 5s

Politics with Amy Walter (Extra): Nevada Goes for Bernie 2020-02-23

The Nevada caucuses were held on Saturday. Senator Bernie Sanders easily claimed victory, proving he can build a broad coalition of voters.  Host Amy Walter discusses the results of the Silver State with Joel Payne, a Democratic strategist; Tara Golshan, 2020 reporter at HuffPost Politics; and Zach Montellaro, campaign reporter for Politico. 
23/02/2015m 43s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Nevada Caucus and Beyond

Democratic strategist Joel Payne, Maya King from Politico, and Jon Ralston from The Nevada Independent join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss Saturday's caucus in Nevada and how candidates fared this week.  On Wednesday, Michael Bloomberg joined his rivals in Nevada for his first debate as a presidential candidate. The former mayor has positioned himself as a moderate businessman alternative to President Donald Trump. While he's spent millions on highly-produced advertisements, his debate performance has caused some to question whether the appeal from his ads translates into a candidate that could beat President Trump. Rosie Gray from BuzzFeed News shares some insights from the campaign trail.  On Super Tuesday, California's 415 Democratic delegates will be up for grabs. But as of writing, more than one million voters have already submitted their ballots. Paul Mitchell of Political Data Inc. shares how campaigns are trying to sway voters ahead of March 3rd.  Also, a look at the role Latino voters will play in the Democratic primary and beyond. We hear from Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia of Texas, Mark Hugo Lopez from the Pew Research Center, and Dr. Stephen Nuño-Perez from Latino Decisions. 
21/02/2046m 59s

Climate Change Finds Its Way onto the Debate Stage in Nevada 2020-02-20

Climate Change Finds Its Way onto the Debate Stage in Nevada Studies have also shown that Latino voters are more engaged with the issue of climate change than other voting groups. Why Aren't There More Famous Female Magicians? Sexism and social biases have historically prevented female magicians from becoming as famous as male magicians. Indigenous-Led Pipeline Protests Bring Canada to a Standstill For two weeks now, activists across Canada have blockaded rail lines and ports to protest the construction of a natural gas pipeline on Wet’suwet’en First Nation territory. A Honduran Girl, Separated from Her Family for Six Years In 2013, a 10-year-old Honduran girl requested asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border. After being placed into the system, their family never heard from her again.
20/02/2041m 10s

Mixed Messages As Secretary Pompeo Visits Africa 2020-02-19

Mixed Messages As Secretary Pompeo Visits Africa It’s only the second visit by a Secretary of State during this administration. California to Apologize to Japanese Americans for Internment Camps The state of California is issuing an apology in the form of a bipartisan bill that’s expected to pass today.  Bankruptcy Filing Complicates Future of Abuse Cases Against the Boy Scouts of America On Tuesday, the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy. The bankruptcy filing has raised concerns about what the move means for the future of sexual abuse cases against the group. 
19/02/2038m 24s

Census 2020: How Community Leaders in Oklahoma Are Working to Prevent an Undercount 2020-02-18

Census 2020: How Community Leaders in Oklahoma Are Working to Prevent an Undercount Oklahoma is one of several states that has allocated no funds to the rollout of the 2020 census, leaving non-profit organizations to pick up the slack. Black Dance Creators Are Not Getting The Credit They Deserve The video game Fortnite and influencers on TikTok make massive profits from using dances made by black creators without even crediting them.   The Amazon's Priest Shortage Reignites Debate over Celibacy in the Catholic Church In some of the most remote areas of the Amazon, Catholics will sometimes have to wait months between masses, sometimes years. 
18/02/2032m 19s

Trump Administration Escalates Crackdown on Sanctuary Cities 2020-02-17

Trump Administration Escalates Crackdown on Sanctuary Cities It will deploy dozens of border patrol agents in cities that have pushed back against its immigration enforcement policies, including Los Angeles and Houston.   Why Public Transportation Is Such an Important Site of Civil Rights Protest Transportation has long been a staging ground for civil rights protests. And U.S. history is filled with the stories of those who stood up to discrimination on public transit. The Exploitative Contracts Between Strippers and Strip Clubs Genea Sky fell from a 15-foot pole in Dallas. As a contract worker, she cannot access workers compensation or employee insurance. 
17/02/2030m 20s

Politics with Amy Walter: Black Voters and the Democratic Primary

Andrew Prokop of Vox, Adam Harris of The Atlantic, and Philip Bump of The Washington Post join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the results from New Hampshire, Senator Bernie Sander's perceived lead, and Attorney General William Barr's handling of sentencing recommendations for Roger J. Stone. Also, The Democratic Party of Nevada is trying to avoid the tech issues that disrupted the final result of the Iowa caucuses. Rebecca Katz of New Deal Strategies and Megan Messerly of The Nevada Independent weigh in on the process and how candidates are making their case to voters in the final days before the caucuses.  Finally, Maya King of Politico and Errin Haines of The 19th* join Amy Walter to discuss how presidential hopefuls are modifying their messages to court black voters. 
14/02/2050m 34s

What Bernie Sander's New Hampshire Victory Means for the Democratic Primary 2020-12-20

What Bernie Sander's New Hampshire Victory Means for the Democratic Primary Sen. Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary on Tuesday. The Takeaway's Amy Walter weighs in on what the results mean for the weeks ahead. Is Abortion the Litmus Test for Democrats Today? At Friday's debate in New Hampshire, almost all the candidates went out of their way to reaffirm their support of abortion. Siba, a Standard Poodle, Wins 144th Westminster Dog Show Siba, a standard poodle, was crowned "Best in Show" at the 144th West Minister Dog Show in New York on Tuesday.
12/02/2030m 31s

Coronavirus Continues to Spread Despite Mass Quarantines in China 2020-02-11

Coronavirus Continues to Spread Despite Mass Quarantines in China As the number of confirmed infections continues to climb in China, how effective has quarantine been?  'Birds of Prey' Director Cathy Yan on Crafting Her Own Vision of Gotham City The Takeaway speaks with Cathy Yan about helming 'Birds of Prey' and why studios are finally acknowledging that the fan base for superhero movies extends far beyond teenage boys. The National Archives Is Deleting Records About Trump’s ICE Policies In 2017 the Archives agreed to let Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials delete or destroy documents that detail the sexual abuse and death of undocumented immigrants
11/02/2037m 34s

Will Radical Resistance Movements Shaking up the Globe Reach the U.S.? 2020-02-10

Will Radical Resistance Movements Shaking up the Globe Reach the U.S.? Protests in the U.S. have typically focused on changing "the system," rather than overthrowing it. Gayle King Comes Under Fire for Interview About Kobe Bryant's Legacy This taps into longstanding cultural expectations of black women and the black family, and the priority of upholding and defending black men.  
10/02/2032m 13s

Politics with Amy Walter: Behind the New Hampshire Primary

On Tuesday, voters in New Hampshire will cast their votes in the first primary contest of the 2020 election. Typically, the candidate who emerged as the winner in Iowa would slingshot to New Hampshire where the momentum picks up or gets checked, but a delay in the final tally has muddled the outlook. Priscilla Thompson, 2020 campaign embed with NBC and Josh Rogers, Politics Reporter at New Hampshire Public Radio join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss.  Executive Director of the New Hampshire Democratic Party, Amy Kennedy, weighed in on how The Party plans on engaging the state's contingent of Democratic voters. Dante Scala, professor of political science at the University of New Hampshire explains the impact the Iowa caucuses have on voters on Tuesday.  David Weigel of The Washington Post weighs in on the State of the Union Address and the Senate's vote to acquit President Trump on two articles of impeachment.  Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcast via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go. Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page or Twitter.  
07/02/2041m 22s

Following Acquittal, What's Next for the Democrats? 2020-02-06

Following Acquittal, What's Next for the Democrats? Rep. Steve Israel argues that Democrats should continue to expose Trump's misdeeds and focus on November. The Murky Waters of Social Media and "Objectivity" in Newsrooms Is there even such a thing as "objectivity?" Prada to Address Racist Incidents in Landmark Settlement In late 2018, luxury fashion house Prada came under fire for a racist window display in its flagship shop in SoHo.  Student Homelessness is at an All-Time High In the 2017-2018 school year, more than 1.5 million public school children had experienced homelessness.
06/02/2037m 44s

President Trump's State of the Union: Immigration, Economy, 2020 Elections 2020-02-05

President Trump's State of the Union: Immigration, Economy, 2020 Elections The President avoided one major topic: impeachment. Fear of the Coronavirus Spurs Surge in Xenophobia and Anti-Chinese Sentiment The long standing stereotype of the sick foreigner is playing into how we are dealing with the Coronavirus. Veteran Journalist Diane Rehm on the Right-to-Die Movement In her new book "When My Times Comes," Rehm explores the highly divisive field of medical aid in dying.  The Growing Support for Aid-in-Dying Legislation But there is a lot of confusion around what aid-in-dying actually entails, and what it means for the rights of patients who are terminally ill and their families.   
05/02/2038m 25s

Iowa Caucus: Is It Time to Overhaul the System? 2020-02-04

Iowa Caucus: Is It Time to Overhaul the System? After months of campaigning, the Iowa caucuses are finally over, well almost over.  CTE: The State of the Science Another NFL season is over, but chronic traumatic encephalopathy, often associated with repeated head injuries from football, remains in the news. In "The Other Latif," a Reporter Investigates His Namesake at Guantánamo Bay Radiolab's director of research Latif Nasser discovers that there's someone else who shares his unusual name: detainee 244 at Guantánamo Bay. Trump Administration Reverses Land Mine Policy   Last week, the Trump administration eased restrictions on the deployment of land mines by the U.S. military.
04/02/2039m 3s

Trump Administration Expands Controversial Travel Ban 2020-02-03

Trump Administration Expands Controversial Travel Ban On Friday, President Trump expanded the ban to include six new countries: Nigeria, Eritrea, Tanzania, Sudan, Kyrgyzstan, and Myanmar. Miscarriages, a Common Issue We Don't Discuss Miscarriage has long been a sensitive topic, The Takeaway takes an in-depth look at the impact it can have on women.   Taika Waititi Breaks Down the Process Behind 'Jojo Rabbit' The Takeaway speaks with Taika Waititi about the risks of making a comedy about Nazi Germany with 'Jojo Rabbit,' and balancing big-budget blockbusters with more personal indie films. The Challenges of Caucusing with a Child In Iowa, many parents—especially women—who want to caucus today will run into a familiar problem: childcare.
03/02/2052m 59s

Politics from Amy Walter: Caucus Time

In the second installment of Politics with Amy Walter from Iowa, we contextualize the caucuses set to take place on Monday. Democratic Strategist Matt Paul fills us in on why many voters are undecided until the last minute and what it will take to convince them to get behind a candidate. Chair of the Iowa Democratic Party Troy Price and Iowa Public Radio's politics reporter Clay Masters explain how the caucus process has changed since 2016. Iowa State University student Megan Johansen explains why she's supporting Pete Buttigieg.  Also, Peter Ambler, the executive director of Giffords explains how the national conversation surrounding gun control has shifted, even in the suburbs.  ICYMI: Check out the first installment from Iowa here.    
01/02/2049m 22s

The Questioning Phase of the Impeachment Trial Begins 2020-01-30

The Questioning Phase of the Impeachment Trial Begins Senators began questioning House Managers and President Trump’s attorneys about the president’s conduct with Ukraine. Despite Its Troubled History, the Border Patrol is Training Kids to Apprehend Migrants The Border Patrol has been training teens for years to take part in law enforcement work. Why Boris Johnson and Trump are Butting Heads on Trade While much of the rhetoric around Brexit has been about isolationism, the split also means that Britain has to create new trade agreements with countries around the world. How Filmmakers are Reckoning with #MeToo on the Big Screen The film that is loosely based on the Harvey Weinstein story, "The Assistant", hits theaters on Friday. The Takeaway looks at how filmmakers are reckoning with #MeToo on the big screen.
30/01/2045m 53s

Trump Unveils So-Called Peace Plan for the Middle East 2020-01-29

Trump Unveils So-Called Peace Plan for the Middle East On Tuesday, President Donald Trump announced his long-awaited plan for peace between Israel and the Palestinians. The Harvey Weinstein Trial is Moving Quickly And the defense has worked to undermine the allegations by pointing to one victim’s continued contact with Weinstein after the alleged assault. Could "She" Be President? A Look at Pronoun Bias in Politics Presidential candidates have been using female pronouns to talk about the presidency. Turns out we may all be biased against the “she” pronoun in that context. The Devastating Family Toll of Suicide by Firearm Karyl Chastain Beal lost her daughter Arlene to suicide by firearm back in the 1990s. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria is a Growing Threat Recent studies from the World Health Organization and the United Nations say that resistant bacteria and the decline of antibiotic development could soon lead to a global crisis. 
29/01/2031m 49s

Is the World Prepared for the Next Pandemic? 2020-01-28

Is the World Prepared for the Next Pandemic? As fears over the spread of the coronavirus continue to spread, it raises questions about how prepared countries around the world are for the next pandemic. World's Largest Money Manager to Make Investment Decisions Based on Climate Change The world’s largest money manager, BlackRock, announced recently that it plans to make climate change a central part of its investment strategy. What Exactly is the Relationship Between India's Prime Minister Modi and President Trump? Late last year, Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited the U.S. for a massive rally in Texas, and next month President Trump will visit India for a similar event. Trump Administration Issues Rollback of U.S. Waterways Protections  Last Thursday, the Trump administration finalized a new rule rolling back environmental protections of streams, wetlands, and groundwater across the country.
28/01/2042m 31s

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Verbally Attacks NPR Host Mary Louise Kelly 2020-01-27

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Verbally Attacks NPR Host Mary Louise Kelly It’s just the latest example of the Trump administration demonizing members of the news media. The Life and Legacy of Basketball Legend Kobe Bryant Kobe Bryant was one of 9 killed during a helicopter crash in Calabasas, California, on Sunday. How to Write About Experiences Other Than Your Own After the controversy around "American Dirt," we wanted to discuss how people can successfully write about identities and experiences outside of their own. Thousands from the South Asian Diaspora Protest India's New Citizenship Law As protests in India continue against a law that grants citizenship based on religion, the South Asian diaspora has also taken to the streets to join the fight.  
27/01/2042m 31s

Politics with Amy Walter: The View from Iowa

This week, Politics with Amy Walter took a trip to Iowa to get a sense of how voters are feeling ahead of the upcoming caucuses. We asked politicians, economists, pollsters, and caucusgoers about what issues are important to them and which candidate could deliver the White House to Democrats. The issues of foremost concern included race, healthcare, labor protections, hyper-polarization, climate change, and defeating President Trump.  J. Ann Selzer, whose poll is considered the “gold standard,” walks us through her latest data set and what to make of this incredibly close race.  From Waterloo, we heard from Mayor Quentin Hart, who has endorsed former Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Pastor Frantz Whitfield, a supporter of Vice President Joe Biden, about the calculus behind their endorsements. Dave Swenson, an economist at Iowa State University, explained the economy of the state which holds an outsized influence on the rest of the primary season.    
24/01/2047m 58s

House Managers Begin Their Case Against President Trump 2020-01-23

House Managers Begin Their Case Against President Trump Each of the seven House managers will present different aspects of the case. Women are Leading Protests Against Controversial Citizenship Law in India In India, people are still protesting a law passed over a month ago that many see as discriminatory against Muslims because it grants citizenship based on religion. Glenn Greenwald Responds to Accusations of Cybercrimes by the Brazilian Government The Brazilian government alleges that Greenwald helped hack the cellphones of public officials. Greenwald joins The Takeaway to discuss the charges against him. The Threats That Journalists Face for Reporting on the Government As civil unrest and protests have grown, in places like Hong Kong, Chile, and Lebanon, governments have cracked down on reporters as well as protesters. The Rise of "Abortion Reversal" Laws In 2019, the U.S. saw an unprecedented number of laws aimed at limiting people’s right to abortion.
23/01/2047m 54s

Mexican Officials Attempt to Stop Migrant Caravan, Indicative of U.S. Pressure on Mexico 2020-01-22

Mexican Officials Attempt to Stop Migrant Caravan, Indicative of U.S. Pressure on Mexico The Mexican National Guard deployed tear gas on the migrant caravan at the Mexico-Guatemala border. Seeking Asylum: From the Southern Border to Japan The asylum system, designed by major countries to deal with people fleeing persecution, is broken, everywhere. New State Bills and Laws Could Have Lasting Impact on LGBTQ Community  While Utah's law banning conversation therapy goes into effect today, a dozen of states have proposed new bills that many believe are discriminatory against transgender minors.  Actor BD Wong and Writer Teresa Hsiao on Bringing Asian American Stories to the Small Screen Awkwafina stars in a new sitcom based on her own life called 'Awkwafina is Nora from Queens.' Actor BD Wong and executive producer Teresa Hsiao discuss bringing the story to television.
22/01/2052m 48s

Iowa Prepares to Caucus as Impeachment Trial Kicks Off 2020-01-21

Iowa Prepares to Caucus as Impeachment Trial Kicks Off How The Trumps and Kushners Got Rich Off Federal Policies President Trump is no stranger to using his influence to seek favors. It’s a strategy that is not out of the ordinary in the world where he made his fortune, New York real estate. In Puerto Rico, Fallout Over Unused Aid Raises Questions about Government Mismanagement Over the weekend, a video went viral on social media, showing a warehouse full of unused disaster supplies in the city of Ponce. The Barriers to Finding Mental Healthcare While Black Only a quarter of Black Americans seek out care, compared with 40% of white people.
21/01/2045m 39s

Richmond Braces for Major Rally Against Gun Control 2020-01-20

Richmond Braces for Major Rally Against Gun Control Thousands of gun rights activists are expected to rally against a series of proposed gun control laws in Virginia. Martin Luther King Jr. Was Surveilled by the FBI. Today, Law Enforcement Still Tracks Black Activists The FBI and law enforcement agencies have come under fire for their surveillance practices of Black activists. Bad Boys Director Adil El Arbi on Taking the Leap from Belgium to Hollywood The FBI and law enforcement agencies have come under fire for their surveillance practices of Black activists. A New Wave of Progressive Prosecutors and the Barriers They Face Many left-leaning district attorneys are seeking reforms that are seeing pushback. The Quiet Rise of Meth Overdoses During the Opioid Epidemic There is now a rise in the number of deaths and overdoses from methamphetamine and cocaine.
20/01/2031m 55s

Politics with Amy Walter: A Look at Pennsylvania and 2020's Battleground States

With caucus and primary season around the corner, it’s only a matter of time until candidates shift gears and begin expanding their campaigns in battleground states. Come November, voters in states like Pennsylvania, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin will play a critical role in determining what party will take the White House. Although Pennsylvania handed President Obama victories in 2008 and 2012, voters decided to take a chance on President Trump in 2016, awarding him 20 electoral votes. This week, Politics with Amy Walter traveled to Pennsylvania to hear from politicians in the state about the lessons learned from 2016 and what’s at stake in 2020. Congressman Brendan Boyle, Congressman Dwight Evans, and Philadelphia Councilmember Kendra Brooks sat down with Amy Walter.  Plus, Jerome Dillard, the State Director for Ex-Incarcerated People Organizing (EXPO), highlights the implications of failing to engage disenfranchised voters. Also, the New York Times’ Margot Sanger-Katz explains the Republican-led lawsuit that attempts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act and what that means for the 20 million Americans that would lose coverage.  Finally, Steve Mistler, Chief Political Correspondent of Maine Public Radio, weighs in on Senator Susan Collins’ legacy and how it might change in light of the ongoing impeachment trial.
17/01/2051m 41s

Why Some Newspapers Are Rethinking Presidential Endorsements 2020-01-16

Why Some Newspapers Are Rethinking Presidential Endorsements Some newspapers are rethinking not only their endorsement process, but their entire editorial and opinion sections altogether. Rapper Killer Mike on the Political Issues that Matter to Him in 2020 The Takeaway talks to rapper Killer Mike about his activism, starting back when he was a teen, and gets his take on the 2020 candidate field. Trump Administration Ends Delay in Puerto Rico Relief Funding The Department of Housing and Urban Development has been delaying Puerto Rico from accessing about $8 billion of relief funding for nearly a year.
16/01/2033m 56s

The United Methodist Church May Split Over LGBTQ Issues — Here's What May Happen 2020-01-15

The United Methodist Church May Split Over LGBTQ Issues — Here's What May Happen The "traditionalist" faction of the UMC may split from the Church, leading to an international conundrum. Are Workplaces Ready for Salary Talk? Talking about money has historically been seen as taboo, especially for women. A Rift Within the Romance Novel Industry Romance is the publishing world’s most lucrative genre.  Bloomberg's Spending Spree in the 2020 Race Pollsters are watching whether Bloomberg’s ad campaign has the potential to overshadow candidates who have more of a grassroots following.
15/01/2034m 40s

Anti-Regime Protests Break Out in Iran Over Shot Down Ukrainian Jet 2020-01-14

Anti-Regime Protests Break Out in Iran Over Shot Down Ukrainian Jet Citizens are expressing outrage over the government previously lying about having shot down the passenger plane. International Olympic Committee Bans Politics Protesting at the Summer Games The IOC has renounced the legacy of political protests at the Olympics and has decided to ban demonstrations from within the games.  Why are the Oscars Still So White? Five years after the hashtag began, the Oscars nominees still lack diversity. Texas Governor Says the State Will No Longer Resettle Refugees Under a new Trump directive, states have the ability to decide whether or not they resettle refugees.
14/01/2031m 57s

Earthquakes Continue to Rattle Puerto Rico 2020-01-13

Earthquakes Continue to Rattle Puerto Rico A 5.9-magnitude earthquake struck Puerto Rico on Saturday morning. Can Solar Energy Solve Puerto Rico's Energy Crisis? Last week’s earthquake in Puerto Rico caused widespread power outages on the Island that left hundreds of thousands of residents without electricity for days. The Legacy of Colonialism in Caribbean Tourism The Caribbean is one of the most tourism-dependent regions in the world, yet the majority of the money made doesn't stay on the islands. How the Politics of Gun Control Has Flipped In Virginia, Democrats flipped the House and Senate in November, and now hold full control of the state government for the first time in a generation.
13/01/2030m 45s

Politics with Amy Walter: Iran, Impeachment, and Iowa

Against the background of impeachment, heightened tensions with Iran, and the Iowa Caucuses, Astead Herndon of The New York Times and Clare Malone of FiveThirtyEight join Politics with Amy Walter to provide an update on the state of the Democratic Primary. Plus, Thanassis Cambanis of the Century Foundation analyzes the future of the US-Iran relationship in light of the assassination of Major General Qassim Soleimani and Andrew Clevenger of CQ Roll Call provides context about the War Powers Resolution.    
10/01/2031m 16s

What's the Relationship between Journalism and Patriotism? 2020-01-09

What's the Relationship between Journalism and Patriotism? As tensions between the U.S. and Iran escalate, a familiar debate is resurfacing on cable news. The NFL's Rooney Rule is Not Working Like it Was Intended To The Rooney Rule was created to help minorities get more head coaching opportunities in the NFL, it hasn't exactly worked as intended.  An Environmental Rule Change That Ignores Climate Change Federal agencies would no longer have to take climate change into account when measuring the environmental impact of major infrastructure projects. Elizabeth Warren Goes After the Latinx Vote When Julián Castro dropped out of the 2020 race, he joined team Warren, which has been trying to close a gap with Latino voters. A link to the West Side story will be available here soon.
09/01/2031m 26s

Iran Retaliates, Firing Missiles Into Iraq 2020-01-08

Iran Retaliates, Firing Missiles Into Iraq On Tuesday, Iran’s military fired over a dozen ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq that house U.S. soldiers. What Lawmakers are Saying About the US-Iran Conflict Plus, a look at what Congress is busy with these next few weeks. Child Care on the Campaign Trail For many women running for office, paying for child care is a major hurdle. Is Willpower the Secret to Keeping New Year's Resolutions? More and more psychologists are questioning the role of willpower in accomplishing our goals.  Alleged War Criminals from Guatemala's Civil War are Evading Justice — By Living in the U.S. Some have been deported back to Guatemala, where they are facing trials for human rights abuses.
08/01/2033m 40s

Are the Iranian People United Behind Their Government? 2020-01-07

Are the Iranian People United Behind Their Government?  The media portrayal of Iran shows the country united behind its government. But just how accurate is that viewpoint? Another Look at the US-Iran Conflict from Iranian Americans Two Iranian Americans joined The Takeaway again to give their perspective on the escalating conflict. Two Years Into the Time's Up Movement, Has Hollywood Changed? Does the world of entertainment look better, and safer, because of the movement? "It's What I Call a Massacre:" Violence in Mississippi Prisons Leaves Inmates Dead, Families in the Dark There have been at least five inmates confirmed dead. But advocates and prisoners worry there may be more. Magnitude 6.4 Earthquake Rocks Puerto Rico Millions of Puerto Ricans woke up to a 6.4 magnitude earthquake on Tuesday. 
07/01/2039m 46s

The Aftermath of Soleimani's Death Since the U.S. Airstrike 2020-01-06

The Aftermath of Soleimani's Death Since the U.S. Airstrike How is President's Trump decision to assassinate a top Iranian commander playing out in Washington? How Tribal Experts Are Shaping the Federal Government's Wildfire Strategy In recent years, the federal government has been deferring more to tribal experts who say that intentionally setting prescribed fires is the best way to lessen damage from wildfires. Why Some Foster Children Stay in Motels, Offices, and Institutions About 56,000 foster children were living in congregate care as of 2013, according to the federal Children’s Bureau. Weinstein's Criminal Trial Begins With a Long Jury Selection Process The former movie mogul is in Manhattan for proceedings expected to last six weeks, and much of the focus will be on jury selection.
06/01/2040m 43s

“Stirring the Hornets Nest:” US Airstrike Kills Qassim Soleimani 2020-01-03

By now you’ve heard the headline...General Qassim Soleimani, Iran’s most powerful military commander, was killed in a U.S. drone strike in Baghdad. Tensions between the U.S. and Iran have grown from an already simmering level. Cities and security officials in the U.S. have ramped up efforts in anticipation of retaliation. Soleimani’s death was mourned angrily in Iran, where thousands rallied in Tehran and the general’s hometown of Kerman.  Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollaha Khamenei, said in a statement: “Revenge awaits those criminals who have tainted their filthy hands with his blood and the blood of the other martyrs of last night's incident."  Soleimani’s killing was cheered here at home, by the administration, and former officials like John Bolton, who tweeted: “Long in the making, this was a decisive blow against Iran’s malign Quds Force activities worldwide.” Meanwhile, on Friday morning on CNN, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo explained the administration’s rationale for the strike, saying that the action was intended to help with “De-escalation.” Detractors say that’s a fantasy, and regardless, Democrats in Congress are wondering this weekend why they weren’t consulted on the move. And that’s where the debate really is on this: Most American politicians agree that Soleimani was a threat to the United States, but does the move create instability in the region that we can’t escape? Was it worth the risk of a war with Iran? “What’s next?” is obviously the question on everyone’s mind.  For more on this, we turn to Borzou Daragahi, the International Correspondent for The Independent, covering the Middle East, Europe, & North Africa. We spoke to Borzou on Friday morning. Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcast via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go. Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page or Twitter.  
03/01/2012m 56s

