Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

By BBC Radio 4

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Episodes

Mistresses, Ultrasound 'bra', Diane Foley, Black girls in education

It is has been 11 years since the American journalist James Foley was kidnapped in northern Syria, and nearly a decade since his mother, Diane Foley, discovered he had been beheaded by Islamic State fighters. Diane has written a book with the novelist Colum McCann, called American Mother, in which she recounts the story of her son’s kidnapping and murder, and her campaign to improve the chances of Americans wrongfully detained abroad. She joins Emma Barnett in the studio.In the UK, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer; around 55,000 women are diagnosed every year. Emma speaks to Professor Canan Dagdeviren, who has invented a piece of wearable tech that fits inside a bra which may lead, one day in the future, to the creation of an ultrasound bra, able to screen for breast cancer in between check-ups. Canan featured on the BBC’s 100 Women list for 2023 and first sketched the idea at her aunt Fatma’s bedside, who had been diagnosed with breast cancer.From Queen Camilla to Monica Lewinsky, has the perception of mistresses changed in recent decades? Someone who believes that the so-called 'other woman' has had a cultural rebrand is the author Madeleine Gray, who has written a novel about an affair - but from the perspective of the mistress. Green Dot follows 24-year-old Hera who starts a messy relationship with an older married colleague. Madeleine joins Emma to discuss.How do black girls and women experience education in Britain today? Sociologist Dr April-Louise Pennant of Cardiff University joins Emma to discuss why the adultification of black girls means that Black Caribbean girls are excluded from school at double the rate of white girls and why intersectionality means the issue of afro hair continues to affect black girls' education today. She explores these issues and more in her book, Babygirl, You’ve Got This! Experiences of Black Girls and Women in the English Education System.Presenter: Emma Barnett Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
22/02/24·57m 12s

Ukraine children, Director of Wicked Little Letters Thea Sharrock, The implications of a new AI study on the brain

This week marks two years since Russia began its full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Ukraine's government says it has identified 20,000 children who have been abducted by Russian forces. Now Qatar has brokered the third and largest deal, which will see eleven Ukrainian children reunited with their families. Emma speaks to the BBC’s Hague Correspondent, Anna Holligan and film maker Shahida Tulaganova, who directed the ITV documentary, Ukraine’s Stolen Children.Wicked Little Letters is a new black comedy film set in Littlehampton in the 1920s. It follows two neighbours, deeply conservative Edith Swan played by Olivia Colman and rowdy Irish single mother Rose Gooding played by Jessie Buckley. When Edith and other residents begin to receive poisonous pen letters full of obscenities, potty mouthed Rose is charged with the crime. The director, Thea Sharrock, joins Emma.A new scientific paper from researchers at Stanford University using AI has shown the ability to spot consistent differences between men and women's brains. Gina Rippon,  neuroscientist and author of The Gendered Brain & Professor Melissa Hines, director of the Gender Development Research Centre at the University of Cambridge join Emma.How much do you know about your female ancestors? There’s a growing trend in finding out more about our family histories – but it’s harder to find details about women than men. Founder and director of the genealogy service Eneclann, Fiona Fitzsimons and Ailsa Burkimsher who successfully campaigned for mothers' names to be on marriage certificates join Emma.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
21/02/24·56m 50s

Tracey Crouch MP, Marina Litvinenko, Author Kiley Reid

Former government minister Tracey Crouch has joined the list of MPs who’ve said they won’t be standing at the next general election. She won the former Labour seat of Chatham and Aylesford in 2010 and has turned it into a healthy majority of more than 18,000 for the Conservatives. A self confessed 'sports nut', in 2015 she attained her dream job as sports minister and oversaw the government’s football governance review. In 2018 she resigned in protest at the government’s 'unjustifiable' refusal to speed up plans to curb controversial fixed odds betting terminals. Four years ago as the pandemic hit, she was diagnosed with breast cancer, and following treatment went on to raise £153,000 for cancer charities. She joins Emma Barnett to talk about her decision to leave politics and her plans for the future. Yulia Navalnaya, the widow of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny who was announced dead in a Russian prison last week, has directly accused the Kremlin of poisoning and killing him and has vowed to continue his fight to change Russia. Someone who has been following this story intently is Marina Litvinenko, the widow of Alexander Litvinenko, who exposed corruption in Russia and died in a London hospital in 2006 after ingesting tea which contained radioactive polonium. The European Court of Human Rights found Russia was responsible for the killing of Mr Litvinenko in 2021. Marina joins Emma.Can you have a true friendship or relationship if one of you has more money than the other? Novelist Kiley Reid dominated bestseller lists with her debut, Such A Fun Age, which skewered white liberal guilt. Her new book, Come And Get It, returns to themes of race, class, and above all money. Set on a campus in southern America, it follows students and academics whose behaviour is shaped by money. Kiley joins Emma in studio.Women get more gain from exercise than men. That's the suggestion of a new study of 400,000 people. 140 minutes of moderate exercise a week reduced women's risk of premature death from any cause by 18% compared with being inactive. Men needed 300 minutes of exercise for a similar gain. Joining Emma to discuss is Baz Moffat, former Team GB rower and co-founder of The Well, an organisation that works to challenge the status quo for women in health, fitness and sport.
20/02/24·57m 18s

Aisling Bea, Profile of Yulia Navalnaya, Carmen Smith, Wellness v stoicism

The comedy and acting star Aisling Bea grew up in County Kildare in Ireland and in 2011 became the first woman for 20 years to win the prestigious stand-up competition So You Think You’re Funny? Her Bafta-winning sitcom This Way Up firmly established her as a presence to be reckoned with on our TV screens- last year she played the lead in the film based on Take That’s music, Greatest Days, and she regularly pops up on US TV and movies. She joins Emma Barnett to discuss her latest show, Alice and Jack, which has just begun on Channel 4.Following the death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, we look at the role of his wife, Yulia Navalnaya, and whether she might become the new face of the opposition. Yulia is due to speak with European foreign ministers in Brussels today. To discuss, Emma is joined by the Spectator's Russia correspondent, Owen Matthews, who was Bureau Chief for Newsweek in Moscow for more than a decade, and Sarah Rainsford, BBC Eastern Europe Correspondent who was expelled from Russia after many years, and is now based in Warsaw. Carmen Smith is 27 and set to become the youngest peer in the House of Lords. Carmen will replace Plaid Cymru’s only member of the Lords,  Dafydd Wigley (the Rt, Hon Lord Wigley) who is retiring aged 80, and was a previously leader of Plaid.  Carmen will be known as Baroness Smith of Llanfaes, the village where she grew up. She joins Emma to talk about the challenges ahead, the reaction to her selection and why she wants to join a body she believes should be abolished. Can Ancient Greek theories revolutionise our modern day lives? Australian author Brigid Delaney seems to think so. She talks to Emma about swapping wellness for stoicism, alongside classicist Professor Edith Hall.Presenter: Emma Barnett Produced by: Louise Corley Studio engineer: Steve Greenwood
19/02/24·57m 11s

Lorraine Kelly, Paralympian Lauren Rowles, Chief Constable Sarah Crew

Lorraine Kelly CBE has been described as the queen of morning television. Now after a lifetime of wanting to, she has written her first novel, The Island Swimmer, a story of family secrets, island communities and overcoming fear. Lorraine joins Anita Rani to discuss her novel, her life and her 40-year career.It’s been almost 40 years since most UK coal miners went on strike over pit closures and proposed redundancies. It was one of the most divisive conflicts of a generation – but what role did women play? And how did it change things for them? Nuala McGovern is joined by two women who were there at the time – Lisa McKenzie and Heather Wood – to share their experiences. Violence and abuse against shop workers rose to 1,300 incidents a day last year. That’s according to new figures from the British Retail Consortium. Nuala hears from Michele Whitehead, a workplace rep for the Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers, on what it’s like for her. Four years ago, Avon and Somerset Police offered Channel 4 unprecedented access to its Counter Corruption Unit, the people who police the police. Emma Barnett speaks to their Chief Constable, the first woman to hold the post, about why she made the decision to let the cameras in, and the consequences of doing so.Lauren Rowles is a two-time Paralympic Gold, World and European champion rower, who was on the Woman’s Hour Power List of Women in Sport. This summer she’s hoping to break a record at the Paris Paralympics – she tells Nuala about that, and her work away from sport advocating for LGBTQ+ people and those struggling with their mental health. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
17/02/24·56m 47s

Lorraine Kelly, Actor and boxer Kali Reis, Presenter Gemma Cairney

Lorraine Kelly CBE has been described as the queen of morning television. She joined TV-am as their Scottish correspondent in 1984 and, save for a brief maternity leave 30 years ago, has barely left the schedules since - for the last 14 as host of ITV’s Lorraine. Now after a lifetime of wanting to, she has written her first novel, The Island Swimmer, a story of family secrets, island communities and overcoming fear. Lorraine joins Anita Rani to discuss her novel, her life and her 40-year career.The deaths of three women in one week, all allegedly murdered by their husbands, has caused outrage in Somalia and sparked days of protests over the country’s femicide rates. Police have named the suspects in all three killings, which took place in the first week of February, as the dead women’s husbands. Two of the victims were pregnant. The BBC's Fardowsa Hanshi, a video journalist with the Somali Service explains what's going on.Kali Reis is the breakout star of True Detective: Night Country. As the series nears its finale on Sky Atlantic on Monday, Kali joins Anita in the Woman’s Hour studio to talk about going from a career in boxing to acting with Jodie Foster. She is also an indigenous rights activist, who has Native American and African heritage, and was the first indigenous woman fighter to become a World Champion.Last month, Woman's Hour discussed a shocking report which warned of endemic misogyny and discrimination in the music industry. MPs from the Women and Equalities Committee found that sexual harassment and abuse is common. That report has resonated with many – and not just in the music industry. Award-winning broadcaster Gemma Cairney has written a piece in The Guardian about her experience, saying she’d battled racism and misogyny in creative industries for years. Gemma tells us about the reaction to her piece. Professor of Media, Culture and Communications at Brunel University Sarita Malik will explain why Gemma’s experience is so widespread in broadcasting.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Neva Missirian
16/02/24·57m 51s

Rain Newton-Smith, Paralympian Lauren Rowles, Homelessness

In April last year, The Guardian exposed allegations of rape, sexual assault and harassment at the Confederation of British Industry (CBI). Rain Newton-Smith took over as Chief Executive and pledged to reform the culture of the organisation. As she approaches a year in the job, Rain speaks to Nuala McGovern about what progress has been made. She also gives her reaction to the news that the UK fell into recession in December 2023.It’s been nearly a year since we announced the Woman’s Hour Power List, celebrating incredible women in the world of sport. Today we are joined by one of those who placed on the list ahead of her attempt to break a record at this summer's Paris Paralympics. The two-time Paralympic Gold, World and European champion British rower Lauren Rowles is training hard for what she hopes will be her third Paralympic Gold and joins Nuala to discuss her glittering career and her work away from sport advocating for LGBTQ+ people and those struggling with their mental health.  Lorna Tucker ran away from home at the age of 14 and ended up living on the streets of Soho in London. Now a filmmaker, her latest release, Someone’s Daughter, Someone’s Son, has forced her to revisit life on the streets, both from her own perspective and those currently sleeping rough. Writer Helen Russell moved to Denmark a decade ago and wrote a bestselling book, The Year of Living Danishly. Several books and three children later, she has now turned her attention to the parenting culture of Denmark and other Nordic nations. Her new book is How to Raise a Viking: The Secrets of Parenting the World's Happiest Children. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucy Wai
15/02/24·57m 47s

Surviving cancer five times, Government's independent rape advisor, Miners’ strike 40 years on, My Life with the Walter Boys

Violence and abuse against shop workers rose to 1,300 incidents a day last year, up by 50% in the year to September 2023. That's according to new figures by the British Retail Consortium. Nuala hears from Michele Whitehead, a workplace rep for USDAW who has worked at a convenience store in Wolverhampton for 20 years.Dr Natalie Yates-Bolton is 57 and has survived cancer five times. The senior lecturer in nursing was first diagnosed at the age of 22 whilst still at university. She's had 11 operations, 30 sessions of chemotherapy and 55 rounds of radiotherapy. Natalie joins Nuala McGovern to discuss what’s helped her get through three decades of cancer care. Professor Katrin Hohl is the new independent advisor to the Government on rape. She joins Nuala to discuss her new role, and her priorities for change. Forty years ago next month most of the coal miners in the UK went on strike over pit closures and proposed redundancies. The strike lasted a year and was one of the most divisive conflicts of a generation. On Sunday, BBC Two is broadcasting Miners’ Strike: A frontline Line Story, which features personal testimony from men and women on the frontline of the strike. Nuala’s joined by two women who were there at the time to discuss their experiences: Lisa McKenzie appears in the film and was a teenager when her dad was on the picket lines and Heather Wood was also very active in the strike. My Life with the Walter Boys is a teen drama on Netflix that hit 12 million views in it’s first week alone. It was adapted from a book written by Ali Novak when she was just 15 years old. She joins Nuala to talk about the transformation of her book to a hit series along with the executive producer who adapted the story, Melanie Halsall.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Dianne McGregor
14/02/24·57m 38s

Joanne Froggatt and Dr Rachel Clarke, Minette Batters, NFU, Israel/Gaza war

A forthcoming three-part ITV drama Breathtaking, set in a fictionalised London hospital, tells the devastating impact of the Covid-19 pandemic through the eyes of Acute Medical Consultant Dr Abbey Henderson. The series is based on Dr Rachel Clarke’s book of the same name. She worked on Covid wards and is also one of the writers on the series. Dr Henderson is played by Joanne Froggatt, known for many roles including Downton Abbey, Sherwood and Angela Black. They join Emma Barnett to discuss.The "orange peel theory" is as trend where one person in a couple will ask their partner to peel an orange for them. As Valentine's Day approaches, what are the small gestures that mean so much? The ways you show your love? Minette Batters is standing down as President of the National Farmers' Union after six years of leading the organisation. She joins Emma to talk about her tenure leading the farming world, and what it felt like to be the first woman to do so.We've been looking at the experiences of women from both Israel and Gaza on the programme this week, asking what are the main issues facing women on each side as the war continues in to its fifth month. Today Emma speaks to Ayelet Razin Bet Or the Legal Adviser to the Association of Rape Crisis Centres in Israel. Ayelet has been travelling the world in recent months highlighting the horrific evidence of rape, sexual violence and mutilation of women during the October 7 brutal attacks by Hamas that killed 1,200 people and says she feels hugely let down and even betrayed by the response she has seen, particularly from other women. She also talks about her concerns for the 14 female hostages still being held by Hamas. To listen to our discussion about women in Gaza, please head to BBC Sounds to find it in yesterday's episode.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Giles Aspen
13/02/24·57m 45s

Bryony Gordon, Israel-Gaza war, Chief Constable Sarah Crew

Four years ago, Avon and Somerset Police offered Channel 4 unprecedented access to its Counter Corruption Unit, the people who police the police. The result is a three-part documentary series called To Catch A Copper. Emma Barnett speaks to Sarah Crew, Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset Police, about why she made the decision to let the cameras in, and the consequences of doing so.Bryony Gordon is the bestselling author of The Wrong Knickers, You Got This and Mad Girl. She won the MIND Making a Difference Award for changing the perception of mental health in the media, and even ran the London Marathon in her underwear! She joins Emma to discuss binge eating, OCD, menopause and her new book - Mad Woman. As the Israel-Gaza war enters its fifth month, we’re looking at what the impact is on women and children. Tomorrow, Emma will hear from women in Israel. Today, she speaks to BBC Arabic journalist Dalia Haidar and Frances Leach from ActionAid to hear more about what life is like at the moment for Palestinian women and children in Gaza. The three-time Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has confirmed she will retire this year after the games in Paris. The 37-year-old, regarded as one of the greatest sprinters of all time, won the 100m title in 2008 and 2012. Former Team GB sprinter Katherine Merry joins Emma to discuss the announcement. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
12/02/24·57m 46s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Rhianon Bragg, Businesswoman and entrepreneur Emma Grede, Amelia Earhart’s legacy

Rhianon Bragg was held hostage at gunpoint by her ex-boyfriend, Gareth Wyn Jones, for eight hours. He was sentenced in 2020 for stalking, false imprisonment, making threats to kill and possession of a firearm. Now, despite a parole board panel saying they are not satisfied it would be safe, he is being released from prison. Rhianon tells us about how her relationship with Wyn Jones developed, what happened at the end, and how she feels about him coming out of prison.Ambika Mod stars as Emma in the new Netflix adaptation of David Nicholls’ much-loved novel One Day. She acts opposite Leo Woodall as Dex, and their comedic romance plays out over 14 episodes and 20 years. You may have seen Ambika as Shruti, the junior doctor with a pivotal plot line in the BBC labour ward drama This is Going to Hurt. She tells us about taking on this lead role.On Thursday Kate Garraway returned to Good Morning Britain following the death of her husband, Derek. She spoke about her reaction to being called a widow for the first time, by a delivery man, apologising for her loss. We hear from Poorna Bell, a journalist and author who lost her husband in 2015, and Karen Sutton, host of The Widow Podcast, who became a trained grief coach after her husband died in 2016.New sonar images from deep in the Pacific Ocean might have located the wreckage of Amelia Earhart’s missing plane. Has Earhart’s disappearance finally been solved, or has the obsession with this mystery distracted us from the pioneering woman herself? Pilot Katherine Moloney and historian Dr Darren Reid discuss Amelia Earhart, her legacy, and women in aviation today.Emma Grede, a native East Londoner, now a thriving businesswoman in the US, is known for her entrepreneurial prowess and successful collaborations with the Kardashian sisters. Emma is a driving force behind iconic brands like Good American and Skims. She will soon be making her mark as a guest investor on an upcoming episode of BBC’s Dragon's Den.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
10/02/24·55m 40s