How Local and Federal Policies are Criminalizing Homelessness 2020-01-02

How Local and Federal Policies are Criminalizing Homelessness Homelessness is on the rise throughout the country, and so is its criminalization. A Look Ahead at U.S. Foreign Policy in 2020 2019 had an overwhelming amount of national news that may have caused us to lose sight of the important foreign policy issues. The Danger of Migrant Protection Protocols and What to Expect from U.S. Immigration Policy in 2020 The U.S. immigration protocols that force migrants to wait for their asylum hearing court date in Mexican border towns are extremely dangerous for asylum seekers.  The "Party of Five" Reboot Tackles Family Separation The new version centers around the Mexican-American siblings whose immigrant parents get deported to Mexico.
02/01/2036m 51s

Laughing in Color 2020-01-01

While the lines in comedy are changing at the moment, not everyone is feeling limited by these new rules. As with much of the media landscape, women of color are severely underrepresented on stand-up and improv stages. But as the barriers to entry shift, some are finding their voices heard in a way that seemed impossible five or ten years ago. As part of a new series, The Takeaway is going to explore this complicated moment in comedy. We’ll speak to some of the women of color stand-ups and sketch comedy stars who shaped the comedy world into what it is today. And we'll hear from younger comics on what the landscape looks like for them. One question at the center of it all: whose moment is it in comedy today? Headlining the Biggest Sketch Comedy Shows of the 90s The Takeaway speaks with comedians Ellen Cleghorne and T'Keyah Crystal Keymáh about breaking out on Saturday Night Live and In Living Color. Margaret Cho on Pushing the Boundaries of the Comedy World Margaret Cho joins The Takeaway to discuss the comedy scene and the lonely moments as the "only Asian American woman out there."  Cristela Alonzo on Finding Her Voice Through Comedy Stand-up comedian and actress Cristela Alonzo is the latest guest in our series on women of color in comedy.  What Does the Comedy World Look Like for Young Women of Color? Karen Chee and Ayo Edebiri are up-and-coming comedians. They represent the future of comedy.
01/01/201h 10m

New York Ends 2019 in a Week of Rampant Anti-Semitism 2019-12-31

New York Ends 2019 in a Week of Rampant Anti-Semitism A week of anti-semitic attacks in New York City culminated in five people being stabbed at a Hanukkah party outside the city Saturday night.  January 1: More Than Just News Year's Day For many U.S. immigrants and refugees, January 1st is more than just the start of the calendar new year. How TV Shows Have Reflected Political Moments This Decade From optimism to cynicism — how TV reflected political moments in Washington.
31/12/1932m 30s

Despite Billions in Aid, Farm Bankruptcies Are on the Rise 2019-12-30

Despite Billions in Aid, Farm Bankruptcies Are on the Rise Farm bankruptcies are up 24 percent from last year, the highest level the farming industry has seen since 2011. It Could Be Another 257 Years Before Women Are Paid the Same as Men That's 50 years longer than what was predicted just last year.  The Highs and Lows of 2019 Movies Film critic Rafer Guzman weighs in on some overlooked highlights from 2019, and also talks about his least favorite movies of the year. Aung San Suu Kyi's Fall From Grace: Nobel Peace Prize to Denying Genocide  The leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, has become the first Noble Peace Prize winner to defend against accusations of genocide.  New Copyrighted Works Entering the Public Domain in 2020 A new batch of copyrighted material will enter the public domain on New Year's Day. 
30/12/1930m 9s

Smartphone Surveillance in the Digital Age 2019-12-24

Smartphone Surveillance in the Digital Age Across the globe, dozens of companies can now log the precise locations of millions of consumers through their mobile phones. Joe Biden's Comments on Stuttering Takes on a National Conversation In the last Democratic debate, Joe Biden talked about mentoring a boy with a speech impediment much like his own, thrusting stuttering into the current national conversation. New Film, "Clemency," Looks at Death Row From a Warden's Eyes The death row drama shows how those carrying out state-sanctioned killings are often left traumatized and isolated. Saudi Arabia Escapes Accountability for Jamal Khashoggi's Murder The Saudi Arabian criminal court has sentenced five people to death for the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, but are they hiding something? 
24/12/1936m 11s

One Year After The First Step Act 2019-12-23

One Year After The First Step Act Has the law achieved what it set out to do? How Migrant Communities Throughout History Have Grappled With American Christmas Hanukkah in the U.S. evolved alongside Christmas. This is Not the Queer Representation You're Looking For Many are calling out the most recent Star Wars for teasing LGBTQ representation and then not following through in a meaningful way.
23/12/1945m 46s

Politics With Amy Walter: What's next for Trump and Saudi Arabia?

On Thursday, presidential candidates seeking the Democratic nomination gathered in Los Angeles for the sixth debate. Maya King of Politico and Kevin Robillard of HuffPost join Politics with Amy Walter with analysis of the state of the Democratic primary field. Also, Toluse Olorunnipa of The Washington Post recaps President Trump's time in office as we head into 2020 and Jesse Paul of the Colorado Sun weighs in on how vulnerable Republicans in the Senate are thinking about 2020.  Plus, Nader Hashemi of the Center for Middle East Studies and Senator Chris Murphy provide context regarding the past and present of the United State's relationship with Saudi Arabia.  Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcast via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go. Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page or Twitter.
22/12/1946m 33s

Laughing in Color

While the lines in comedy are changing at the moment, not everyone is feeling limited by these new rules. As with much of the media landscape, women of color are severely underrepresented on stand-up and improv stages. But as the barriers to entry shift, some are finding their voices heard in a way that seemed impossible five or ten years ago. As part of a new series, The Takeaway is going to explore this complicated moment in comedy. We’ll speak to some of the women of color stand-ups and sketch comedy stars who shaped the comedy world into what it is today. And we'll hear from younger comics on what the landscape looks like for them. One question at the center of it all: whose moment is it in comedy today? Headlining the Biggest Sketch Comedy Shows of the 90s The Takeaway speaks with comedians Ellen Cleghorne and T'Keyah Crystal Keymáh about breaking out on Saturday Night Live and In Living Color. Margaret Cho on Pushing the Boundaries of the Comedy World Margaret Cho joins The Takeaway to discuss the comedy scene and the lonely moments as the "only Asian American woman out there."  Cristela Alonzo on Finding Her Voice Through Comedy Stand-up comedian and actress Cristela Alonzo is the latest guest in our series on women of color in comedy.  What Does the Comedy World Look Like for Young Women of Color? Karen Chee and Ayo Edebiri are up-and-coming comedians. They represent the future of comedy.
21/12/191h 10m

What's Next for Donald Trump? 2019-12-19

What's Next for Donald Trump? Donald Trump became the third U.S. president to be impeached by the House of Representatives. What's next? Why A Non-Alcoholic Bar Appeals To Drinkers and Non-Drinkers Alike There is a growing movement of people promoting the benefits of sobriety and drinking in moderation
19/12/1931m 37s

Judges in Wisconsin and Georgia Approve Mass Voter Roll Purges 2019-12-18

Judges in Wisconsin and Georgia Approve Mass Voter Roll Purges Hundreds of thousands of voters could soon be ineligible to vote in Wisconsin and Georgia.  The World's Largest Democracy Is Protesting Anger over a new citizenship law that would endanger Muslims in India is causing mass unrest. 
18/12/1923m 28s

Tenants Left in a State of Precarity as Mysterious Shell Companies Buy Millions of Homes 2019-12-17

Tenants Left in a State of Precarity as Mysterious Shell Companies Buy Millions of Homes Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting is now suing to determine who owns all these homes. Federal Government to Crack Down on Robocalls Americans received more than 5 billion robocalls in November alone, according to the robocall blocking app YouCall. "Richard Jewell" and Female Journalists in Hollywood The new film is coming under fire for its portrayal of real-life reporter Kathy Scruggs. 
17/12/1929m 38s

What Trump's Executive Order Means for Anti-Semitism in the U.S. 2019-12-16

What Trump's Executive Order Means for Anti-Semitism in the U.S. Last Wednesday, President Donald Trump signed an executive order aiming to curb anti-semitism in the U.S. Boris Johnson and the Conservative Party Win Big In U.K. General Election The Conservative Party had a landslide victory in the U.K.'s general election last week. Arrest of a Journalist and Activist Raises Concerns of Free Speech Crackdown in Nigeria Omoyele Sowore was re-arrested on December 6 by Nigerian security forces, less than a day after making bail.  
16/12/1925m 54s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Political Power of Women

This week, Nick Fandos joined Politics with Amy Walter to share the latest about the House's impeachment vote. But while the national media has been saturated with impeachment, Democratic candidates are focused on Iowa, where voters will cast their ballots in the new year. Tiffany Muller, President and Executive Director of End Citizens United and Michael McAdams, National Press Secretary of the National Republican Congressional Committee, weigh in on how the two parties vision impeachment playing out in 2020 and the messages they're relaying to their separate bases.  Also, The Washington Post's Heather Long discusses why it's rare to hear about the loss of administrative jobs that were primarily held by women. The president of the Voter Participation Center, Page Gardner, explains why presidential candidates should harness the voting power of unmarried women.
13/12/1947m 49s

A Look at the Toxic Company Culture at Away 2019-12-12

 A Look at the Toxic Company Culture at Away The luggage and lifestyle brand is just the latest millennial tech company to be called out for its cutthroat work culture. Racial Discrimination in the World of Banking The New York Times has published audio recordings of a former NFL player being discriminated against at a JPMorgan branch.  Why Defrauded Students Still Can't Get Debt Relief Tens of thousands of students across the country have been defrauded by for-profit colleges.
12/12/1925m 31s

USMCA to Become the New NAFTA 2019-12-11

USMCA to Become the New NAFTA The governments of the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, announced the passing of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement in Mexico City on Tuesday. The High Costs of Rising Seas Last Wednesday, officials in the Florida Keys said it might be too expensive to protect some of the island from rising seas brought by climate change.  Russia Banned from International Sports Competitions for Four Years On Monday, the World Anti-Doping Agency barred Russia from competing in the 2020 summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, among other major sporting events. Dollar Stores Continue to Boom as More Cities Implement Measures to Prevent Further Developments Forth Worth, Texas, has become the most recent city to pass an ordinance that will limit the number of dollar stores that can be developed. 
11/12/1938m 43s

Explosive Investigation Shows U.S. Officials Mislead the Public About "Unwinnable" War In Afghanistan for Years 2019-12-10

Explosive Investigation Shows U.S. Officials Mislead the Public About "Unwinnable" War In Afghanistan for Years  Since 2001, U.S. officials have been misleading the public with a public charade of a successful war effort, but behind the scenes, a different story was playing out.  Should Foster Care Be Reduced, Or Reformed? According to the Department of Health and Human Services, last year the number of children in foster care decreased for the first time since 2011. House Judiciary Chair Announces Articles of Impeachment The charges are twofold: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.
10/12/1939m 50s

Rebroadcast: Correction Staff at ICE Jail Skirted Rules with Mentally Ill Detainee who Hanged Himself 2019-12-09

by José Olivares A warning to listeners: some of the audio in this story is disturbing and hard to listen to. An exclusive Takeaway and The Intercept investigation shows that correctional staff at an Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center skirted rules when dealing with a migrant with mental illness. The detainee, a 40-year-old undocumented Mexican migrant, killed himself after spending 21 days in solitary confinement in July 2018. The investigation shows that correctional staff at the Stewart Detention Center did not follow the ICE national detention standards during the classification process, the disciplinary process and even on the night he killed himself. The migrant, Efraín Romero de la Rosa, took his own life at the Stewart Detention Facility in Georgia, which is run by the private corrections company CoreCivic. He had been previously diagnosed with schizophrenia. The solitary confinement cell in which Efraín Romero de la Rosa took his own life. (GBI Investigation Photo) While in ICE custody, Efraín was placed in solitary confinement for 15 days, was later placed on suicide watch and, separately, spent time at a mental health institution for over a month. On his return to Stewart to continue immigration proceedings, correctional staff neglected to recognize his mental illness and classify him accordingly. Staff had noted his fixation on death, repeatedly telling staff he would "die three terrible deaths," and telling other detainees he was a "prophet." Yet, CoreCivic's correctional staff sent Efraín to solitary confinement for 30 days. None of the disciplinary records released by CoreCivic in response to courtroom discovery demands and provided by family attorney Andrew Free make mention of his worsening mental illness. The Takeaway and The Intercept accessed hundreds of pages of records, photos, audio with witnesses and correctional staff, and 18 hours of security footage from within the facility. Efraín’s story helps the public gain insight at the tangled and opaque world of ICE detention. As the Trump Administration continues to round up migrants at an increasing pace, more people diagnosed with mental illness will inevitably be placed in ICE detention. You can listen to the entire investigation by clicking "play" above. You can read the detailed investigation on The Intercept here. A special thank you to Cindi Kim, Associate General Counsel at New York Public Radio. For The Takeaway, Deidre Depke, Ellen Frankman, Lee Hill, Arwa Gunja and Jim Schachter edited; Jay Cowit sound designed and composed the score. For The Intercept, Ali Gharib edited the story, Ariel Zambelich was the visual designer, and Travis Mannon and Lauren Feeney made the accompanying film.
09/12/1934m 17s

Politics with Amy Walter: The State of the Democratic Primary Field

The road to the White House is rarely a linear path. That was abundantly clear this week when Senator Kamala Harris announced that she was suspending her campaign. The announcement came as a surprise to many because at the time of launch, Senator Harris was one to watch. Political reporters Darren Sands, Laura Barron-Lopez, and Maya King join us to discuss the end of her campaign and what challenges the Democratic Party faces in putting forth the best candidate.  Also, Congressman Krishnamoorthi provides an update on the impeachment inquiry. Finally, Caitlin Zaloom and Alia Wong describe how college went from being accessible to burdensome and expensive.   
06/12/1945m 2s

A New Trump Rule Could Cut Food Stamp Benefits for 700,000 2019-12-05

A New Trump Rule Could Cut Food Stamp Benefits for 700,000 The Trump administration announced a series of rule changes last year, and on Wednesday, the final rule was announced.  How Does Mississippi Felony Voting Rights Compare to the Rest of the Country? Nearly one of every 10 adults in Mississippi has been convicted of a felony and lost the right to vote. The Double Standard In How The Media Covers 2020 Democratic Candidates How the media helped shape which candidates made it this far... and who didn't. Consulting Firm McKinsey & Company Aided ICE to Implement Trump Administration's Immigration Policies A new investigation examines how the global consulting firm, McKinsey & Company, helped ICE carry out President Trump's immigration policies.  Northwestern University Student Paper Sparks Debate About Student and Professional Journalism Recent events at Northwestern University have sparked a debate about student journalism. 
05/12/1929m 49s

Why the Framers Empowered Congress to Impeach the President 2019-12-03

Why the Framers Empowered Congress to Impeach the President With so few examples of impeachment in our history, it can become unclear what exactly impeachable conduct is, and what the framers intended with it. When Black Critics Examine Black Art A number of black critics have received pushback on social media for their criticism of the new film "Queen & Slim." Unprecedented Violence and Hundreds Dead in Iran's Protests At least 180 people were killed in a violent crackdown that resulted in Iranian security forces opening fire on unarmed protesters.  Trump Launches Task Force to Address Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women The National Justice Institute estimates that 84 percent of Native American women experience violence in their lifetime.
03/12/1932m 53s

The Dangers of Working in Amazon Warehouses 2019-12-02

The Dangers of Working in Amazon Warehouses New reporting found that Amazon's average serious injury rate was more than double the national average for its industry. Are Dating App Companies Responsible for Protecting Their Users from Sex Offenders?  Millions of Americans are using dating apps to find love. Do the companies who own these apps have a moral or legal responsibility to screen users who are registered as sex offenders?
02/12/1928m 31s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Politics of Climate Change

Scientists have painted a bleak picture of the future if we fail to curb greenhouse gas emissions, but we’ve already started to witness the fallout of a warming planet. Politics with Amy Walter looks at the role climate change is playing across politics and at the vulnerable communities that stand to lose the most.  Our coverage this week is part of a collaboration with 250 other media organizations called “Covering Climate Now.”  President Donald Trump was elected in 2016 fresh off of giving campaign speeches that promised to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement and bring back coal jobs. Just over two years later, we look at whether or not he's made good on those promises. Guests: Rachel Cleetus, Policy director with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists Kendra Pierre-Louis, Climate reporter for The New York Times Christine Todd Whitman, Former Governor of New Jersey and Former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Zahra Hirji, Climate reporter for BuzzFeed News Rich Fitzgerald, County Executive (D) for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Leandra Mira, Pittsburgh climate activist Comment from Shell: "Shell received its Air Quality Permit in 2015 from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, with oversight from the Federal Environmental Protection Agency.  In line with its permitting requirements, Shell will meet the regulatory standards created to protect people and the environment."
29/11/1944m 50s

How Will Bloomberg News Cover Bloomberg the Candidate? 2019-11-27

How Will Bloomberg News Cover Bloomberg the Candidate? Mike Bloomberg announced he is running for president and some are worried about how Bloomberg News will cover his candidacy. Adding Indigenous Ingredients to the Thanksgiving Table There has been a resurgence of dishes championed by Native American and indigenous cooks and chefs that are breaking into the mainstream. How the Alcatraz Occupation of 1969 Sparked the Native American Civil Rights Movement Fifty years ago this month, a group of Native American activists launched a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island in the San Francisco Bay. Is Thanksgiving a Time for Speaking Out, or Keeping the Peace? With the impeachment proceedings dominating the news, the Democratic candidates campaigning and debating, this year, it seems impossible to avoid politics. Continuing Concerns About Political Ads on Social Media Twitter announced it was banning political ads. But Facebook has continued to take a more hands-off approach.
27/11/1928m 56s

New Initiative Seeks to Bridge Prosecution Empathy Gap 2019-11-26

New Initiative Seeks to Bridge Prosecution Empathy Gap A new initiative signed by 40 progressive district attorneys pledges to have prosecutors visit correctional centers in an effort to instill more empathy in the sentencing process. Sentencing of School Shooter Reignites Conversation About Life Without Parole for Juveniles The United States is the only country in the world that sentences juveniles to life in prison. The American Plastics Renaissance: Big Oil's Plan B  The expansion of fracking in the U.S. has paved the way for a renaissance in American plastics manufacturing. When You're Over 50 in Hollywood The Good Liar, a thriller released earlier this month, stars septuagenarians Ian McKellen as a con artist and Helen Mirren as his target.
26/11/1932m 0s

Trump's Recent Pardons Cause Rift within the Military 2019-11-25

Trump's Recent Pardons Cause Rift within the Military President Donald Trump recently pardoned three military officers who were convicted or accused of war crimes.  The Decline of Local News In the past 15 years, more than 2,000 newspapers have shuttered across the United States.  What does the future hold for Israeli politics? With Prime Minister Netanyahu being indicted on corruption charges as the U.S. reverses its stance on the illegality of Israeli settlements, what's in store for Israeli politics?   Why Disabled Workers Can Get Paid Less Than Minimum Wage Most Americans might not know that federal law allows certain employers to pay people with disabilities far less than the minimum wage, trapping them in poverty.  
25/11/1928m 48s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Divided States of Government

Not that long ago, state government was seen as one of the last places for functional governing. But, over the last 10 years, state politics have become as polarized as Washington, DC.  At the same time, 2020 Democratic candidates for president are debating which approach they should take to governing. Some, like former Vice President Joe Biden, argue that voters want a return to a more pragmatic style of governing. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are less interested in bringing GOP legislators to the table than they are in bringing a grass-roots revolution to Washington.  Wisconsin State Senator Janet Bewley joins us to discuss what it's like to govern in the minority. Governing reporter Alan Greenblatt weighs in about how state legislatures have become increasingly entrenched in party politics.  Political analysts Joel Payne and Ty Mastdrof join us for analysis of the last debate. Plus, New York Times congressional reporter Nick Fandos fills us in on the latest surrounding the impeachment inquiry.    
22/11/1948m 2s

Two More Witnesses Testify at Public Hearings 2019-11-21

Two More Witnesses Testify at Public Hearings Fiona Hill, the former top Russia adviser to the Trump White House, and David Holmes, a political counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, are at Capitol Hill this morning.  The Legacy of Pay-to-Play Ambassador Appointments President Donald Trump has raised some eyebrows over his nominees for cushy ambassadorships abroad. HBCU's and Other Minority-Serving Institutions Set to Lose $255 Million in Funding Over D.C. Deadlock The Department of Education says funding will go through for the rest of the year but planning for next year is stalled amid concerns that programs will be cut and staff laid off. Indigenous Communities Get Unequal Recovery Aid After a Natural Disaster U.S. citizens on average receive $26 per person from the federal government, but tribal citizens only get about $3 per person, per year.
21/11/1937m 3s

Sondland Testimony Implicates Key Trump Administration Officials 2019-11-20

Sondland Testimony Implicates Key Trump Administration Officials Gordon Sondland, the former ambassador to the European Union, gave riveting testimony today in the impeachment hearing that has rocked the nations.   The Legacy of Julian Assange Yesterday, Swedish prosecutors dropped their investigation of rape and sexual assault allegations against Julian Assange. 99% of Native American Languages are in Danger of Going Extinct  Despite efforts to preserve them, many indigenous languages in the United States are at risk of going extinct. Nearly Two Thousand Dams at Risk for Failure in the U.S. An investigation from the Associated Press found that almost 1,700 dams pose potential risk for failure in 44 states and Puerto Rico.  Racism Pushed Chinese Americans to Leave the U.S. En Masse in the 20th Century During a time that people flocked to the U.S. for a better life, second and third generation Chinese Americans chose to leave and pursue the same dream in China.    
20/11/1949m 6s

Here Comes the Second Round of Public Impeachment Hearings 2019-11-19

Here Comes the Second Round of Public Impeachment Hearings The House Intelligence Committee will hear testimony from eight more witnesses over the next three days. As Impeachment Hearings Go On, a War Rages In Ukraine The military aid that was the subject of President Trump's call with President Zelensky foretells the larger conflict happening in the eastern block. EPA to Limit Science Used for Public Health Regulations The EPA plans to adopt a new rule that would limit the scientific and medical research the government uses for public health regulations.  Leaked Documents Provide New Insight into China's Crackdown on Ethnic Minorities An investigation from the New York Times unveiled new insight into China’s mass detention of as many as a million ethnic minorities in the western region of Xinjiang.
19/11/1941m 59s

Mormon Deaths In Mexico Reignite Questions About the Ongoing Drug War 2019-11-18

Mormon Deaths In Mexico Reignite Questions About the Ongoing Drug War Mexico and the United States are in an embittered battle with drug cartels, but some are calling into question its effectiveness as well as the media coverage.   Mark Ruffalo and Todd Haynes Tackle Corporate Corruption in 'Dark Waters' Actor Mark Ruffalo and director Todd Haynes sit down with The Takeaway to discuss bringing the true story of a decades-long legal fight against chemical giant DuPont. New Study Shows Two Million Americans Lack Access to Running Water and Toilet As federal investment in the U.S.'s water infrastructure continues to shrink, the scope of this crisis is projected to grow. Despite Trump's Efforts, Louisiana Re-Elects Democratic Governor This weekend, Louisiana residents re-elected incumbent governor John Bel Edwards.
18/11/1939m 22s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Impeachment Will be Televised

This week marked a shift in the ongoing impeachment inquiry as the first round of televised testimony began on Wednesday. Marie Yovanovitch, the well-respected former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine until May of this year became the third televised testimony on Friday. Yovanovitch believes she was removed from her post by President Trump because as she sees it, she was impeding his - and Rudy Guiliani’s - personal political agenda.   While the televised inquiry didn't reveal much new information, it provided an opportunity for those watching from home to hear from long-time government civil servants involved in Ukrainian foreign policy. Amanda Terkel from HuffPost and Anita Kumar from Politico join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the latest on impeachment. Pollster Kristen Soltis Anderson weighs in on public opinion surrounding the President and the inquiry. Barbara Perry of the University of Virginia's Miller Center describes how social media and the 24-hour news cycle changes how Americans metabolize impeachment. Alan Frumin walks us through the rules that govern impeachment proceedings.   
15/11/1946m 18s

The Divide Within The State Department 2019-11-14

The Divide Within The State Department Wednesday's public impeachment hearings saw the Trump administration take a two tracked-approach to foreign policy on Ukraine. What Evo Morales's Resignation Means for Bolivia President Evo Morales, the first indigenous leader of Bolivia, has stepped down following allegations of election fraud. 'Lionheart' Oscar Snub: A Consequence of Imperialism?  The disqualification of the Nigerian film "Lionheart" from the Best International Feature Film category has ignited a conversation about the history of colonialism. Two Monumental Cases are Being Argued at the Supreme Court This week, while all eyes have been focused on the impeachment hearings in the House, two monumental cases are being argued at the Supreme Court.  
14/11/1929m 17s

Day 1 of the Public Impeachment Hearings 2019-11-13

Day 1 of the Public Impeachment Hearings  The House of Representatives kicks off the first round of televised impeachment hearings. Trump Plans to Shrink the National Security Council These latest changes to the NSC come right in the middle of impeachment proceedings against President Trump.
13/11/1929m 7s

Public Impeachment Hearings Pose New Challenge for the Media 2019-11-12

Public Impeachment Hearings Pose New Challenge for the Media On Wednesday, televised impeachment hearings begin in the House of Representatives. Flint Water Crisis Finds Its Way into the Classroom It’s been five years since the Flint water crisis was thrust into the national spotlight. How Universities are Addressing Slavery and Reparations Georgetown, Princeton Theological Seminary, and Virginia Theological Seminary are creating scholarships, while Harvard, Yale, and Brown have admitted to benefiting from the slave trade.
12/11/1937m 37s

Politics with Amy Walter: What Did Democrats Get Wrong About Religious Voters in 2016?