TikTok sleuths, Widows, Politicising Taylor Swift, Surgery critics 'silenced'

Yesterday, Kate Garraway returned to Good Morning Britain following the loss of her husband, Derek. She spoke about her reaction to being called a widow for the first time, by a delivery man, apologising for her loss. Anita Rani speaks to Poorna Bell, a journalist and author who lost her husband in 2015, and Karen Sutton, host of The Widow Podcast, who became a trained grief coach after her husband passed away in 2016. Anita Rani talks to a woman who says a cosmetic surgery clinic tried to silence her after she reported concerns about her eye operation. Signature clinic is taking five people in total to court after they posted negative reviews or comments on support groups. A judge has thrown out an attempt to get a gagging order against one of them. BBC reporter Melanie Abbott speaks to the woman concerned. And that woman's solicitor tells Anita what she thinks this judgement means for free speech. A trend is surfacing on social media, where women reach out to one another with a request - Can you find out if my partner is cheating on me? Anita speaks to Becky Hayes from The Laura and Becky Show podcast, who is creating social media content out of these requests and a journalist who has researched the subject, Beth Ashley, for a discussion on the morality of social media investigators. Although payments are not taken for these requests and identities are kept secret, some might ask whether it’s appropriate to make humorous content, out of what could possibly be very devastating news for someone. And without the context of the relationship to inform them, whether the trend invade people’s privacy. Fans are eagerly waiting to see if Taylor Swift will make it from Tokyo to Las Vegas in time to support her American footballer boyfriend Travis Kelce at the US Super Bowl this Sunday. Many in the Trump camp are watching closely too, as right-wing conspiracy theories run wild that the pop megastar might use the event to influence the presidential elections. What is going on? Anita talks to BBC reporter Holly Honderich, based in Washington.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
09/02/24·57m 34s

Vapes, Phoebe Dynevor and Amelia Earhart's legacy

A BBC investigation has uncovered evidence that vapes are being used to groom children into sexual or criminal exploitation. Last week, the Prime Minister announced that disposable vapes are set to be banned as part of plans to tackle the rising number of young people taking up vaping - measures will also be introduced to prevent vapes being marketed at children and to target under-age sales. However, there are concerns that banning the sale of vapes will encourage children to seek them elsewhere. Emma Barnett is joined by the BBC’s Hayley Hassall and the Children’s Commissioner for England Dame Rachel de Souza. Apparently, if you’re a middle-aged couple and your sex life has faded away you may be experiencing the “couplepause”. The therapist and writer Lucy Cavendish joins Emma to explain what this is and how to get the spark back. Actor Phoebe Dynevor, best known as Daphne Bridgerton in the Netflix blockbuster series, joins Emma in the studio. Her most recent role, as an ambitious hedge fund manager in the film Fair Play, has earned her a nomination for the EE Rising Star award at this year’s Baftas.New sonar images from deep in the Pacific Ocean might have located the wreckage of Amelia Earhart’s missing plane. Has Earhart’s disappearance finally been solved, or has the obsession with this mystery distracted us from the pioneering woman herself? Pilot Katherine Moloney and historian Dr Darren Reid discuss Amelia Earhart, her legacy, and women in aviation today.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
08/02/24·57m 35s

Businesswoman and entrepreneur Emma Grede, Crystal Hefner, Social media algorithms and misogyny

Emma Grede, a native East Londoner, now a thriving businesswoman in the US, is known for her entrepreneurial prowess and successful collaborations with the Kardashian sisters. Emma is a driving force behind iconic brands like Good American and Skims. She will soon be making her mark as a guest investor on an upcoming episode of BBC’s Dragons' Den, and she joins Emma to explain how she's learned more from her business failures, and what she looks for in a potential investment.The Welsh government has intervened in the running of the fire service in South Wales - after a toxic culture of misogyny and sexual harassment was uncovered during a review. In what's been called an unprecedented move, four Government-appointed commissioners have been brought in to restructure management. Emma speaks to Hannah Blythyn, Deputy Minister for social partnership and Member of the Senedd. Crystal Hefner, spent almost ten years of her life inside the Playboy Mansion after meeting founder and editor of Playboy magazine - Hugh Hefner - when she was 21. She became one of his infamous ‘girlfriends’ before marrying him, travelled the world and attended lavish parties. She has now written a book, Only Say Good Things: Surviving Playboy and Finding Myself, in which she provides an insight into her time spent at the mansion and her experiences of beauty standards and objectification. New research suggests social media algorithms prioritise serving harmful and misogynistic content to young people – with a fourfold increase across just five days shown to the study’s test personas. How do we keep young people safe online – particularly on social media sites? Emma discusses this issue with the report author, Dr Kaitlyn Regehr and Will Gardner from online safety organisation Childnet.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Steve Greenwood
07/02/24·57m 27s

Rhianon Bragg, Women of Substance, ultramarathon runner Allie Bailey

Rhianon Bragg was held hostage at gunpoint by her ex-boyfriend, Gareth Wyn Jones, for eight hours. He was sentenced in 2020 for stalking, false imprisonment, making threats to kill and possession of a firearm. Now, despite a parole board panel saying they are not satisfied it would be safe, he is being released from prison. Rhianon speaks to Emma about how her relationship with Wyn Jones developed, what happened at the end, and how she feels about him coming out of prison.The Prime Minister has upset some people by seeming to take a bet with TalkTV presenter Piers Morgan over his Rwanda policy. Rishi Sunak told presenter Rachel Burden on BBC 5 Live that he wanted to show his commitment to his immigration policy. Rachel joins Emma to discuss what the bet tells us, alongside Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor at the Spectator.Ultrarunner Allie Bailey is the first woman to have run the length of the Panama Canal and she’s completed more than 200 marathons and almost 80 ultramarathons. She joins Emma to talk about her new book “There is No Wall” which details how she was doing a lot of her running at the height of her struggles with alcoholism, depression and mental breakdowns.What can women artists’ work tell us about their addictions? Sally Marlow is a Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London. She’s been looking at five women artists for a BBC Radio 3 series, Women of Substance, to find out what their work can tell us about their addictions. She joins Emma to discuss researching Billie Holiday in particular, and what the lyrics of Billie's songs reveal about alcohol use in women.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
06/02/24·57m 21s

Ambika Mod, Forgiveness, Grandparent classes, Grammys

Ambika Mod stars as Emma in the new Netflix adaptation of David Nicholls’ much-loved novel One Day. She acts opposite Leo Woodall as Dex, and their comedic romance plays out over 14 episodes and 20 years. You may have seen Ambika as Shruti, the junior doctor with a pivotal plot line in the BBC labour ward drama This is Going to Hurt. She joins Anita Rani in the Woman’s Hour studio to talk about now taking the lead.A new programme on Radio 4, Forgiveness: Stories from the Front Line, explores how you survive and restore your life, when something truly appalling is done to you. Anita is joined by the founder of the Forgiveness Project, Marina Cantacuzino and Marian Partington, whose sister Lucy was murdered by Fred and Rosemary West in 1973.Grandparent antenatal classes give grandparents-to-be the chance to brush up on practical skills and get key advice on how to look after young kids again. Anita talks to Dr Francesca Dooley, founder of Happy Parents Happy Baby where she runs grandparent classes, and Francesca’s mother Beverly Bonora who was in her first ever class.Taylor Swift has made history at the Grammys by winning album of the year for a fourth time. Billie Elish, SZA and Miley Cyrus also took home major awards. Even Jay-Z got in on the act, calling out the fact that his wife Beyonce has never won album of the year. Anita discusses with Jude Rogers, arts and culture journalist for the Guardian and Observer and Tschepo Mokoena, freelance culture writer and author of Beyonce, Lives of Musicians.
05/02/24·56m 20s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Candace Bushnell, Lisa St Aubin de Terán, Ideological Gender Gap

The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, whose column in the New York Observer was the inspiration behind the TV series, joins Anita in the studio. The real-life Carrie Bradshaw is bringing her one-woman show about creating the hit series to the West End and then doing a UK tour.After 20 years of silence, prize-winning author Lisa St Aubin de Terán is back with a new book. Aged 16, Lisa married a Venezuelan landowner-turned-bank robber; she eventually ran away from him with her young daughter only to end up trapped in a castle with the Scottish poet George MacBeth. From there she eloped to Italy and in 2004 she settled in north Mozambique, establishing the Teran Foundation to develop community tourism. She lived there until 2022 when a cyclone took the roof off her house, and returned to London with a bag full of manuscripts including her memoir, Better Broken than New. She joins Emma in studio.A new study says that an ideological gap has opened up between young men and women in countries on every continent. These increasingly different world views could have far-reaching consequences. One of the leading researchers in gender studies Dr Alice Evans, Senior Lecturer in the Social Science of Development at King’s College London tells Emma why Gen Z is two generations, not one. Emma also speaks to Professor Rosie Campbell, Director of the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London.Emma talks to the TV presenter Kaye Adams about her 10-year battle with HMRC over their claim she owed almost £125,000 in unpaid taxes. Best known for her role on the Loose Women panel show, she also hosts the morning show on BBC Radio Scotland. She says the protracted legal case has left her feeling “utterly, utterly beat up and gaslit”, despite her vindication.From cute cat memes to plush toys, a new exhibition at Somerset House explores the power of cuteness in contemporary culture. But is buying into a cute aesthetic regressive or even sexist, or can cute be reclaimed as a form of protest? And how would you feel, as a grown woman, about being labelled 'cute' or 'adorable'? To discuss, Emma is joined by Dr Isabel Galleymore, a consultant on the Cute exhibition; and the journalist Vicky Spratt.Have you ever thought about where your name came from? Perhaps you were named after a favourite relative, a character in a movie or maybe your parents just liked the sound of it. Photographer Deirdre Brennan wanted to mark the 1500th anniversary of Saint Brigid, one of the patron saints of Ireland. To do this, she photographed Brigids all over Ireland and asked them how they felt about their name. She joins Emma to discuss the project - as does one of the Brigids involved in her project - Brigid McDonnell, a sheep farmer from County Antrim, Northern Ireland.
03/02/24·57m 31s

Candace Bushnell, No Queens in Europe, Early Years recruitment

Anita Rani speaks to Roopam Carroll, who recently sold her nursery business, and Ellen Broome, Head of Family and Childcare at the charity CORAM.Since the abdication of Queen Margarethe II of Denmark, there are no Queens in Europe. This is the first time this has happened since Queen Isabella of Spain was crowned in 1833. Will this make a difference in Europe? What difference have previous Queens in Europe made? Royal commentator Caroline Aston and journalist Emily Andrews join Anita to discuss. The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, whose column in the New York Observer was the inspiration behind the TV series, joins Anita in the studio. The real-life Carrie Bradshaw is bringing her one-woman show about creating the hit series to the West End and then doing a UK tour. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
02/02/24·57m 16s

Kaye Adams, Chemical attack, Gender gap, Saint Brigid

Nine people have been injured after a man threw a 'corrosive substance' over a mother and her two girls in Clapham, south London, yesterday evening. The family, three responding police offices and three other people who tried to help were taken to hospital after the attack. Witnesses described a "horrific" scene. Police are searching for the subject. Emma Barnett spoke to a solicitor Ayesha Nayyar, who has previously represented victims of acid crime. Emma talks to the TV presenter Kaye Adams about her 10-year battle with HMRC over their claim she owed almost £125,000 in unpaid taxes. Best known for her role on the Loose Women panel show, she also hosts the morning show on BBC Radio Scotland. She says the protracted legal case has left her feeling “utterly, utterly beat up and gaslit”, despite her vindication.A new study says that an ideological gap has opened up between young men and women in countries on every continent. These increasingly different world views could have far-reaching consequences. One of the leading researchers in gender studies Dr Alice Evans, Senior Lecturer in the Social Science of Development at King’s College London tells Emma why Gen Z is two generations, not one. Emma also speaks to Professor Rosie Campbell, Director of the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London.Have you ever thought about where your name came from? Perhaps you were named after a favourite relative, a character in a movie or maybe your parents just liked the sound of it. Photographer Deirdre Brennan wanted to mark the 1500th anniversary of Saint Brigid, one of the patron saints of Ireland. To do this, she photographed Brigids all over Ireland and asked them how they felt about their name. She joins Emma to discuss the project - as does one of the Brigids involved in her project - Brigid McDonnell, a sheep farmer from County Antrim, Northern Ireland.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Steve Greenwood
01/02/24·57m 31s

Arlene Foster, french women and high heels

Former Northern Ireland First Minister and DUP leader Arlene Foster joins the programme to talk about a return to devolution in Northern Ireland and the fourth anniversary of Brexit. Author Fiona Williams is out with her debut novel, The House of Broken Bricks. She joins Emma to talk about the ways in which the book relates to her real life in terms of navigating issues of race and belonging, and why she wanted to write a story so intertwined with nature. Thames Valley Police has referred itself to the policing regulator after a BBC investigation revealed that officers ridiculed an assault victim while watching body-worn video that showed her groin. Emma speaks with the BBC's Noel Titheradge about his investigation as well as Harriet Wistrich about misogyny in the UK police force.It’s out with heels and in with trainers. That’s what is happening in France where, according to a poll, women are falling out of love with high heels - instead going for a chunky boot or comfortable trainer. To discuss this fashion shift, Emma is joined by Professor of Fashion History Dr Serena Dyer and French shoe designer Marie Laffont.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Cece Armstrong Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
31/01/24·57m 24s

Misogyny in the music industry, author Lisa St Aubin de Terán, cervical smears

A new report comes out today by the Women and Equalities Select Committee about the serious problems faced by women in the music industry. To tell Emma Barnett what's in it is the Chair of the Women and Equalities Committee and Conservative MP Caroline Nokes. Emma also gets the reaction of academic and business research consultant Vick Bain.Sky Sports presenter Jo Wilson has been gracing our screens since 2011, but what you might not have known is that Jo has also lived with Stage 3C cervical cancer. After a difficult birth experience in 2020, she was reluctant to book a smear test, but convinced herself to do it 19 months later leading to her diagnosis. Her treatment was successful, and she is now speaking out about her personal experience in a bid to encourage women to take up their smear tests. NHS data shows that almost a third of women in England did not attend their test last year. Emma speaks to Jo and to Theresa Freeman-Wang, consultant gynaecologist and clinical advisor to Jo’s Trust.After 20 years of silence, prize-winning author Lisa St Aubin de Terán is back with a new book. Aged 16, Lisa married a Venezuelan landowner-turned-bank robber; she eventually ran away from him with her young daughter only to end up trapped in a castle with the Scottish poet George MacBeth. From there she eloped to Italy and in 2004 she settled in north Mozambique, establishing the Teran Foundation to develop community tourism. She lived there until 2022 when a cyclone took the roof off her house, and returned to London with a bag full of manuscripts including her memoir, Better Broken than New. She joins Emma in studio.Last week we spoke about the record low birth rate in China as the country struggles to revert effects of the decades long one-child-policy. Today, we turn our attention to Japan. The population of the world’s third biggest economy has been declining for 16 years. An ageing workforce, combined with the country's strict immigration control, has, among other things, led to significant labour shortages. Could women be Japan’s hidden asset? Emma speaks to Moeka Iida, The Economist’s reporter and researcher in Tokyo.
30/01/24·57m 5s

Fasting and women, Conscription, Cuteness exhibition

Following the speech last week by the head of the British Armed Forces calling for a new ‘citizen army’, we look at what this could look like and what role women would play. Emma Barnett speaks to former RAF Group Captain Kathleen Sherit the author of Women on the Front Line, and to Diane Allen, a retired Army Lieutenant Colonel. It's been reported that the Prime Minister Rishi Sunak fasts for 36 hours at the start of each week. He is said to stop eating by 5pm on a Sunday and doesn't permit himself to touch food again until 5am on a Tuesday, and allows himself to drink only black coffee and water. It is said that he has followed this practice for years. Emma is joined by Dr Saira Hameed to discuss fasting and how men and women should approach it differently. Amy and Anu are identical twins, but just after they were born, they were taken from their mother and sold to separate families. Years later they connected online and realised they were among thousands of babies in Georgia stolen from hospitals and sold, some as recently as 2005. Emma speaks to one of the twins, Amy Khvitia, and also Fay Nurse, a BBC journalist behind a new documentary, Georgia’s Stolen Children. From cute cat memes to plush toys, a new exhibition at Somerset House explores the power of cuteness in contemporary culture. But is buying into a cute aesthetic regressive or even sexist, or can cute be reclaimed as a form of protest? And how would you feel, as a grown woman, about being labelled 'cute' or 'adorable'? To discuss, Emma is joined by Dr Isabel Galleymore, a consultant on the Cute exhibition; and the journalist Vicky Spratt.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
29/01/24·57m 24s

Long Covid, Professor Jo Phoenix tribunal victory, Paying children for chores

Hundreds of doctors - led by campaign group Long Covid Doctors for Action - are planning to sue the NHS over claims that inadequate PPE provision has left them with Long Covid. Dr Nathalie MacDermott, joins Emma Barnett to discuss. Do you pay your children to do the chores around the house? The journalist Helen Carroll faced an online backlash after revealing she pays her son £40 a month to load the dishwasher everyday. To navigate the thorny issue, Sue Atkins, Parenting Coach and Author of Parenting Made Easy joins Anita Rani to discuss. In an exclusive interview, Emma speaks to the academic Professor Jo Phoenix who has won an unfair dismissal claim against the Open University after she was compared with “a racist uncle at the Christmas table” because of her gender-critical beliefs. China is experiencing its biggest population drop in six decades. In an attempt to recover from the ‘one-child policy’ introduced in 1980, the government are now urging women to have more children. But a large amount of women in China are saying no – they don’t want children, or to get married. Ty Dr Ye Liu from King’s College London and Cindy Yu, host of the Spectator’s Chinese Whispers podcast, discuss. Rapper Princess Superstar speaks to Emma about finally hitting the big time after a 30-year career in the music industry. Her song, Perfect, features on the soundtrack of the blockbuster film Saltburn. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
27/01/24·57m 9s