A recent study from Pew Research found that white people who identify as Christians represent about two-thirds of all Republicans. Meanwhile, Americans unaffiliated with any religion, and racial minorities who identify as Christians, now each make up a bigger share of the Democratic coalition. This week, we take a look at how people of faith are balancing their religious beliefs with politics. The Atlantic's Emma Green explains what Democrats misunderstood about religious voters in 2016. Reverend Joe Darby of Nichols Chapel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina talks to us about what he's hearing from his congregation in the early-primary state. Pastor Bart Barber of First Baptist Church in Farmersville, Texas joins us to discuss Evangelical support for President Trump in 2016. Doug Pagitt, pastor and executive director of Vote Common Good, discusses his campaign to ask Evangelicals and Christians to consider Democratic candidates.  Finally, Congresswoman Elaine Luria of Virginia's second district joins us to discuss the ongoing impeachment inquiry and the implications of televised testimony.   
08/11/1945m 34s

How a Florida County Followed Trump's Call to Cancel "Fake News" 2019-11-07

How a Florida County Followed Trump's Call to Cancel "Fake News" The board of commissioners for Citrus County, Florida recently rejected a library's request to renew its New York Times subscription, with one commissioner calling the daily "fake news." Is the Term "Latinx" Unifying, or Divisive? One term that recently made its way into the demographic lexicon is getting lots of attention, and pushback: Latinx. How Law Enforcement Discretion Prevents Migrant Victims of Crime from Accessing U-Visas A new Reveal investigation shows the complexities of the U-Visa process. Could New Evidence Free Death Row Inmate Rodney Reed? Rodney Reed has spent two decades on death row for a murder he maintains he did not commit. New evidence has led to urgent calls to give him a reprieve.  
07/11/1930m 5s

OK Boomer and the Generational Divide 2019-11-06

OK Boomer and the Generational Divide Those two words have become the latest catchphrase for a younger generation expressing its frustration with their older counterparts.  Democrats Win Control In Kentucky Andy Bashear won a tight vote against opponent incumbent Republican Matt Bevin. Mississippi Gubernatorial Race Highlights a Jim Crow-Era Electoral Law A tight gubernatorial race Mississippi ignites a conversation about the states electoral process. Are 'Opportunity Zone' Tax Breaks a Giveaway For the Rich? Roughly 12 percent of census tracts around the country are being reclassified as opportunity zones, including almost all of Puerto Rico. 
06/11/1927m 2s

How Swing State Unemployment Numbers May Help Us Understand 2020 2019-11-05

How Swing State Unemployment Numbers May Help Us Understand 2020 Is the pendulum beginning to swing towards a rise in unemployment? New HBO Documentary Highlights the 85 Year Legacy of the Apollo Theater The famous Harlem theater and its amateur night was the gateway for some of the country's greatest musicians and comedians.  A Shakeup on America's Public Lands The Bureau of Land Management plans to move its headquarters from Washington, DC to Grand Junction, Colorado. California Wildfires are Contained, but Air Pollution Lingers After the California fires, dangerous conditions continue to pose a health hazard, particularly in the form of air pollution. Can Breathalyzers Actually Make People Safer? A look at how breathalyzers in cars factor into efforts to curb the high numbers of DUIs in the U.S. today.
05/11/1922m 21s

Georgia's Voter Purges Raise Voter Suppression Concerns 2019-11-04

Georgia's Voter Purges Raise Voter Suppression Concerns State officials announced they will purge more than 300,000 names from voter rolls. How Big Business Killed Deadspin An editorial decision to "stick to sports" turned into mass exodus at Deadspin, leaving the popular site with no staff remaining.   'Harriet' Attempts to Capture the Life of an American Icon 'Harriet' is the first Hollywood feature film to center around the life of Harriet Tubman. But the casting of British actress Cynthia Erivo as Tubman has generated controversy. How California's Housing Crisis is Worsening Wildfire Damage Developers are building cheaper housing on land prone to wildfire damage. A Temporary Ban to Trump's Health Care Requirements for Immigrants A judge issued a temporary ban on a Trump administration immigration policy, which would have required immigrants to prove they have health insurance, or the ability to afford it.
04/11/1933m 41s

Politics with Amy Walter: Prescription Drug Costs and 2020

The rocketing cost of prescription drug prices makes the burdensome healthcare landscape more difficult to navigate for the millions of Americans that rely on a prescription. One thing that voters, regardless of party, have agreed on is that the cost of prescription drugs in the U.S. is way too high. Americans spend significantly more on prescription drugs when compared to any other country. But, why? Senator Amy Klobuchar joins Politics with Amy Walter to discuss her work in Washington on reducing the cost of prescription drugs. Sarah Kliff of The New York Times and Yasmeen Abutaleb of The Washington Post join us to discuss why there's been such little movement on this subject, even though there's broad support for reform. Finally, Nick Fandos, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times, joins us to discuss the House's vote to authorize a resolution to establish the next phase of the impeachment inquiry. 
01/11/1947m 34s

Is There a Rift Between Trump and the Military? 2019-10-31

Is There a Rift Between Trump and the Military? This week, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman testified before Congress about his concerns that President Trump pressured the Ukrainian president to investigate Joe Biden. The Movement to Decriminalize Sex Work The push for decriminalization is gaining national attention, with proposed legislation on the line. Boeing's CEO Finally Answers to Lawmakers Lawmakers have been holding hearings for months to get to the bottom of what went wrong. How Right-Wing Industry Leaders are Re-Shaping the Interior Department  Industry leaders proposed a plan to commercialize camping grounds and raise the entrance fees.
31/10/1930m 39s

Understanding the Key Witnesses in the Impeachment Investigation 2019-10-30

Understanding the Key Witnesses in the Impeachment Investigation Testifying in the inquiry can mean taking on big risks and incurring high costs.  The Bravery of Journalists in Ukraine Ukraine can be a difficult place for journalists. Journalists Nastya Stanko and Anna Babinets share their experiences covering crime, corruption, and war in the country.  Panel Decides Some Chimps Won't Be Moved to Sanctuary Though research on the endangered animals has been banned, a panel of veterinarians decided that some chimpanzees will have to retire in labs. Honduran Mother Wins Asylum Case. Will her Daughter, Who was Deported, Be Able to Come to the U.S.? In March, WNYC's Beth Fertig brought us the story of Ana and Susan. We hear news of Ana's asylum win. Americans are Losing Faith in the Government and Democracy  Studies show that more Americans are saying they distrust the government and in extreme cases would consider an alternative to democracy.  
30/10/1930m 3s

Wildfires are Sweeping Through Northern and Southern California 2019-10-29

Wildfires are Sweeping Through Northern and Southern California The Kincaid Fire in Sonoma County and the Getty Fire in Los Angeles are causing massive amounts of damage and forcing thousands to evacuate the area. Representative Katie Hill Resigns Amid Allegations of Sexual Misconduct Representative Hill was a rising star in the Democratic freshman class, but now she's leaving Congress. What happened? The Supervillain on HBO's 'Watchmen' Is Racism  The new HBO series based on the graphic novel is gaining a lot of attention for the way it tackles race issues and politics.  Millions of Schoolchildren Are Now Under Digital Surveillance  Companies use AI to track what students are typing in their emails, chats, Google docs, and any other school platforms.
29/10/1938m 8s

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, ISIS Leader, Killed in US Military Raid 2019-10-28

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, ISIS Leader, Killed in US Military Raid  On Sunday morning, President Trump declared Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State, dead at a press conference in the White House. New York Sues Exxon in Historic Climate Change Case A trial began last week in which Exxon Mobil is accused of misleading investors — and the public — about how climate change regulations would affect its operations. Disney Unlocks the Vault, but 'Song of the South' Remains Behind Closed Doors Disney is set to launch a new streaming service, giving audiences access to a range of the studio's films, but one controversial title will remain locked away: "Song of the South." Chicago Teachers Strike Strike Enters Second Week About 300,000 Chicago public school children are missing class for the 8th day on Monday, as the teacher’s strike continues. 
28/10/1937m 24s

Politics with Amy Walter: Are Democrats Breaking Up with Big Tech?

What began as a love affair is now a relationship on the rocks. This week on Politics with Amy Walter, a look at the relationship between Democrats and big tech giants like Amazon, Facebook, and Google.  When it comes to big tech, the conversation has shifted from if they should be regulated to how and by whom. For a long time, these tech giants grew quickly and quietly beyond what many of us could’ve imagined. As a result, incredible wealth and power started to concentrate in Silicon Valley, largely unchecked by Congress. Tim Wu, the author of The Curse of Bigness and a professor at Columbia University, explains how big tech companies became embedded in the social and economic fabric of our country. Senator Mark Warner is one of a growing number of Democrats who are critical of how much power big tech has amassed, and he shares his ideas on how to rein them in on today's show. Representative Ro Khanna, the Democrat who represents Silicon Valley in Congress, walks us through the adversarial nature of the relationship between Silicon Valley and Washington, D.C. Plus, Cecilia Kang, a tech reporter at the New York Times, gives an update on the antitrust investigations going on. Finally, journalist and author Charles Duhigg explains the spectacular growth of Amazon, from its early days as an online retailer to the tech giant it is today.   
25/10/1948m 27s

The Republican Response to the Impeachment Inquiry 2019-10-24

The Republican Response to the Impeachment Inquiry We hear from a Republican strategist on the ongoing impeachment inquiry. How the Media Covered Hillary Clinton's Emails The Clinton email scandal has been put to bed with a new State Department report, but the media didn't treat it the way it did the rest of the email story. Houston Astros Controversy Highlights Problems within the MLB An Astros assistant general manager yelled profane language at several female reporters in the Astros clubhouse over the weekend. Other segments: HUD Officials Admit to Withholding Funding from Puerto Rico Last week, officials from the Department of Housing and Urban Development admitted that they purposefully delayed sending hurricane relief to Puerto Rico. Some Parents Are Saying "No" to Homework Many parents and teachers think homework needs to be reduced, or even eliminated, for elementary school children.  
24/10/1931m 57s

In the U.S., the Number of Uninsured Children is On the Rise 2019-10-23

In the U.S., the Number of Uninsured Children is On the Rise More than one million U.S. children disappeared from the rolls of Medicaid and CHIP between December 2017 and June 2019. Why Unregulated Gun Sales Flourish Online Guns and gun parts are sold openly on some of the internet's biggest platforms. Diversity Initiatives Fall Short in the Workplace Organizations across the country are increasingly turning to diversity and inclusion initiatives, in an effort to develop a culture of inclusion in the workplace.
23/10/1930m 29s

The Key Factors for Protests Around the World 2019-10-22

The Key Factors for Protests Around the World At the heart of many of these protests are the increasing level of inequality and distrust, and disgust, with the inner workings of government. Four Pharmaceutical Companies Avoid Their Day in Federal Court with Settlement  The deal came hours before what would have been the first federal opioid trial was set to begin.  Your Halloween Chocolate Most Likely Comes from Child Labor in West Africa Most of the cocoa cultivated in West Africa uses child labor. Justin Trudeau Wins a Second Term as Canadian Prime Minister But his diminished standing in government could have implications for the passage of the USMCA. Will Impeachment Bring People to the Streets? If impeachment proceedings go on behind closed doors, will the public support it?
22/10/1936m 53s

Civil Servants, Marginalized for Years, are Pushing Back 2019-10-21

Civil Servants, Marginalized for Years, are Pushing Back The Trump administration’s attack on career diplomats and intelligence officials started as soon as he came into office. But now, civil servants are talking to Congress. California Becomes First State to Mandate Late Start Times for Middle Schools and High Schools  Experts say late start times are medically and academically beneficial for students, but changing school start times can cause many headaches.  Chicago Teachers Strike for Social Justice This strike is notable because the emphasis is on smaller class sizes, more support staff, nurses, and even housing.
21/10/1941m 22s

Politics with Amy Walter: Will Impeachment Inspire more Republicans to Run for Office?

The midterm elections of 2018 served as a rude awakening for Republicans who watched their majority slip away in the House. Many Americans that had supported Donald Trump in 2016 decided to support moderate Democrats. In 2019, a record number of incumbent Republican retirements poses another challenge for the GOP. Winning back the seats in districts that Trump carried in 2016 is a priority for Republicans and the Democrat-led impeachment inquiry might give them the support to do so. On the latest episode of Politics with Amy Walter, Parker Poling from the National Republican Congressional Committee and Dave Wasserman from The Cook Political Report join us to discuss the role impeachment will play in drumming up Republican candidates in 2020. Plus, Jennifer Duffy, senior editor for The Cook Political Report, provides an update on upcoming Senate races.  Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia of Texas tells us what she's hearing from her constituents about the impeachment inquiry. Elena Schneider, a national politics reporter for Politico, provides an update on Mayor Pete Buttigieg's debate performance and his ability to fundraise.  Finally, Politics with Amy Walter reflects on the legacy of Congressman Elijah Cummings.
18/10/1947m 46s

The Legacy of Elijah Cummings 2019-10-17

The Legacy of Elijah Cummings On Thursday, Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland died from “complications concerning longstanding health challenges.” Living at the Intersection of Domestic Violence and Immigration October marks Domestic Violence Awareness Month. While domestic violence affects all kinds of people, immigrant women face a unique set of challenges in getting help and support.  It's Not Just the Glass Ceiling — Career Barriers for Women Start at the Management Level Women of color are especially affected by what a new report calls the "broken rung" of the corporate ladder. Ohio Purges Voters Amid Growing Concerns of Voter Suppression Across the U.S. Voter suppression is a longstanding issue in Ohio, and advocates say this case demonstrates the danger posed to voters ahead of 2020.
17/10/1926m 15s

The Latest: Pence and Pompeo Head to Syria 2019-10-16

The Latest: Pence and Pompeo Head to Syria Yesterday, the White House announced that Vice President Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo were headed to Syria, as part of a delegation to negotiate a ceasefire agreement. Evangelical Voters and Trump: Will the Turkish Offensive in Syria Mark a Change? Some evangelicals have cast doubt on President Trump's actions, but they may still support him. From 'The Irishman' to 'Gemini Man': Is De-Aging Technology Worth the Cost?   Hollywood has been working to improve the digital process of de-aging actors. Two new movies put the latest technology to the test. Mob Killings of Minorities in India is on the Rise  Mob attacks of Muslims and other Indian minority groups have been on the rise since Prime Minister Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party took power in 2014.  Democrats Face Off in Fourth Presidential Debate A surging Elizabeth Warren was a target for the crowded field.
16/10/1929m 24s

Trump's Rhetoric Towards the Press has Real-World Implications 2019-10-15

Trump's Rhetoric Towards the Press has Real-World Implications The Takeaway is joined by a journalist covering Washington and the Committee to Protect Journalists to discuss the implications of President Trump's attitude towards the press.  Tensions Grow Between the Trump Administration and Fox News Is the relationship between the president and his favorite network changing? Officer Fatally Shoots Black Woman During Welfare Check: "If Your Safe Space Isn't Your Home, Then Where Is It?" Fort Worth police officer shot and killed Atatiana Jefferson through her window without announcing himself. Chicago Tackles Gun Violence with Community Outreach The city is trying to reduce gun violence by identifying and working with the most vulnerable community members using counseling, nonviolence training, and conflict mediation. New EPA Water Rule Attempts to Deliver Safer Drinking Water But the rule does fall short of removing all lead water pipes.
15/10/1931m 7s

How Will Congress Move Forward on Impeachment, with the Trump Admin Failing to Cooperate? 2019-10-14

How Will Congress Move Forward on Impeachment, with the Trump Admin Failing to Cooperate? Some have called this a "constitutional crisis" — but are we at that moment yet? Anti-Semitism Continues to Rise Throughout the Country  Acts of anti-Semitism have continued to rise throughout the nation and have doubled in Massachusetts.  Sesame Street is Teaching Children About Addiction Sesame Street is now taking on the topic of addiction in an effort to speak to the many children who are impacted by parents with substance abuse disorders. Other segments: Listen: Kurdish Diaspora in the U.S. Reacts to Turkey's Invasion of Northern Syria Kurdish people see Trump's move as a major betrayal to their community.
14/10/1936m 7s

Politics with Amy Walter: Digital Campaign Advertising and 2020

Even though Congress is technically on recess, it has been a busy week in the nation’s capital. The week started with a letter from White House Counsel Patrick Cipollone to Speaker Nancy Pelosi, informing the House leader that the White House was not going to participate in an impeachment inquiry that it considered unconstitutional. Resistance to the impeachment inquiry escalated when the White House refused to let the U.S. Ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland, testify to Congress. Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, joined Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the latest on the impeachment inquiry and how the House will continue their investigation without a cooperating White House.  Also, Eugene Kiely and Erika Franklin Fowler discuss the implications of political digital advertising for 2020. Congresswoman Katherine Clark weighs in about the House Democratic Caucus and efforts to prioritize the issue of gun violence. Finally, Peter Beinart shares why the presidency might skip generation X.  
11/10/1946m 7s

Turkey Begins Offensive in Northern Syria: What Will Happen to the Kurds? 2019-10-10

Turkey Begins Offensive in Northern Syria: What Will Happen to the Kurds? President Trump has been criticized for turning his back on the Kurdish people in the region. Millions Without Power in California  The state’s largest utility, PG&E, started cutting electricity as a precaution against wildfires. Despite Criticism, Atlanta Braves Are Resistant to Change Ryan Helsley, a pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals and citizen of the Cherokee Nation called out the Atlanta Braves "tomahawk chop," but the Braves have been reluctant to change. Pregnancy Discrimination is Still Pervasive in the Workplace Decades after the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, pregnancy discrimination is still pervasive in the workplace.  Palm Oil Production Linked to Massive Forest Fires in Indonesia The U.S. has largely contributed to the growth of this palm oil industry.
10/10/1940m 15s

Grappling with Gun Control in Washington and Kansas City 2019-10-09

Grappling with Gun Control in Washington and Kansas City Gun reform legislation in Washington stalls, and a mass shooting occurred in Kansas City, Kansas.  The Expectations of Forgiveness from Black Americans in the Aftermath of Violence The end of Amber Guyger's trial sparked a conversation on the perceived responsibility of black people to be the moral compass. How are Polls Shaping the Impeachment Inquiry? Can a news story get so big that it influences polling?
09/10/1937m 5s

Peter Navarro Talks Upcoming Trade Negotiations with China 2019-10-08

Peter Navarro Talks Upcoming Trade Negotiations with China "Truly a Trump miracle," the Assistant to the President on Trade says about the state of the U.S. economy. Separating Fact from Fiction on Tariffs with China China has hit back with its own retaliatory tariffs, and it’s unclear how far this trade war will go. Trial Date Set for Five Alleged 9/11 Terrorists at Guantanamo. What Will Be the Challenges? Aside from the upcoming trial, there are particular challenges for the Guantanamo base and prison. NBA-China Relationship Rocky After Rockets Manager Tweets in Support of Hong Kong China’s billion-dollar NBA fan base is enraged and threatening to cut ties. Other segments: United Auto Workers Begin their Fourth Week of Strikes  As the strike continues, there is a growing concern over the larger economic impact the strike could have in General Motors's home state of Michigan.
08/10/1938m 17s

Trump Administration Moves Ahead with Major Foreign Policy Overhauls Amid Impeachment Inquiry 2019-10-07

Trump Administration Moves Ahead with Major Foreign Policy Overhauls Amid Impeachment Inquiry  Even as the Ukraine scandal embroils the White House, President Trump has continued to press forward with an often unpredictable approach to foreign policy. Why Have Civilian Casualties Gone Up During the Trump Administration?  Civilian casualties have risen in many of the conflicts the U.S. is involved in since President Trump took office. Will Smart Speakers Be the New Normal? Products with smart speakers have become very popular with consumers, but they have also been criticized for the way that they erode privacy and hand over personal information to Amazon. Other segments: How Facebook Fostered Digital Age Discrimination  The EEOC recently ruled that certain companies using targeted job ads on Facebook violated civil rights law by restricting ads based on age.
07/10/1937m 20s

Politics with Amy Walter: Quid Pro Quo My God

This week, new information about President Trump’s interactions with foreign governments have rattled Washington, D.C.  While the White House works on beating back the impeachment inquiry, members of Congress are home in their districts checking in with constituents. This task might prove difficult for those representing districts that have supported the president in the past, like Democratic Congresswoman Elaine Luria from Virginia. Representative Luria joined Politics with Amy Walter to discuss why she decided to support the impeachment inquiry and the response she's received from constituents in a district that voted for Donald Trump in 2016.  DC-based reporters Yamiche Alcindor of PBS and MSNBC and Rachael Bade of The Washington Post contextualize the ongoing impeachment proceedings. Tim Alberta from Politico chronicles the transformation of the Republican Party and historian Timothy Naftali demonstrates the role of bipartisanship during past impeachments.  Amy's Final Take This week, we also got our first polls taken since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the House was starting a formal impeachment inquiry. Here’s what they show: Even as support for impeachment has grown, opinions about how the president is doing his job are virtually unchanged. In other words, as we’ve seen over the last 2 plus years, voters are pretty locked into how they feel about this president and there’s nothing that has been able to alter that.  This is different from what we saw back during the Nixon impeachment. Back then, as support for impeachment rose, Nixon’s approval rating dropped. While support for impeaching Trump is basically at the same point it was with Nixon in 1974, Trump’s job approval rating is 41 percent Nixon’s was just 25 percent.  It is a testament to just how much more polarized the electorate is today than it was 45 years ago. And, a reminder that even as more and more information about Trump’s interactions with Ukraine are revealed — much of it is getting to Americans through partisan, biased filters like social media and cable news - making it harder and harder for any sort of ‘consensus’ to be found either among members of Congress - or the electorate.  And, we end up where we’ve been all along. A divided country, more deeply and firmly entrenched than ever. And, those who aren’t as politically engaged or aligned, struggling to make sense of it all. Opening music: I Think Like Midnight
04/10/1947m 30s

U.S. Asylum Policy is Sending Migrants to Mexico, Where They Face Kidnapping, Assault and Violence 2019-10-03

U.S. Asylum Policy is Sending Migrants to Mexico, Where They Face Kidnapping, Assault and Violence The Migrant Protection Protocols policy sends asylum seekers to Mexico to wait for their day in court. Can 'Joker' Turn Internet Outrage into Box Office Success? The Takeaway speaks with Newsday’s Rafer Guzman and New York Magazine’s Alison Willmore about "Joker" and whether the outrage surrounding its release is overblown or justified. Other segments: Bahamas Continues Hurricane Dorian Recovery Efforts as Haitians Worry About their Future in the Country It has been one month since Hurricane Dorian hit the Bahamas. As the country recovers, deep-seated anti-Haitian sentiments are once again bubbling to the surface.
03/10/1929m 25s

Trump Inc. Explores Web of Connections Between President Trump and Ukraine 2019-10-02

Trump Inc. Explores Web of Connections Between President Trump and Ukraine Even before he became president, Donald Trump had ties with the former Soviet Republic. "It's Fueled My Fire": Formerly-Imprisoned Journalist Reflects One Year Since Khashoggi's Death Washington Post writer Jason Rezaian reflects on his colleague Jamal Khashoggi's legacy. Robbie Robertson on His New Album "Sinematic" Since leaving The Band in the 1970s, Robbie Robertson has put out multiple solo albums and written a memoir. This month, Robertson released his latest solo record, Sinematic.  Other segments: Harvard Can Continue to Consider Race in Admissions, Federal Judge Rules Using affirmative action in the admissions process does not violate any laws. Amber Guyger's Conviction and the Argument For Self-Defense The former Dallas police officer was found guilty of killing her unarmed black neighbor in his own apartment last year.
02/10/1939m 34s

Impeachment Saga Puts New Spotlight on Federal Whistleblower Complaints 2019-10-01

Last week, Joseph Maguire, Acting Director of National Intelligence, testified before Congress, as part of the impeachment inquiry launched by Democrats against President Trump. "I want to stress that I believe the whistleblower and the Inspector General, have acted in good faith throughout," Maguire said. "I have every reason to believe, that they have done everything by the book, and followed the law." The inquiry revolves around the Ukraine controversy, in which President Trump asked the Ukranian government to investigate political rival Joe Biden’s son. But at the center of this saga is a whistleblower report that the Trump Administration allegedly attempted to suppress. On Monday, the president told reporters his administration is trying to find out more about the whistleblower, saying his administration was "trying to find out about a whistleblower." Last week, Trump implicitly threatened the whistleblower, in leaked audio published by The L.A. Times, calling them a "spy." "The spies and treason — we used to handle it a little differently than we do now," Trump said. This public display by the President and others has brought about questions of the treatment of whistleblowers in both the public and private sectors. In many cases, whistleblowers face retaliation for speaking up about potential misconduct. Tom Mueller, journalist and author of the forthcoming book, Crisis of Conscience: Whistleblowing in an Age of Fraud, joins The Takeaway to discuss the risks whistleblowers face when speaking out about state and corporate wrongdoings. But sometimes speaking up and blowing the whistle can save lives — and may be worth the risks. For two other Takeaway guests, moral and ethical dilemmas are not just abstract concepts. These are daily battles they have been going through since they first blew the whistle in their respective departments. Robert MacLean is a twice-fired TSA Federal Air Marshal, who blew the whistle on practices by the Department of Homeland Security back in 2003. MacLean found out the DHS would be cutting Federal Air Marshal personnel on long-distance flights that were at risk of terrorist attacks. Brandon Coleman is a former counselor with the Department of Veterans Affairs, who blew the whistle in 2015 about the lack of treatment for suicidal veterans within the VA. Coleman documented the VA’s neglect of suicidal veterans in Phoenix, who were often not being given necessary treatment. As a veteran himself, Coleman also found out VA staff were inappropriately accessing his own records.
01/10/1932m 48s

How Should the Media Be Covering Impeachment? 2019-09-30

How Should the Media Be Covering Impeachment?  The latest Trump administration scandal has pushed the impeachment news cycle into overdrive, as mainstream media and right-wing outlets battle over control of the narrative. A Growing Catalog of Hate Symbols The Anti-Defamation League added 36 entries to its online catalog of extremist symbols, from logos of extremist groups to numbers that carry secret codes.
30/09/1936m 36s

Politics with Amy Walter: In Pursuit of Impeachment

This week, President Donald Trump was accused of enlisting the President of Ukraine to investigate his political rival, Vice President Joe Biden. A whistleblower's complaint alleges that the White House tried to hide the transcript of the conversation between the two leaders. For many, the allegations leveled against President Trump this week broke the dam. Several Democrats from purple districts who previously had not supported impeachment decided to back an impeachment inquiry announced by Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday. Shortly after, an unclassified version of the whistleblower's complaint was released and the acting Director of National Intelligence went before Congress.  Purple-district Democrat, Rep. Colin Allred of Texas, joined Politics with Amy Walter to discuss what changed his mind on the impeachment inquiry.  Guests: Representative Colin Allred, Democrat, Texas-32 John Bresnahan, Congressional Bureau Chief for Politico Margaret Taylor, Senior Editor and Counsel at Lawfare Doug Heye, Republican Strategist and CNN Contributor  Joel Payne, Democratic Strategist and Former Aide to Harry Reid
27/09/1945m 48s

The National Conversation Around Sexual Assault, One Year Since the Kavanaugh Hearings 2019-09-26

The Changing Landscape of Impeachment Today, the acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire is testifying to Congress about the whistleblower complaint that started this all. What the Republicans Think About the Push for Impeachment The Republican response to the latest news about Ukraine, the whistleblower complaint, and moves to impeach President Trump. The National Conversation Around Sexual Assault, One Year Since the Kavanaugh Hearings Ana Maria Archila's confrontation of Senator Jeff Flake became a rallying cry for women across the country and still resonates a year later. 
26/09/1930m 53s

More Democrats Call for Impeachment Amid Whistleblower Reports 2019-09-24

More Democrats Call for Impeachment Amid Whistleblower Reports Two members of Congress join to discuss whether or not impeachment is inevitable. Athletes and Sexual Assault: Why Survivors Should be Centered in the Conversation It is a tremendous risk for women to publicly come forward with their experiences of sexual assault. How Libraries Are Bridging the Digital Divide When people don’t have internet at home, or don't know how to use digital tools, they turn to their local libraries. Other segments: President Trump's Fraught Relationship with Ukraine There's a lot of confusion over what exactly Ukraine's role is.
24/09/1940m 20s

The New Wave of Corporate Activism 2019-09-23

The New Wave of Corporate Activism More and more businesses are taking a stand on everything from gun control to climate change. Is There Anything Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Can't Do? The Takeaway speaks to NBA legend and author Kareem Abdul-Jabbar about how he’s managed to find success in such a wide range of professional fields.
23/09/1932m 29s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Politics of Climate Change