Lauren Sequeira, Rape misconceptions, Singer Julia Bullock

False beliefs about what does and doesn’t constitute rape are more deeply ingrained in young people than we might think. The Crown Prosecution Service has conducted research into what these misconceptions are, and the impact they’re having on the justice system when it comes to rape convictions. Anita Rani is joined by Baljit Ubhey from the CPS and Andrea Simon from End Violence Against Women to hear more.Julia Bullock is an American classical singer. Her debut solo album, Walking in the Dark, was nominated for a Grammy award. Next week, she is bringing her mixed-media project History’s Persistent Voice to London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. It shines a light on the words, work and experiences of Black American and British artists, and includes new songs commissioned from leading Black women composers. She joins Anita to discuss her music, her influences and her passions. Journalist Helen Carroll faced a backlash online when she revealed she pays her son £40 a month to load the dishwasher. This sparked a discussion - were you paid as a child to do household chores? Or do you think children should just be doing things around the house anyway without money? Parenting coach and psychologist Sue Atkins joins Anita to discuss. Domino Day is a brand new series coming to BBC Three which combines the world of modern dating with the world of the supernatural. Series writer Lauren Sequeira speaks to Anita about why the show’s themes of modern relationships and female empowerment are so important to her, and why she wanted to show witches in a whole new light. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
26/01/24·56m 47s

Long Covid, Holocaust Memorial Day, Princess Superstar

Hundreds of doctors - led by campaign group Long Covid Doctors for Action - are planning to sue the NHS over claims that inadequate PPE provision has left them with Long Covid, according to Sky News. One of those, Dr Nathalie MacDermott, joins Emma Barnett to discuss it. Emma is joined by the rapper Princess Superstar who, after a 30-year career, has finally hit the big time following her song, Perfect, featuring on the soundtrack for the blockbuster film Saltburn. Ahead of Holocaust Memorial Day, we speak to three Jewish women - one, a survivor who was born in a concentration camp - about how you keep teaching the lessons of the Holocaust as fewer and fewer survivors are around to tell their stories. The Chancellor Jeremy Hunt is facing pressure to fix "unfair" child benefit rules. Campaigners like Martin Lewis have called for it to be a focus of the Budget in March as he says single income families are being penalised. Emma talks to the chair of the Treasury Select Committee, the Conservative MP Harriet Baldwin, and Tom Waters from the Institute for Fiscal Studies.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
25/01/24·57m 18s

Claire Waxman, Victims' Bill, China birth rate, D-Mer Study, Academy Award nominations

The Victim’s and Prisoner’s Bill heads to the House of Lords today for the Committee Stage. What is it trying to achieve, and what difference will it make to women? Emma is joined by the Independent London Victim’s Commissioner, Claire Waxman OBE, and a woman who will share her personal experience of a partner convicted of child sexual abuse who, under the current law, still had access to his daughter. China is experiencing its biggest population drop in six decades. In an attempt to recover from the ‘one-child policy’ introduced in 1980, the government are now urging women to have more children. But a large amount of women in China are saying no – they don’t want children, or to get married. To discuss this further, Emma is joined by Dr Ye Liu from King’s College London and Cindy Yu, host of the Spectator’s Chinese Whispers podcast. D-MER is a relatively unknown condition that could affect around nine percent of mothers who breastfeed. Emma speaks to Charlie Middleton from the University of Dundee, who is leading a study into the condition to find out more about it, and Beth Strachan, who has D-MER and is currently breastfeeding. The Oscar nominations are out, and many feel that there are some key women who haven’t made the list, but should have. Among these are Barbie director Greta Gerwig and actor Margot Robbie – although Ryan Gosling has been nominated for his role in the movie. There’s only one woman director nominated – Justine Triet. Are women being snubbed? Film journalist Karen Krizanovich joins Emma to discuss.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Donald MacDonald
24/01/24·57m 20s

Professor Jo Phoenix tribunal victory, Actor Sarah Greene

In an exclusive interview, Emma Barnett speaks to the academic Professor Jo Phoenix who has won an unfair dismissal claim against the Open University after she was compared with “a racist uncle at the Christmas table” because of her gender critical beliefs.New York Times writer Amanda Taub brings us the latest news from the US Presidential race.Irish actor Sarah Greene on her new project, an eight-part series – Sexy Beast – which has just launched on Paramount+. And we hear about a campaign to get a new portrait of Margaret Bondfield, the first female government minister, commissioned and hung in Parliament with MP Alison McGovern and historian Professor Pam Cox.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
23/01/24·57m 26s

DJ Paulette, Abortion, Vinted co-founder, Childcare

Award-winning DJ Paulette has been in the music industry for more than 30 years. She got her start at the famous Haçienda nightclub in Manchester but has DJ'd all over the world. Her book, Welcome to the Club: The Life and Lessons of a Black Woman DJ, tells some of the tales of her career so far and shines a light on many other women in the electronic dance music industry. Paulette joins Emma Barnett.New guidance from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to healthcare workers says that suspected illegal abortions should not be reported to the police. This guidance, which applies to England and Wales, follows some recent cases where women have been convicted of having illegal abortions. Emma is joined by former Chief Superintendent at the Metropolitan Police Parm Sandhu, and Associate Professor in Criminal Law and Criminal Justice at Durham University Dr Emma Milne to discuss.Buying second-hand clothes is fashionable again, thanks to online marketplaces like Vinted, Depop and eBay. Emma talks to Vinted co-founder Milda Mitkute about what it takes to turn an idea into a successful business and why she decided to leave the company in 2017 when her first child was born.Is the Government's key childcare promise to parents in trouble? One newspaper is reporting that thousands of parents are being warned they won't be able to access the offer of free childcare to under twos this year. Emma gets the view of providers from Neil Leitch, Chief Executive of the Early Years Alliance which represents 14,000 nurseries, pre-schools and childminders, and June O'Sullivan CEO of LEYF nurseries.
22/01/24·56m 14s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Jodie Comer, Vicky McClure, Jameela Jamil

The Killing Eve star Jodie Comer joins us to discuss her latest film, The End We Start From. The protagonist is a new mum, who has to navigate a flooded Britain with her baby. Jodie also reflects on the powerful response to her play Prima Facie, and the impact of fame on her life.According to a new report by the charity Brainkind, up to one in two survivors of domestic abuse in the UK may be living with an undiagnosed brain injury. We speak to Steffy Bechelet from Brainkind and Dr Annemarie Burns, a consultant clinical neuro-psychologist.Vicky McClure joins us to discuss her new role as explosives expert Lana Washington in a new series of Trigger Point. How often do you feel weary and depleted? The burnout coach and historian Anna Schaffner discusses her book, Exhausted: An A-Z for the Weary.They were known as Israel’s “eyes on the border.” These were female Israeli border soldiers - who raised concerns about suspicious Hamas activity on the Gaza border in the run up to the October 7 attack - but those concerns went unheard by higher ranking officers. Hamas killed at least 1,200 people in that attack and took about 240 hostages, around 130 of whom are still being held. Since then, nearly 25,000 civilians have been killed in the Israeli bombardment that followed, according to the Hamas-run health ministry. We speak to the BBC’s Alice Cuddy and the author Mary Ann Sieghart.The actor and activist Jameela Jamil has made headlines over the years for her provocative, sometimes sweary social media posts, often calling out celebrity culture for promoting unrealistic ideals. She reflects on cancel culture and her resolution to post online with more 'grace and empathy'.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Erin Riley
20/01/24·56m 28s

Vicky McClure, Mean Girls, Women’s Health Strategy update

Vicky McClure is back on our screens as explosives expert Lana Washington in a new series of Trigger Point. Well known for her stand-out roles in Line of Duty and This is England, Vicky also set up the Dementia Choir, and recently received a MBE for services to drama and charity.The classic teen drama film Mean Girls has been remade as a musical film and it opens in the UK today.  Author Holly Bourne, who writes young adult fiction, and film critic Christina Newland discuss its enduring themes.2024 will be the biggest year ever for democracy as more than four billion people across the world go to the polls. To mark this historic milestone, the FT has launched Democracy, 2024, a short film series to examine what democracy will look like in the year ahead. Anita Rani talks to FT editor Roula Khalaf and the comedian Aditi Mittal, who has contributed to the series.Dame Professor Lesley Regan, the Women’s Health Ambassador for England, gives an update on the progress of the Government’s Women's Health Strategy.And the latest on the situation for women and girls in Afghanistan with BBC journalist Zarghuna Kargar.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Emma Harth
19/01/24·54m 19s

Jodie Comer, Olivia Attwood, Da'Vine Joy Randolph

The actor Jodie Comer became a household name playing the glorious baddie Villanelle in BBC drama Killing Eve, and she has gone on to win multiple awards for her work on screen and stage. She joins Emma Barnett now to talk about her latest film, The End We Start From. Think 28 Days Later meets The Day After Tomorrow with a twist – the protagonist is a new mum, who has to navigate a flooded Britain with her baby.Football commentators Eni Aluko and Lucy Ward are reported to be considering legal action against Joey Barton for his recent online criticisms of them. Eni Aluko has released a video on her Instagram speaking about the effect it has had on her. Where is the line between sexist bullying online and freedom of speech? Emma speaks to Henry Winter, Chief football writer at The Times and Seyi Akiwowo, founder of Glitch UK, a charity working to end online abuse, and author of How to Stay Safe Online.Olivia Attwood knows more than most about the financial – and emotional – cost of cosmetic treatments. The former Love Island contestant and star of The Only Way Is Essex has been open about the surgeries and 'tweakments' she has had. In her new ITV series The Price of Perfection, she goes behind the scenes to watch butts being lifted, lips being filled and breasts being enlarged. But she wants to make sure that teenage girls don’t make the mistakes she herself made.Da’Vine Joy Randolph has just won this year’s Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture for her portrayal of Mary Lamb in Alexander Payne’s new film The Holdovers. It’s about a teacher, pupil and head cook who end up spending Christmas together at a New England boarding school in the early 1970’s. Mary is grieving the loss of her son, who has been killed in Vietnam. Da’Vine has been tipped for more awards recognition to come, and she joins Emma in the Woman’s Hour studio.
18/01/24·57m 53s

Jameela Jamil, Claudia Winkleman, Abortion buffer zones, Female Israel border soldiers

The actress Jameela Jamil talks to Emma Barnett about her crusade for gentle exercise and body positivity as well as her new strategy for how she communicates on social media. She’s become one of the internet’s most prominent activists holding the beauty industry and celebrity culture to account for their unrealistic ideals with her provocative online posts. Her outspoken views have led to widely publicised social media spats which she says have left her with the desire to post with more “grace and empathy”. Best known for her role as Tahini in the Netflix series The Good Place she also hosts the podcast iWeigh which declares its “radical inclusivity” agenda where guests talk about what they “weigh” or value in life as opposed to their physical weight. New draft guidance from the Home Office appears to water down previously voted on laws about Safe Access Zones around abortion clinics. To talk about what this could mean for women seeking an abortion, and why the changes might be made, Emma is joined by Jo Gideon, Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent Central and Louise McCudden from MSI Reproductive Choices. They were known as Israel’s “eyes on the border.” These were female Israeli border soldiers - who raised concerns about suspicious Hamas activity on the Gaza border in the run up to the October 7 attack - but those concerns went unheard by higher ranking officers. Hamas killed at least 1,200 people in that attack and took about 240 hostages. Since then, more than 23,000 civilians have been killed in the Israeli bombardment that followed, according to the Hamas-run health ministry. Emma discusses with the BBC’s Alice Cuddy who reported on these soldiers and Mary Ann Sieghart, the journalist and author of “The Authority Gap: Why Women Are Still Taken Less Seriously Than Men and What We Can Do About it”The Traitors is back, we’re a few episodes into this second series of the hit reality TV show and things are hotting up at the Scottish castle, where a bunch of strangers are divided into traitors and ‘Faithful’ then compete to win up to £120,000.  Claudia Winkleman is the host who hand picks the traitors.  She joins Emma. Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley
17/01/24·57m 30s

Having more children after 40, Gladiators, Nikki Hayley profile

The first female Radio 1 DJ Annie Nightingale has died at the age of 83. She was a huge trailblazer when it came to breaking down barriers for women in radio. To mark her death, we hear a clip from 2007 when Annie spoke to Martha Kearney on Woman’s Hour.Two female journalists who spent over a year in prison for covering the death of Mahsa Amini have been released on bail by Iranian authorities. Niloufar Hamedi and Elaheh Mohammadi are appealing against their jail sentences and will remain out of prison until a decision is made. Emma Barnett is joined by Women's Affairs Journalist for the BBC World Service Ferenak Amidi to hear more.From Kourtney Kardashian to Sienna Miller, there’s been lots of recent examples of women who have kids early on in life, and then try to conceive with a new partner in their 40s and beyond. Journalist Grace Ackroyd has written candidly about her experience of this – she talks to Emma about having children again at a new stage in life, and the challenges she’s faced.Gladiators is back on our TV screens. The BBC’s reboot of the super popular 90s series was launched this weekend, with new games added to the show. We’ll hear the first impressions from one of the original Gladiators – Diane Youdale, better known as ‘Jet’, who joins Emma to talk about her own experience and advice she would give to the new female gladiators.Ahead of the US election this year, one woman has begun to challenge Donald Trump in the polls for who will be the Republican representative. To find out more about Nikki Haley, Emma is joined by Dr Leslie Vinjamuri, Director of the US and Americas programme at Chatham House, and Julia Manchester, national political reporter at The Hill who is reporting live from this week’s Iowa caucuses. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
16/01/24·57m 30s

Domestic abuse and brain injury, Calvin Klein advert, Exhaustion

Up to one in two survivors of domestic abuse in the UK may be living with an undiagnosed brain injury. That's according to a new report by the charity Brainkind. Emma Barnett is joined by Steffy Bechelet from Brainkind and Dr Annmarie Burns, a Consultant Clinical Neuro-psychologist.How often do you feel weary and depleted? Or perhaps just plain exhausted? Anna Schaffner knows these feelings well. Now a coach specialising in helping the exhausted, in her previous life as an academic, as a Professor of Cultural History at the University of Kent, she suffered from burnout. She has now written a book, Exhausted: An A-Z for the Weary.Since 1 January, working parents in England have been able to apply for a code to access new free childcare hours for two-year-olds, which will then kick in on 1 April. The scheme is part of a significant investment in childcare announced by the Government. But one campaigning organisation has found that parents are facing major challenges in securing a code. Joining Emma is Lauren Fabianski from the campaign group Pregnant then Screwed who carried out the survey.After the Advertising Standards Authority banned a Calvin Klein poster featuring the singer FKA twigs for presenting her “as a stereotypical sexual object”, we’re asking, what determines whether an advert is objectifying? Sarah Golding, the CEO of The&Partnership and journalist Rebecca Cope join Emma.Last week, Jade Robertson woke up to find that one of the dresses from her fashion brand Little Lies had sold out overnight – after Taylor Swift was spotted wearing it. Jade joins Emma to talk about what this means for her and her fashion brand. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
16/01/24·57m 59s

Weekend Woman’s Hour - Cush Jumbo, Spice Girls Stamp, Assisted Dying

Cush Jumbo is the award-winning actor known for her roles on the stage and screen, from The Good Fight to Macbeth. She joins Clare McDonnell to discuss starring in - and executive producing – the new crime thriller series Criminal Record. Cush stars as DS June Lenker, a police detective locked in a confrontation with an older detective, played by Peter Capaldi, over a historic murder conviction.For the first time, Royal Mail has dedicated set of stamps to a female pop group, to commemorate 30 years since the Spice Girls formed in 1994. Lauren Bravo, a culture journalist and author and DJ Yinka Bokinni joined Emma to talk about it.Last week on Woman’s Hour we heard the candid admission by the former Labour MP and Government Minister, Dame Joan Ruddock that she was ready to end her terminally ill husband's life using a pillow in a bid to end his pain. Her husband the former MP Frank Doran had been suffering from end stage bowel cancer in 2017, and she struggled to get him pain relief medication in the hours before he died. She is now calling for a free vote in the Commons to legalise assisted dying. The public debate around the subject has been revived in recent months by leading figures such as Esther Rantzen - who revealed that she is considering travelling to a Dignitas clinic in Switzerland if her cancer worsens. But others such as Baroness Ilora Finlay, a cross bench peer in the House of Lords and a palliative end of life care expert, are cautioning against a law change. She believes improved access to care and pain relief is the answer when people are dying rather than the taking of lethal drugs. She joins Clare McDonnell to reflect on the new push for a law change.Shere Hite - a name many people will remember, but some may not know. She was a pioneering feminist sex researcher who published her ground-breaking book, The Hite Report: A National Study of Female Sexuality in 1976. The book was seen by many as radical, changing prevailing notions about female sexuality. Shere went on to write and publish several more books, but endured intense and lasting criticism in the US, and eventually moved to Europe and renounced her American citizenship in 1995. She died in 2020. Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated Director, Nicole Newnham felt that despite how influential Shere had been in life, that she has since been forgotten. So Nicole produced the documentary, The Disappearance of Shere Hite, which is released in UK cinemas on January 12th. She joins Krupa to discuss it. As the number of pupils missing a significant amount of their education is about double the level it was before the pandemic, Clare is joined by Ellie Costello, the executive director of Square Peg, a not-for-profit which helps families that struggle with school attendance.
13/01/24·56m 39s

Quarterlife crisis, Family Courts, Northern Soul

A pilot scheme to allow journalists to report cases from three family courts in England and Wales is to be extended to almost half of the courts. From the end of January, coverage of cases at 16 more family court centres in England will be permitted. This means 19 of the 43 centres in England and Wales will be part of the Transparency Pilot. Families and individual social workers will be anonymous under the scheme. Krupa Padhy talks to Louise Tickle, a journalist who specialises in reporting on family courts and leads a project for the Bureau of Investigative journalism supporting other journalists to do the same, and Angela Frazer Wicks, Chair of the Family Rights Group and a parent with experience of the family justice system.Popular psychology tends to define a quarter-life crisis as the confusion, stress and anxiety individuals in their 20s and 30s feel about their goals, beliefs and relationships as they seek direction in life and look to find their place in the world. Satya Doyle Byock, a clinical psychotherapist based in the US is the author of the new book Quarterlife: The Search for Self in Early Adulthood and she joins Krupa to talk about young people's struggles with the push and pull of meaning and stability.Northern Soul is commonly associated with Northern England and the 1970s. But mother and daughter duo Levanna and Eve are turning this on its head. Through Levanna’s viral dance videos on social media and Eve’s DJing at their events in Bristol, they’re bringing Northern groove to the South West, all whilst introducing a new generation to the genre. They speak to Krupa about the release of their new album, Wonderful Night.Shere Hite was a pioneering feminist sex researcher who published The Hite Report: A National Study of Female Sexuality in 1976. The book was seen by many as radical, changing prevailing notions about female sexuality. It laid out the views of 3,500 women on sexuality and the female orgasm, but it was derided by some, including Playboy, which dubbed it the "Hate Report". Shere went on to write and publish several more books, but endured intense and lasting criticism in the US, and eventually moved to Europe and renounced her American citizenship in 1995. She died in 2020. Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated director Nicole Newnham felt that despite how influential Shere had been in life, that she has since been forgotten. So, Nicole produced the documentary, The Disappearance of Shere Hite, which is in UK cinemas from 12 January. She joins Krupa to discuss it.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan HannantPresenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
12/01/24·55m 42s

Zara Aleena's aunt, Spice Girls stamps, surge in scabies

Farah Naz, the aunt of murdered law graduate Zara Aleena, tells of her concerns that her niece’s killer has allegedly been caught having sex with a prison worker. Jordan McSweeney is serving a life sentence at high security Belmarsh Prison in South London.For the first time, Royal Mail has dedicated set of stamps to a female pop group, to commemorate 30 years since the Spice Girls formed in 1994. We talk to Lauren Bravo, a culture journalist and DJ Yinka Bokinni. We hear about the start of a new landmark Radio 4 documentary series called Child which follows a child’s development from fertilisation to first birthday from its creator India Rakusen.There’s been a surge in the number of scabies cases and experts are warning there’s an acute shortage of treatments which is turning it into a major public health threat. Emma Barnett talks to Dr Tess McPherson about who is most at risk from catching it and how best to avoid it.And we talk to barrister Harriet Johnson about a study which suggests rape convictions are 20% less likely in cases where victims give pre-recorded evidence. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Emma Harth
11/01/24·56m 39s

Cosmetic surgery reviews, Speed dating, Bangladesh elections, Assisted dying & palliative care

Woman’s Hour investigates the cosmetic surgery clinic taking legal action when patients post unfavourable reviews. Kate Kronenbach tells reporter Melanie Abbott she was disappointed when she had an operation to remove fat from her arms after losing 10 stone, and received a solicitor’s letter when she wrote about her experience on the Trustpilot website. Action has also been taken against five others. The Free Speech Union is supporting them in their case. Clare McDonnell discusses the story with Melanie and speaks to the Union and to patient campaigner Dawn Knight. Is speed-dating making a comeback? Apathy over dating apps seems to be pushing both men and women towards the kind of speed dating that was so popular in the nineties. But is it better than online dating? And does it work? Clare is joined by writer Radhika Sanghani and relationship counsellor Suzie Hayman to discuss.Bangladeshi PM Sheikh Hasina won a controversial fourth consecutive term in Parliamentary elections last elections last Sunday. The opposition party called it a 'sham' election, coming after mass arrests of her political opponents and refused to participate. The leader of the Opposition former PM Khaleda Zia – also female - is under house arrest. Between them the two women have dominated Bangladeshi politics since 1991. BBC News South Asian Correspondent, Samira Hussain, joins Clare McDonnell to tell us more about these leaders and the political situation in Bangladesh. Last week on Woman’s Hour we heard the candid admission by the former Labour MP and Government Minister, Dame Joan Ruddock that she was ready to end her terminally ill husband's life using a pillow in a bid to end his pain. Her husband the former MP Frank Doran had been suffering from end stage bowel cancer in 2017, and she struggled to get him pain relief medication in the hours before he died. She is now calling for a free vote in the Commons to legalise assisted dying. The public debate around the subject has been revived in recent months by leading figures such as Esther Rantzen - who revealed that she is considering travelling to a Dignitas clinic in Switzerland if her cancer worsens; and the late Dame Diana Rigg, who made a recording before her death making the case for assisted dying. But others such as Baroness Ilora Finlay, a cross bench peer in the House of Lords and a palliative end of life care expert, are cautioning against a law change. She believes improved access to care and pain relief is the answer when people are dying rather than the taking of lethal drugs. She joins Clare McDonnell to reflect on the new push for a law change.Presented by Clare McDonnell Producer: Louise Corley
10/01/24·57m 36s

Midwife shortages, Dating at 81, Jackie Mag anniversary

The number of midwives in England has increased by just 7% over the last year and some NHS Trusts in England have more than one in five midwifery jobs vacant, according to BBC research. The Royal College of Midwives says staffing gaps have to close. The BBC’s Health Correspondent Catherine Burns joins Clare McDonnell to talk about what her investigation into maternity units in England has discovered, and to share the story of Farzana, who had to give birth on her own after midwives said they were too busy to answer her calls.Carole Stone must have one of the best address books ever. A former producer of BBC Radio 4’s Any Questions, for years Carole has run 'salons' and parties bringing together hundreds of interesting people - politicians, actors, journalists. Carole’s partner, the TV broadcaster Richard Lindley, died four years ago. Carole joins Clare to discuss how and why she is looking for another soulmate at the age of 81. Could the next leader of North Korea be a woman? Clare gets the latest from lead correspondent at NK News, Jeongmin Kim, and hears more about what life is like for women on the ground with North Korea expert, Professor Hazel Smith.As the number of pupils missing a significant amount of their education is about double the level it was before the pandemic, Clare is joined by Ellie Costello, the executive director of Square Peg, a not-for-profit which helps families that struggle with school attendance. It’s 60 years this week since Jackie, the magazine for teenage girls, was first published. At its peak, it was selling more than a million copies a week. To celebrate the anniversary, Clare is joined by Nina Myskow, Jackie’s first female editor, and Wendy Rigg, a teenage fan who achieved her dream of working on Jackie.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Lottie Garton
09/01/24·57m 24s

Cush Jumbo, Church leader survivors, Exonerated sub-postmistress

Cush Jumbo is the award-winning actor known for her roles on the stage and screen, from The Good Fight to Macbeth. She joins Clare McDonnell to discuss starring in - and executive producing – the new crime thriller series Criminal Record. Cush stars as DS June Lenker, a police detective locked in a confrontation with an older detective, played by Peter Capaldi, over a historic murder conviction.A BBC investigation into one of Africa’s most influential pastors has uncovered hundreds of allegations of abuse, including a number of British victims. TB Joshua, who founded the Synagogue Church of All Nations in Nigeria, built an evangelical empire that drew presidents, Premier League footballers and millions of followers from across the globe - including from towns and cities across the UK. Multiple victims claim they repeatedly tried to raise the alarm with British authorities, including the Foreign Office, but an adequate investigation “never took place”. Two UK survivors of his abuse - Rae and Anneka - join Clare to discuss their experiences as ‘disciples’, why they left and the law changes they hope will result from this exposure.The Post Office Horizon scandal is once more dominating the headlines. Today, a petition calling for the former Post Office chief executive Paula Vennells to lose her CBE has received more than one million signatures, and yesterday the Prime Minister told the BBC the Government was reviewing options to help victims of the scandal. More than 700 branch managers were convicted of false accounting, theft and fraud based on faulty software. Currently, a public inquiry into the scandal is ongoing and the Metropolitan Police is investigating the Post Office over potential fraud offences arising from the prosecutions. One of the women who was falsely accused was Jo Hamilton. Her story has been told in the ITV drama Mr Bates vs. The Post Office, where she was played by the actor Monica Dolan. Jo joins Clare.What do you do if your child refuses to go to school? Today, the Government is expected to announce funding for a new initiative aimed at tackling school absences in England. More than a fifth of secondary school pupils in England are persistently absent. The new scheme will see funding for school attendance mentors, an initiative which has been trialled in a pilot by the charity Barnardos. Clare speaks to Nadine Good from the charity, and hears from head teacher Simon Kidwell.
08/01/24·57m 22s

Weekend Woman's Hour - Women in the metaverse, Author Vanessa Chan, Women and negotiation

Police are investigating what is possibly the first crime of its kind: a British schoolgirl playing a game in the metaverse was allegedly sexually assaulted by a group of online strangers. Given that this happened in a virtual reality game, it is not yet clear whether there is any crime here to prosecute. We hear from Helen Rumbelow from The Times, and her colleague Sean Russell, who has gone into the metaverse as both a man and a woman, and was struck by how different it was.How much of your daily life do you spend negotiating? Perhaps at work, or with your children – or even in-laws? Mum and a mic on Instagram, Jane Dowden, discusses the negotiations she has with her twins, and clinical psychologist Catherine Hallissey tells us what goes on in our brains while we’re negotiating, and the best way to do so with family.Is farming getting easier for women? New research out this week suggests that women working in agriculture are finding life worse now than they did 10 years ago. This comes as more women are showing an interest in pursuing farming as a career – with some agricultural colleges enrolling record numbers of girls onto their courses. We hear from Emily Norton, a female farmer and agricultural commentator, as well as Bridgette Baker, a young farmer who recently graduated, to find out their experiences in farming.Violinist Izzy Judd trained at the Royal Academy of Music and was an original member of the string quartet Escala, who shot to fame on Britain’s Got Talent in 2008. She met her husband Harry on the McFly Wonderland tour. Following marriage and three small children, Izzy has written two books - Dare to Dream and Mindfulness for Mums. She has now returned to her love of playing the violin, with a forthcoming EP - Moments, and a single - Somewhere in My Memory. The Storm We Made is a new book by the debut author Vanessa Chan. Set in what we know today as Malaysia across two timelines - British colonialism and Japanese colonialism - it follows bored housewife Cecily who risks it all to become a spy for a general. But her decisions have huge repercussions for her and her family. Vanessa Chan tells us about her book which was fought over in a seven-way auction by publishers in the UK.Steph Daniels gave up hockey in her 30s to teach PE and English and manage an all-female synth pop group called Zenana. However, in her 70s, she saw an advert for Bedford Hockey Club and decided to dust off her sticks. Since then, she’s even attended a trial for the over-70s England team and vows to try again next year. She tells us about reigniting old passions.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
06/01/24·53m 13s

Women and music in 2023, Nicole Jacobs, Women in farming

Female artists dominated the 2023 music scene. New figures from the British Phonographic Institute reveal that Miley Cyrus, Taylor Swift, Billie Eilish, Olivia Rodrigo, Raye, Dua Lipa, Ellie Goulding and many more - spent a record-breaking 31 weeks in the number one spot in the UK Singles Chart. But that’s not all... they had seven of the top 10 singles and even took the top vinyl album spot. Why was 2023 so good for female artists? And will it continue? We ask global music business lecturer and podcaster, Karlyn King, and music journalist Jo Kendall.Domestic Abuse Commissioner Nicole Jacobs says new Government plans to get rid of shorter jail sentences in England and Wales put women at risk. The new sentencing bill currently making its way through Parliament aims to give what are known as suspended sentences where people may have instead been given jail terms of 12 months or less. Estimates from the Office for National Statistics show around 2.4 million people - 1.7 million of those being women - suffered from domestic abuse in the year to March 2022.We're a few days into the new year - and maybe you're trying to start some new healthy habits, or even hygiene habits. And for some that's desperately needed - a new survey from the bathroom suppliers Showers to You shows that out of 2,200 UK residents, almost one in ten only wash their towels twice a year. 5% of men have admitted to washing towels once a year - compared to 1% of women. Professor Sally Bloomfield from the International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene explains what we should be doing to protect ourselves and others.Is farming getting easier for women? New research out today suggests that women working in agriculture are finding life worse now than they did 10 years ago. This comes as more women are showing an interest in pursuing farming as a career – with some agricultural colleges enrolling record numbers of girls onto their courses. Claire McDonnell speaks to Emily Norton, a female farmer and agricultural commentator, as well as Bridgette Baker, a young farmer who recently graduated, to find out their experiences in farming.Women’s Health magazine is an iconic brand in the UK and read globally by millions of people monthly. Women’s Health Editor-in-Chief Claire Sanderson has just made history as the first woman globally to also be appointed Editor-in-Chief of Men's Health. Claire joins Woman’s Hour to discuss what it means to be a woman editing a men’s magazine, whether there is a crossover with what women and men are reading and, in an age where we’re worried about body image, are these magazines useful?Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
05/01/24·55m 51s

Dame Joan Ruddock, Katherine Parkinson, Negotiating care with siblings, Author Vanessa Chan

Katherine Parkinson has graced our TV screens for almost two decades, from Doc Martin and The IT Crowd to Humans and Here We Go. Now she has a comedy drama airing on ITV called Significant Other, in which she plays one half of an odd couple - neighbours who meet in highly unusual circumstances. She joins Clare McDonnell to discuss. Former Labour MP and government Minister Dame Joan Ruddock tells Clare about her call for a free vote in the Commons to legalise assisted dying. She admitted she was ready to end her terminally ill husband’s life to stop his pain. Our New Year's day programme on negotiating provoked one listener to write to us: 'I would love you to cover negotiations between carers and their parent with dementia. Another world! As is negotiating between carer and their siblings'. Professor June Andrews, who’s a fellow of the Royal College of Nursing and an author of Carers and Caring, and Dr Lis Boulton, Health and Care Manager at the charity Age UK, discuss. The Storm We Made is a new book by the debut author Vanessa Chan. Set in what we know today as Malaysia across two timelines - British colonialism and Japanese colonialism - it follows bored housewife Cecily who risks it all to become a spy for a general. But her decisions have huge repercussions for her and her family. Vanessa Chan joins Clare to discuss her book which was fought over in a seven-way auction by publishers in the UK. Steph Daniels gave up hockey in her 30s to teach PE and English and manage an all-female synth pop group called Zenana. However, in her 70s, she saw an advert for Bedford Hockey Club and decided to dust off her sticks. Since then, she’s even attended a trial for the over-70s England team and vows to try again next year. She joins Clare to talk about reigniting old passions.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Dianne McGregor
04/01/24·57m 24s

Shakespeare's Women, Izzy Judd, Women in the metaverse

A new play - Shakespeare’s Women - transports ten of Shakespeare’s female characters from the 16th century to 2024, placing them in the same domestic abuse support group. Written by Lorien Haynes, this dark comedy gradually exposes each woman’s darkest secrets and asks what would happen if these protagonists survived their men and traditional narratives, to become flesh and blood today? Lorien and the director Jude Kelly, join Emma Barnett in the Woman’s Hour studio.Violinist Izzy Judd trained at the Royal Academy of Music and was an original member of the string quartet Escala, who shot to fame on Britain’s Got Talent in 2008. She met her husband Harry on the McFly Wonderland tour. Following marriage and three small children, Izzy has written two books - Dare to Dream and Mindfulness for Mums. She has now returned to her love of playing the violin, with a forthcoming EP - Moments, and a single - Somewhere in My Memory. Izzy joins Emma to talk about her music and motherhood.Police are investigating what is possibly the first crime of its kind: a British schoolgirl playing a game in the metaverse was allegedly sexually assaulted by a group of online strangers. Given that this happened in a virtual reality game, it is not yet clear whether there is any crime here to prosecute. Emma is joined by Helen Rumbelow from The Times and her colleague Sean Russell, who has gone into the metaverse as both a man and a woman, and was struck by how different it was.In 2015, BAFTA-winning film-maker Leslee Udwin decided that making programmes to raise awareness about issues like rape was not enough for her. Her investigation India’s Daughter - about Jyoti Singh Pandey who was raped, tortured and killed by six men on a bus in Delhi in 2012 – asked why men rape women. Leslee spoke to one of the attackers, who blamed the victim. Leslee decided to campaign for a revolution in education, not just in India, but in the UK and theoretically, every country. Her aim is to equip all children with the tools to ‘think equal,’ and reduce violence against women. She joins Emma.
03/01/24·53m 51s

Lavinia Greenlaw, Lindsay Duncan, the Irish mother and baby homes scandal

The names of Jeffrey Epstein's associates are likely to be published today, after a judge in the US ordered the release of court documents. Epstein took his own life after he was accussed of sexually abusing and trafficking underage girls. Names connected to him have previously been anonymised as John or Jane Doe; but now around 170 people, mostly men, will have their association with the former financier made public. Joan Smith, journalist and author, and Georgina Calvert-Lee, an equality lawyer at Bellevue Law, tell Emma Barnett what the list will mean.Lavinia Greenlaw is one of the country's leading poets and has now published a selected edition of her work, covering three decades of writing. She tells Emma about her new role as poetry editor at Faber, the first woman to hold the position. She is now the custodian of a back catalogue that includes TS Eliot, Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes, and the gatekeeper for aspiring poets of the next generation.It is ten years since journalist Alison O’Reilly revealed that up to 796 babies were buried in a mass, unmarked grave in the grounds of a former mother and baby home in Galway in Ireland. The Irish government has promised compensation but none has been paid out. Is this now about to change? Alison joins Emma to discuss the latest developments.And how far would you go to help a friend? In Lindsay Duncan's new drama, Truelove, on Channel 4, a drunken reunion at a funeral leads a group of friends to make a pact: they will support each other in assisted dying rather than let a friend suffer alone. Lindsay tells Emma how a thriller starring a cast in their 70s and 80s is turning the police procedural on its head.Producer: Hannah Sander Presenter: Emma Barnett
02/01/24·55m 14s