Scientists have painted a bleak picture of the future if we fail to curb greenhouse gas emissions, but we’ve already started to witness the fallout of a warming planet. Politics with Amy Walter looks at the role climate change is playing across politics and at the vulnerable communities that stand to lose the most.  Our coverage this week is part of a collaboration with 250 other media organizations called “Covering Climate Now.”  President Donald Trump was elected in 2016 fresh off of giving campaign speeches that promised to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement and bring back coal jobs. Just over two years later, we look at whether or not he's made good on those promises. Guests: Rachel Cleetus, Policy director with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists Kendra Pierre-Louis, Climate reporter for The New York Times Christine Todd Whitman, Former Governor of New Jersey and Former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Zahra Hirji, Climate reporter for BuzzFeed News Rich Fitzgerald, County Executive (D) for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Leandra Mira, Pittsburgh climate activist Comment from Shell: "Shell received its Air Quality Permit in 2015 from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, with oversight from the Federal Environmental Protection Agency.  In line with its permitting requirements, Shell will meet the regulatory standards created to protect people and the environment."
20/09/1945m 0s

From Resilience to Resistance: The Toll of Hurricane Maria, Two Years Later 2019-09-19

From Resilience to Resistance: The Toll of Hurricane Maria, Two Years Later This Friday marks two years since Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico.  The Art of Tackling Climate Change The Takeaway sits down with three artists who are working to incorporate climate change into their work. Electoral Stalemate Leaves Israel's Political Future in Question Neither Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu or challenger Benny Gantz have enough votes to form a government.
19/09/1931m 35s

How are the Concerns of Asian Americans Being Considered Ahead of the 2020 Elections? 2019-09-18

How are the Concerns of Asian Americans Being Considered Ahead of the 2020 Elections? Andrew Yang and Kamala Harris have brought Asian American identity into a new national focus. 2020 Republican Candidate Mark Sanford Condemns Primary Cancellations  Former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford believes the cancelation of Republican primaries in four states is anti-American.  More Local TV Meteorologists are Discussing Climate Change Over the past few years, a growing number of local TV meteorologists have been discussing climate change as part of their regular weather forecasts. Other segments: Where Does the U.S.-Saudi Relationship Stand? New tensions come almost a year after Saudi Arabia killed The Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The High Price of Fast Delivery: Amazon Contractors are Crashing, But the Company Does Not Take Responsibility A new report shows how the web of Amazon contractors makes it difficult to track crash data.
18/09/1934m 51s

The Trump Administration's Federal Court Strategy: 150 Judges Confirmed So Far 2019-09-17

The Trump Administration's Federal Court Strategy: 150 Judges Confirmed So Far What does the Democrats' strategy look like in the lead-up to 2020? Nationwide Efforts to Track Police Officers who Lie on the Job In cities like Seattle, St. Louis, and Houston, newly elected prosecutors are building more expansive databases to track dishonest officers. Ecological Grief: a Barely Understood Consequence of Climate Change As the natural environment is changed by a warming planet, indigenous communities often suffer disproportionately. Other segments:  A New California Bill is a Game-Changer for the Gig Economy Uber and Lyft have vowed to spend $30 million to fight the bill.
17/09/1938m 32s

Climate Change is Making Children Anxious 2019-09-16

Climate Change is Making Children Anxious And they want to do something about it. Revisiting the Groundbreaking Career of Actor Raúl Juliá The PBS documentary “Raúl Juliá: The World’s a Stage” paints a portrait of a trailblazing Latino performer, who consistently emphasized his Puerto Rican identity in his acting roles. Other segments: How does the UAW Strike Compare with Past Union Actions? The UAW previously went on strike in 2007 and, notably, 1970. How does today's strike compare? The Companies Profiting from the Militarization of the U.S.-Border A new report points to the companies' profits — and their potential influence in Washington.
16/09/1933m 55s

Politics with Amy Walter: Democratic Candidates Battle It Out in Houston

The third Democratic primary debate is behind us now--all three hours of it. On Thursday night, the top ten polling Democratic candidates met in Houston, Texas. And for the first time, frontrunners Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, and Bernie Sanders shared a single stage. So, did anything from the latest debate reshape the battle for the nomination? That’s the question at the center of today's show. We also look at how the caucus process works in Nevada and what we might expect in the first primary state, New Hampshire. Finally, a conversation about the Democrats and impeachment, in light of the House Judiciary Committee vote this week to move forward with an impeachment inquiry.  Guests: Claire Malone, senior politics writer for FiveThirtyEight Joel Payne, former aide to the Hillary Clinton Campaign  Issac Dovere, staff writer at The Atlantic Shelby Wiltz, caucus director for the Nevada State Democratic Party Rebecca Katz, founding partner of New Deal Strategies Karen Hicks, founder and CEO of Civix Strategy Group Kyle Cheney, Congress reporter for Politico 
13/09/1944m 40s

Why Are People Leaving Some of Biggest U.S. Metro Areas? 2019-09-12

Why Are People Leaving Some of Biggest U.S. Metro Areas? New data from the Census Bureau shows that populations are declining in some of the biggest metro areas in the country, like New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. Who Was the Mysterious Spy in Russia, Feeding Secrets to the CIA? The spy was removed by the CIA from Russia in 2017. How "Hustlers" Is Changing the Portrayal of Strippers in Hollywood The film's writer and director, Lorene Scafaria, hired the stripper Jacqueline Francis to consult on the movie. Jacqueline ensured that the film dealt with the subject honestly. Other segments: Benjamin Netanyahu Pledges to Annex the West Bank Israel's prime minister announced Tuesday that he will move to annex part of the occupied West Bank if he wins the election next week. Your Donations to Charities Are Lining the Pockets of a Las Vegas Telemarketer Las Vegas telemarketer Richard Zeitlin and his companies have taken nearly 90 percent of what they've raised for for charities and super PACS.
12/09/1931m 40s

How States Are Holding Opioid Manufacturers and Distributors Accountable 2019-09-11

How States Are Holding Opioid Manufacturers and Distributors Accountable States across the country are holding manufacturers and distributors of opioids accountable for their role in creating what they say is an epidemic. U.S. Jails and Prisons Failing to Provide Treatment for Opioid Addiction Incarcerated people are 40 times more likely to overdose upon release. California Bill Would Allow Student Athletes To Be Paid For Endorsements And Likeness Rights The Fair Pay To Play Act passed through the State Assembly on Monday and has already passed through the Senate. Other Segments: What North Carolina's Special Election Means for 2020 The Takeaway also looks at John Bolton's exit and what that might mean for Trump’s foreign policy and the 2020 election.
11/09/1941m 48s

Has a New Norm Been Broken with the NOAA Controversy? 2019-09-10

Has a New Norm Been Broken with the NOAA Controversy? Millions of Americans were looking to the federal government for life-saving information about Hurricane Dorian. They got a political fiasco. The Eleventh Hour Fight Over Fate of California's Privacy Bill Legislators have until the end of the week to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act. What is the United States Doing About Food Waste? European countries have more effective federal legislation to reduce food waste than the U.S.   Other segments: British Parliament Suspended for Five Weeks as Halloween Brexit Deadline Looms The deadline to finalize a Brexit deal with the European Union is October 31st. But a weeks-long suspension of Parliament is now in effect, leaving little time to finalize a new plan. What Would a "Safe Third Country" Agreement Between the U.S. and Honduras Mean for the Asylum Crisis? The alleged 'Safe Third Country' agreement speaks volumes of the U.S.-Honduras relationship.
10/09/1934m 37s

U.S.-Taliban Talks Stall Days Before September 11th Anniversary 2019-09-09

U.S.-Taliban Talks Stall Days Before September 11th Anniversary On Saturday, President Trump said he was canceling a secret meeting at Camp David between U.S., Taliban, and Afghan officials. The Takeaway looks at what's next for the negotiations. FTC Fines YouTube for Violating Child Privacy  YouTube was collecting information from children to help target them with ads.  The One Where We Talk About Friends (Sorry, We Had To) It’s been 25 years since the world met Rachel, Ross, Chandler, Joey, Monica, and Phoebe. Other segments: The Secret Life of Credit Card Data  A single swipe of your credit card hands your data over to at least a half dozen different types of companies. Bahamas in Desperate Need of Relief After Hurricane Dorian The death toll continues to climb as the true nature of the storm's devastation comes into relief.
09/09/1933m 1s

Politics with Amy Walter: What Have We Learned on the Campaign Trail?

Amy Walter's take: There’s something of a consensus-building within the so-called mainstream political media that it’s only a matter of time before Biden’s Teflon shield is deflated. His debate performances have been shaky. He is not as quick on his feet as the other candidates. And, he’s spent most of the campaign on defense - either explaining past votes, or changing long-held positions on policy.  But, it also seems to me that many in the political class may be underestimating the staying power of a flawed - but popular and well-known - candidate. In 2016, for example, the assumption among the political elites - me included - was that once the summer ended, so would Trump’s hold on the lead in the GOP race. Voters would start to get serious about electability and stability and would reject this unorthodox candidate. Obviously, we know that didn’t happen.  This isn’t to say that Biden’s destined to win the nomination. But, just that his staying power may be more durable than we think. He’s built up a lot of goodwill over his many years in office that no one else can claim.  Guests: Annie Linskey, National politics reporter for The Washington Post Josh Jamerson, National politics reporter for The Wall Street Journal Elaina Plott, White House correspondent for The Atlantic Matt Paul, Democratic Strategist based in Des Moines   
06/09/1925m 33s

Is Vaping More Dangerous Than It Seems? 2019-09-05

Is Vaping More Dangerous Than It Seems? Hundreds of patients with severe respiratory illnesses have reported using e-cigarette products. The Legacy of Venus and Serena Williams  Serena Williams won her 100th singles victory at the Open, despite reports that she injured her ankle just days before.  Pro-Beijing Counter-Protesters in the U.S. Clash with Pro-Hong Kong Protesters What do these clashes tell us about the protests' future? Other segments:  North Carolina Judges Rule Republican-Drawn Legislative District Map Is Unconstitutional  Three North Carolina judges gave the Republican state legislature until September 18th to redraw the map.  When Can the Government Separate a Parent from Child at the Border?  Beth Fertig is a senior reporter with WNYC and she told us one father’s story.
05/09/1932m 58s

What's Happening at the NRA? 2019-09-04

What's Happening at the NRA? For the last year, the National Rifle Association has been in turmoil, from financial uncertainty and legal disputes to leadership struggles and the shuttering of NRATV. Congressman Lacy Clay Demands Action After 12 Children Shot to Death in St. Louis Missouri Governor Mike Parson refused to address gun violence in a special legislative session. Domestic Workers are Still Fighting for Basic Labor Rights  Domestic workers don't have basic labor rights like paid sick time. The Domestic Workers Bill Of Rights Act, introduced in July, is trying to change that.  Need for Home Care Workers Grows, But They're Exploited These positions are among the hardest and lowest paid in the country. Other segments: Methane Regulation Rollbacks Meet Resistance from Oil and Gas Companies Environmental organizations, climate scientists and public health groups, as well as oil and gas companies, have all spoken out against this rollback. 
04/09/1940m 8s

What's the Link Between Hurricanes and Climate Change? 2019-09-03

What's the Link Between Hurricanes and Climate Change? Some experts say hurricanes like Dorian are becoming more intense due to global warming.   Hong Kong Students are Heading Back to School, But Protesters Still Aren't Backing Down Authorities in mainland China had hoped the demonstrations would die down by the fall. Rural Communities Struggle to Continue Providing Emergency Medical Services In the rural United States, communities depend on emergency medical services, but operating an ambulance in these areas comes with a unique set of challenges.  Why are Workplace Menopause Polices Being Pushed For in the UK and Not the US? Politicians in the UK have been calling for workplace's to have menopause policies and awareness, that's not the case in the US.  More Than a Century After 'The Jungle,' Meatpacking Industry Still Relies on Immigrants On Labor Day, the horrifying realities of being an undocumented immigrant worker in the meatpacking industry.  U.S.-Born Latinos Struggle to Gain Visibility in Hollywood A new report outlines the bleak state of Latino representation in the film industry, but the research also undersells the lack of opportunity for U.S.-born Latinos in Hollywood.
03/09/1933m 35s

EXCLUSIVE: Correction Staff at ICE Jail Skirted Rules with Mentally Ill Detainee who Hanged Himself 2019-09-02

by José Olivares A warning to listeners: some of the audio in this story is disturbing and hard to listen to. An exclusive Takeaway and The Intercept investigation shows that correctional staff at an Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center skirted rules when dealing with a migrant with mental illness. The detainee, a 40-year-old undocumented Mexican migrant, killed himself after spending 21 days in solitary confinement in July 2018. The investigation shows that correctional staff at the Stewart Detention Center did not follow the ICE national detention standards during the classification process, the disciplinary process and even on the night he killed himself. The migrant, Efraín Romero de la Rosa, took his own life at the Stewart Detention Facility in Georgia, which is run by the private corrections company CoreCivic. He had been previously diagnosed with schizophrenia. The solitary confinement cell in which Efraín Romero de la Rosa took his own life. (GBI Investigation Photo) While in ICE custody, Efraín was placed in solitary confinement for 15 days, was later placed on suicide watch and, separately, spent time at a mental health institution for over a month. On his return to Stewart to continue immigration proceedings, correctional staff neglected to recognize his mental illness and classify him accordingly. Staff had noted his fixation on death, repeatedly telling staff he would "die three terrible deaths," and telling other detainees he was a "prophet." Yet, CoreCivic's correctional staff sent Efraín to solitary confinement for 30 days. None of the disciplinary records released by CoreCivic in response to courtroom discovery demands and provided by family attorney Andrew Free make mention of his worsening mental illness. The Takeaway and The Intercept accessed hundreds of pages of records, photos, audio with witnesses and correctional staff, and 18 hours of security footage from within the facility. Efraín’s story helps the public gain insight at the tangled and opaque world of ICE detention. As the Trump Administration continues to round up migrants at an increasing pace, more people diagnosed with mental illness will inevitably be placed in ICE detention. You can listen to the entire investigation by clicking "play" above. You can read the detailed investigation on The Intercept here. A special thank you to Cindi Kim, Associate General Counsel at New York Public Radio. For The Takeaway, Deidre Depke, Ellen Frankman, Lee Hill, Arwa Gunja and Jim Schachter edited; Jay Cowit sound designed and composed the score. For The Intercept, Ali Gharib edited the story, Ariel Zambelich was the visual designer, and Travis Mannon and Lauren Feeney made the accompanying film.
02/09/1933m 55s

Politics with Amy Walter: Will Unions Deliver 2020 to the Democrats?

In the episode before Labor Day, we look at the rise and fall of the labor movement, particularly unions. By collectively bargaining for better work conditions, unions elevated the middle class. Over the years, many unions have watched their membership numbers decline. As a result of a few Supreme Court decisions, a loss in manufacturing jobs, and a lack of increased federal protections, the influence of unions was reduced. As we edge closer to 2020, candidates hoping to win the Democratic nomination have made rebuilding the middle class the central tenant of their candidacies. So, what role will unions and organized labor play in 2020? Plus, we look at domestic workers and caregivers and how they've been left out of the conversation when it comes to labor protections. Guests:Randi Weingarten, President of the American Federation of Teachers Lee Saunders, President of AFSCME, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Mary Kay Henry, President of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Stephanie Bloomingdale, President of the Wisconsin AFL-CIO Rusty McAllister, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Nevada ALF-CIO Rick Bloomingdale, President of the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO Dave Jamieson, Labor Reporter at the Huffington Post Ai-jen Poo, Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance
30/08/1948m 9s

In Kashmir and Elsewhere, Digital Authoritarianism is on the Rise 2019-08-29

In Kashmir and Elsewhere, Digital Authoritarianism is on the Rise  Kashmir's blackout has meant that millions of people in the state have not been able to communicate with the outside world, so reports on conditions in Kashmir have been scarce.  Rohingya Babies Born In Bangladeshi Refugee Camps Around the second anniversary of the mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims to Bangladesh, we look at the babies that have been left stateless.  U.S. Soccer Fans Rebel Against the Banning of Political Speech in the Stands For 33 minutes, many fans of the Portland Timbers and Seattle Sounders stayed silent. Then, the anti-fascist banners came out. South Asian Actors Are Finally Getting Hollywood Leads -- No Accent Required 2019 has seen a spread of movies starring South Asian actors. Is it a sign of a shift, or just a blip?
29/08/1938m 40s

Growing Concerns about U.S. Election System Ahead of 2020 2019-08-28

Growing Concerns about U.S. Election System Ahead of 2020 On Monday, vice chairman of the Federal Election Commission Matthew Petersen announced his resignation.  Will Brazil's Far-Right President Fight Raging Fires in the Amazon? Brazil’s space research center reported a 77 percent increase in fires in the Amazon. Climate scientists worry that large parts of this rain forest will not be recoverable. Leakers are Making Bank by Uploading Bootlegs and Fake Songs to Music Streaming Services Streaming services are struggling with the fact that unscrupulous posters are gaming their platforms to make tens of thousands of dollars off of stolen music. You Can Now Track Gun Suspects in Chicago  The Chicago Police Department has launched a controversial new online tool that lets the public track people who have been arrested for gun-related offenses. It Could Get Harder to Prove Housing Discrimination The rule change would make it almost impossible to sue for housing discrimination if an algorithm is involved — but algorithms aren't free from bias. 
28/08/1931m 18s

The Rise of the Term "Identity Politics" 2019-08-27

The Rise of the Term "Identity Politics" The term “identity politics” is often reserved for when candidates talk about issues that affect minority communities, but not for coded appeals to white voters. Newark Announces Plan to Get the Lead Out of its Water But after years of confusion over the true scale of the problem, residents remain skeptical. 'It's Not Really Going to Support My Children': The Fight to Keep Child Support in the Family In many states, child support payments go to the government if a parent is on welfare. Beyond 1619: Slavery Under the Spanish Crown Under the Spanish crown, slavery dates back a full century before 1619. How the U.S. Prison System Fails Those With Hepatitis C Hepatitis C is far more common in jails and prisons than in the general population.
27/08/1928m 45s

Podcast: What Does Andrew Luck's Retirement Mean for the NFL? 2019-08-26

What Does Andrew Luck's Retirement Mean for the NFL? The Indianapolis Colts quarterback announced his retirement over the weekend.  Rising Temperatures are Creating Dangerous Conditions for Workers Over 800 workers died in the U.S. from heat exposure between 1992 and 2017. Other segments: Climate Change is Affecting Farm Workers  And as global temperatures rise, Californian farmers have been moving north, seeking better working conditions and a slightly cooler climate. In Texas, Homelessness Crisis Highlights "Housing First" Approach Austin moved to decriminalize homelessness, leading to a Texas-sized debate over housing policy.
26/08/1929m 21s

Politics with Amy Walter: Should We Be Worried About a Recession?

The ongoing trade war with China, a weakened global economy, and a lack of investment by companies indicates that a recession might be looming. President Trump has spent his first term saying that the economy is in better shape than ever before, but is that really the case? Who stands to suffer most during another recession? Has the trade war with China fulfilled President Trump's objective for the economy? Also, when it comes to understanding economic opportunity in Africa, the continent is still largely overlooked by the West. We look at the African Continental Free Trade Area and the opportunities it could unlock.  Finally, a conversation with the political heavy-hitter from New Hampshire that Democratic hopefuls are trying to woo. This episode was guest hosted by Duarte Geraldino.  Guests: Nancy Cook, White House Reporter, POLITICO  Andria Smythe, Assistant Professor of Economics at Howard University David Luke, Coordinator of the African Trade Policy Centre at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa Howard French, Journalism Professor at Columbia University and former New York Times foreign bureau chief in Africa and China Carlos Cardona, Laconia Democratic Party Chair
23/08/1945m 5s

Podcast: The History Behind President Trump's Accusations of "Disloyalty" Against Jewish Americans 2019-08-22

The History Behind President Trump's Accusations of "Disloyalty" Against Jewish Americans  On Tuesday, President Trump said that any Jewish person who votes for a Democrat is either guilty of ignorance or “great disloyalty," an anti-Semitic trope that dates back centuries. New Trump Rules would Detain Migrant Families and Children Indefinitely What does this mean for migrant families and children in government custody? Sports from Grade School to College: The Rise of "Pay to Play" As sports get more expensive, lower and middle-income children are dropping off while their wealthier peers get into the game. Other segments: The Risks of Denying the Flu Vaccine to Migrant Children The government will not administer the flu vaccine to families in detention camps, despite the fact that several children in detention facilities have died as a result of the flu.
22/08/1930m 41s

Podcast: How the Trump Administration is Affecting Women's Health Care Beyond Abortion 2019-08-21

How the Trump Administration is Affecting Women's Health Care Beyond Abortion The lightning rod of Planned Parenthood and access to abortion could be overshadowing more widespread cuts to programs servicing women's health. "In God We Trust": Louisiana Tests the Legal Limits of Religious Speech in Public Schools In Louisiana, a 2018 law will go into effect this coming school year, requiring all schools to display the phrase “In God We Trust” in every building.  Other segments:  Telepsychiatry in Schools Could Help More Children Have Access to Mental Health Treatment  Telemedicine is allowing psychiatrists to help children in rural and urban areas where there is a lack of mental health professionals.  Brexit Negotiations Remain at a Standstill as Boris Johnson Prepares for G7 Summit On Saturday, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson will head to France for the G7 Summit, a meeting that's likely to highlight growing divides between several of the leaders in attendance.
21/08/1928m 27s

1619: The Enduring Legacy of Slavery in the United States

1619: The Truth About 400 Years of Slavery Four hundred years ago this month, the first group of enslaved Africans were forcibly brought by British colonists to what is now the United States.  1619: The Racist Roots of the U.S. Racial Wealth Gap Sandy Darity breaks down the long term economic consequences of the aftermath of slavery and ties it into the racial wealth gap that we’re seeing today. 1619: How Slavery Has Impacted the Empathy Gap in our Country Scholar Clint Smith explains why we don’t show the same empathy to those who suffer the consequences of our country’s actions against African Americans even today. Read the 1619 Project here. Guests:  Dr. Ibram X Kendi Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers William Darity, who goes by Sandy. Clint Smith
20/08/1942m 3s

Podcast: Homelessness is on the Rise, Despite Efforts at Intervention 2019-08-19

Homelessness is on the Rise, Despite Efforts at Intervention While homelessness as a whole has been going down since 2007, in the 2017-2018 years, there was a slight increase in homelessness nationwide.  The Backlash Against Jay-Z's Partnership with the NFL The rapper’s company will serve as the “entertainment strategist” for the football league, and many are calling into question Jay-Z’s motives. USCIS Backlog Leaves Thousands of Immigrants In Limbo More than 90 percent of people seeking U.S. visas are waiting in line. Other segments:  NYPD Officer Fired for Prohibited Chokehold in Eric Garner's Death Eric Garner’s death in 2014 helped spark the national movement against police brutality. The Tense Relationship Between Trump And Labor Unions Labor leaders are split on how to handle a president who says he supports them but passes policies that don't.
19/08/1937m 31s

Politics with Amy Walter: Texodus: Can Democrats Turn the Lone Star State Blue?

A number of Republicans in the House have announced their retirements... and turns out many are in suburban districts, where the GOP’s support has been dwindling. In June, we saw one of the more high-profile Republican retirements when Congresswoman Susan Brooks, who represents Indiana’s 5th congressional district, announced that she would not seek reelection. In fact, 4 of the 11 retirements are Congressman in Texas. This on top of 5 Texas Republican retirements in 2018 and two districts where Democrats flipped the seat. Could this turn Texas -- a historically red state -- blue, or at least purple? This week, we break down these Republican retirements. Guests: Brendan Buck is a partner at Seven Letter Communications and the former chief communications advisor and counselor to Speaker Paul Ryan. Susan Brooks (R), represents Indiana’s 5th congressional district.  Pete Sessions (R), former Congressman from Texas. Cal Jillson, professor of political science at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. Manny Garcia, executive director of the Texas Democratic Party.
16/08/1945m 27s

Podcast: ICE Raids In Mississippi Last Week Left Some Children Without Parents 2019-08-15

ICE Raids In Mississippi Last Week Left Some Children Without Parents Raids like this can be scaring for many children.  The Historical Precedent for Trump's 'Public Charge' Rule U.S. immigration policy has long been governed by the notion of who deserves to be admitted into the country, and who deserves citizenship. Author Viet Thanh Nguyen on the Legacy of 'Apocalypse Now,' Forty Years Later "Apocalypse Now" continues to shape the way younger generations in the U.S. think about and relate to the Vietnam War. But the film is only concerned with the American side of the story. Other segments: Trouble with the Stock Market. What Does This Tell Us About the U.S. Economy? Could this be a sign of an upcoming economic crisis? How Would Imposing More China Tariffs Impact Independent Toy Stores? Ann Kinzle, the owner of two independent toy stores in Chicago, said the tariffs could hurt her business. 
15/08/1933m 55s

Podcast: Wave of Child Sex Abuse Lawsuits Expected As New York's Child Victims Act Takes Effect 2019-08-14

Wave of Child Sex Abuse Lawsuits Expected As New York's Child Victims Act Takes Effect For the next year, anyone who was sexually abused as a child in New York can sue people and institutions, no matter how long it has been. What a Deadly Explosion in Russia Could Mean for the Nuclear Arms Race Last Thursday, at least seven people were killed in Russia in what appears to have been an explosion involving a nuclear-propelled missile.  Contracts Signed by Former Puerto Rican Governor May Go Under Review. Will This Lead to Change? The new governor of the island has already canceled one contract to fix the island's power grid. Why Ambulance Bills are So High, and So Unexpected There’s been a lot of talk in Washington about the high cost of medical care, but one of the biggest sources of surprisingly high bills is from ambulances.
14/08/1945m 59s

Podcast: Police and Protesters Clash at Hong Kong Airport 2019-08-13

Police and Protesters Clash at Hong Kong Airport Thousands of protesters descended on the international airport in Hong Kong over the weekend and successfully shut the airport down. SoulCycle Becomes Latest Brand to Reckon with a Social Media Boycott Stephen Ross, chairman of the parent company of SoulCycle and Equinox, came under fire last week for throwing a fundraiser for President Trump. Other Segments: What's the Link Between Our Gut and Our Health? Recent research shows that antibiotics and the food we eat play a huge part in maintaining the bacteria in our gut…and could also play a big role in determining how much we weigh. What Climate Change Means for Food Production Last week, the UN released a report warning of the long term effects of climate change on our food supply.
13/08/1929m 22s

Podcast: What Does Justice Look Like for Jeffrey Epstein's Victims Now? 2019-08-12

What Does Justice Look Like for Jeffrey Epstein's Victims Now? On Saturday morning, guards at the Metropolitan Correctional Facility discovered the body of Jeffrey Epstein, who has apparently died by suicide. Issue of Suicides in U.S. Jails Extends Far Beyond Jeffrey Epstein Jeffrey Epstein’s apparent suicide dominated headlines over the weekend, and his high-profile case is just a part of the much bigger picture of suicides in jails across the country. The Racial Divide of Breastfeeding in the U.S. In the U.S., white, educated women are more likely to breastfeed and for longer periods. Some reasons for that are deeply rooted in our nation’s history. Other Segments: U.S.-China Trade War Enters Dangerous New Chapter The Trump administration labeled the Chinese government a "currency manipulator" following a weakening of its currency.
12/08/1936m 31s

Ferguson: Five Years Later (A Takeaway Special Podcast)

Reflecting on Ferguson, Five Years Later It's been five years since Michael Brown was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Missouri. Ferguson's New Generation of Activists Michael Brown's death, and the protests that followed, inspired a new generation of activists in and around Ferguson. Former Police Captain Shares His Experiences of Ferguson Captain Ron Johnson, a veteran of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, led police operations in Ferguson for the weeks and months of protests following Michael Brown's death.
10/08/1932m 18s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Past and Present of Gun Control