Women and Negotiations

A special Woman's Hour episode all about women and negotiation. Nicky Perfect is the former Deputy Head of the elite New Scotland Yard Hostage and Crisis Negotiation Unit. She has travelled the world teaching negotiation and working with the Government on international operations. She’ll be joining Hayley Hassall throughout the programme sharing her own experiences and advice, and taking us through how what she learnt can be used in our everyday lives.What has been the role of women in negotiations historically? Professor Margaret Macmillan specialises in British Imperial and International History from the 19th to the 20th Century. In those days, negotiations never involved women on paper – but that wasn’t always the case in reality. She joins Hayley to tell us more. Nomi Bar-Yaacov has been all over the world mediating and negotiating international conflicts. She’ll tell Hayley some of her experiences, as well as how these negotiations happen, and the different roles women play.How much of your daily life do you spend negotiating? Perhaps at work, or with your children – or even in-laws? Mum and a mic on Instagram, Jane Dowden, joins Hayley to chat through negotiations she has with her twins, and clinical psychologist Catherine Hallissey will talk about what goes on in our brains while we’re negotiating, and the best way to do so with family. At the end of last year, the largest negotiations including delegates from all over the world took place – COP28, the United Nation's climate summit. Rachel Kyte was there – and at several previous COPs as well, having served as special representative of the UN secretary-general and chief executive officer of Sustainable Development for All among other roles. She’ll tell Hayley all about how negotiations like COP work behind-the-scenes, including the strops and the drama that lead eventually to world-changing commitments. Presenter: Hayley Hassall Producer: Lottie Garton
01/01/24·56m 23s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Dame Siân Phillips, Highflying care-leavers, 'Trouser-less' trend

Just 14% of care leavers go to university, compared to 47% of young people who didn’t grow up in care, according to a report by the think tank Civitas. The figures have barely changed over the past 10 years and at the current rate of progress, it will take 107 years to close the gap. Two care-experienced young women who did manage to smash the so-called care ceiling share their experiences with Krupa; Rebecca Munro, who graduated with a masters in business and is now an Education Liaison Officer at the University of St Andrews and Lucy Barnes, a barrister.Up to half of women will have a UTI at some point in their life. Earlier this year the NHS launched a new awareness campaign which the filmmaker and author Kate Muir has criticised for not mentioning vaginal oestrogen as a treatment. Kate joins Krupa Padhy alongside Dr Olivia Hum, a GP who is on the Council of the British Menopause Society.Actor Dame Siân Phillips’ life and career are explored in a new documentary, Siân Phillips at 90. She joins Krupa to talk about some of her acting roles, including playing Emmeline Pankhurst in a BBC drama in the 1970s, what it was like being married to Peter O’Toole, and what she’s doing now.Terri Lyne Carrington, a multi-Grammy-winning drummer and jazz artist, saw a distinct lack of songs by female composers being learned by jazz musicians - and decided to fix it. As a ‘gender justice advocate’ she decided to create a project, the New Standards: 101 Lead Sheets By Women Composers, and an accompanying album which won a Grammy, to shine a light on female jazz composers. She joins Nuala McGovern to discuss the project and jazz and gender justice on our special programme about women digging for the truth.Would you swap your trousers for a pair of statement knickers? Julia Hobbs from Vogue tells Krupa about the new trouser-less trend that's been sweeping the catwalks and social media, and the reactions she got when testing it out on the London Underground.As a nation we eat more sprouts than any other country in Europe but it’s a vegetable that, like marmite, divides opinion. Anita Rani is joined by plant pathologist Dr Lauren Chappell and the brassica research expert Dr Rachel Wells to explain how sprouts are being engineered to taste sweeter and withstand climate change. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Donald MacDonald
30/12/23·55m 11s

Dame Siân Phillips, Abuse of vulnerable elderly, Clemency Burton-Hill

Actor Dame Siân Phillips’ life and career are explored in a new documentary, Siân Phillips at 90. She joins Krupa Padhy to talk about some of her acting roles, including playing Emmeline Pankhurst in a BBC drama in the 1970s, what it was like being married to Peter O’Toole, and what she’s doing now.Clemency Burton-Hill MBE, is an award-winning broadcaster, podcaster, author, journalist and musician. She joins Krupa to discuss Journal of Wonder - the newest book in her bestselling Year of Wonder series - which takes you from January to December with classical music suggestions for every day.The power of attorney system can sometimes be abused to take advantage of older people. Krupa is joined by Carolyn Stephens, who shares her story of becoming estranged from her elderly father after he met a woman on a singles holiday. He later agreed to grant power of attorney to the woman, which resulted in him being placed in a care home without his family knowing. Journalist Sue Mitchell, who shares the details of the whole affair in an upcoming radio documentary, also joins Krupa to talk about why she wanted to tell Carolyn’s story. Co-founder of The Onion Collective, Jess Prendergast, tells Krupa how she and her friends created the social enterprise East Quay Watchet in Somerset after they were frustrated by the lack of opportunities in their local town. Plus local ‘craftivist’ Lyn Barlow tells us about exhibiting her textile art in the new gallery and what the new enterprise means to her. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Lottie Garton
29/12/23·56m 12s

Highflying care-leavers, Freebirths, 'Trouser-less' trend

This summer, the region of Manipur in India made headlines after two women were viciously attacked and assaulted by a mob of men. With a similar case happening this month in the south west of the country, Krupa Padhy is joined by Geeta Pandey, BBC Women and Social Affairs Editor in Delhi, and Professor of Modern Indian History at the University of Nottingham, Dr Uditi Sen, to find out why these incidents continue to happen and whether anything is being done at a higher level to stop them.Just 14% of care leavers go to university, compared to 47% of young people who didn’t grow up in care, according to a report by the think tank Civitas. The figures have barely changed over the past 10 years and at the current rate of progress, it will take 107 years to close the gap. Two care-experienced young women who did manage to smash the so-called care ceiling share their experiences with Krupa; Rebecca Munro, who graduated with a masters in business and is now an Education Liaison Officer at the University of St Andrews and Lucy Barnes, a barrister.A freebirth is defined as giving birth without a healthcare professional in attendance. It is also known as an unassisted birth. Anecdotally, more women are making this choice in the UK - but why? What sort of experiences are they having and is it a safe and responsible decision? Krupa speaks to Naomi Nygaarda, a psychotherapist and a mother who chose to freebirth both her children and Mavis Kirkham, a retired midwife and emeritus Professor of Midwifery at Sheffield Hallam University and co-editor of Freebirth Stories, a collection of stories from women choosing to give birth this way. Would you swap your trousers for a pair of statement knickers? Julia Hobbs from Vogue tells Krupa about the new trouser-less trend that's been sweeping the catwalks and social media, and the reactions she got when testing it out on the London Underground.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
28/12/23·57m 21s

UTI treatment, Being dumped by text, Lighthouse keeper

Up to half of women will have a UTI at some point in their life. Earlier this year the NHS launched a new awareness campaign which the filmaker and author Kate Muir has criticised for not mentioning vaginal oestrogen as a treatment. Kate joins Krupa Padhy alongside Dr Olivia Hum, a GP who is on the Council of the British Menopause Society. Dr Ronny Cheung speaks to Krupa about the double-edge sword of children building their immunities in their early years and the disruption caused to working parents and carers. What do parents need to know about caring for a child with seasonal colds and coughs? Sally Snowman is the last official lighthouse keeper in the United States and at the end of this month she will retire after two decades of service. She's the first and last woman to be the lighthouse keeper for Boston Light in Massachusetts. She joins Krupa to discuss what it's like being a lighthouse keeper and how she feels about leaving it.We know that Christmas and New Year, although filled with joy for some, can put a really big strain on relationships and it can be a time when people in an unhappy relationship decide to end them. But is there ever a good way to break up a relationship? And is it ever acceptable or kinder to end something by text? Krupa is joined by Olivia Petter, journalist and author of Millennial Love and Vicky Spratt, journalist and documentary maker.The award winning comedian, writer, playwright and actor Meera Syal – known for her comedy series such as Goodness Gracious Me and The Kumars - has been talking to Ros Akins on Radio 4’s Media Show, we can hear some of that interview.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Emma Pearce
27/12/23·57m 23s

Women who dig for the truth

A special Woman’s Hour episode all about women who dig for the truth.Marianne Asher-Chapman from Holts Summit, Missouri has been searching for her daughter, Angie Yarnell, for more than 20 years now. Angie went missing in 2003. Her husband, Michael pled guilty to involuntary manslaughter in 2009. He was released in 2013. He has so far refused to tell Marianne or the authorities where he buried Angie - and Marianne has been unable to find her - despite physically digging in the property where she thinks her daughter may have been buried. She joins Nuala to discuss what she’s done to find her daughter and how she’s now helping other families with missing relatives.Terri Lyne Carrington, a multi-Grammy-winning drummer and jazz artist, saw a distinct lack of songs by female composers being learned by jazz musicians - and decided to fix it. As a ‘gender justice advocate’ she decided to create a project, the New Standards: 101 Lead Sheets By Women Composers, and an accompanying album which won a Grammy, to shine a light on female jazz composers. She joins Nuala to discuss the project and jazz and gender justice on our special programme about women digging for the truth.Many of us have stayed up late, spending the night scrolling through the internet, looking for clues or information we might be on the hunt for. But have you ever felt like you need help to find out something? Someone to confirm your worst fears or set you free? Alison Harris is a private investigator and began her career in investigations later in life. She speaks to Nuala about how being a PI isn’t always the glamorous job we imagine - and what it’s like to find the truth for people.In 2018, Helen McLaughlin and Karen Whitehouse got married in Amsterdam - but they had their day forever changed in their memories, after someone defecated on the floor of a toilet cubicle in the ladies’ bathroom. They enlisted the help of their friend, ‘Detective’ Lauren Kilby to find out who did it - and why. Karen Whitehouse, one of the brides, and ‘Detective’ Lauren join Nuala to talk about their unusual investigation - and why they couldn’t let it go.A name you may be familiar with when it comes to the search for the truth is historian, Philippa Langley. Known now by many as the woman who found King Richard III underneath a car park in Leicester, she’s turned her attention to his nephews, the missing Princes, who for centuries have been said to have been murdered by their uncle, King Richard, after he took the throne. Her new research suggests otherwise - and she joins Nuala to talk all about the search for the truth and what it means to her.
26/12/23·55m 3s

The Queen of the Brassicas - the Brussels sprout!

Our Christmas Day special programme is devoted to the Brussels sprout, with some incredible women for whom they’re playing a key role in their working lives. As a nation we eat more sprouts than any other country in Europe but it’s a vegetable that, like marmite, divides opinion. Originally from the Middle East, they came to Europe as an export of the Roman Empire. We hear how they became known as Brussels sprouts with the head of the Royal Horticultural Society Clare Matterson and the food historian Dr Sue Bailey. Plant pathologist Dr Lauren Chappell and the brassica research expert Dr Rachel Wells explain how sprouts are being engineered to taste sweeter and withstand climate change. Nutritionist Charlotte Hunter says the phytoestrogens in these mini cabbages mean women should be eating more of them. And for ideas about how to cook your sprouts, chef and broadcaster Andi Oliver and her daughter Miquita are on hand, as well as the chef Rosalind Rathouse.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager Neva Missirian
25/12/23·55m 4s

Weekend Woman's Hour - Gracie Spinks’s parents, Gatekeeping your perfume, Child-free women at work

23-year-old Gracie Spinks was killed by a man who she had reported to the police for stalking her. The inquest into her death reported several failures by Derbyshire Police in how her case was handled. Now, her parents, Richard Spinks and Alison Ward, are campaigning for Gracie’s Law, which would ensure better training for police officers around stalking, and the appointment of independent stalking advocates. They tell us about Gracie and the changes they want to be made in her memory.Have you got a signature scent – and would you share where you got it from? Whether you are ‘gatekeeping’ your perfume or keen to spread the word about your favourite scent, smell is one of the most evocative and emotive of our senses. We talk all things fragrance with The Guardian's beauty editor, Sali Hughes, and Experimental Perfume Club’s Roshni Dhanjee - why we want to smell unique, gifting perfume, and why smell is so connected to our emotions and identity.‘There is an expectation that women like me – without children - will pick up the slack so the working mums can have time off with their families’. Those are the words of Sam Walsh who has worked every Boxing Day for the last 20 years. She decided to quit her retail job in October because she resented having to work over the Xmas period. Sam, who runs The Non Mum Network Facebook group and website, says working parents shouldn’t be given priority. Kelly Simmons has recently left the Football Association after 32 years with the organisation. Best known for her time as Director of the Women’s Professional Game, Kelly joins Jessica Creighton to discuss her long career and the future of the Women’s Super League, which she helped to launch and transform.Elle and The Pocket Belles describe themselves as an all-girl retro band. They are a vocal harmony group who have been singing together for more than a decade. They’ll be creating more Christmas cheer for us.Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Rebecca Myatt
23/12/23·53m 46s

A new drug for hot flushes and night sweats, Combatting loneliness at Christmas

A new drug called Veoza used to prevent hot flushes and night sweats has been approved in the UK. Also known as fezolinetant, it is prescription-only and will be available privately from January. Dr Paula Briggs, chair of the British Menopause Society and consultant in sexual and reproductive health at Liverpool Women’s Hospital joins Jessica to explain the importance for many women of this decision.What would you say to spending Christmas with your friends instead of your family? You may have seen an article this morning in the Independent where the journalist Katie Glass says she'll be having a 'women-only Christmas', sharing the day with four like-minded girlfriends. Some of us may choose to do this intentionally, for others it may not be their first choice but they are making the most of the situation. And sometimes the most unexpected Christmases turn out to be the most fun. Journalist Daisy Finer spent Christmas last year with a female friend, when her children were with her ex-husband, and talks about 'the joy of a very self-centred Christmas'.Have you got a signature scent – and would you share where you got it from? Whether you are ‘gatekeeping’ your perfume or keen to spread the word about your favourite scent, smell is one of the most evocative and emotive of our senses. Joining Jessica Creighton to talk all things fragrance, Guardian beauty editor Sali Hughes and Experimental Perfume Club’s Roshni Dhanjee discuss why we want to smell unique, gifting perfume, and why smell is so connected to our emotions and identity.Can loneliness really take the same toll on your physical and mental health as smoking and lack of exercise? The British Psychological Society says it’s a scourge on society and should be treated as a public health emergency. It’s calling for the Government’s 2018 Loneliness Strategy to be updated to reflect the impact of the pandemic. We talk to Julia Faulconbridge, a consultant clinical psychologist from the organisation, and also Liz Veitch, a retired deputy headteacher who became increasingly lonely after being widowed, moving house and then facing the lockdowns. She was introduced to 19-year-old Ankita Menon, a volunteer with Kissing It Better, whose mission statement is ‘to reduce the isolation of old age by bringing the generations together.’Elle and The Pocket Belles sing live in the Woman’s Hour studio on the last live programme before Christmas. Describing themselves as an all-girl retro band, they are a vocal harmony group who have been singing together for more than a decade. They’ll be creating more Christmas cheer with a couple of seasonal songs.Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Kirsty Starkey
22/12/23·51m 13s

Spiking, The pill, Family dynamics at Christmas

The Met Police have reported that cases of spiking - putting alcohol or drugs into another person's drink or body without their consent - have quadrupled in London over the last five years. This week the Home Office set out new provisions to provide training for venue staff and test-kits for customers. Campaigner Sharon Gaffka joins Jessica Creighton to talk about whether that's enough for spiking victims. As we gear up for Christmas, some people might be considering the age-old question: How do you survive the big day without falling out with your family? With unwanted questions about your parenting style, your career or even your love life - tensions can often rise over the brussels sprouts. Camilla McGill is a parent coach and joins Jessica to give us tips on how to manage anxieties and stress with loved ones.A 16-year-old girl died last week from what is thought to have been a blood clot - three weeks after being prescribed the contraceptive pill. According to the NHS, there is a very low risk of serious side effects from taking the pill. Dr Janet Barter is a consultant in sexual and reproductive health at Barts Health NHS Trust in London – she tells Jessica the facts we need to know around the pill.Last year, female-owned businesses received just 2% of all venture capital funding, Parliament’s Treasury Committee found. Entrepreneur Grace Beverley wants to raise awareness of the female funding gap. She joins Jessica to talk about her business model and using her platform to empower women. If you are a woman who is adopted, then the decision to have children of your own can be a complicated one, as your own birth family’s medical history may be a mystery to you. How do you know what you are passing on through your genes? Writer and journalist Katharine Quarmby has been looking into this issue because she has had to grapple with it herself. She joins Jessica to discuss. Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Lottie Garton
21/12/23·57m 26s

Mary Earps' SPOTY win, Women's Super League founder Kelly Simmons, Pregnancy sickness

England goalkeeper Mary Earps has been voted BBC Sports Personality of the Year. She was a big part of the Lionesses' win at the Euros in 2022 and was named goalkeeper of the tournament in this year's World Cup. But back in 2019 she was ready to quit the game. Jessica Creighton speaks to Rebecca Myers from the The Sunday Times about Earps' bumpy road to success.Kelly Simmons has recently left the Football Association after 32 years with the organisation. Best known for her time as Director of the Women’s Professional Game, Kelly joins Jessica to discuss her long career and the future of the Women’s Super League which she helped to launch and transform.A breakthrough on why women get pregnancy sickness could open the way to finding a cure. Scientists have discovered a hormone that causes nausea and vomiting in pregnant women, sometimes to the extent that they get Hyperemesis Gravidarum – the most severe form of sickness often resulting in hospitalisation. Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Medicine at Cambridge University Sir Stephen O’Rahilly and CEO of the charity Pregnancy Sickness Support Charlotte Howden join Jessica to discuss the implications of this discovery.Could planning for a simpler, more realistic January be the best way to help your mental health this Christmas? Author and psychological decluttering expert Cathy Madavan and clinical psychologist Dr Emma Hepburn join Jessica to discuss why less might mean more as we move into the new year.'Go to the front line yourself - and die'. Those are the reported words of the wives and girlfriends of Russian soldiers to Vladimir Putin, who they are addressing on a Telegram channel called The Way Home. According to UK estimates, 300,000 military personnel from Russia have died during the war in Ukraine. Jessica gets insights from Dr Jenny Mathers from the Department of International Politics at Aberystwyth University.
20/12/23·57m 21s

Kirsty Wark on leaving Newsnight, Sports Personality of the Year

Kirsty Wark joins Emma Barnett to talk about stepping down from Newsnight after 30 years; what she’s planning to fill the extra time with and she also shares some Christmas cooking tips.A new book, A Heart Afire, paints a picture of paediatrician Helen Taussig who dedicated her life to looking after children with heart defects. We hear from author Patricia Meisol.We look at the issues of "workplace housework" - tasks like organising office Christmas parties, sorting the secret santa gifts, decorating the communal spaces - with economist Lise Vasterlund and comedian Cally Beaton.Could a woman win the BBC's annual Sports Personality Of The Year award later today? Now in it's 70th year, we talk to Lady Mary Peters who won the gong in 1972 – the same year she won gold in the pentathlon at the Munich Olympics.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Neva Missirian
19/12/23·57m 23s

Gracie Spinks' parents, Child-free women at work, Grandma Wong

23-year-old Gracie Spinks was killed by a man who she had reported to the police for stalking her. The inquest into her death reported several failures by Derbyshire Police in how her case was handled. Now, her parents, Richard Spinks and Alison Ward, are campaigning for Gracie’s Law, which would ensure better training for police officers around stalking, and the appointment of independent stalking advocates. They join Emma Barnett to discuss Gracie and the changes they want to be made in her memory.‘There is an expectation that women like me – without children - will pick up the slack so the working mums can have time off with their families’. Those are the words of Sam Walsh who has worked every Boxing Day for the last 20 years. She decided to quit her retail job in October because she resented having to work over the Christmas period. Sam, who runs The Non Mum Network Facebook group and website, says working parents shouldn’t be given priority. Today is the beginning of the Jimmy Lai trial in Hong Kong - a national security case against the media mogul and pro-democracy activist who has been accused of conspiring to collude with foreign forces. Outside the court is the familiar face of a woman affectionately known as 'Grandma Wong', real name Alexandra. Cindy Yu, Assistant Editor of The Spectator, tells us more about her.The damage being done to girls’ education in Afghanistan has been well documented, but new research suggests the Taliban is causing ‘irreversible damage’ to boys’ education too. Research carried out by Human Rights Watch found that female teachers have been replaced by men with no qualifications, and that boys are subject to brutal punishment. Emma speaks to Sahar Fetrat, the author of the report.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
18/12/23·57m 12s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Imelda Staunton, Quitting parties, Mica Paris

Imelda Staunton has played Queen Elizabeth II for the last two series of television drama The Crown. As the final episodes are released this week, she joins us to discuss playing the monarch, and what it’s been like to take on this role since Her Majesty died.How could people step in safely if they see a woman being harassed in public? Former police officer Graham Goulden and criminologist Molly Ackhurst tell us how bystanders can protect themselves while helping others.Soul singer Mica Paris will headline an evening of gospel music on Sky Arts, where she’ll be joined by 10 gospel singers and a four-piece band to perform Christmas songs. She gives us a taste of what to expect on A Gospel Christmas.It's been a year and a half since Roe vs Wade was overturned in the United States, ending the constitutional nationwide right to abortion for millions of women. It remains an issue that divides opinion. The British writer Nazrin Choudhury has directed a short film, Red White and Blue, which follows the character Rachel Johnson, played by Brittany Snow, who is forced to cross state lines in search of an abortion. Should we celebrate quitting a job? When Hannah Witton decided to stop making her successful YouTube and podcast series, Doing It, her friends threw her a surprise quitting ceremony. Hannah tells us whether this party helped, alongside the career coach Soma Ghosh with her advice for anyone thinking of quitting.The bestselling author Louise Doughty joins us to discuss a new ITVX drama based on her novel: Platform 7. She tells us how she has turned male-heavy police procedurals on their head – and why she thinks all middle-aged women long to go on the run.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Sarah Crawley
16/12/23·52m 6s

Kinship care, Shane MacGowan's widow Victoria Mary Clarke, 'Red White and Blue', Lora Logic

The government is today unveiling the first ever national Kinship Care strategy, aiming to bring more awareness and more money to family members looking after children that aren’t theirs. Kinship care is when a child lives full time, or most of the time, with a relative, be it grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings, or someone in the wider family network, because their own parents can’t care for them. Anita talks to David Johnston, the Under Secretary of State for Children, Families and Wellbeing at the Department of Education about the new strategy.Shane MacGowan, the legendary songwriter and frontman with The Pogues, died on 30th November. As the classic Christmas anthem Fairy Tale of New York reaches number one in Ireland, Anita speaks to his widow, Victoria Mary Clarke about their life together, his music, his addictions and his legacy. It has been a year and a half since Roe vs Wade was overturned in the United States, ending the constitutional nationwide right to abortion for millions of women. It remains an issue that divides opinion. Anita talks to the British writer Nazrin Choudhury, the director of a new short film on the subject; 'Red White and Blue,' follows the character Rachel Johnson, a single mother in a precarious financial position, who is forced to cross state lines from Arkansas in search of an abortion. Musician Lora Logic was the woman behind the iconic saxophone that was a part of the British Punk-Rock band X-Ray Spex. After almost 30 years, the band are re-releasing their second album, Conscious Consumer. Lora joins Anita to talk about the album, what she’s up to now and what lead singer Poly Styrene would have thought of the re-release.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Sue Maillot
15/12/23·55m 28s

Mica Paris, Is Facebook dangerous for kids? Regretting your tattoos

The National Crime Agency has warned parents that Facebook and Instagram are now a danger to children. That’s after Meta, the parent company of the social media sites, made the decision to introduce encrypted messaging. The BBC’s Technology Editor Zoe Kleinman and online safety expert John Carr join Emma Barnett to discuss. Bafta award-winning actor Sheridan Smith has said that she regrets the tattoos she’s got and would never get another one done. It’s a situation that a lot of people find themselves in. Letitia Mortimer, a London-based tattoo artist, talks to Emma about seeing plenty of people wanting to get their tattoos covered or removed over the years. Soul singer Mica Paris will headline an evening of gospel music on television, where she’ll be joined by 10 gospel singers and a dynamic four-piece band to perform moving versions of various Christmas songs. She joins Emma live in the studio to give us a taste of what to expect on A Gospel Christmas and her new album.Two referenda to change Ireland’s constitution regarding gender and family are to be held on International Women’s Day next year. The amendments would broaden the definition of family beyond marriage in the constitution, and there would be reference to carers to recognise all those who provide care. Commentator Laura Perrins and academic and activist Ailbhe Smyth join Emma to discuss why the suggestions are potentially contentious. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
14/12/23·51m 45s

Imelda Staunton on depicting Queen Elizabeth II

How could people step in safely if they see a woman being harassed in public? Former police officer Graham Goulden and criminologist Molly Ackhurst tell Emma Barnett how bystanders can protect themselves while helping others.Imelda Staunton has played Queen Elizabeth II for the last two series of television drama The Crown. She joined us before she started the role, in 2021, to talk about how she was approaching the role, and why it was important to her. She joins Emma Barnett again now that it’s coming to an end – the final episodes of The Crown are released on Netflix this week.Should we celebrate quitting a job? We’ve got divorce parties - how about a quitting party? When award-winning sex educator and author, Hannah Witton decided to stop making her successful YouTube and podcast series, Doing It, her friends and colleagues threw her a surprise quitting ceremony. There was cake, and even a card saying Bye, Bye Don't Come Back. Hannah tells Emma whether this party helped, alongside career coach, and host of the Career Happiness podcast, Soma Ghosh, with her advice for anyone thinking of quitting.There has been a significant increase in the number of women being investigated by police after a suspected abortion, according to a senior consultant gynaecologist, with some women facing high-profile court cases, and other instances where children have been removed from the mother. Abortion is a criminal offence in England and Wales unless it meets strict criteria. Co-chairman of the British Society of Abortion Care Providers Dr Jonathan Lord, who has raised these concerns, joins Emma.Producer: Hannah Sander Presenter: Emma Barnett
13/12/23·57m 37s

The future of embryo research, Ofsted inspections, British Gymnastics' complaints procedure

Leading scientists are calling for a change in the law to help IVF patients donate unused embryos to biomedical research after a collapse in donations over the past 15 years. Emma Barnett talks to Professor of Reproductive Physiology at Cambridge University Kathy Niakan and Clare Ettinghausen from the UK's fertility regulator, the HFEA.The new play Glacier is a dark and poignant festive comedy. It follows three women who meet while wild swimming in their local lake one Christmas. They form an unofficial tradition, meeting each year to go for a swim and escape. Escape their responsibilities, life’s stresses, and maybe most of all – their families. We hear from playwright, comedian and podcaster Alison Spittle, and actor Sophie Steer, who stars in the show.We take another look at the world of gymnastics following on from last year's damning Whyte review with labelled the British Gymanstics as "inept and dysfunctional". Since that time, not one complaint of abuse has been upheld by British Gymnastics’ Independent Complaints Process – with every single case over the past three years collapsing. We talk to Claire Heafford from Gymnasts 4 Change about their campaign for a new procedures. As two teaching unions call for a pause in Ofsted inspections following the death of head teacher Ruth Perry, we talk to Paul Whiteman, the General Secretary of the teaching union the National Association of Head Teachers.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
12/12/23·57m 20s

Cancer during pregnancy, Israel-Gaza, Wedding dresses

Israel has accused the United Nations of moving too slowly to respond to accounts that Hamas carried out widespread sexual violence against women in the October 7th brutal attack on Israel. Christina Lamb, Chief Foreign Correspondent for the Sunday Times, has brought the details of this part of the attacks to light joins Emma Barnett.Mandy Abramson runs a bridal shop in Skipton in North Yorkshire. For two years now she’s run a special week in December where she invites women from all walks of life to try on a wedding dress even if they have no plans to marry. She joins Emma to explain why she wants to give everyone a chance to try on their dream dress. When Louise Beevers found a lump in her breast during pregnancy, she was told by her GP that it was hormone related. Four months later she was diagnosed with Grade 3 breast cancer, and despite undergoing treatment the cancer is now incurable. Louise joins Emma alongside the Chief Medical Officer from Macmillan Cancer Support Professor Richard Simcock to discuss why greater awareness about cancer in pregnancy is needed.Bestselling author of Apple Tree Yard, Louise Doughty, on a new ITVX drama based on her novel: Platform 7. She tells Emma Barnett how she has turned male-heavy police procedurals and spy thrillers on their head – and why she thinks all middle-aged women long to go on the run.Emma talks to two women about their hope for peace in Israel. Amira Mohammed is a Palestinian woman who works with young leaders across the Middle East and North Africa; and Danielle Cumpton is a 32-year-old from Israel who works for an organisation that promotes political partnership between Jews and Arabs within IsraelPresenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
11/12/23·57m 36s

Ruth Perry's sister, City Girl in Nature, Caring for a spouse, The politics of Christmas presents

An Ofsted inspection "contributed" to the death of head teacher Ruth Perry. That’s the conclusion of senior coroner Heidi Connor. This is the first time Ofsted has been listed as a contributing factor in the death of a head teacher. Ruth Perry had been head of Caversham Primary School in Berkshire for 13 years when she took her own life in January, ahead of an inspection report being made public which had downgraded the school from Outstanding to Inadequate, based on safeguarding concerns. Her death ignited a national debate about the mental health of school leaders and the pressure they are under in terms of inspections. Anita Rani speaks to Ruth Perry’s sister, Professor Julia Waters.   Born and raised in Deptford, south east London, Kwesia didn’t grow up with a lot of nature around her. That’s until she went on a life-changing trip to the Amazon. She’s since created her YouTube channel, City Girl in Nature, to guide other city dwellers into the great outdoors. She speaks to Krupa Padhy about her platform, nature activism work, and winning Best New Voice at the Audio Production Awards for her podcast Get Birding.   Lina Mookerjee had been married to her husband Richard for more than 15 years when he lost both his sight and hearing. Lina is now as much a carer to Richard as she is a wife. Lina and Richard share their story and discuss what they describe as the ‘invisible’ work of carers.   Research suggests that the average Briton spends £300 on Christmas gifts. One woman who is bucking this trend is the writer and journalist Nell Frizzell, who says that her family Christmases have improved since they stopped buying one another gifts. Krupa hears from Nell and Ellie Gibson, comedian and one half of the Scummy Mummies, who is a big fan of gifting every festive season.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
09/12/23·57m 30s

Ruth Perry's sister Julia Waters, America Ferrera, 'Stuffed'

An Ofsted inspection "contributed" to the death of headteacher Ruth Perry. That’s the conclusion of senior coroner Heidi Connor. This is the first time Ofsted has been listed as a contributing factor in the death of a head teacher. Ofsted are yet to comment on the verdict. Ruth Perry had been head of Caversham Primary School in Berkshire for 13 years when she took her own life in January, ahead of an inspection report being made public which had downgraded the school from Outstanding to Inadequate, based on safeguarding concerns. The school was regraded this summer to Good. Her death ignited a national debate about the mental health of school leaders and the pressure they are under in terms of inspections. Anita is joined by Ruth Perry’s sister, Professor Julia Waters.America Ferrera is an award-winning actress, a director, producer and activist. She shot to stardom with her roles in Ugly Betty and The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants, but you'll most recently have seen her playing Gloria, an assistant to the chief executive of Mattel, in the blockbuster Barbie film, who delivers a powerful monologue on the double standards of being a woman. America joins Anita to talk about how she didn't "set out to be a role model, or to break barriers, or to have a career about defying the norm.” Food has revolved around women for centuries. History of food can provide us with a lens through which we can discover untold stories of women: their joys, struggles and ever-changing roles in society. Pen Vogler, author of “Stuffed," explores such themes in her new book and examines the history and culture of British food through political, social and global upheavals. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
08/12/23·57m 42s

Conductor Marin Alsop, actor Diana Quick and a campaign to protect domestic abuse victims

Marin Alsop is one of the most famous conductors in the world. Ten years ago, she became the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall. Now she is giving the European premiere of Too Hot To Handel: The Gospel Messiah!, a reimagining of Handel’s Messiah Marin tells Hayley Hassell why she wanted to rework the piece, and looks back over her illustrious career as a conductor. The actor Diana Quick joins Hayley to discuss her role as Mrs Wentworth in a new series The Famous Five – and describe how the classic adventures have been brought to life with a new, fresh, modern reimagining of Enid Blyton’s iconic stories.The Centre for Women’s Justice is campaigning to prevent unjust criminalisation of victims and survivors of domestic abuse. Hayley is joined by director of the CWJ, Harriet Wistrich, and former director of Southall Black Sisters, Pragna Patel.What can we tell about medieval women’s lives from studying their skeletons? Dr Sarah Inskip from Leicester University has been part of a team excavating Cambridge graveyards for a new research project called After the Plague. She has found evidence that some medieval women did very strenuous work that changed the shape of their upper bodies; others were trading and travelling across Europe, and many would have existed in chronic pain.Producer: Hannah Sander Presenter: Hayley Hassell
07/12/23·56m 39s

Julianne Moore, Dame Mary Berry, Prevalence of forced sterilisation

Academy Award-winning actor Julianne Moore plays Gracie Atherton-Yoo in Todd Haynes’ newest film, May December. The film tells the story of a married couple who were at the centre of a notorious tabloid relationship, and the actress doing research on them for a film about their past. Julianne joins Krupa to talk about the controversies within the film, and how it’s already been tipped for the Oscars. Lina Mookerjee had been married to her husband Richard for more than 15 years when he lost both his sight and hearing. Lina is now as much a carer to Richard as she is a wife. Lina and Richard join Krupa to share their story and discuss what they describe as the ‘invisible’ work of carers. Dame Mary Berry joins Krupa to discuss her one-off TV special ‘Mary Berry’s Highland Christmas.’ She tells us how her Scottish roots have inspired her latest festive recipes and gives us some tips for entertaining this Christmas.The New York Times has just published an investigation into the prevalence of forced sterilisation of disabled women in Europe, even when the procedure is not medically necessary and despite it being banned under multiple international treaties. New York Times reporter Sarah Hurtes met with families who have chosen to sterilise their daughters and women who have undergone sterilisation procedures. She joins Krupa to talk about what she found and we also speak to German politician Katrin Langensiepen who is one of the few visibly disabled members of the European Parliament. She’s pushing for a strict Europe-wide outright ban on non-consensual sterilisation.Presented by Krupa Padhy Producer: Louise Corley
06/12/23·57m 28s