Last weekend, there were two mass shootings in the span of 13 hours. In El Paso, 22 were killed in what federal authorities are considering a domestic terrorist attack. And in Dayton, nine people were killed when a gunman opened fire in the city’s Oregon district. After horrific events like these, there's always questions like "Will lawmakers take action?" and "Will this time be different?" While there has been some small movement in the wake of the Parkland and Las Vegas mass shootings, the issue of gun control is largely at a standstill.   This week, we're revisiting the last time major gun control legislation was signed into law. Twenty-five years ago, Congress passed two major gun control bills, but the votes didn’t line up exactly as you’d expect. The Brady Bill, which was signed in 1993, didn’t go into effect until February 1994, and that was followed by the Assault Weapons Ban later that year.   Plus, we take a look at the complex world of absentee ballots. Last week, a new round of charges were filed against a political operative in North Carolina. He's being investigated for alleged voter fraud related to his handling of absentee ballots during the 2016 and 2018 elections. We also break down another voter fraud scandal in Brooks County, Georgia, from 2010.  Guests: Hank Brown (R), former Senator from Colorado Glen Browder (D), former Congressman from Alabama German Lopez, senior correspondent at Vox Professor Barry Burden, director of the Elections Research Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Steve Harrison, political reporter for WFAE Jon Ward, national political correspondent with Yahoo News Andra Gillespie, associate professor of political science at Emory University   
09/08/1948m 33s

Podcast: Rethinking Public Spaces in the Wake of Mass Shootings 2019-08-08

Rethinking Public Spaces in the Wake of Mass Shootings As mass shootings continue to happen in public spaces, many people in the United States say their sense of safety has been deeply shaken. A Leadership Crisis in Puerto Rico Puerto Rico’s Supreme Court has ruled that the new governor, Pedro R. Pierluisi, was sworn in last week on unconstitutional grounds. Venezuela Hit with More U.S. Sanctions as Humanitarian Crisis Worsens The latest sanctions come more than three months after opposition leader Juan Guaidó's attempted coup stalled. Other Segments: Ferguson's New Generation of Activists Michael Brown's death, and the protests that followed, inspired a new generation of activists in and around Ferguson. Former Police Captain Shares His Experiences of Ferguson Captain Ron Johnson, a veteran of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, led police operations in Ferguson for the weeks and months of protests following Michael Brown's death.
08/08/1925m 30s

Podcast: The Danger of Linking Mental Illness to Mass Shootings 2019-08-07

The Danger of Linking Mental Illness to Mass Shootings The American Psychiatric Association said that gun violence is a public health crisis and that “the overwhelming majority of people with mental illness are not violent." Toni Morrison's Legacy Listeners reflect on the work and life of author Toni Morrison. SNL Writer Julio Torres Steps in Front of the Camera to Show Viewers His Favorite Shapes This week, Saturday Night Live writer Julio Torres is out with "My Favorite Shapes," a stand-up special that highlights his delightfully absurd sensibilities. Other Segments: Reflecting on Ferguson, Five Years Later It's been five years since Michael Brown was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Missouri. India Revokes Kashmir's Autonomy The region is now under a complete news and communication blackout while much of India celebrates.  
07/08/1933m 40s

Podcast: The Physical and Psychological Toll of Surviving a Mass Shooting 2019-08-06

The Physical and Psychological Toll of Surviving a Mass Shooting While much of the media coverage on mass shootings is focused on death tolls, the recovery process for survivors of mass shootings tends to get overlooked. Can We Reduce Domestic Terrorism in the U.S.? In remarks from the White House on Monday, President Trump talked about possible tools to detect mass shooters before they strike. How Are You Processing the Mass Shootings? Listeners react to the recent mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton. Other Segments: Saudi Arabia Will Expand the Rights of Women But the announcement comes at a time when Saudi Arabia and its de facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, are under intense scrutiny for their record of human rights abuses. Has Anything Changed in Flint? Like in 2016, the 2020 presidential candidates continue to talk about and visit Flint, yet many residents still don't have safe water. The Hidden Failings of Family Medical Leave The Family Medical Leave Act, which mandates 12 weeks of unpaid leave, is more difficult to benefit from than one might imagine.
06/08/1926m 36s

Podcast: Tragedy Strikes in El Paso and Dayton 2019-08-05

Tragedy Strikes in El Paso and Dayton  Over the weekend, two mass shootings marked a week full of domestic terrorism in the country.   "Erased from Public Memory": The History of Anti-Latino Violence in the U.S. There is a historical precedent to the shooting in El Paso and people living in the border. Black Homeownership Drops to Lowest Level in 50 Years At the same time, the Trump administration is trying to weaken the 1968 Fair Housing Act. Other news:  Why Aren't There More Female Esports Competitors? As esports becomes more popular, the gender divide amongst its competitors is becoming more apparent. The Political Future of Puerto Rico Today marks the first week of a new era for Puerto Rico without Ricardo Roselló as its leader, following his resignation on Friday.
05/08/1930m 42s

Politics with Amy Walter: the Upcoming 2020 Elections in the Battleground State

This week, Politics with Amy Walter is coming to you from Detroit. The city has gotten a lot of attention over the course of the week as it hosted the latest round of democratic debates. But why Detroit? Because — Michigan. President Donald Trump won Michigan by just over 10,000 votes in 2016. But Democrats are hoping to put the state firmly back in their column. After a strong showing in the 2018 midterms, Democrats are feeling hopeful. Republicans say there's still a lot of support for President Trump — even in the counties, the Democrats were able to flip.  Guests: Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D), representing Michigan's 12th District Lavora Barnes, Chair of the Michigan Democratic Party Congresswoman Haley Stevens (D), representing Michigan's 11th District Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D) Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a progressive activist who ran against Whitmer in the primary Congressman Paul Mitchell (R), representing Michigan's 10th District Jamie Roe, a Michigan-based Republican strategist
02/08/1945m 44s

Podcast: Coal Miners, Protesting Unpaid Wages, Block Train Tracks 2019-08-01

Coal Miners, Protesting Unpaid Wages, Block Train Tracks On July 1st, the mining company BlackJewel LLC, the 6th largest coal producer in the country, filed for bankruptcy, and the fate of its 1,700 employees remains unclear. Remembering the Red Summer, 100 Years Later Black communities faced unprecedented violence during the Red Summer of 1919, and responded with activism that laid the groundwork for modern protest movements.  Hannah Gadsby on Breaking Comedy Rules and Creating New Ones in "Douglas" Hannah Gadsby sits down with The Takeaway to talk about managing audience expectations, discussing her recent autism diagnosis on stage, and channeling anger through her work. Other segments: Both Police and Protesters are Grappling with Technology Amid Hong Kong Protests After weeks of demonstrations, tension is escalating. How Did the CNN Debates Address Race and Inequality? CNN held the second of two Democratic presidential debates in Detroit Wednesday night.
01/08/1938m 54s

Podcast: How the Political Crisis in Puerto Rico is Unifying the Puerto Rican Diaspora 2019-07-31

How the Political Crisis in Puerto Rico is Unifying the Puerto Rican Diaspora The protests in Puerto Rico have served to lift up the voices of groups that were typically underrepresented on the island: LGBTQ people, women, and members of the diaspora. Democratic Debates in Detroit and Where Black Voters Stand in 2020 Democrats lost many black voters in 2016. The Democratic debates in Detroit, a majority-black city, could show how Democrats plan to get those votes back in 2020. Did Katy Perry Steal A Song? A Forensic Musicologist Weighs In A jury decided this week that Katy Perry's hit "Dark Horse" infringed on the copyright of Christian rap group. Other segments:  US Nuclear's Secret Plan to Leverage Trump's Saudi Ties into a Comeback Congress is investigating the plan, which would export nuclear tech to Saudi Arabia, and could be in violation of U.S. law.
31/07/1944m 55s

Podcast: Departure of Dan Coats Signals New Direction for Intelligence Agencies Heading into 2020 2019-07-30

Departure of Dan Coats Signals New Direction for Intelligence Agencies Heading into 2020 Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats will be stepping down next month, after a tenure that saw him clash with President Trump over Russian election meddling. Police Departments are Struggling to Help Officers With Their Mental Health, But It's Not Always Welcome Police departments around the country are trying to break the culture of silence around mental health struggles. Other segments:  FEMA Reinstates Restrictions to Puerto Rico's Access to Federal Aid  FEMA Press Secretary Lizzie Litzow said the decision was made because of Puerto Rico's leadership changes and history of financial irregularities and mismanagement. Tinder Now Issues Alerts to LGBTQ Users Entering Countries Where Same-Sex Relationships are Criminalized Tinder has warned LGBTQ users to exercise caution when connecting to people in these countries as law enforcement has been known to use the app for entrapment. 
30/07/1931m 9s

Podcast: Muslim Politicians Hold First National Gathering As Islamophobia Continues To Rise 2019-07-29

Muslim Politicians Hold First National Gathering As Islamophobia Continues To Rise The number of Muslim candidates has risen significantly since President Trump was elected in 2016. What does the Guatemalan "Safe Third Country" Agreement Mean? Immigration Policy Changes, Explained An update on recent immigration and asylum policy changes. Woman Set to Replace Rosselló Doesn't Want the Job  Puerto Rico's Secretary of Justice is next in line to run the government, but she faces legal and ethical dilemmas of her own. Why Law Enforcement Loves Amazon's Doorbell Camera, Ring  New reports have come out that show how local police departments are collaborating with Ring and Ring users, which is worrying privacy advocates.  Other segments:  As Indigenous Protections Erode Under Bolsonaro, Brazilian Miners Murder Tribal Leader  Last week, a group of Brazilian miners invaded indigenous land and fatally stabbed a leader of the Waiãpi tribe.  The End of "Orange Is the New Black" Netflix released the show's seventh and final season on July 26.
29/07/1934m 13s

Politics with Amy Walter: Mueller's Testimony Underscores a Crisis of Faith in Democracy

Much of the coverage of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's congressional testimony this week focused on optics, with pundits on both sides framing the hearings as either beneficial or damaging to a particular political narrative. But where the hearings may have lacked in made-for-TV soundbites, Mueller's comments reiterated the fact that the United States remains under attack from a foreign adversary, one that seeks to undermine our faith in the foundational principles of democracy. We hear from cybersecurity experts about how this problem goes far deeper than just election meddling, and what needs to be done to address the continuing threat. Plus, we take a look at the growing amount of student debt owed in the US, which passed a staggering $1.5 trillion in 2018. With more and more students struggling to pay for a college education, what are political leaders, and 2020 Democratic presidential candidates, doing to address this crisis? Guests: Suzanne Spaulding, former Under Secretary for cyber and infrastructure protection at the US Department of Homeland Security. Lisa Kaplan, founder of the Alethea Group. M.H. Miller, editor at The New York Times, and author of a forthcoming book about his experience with student debt. Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, a reporter covering the economics of education for The Washington Post.
26/07/1946m 42s

Podcast: 'The People Have Spoken': Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló Resigns 2019-07-25

'The People Have Spoken': Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló Resigns The historic protests on the island have shaken the political establishment on the island. More Than 3 Million People Could Lose Food Stamps Under New USDA Rules A proposal by the Trump administration could leave millions facing hunger. Tarantino's Treatment of Women in “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and Beyond Director Quentin Tarantino is out with a new movie that raises familiar questions about his treatment of women and female characters. Other segments:  California Prepares for the Worst of Fire Season PG&E, Northern California's biggest utility, is under a microscope after being held responsible for some of the most devastating fires over the last two years. 
25/07/1939m 26s

Podcast: Robert Mueller Testifies: Three Things We May Be Overlooking 2019-07-24

You can find all of our coverage of the Mueller report here. Database Shows that Drug Companies Distributed 76 Billion Opioid Pills in 7 Years As a result, major drug companies will face the first of many lawsuits in October. New US Budget Deal Avoids Massive Cuts at the Cost of Trillion-Dollar Deficits Congress has just a few days to pass the budget and avoid a looming fiscal crisis. U.S. Government Hospitals Put Native Americans at Particular Risk for Opioid Use The Department of Health and Human Services released a scathing report on the Indian Health Service and its role in the opioid epidemic. USDA Indefinitely Suspends Report on Bee Population The survey collected data that helped beekeepers, farmers, and scientists better understand the declining bee population. 
24/07/1945m 19s

Podcast: Should 2020 Democrats Appeal to Moderates or Progressives? 2019-07-23

Should 2020 Democrats Appeal to Moderates or Progressives? Some members of the House have been calling for Democratic candidates to appeal to the center, and for outspoken progressive lawmakers to tone down their rhetoric.  The State of Election Security on the Eve of Mueller's Testimony  The redacted Mueller Report warned that Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election was the beginning. Puerto Rican Musician iLe Demands Resignation of Gov. Rosselló, Co-Writing Protest Song A new song by Residente, iLe and Bad Bunny has been deemed the "anthem" of this moment in Puerto Rican history. Other segments:  Tensions Continue to Grow Between the West and Iran  The British and the U.S. have announced plans to increase their military presence in the Strait of Hormuz after months of escalating incidents.
23/07/1940m 19s

Podcast: How Puerto Rico's Colonial Roots is Influencing the Political Unrest 2019-07-22

How Puerto Rico's Colonial Roots is Influencing the Political Unrest Today is the 10th day of demonstrations in Puerto Rico calling for the resignation of Governor Ricardo Rosselló. How Puerto Rican Student Activists Envision the Future of the Island With the increased political turmoil in Puerto Rico, we wanted to hear how politically active students on the island are processing this political crisis.  Are Deepfakes the Next Fake News? Deepfakes, or video and audio that's manipulated using artificial intelligence, raises concerns about the spread of disinformation, especially heading into the 2020 election.  Trees are an Immediate, Cost-Effective Solution to Battling Rising Temperatures Global temperature is rising and heat waves are getting worse. One straightforward way to make things better: plant trees.  Other segments:  Mumbai's Annual Monsoon Problem The city's aging infrastructure and rapid development means Mumbai residents face constant disruptions because of flooding during the rainy season.  As Floodwaters Recede in South Asia, Concern Grows Over Rest of Monsoon Season  Extreme weather tied to climate change has made this year's monsoon more unpredictable. 
22/07/1937m 22s

Politics with Amy Walter: There's a Generational Divide Upending U.S. Politics

After a bruising political week in which President Trump's feud with "The Squad" reached a fever pitch, Amy Walter reflects on how both Republicans and Democrats could be alienating crucial voters ahead of the 2020 elections. Plus, we look at the yawning generation gap, as voters from different eras compete for political relevance. With the U.S. electorate divided along generational lines, there are transformational demographic trends already having clear impacts on the way 2020 presidential candidates are trying to appeal to voters. But while the Baby Boomer bloc is increasingly eclipsed by the combined numbers of Generation X, Millennials, and Generation Z, so far it's an open question whether or not the influence of younger voters will have the final say in determining the results of the Democratic primary, or the general election. This week, we look at the different generations active in U.S. politics, and try to figure out the forces at play in deciding the country's future. Guests: Dave Weigel, national political reporter for The Washington Post Paul Taylor, author of The Next America: Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown Clare Malone, senior political writer at FiveThirtyEight Manuel Pastor, professor of sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California
19/07/1947m 31s

Podcast: The Political Crisis Continues in Puerto Rico 2019-07-18

The Political Crisis Continues in Puerto Rico  Pressure is continuing to mount on Puerto Rico’s governor, Ricardo Rosselló, following a scandal over the weekend in which nearly 900 pages of his private chat messages were leaked. Two Voices from the Puerto Rican Diaspora Talk About the Crisis on the Island As protests break out on the island, we hear from Puerto Ricans on the mainland. How Trump Is Reshaping the Courts It’s two and a half years into his presidency, and President Trump has dramatically reshaped the nation’s courts. The Familial and Cultural Resonance of Cookbooks The internet has made looking up recipes easier than ever, yet the growing sales of physical cookbooks show we still prefer holding something tangible. European Commission Elects Ursula Von Der Leyen as First Female President Ursula von der Leyen, former German defense minister, will play a key role in the US-EU relations, on issues like trade, G-20 meetings, climate change, and the Iran deal.
18/07/1936m 11s

Podcast: Black Lives Matter: The State of Activism Five Years After Eric Garner's Death 2019-07-17

Black Lives Matter: The State of Activism Five Years After Eric Garner's Death On the fifth anniversary of Garner's death by chokehold, a roundtable discussion on how the Black Lives Matter movement has evolved. The Inequity of Sex Offender Registries  The recent revelation's about Jeffrey Epstein's sex crimes demonstrates many of the problems within sex offender registries.  What 007 and Ariel Tell Us About Hollywood  Two recent casting choices give black women leading roles in iconic movie franchises.  Sudan Protests Continue Amid Ongoing Talks Between Military Council and Civilian Opposition On Wednesday, an agreement was reached to establish a council while the country waits for elections.
17/07/1943m 27s

Podcast: Trump Administration Makes Dramatic Change to U.S. Asylum Policy 2019-07-16

Trump Administration Makes Dramatic Change to U.S. Asylum Policy Starting today, migrants who do not seek asylum in at least one other country they cross through before reaching the U.S. cannot request asylum here. What the Media Gets Wrong About Racism What Trump's racist tweets, and the media's response to them, say about the experiences of women of color in the United States.  Other segments: With Voting On the Line, Some Florida State Attorneys Are Addressing Onerous Court Fines  Some State Attorneys in Florida are looking for ways to turn court fines and fees into community service to give more Floridians the right to vote. The Latest on the United Kingdom's Prime Minister Race In the United Kingdom, a Conservative Party leadership race is underway to determine who will become the country’s next prime minister. 
16/07/1928m 25s

Podcast: Political Scandals are Shaking Up Puerto Rico. What Exactly is Happening? 2019-07-15

Political Scandals are Shaking Up Puerto Rico. What Exactly is Happening? Two former top government officials were arrested and the governor is embroiled in his own scandal. We break down the situation. Centers for Unaccompanied Migrant Children Expand While media attention has been focused on the adult and family migrant facilities near the border, the number of shelters for unaccompanied children and babies continues to expand.  Why Some Amazon Workers Are Striking Today Today is Amazon Prime Day, but this year, workers at an Amazon fulfillment center in Shakopee, Minnesota, plan a six-hour work stoppage. It's the first of its kind in the U.S. Other segments: New Orleans Residents Survey the Damage After a Weekend of Heavy Rainfall The Takeaway checks in with a New Orleans community member to hear how residents are dealing with the aftermath of Tropical Storm Barry. France Moves to Impose a "Digital Tax" on Big U.S. Tech France may be the first to pass a so-called “digital” tax on major US-based tech companies including Google, Amazon, and Facebook.
15/07/1931m 46s

Politics with Amy Walter: Democrats Divided

The ongoing migrant crisis is getting worse, as the Department of Homeland Security is running out of room to house the increasing number of migrants detained at the border. And when evidence of the conditions dominated the news cycle earlier this month, the outrage prompted lawmakers to get involved. But how that involvement played out became the latest point of contention between factions within the Democratic Party. The Senate passed a spending bill aimed at alleviating what the Trump administration said was a lack of funding to properly house detained migrants. But the Democratic-controlled House, wary of writing a blank check without strict limits on how that money would be spent, sent a revised bill back to the Senate. But when that bill died with Mitch McConnell, the conservative-leaning "Problem Solvers" caucus of the House Democrats signaled that they were willing to pass the Senate's no-strings-attached bill, with or without the support of Speaker Pelosi. When Pelosi ultimately sided with the Problem Solvers, it set off a backlash among the party's progressive wing, most notably Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib, and Ilhan Omar, known collectively as "The Squad." And the outrage breathed new life into a long-simmering division between The Squad and Party leadership. This week, Amy examines how deep these divisions go, and whether or not party unity is possible heading into 2020. Also, Representative Seth Moulton from Massachusetts, who's running for the Democratic presidential nomination, joins Amy for her Candidate Talk series. Guests: Ryan Grim, the DC bureau chief at The Intercept, and the author of We’ve Got People: From Jesse Jackson to AOC, the End of Big Money and the Rise of a Movement Seth Moulton, Represents Massachusetts's Sixth District in the House of Representatives, Democratic presidential candidate Heidi Heitkamp, former Senator from North Dakota Steve Kornacki, National Political Correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC, author of the book The Red and the Blue Eric Liu, CEO of Citizen University and executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Citizenship and American Identity Program, author of Become America: Civic Sermons on Love, Responsibility, and Democracy
13/07/1947m 23s

Candidate Talk: Seth Moulton

Amy sits down with Representative Seth Moulton who announced in April that he is running for president. He's one of the few combat veterans seeking the Democratic nomination, having served as a Marine in Iraq over the course of four deployments. Moulton has been a vocal critic of Democratic leadership, wanting to see a new generation take the helm. He made waves in challenging Nancy Pelosi's leadership spot, in an unsuccessful bid for House Speaker in 2018. Moulton did not qualify for the first debate and is unlikely to appear for the second round later this month in Detroit.
12/07/1913m 40s

Podcast: U.S. Hispanic Population is at All-Time High, But Growth is Slowing 2019-07-11

U.S. Hispanic Population is at All-Time High, But Growth is Slowing We analyze the U.S. Hispanic population demographically, economically, and politically, and look into what this means for the Latino vote in 2020. Chicago Defender Ends Print Run The Chicago Defender is one of the most important black publications in U.S. history and it will now only publish its content online. Director Lulu Wang on Negotiating Different Parts of Her Identity in "The Farewell" When filmmaker Lulu Wang’s grandmother was diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer six years ago, Wang's family chose not to tell her grandmother that she had been given just months to live. Other segments:  Michael Johnson is Released 25-Years Early After Being Convicted of Violating HIV Criminalization Law Michael Johnson was sentenced to nearly 31-years in prison for not telling his partners he had HIV. His trial and release are making people take another look at HIV criminalization laws. France Télécom Executives Face Up to a Year in Prison for Creating Work Conditions That Led to 35 Suicides The trial of seven former France Télécom executives, charged with creating work conditions that led 35 of their employees to die by suicide, will be over Friday. 
11/07/1933m 52s

Podcast: Native Leaders Invite 2020 Candidates to Presidential Forum 2019-07-10

Native Leaders Invite 2020 Candidates to Presidential Forum The forum will be hosted by Native organizations in Sioux County to talk about issues specifically related to Native Americans. Joy of World Cup Victory Contrasts with Fight for Equal Pay As the US women's soccer team celebrated their fourth World Cup win with a ticker tape parade in New York, the players continue to fight for equal pay and more investment in the sport. Farai Chideya on the Broken Adoption System in the U.S. The journalist and author has had three adoptions fall through. Other segments: The Iranian Diplomat Behind the Nuclear Deal, Now Caught in the Middle  Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif was integral to the 2015 nuclear deal. But now he's under fire from hardliners on both sides.  Can Cities Solve the Affordable Housing Crisis?  There is an undeniable affordable housing crisis in this country. But when local leaders try to step in and solve this problem, there’s often big time pushback from local residents.
10/07/1935m 49s

Podcast: Even With Insurance, the Cost of Health Care Remains a Crushing Burden 2019-07-09

Even With Insurance, the Cost of Health Care Remains a Crushing Burden Meanwhile, a US Circuit Court of Appeals is once again hearing arguments on the fate of Obamacare. A Look At Rising Drug Prices Prescription drugs are becoming increasingly unaffordable, making the issue one of the most important of the 2020 presidential race.  Congress Raises Concerns Over Facebook's Planned Cryptocurrency  Last week, congressional leaders asked Facebook to stop the development of its new cryptocurrency until they can assess the risks and opportunities for regulation. Other segments:  Digital 'Fingerprinting' Is The Next Generation Tracking Technology When you browse the web, advertisers can use this technology to store your location and identity. As Iran and the U.S. Escalate Tensions, Europe is Caught In the Middle Iran’s breach on uranium enrichment leaves France, Germany, and Britain in a difficult position over what to do in response.
09/07/1928m 43s

Podcast: Rifts Emerge Between Progressive and Moderate Democrats Heading into 2020 2019-07-08

Rifts Emerge Between Progressive and Moderate Democrats Heading into 2020 Recent tensions within the Democratic Party played out this weekend when Nancy Pelosi called out progressive Democratic politicians in an interview with the New York Times. Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein's Powerful Allies The latest charges against Jeffrey Epstein are raising new questions about how much his powerful allies knew about his behavior and what they did to protect him. Facial Recognition Scans on the Rise If you were at an airport over the Fourth of July holiday, there’s a chance you saw some new technology as you were checking in: facial recognition scans. Summer Reads to Beat the Heat New York Times book critic Parul Sehgal joins The Takeaway with a list of recommendations worth reading during the hottest months of the year. Other segments: Taliban Continues Negotiations with U.S. and Afghan Officials The Taliban is continuing negotiations with U.S. and Afghan officials with the hopes of bringing peace to the region. What Would Life Be Like for Afghan Women If the Taliban Regains Power? Women in Afghanistan are worried they may lose many of the civil rights they gained after America's intervention in 2001 if the Taliban regains power.
08/07/1936m 44s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Democratic National Committee's 2020 Transformation

After all the drama in 2016, the Democratic National Committee has reformed the nomination process. Today on Politics with Amy Walter from The Takeaway, a look at the new rules and what impact they could have both intended and unintended. Tom Perez was elected as chairman of the DNC in 2017. Perez's mission is to insure that 2020 isn’t a repeat of 2016. That doesn’t just mean winning, it means re-instilling faith in the system for Democrats. And the DNC has done a lot of work on this front. Amy Walter talks with chairman Perez about the reforms the DNC has undertaken. Also: we look into the potential unintended consequence of the new superdelegate rule with Dave Wasserman from the Cook Political Report. Alexandra Jaffe, political reporter for the Associated Press, talks debates and whether or not the new rules worked for the first round. Jeff Link, a longtime Iowa Democratic strategist, explains what’s new for the first caucus state and the role that Iowa plays in the presidential nominating process. We also tackle the unwritten rules on money and fundraising with Maggie Severns of Politico and try to figure out what the role of the DNC actually is these days, and how it’s changed in the last 25 years with Jamal Simmons of HillTV. Amy's Final Take:  When it comes to covering a primary, the media spends most of its time focused on candidates - their personalities, their policies, and their blunders. But, winning candidates spend A LOT of their time focused on the unsexy stuff - how to leverage the rules to their advantage. For example, Barack Obama’s campaign in 2008 realized early on that the delegate rules meant that caucuses were going to win him a lot of delegates - even if they didn’t garner as much media attention as big primary states like Pennsylvania or Texas. This year, Democrats have lots of new written and unwritten rules to figure out. One unwritten rule: How to raise lots of money without looking beholden to corportists and 1 percenters. Thus far, it’s meant that no candidate has been able to raise the sort of eye-popping fundraising numbers as candidates Barack Obama in 2007 or Hillary Clinton did in 2015. On July 15, the second quarter fundraising reports are publicly available giving us another chance to see which candidates are thriving - and which are struggling - to keep up. The new debate rules meant that almost every candidate got on stage. But, only a few of them really broke through. The debates did not fundamentally reset the race. But, they did give us a benchmark for evaluating these candidates over time: Who wears well and who withers as the campaign gets into higher gear? Read her latest Cook Political Report here.
05/07/1947m 12s

Podcast: Holes and Gaps: Where Our Voting Systems Fail 2019-07-04

Even as our national focus has turned towards cyber threats, vulnerabilities in our election systems abound -- from outdated voting machines and hack-able technology to lack of paper back-ups and no procedural standards across states or even counties.   How United States' Elections Work Fifteen days ahead of the midterm elections, The Takeaway is taking a step back and looking at the infrastructure of the United States' voting system.  Holes and Gaps: Where Our Voting Systems Fail What are the gaps in our election systems? We explore everything from technological glitches, to cybersecurity holes, to flaws in policy. Making Our Election Systems Better. Now. What would it take to make our elections infrastructure safer and better today?
04/07/1946m 39s

Podcast: A Former Border Patrol Agent on the Culture of CBP 2019-07-03

A Former Border Patrol Agent on the Culture of CBP We speak with a former Border Patrol agent about the evolution of the agency and its culture, and how people are recruited and retained. UN Report Highlights Violence Against Yemeni Children A new UN report on the conflict in Yemen shows how the war has impacted the country’s youngest. Social Media Takes On Misleading Health Claims Social media platforms like YouTube and Facebook are taking action to keep medical misinformation from gaining traction. Musicians Strike in Baltimore as Nationwide Orchestras Face Changes As symphonies adapt to lower ticket sales and the changing cultural landscape, we take a look at Baltimore, where musicians are protesting payroll cuts. Other segments: Alaska's Governor Slashes Funding to Universities Alaska’s Republican governor has cut nearly 41 percent of the state’s higher education operating budget.
03/07/1937m 2s

Podcast: What Does Responsible Tourism Look Like? 2019-07-02

What Does Responsible Tourism Look Like? Across the globe, tourism is on the rise, and our planet is feeling it. By some estimates, global tourism accounts for nearly 10 percent of the world’s carbon emissions. Songs of Summer Listeners share their favorite summer anthems for 2019. Why Did GrubHub Buy Thousands of Websites With the Names of Local Restaurants? Grubhub, one of the biggest food delivery apps in the country, has bought thousands of web addresses for local restaurants, making it harder for them to compete with Grubhub online. Other segments: Protests in Hong Kong Continue For weeks now, protesters in Hong Kong have turned out to demonstrate against their own government. Tiffany Cabán Takes on the Queens Machine The unlikely rise of a young, once unknown political hopeful Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has seemingly been replicated by Tiffany Cabán.
02/07/1928m 34s

Podcast: A Small Step for Trump, A Giant Leap for North Korea 2019-07-01

A Small Step for Trump, A Giant Leap for North Korea Donald Trump is the first sitting U.S. president to step onto North Korean soil. Was it a step toward peace and cooperation, or toward nuclear appeasement? A Rare Look At China's Treatment of Uighur Muslims When parents go to "re-education" camps, where they're reportedly shackled and forced to sing patriotic songs, their kids go to "Kindergartens" behind brick walls and barbed wire. Yesterday Tries to Keep Beatlemania Alive in 2019 Rock and roll no longer rules the music charts, but Bohemian Rhapsody, Rocketman, and Yesterday have all found Hollywood looking back at the genre’s heyday. Other segments: The Private Pain of Social Media Stardom for Online Gamers Etika amassed hundreds of thousands of followers on YouTube for his prolific and provocative missives, while apparently struggling with mental health issues. Water Shortages in India Made Worse by Mismanagement Evacuations and death tolls rise as 44 percent of the country remains drought-stricken.
01/07/1933m 30s

Politics with Amy Walter: Unpacking the Democratic Debates from the Aspen Ideas Festival

At this year's Aspen Ideas Festival, Amy hosted back-to-back post-debate discussions with a panel of influential writers. We'll hear excerpts from the conversation, in an effort to provide analysis of the first Democratic debates of the 2020 presidential campaign. We also talk with two academics to discuss how their policy work could be used in tandem with politics to bring about change in areas of technology and inequality. Finally, Amy reflects on the LGBTQ movement, on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Guests: Kristen Soltis Anderson, co-founder of Echelon Insights and author of The Selfie Vote: Where Millennials Are Leading America (and How Republicans Can Keep Up) Rich Lowry, editor-in-chief of National Review Jonathan Capehart, opinion writer for The Washington Post and a member of its editorial board; he also hosts the “Cape Up” podcast Raj Chetty, professor of economics at Harvard University, and the director of Opportunity Insights Ramesh Srinivasan, professor and director of the Digital Cultures Lab at UCLA Ilene Chaiken, co-creator of The L Word and executive producer of Empire
28/06/1946m 53s

Podcast: Life After Overdose, Part 4: The Future 2019-06-27

Life After Overdose, Part 4: The Future We conclude our series "Life After Overdose" with a look at what life is like today for Lauren and April, and what comes next for each of them.  Comedian Ramy Youssef Finds the Humor in Stories We Aren't Supposed to Laugh About Ramy Youssef sits down with The Takeaway to discuss his personal approach to writing jokes about some very taboo subjects. Stonewall in 50 Acts with Trans Activists of Color Taking Center Stage The plays aim to address the contributions and impact of people of color and trans people who have been largely erased from contemporary depictions of Stonewall. Other segments: Climate Change Was a Top Issue at Democratic Primary Debate in Miami The Democratic primary debates kicked off in Miami, a city at the forefront of climate change in the country. The Supreme Court's Decisions on Representation in Government  Two legal analysts break down today's rulings from the Supreme Court, which both have an impact on representation in government. 
27/06/1933m 13s

Podcast: Two Iranian American Voices Give Perspective to US-Iran Conflict 2019-06-26

Two Iranian American Voices Give Perspective to US-Iran Conflict  Two Iranian-Americans who have witnessed how the relationship between the U.S. and Iran have impacted Iranians living in the U.S. and back in Iran gave their perspective on the conflict. Life After Overdose, Part 3: Families In the third part of our series "Life After Overdose": how families are impacted when a loved one is addicted, overdoses, and survives. Journalists Detained at Border Told to Turn Over Devices with Confidential Source Info CBP agents took the laptop of Rolling Stone contributing editor, and interrogated him about its contents for hours. For some journalists, it's a common occurrence. Tragic Photograph of Border Drowning Puts Spotlight on Migrants Trying to Reach US A photograph of a father and daughter who drowned trying to cross the Rio Grande shows the desperation in the midst of stricter immigration policies in the U.S. and Mexico.
26/06/1939m 58s

Podcast: Plant-Based Meat Alternatives are Beefing Up in Popularity 2019-06-25

Plant-Based Meat Alternatives are Beefing Up in Popularity  Plant-based meat has seen a boom in popularity but is it really all its chalked up to be? Migrants, Refugees Sent to Dangerous Mexican Border Towns to Await Hearings  The U.S. is sending Central American migrants fleeing gang violence back to Mexican cities with reputations for gang violence to await their asylum hearings.  Cubans are Migrating to the U.S. After Sanctions Leave Them Scrambling for Food The island is facing one of the worst economic crises since the post-Soviet period. Life After Overdose, Part 2: Efforts, from the Hospital to the Neighborhood In the second part of "Life After Overdose," we go to Columbus, Ohio, to meet with an ER doctor who faces overdose patients daily. He shares his efforts to steer them to recovery. Other segments: We Heard from You: Milestone Moments, 50 Years After Stonewall  Listeners share a specific moment in the movement for LGBTQ rights that has stuck with them. 
25/06/1934m 53s

Podcast: “The Children are Dirty, They're Sick": Extreme Overcrowding and Unsanitary Conditions Reported at Migrant Detention Centers 2019-06-24

“The Children are Dirty, They're Sick": Extreme Overcrowding and Unsanitary Conditions Reported at Migrant Detention Centers Last week, migrant children being held in a Customs and Border Protection facility in Clint, Texas told a team of lawyers they hadn't bathed in weeks and are sleeping on concrete floors. South Bend Locals Question Buttigieg's Leadership After Police Shooting of Black Resident  Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s local leadership is being questioned after the death of South Bend resident Eric Logan, who was shot and killed by a white police officer. Instant Replay Draws Scrutiny in Women's World Cup Instant replay in soccer — known as VAR for Video Assistant Referee — is here to stay, but that hasn't stopped the controversy around it from dominating World Cup conversations.  Life After Overdose, Part 1: The Overdose In the first part of our series "Life After Overdose," we meet 41-year-old Lauren Hamilton, and 25-year-old April Erion. Both survived opioid overdoses in the last year. Other segments: The Trump Campaign Has Not Paid Their Police Bills  The Trump campaign owes at least $841,219 to ten different municipal governments for police services during his campaign rallies.  
24/06/1942m 12s

Politics with Amy Walter: Digital Ads and the Wild West of Political Campaigning

As U.S. voters increasingly spend more of their lives online, political campaigns and other outside groups are trying to figure out how best to meet them on these digital spaces. But in the rush to perfect the effectiveness of digital ads, regulators have been slow to catch up. Will the lessons of 2016, and what can happen when nefarious actors hijack those platforms to spread disinformation, prove an effective warning for 2020 and beyond? And will Democrats be able to catch up to the Trump campaign's robust online operation? Also, continuing with our "Candidate Talk" series, Amy talks with Senator Michael Bennet about trying to break out in a crowded Democratic field. Guests: Patrick Ruffini, Republican digital strategist, partner and co-founder of Echelon Insights, a polling and data analytics firm Guy Cecil, Chairman of Priorities USA, a Democratic super PAC Kevin Roose, tech columnist for Business Day at The New York Times Young Mie Kim, professor at the school of journalism and mass communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Ellen Weintraub, Chair of the Federal Election Commission Michael Bennet, United States Senator from Colorado, Democratic Presidential candidate
23/06/1946m 37s

Podcast: Displaced Planet: UN Reports Record Number of Global Refugees 2019-06-20

Displaced Planet: UN Reports Record Number of Global Refugees   70 Million. That's how many people around the world have been forcibly displaced by violence, natural disasters, and poverty. The Takeaway talked to some experts on the crisis. What to Know About the Controversial New Antidepressant Pushed on Veterans A new fast-acting drug for treatment-resistant depression has been fast-tracked for VA approval, but critics say the drug is not yet well tested enough for the market.  Landlord for Military Families Falsified Records to Receive Financial Incentives from the Air Force One of the U.S. military's largest private-industry landlords falsified records to receive financial incentives from the Airforce at the expense of military families.  What the First Native American U.S. Poet Laureate Means to Indigenous People Joy Harjo is a musician, poet, and member of the Muscogee Creek Nation. On Wednesday, she also became the first Native American U.S. Poet Laureate.   Other segments:  San Francisco Moves to Ban E-Cigarettes  San Francisco is set to become the country's first city to completely ban the sale of e-cigarettes. 
20/06/1939m 59s

Podcast: Diplomats, Experts Convene in Bonn to Address Climate Change, the "Fight for Our Lives" 2019-06-19

Diplomats, Experts Convene in Bonn to Address Climate Change, the "Fight for Our Lives" The talks follow the publishing of a report that called climate change an "existential threat" to human civilization by 2050 if it is not adequately addressed.  How Mexican Officials are Amping Up Their Immigration Enforcement Human rights activists see this as Mexico's President stepping back on campaign promises. A Look at the Juneteenth Hearing on Slavery Reparations Bill Slavery reparations have entered the mainstream political discourse. We take a look at a congressional hearing on a bill that would move it forward. Not All Female Athletes Play to the Male Gaze After getting a league of their own, W.N.B.A players embrace a fashion sense of their own. Other segments:  Lack of Prescription Medication for Jail Inmates Tied to Suicide Deaths in Lock-Up Increasing rates of substance abuse and decreased access to mental health treatment, have further complicated the issue that is no longer accounted for as it once was. 
19/06/1940m 31s

Podcast: Tensions Between U.S. and Iran Heighten 2019-06-18

Tensions Between U.S. and Iran Heighten A lead architect for the Iran nuclear deal discusses what went wrong, and the current state of tensions between the U.S. and Iran.  Supreme Court to Take Up Case on Race and Television Byron Allen, who is black, says Comcast’s refusal to carry his channels was racially motivated. Can Hollywood Reverse a Slow Summer Movie Season? Hollywood’s reliance on sequels and reboots has not succeeded with audiences this summer. The Takeaway looks at whether the film industry can turn things around in the coming months. Gerrymandering in 2010 Set the Stage for This Year's Anti-Abortion Laws How are abortion clinics in anti-abortion states faring under the legislative burdens? How are providers doing with their neighbors? And how did we get here? A Chinese Insurance Company is Using Facial Recognition on Customers. Will We See This in the U.S.? A Chinese insurance company is using facial recognition technology to assess whether their customers will be "financial risks."
18/06/1930m 44s

Podcast: Prosecutors Drop Charges in Flint Water Crisis Cases, Extending Investigation 2019-06-17

Prosecutors Drop Charges in Flint Water Crisis Cases, Extending Investigation  Last week, prosecutors dropped all pending criminal charges against officials involved in the Flint water crisis, creating another delay in the city's ordeal. Exploitative Labor Practices are Leading the Video Game Industry to Unionize Video game studios are burning out their developers with 100 hour work weeks without overtime pay. These labor practices are making more game developers consider unionizing.  Four Years Since the Charleston Massacre: Reflections and Steps Forward We speak with two South Carolina lawmakers who give us insight on changes at the state and federal level. Other segments: Massacre of Pro-Democratic Protesters Brings Global Attention to Crisis in Sudan  The killing of at least 100 protesters in Sudan by paramilitary forces has brought global awareness to the human rights atrocities being committed by the military leadership.
17/06/1936m 43s

Politics with Amy Walter: Democratic Socialism is Having a Moment; Will Voters be Receptive to its Message?

Throughout most of the 20th century and beyond, the term "socialism" has carried a lot of baggage in U.S. political history. Socialism itself has deep historical roots in the U.S. But the ideology became a toxic brand thanks in part to the Cold War, as Soviet republics and their imitators around the world saw authoritarians seize power under the guise of socialism. But almost 30 years after the fall of the Soviet Union, socialism is once again having a moment in mainstream U.S. politics. As politicians like Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez pitch their Democratic Socialism to a generation not familiar with Cold War rhetoric, skeptics remain unconvinced about the promise of sweeping social reform. Guests: Bernie Sanders, United States Senator from Vermont, Democratic presidential candidate Peter Beinart, contributing editor for The Atlantic and professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Congressional Correspondent for The New York Times Ilya Somin, Professor of Law at George Mason University
14/06/1944m 57s

Podcast: Decades After Stonewall, Police Departments Struggle to Build Trust with LGBTQ Community 2019-06-13

Decades After Stonewall, Police Departments Struggle to Build Trust with LGBTQ Community Last week, the NYPD formally apologized for the 1969 raid at the Stonewall Inn. But fifty years after Stonewall, the relationship between LGBTQ people and police is still fractured. Hong Kong's Business Community Is Protesting, Too For the past few days, the streets of Hong Kong have been filled with the sounds of protest. Are Injured Professional Athletes Pressured to Play Despite the Risk of Greater Injury?  Kevin Durant injured his Achilles during game five of the NBA finals, his first game since suffering an injury last month, leading some to question if Durant should have been playing. Bridging the Communication Gap for Incarcerated Families  Ahead of Father’s Day, The Takeaway talks to Antoine Patton and his daughter Jay Jay about their efforts to improve relationships with kids across bars.   Other segments:  Nevada Becomes First State to Protect Job Applicants from Marijuana Testing The law does not apply to EMTs, firefighters, and those employed to operate motor vehicles which could "adversely affect the safety of others." 
13/06/1942m 47s

Podcast: Border Patrol Camera Data Hacked, Released 2019-06-12

Border Patrol Camera Data Hacked, Released This week, Customs and Border Protection announced that hackers had stolen license plate images and travelers’ photos in what some inside the agency are calling a “major incident.” The Challenges of Preserving Audio in the 21st Century In light of a New York Times report detailing a 2008 Universal Studios fire that destroyed over 500,000 song recordings, The Takeaway looks into best practices for audio preservation. Three Years Later, LGBTQ Gun Violence Activists Reflect on the Pulse Nightclub Shooting The violence that unfolded in a once safe space became a call to action for many in the LGBTQ community. Other segments:  Housing Crisis Outpaces Efforts to Slow Homelessness in LA The homelessness crisis in Los Angeles worsens, even as tens of thousands find permanent housing.  Opioid Maker Insys Declares Bankruptcy After $225 Million Settlement  Insys Therapeutics has become the first major opioid manufacture to declare bankruptcy after facing fines resulting from fraud charges brought by the Justice Department. 
12/06/1935m 36s

Podcast: Venezuelans Stream into an Uncertain Future in Colombia 2019-06-11

Venezuelans Stream into an Uncertain Future in Colombia With inflation at nearly one million percent, food and medicine have been all but impossible to purchase in Venezuela.  President Trump and Auto Industry at Odds Over Future of Car Emissions Standards President Trump is preparing to roll back Obama-era vehicle emissions standards. 17 of the biggest automakers in the world told the White House that the rule change goes too far. The Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Utah and Around the Country All over the country, Indigenous women go missing or are murdered at higher rates than the rest of the population. The Takeaway convened a conversation about the crisis. Other segments: Extradition Protests in Hong Kong are About Autonomy A proposal to extradite certain criminals to mainland China has brought over 1 million protesters to the streets of Hong Kong. 
11/06/1938m 18s

Podcast: Is the U.S. Immigration Policy 'Inhumane?' 2019-06-10

Is the U.S. Immigration Policy 'Inhumane?'  Last week, the Trump administration announced that it will cut funding for soccer and education programs for unaccompanied children in federal custody. ICE Records: Ill Migrant Continued Working in ICE Custody Until He Was Hospitalized. Three Weeks Later, He Died. Yulio Castro-Garrido died in January 2018, after spending a month and a half at the ICE Stewart Detention Center. YouTube Has New Policy to Remove Videos Pushing Extreme Views YouTube announced last Wednesday the latest attempt by tech companies to clean up hate speech, but will it be enough? The South American Fight for 'Futbol Feminista'  The Women's World Cup has once again highlighted the disparities between the men's and women's teams in South America — and brought attention to the new push for "feminist" soccer.  Other segments:  "Last Black Man in San Francisco" Filmmakers on Bringing Bay Area Gentrification to the Screen "The Last Black Man in San Francisco" follows a man attempting to return to his family’s home in a gentrified San Francisco that no longer has a place for black Americans.
10/06/1938m 25s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Impact of Black Voters: “When We Show Up, We Transform How Power Operates”

When it comes to elections there’s always a key voting bloc that gets the media attention. If candidate X wins the FILL IN THE BLANK they’ll win the election. Over the past few years, we’ve heard a lot about the Latino vote. The white working class vote. The suburban women vote. But a core constituency of the Democratic electorate, since Barack Obama was elected has not gotten the same level of attention: African Americans. Will this change before 2020? According to the strategists we talked to, if Democrats want to win back the White House, it better. Guests: Alicia Garza, a founder of the Black Lives Matter Global Network, and the head of the Black Futures Lab Bakari Sellers, former South Carolina state representative and a CNN contributor Thelisha Eaddy, South Carolina Public Radio reporter Theodore  R. Johnson, Senior Fellow at the Brennan Center Aimee Allison, founder of She the People
07/06/1945m 45s

Podcast: Parkland School Officer is Arrested, Forcing New Questions About Police in Schools 2019-06-06

Parkland School Officer is Arrested, Forcing New Questions About Police in Schools Critics say school resource officers heighten the chance of propelling students into the school-to-prison pipeline. Others say they are a school's best defense against a gunman. Seeking Asylum as a Transgender Woman Navigating the asylum system is hard. But for transgender women, it can be unsafe, or even life-threatening.  "Always Be My Maybe" and the Continuing History of Asian American Comedy The Netflix film further brings Asian American comedians to the forefront. Other segments: Utah Considers Different Approach to Water Management and Conservation Utah and six other states have agreed on a plan to better manage their use of the Colorado River, which 40 million people rely on as their water source. Mentally Ill, Incarcerated Persons Languish in Jail Waiting for Hospital Beds At least seven states have been sued over long wait times for those incarcerated and in need of mental health treatment in order to stand trial.
06/06/1932m 27s

Podcast: US Census in Crisis: As Supreme Court Weighs Citizenship Question, New Study Finds Key Groups May Be Overlooked 2019-06-05

US Census in Crisis: As Supreme Court Weighs Citizenship Question, New Study Finds Key Groups May Be Overlooked Black and Latino populations could be under-counted, according to a new study by the Urban Institute. The Enduring Battle Over Access to Educational Materials for Inmates An Illinois prison recently removed 200 books from its prison library. Many state prison systems claim certain books cause significant security risks, but advocates call it censorship. "Bingeing is Not Recommended": Handmaid's Tale Creator Bruce Miller on Building a Dystopia  The Handmaid's Tale season 3 is out now. Tanzina Vega talks with its creator about bringing Margaret Atwood's world to life in this historical moment. Other segments: Utah's Population Is Growing; Can the Housing Market Keep Up? Out-of-staters are moving to Utah, and Utahns are staying put. The pressure on the housing market is driving prices up. How is the Beehive state coping? Repression in Sudan: Military Brutally Attacks Protest Camp With the latest attack by the military counsel, where does the revolution go next?
05/06/1930m 44s

Podcast: Ransomware Attack Leaves Baltimore Locked out of City Hall 2019-06-04

Ransomware Attack Leaves Baltimore Locked out of City Hall Baltimore is the latest high-profile victim in a long string of attacks on soft targets like city governments and small businesses. Canadian National Inquiry: Killing and Disappearances of Indigenous Women Is 'Genocide' But will the Canadian government actually make meaningful change? A Look Back at Tiananmen Square, 30 Years Later Over the past three decades, China has worked to systematically erase the memory of the massacre, of which the death toll is still unknown. Other segments:  Rumblings in Federal Oversight Agencies Could Spell Trouble for Big Tech Amid calls to break up Facebook and Google, the Justice Department and the FTC are changing the way they approach oversight.  The World's Banana Supply is Being Threatened by Disease Can you imagine a world without bananas? Disease and Fungus are causing major threats to the world's banana market. 
04/06/1931m 28s

Podcast: Rethinking the Response to Mass Shootings 2019-06-03

Rethinking the Response to Mass Shootings After a mass shooting in Virginia Beach left 12 people dead, The Takeaway examines how government officials, the public, and the media respond to mass shootings in this moment. New Round of Israeli Elections Threaten to Complicate Trump Administration's Plans in the Middle East Israel is back in election mode, as lawmakers dissolved the parliament after Prime Minister Netanyahu failed to form a coalition government. New elections are scheduled for September. Killings by Police, Corruption Allegations, Political Impasse: An Update on Brazil's Bolsonaro It has been five months since the far-right president took office and his popularity continues to drop. US Playing to Win the World Cup, and a Gender Discrimination Lawsuit The US women's soccer team are looking to win their fourth World Cup title, even as they are suing for gender discrimination.  Other segments:  How Close is the Next Recession? According to the "yield curve," which looks at the bond market, another recession might be closer than we think.
03/06/1937m 48s

Celebrating One Year of Amy Walter

Five times in history, the candidate elected president of the United States was not the winner of the national popular vote. With two of those five elections in recent memory, and a demographic shift that will likely continue the trend, the electoral college is facing increasing criticism and calls for abolishment.  On the one-year anniversary of the launch of Politics with Amy Walter from The Takeaway, the show takes a look back at the history of the electoral college. Amy moderates a debate for and against the institution, plus an exploration of the public’s shifting support for the electoral college. Guests include The New York Times columnist and CBS News political analyst Jamelle Bouie, Carrie Dann, political editor for NBC News, Ruy Teixeira, Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and Lina Newton, associate professor of political science at Hunter College.
31/05/1945m 7s

Podcast: Robert Mueller’s Surprise Remarks Add Renewed Pressure on Congressional Democrats 2019-05-30

Robert Mueller’s Surprise Remarks Add Renewed Pressure on Congressional Democrats Robert Mueller chose not to add to his office’s findings, but he pointedly did not exonerate President Trump.  Backlash to Documentary 'After Maria' Highlights Demand for Wider Range of Puerto Rican Films Netflix has received backlash for the documentary, 'After Maria,' which some members of the Puerto Rican community say ignores hardships on the island in the aftermath of the storm. Other segments: Oklahoma Storms Threaten Local Communities and a Crumbling Infrastructure A dam near Tulsa is releasing enormous amounts of water —  parts of the city are underwater. Case in Point: D’Angelo Burgess Fled From Police. Does That Make Him a Killer? The latest installment of our series "Case in Point" with The Marshall Project.
30/05/1930m 59s

Podcast: Mueller Speaks, Says 'The Report Is My Testimony' 2019-05-29

Mueller Speaks, Says 'The Report Is My Testimony'  Robert Mueller gave his first and last statement as special counsel for the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.  Porn Literacy Courses Are Helping High School Students Understand Their Misconceptions About Sex A porn literacy program out of Boston is helping teenagers recognize the misconceptions about sex they have learned from watching porn.  How to Manage Burnout in a High Pressure Work Environment The World Health Organization's new definition of burnout relates to “chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.”  Other segments: Malaysia Vows to Send Back Illegal Recycling Shipments to Countries Including the U.S. On Tuesday, Malaysia announced it would return 3,300 tons of plastic waste to countries like Canada, the U.S., and the UK, stating that contaminated plastic was being illegally imported. Traffic Jam at 29,000 Feet: Mount Everest and Other Destinations Overrun by Tourists The Nepalese government has issued a record number of permits to scale Mount Everest this season. So far, 11 climbers have died.
29/05/1930m 13s

Podcast: E.U. Elections Results Reveal a Continent Divided 2019-05-28

E.U. Elections Results Reveal a Continent Divided With the highest number of votes cast in more than 20 years, the once predominant centrist parties lost influence to smaller groups on the right and the left. Talking to Our Kids About Abortion A slew of recent laws have restricted abortion access in US states like Alabama, Georgia, and Missouri. That means parents are having more conversations about abortion with their kids. The History of Middle Eastern and North African Representation in Hollywood While Disney's original 'Aladdin' was headlined by white voice actors, the 2019 version mainly features actors of Middle Eastern and North African descent.  Other segments:  America's Longest War Continues to Claim Lives Renowned journalist C.J. Chivers talks of war, service-members, and his latest book. ICE Placed Thousands in Solitary Confinement, Many for Minor Infractions Detainees were placed in solitary confinement for cutting another detainee's hair or sharing a coffee cup. 
28/05/1930m 8s

Homefront: Stories from Military Families

Today, on Memorial Day, The Takeaway has a special hour devoted to America’s military families and the unique challenges they face and the sacrifices they make.  Terry Burgess' son, Army Staff Sgt. Bryan Burgess, was killed in Afghanistan on March 29, 2011. Terry shares what helps him with his grief, what Memorial Day means to him as a Gold Star father, and what he wants civilians to know about the holiday. Terry is the co-founder of Gold Star Parent Retreat and wrote the book "When Our Blue Star Turned Gold" with his wife Beth.  Jamie Howard, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute who specializes in anxiety disorders and trauma resiliency, discusses the stress that deployment and regular moves have on kids in military families. The Takeaway also looks at the substandard conditions in privatized military housing with Deborah Nelson, freelance investigative reporter for Reuters and journalism professor at University of Maryland. For many military spouses, it is a challenge to find consistent and meaningful work, and a conversation with military wives Karla Candelaria-Oquendo and Katie Kirsch explores those challenges. And finally, Gold Star spouse Sherry Jennings-Kevianne, who lost her husband Marine Sgt. Julian Kevianne 21 months ago, reflects on her husband’s legacy and what Memorial Day means to her.
27/05/1947m 7s