Women's Football, Head of Ofcom, The politics of Christmas presents

There are big changes afoot for women’s football. Former England Lioness Karen Carney published a review into the women’s domestic game over the summer and the Government has just announced that it will back all the findings from her report. That includes making the top two tiers professional and giving the sport a dedicated broadcast slot. Baroness Sue Campbell, director of women's football at the Football Association, discusses their decision.The head of Ofcom, Dame Melanie Dawes, talks about her plans to make tech companies stop children accessing online pornography in her first broadcast interview on the subject. Under the new Online Safety Act, which came into effect last month, the regulator has been tasked with coming up with age verification measures. Latest research shows that the average age at which children first see online pornography is 13 - although nearly a quarter come across it by age 11 and one in 10 as young as nine. By 18, 79% have encountered violent pornography depicting coercive, degrading or pain-inducing sex acts.A report out today details for the first time the views of the bereaved families of women killed by men. A woman is killed by a man on average every three days in the UK and the charity Killed Women is campaigning to end this and improve the experiences for families forced to deal with it. The director of Killed Women, Anna Ryder, joins Krupa Padhy to discuss the report’s findings ahead of a planned protest outside Parliament.Now it's only 20 sleeps until Christmas, and for many of you that might mean running around the shops buying all your Christmas presents. But one woman who is bucking this trend is the writer and journalist Nell Frizzell, who says that her family Christmases have improved since they stopped buying one another gifts. Nell and Ellie Gibson, comedian and one half of the Scummy Mummies who IS a big fan of gifting every festive season discuss.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Kirsty Starkey
05/12/23·57m 31s

Stella Creasy MP, Living with one breast, City Girl in Nature

A man has been convicted in court of harassing the Labour MP Stella Creasy. This harassment included reporting her to social services as an 'unfit mother'. A safeguarding review quickly cleared Stella Creasy – but the complaint cannot be removed from her records. Today, she is tabling an amendment to the Victims and Prisoners Bill, to allow councils to delete baseless complaints. Stella Creasy speaks to Krupa Padhy about her fight for justice under a law she herself drafted. She also pays tribute to fellow Labour politician Glenys Kinnock, who died on Sunday.Last week on the programme we heard from Katy Marks, an architect by trade, who discovered after her single mastectomy that there was no bra on the market that was flat on one side. She didn’t want to use a prosthetic and so designed her own. Lots of you got in touch following that item to talk about your own experiences of living with one breast. Krupa is joined by two listeners, Diane Devlin and Laura Homer.Born and raised in Deptford, south east London, Kwesia didn’t grow up with a lot of nature around her. That’s until she went on a life-changing trip to the Amazon. She’s since created her YouTube channel, City Girl in Nature, to guide other city dwellers into the great outdoors. She speaks to Krupa about her platform, nature activism work, and winning Best New Voice at the Audio Production Awards for her podcast Get Birding.Some studies have found that women are more vulnerable to negative health impacts of single-use plastics, and women also form a larger majority of plastic consumers. With COP28 now underway in Dubai, Krupa is joined by Christina Dixon from Environmental Investigation Agency - an NGO which uncovers environmental crime and abuse. She would like to see plastic pollution being given a higher profile in climate talks.What do our shoe choices say about us? A new exhibition at the Arc in Winchester in Hampshire called SHOES: INSIDE OUT looks at our relationship with our footwear. From the functional and practical to the fashionable and extravagant, what can shoes tell us about our social history, modern lives and our aspirations? Krupa is joined by Claire Isbester, co-curator of the exhibition.
04/12/23·57m 41s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Emily Blunt, Stammering, Long-distance friendships, Maria Callas' legacy

Research by the charity Stamma shows that 8% of children will start stuttering at some point. Our listener Geri, a mother who’s son has a stammer, got in touch with Woman’s Hour and asked us to discuss the topic. Kirsten Howells from Stamma, Tiktok influencer Jessie Yendle and Geri join Claire McDonnell to share their own experiences and advice.Actor Emily Blunt found fame as the scene-stealing assistant in The Devil Wears Prada, and has since starred in many films including Mary Poppins Returns and A Quiet Place with her real-life husband John Krasinski. She is also in one of this year’s biggest cinematic hits, Oppenheimer. As Christopher Nolan’s blockbuster about the father of the atomic bomb is released on ultra-HD DVD and Blu-ray, Emily Blunt talks to Clare McDonnell about her role as Kitty Oppenheimer, Robert’s wife.How do you keep long-distance friendships going? Clare talks to filmmaker Shannon Haly, who lives in New York and wrote a viral poem about missing her best friend. They are joined by the journalist Rose Stokes who, after having an 18-year long-distance friendship decided to move to live in the same city as her friend.What do women look for in a bra after breast cancer surgery? Clare is joined by Katy Marks, an architect by trade, who discovered after her single mastectomy that there was no bra on the market that was flat on one side. She didn’t want to use a prosthetic and so designed her own, called Uno, which launched on Monday. She’ll be joined on the programme by Asmaa Al-allak who won this year’s Great British Sewing Bee and is a consultant breast surgeon who has made post-surgery lingerie for her patients.Today marks 100 years since the birth of one of opera’s most renowned and influential singers of the 20th century: the iconic heroine, Maria Callas. But what is it about her talent that has transcended the decades? Two sopranos – Alison Langer and Nadine Benjamin – join Anita to describe Maria Callas’ enduring star quality. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
02/12/23·54m 35s

Director Adura Onashile, Grieving and Christmas Shopping, Maria Callas's Centenary

In Adura Onashile’s debut film, Girl, mother Grace and daughter Ama have recently arrived in Glasgow and have created a beautiful cocoon for themselves in a council block apartment. But Grace carries deep trauma from her past, and she finds it exceptionally difficult to watch her daughter go out into the world alone. Director Adura Onashile tells Anita why she emphasised the beauty of urban poverty, and how she drew on her relationship with her own mother.Gwyneth Paltrow shared a photo on Instagram holdings hands with her ex-husband Chris Martin's current partner, Dakota Johnson.. But we ask, could you be friends with your ex's new partner? Alexandra Jones, a journalist who wrote a feature for Vogue about why she feels great about having a friendship with her ex’s now wife.Tomorrow marks one hundred years since the birth of one Opera’s most renowned and influential singers of the 20th century: the iconic heroine, Maria Callas. But what is it about her talent that has transcended the decades? Two sopranos – Alison Langer and Nadine Benjamin – join Anita to describe Maria Callas’ enduring star quality. Going shopping after a loved one has died can be a sharp reminder of your loss. Carmel Bones, who recently lost the main three men in her life now finds it hard to go into men’s department stores. Anita speaks to Carmel about her plan to tackle her grief and psychotherapist Julia Samuel gives her advice.Next Sunday, December 3, the annual Radio 4 Christmas Appeal is taking place. Money raised by the Appeal will go to people experiencing homelessness, as well as to support frontline workers and to fund organisations working to end and prevent homelessness. West Mercia Women’s Aid are one of the charities who receive donations to assist some of the women that come to them for help. Anita speaks to Chief Executive, Sue Coleman to find out how important this funding is and why they are focussed on older women vulnerable to domestic abuse.Presented by Anita Rani Producer: Louise Corley
01/12/23·55m 2s

Emily Blunt, Pathologist-novelist, Baby formula, Short marriages

Actor Emily Blunt found fame as the scene-stealing assistant in The Devil Wears Prada, and has since starred in many films including Mary Poppins Returns and A Quiet Place with her real-life husband John Krasinski. She is also in one of this year’s biggest cinematic hits, Oppenheimer. As Christopher Nolan’s blockbuster about the father of the atomic bomb is released on ultra-HD DVD and Blu-ray, Emily Blunt talks to Clare McDonnell about her role as Kitty Oppenheimer, Robert’s wife.The price of baby formula has been making the headlines this week. The main brands have been pulled up by the Government’s Competition and Markets Authority for their high pricing. In fact, their research shows that the retail price is a lot higher than the costs to make the product. Joining Clare to discuss the high prices is Sarah Cardell, chief executive of the CMA and Kirsty Jackson, the founder of High Peak Baby Bank, a donation service for families in need up in the Staffordshire area. How common is it for a long relationship to end with a short marriage? What is it about formalising a union, or having a wedding that can be the catalyst for a split? And what are the legal pitfalls that couples might want to avoid? Clare is joined by Eve Simmons, US Health and Wellness Editor for the Daily Mail and Laura Naser, a partner in family law.As Ireland's first female state pathologist, Dr Marie Cassidy helped to solve murders and clarify unexplained deaths for over 15 years. She tells Clare what drew her to this career, how she deals with the emotionally taxing nature of the job and why she's now turned to writing with her debut novel 'Body of Truth'.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan Hannant and Neva Missirian
30/11/23·56m 31s

British Gymnastics and safeguarding, Long-distance friendships, Myha’la, Hunters, Hockey kits

Last year's landmark Whyte Review into gymnastics detailed 'systemic issues' of physical and emotional abuse between 2008 and 2020. Today, British Gymnastics has for the first time introduced safeguarding policies relating to weighing, hydration and academic education, which they say are designed to better protect the welfare of gymnasts, but do they go far enough? Clare speaks to David Hart, performance director for British Gymnastics, Karen Whelan, gymnastics coach and mother of two-time British Olympian Hannah Whelan, and Eloise Jotischky, former elite gymnast and trustee and the youth voice on the Gymnasts for Change board and the first (and currently only) person to win a civil case against British Gymnastics for the abuse she experienced in the sport.The actor Myha'la joins Clare to discuss her latest project starring alongside Julia Roberts and Mahershala Ali in the film Leave the World Behind. It's an apocalyptic thriller which sees Julia Roberts's character Amanda rent a luxury house in the countryside with her family. They're disturbed by Ruth, played by Myha'la, and her father who claim they own the house and need a place to stay following a mysterious cyber attack. Team GB hockey player Tess Howard campaigned for women to be able to choose whether they play in shorts or the traditional skort for their matches, resulting in official changes to the sport’s kit regulations. She’s been awarded Changemaker of the Year at the Sunday Times Sportswomen awards for her work. How do you keep long-distance friendships going? Clare talks to film maker Shannon Haly, who lives in New York and wrote a viral poem about missing her best friend. They are joined by the journalist Rose Stokes who, after having an 18-year long-distance friendship decided to move to live in the same city as her friend. It's long been claimed that in prehistoric times, women were gatherers while men were hunters. However, new research debunks this narrative and suggests that women were actually superior to men when it comes to hunting. Clare spoke to Dr Annamieke Milks, a palaeolithic archaeologist from the University of Reading who is an expert in hunting and weapons.Presenter Clare McDonnell Producer: Dianne McGregor
29/11/23·57m 35s

Parenting a child with a stammer, EHRC Chair Baroness Falkner, Ukrainian chess player Kamila Hryshchenko

Research by the charity Stamma shows that 8% of children will start stuttering at some point. Our listener Geri, a mother who’s son has a stammer, got in touch with Woman’s Hour and asked us to discuss the topic. Kirsten Howells from Stamma, Tiktokker Jessie Yendle and Geri join Claire McDonnell to share their own experiences and advice.In 2013 Benita Alexander was working as a producer at NBC in New York. Tasked with putting a documentary together on renowned Swiss surgeon Dr Paolo Macchiarini, the pair soon grew close and started dating. However, not was all what it seemed with both their relationship and the success of his surgical invention. Benita joins Claire McDonnell to tell her story, as featured in the new Netflix documentary, Bad Surgeon: Love Under The Knife?The UK’s Equalities and Human Rights Commission is being investigated by the UN over its position on “biological sex” and the provision of single-sex spaces. We talk to EHRC Chair Baroness Kishwer Falkner. Kamila Hryshchenko is one of the highest chess ranked players in England however until very recently she represented a different nation. Kamila and her mother were forced to flee their home nation of Ukraine during the outbreak of war in 2022 and it was chess that proved instrumental to securing Kamila and her mother’s safety. Kamila has chosen to now play for England and she joins Clare McDonnell.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Emma Pearce
28/11/23·57m 44s

Dame Harriet Walter, Runner Eilish McColgan, Post-mastectomy bras

Award-winning actor Dame Harriet Walter is back on stage at the National Theatre in Federico Lorca’s newly-adapted The House of Bernada Alba. After a break of seven years playing assorted television roles including ‘difficult’ mothers in Succession and Ted Lasso, she’s back treading the boards and once again playing a formidable matriarch. She joins Clare McDonnell in the studio to talk about her career so far, as well as her newest role.As of today, police in Northern Ireland can now charge people with upskirting, downblousing and cyber-flashing. At the same time, British Transport Police are encouraging women to lower their tolerance for sexual harassment during their commute and report minor offenders more often. So is recognition of so-called 'minor' sexual offences improving? Clare speaks to Naomi Long, Leader of the Alliance Party and former Northern Ireland Justice Minister, and to women's rights activist Zan Moon.What do women look for in a bra after breast cancer surgery? Clare is joined by Katy Marks, an architect by trade, who discovered after her single mastectomy that there was no bra on the market that was flat on one side. She didn’t want to use a prosthetic and so designed her own, called Uno, which launches today. She’ll be joined on the programme by Asmaa Al-allak who won this year’s Great British Sewing Bee and is a consultant breast surgeon who has made post-surgery lingerie for her patients.Runner Eilish McColgan follows in the footsteps of her mother Liz McColgan in the pursuit of sporting greatness. Now she’s made a documentary telling their story, looking at their relationship and charting the times Eilish has broken her mother’s records – all except the marathon. Eilish joins Clare to talk about making the documentary, as well as the pressures and benefits of following in the family business.
27/11/23·57m 32s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Sharon Osbourne, Jodie Whittaker and Outgoing Chief Inspectorate of Ofsted, Amanda Spielman

For more than two decades, Sharon Osbourne has been a regular feature on our screens. She came to prominence while appearing with her husband Ozzy on The Osbournes - a reality television show on MTV, which followed the family's daily life. She later became a talent show judge on television programmes such as the X Factor and America's Got Talent. She joins Anita Rani to discuss her forthcoming theatre show - Sharon Osbourne - Cut The Crap!Actor Jodie Whittaker joins Woman’s Hour to talk about her role in a new Australian six part drama called One Night. Shot in New South Wales the story unfolds around three women from a coastal community whose reunion after many years apart is intensified by the publishing of a novel based on their lives. She joins Emma to discuss some of her other hard hitting roles post Doctor Who.Amanda Spielman is coming to the end of an unprecedented seven year tenure at the helm of Ofsted. This year the organisation has come under intense scrutiny over its inspection regime and in particular the use of single-phrase judgments of schools, and the potential mental health impacts of those on school leaders and teachers. During the week Ofsted’s annual report is released, Amanda Spielman joins Emma for her only BBC interview.Another Body is an award-winning documentary which follows US engineering student, 'Taylor', in her search for answers and justice after she discovers deepfake pornography of herself circulating online. Ahead of its release in the UK, one of the documentary's directors, Sophie Compton joins Emma to discuss why she decided to make this documentary, what she found and why she used deepfake technology herself to anonymise the identities of the protagonists.Coaching for sonographers, the professionals carrying out the scans, on how to deliver unexpected and potentially devastating pregnancy news has been successfully tested in new research from the University of Leeds. Emma speaks to the lead researcher, Dr Judith Johnson, and also Karen, who says she was left with PTSD after receiving unexpected news about the health of her baby during a scan.
25/11/23·57m 46s

Sharon Osbourne, Shani Dhanda, Nurses and their mental health

For more than two decades, Sharon Osbourne has been a regular feature on our screens. She came to prominence while appearing with her husband Ozzy on The Osbournes - a reality television show on MTV, which followed the family's daily life. She later became a talent show judge on television programmes such as the X Factor and America's Got Talent. She joins Anita Rani to discuss her forthcoming theatre show - Sharon Osbourne - Cut The Crap! - in which she promises to reveal all about some of the hardest years of her eventful life.The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) is warning of a growing mental health crisis amongst nursing staff, as its membership support line data shows a substantial increase in the number of nursing staff seeking help for having suicidal thoughts. We hear from Hannah Cadogan - a nurse currently working in the NHS - and Stephen Jones, the Lead for Mental Health at the RCN to unpick what lies behind this increase.Dr Shani Dhanda is a disability inclusion & accessibility specialist, social entrepreneur and broadcaster. This month she was named the UK’s most influential disabled person by the Shaw Trust as part of the Disability Power 100 nominated by the public and judged by an independent panel. Shani is also an Ambassador for disability charity Scope. The Autumn Statement was controversial in its announcements affecting sick and disabled people, with the Government claiming their changes would support more people into work and campaigners and some professionals saying they could make the situation worse. Shani joins us to give her take, but also to discuss her life.Women composers for the film, TV and gaming industries are rare; this month a report, Female Professionals in European Film Production 2023 revealed only 10% of European film composers are women; and in this year’s GameSoundCon Game Audio Industry Survey, women game composers and sound designers made up only 15% of the talent. Anita discusses what can be done to reduce the gender gap in the media music industry with the composers Hannah Peel and Bishi.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey
24/11/23·56m 40s

Jodie Whittaker, Ofsted Chief Inspector Amanda Spielman

Actor Jodie Whittaker joins Woman’s Hour to talk about her role in a new Australian six part drama called One Night. Shot in New South Wales the story unfolds around three women from a coastal community whose reunion after many years apart is intensified by the publishing of a novel based on their lives. The central theme being the rape of Jodie’s character Tess twenty years previously and the impact its had on all their lives. Emma Barnett will be asking her about some of her other hard hitting roles post Doctor Who. Amanda Spielman is coming to the end of an unprecedented seven year tenure at the helm of Ofsted. This year the organisation has come under intense scrutiny over its inspection regime and in particular the use of single-phrase judgments of schools, and the potential mental health impacts of those on school leaders and teachers, with many in the profession arguing that the current system is now unfit for purpose, and requires a complete overhaul. On the day Ofsted’s annual report is released, Amanda Spielman joins Emma Barnett for her only BBC interview.The politician Margot Wallström introduced the concept of a feminist foreign policy to the world in 2014 when she became foreign secretary of Sweden. During her tenure she publicly recognised the state of Palestine, endorsed a United Nations ban on nuclear weapons and made no secret of her dislike for President Trump. Since then more than a dozen governments have announced their commitment to a feminist foreign policy, but what does it actually mean? Emma Barnett talks to Margot Wallström and to the German activist and author Kristina Lunz who has just written the Future of Foreign Policy is FeministPresenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
23/11/23·57m 20s