The Juggle Is Real: Navigating Life In Your 40s

 If you're in your 40s and more tired than you've ever been because you are juggling life, money, aging parents, aging yourself, not wanting to play games any more etc. raise your hand. ?? How are you coping? — Tanzina Vega (@tanzinavega) May 9, 2019 After a tweet from host Tanzina Vega about coping with life in your 40s went viral, we kicked off a series exploring the challenges and opportunities of life in your 40s. We've brought all those conversations together in this special podcast episode called "The Juggle Is Real: Navigating Life in Your Forties." 
25/05/1943m 27s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Evolution of the Executive

Every president leaves their mark on the office of the presidency. The office of the presidency also leaves its mark on every person who holds it. This week, we broadcast from the Presidential Ideas Festival, hosted by the University of Virginia’s Miller Center in Charlottesville. It’s a three-day festival attended by presidential scholars, journalists, political junkies, as well as politicians and administration officials. We spent our time here talking to people who have worked closely with former presidents, on both sides of the aisle, to get their perspective on how the office changes those who serve, and on how those who served have changed the office.  Guests: Barbara Perry, Professor and Director of Presidential Studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center Andy Card, White House Chief of Staff during the George W. Bush administration Kathleen Sebelius, United States Secretary of Health and Human Services during the Barack Obama administration Karl Rove, Senior Advisor and Deputy Chief of Staff during the George W. Bush administration Susan Rice, U.S. National Security Advisor during the Barack Obama administration
24/05/1947m 19s

Podcast: 2019-05-23 Lack of Inclusionary Affordable Housing Leads to Segregation and Financial Disparity

Lack of Inclusionary Affordable Housing Leads to Segregation and Financial Disparity  Connecticut's affordable housing issues have turned parts of the state into some of the most segregated and financially disparate in the country. This is indicative of a national trend.  The Juggle: Relationships in Your 40s The Takeaway is tackling life your 40s and what makes this decade so unique. Next up: relationships.  'Booksmart' Marks a Wave of More Progressive Teen Films This Friday, Olivia Wilde's directorial debut, "Booksmart," hits theaters. It comes as part of a recent wave of teen movies that take a more modern look at high school relationships. Other segments:  President Trump Faces Second Legal Setback in Fight to Block House Subpoenas A federal judge said on Wednesday that Deutsche Bank and Capital One can comply with subpoenas from House Democrats and turn over financial documents related to President Trump. Kenya Could be the Next Country to Strike Down a Colonial-Era Law Against Homosexuality  The law in question is part of the penal code in dozens of former British colonies. 
23/05/1933m 55s

Podcast: 2019-05-22 President Trump Faces First Major Blow in Effort to Stonewall House Democrats' Subpoenas

President Trump Faces First Major Blow in Effort to Stonewall House Democrats' Subpoenas President Trump is suing to block an accounting firm from handing over his financial records to Congress. But on Monday, a District Court Judge ruled against the president. McDonald's Workers File More Claims Against Company for Sexual Harassment This is the third — and largest — round of complaints filed against the fast-food chain. The Juggle: Health In Your 40s The Takeaway is tackling life your 40s and what makes this decade so unique. Next up: health. Other segments:  States Across the Country Consider Cash Bail Reform  Roughly 460,000 people are jailed on any given day because they were unable to post cash bail.
22/05/1937m 25s

Podcast: 2019-05-21 Insurance Companies Continue to Deny Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Despite Law Guaranteeing Coverage

Insurance Companies Continue to Deny Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Despite Law Guaranteeing Coverage When the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act was passed in 2008, it supposed to guarantee insurance coverage of mental health and substance abuse disorders, it didn't.  Backlogs, Quotas and Rushed Cases: The Pressures Immigration Judges Face Immigration judges throughout the country ultimately decide the fate of migrants. The Juggle: Working In Your 40s The Takeaway is tackling life your 40s and what makes this decade so unique. Next up: work. Other segments:  One Year After Sexual Assault Accusations Against Steve Wynn, RNC Continues Accepting His Donations Over a year ago, the #MeToo movement caught up with casino mogul Steve Wynn. Today, the organization that cast him out in response to those allegations is continuing to accept his cash. The Need for Wealthy Benefactors Creates an Ethical Dilemma for Museums  The Met announced they'd no longer be accepting money from the Sackler family, but the Sackler's aren't the only donors creating problems in the art world.
21/05/1929m 46s

Podcast: 2019-05-20 5th Death of a Migrant Child Since December Occurs as Border Apprehensions Continue to Rise

5th Death of a Migrant Child Since December Occurs as Border Apprehensions Continue to Rise Since December, five migrant children have died after being detained by U.S. immigration agencies.  The Juggle: Money In Your 40s The Takeaway is tackling life your 40s and what makes this decade so unique. First up: money. New York City Considers Ban on Fur Speaker of the NYC Council Corey Johnson is urging his colleagues to support a proposed ban on the sale of fur in New York City, setting off the latest chapter in a long debate. 'Trial by Fire' Examines Whether Texas Executed an Innocent Man “Trial by Fire,” a new movie starring Laura Dern, tells the true story of a man executed by the state of Texas for a crime that evidence suggests he did not commit. Other segments:  Officer-Involved Deaths: How Much Does the Public Actually Learn? Oscar Grant, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland: new information has come to light in these cases. What have we learned?
20/05/1936m 5s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Political Power of Teachers

It feels like every day someone new announces they are running for President. But Andrew Yang, the founder of the fellowship program for recent college graduates Venture for America, was one of the first to declare. If elected, he says he would implement a universal basic income, meaning that every American citizen over 18 years of age would get $1,000 a month. We speak to him about how that would actually work, and how he would pay for it. Also, the teachers’ strikes across the country that began in 2018 are a sign that teachers’ unions are stronger than ever. As the 2020 Democratic candidates compete for their support, they are laying out ambitious education proposals. Will this be the election that people vote on education? Or is this still largely viewed as a state issue, not a federal one?  Guests: Andrew Yang, Democratic presidential candidate  Randi Weingarten, President of the American Federation of Teachers Sarah Reckhow, Associate Professor of Political Science at Michigan State University Jeffrey Henig, Professor of Political Science at Teachers College, Columbia University Linda Tillman, Ph.D., Professor Emerita at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill  
17/05/1949m 26s

Podcast: 2019-05-16 School Segregation is Getting Worse 65 Years After Brown v. Board of Education

School Segregation is Getting Worse 65 Years After Brown v. Board of Education  The number of intensely segregated minority schools has tripled since 1988 with New York and California having some of the highest rates of school segregation.  'The Unsung Heroes:' Military Kids Resilient, but Face Extra Challenges Common realities of being in a military family, like having a parent deployed or moving around a lot, can be stressors for children.  Creating an Advice Show By and For People of Color KQED's podcast "Truth Be Told" is an advice show designed to give people of color a space to talk among themselves that’s not framed through whiteness. Other segments:  Disney Is Extending Its Reach to Infinity and Beyond Disney announced Tuesday that they will be taking Comcast's stake in Hulu, adding another property to what is quickly becoming the most powerful entertainment company in history. San Francisco Bans Facial Recognition in a Move to Democratize Surveillance Technology The federal government can still use facial recognition technology in the jurisdiction.  
16/05/1932m 12s

Podcast: 2019-05-15 Where Do U.S.-Russia Relations Stand Following Pompeo's Meeting with Putin?

Where Do U.S.-Russia Relations Stand Following Pompeo's Meeting with Putin? Secretary of State Mike Pompeo went to Russia on Tuesday to meet with Vladimir Putin. The leaders discussed several issues on which the two countries remain sharply opposed. "Freedom Never Smelled So Good":  How an American Woman is Helping Honduran Women Achieve Justice Gracie Murphree has been running a refugee center in Honduras for women and children escaping violence. LGBTQ Representation is Becoming More Prominent in Children's Entertainment A recent episode of Arthur, where Arthur's teacher gets married to his partner Patrick, is emblematic of the rise of LGBTQ representation in children's entertainment. Other segments: Attack at a Church in Burkina Faso is the Latest in a Surge of Terrorism in the Country  This past Sunday, a terrorist attack at a Catholic church left six dead. This is just the latest in a surge of attacks over the last few years. WhatsApp Hack Exposes Vulnerabilities of Encrypted Messaging Apps The hack affected 1.5 billion WhatsApp users.
15/05/1928m 23s

Podcast: 2019-05-14 Hospitals in Rural America are Closing, Leading to Devastating Consequences

Hospitals in Rural America are Closing, Leading to Devastating Consequences Patients are having to travel long distances to access the care they need. China Strikes Back: Trade War Escalation Spooks Global Markets China announced retaliatory tariffs on Monday, promising to "never surrender" in the trade war with the US. Pompeo Cancels Trip to Moscow to Meet with E.U. Diplomats About Iran On Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo canceled a planned trip to Moscow and instead met With E.U. diplomats, with hopes of finding common ground over Iran. Other segments: A Rhode Island School Districts "Lunch Shaming" Policy Renews Conversation Over School Lunch Debt Students in Warwick, RI who owed money for past meals were to be served cold sunflower butter and jelly sandwiches until a national backlash caused the district to scrap its plan.
14/05/1938m 53s

Podcast: 2019-05-13 Laws Across the Country Seek to Limit Abortion to 6 Weeks

Laws Across the Country Seek to Limit Abortion to 6 Weeks The Alabama bill aims to criminalize abortion in almost all cases and would charge doctors with up to 99 years in prisons for providing abortions. How Torture Crushed Civilian Opposition in Syria  Up to hundreds of thousands of Syrians were imprisoned and tortured — and many were killed — in President Bashar al-Assad's continued campaign to stifle opposition.  Asylum Seekers May Face More Danger in Mexico as Border Patrol Begins Screenings The Remain in Mexico policy change is also placing migrants in danger. Are Video Games Encouraging Kids to Gamble? "Loot Box" Reform Would Curb In-Game Purchases Republican Senator Josh Hawley plans legislation that would prohibit game makers from selling loot boxes to minors. Other segments: Advocates, Lawmakers Push to Stop Violence Against Native Women Native women face high rates of violence and murder and go missing more often than other groups of women. 
13/05/1940m 36s

Politics with Amy Walter: "The World's Most Exclusive Club"

In his 1957 book, Citadel, journalist William White refers to the Senate as “the world’s most exclusive club.” But for many high-profile Democrats, it's a club that seems to have gone out of style. In April, Stacey Abrams, the Democrat who narrowly lost the race for governor of Georgia in 2018, announced that she is not running for Senate. Joaquin Castro in Texas, Ambassador Susan Rice in Maine, Congresswoman Cindy Axne and former Governor Tom Vilsack of Iowa have all made the same decision. Then, there's the Democrats who have decided to run for president instead: John Hickenlooper, the former governor of Colorado, and Beto O’Rourke who rose to prominence in 2018 when he challenged Texas Senator Ted Cruz.  What's going on here?  Jennifer Duffy, a political analyst covering US Senate and Governor's races for the Cook Political Report, explains why for some Democrats the Senate seems to have lost its allure. Frances Lee, a political science professor at the University of Maryland, tells us how we got a Senate in the first place.  Osita Nwanevu, a staff writer at the New Yorker covering politics and policy in Washington, D.C., and Logan Dobson, a Republican strategist and the former director of Data and Analytics for the National Republican Senatorial Committee, debate equal state representation in the U.S Senate. Alan Frumin, the Senate Parliamentarian from 1987 to 1995 and again from 2001 to 2012, answers questions from our listeners about Senate rules and procedures.  Amy's Final Take: The debate about how the Senate works - or doesn’t - is part of a bigger debate and a bigger issue that I’ve talked about a lot on this show; the breakdown of trust and faith in institutions. The whole deal in politics is that winners treat the losers fairly because they know that someday they will be on the losing side and want to be treated with respect and fairness. But, that’s not where we are now. Americans are more distrustful of the other party than ever before. But, changing the underlying structures of the system creates all kinds of unintended consequences that may only exacerbate the problems they are trying to fix.  Blowing up or reconstructing institutions like the Senate may solve a short-term problem, but in the long term our bigger problem that needs fixing is to find faith and trust in one another.
10/05/1947m 23s

Podcast: 2019-05-09 Checking the Checks and Balances

Checking the Checks and Balances As the fight between House Democrats and the White House continues to escalate, are the checks and balances between the branches of the government working?  China Attempts to Undercut Trade Deal; Trump Promises New Tariffs Negotiations appeared to have been going well, but the Chinese reportedly reneged on a series of key promises. European Far-Right Leaders May Capitalize on the Rise of Spain's "Vox" Party It's the first time a far-right party has gained seats since the fall of the dictatorship in 1975. Other segments:  Ebola Response in the Democratic Republic of Congo: What Are the Challenges? More than 1,000 people have died from Ebola since last summer in the Democratic Republic of Congo. When You Play the Game of Spoilers, Do You Win or Lose? With spoiler warnings at an all-time high with the release of Avengers: Endgame and the final season of Game of Thrones, we took a look at how rational the fear of spoilers really is.  
09/05/1928m 14s

Podcast: 2019-05-08 As Uber Prepares to Go Public, Drivers Across the Country Strike

As Uber Prepares to Go Public, Drivers Across the Country Strike Drivers are demanding better pay, as the company stands to reap $10 billion after its long-awaited IPO. Treasury Secretary Refuses Congressional Request to Hand Over Trump's Tax Returns  Mnuchin said the request lacked a “legitimate legislative purpose” and that he could not authorize the release as a result.  'It's So Hard:' Military Spouses on the Challenges of Having a Career  When we asked Takeaway listeners in military families about the biggest challenges they face, many of you said finding employment as a spouse. 
08/05/1938m 35s

Podcast: 2019-05-07 Celebrating One Year of Tanzina Vega

One year ago today, Tanzina Vega made her debut as the host of The Takeaway. At the time, she outlined three gaps in the United States that she felt should be part of The Takeaway's core mission: the wealth gap, the truth gap and the empathy gap. To celebrate Tanzina's one-year anniversary, The Takeaway is broadcasting live from WNYC's The Greene Space and asking, when it comes to inequality, misinformation and understanding, are we further apart today than we were then? Joining Tanzina to address the empathy gap, and what it takes to more fully imagine the perspectives of others, are Jelani Cobb, a staff writer for The New Yorker who writes about race, politics, history, and culture, Ziwe Fumudoh, a comedian and writer for Showtime’s "Desus and Mero," and Javier Zamora, a poet and writer born in El Salvador, and author of the collection "Unaccompanied." To delve into the racial wealth gap in the United States, Tanzina speaks with Andre Perry, a Brookings Institution fellow and author of the forthcoming book, "Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in American Cities." And rounding out the hour is Susan Chira, editor-in-chief of The Marshall Project, who joins Tanzina to discuss the truth gap in our changing media landscape.
07/05/1945m 40s

Podcast: 2019-05-06 President Trump Picks Former Obama Administration Official to Lead ICE in New Direction

President Trump Picks Former Obama Administration Official to Lead ICE in New Direction On Sunday, President Trump named Mark Morgan as the next director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Last month, the president said he wanted to take ICE in a "tougher direction." Lila Downs Talks Immigration, Politics and Identity "Al Chile" When Downs speaks, the Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter says things "al chile" — by telling it like it is. Children in Puerto Rico Suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Since Hurricane Maria A new study shows seven percent of kids are dealing with significant symptoms of PTSD.  
06/05/1932m 12s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Trump Administration Hopes "It's the Economy, Stupid" Holds True in 2020

"It’s the economy, stupid." James Carville is the Democratic strategist who famously coined that phrase while working on Bill Clinton’s presidential campaign in 1992. He meant people vote with their pocketbooks. In other words, when the economy is strong, the incumbent wins. That should be good news for the Trump administration because by many measures the economy is doing great. It grew at an unexpectedly high pace of 3 percent in the first-quarter of this year. The stock market is surging. Wages are up. Unemployment is down. Yet despite all this, the President's approval rating is still stuck in the low to mid-40s, putting the old cliche "it's the economy, stupid," to the test.  Kevin Hassett, the Chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, says that he expects the economic growth we have been seeing to continue this year at an even faster rate. We get a fact-check on that from Heather Long, Washington Post's economics correspondent, who tells us about what she sees as the biggest problem facing the U.S. economy today: rising inequality. Plus, she brings us up to speed on Donald Trump's picks for the Federal Reserve.  Denise Murray, a farmer in Wisconsin, talks about selling her dairy cows because their upkeep had gotten too expensive. Mike Gallagher, a Republican congressman representing the 8th district of Wisconsin, explains how the Trump administration's tariffs on steel and aluminum have impacted farmers like Murray in his state, and whether he thinks his constituents will still support the president in 2020.  Scott Clement, the polling director at the Washington Post, tells us about a new Washington-ABC poll that shows that most people feel that our economic system benefits those in power. He says this could be a problem for the president.  Lastly, Lynn Vavreck, the co-author of "Identity Crisis: The 2016 Presidential Campaign and the Battle for the Meaning of America," says that actually, there may be some issues that are even important to voters than the economy. Read Amy Walter's take here.
03/05/1946m 56s

Podcast: 2019-05-02 AG William Barr Refuses to Testify Before House Panel

AG William Barr Refuses to Testify Before House Panel After testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee Wednesday, Attorney General William Barr is refusing to testify before the House on Thursday. Labor Dept. Offers Guidance to Gig Economy Companies Looking to Label Workers as Contractors A recent letter from the Labor Dept. informed an unknown gig economy company that they could call their workers contractors, offering guidance to other companies looking to do the same. Caster Semenya Will Have to Suppress Testosterone to Compete in Her Top Races The ruling came as a surprise to many who contend that elevated testosterone levels do not enhance performance to a level that necessitates such regulation. 
02/05/1929m 39s

Podcast: 2019-05-01 Venezuelan Protests: A Failed Coup?

Venezuelan Protests: A Failed Coup? The opposition hoped Maduro would be ousted — what next for their efforts? Mueller Puts a Stamp on it: Secret Letter to William Barr Overshadows AG's Congressional Testimony Attorney General Barr faces two days of hearings in Congress this week. Deteriorating, Unsanitary Conditions in Privatized Military Housing One-third of all military families live in privatized housing — that’s around 700,000 people. For many, that means facing substandard living conditions. Undocumented Workers Allege Exploitation at Trump Golf Course Undocumented workers at Trump’s country club in Westchester, New York say they were told to perform unpaid labor, according to new reporting out from The Washington Post. Social Media Was Blocked in Sri Lanka, but the Social Fissures Remained Hours after the Easter Sunday bombings in Sri Lanka, the government blocked popular social media sites.
01/05/1931m 50s

Podcast: 2019-04-30 Guantanamo Bay May Soon Need Hospice Care

Guantanamo Bay May Soon Need Hospice Care With no end in sight, the Pentagon is having to consider how Guantanamo Bay will provide treatment for geriatric detainees as prisoners get older. How a Wealth Gap Contributes to a Privacy Gap  Poor people tend to face far more severe repercussions from a lack of privacy online.  Who Gets to Make a Living as an Artist? The more affluent a person's family is, the greater chance they have of landing a career in the arts.  
30/04/1926m 38s

Politics with Amy Walter: "The X Factor": Will Joe Biden Reshape the Race?

Joe Biden officially announced that he is running for the nation's top job on Thursday. As candidate number 20, he is entering a historically crowded race. Does he have what it takes to stand out from the pack?  We check in with two campaign reporters, Juana Summers from The Associated Press, and Annie Linskey from The Washington Post, who tell us about what voters seem to be looking for when trying to choose between the candidates.  For our Biden digest, we turn to Mike Memoli, of NBC News, who has been following Biden's career on the national stage for over a decade. He explains what he thinks we can expect from Biden’s third attempt to reach the highest office. Borys Krawczeniuk, of the Scranton Times-Tribune, gives us the view from Biden's hometown. And Aimee Allison, the founder of the political group She the People, says he has some serious obstacles to overcome if he wants to do well with black women voters.  Plus, Bloomberg's Joshua Green has been out on the campaign trail trying to gauge where voters stand on the issue of impeachment. His verdict? They are pretty ambivalent.  Amy's Final Take: After the  2016 election, the  media was criticized for spending too much time in D.C. absorbed in our Twitter bubbles. Voters were telling us the story of the election, but we weren’t listening to it. Three years later, the Washington, D.C. and Twitter echo chambers are obsessed with talk of "impeachment" and "Russia" yet that’s not what voters or presidential candidates are talking about out in the states.   My sense, from listening to voters and to the reporters who are on the ground covering them, is that Democratic voters are more pragmatic than prescriptive. The grassroots demand for Congress to start impeachment just doesn't seem to be there. Now, should Trump win re-election, I'd expect that pragmatism to give way to all out panic and push-back. That may change, but for now, we should take the lessons of 2016 to heart and stop trying to make the narrative fit neatly into a box we have already pre-built. The race for 2020 has a LONG way to go. The best way to understand where it’s headed is to watch it unfold at its own pace, not the one being set by cable TV.
26/04/1946m 36s

Podcast: 2019-04-25 The Debate Over Felon Disenfranchisement

The Debate Over Felon Disenfranchisement The debate over felon disenfranchisement is playing out across the country, where a patchwork map of state laws means things look different in Maine than they do in Iowa or in Wisconsin. First Licensed Vaccine to Immunize Children in Three Malaria-Endemic Countries  Children in Malawi began to be immunized against malaria with the world's first licensed vaccine this week. Indie Superhero Movies Face Off Against Blockbusters at the Box Office "Avengers: Endgame" is expected to make more than $260 million this weekend. "Fast Color," an indie superhero movie that centers around women of color, has struggled to find an audience.
25/04/1932m 28s

Can Social Security Be Saved?

Can Social Security Be Saved? A new report has extended Social Security's lifetime by one year, but the program is still on track to become insolvent in 2035. US Companies Turn Back to Saudis Months After Khashoggi Killing Just six months after Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi was, according to U.S. intelligence agencies, assassinated by Saudi Arabia, American businesses are starting to return. Sri Lanka Attacks Highlight Continuing Threat From ISIS-Inspired Actors ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attacks in Sri Lanka that have killed at least 300 people. Guests: Nancy Altman Michael de la Merced Rukmini Callimachi
24/04/1930m 55s

Series of Deadly Suicide Bombings in Sri Lanka Target Churches and Hotels

Series of Deadly Suicide Bombings in Sri Lanka Target Churches and Hotels On Sunday, a series of coordinated bombings in Sri Lanka killed more than 250 people. Three of the attacks were carried out at churches. He Shot Her and Will Soon Be Able to Own a Gun Again. On the Fight to Close the 'Boyfriend Loophole.' "If there were controls in place that had closed the loophole on him...he would not have been able to inflict as much harm as he did, that his behavior would have been hastened." After Gun Violence, School Principals Rely on Others Who've Experienced that Same Trauma School principals dealing with gun violence in their classrooms are relying on the support of others who have already walked that path. Guests:  Emily Schmall Neil DeVotta Sarah D. Wire Courtney Weaver Andy Fetchik George Roberts
22/04/1931m 32s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Mueller Report is Not the End, It's Just the Beginning

It’s been a long (almost) two years but the Special Counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, possible coordination between the Trump Campaign and Russia, and obstruction of justice has reached its final culmination. The redacted report was released on Thursday. The end. Or is it just the beginning? Well, like a lot of things...it’s both. Katie Benner, a Justice Department reporter at The New York Times, discusses the new and revealing pieces of the redacted Mueller report and if Robert Mueller did anything that sets precedent for the next special counsel. Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for the New York Times, brings us up to speed on the investigations that are being conducted by several congressional committees.  Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi is the Democratic representative from Illinois’s 8th congressional district. He also serves on two key congressional committees with their own investigations into President Donald Trump: The Committee on Oversight and Reform and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. We talk to him about how those investigations will or won’t change now that we have the redacted Mueller report.  For a conservative take on the redacted Mueller report, we speak to Noah Rothman, a political commentator, and editor at Commentary. Finally, what impact could the release of the redacted Mueller report have on Donald Trump and his presidency? We talk to Carrie Dann, a politics editor at NBC, who has been analyzing what impact the Mueller investigation has had on public opinion. 
19/04/1946m 1s

The Mueller Report: What We Know So Far

The Mueller Report: What We Know So Far Initial analysis from reporter Max Kutner and legal expert Caroline Fredrickson. Congressman Jamie Raskin: Immediate Thoughts on Redacted Mueller Report The Democrat from Maryland joins us to discuss his immediate thoughts. William Barr has a History of Withholding Key Information from Congress In 1989, he provided a summary that gave cover to President George H.W. Bush's abduction of Manuel Noriega from Panama. Guests: Max Kutner Caroline Fredrickson  Congressman Jamie Raskin Ryan Goodman
18/04/1946m 27s

Measles Cases Continue to Grow. Here's How We Got Here.

Measles Cases Continue to Grow. Here's How We Got Here. Public health, freedom of religion and politics converge in the history of fighting over vaccinations.  In Indonesian Elections, it's Fake News Vs. Ballot Truths Nearly 200 million Indonesians will be able to vote across 17,000 islands on Wednesday, making for the world's largest single-day election.   Death Penalty for People With Mental Illness: Should It Be Banned? Should people living with mental illness face the death penalty? Guests: Gwynne Hogan  Arthur Caplan  Rebecca Henschke Maurice Chammah
17/04/1930m 57s

The Challenges Women of Color Have Faced in Politics and Beyond

The Challenges Women of Color Have Faced in Politics and Beyond Republicans have taken Rep. Omar's comments out of context, while Democrats have been lackluster in their defense. The Notre Dame Cathedral Fire: What it Means for France and the World The world watched as the devastating fire engulfed the cathedral on Monday. But the pain of its damage goes well beyond Paris. Facial Recognition Surveillance Targets Uighur Minority in China  This is the first instance of a government using AI for the explicit purpose of racial profiling, according to reporting from The New York Times.  Stop & Shop Workers Go on Strike 31,000 workers have been on strike since last Thursday, leaving 240 stores understaffed or closed altogether.  Guests: Congresswoman Donna Edwards Professor Andrea Benjamin Carol Krinsky Paul Mozur Jennifer Klein
16/04/1937m 34s

Burning of Three Black Churches Serves as Reminder of Racism's Continuing Legacy

Burning of Three Black Churches Serves as Reminder of Racism's Continuing Legacy The churches were all burned in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, over the course of ten days in March. Congress Investigates the High Cost of Insulin The price of insulin has nearly tripled in the last decade. Congress is now investigating why. An Uncertain Path Forward for Transgender Troops On Friday, the Trump administration banned transgender people from openly enlisting in the military. Advocates say this marks a return to "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" for transgender troops. Guests: Dr. Ibram X Kendi Dr. Randal Maurice Jelks Robin Feldman Aaron Belkin Blake Dremann
15/04/1932m 27s

Candidate Talk: Cory Booker

On February 1st, the start of Black History month, New Jersey Senator Cory Booker announced he was running for president. Since then, he’s been on the campaign trail and announced that he raised $5 million. This weekend, he makes his official hometown kick off of his Justice for all Tour in Newark and then heads immediately to Iowa. Amy Walter got the chance to sit down with Senator Booker to discuss his campaign, the legislation he’s introduced in the Senate to form a commission to study the issue of reparations, and vision for the future. Reparations has come up a lot recently as the Democratic candidates have been asked to weigh in on the issue. Earlier this week, Senator Cory Booker announced that he would introduce legislation, “to form a commission for the study of reparation proposals for African-Americans.” But the idea of reparations has a long history, Amy explores that with The Takeaway’s Tanzina Vega. Plus, Amy talks to Rob O’Dell, from the Arizona Republic, about his two-year investigation with USA TODAY and the Center for Public Integrity. Over the past eight years, state lawmakers have introduced at least 10,000 bills that were written, almost entirely, by corporations, industry groups, or think tanks. O'Dell helped create the algorithm that led to this discovery, and he says these numbers are just the tip of the iceberg. To end the hour, Amy talks to Allison Anderman, the Managing Attorney at the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, about how lobbying works, in practice.  In response to Allison Anderman’s comments about what she calls “the corporate gun lobby,” we reached out to The Second Amendment Foundation, and to the NRA. The Second Amendment Foundation statement:  ''The gun prohibition lobby falsely claims that gun manufacturers are in the driver's seat when it comes to lobbying for gun rights. The fight for Constitutional Carry, the right to exercise a constitutional right without a permit, is lead by grassroots activist gun owners on a state level. Twelve states have now passed Constitutional Carry and the gun ban lobby is losing this battle. As a result, they have come unglued and make many false and outrageous claims that are simply not true." - Alan Gottlieb, Founder Second Amendment Foundation The statement from the NRA:  "It's understandable that gun control groups like the Giffords Law Center try to mislead the American public by calling NRA the corporate gun lobby, but that’s false. The NRA represents more than 5 million dues-paying members and the tens of millions of law-abiding gun owners who want nothing more than the right to protect themselves, their families, and their homes. Gun control advocates like Anderman would rather strip people of their constitutionally protected rights and put you at the mercy of criminals who don’t give a second thought to breaking in your homes and shooting you dead. We’re proud of our success in championing legislation like constitutional carry because it recognizes the rights of law-abiding people to defend themselves in the manner they see fit. Again, it’s another example of the gun control lobby trying to mislead the American public by saying constitutional carry allows anybody to carry a gun. That is a lie. It allows anyone who is legally allowed to posses a firearm to carry a firearm. They suggest it allows criminals to carry without a permit when that’s just not the case. That’s because gun control groups like these are largely composed of high-priced lobbyists and lawyers that are financed by a small handful of the country's elitist billionaires. They have no constituency, no grassroots appeal, and continue losing ground in state after state. The NRA is financed by membership dues and donations. Our constituents are every law-abiding gun owner in the country, our grassroots outreach is second to none, and we will continue defending the 2nd Amendment as long as there’s a Constitution of the United States." - Lars Dalseide, NRA spokesman
12/04/1947m 21s

New Tax Bill Will Make it Illegal for IRS to Offer Free E-Filing Option

New Tax Bill Will Make it Illegal for IRS to Offer Free E-Filing Option The Taxpayer First Act just passed the House this week. Politics and Voting in the Lone Star State First, a look at investigations into Texas's effort to remove thousands of voters from the rolls; Then a look at what Texas voters are looking for going into election season 2020. Wyatt Cenac Shakes Up Late Night with a Deep Dive on Education This season of comedian Wyatt Cenac’s "Problem Areas" explores education in the United States. Cenac spoke with The Takeaway about his show's unique spot in the late-night landscape. Guests: Hannah Levintova Mark Jones Wyatt Cenac
11/04/1933m 17s

Hearing on White Nationalism Gives Platform to Extreme Views

Hearing on White Nationalism Gives Platform to Extreme Views Testimony on containing white nationalism got side-lined by partisan infighting that resulted in little agreement on the notion of extremism.  Georgia Bill to Regulate Journalism an 'Opportunity' for Dialogue A bill in Georgia would force reporters to turn over their notes for an ethical review. It's likely not going to pass, but it's a wake-up call for journalists. New York Islanders' Shannon Hogan on Breaking Gender Barriers in Sports Broadcasting This season, Shannon Hogan was joined on the MSG Network by an all-women team of analysts, a first for a pro-sports team. Guests: Heidi Beirich Andy Campbell Stephen Fowler Shannon Hogan
10/04/1930m 44s

The U.S. Label Iran's IRGC a Foreign Terrorist Organization

The U.S. Label Iran's IRGC a Foreign Terrorist Organization On Monday, the United States government made an unprecedented move against Iran. The IRS Audits the Working Poor at a Higher Rate than Wealthier People The audit process itself also has immediate and long-term effects for working class people. Author Kwame Alexander Wants to Help Young People Imagine a Better World Kwame Alexander's new book, "The Undefeated," celebrates black Americans throughout history. The Takeaway spoke with Alexander about his unique approach to engaging young readers. Guests:  Robin Wright Farnaz Fassihi Paul Kiel Kwame Alexander
09/04/1932m 43s

Kirstjen Nielsen is Out as Homeland Security Secretary

Kirstjen Nielsen is Out as Homeland Security Secretary Nielsen’s time in that role has been rocky. How Much Do We Actually Know About CBD? The availability of CBD has skyrocketed in the last year, but how much do we actually know about it, and can CBD really do everything advertises say it can? Mar-a-Lago Breach Raises Questions of National Security at Trump's Private Club A woman slipped through security to illegally enter Mar-a-Lago. She was carrying a thumb drive infected with malware. Guests: Jonathan Blitzer Leon Fresco Laura Sanders David Fahrenthold
08/04/1933m 29s

Politics with Amy Walter: Those Who Draw the Lines...Have the Power

On this week's Politics with Amy Walter: The fight over redistricting and who gets to wield the pen. “Slay the Dragon,” chronicles the challenges to congressional maps in several states that have been accused of partisan gerrymandering including Michigan and Wisconsin. In Michigan, voters approved a ballot measure in 2018 to take map-drawing power out of the hands of the legislature and put it into the hands of an independent commission. The film also follows the legal team involved in Gill v. Whitford as that case from Wisconsin makes its way to the Supreme Court of the United States.  Barak Goodman is the co-director of Slay the Dragon. The film will premiere later this month at The Tribeca Film Festival. Scott Walker was the governor of Wisconsin from 2011 to 2019. During his tenure, Republican lawmakers created new congressional districts which he then signed into law. Walker is now the Finance Chairman of The National Republican Redistricting Trust, but he's also been accused by critics of partisan gerrymandering. Amy Walter speaks to Walker about why he decided to continue to focus on an issue that has embroiled him in so much controversy. Eric Holder, the Attorney General under President Obama, recently wrote an editorial for The Washington Post in which he announced that he will not be running for president, and instead will focus his energies on the “fight to end gerrymandering.” We talk to Holder about why he thinks this is a such an important issue for Democrats to combat right now.  On March 26th, the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral arguments in this term’s gerrymandering case. Amy Howe, the co-founder of SCOTUSblog, brings us up to speed on what happened and what to watch for. 
05/04/1945m 30s

Baltimore's Mayor Embroiled in Children's Book Scandal

Baltimore's Mayor Embroiled in Children's Book Scandal There are questions about Mayor Catherine Pugh's self-published kids book, and whether or not buyers were given access to government influence. The Death of the Lyell Glacier Yosemite National Park's Lyell Glacier is dying. Writer Dan Duane joined Yosemite geologist Greg Stock in a hike up to the glacier, which is now a fraction of its original size. Making Arab American Theater Muslim and Arab American theater are having a moment. But the communities at the hearts of these shows fear they will only garner attention if they are about that identity. Guests: Alec MacGillis Liz Bowie Dan Duane Greg Stock Jamil Khoury Yussef El Guindi
04/04/1931m 53s

Making Reparations Work in America

Making Reparations Work in America 2020 candidates are speaking up about reparations. But this debate goes far beyond being a political talking point. Congressional Failure to Approve Puerto Rico Recovery Aid Reflects Long History of Bipartisan Neglect Puerto Rico's government recently had to cut food stamp benefits, adding further insecurity to an already vulnerable population. McConnell Moves To Limit Debates Over Judges To Two Hours Mitch McConnell’s latest push to fill the courts with young conservative judges involves a rule change that would limit floor debate over nominations to two hours total. Lori Lightfoot Voted in as Chicago's First African American Woman Mayor On Tuesday, Chicago became the largest U.S. city to elect an African American woman as mayor. Now, all eyes are on how Lori Lightfoot will address issues from gun violence to policing. Lesley McSpadden, Michael Brown's Mother, Loses Ferguson City Council Race The election of Fran Griffin means that the city council now has an even split between black and white representatives for a majority black city that’s rife with racial tension. Guests: Maxine Crump Katherine Franke Nkechi Taifa Dánica Coto Andrea González-Ramírez Lawrence Hurley
03/04/1937m 51s

Facebook Promises To Combat Divisiveness and Improve Privacy. Again.

Facebook Promises To Combat Divisiveness and Improve Privacy. Again.  Mark Zuckerberg called for increased oversight to help reign in harmful content and fake news, as well as improve privacy. Governor Ralph Northam Returns to the Public Eye Following Scandal Virginia's Governor, Lt. Governor and Attorney General all faced scandal, yet all remain in their jobs. What happens from here and how do Virginian's feel about it? In Hulu's "Shrill," a Fat-Phobic World Is the Punchline  Shrill, based on the Lindy West memoir of the same name, explores the personal story of a self-described fat woman in pursuit of her own lost power. Guests: Issie Lapowsky Corey D.B. Walker Samhita Mukhopadhyay
02/04/1931m 36s

Trump Administration's Immigration Policies May Be To Blame for the Current Border Crisis`

Trump Administration's Immigration Policies May Be To Blame for the Current Border Crisis Your immigration news roundup: migrant family surge, Central American aid cut, and threats to shut the border. Why Country Music Classifications Often Fall Along Racial Lines Last month, Billboard removed the country-trap song, “Old Town Road,” from its country chart. The decision has highlighted how music genres are often classified along racial lines. After Cyclone Idai, Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe Struggle with Scope of Relief Effort The UN's World Food Programme has equated the challenges to those of the humanitarian crises in Yemen, Syria, and South Sudan. Guests: Dara Lind Lomi Kriel Kiana Fitzgerald Dasen Thathiah
01/04/1931m 14s

How to Win Wisconsin

In 2016, Donald Trump cracked the so-called blue wall in the industrial Midwest winning Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin. This week on Politics with Amy Walter, what will it take for Democrats to win back Wisconsin? Plus a conversation with presidential candidate Julián Castro. To begin the hour, Craig Gilbert, Washington Bureau Chief at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, explores what tipped the state to President Trump’s favor in 2016 and what it will take for Democrats to win it back in 2020. Republican Congressman Sean Duffy represents Wisconsin’s 7th district in a rural part of the state. Congressman Duffy talks to Amy Walter about why President Trump performed so well in rural areas in 2016 and weighs in on whether or not Trump’s trade policy and tariffs will hurt him there in 2020.  Congresswoman Gwen Moore joins Amy Walter to reflect on 2016 and the course correction Democrats have made in the state. And Senator Tammy Baldwin, who won re-election in 2018, has been offering advice to some of the 2020 candidates who have asked her the secret to running as a liberal Democrat in the state.  To end the hour, we talk to Julian Castro. Castro served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development during the Obama administration. He was also the mayor of San Antonio. He announced he was running for president on January 12, 2019. 
29/03/1945m 0s

It's Not Just the Special Olympics, Betsy DeVos Takes Heat for Special Ed Cuts

It's Not Just the Special Olympics, Betsy DeVos Takes Heat for Special Ed Cuts  The Education Secretary has called for cuts to the Special Olympics, as well as programs to help students who are blind, deaf, and otherwise require special education services.  How a Changing Credit Industry Could Hurt Consumer Privacy Consumer credit-reporting company Equifax and credit score company FICO are partnering to sell consumer data to banks. But how secure is that data following the 2017 Equifax data breach? Adjunct Professors are Organizing; Demanding Better Pay, Respect Facing budget cuts, colleges across the country are hiring less full-time professors and more adjuncts. Guests: Emmanuel Felton AnnaMaria Andriotis Danielle Douglas-Gabriel
28/03/1930m 2s

Supreme Court Weighs Arguments Over Partisan Gerrymandering

Supreme Court Weighs Arguments Over Partisan Gerrymandering On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard two cases involving the design of congressional maps. The Takeaway looks at how gerrymandering has shaped national politics, particularly since 2010. Trump Administration Gets Behind New Effort to Overturn the Affordable Care Act The Department of Justice announced support of a district court ruling that argued the entire ACA was unconstitutional just as Democrats announce new health care legislation. Ogossagou Massacre: More Than 150 Fulani Villagers Killed in Mali  Part of the rise in violence against the Fulani herding population has come because of charges that the nomadic herding group has ties to Islamist militant groups. How Exposure to Gun Violence Can Impact Young People Recent suicides have drawn attention to the impacts of witnessing a mass shooting, especially in young people. Exposure to any kind of gun violence can have an impact on mental health.  Guests: David Daley Mary Agnes Carey Corinne Dufka  Maryse Richards Sandro Galea
27/03/1941m 40s

Will the Mueller Report Shift Public Trust in American Institutions?

Will the Mueller Report Shift Public Trust in American Institutions? Following the release of a summary of the Mueller Report, what has the investigation meant for Americans’ trust in our institutions, from the Department of Justice to the media? How Does the Mueller Report Affect Democratic Agenda? The Department of Justice exonerated President Trump at a time when House Democrats are ramping up their investigations into the president. Enforcing Ban on Bump Stocks Will Be Challenging  The federal regulation set to go into effect Tuesday is based mostly on the honor system.  Hunger 9 Strike to Raise Awareness on Gun Violence in Miami Although crime has gone down overall in Miami-Dade County, gun violence disproportionately affects black neighborhoods.  Guests: Margaret Sullivan Aziz Huq Representative Eric Swalwell Karen Rouse Matt Vasilogambros Nadege Green
26/03/1933m 33s

The Mueller Report is In; What Does it Mean?

The Mueller Report is In; What Does it Mean? Attorney General William Barr released a letter to Congress detailing the Mueller Report's key findings. Amy Walter on Congress's Next Moves Amy Walter joins us to talk about the Democratic response to Barr’s summary. Who's Entitled to What Information About the Mueller Investigation? Robert Mueller must stay silent, says former independent counsel Ken Starr. So who is entitled to what information about the Mueller report, and what's behind the rules surrounding him? Guests:  Marcy Wheeler Ilya Marritz Amy Walter Robert Ray
25/03/1930m 47s

Politics with Amy Walter: The Democratic National Committee's 2020 Transformation

After all the drama in 2016, the Democratic National Committee has reformed the nomination process. Today on Politics with Amy Walter from The Takeaway, a look at the new rules and what impact they could have both intended and unintended. Tom Perez was elected as chairman of the DNC in 2017. Perez's mission is to insure that 2020 isn’t a repeat of 2016. That doesn’t just mean winning, it means re-instilling faith in the system for Democrats. And the DNC has done a lot of work on this front. Amy Walter talks with chairman Perez about the reforms the DNC has undertaken. Also: we look into the potential unintended consequence of the new superdelegate rule with Dave Wasserman from the Cook Political Report. Julia Azari, an associate professor of political science at Marquette University, gives us the rundown on the new and confusing debate rules. Jeff Link, a longtime Iowa Democratic strategist, explains what’s new for the first caucus state and the role that Iowa plays in the presidential nominating process. We also tackle the unwritten rules on money and fundraising with Maggie Severns of Politico and try to figure out what the role of the DNC actually is these days, and how it’s changed in the last 25 years with Jamal Simmons of HillTV. Amy's Final Take:  When it comes to covering a primary, the media spends most of its time focused on candidates - their personalities, their policies, and their blunders. But, winning candidates spend a lot of their time focused on the unsexy stuff - how to leverage the rules to their advantage. For example, Barack Obama’s campaign in 2008 realized early on that the delegate rules meant that caucuses were going to win him a lot of delegates - even if they didn’t garner as much media attention as big primary states like Pennsylvania or Texas. This year, Democrats have lots of new written and unwritten rules to figure out. How to raise lots of money without looking beholden to corportists and one percenters. How to get on the debate stage - and make the most of that opportunity. And, how to convince primary voters that they won the process fair and square. As we saw in 2016, winning the primary is only one part of the challenge for the nominee. He or she has to keep the party unified and inspired all through the general election too. Read her latest Cook Political Report here.
22/03/1946m 59s

No Tap or Toilet: Over One Million Americans Lack Access to Running Water

No Tap or Toilet: Over One Million Americans Lack Access to Running Water Most Americans take access to water for granted. Recovering From The Midwest Floods Last week, an intense winter storm swept the Midwest. The floods that followed were the worst in 50 years. What can farmers do to protect themselves from extreme weather? New Threat To Felon Voting In Florida Last November, Floridians voted to give the right to vote back to felons who had served their sentences. But new bills threaten to disenfranchise almost half of of them again. Is Jordan Peele's "Us" the First Marxist Horror Film? Peele tackles race, class, and psycho-doppelgangers from a parallel universe in his follow-up to "Get Out." Guests: George McGraw Ken Anderson Kira Lerner Valerie Complex Rafer Guzman
21/03/1938m 59s

Who Wins When Public Schools Have Selective Admissions Policies?

Who Wins When Public Schools Have Selective Admissions Policies? A disproportionately small number of black and Latino students were admitted to New York City’s most elite public high schools.  'Secret' Treatment Centers Holding Special Needs Minors Who Cross Border In apparent violation of rules on caring for and holding migrant children with special needs, 'secret' treatment centers were not disclosed, even to the minors’ attorneys. Los Angeles Star Mike Trout Signs Record $430 Million Contract  Los Angeles Angels star outfielder, Mike Trout, is set to become the highest paid athlete in the history of American sports. Racial Discrimination in Jury Selection: Flowers v. Mississippi Heads to SCOTUS Curtis Flowers was convicted of murdering four people, and has been tried for that same crime 6 times. Did the D.A. unlawfully strike more prospective black jurors than white? Guests: Beenish Ahmed Alia Wong Aura Bogado Dave Zirin Samara Freemark
20/03/1937m 36s

How Transportation Can be a Means for Segregation

How Transportation Can be a Means for Segregation  Voters will decide whether to add a train line from Atlanta to Gwinnett county, a suburban area northeast of the city. The referendum raises issues of race and access. Protests Seek to Upend Algerian Politics Young people have been leading protests against Algeria's ruling government for weeks. The longtime president has agreed not to run for a fifth term, but has canceled the elections.  Netflix Cancels Cuban-American Family Sitcom "One Day at a Time" Netflix decision to cancel "One Day at a Time" has been met with criticism and a renewed discussion of the lack of representation in film and television. Guests: King Williams Shin-pei Tsay Ruth Michaelson Vanessa Erazo
19/03/1927m 4s

"I Don’t See How Anyone Can Feel Safe Anywhere": Mosque Shootings in New Zealand Shake the World

"I Don’t See How Anyone Can Feel Safe Anywhere": Mosque Shootings in New Zealand Shake the World The victims range between three and 71-years-old, shedding a light at the horrors of the attack in New Zealand. ICE Using License Plate Tracker Database to Find Undocumented People Last January, ICE paid over $6 million to get access to a privately maintained database of license plates, and the movements of the cars they’re registered to. With Brexit Deadline Approaching, UK Lawmakers Hit Another Legislative Roadblock Deal or no deal? Or no no-deal? The Spectacular Rise and Fall of Elizabeth Holmes  What the now-disgraced founder of the defunct blood testing company Theranos teaches us about the the dark side of Silicon Valley.  Guests: Lamia Imam Khaled Beydoun Kathleen Belew  Dave Maass William Booth John Carreyrou
18/03/1942m 15s

Senate Republicans Split From Trump, What Does This Moment Mean for the Future of the GOP?

Two things happened on the Hill this week. The most high profile of course came on Thursday when the Republican-controlled Senate voted with Democrats, in a rebuke of President Trump’s national emergency declaration for funding of the border wall. But here’s something that might have gotten lost: The day before seven Republican senators voted along with Democrats to end U.S. support of the Saudi led war in Yemen. What does this split tell us about President Trump’s relationship with Republicans in congress? Eliana Johnson is a White House Reporter for Politico. She’s been following this and is here to help us make sense of it all. We also hear from former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld who is considering a primary challenge to President Trump. Henry Olsen, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center and an opinion columnist at the Washington Post, thinks Governor Weld or any other ‘moderate’ Republican considering a challenge to President Trump is on a fool’s errand.   This month, Jay Inslee, the Democratic governor of Washington state, declared he is running for President, and climate change is his number one issue. According to a recent Pew Research Survey, about 67 percent of Democrats see climate change as a top priority, but only 21 percent of Republicans feel that way. Amy asked Governor Inslee how he plans to bring the country together over an issue that only half of the country views as a priority. Amy's Final Take:  Since that day in 2015 when he descended the golden escalator in Trump tower, people like me have wondered whether the GOP would split apart over Donald Trump. His populist, pro-tariff views would alienate business-friendly GOP types. His past support for abortion rights and his multiple divorces would scare off evangelical voters. And, his anti-immigration rhetoric went against the advice of establishment Republicans who warned that unless the GOP expanded its appeal beyond white voters, it would find itself in a demographic death-spiral. Yet, here we are - almost four years later - and the president is as popular with the GOP base as ever. What keeps the GOP together? The president has given Republicans what they wanted - and avoided (for now) the things they worried about him doing. Many don’t like the steel and aluminum tariffs. But, back in 2016 he warned of imposing a 45 percent tariff on Chinese-made goods. Instead of unilaterally pulling out of NAFTA, as he once warned he’d do, he re-negotiated the trade deal. And, he’s not wavered on cultural or social issues that are important to evangelical voters. In other words, he’s giving most Republicans what they wanted. Another unifying factor for the GOP: the 2020 democratic candidates. Even if you don’t like Trump, well, the potential Democratic nominee could be much, much worse.  This is why the president is spending so much time and energy labeling Democrats as the party of socialism. So, the GOP sticks with Trump because he’s giving them most of what they want, but also because the Democratic choice is unpalatable. We should stop asking if Trump is going to lose support from Republicans - he probably won’t. Instead, what we should be looking for is whether he can keep GOPers as motivated to turn out and vote.  Trump had an enthusiasm advantage over Clinton in 2016. In 2018, it was Democrats who were more motivated. Let’s see what 2020 brings. Read Amy's latest Cook Political report here.
15/03/1946m 33s

"To Me, This Is The Right Thing To Do": California Governor Halts State's Executions

"To Me, This Is The Right Thing To Do": California Governor Halts State's Executions California Governor Gavin Newsom announced a moratorium on executions in the state, which holds one quarter of the nation's death row inmates.  Ohio Seeks Lethal Injection Alternatives After Ruling From Federal Judge For years now, lethal injection has been a major point of contention in Ohio. And this month, executions in the state ground to a temporary halt. Young People Around the World Stage Mass Climate Change Protest Friday's Youth Climate Strike will see students from nearly 100 countries walk out of school to demand bold environmental action. Eight Years Into Syrian Civil War, A Writer Reflects  Marwan Hisham called for the end of the Assad regime. He could never have imagined what has transpired since. Guests: Marisa Lagos Carol Steiker  Andrew Welsh-Huggins Haven Coleman Eric Holthaus Marwan Hisham  
14/03/1941m 4s

CEO of Company Housing Migrant Children Detainees Steps Down

CEO of Company Housing Migrant Children Detainees Steps Down The C.E.O. of Southwest Key, a private company that houses the plurality of migrant children in U.S. shelters, has resigned after facing scrutiny from a financial probe. Racial Disparities Persist in Stillbirth Rates According to new data, the black stillbirth rate in Ohio is twice the white stillbirth rate. Diplomatic Situation in Venezuela Worsens Amid Countrywide Power Outages Widespread power outages have escalated the tumultuous situation in Venezuela, where the U.S.-backed opposition has been attempting to overthrow President Nicolas Maduro since January. Salacious College Admissions Scandal Highlights Commonplace Inequities  A new FBI investigation takes cutthroat college admissions to a whole new level, but the 1% shelling out big bucks to get their kids into college is nothing new. Guests: Kim Barker Katherine Hawkins Anne Glausser Andrew Rosati Natasha Warikoo
13/03/1937m 3s

Companies Might Have to 'Lean In' to Transparency by Reporting Salaries

Companies Might Have to 'Lean In' to Transparency by Reporting Salaries  For all the leaning in, women still made 82 cents on the dollar in 2017. Women of color fared even worse. U.N. Environment Assembly Begins in Nairobi Thousands of officials, including heads of state and business leaders, are in Nairobi this week for the UN’s Environment Assembly. Cleaning Up After the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster After the biggest nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, Japan is continuing its clean-up of Fukushima. And it's getting a little assistance from an unlikely helper: robots.
12/03/1928m 27s

"I Felt the System Was Raping Me All Over Again": Senator McSally Reveals Sexual Assault in the Military

"I Felt the System Was Raping Me All Over Again": Senator McSally Reveals Sexual Assault in the Military Republican Senator Martha McSally from Arizona shared her story of assault in the military. Reports show things have not changed much since her rape by a superior officer. Trans Athletes Navigate the World of High School Sports As more high school students come out as trans, their experience as athletes can vary greatly depending on where they live.  Trump Rescinds Drone Strikes Transparency Order President Trump rolled back an Obama-era measure that requires the military and CIA to publish data on drone strikes carried out in non-combat zones.  Guests: Patricia Murphy Lory Manning Katie Barnes Jeremy Scahill Ned Price
11/03/1934m 46s

Divide Over Israel Remains After House Passes Generic "Anti-Hate" Measure

Divide Over Israel Remains After House Passes Generic "Anti-Hate" Measure After initial plans to condemn anti-Semitism more specifically were scrapped, the U.S. House of Representatives' Democratic leadership opted for a more generic "anti-hate" measure. Amy's Take: Where Have Bipartisan Priorities Gone? Amy Walter examines why Democrats and Republicans no longer agree about which issues demand the greatest urgency. Citizenship Question Defies Purpose of the Census, Says CA Sec. of State "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" That question has not been asked as part of the full, once-a-decade census since 1950.
08/03/1947m 17s

Border Crossings Swell as Resources for Migrants Diminish

Border Crossings Swell as Resources for Migrants Diminish U.S. Customs and Border Protection released new data on migrant crossings at the border, revealing a system overwhelmed by more unauthorized crossings than seen in over a decade. How Natural Disasters and Recovery Efforts Discriminate Against the Poor The Alabama tornadoes blew through a low-income communities and left many mobile homes mangled.  EXCLUSIVE: New Jersey ICE Detainee Details Transfer, Force-Feeding During Hunger Strike A man detained by ICE in New Jersey told WNYC's Matt Katz that in 2018, while on a hunger strike, ICE transferred him from New Jersey to El Paso, where he was force-fed. Director Sebastián Lelio on Remaking His Own Film and the Limits of Representation “Gloria Bell,” a new movie starring Julianne Moore, opens this Friday. It’s an English-language remake of the 2013 Chilean film, “Gloria,” but both are made by director Sebastián Lelio. Guests: Sheri Fink Dr. Carlos Gutierrez Pat Duggins Matt Katz Ranjana Natarajan Sebastián Lelio
07/03/1940m 22s