Deepfake pornography, Professor Yvonne Doyle – lessons from the pandemic, Pianist Chloe Flower

Another Body is an award-winning documentary which follows US engineering student, Taylor, in her search for answers and justice after she discovers deepfake pornography of herself circulating online. Ahead of its release in the UK, one of the documentary's directors, Sophie Compton joins Emma to discuss why she decided to make this documentary, what she found and why she used deepfake technology herself to anonymise the identities of the protagonists.The Covid-19 inquiry continues with key scientists sharing their insights into the pandemic response. Someone who has already given their testimony is Professor Yvonne Doyle. Professor Doyle was the former Medical Director and Director of Health Protection for the now defunct Public Health England. She speaks to Emma about the role of PHE in the pandemic response, her experience as a senior woman in government at the time and lessons we can learn from the pandemic.Israel has agreed to a four day pause in its retalitory bombardment of Gaza for the first time since the attacks, masssacring and kidnapping of Israelis by Hamas on October 7th. Hamas has agreed a deal to release 50 of the more than 200 hostages being held in Gaza. It is understood these will be women and children. Emma discusses the news with Yolande Nell, the BBC's Middle East correspondent in Jerusalem and Martin Richards, hostage and crisis negotiator and kidnap response consutlant. The pianist Chloe Flower came to the public’s attention after a show-stopping performance with rap queen Cardi B at the 2019 Grammy Awards. She has collaborated with some of the biggest names in music from Celine Dion to American rappers such as: Meek Mill, Lil Baby, 2Chainz and Nas. Recently Chloe received an award from Gloria Steinem at the Asia Society’s Last Girl Awards for her efforts in the fight against human trafficking. She joins Emma to talk about her “popsical” musical style, which infuses classical music with contemporary pop, and to perform live from her ‘Chloe Hearts Christmas’ album.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley
22/11/23·55m 42s

Carry On women, Unexpected news at baby scans

Barbara Windsor, Hattie Jacques and Joan Sims were some of the iconic women who starred in the Carry On films from the late 1950s onwards. From Carry on Camping to Carry on Up the Khyber, the humour relied largely on innuendo, double entendre and slapstick comedy, with the women viewed as objects for male desire. But were they really sexist? Emma Barnett speaks to Gemma Ross, co-author of The Carry On Girls, who argues it was the women who came out on top and were more sexually confident than the men, as well as actor Anita Harris who was in Carry On Doctor.The experiences of staff in the NHS are the subject of a report out today which has found that female NHS workers face an ‘embedded culture of misogyny.’ The campaign group Surviving in Scrubs has gathered testimony of 150 staff members through their website that launched last year and finds "systemic and institutional sexual violence" with experiences ranging from sexism to rape in the workplace. Emma is joined by Dr Chelcie Jewitt, a specialist trainee in emergency medicine at Merseyside hospitals and co-founder of Surviving in Scrubs, and Professor Dame Jane Dacre, former President of the Royal College of Physicians.The podcast series Intrigue - Million Dollar Lover looks at love in later life and the question of inheritance when someone with adult children finds a new partner. Sue Mitchell follows the unlikely love story of Carolyn, who is 80 and has properties worth a few million dollars, and Dave, 57, a former drug addict who is homeless and has spent a decade in jail. Sue joins Emma ahead of the series release on BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.Coaching for sonographers, the professionals carrying out the scans, on how to deliver unexpected and potentially devastating pregnancy news has been successfully tested in new research from the University of Leeds. We hear from the lead researcher, Dr Judith Johnson, and also from Karen, who says she was left with PTSD after receiving unexpected news about the health of her baby during a scan.
21/11/23·57m 34s

Angela Rippon, Jamie Bernstein on Maestro, Scorchio! The history of The Weather Girl

After being the latest celebrity contestant to be voted off Strictly Come Dancing at Blackpool’s Tower Ballroom, Angela Rippon tells Emma Barnett about forming a lifelong friendship with her 28-year-old dance partner Kai Waddington. At 79, she was the oldest competitor in the series and has wowed the judges and the audience with her flexible dance moves. Sam Fraser started working as a standby weather presenter for BBC South in 2012. When a fan club for her bottom surfaced online and she became a topic on the YouTube channel, Babes of Britain, she soon realised her public reception was not on par with her male counterparts. She turned to stand-up comedy as an outlet – and compiled the experiences of women in her job to produce an Edinburgh Fringe Show, as well as Scorchio! The Story of the Weather Girl, which is on BBC Radio 4 this week. Yvette Greenway-Mansfield won a record settlement of at least £1 million from the NHS in September after her vaginal mesh implant following a hysterectomy caused traumatic complications. We hear her story and about her ongoing campaign on behalf of other sufferers. The legendary composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein’s eldest daughter Jamie talks to Emma about her father and the new film about his life, Maestro, which is released this week. And Noam Sagi talks about waiting for news of his mother currently being held hostage in the Israeli-Gaza war.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
20/11/23·57m 11s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Dame Kelly Holmes, justice secretary Alex Chalk, history of eyeliner

Olympic champion Dame Kelly Holmes spoke publicly about her sexuality for the first time last year. Her new memoir, Unique, details how serving in the military in the late 1980s - when it was illegal to be gay in the military – was a major factor in contributing to her decades-long silence. She joins us to speak about her experience.After a reshuffle that left the government with no women in the “big four” offices of state, we speak to Justice Secretary Alex Chalk about the impact of the reshuffle as well as sentencing reforms which will affect women.From Nefertiti to Amy Winehouse, what is the personal and political power of eyeliner? We discuss with Zahra Hankir, author of Eyeliner: A Cultural History.Tish Murtha is a celebrated photographer whose images of working-class life in North East England can be found in the National Portrait Gallery and Tate Britain. But in her lifetime, Murtha struggled to find work of any kind. Now her daughter, Ella, has made a film about Murtha’s life and work. We speak to Ella and producer of the documentary, Jen Corcoran.How is our interaction with AI shifting our concepts of intimacy and sexuality as humans? We discuss with Kate Devlin, Reader in Artificial Intelligence & Society at King's College London, and to Trudy Barber, Senior Lecturer at Portsmouth University in Media Studies.In April 2020, Debenhams in Ireland closed all 11 of its stores, informing its staff they had been let go in the process. What ensued were pickets and protests across Ireland that lasted for 406 days. As a new film is released on the subject, we're joined by two women who were involved, Carol Ann Bridgeman and Jane Crowe.
18/11/23·56m 34s

Life and work of photographer Tish Murtha, Sitcom Such Brave Girls, Finding your dress shape

Brave Girls is a new sitcom following a dysfunctional family made up of sisters Josie and Billie and their mum Deb. It’s a fictional show exploring trauma but it's a comedy in every sense of the word. Ahead of its release on BBC Three and iPlayer next Wednesday, Anita Rani is joined by Kat Sadler, who plays Josie, and by her real life AND fictional sister Lizzie Davidson, who plays Billie. Just over a year ago, on 28th October, 2022, we did a nursery and childcare special programme, looking at whether the system needs an overhaul. Early this year, the government announced plans to extend the government's existing offer of 30 hours free childcare to working parents of children aged 9-months to two-years-old in England. Beginning in April 2024, funding will be rolled out in stages. Prior to this, only working parents of three and four-year-olds were entitled to the free 30 hours. Now, new BBC News analysis estimates that demand for places at nurseries and childminders is likely to rise by about 15% - equivalent to more than 100,000 additional children in full-time care. Anita dicusses the issues with Neil Leitch, Chief Executive of the Early Years Alliance. Tish Murtha is a celebrated photographer whose images of working-class life in North East England can be found in the National Portrait Gallery and Tate Britain. But in her lifetime, Murtha struggled to find work of any kind. Now her daughter, Ella, has made a film about Murtha’s life and work. Ella talks to Anita, along with Jen Corcoran, who produced the documentary.Are you an apple? A pear? An hourglass? Or even an inverted triangle? For years women have been told to dress for their shape. But our shape doesn’t stay the same over the course of our lifetime. So, how helpful are these shapes? Anita discusses with Anna Berkeley, stylist and founder of the body mapping app, Think Shape, who believes we should actually be more interested in our proportions, and Shakaila Forbes-Bell, Fashion Psychologist and author of Big Dress Energy.Presented by Anita Rani Producer: Louise Corley
17/11/23·57m 28s

Dr Who actor Jemma Redgrave on the show's new 60th anniversary shows and the history of eyeliner

It’s Doctor Who’s 60th year and to celebrate, there will be three anniversary specials coming to your screens starting next week. Jemma Redgrave will be returning as Kate Stewart - Chief Scientific Officer at UNIT - the military organisation set up to investigate alien threats to earth. Jemma speaks to Emma Barnett about what we can expect and what it is like being a part of the show.Professor Dame Lesley Regan talks about the decision to let women access the contraceptive pill from pharmacies in England, from next month, without the need for a GP appointment.There is going to be a new parental leave policy in France. Parents will be entitled to “family leave” worth half their salary for up to a year. We talk a lot on Woman’s Hour about the maternity leave, paternity leave and shared parental leave policies in this country – but what could we learn by looking abroad? Professor Alison Koslowski from University College London and Elena Brown from Rand Europe outline and discuss the different policies.Emmy-nominated film director Nisha Pahuja joins Woman’s Hour to talk about her new documentary, To Kill A Tiger. It focuses on Ranjit, the father of a young girl in a tribal Indian village who has been sexually assaulted, and his battle for justice. Nisha tells Emma why she wanted to make a film about this and the important changes it has made.Eyeliner is one of the most enduring cosmetic tools; it is an aesthetic trademark that was favoured by the ancient Egyptian Queen Nerfertiti, the late singer Amy Winehouse and still up there now, with Z beauty influencers. Writer Zahra Hankir reports its history in her new book Eyeliner.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Bob Nettles
16/11/23·57m 33s

Justice Secretary Alex Chalk on sentencing reforms

After a reshuffle that saw Suella Braverman leave her post as Home Secretary, and left the government with no women in the “big four” offices of state, Justice Secretary Alex Chalk spoke to Emma Barnett. They discussed the impact of the reshuffle, as well as sentencing reforms which will affect women, and the alleged rapist currently serving as a Conservative MP.Endometriosis is a chronic condition which affects one in 10 women, for whom tissue similar to the lining of the womb starts to grow in other places, causing debilitating pain and in some cases fertility complications. But a charity that looks to support women suffering from the condition - Endometriosis South Coast - has faced criticism this week after announcing that a trans woman, Steph Richards, would be their new CEO. The decision to appoint Steph was made by Jodie Hughes, Chair of the Trustees, who also founded the charity. They spoke to Emma about the appointment.Lisa Lintott always enjoyed writing, but being a single mum meant that this had to take a back seat. But when her son Jazz, an aspiring actor, found that he was only being sent typecast roles, Lisa enrolled herself into a creative writing masters and wrote her own play, casting her son in the lead role. Going for Gold, which tells the life story of British boxer Frankie Lucas, has since won multiple awards, including Best Production Play, Best Producer and Best Actor at this year’s Black British Theatre Awards, catapulting them both into the spotlight. Jazz and Lisa told Emma about this unexpected partnership.Minnie the Minx is turning 70. In December the much loved Beano cartoon character will celebrate 70 years since her first appearance. The writers and illustrators of the Beano, based in Dundee, Scotland, created Minnie to “be just as tough as the boys” and “kick back against pre-war societal norms.” Well, that was in 1953. Today, a special edition of The Beano is coming out, guest-edited by England's football captain, Leah Williamson. Laura Howell has been drawing Minnie since 2018 and explained why Minnie’s popularity has endured.
15/11/23·57m 31s

Dame Kelly Holmes, Cabinet reshuffle, Debenhams picketers

The four top jobs in Rishi Sunak’s new cabinet have all been filled with men. It’s the first time this has happened since 2009. To unpack what this means, Emma Barnett is joined by Baroness Kate Fall, former deputy chief of staff to the newly appointed Lord Cameron, and Executive Editor of Politico Anne McElvoy. Double Olympic champion Dame Kelly Holmes spoke publicly about her sexuality for the first time in June last year. Her new memoir, Unique, details how serving in the military in the late 1980s - when it was illegal to be gay in the military – was a major factor in contributing to her decades-long silence. Dame Kelly joins Woman’s Hour to speak about her experience and what it meant to hear the Government’s apology to LGBT veterans. In April 2020, Debenhams in Ireland closed all 11 of its stores, informing its staff they had been let go in the process. What ensued were pickets and protests across Ireland that lasted for 406 days, 24 hours a day and through all weathers. As a new film is released on the subject in the UK, Emma is joined by Carol Ann Bridgeman who worked for Debenhams for 15 years and Jane Crowe who worked there for 23 years. Karuna Nundy is an advocate at the Supreme Court in India and has been leading legal campaigns to criminalise marital rape and to legalise same-sex marriage. She was named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2022 and will be giving a speech on her career tonight at the Institute for Development Studies. She joins Emma to discuss her role in these high-profile cases.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
14/11/23·57m 26s

Suella Braverman sacked as home secretary, Natalie Cassidy, Breast Cancer treatment

Following a weekend of speculation, the most senior woman in government Suella Braverman has been sacked from her role as Home Secretary. To discuss Emma is joined by Lucy Fisher, the Whitehall Editor for the Financial Times; and Claire Pearsall, former Home Office special advisor under Amber Rudd and Sajid Javid. The gripping BBC One drama ‘Time’ focuses on the stories of three women, and shows the stark differences for female and male prisoners. Emma is joined by Time’s screenwriter, Helen Black, who has first-hand experience of the criminal justice system from her past career in the law, and Lady Unchained, who was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for grievous bodily harm following a fight in a club while trying to protect her sister. She is now a poet, performer and broadcaster. The actor Natalie Cassidy pays tribute to the late Anna Scher who taught children in North London to act for more than 50 years.How is our interaction with AI shifting our concepts of intimacy and sexuality as humans? Emma Barnett talks to the Kate Devlin Kate Devlin who’s a Reader Artificial Intelligence & Society at King's College London and the author of Turned On: Science, Sex and Robots, and to Trudy Barber, Senior Lecturer at Portsmouth University in Media Studies.Tens of thousands of women in England could benefit from a drug that helps prevent breast cancer. Anastrozole, used for many years to treat the disease, has now been licensed as a preventative option, and almost 300 thousand women will be eligible to take it. But is it as big a step forwards as it seems? Former surgeon and breast cancer survivor Dr Liz O’Riordan joins Emma to discuss.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
13/11/23·57m 37s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Perinatal pelvic health, ‘Grey pound’ fashion, Jilly Cooper, Swearing, Hot flushes

The Government has announced £11 million in funding for the NHS in England to roll out a dedicated perinatal pelvic health service across all trusts. The aim of these new perinatal pelvic health services will be to help educate and assess women during pregnancy and after a traumatic birth – but how will it work? Emma Barnett hears from Jacqui Barrett, who had a traumatic birth and was incontinent for a year, Professor Swati Jha, consultant gynaecologist and spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, and the Conservative MP Maria Caulfield, who is the Women’s Health Minister. Luxury brands are beginning to feature ‘timeless icons’ in their campaigns to attract older shoppers with more spending power. Is the fashion industry finally responding to the strength of the so-called 'grey pound'? Alexandra Schulman, journalist and former editor-in-chief of British Vogue and retail analyst Kate Hardcastle discuss. Jilly Cooper has sold more than two million copies of her books, including Riders, Rivals, and Polo - taking us into the glamorous worlds of show jumping and classical music. Her latest novel, Tackle!, takes us to the football pitch and features her legendary hero Rupert Campbell-Black. Jilly joins Emma to talk about football, why there is less sex in her novels now, and her view on Prime Minister Rishi Sunak reading her books. Why do we swear, and are women judged differently for swearing than men? Why are some swear words considered more offensive than others, and what does that tell us about misogyny and sexism in society? Dr Emma Byrne, scientist and author of Swearing Is Good For You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, and Dr Rebecca Roache, the author of a new book, For F's Sake: Why Swearing is Shocking, Rude and Fun, discuss. The ABC News Breakfast guest host Imogen Crump has been praised for helping to normalise symptoms of perimenopause, after she experienced a severe hot flush on live television. Emma asks her about what happened.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
11/11/23·57m 40s

Swearing, Women in north east India, The 'grey pound' and fashion, A story of brutal crime, forgiveness and empathy

If you've been following the Covid inquiry, you may have noticed a lot of strong and swearing language. So why do we swear, and are women judged differently for swearing than men? In her new book For F*ck's Sake: Why Swearing is Shocking, Rude, and Fun, Dr Rebecca Roache explores double standards, the misogynistic roots of certain swear words and the challenges in reclaiming them. Anita Rani is also joined by the scientist Dr Emma Byrne who discusses why she swears, swearing in front of children and her own relationship with certain swear words.Six months ago, there was a horrific act of violence in north-east India, when two women were stripped, paraded naked, and allegedly gang raped by a mob. It made the news nationally when their ordeal was made public in a viral video. Now the two women have spoken for the first time, in a face-to-face interview with the BBC's Divya Arya.Luxury fashion brand Loewe recently made headlines with the face of their Spring/Summer 2024 pre-collection campaign: 88-year-old Dame Maggie Smith is pictured modelling some of their best-selling bags. Is this a step in a new direction for the world of fashion? Are major brands waking up to the consumer power of the 'Grey Pound'? Anita Rani is joined retail analyst Kate Hardcastle and former British Vogue Editor Alexandra Shulman.In 1985 in Gary, Indiana, four girls aged between 14 and 16 years old entered the house of an elderly woman and brutally murdered her. They took her car and a small amount of cash. The girls were black and the woman was white. Ruth Pelke was a Bible school teacher, a widow, well-known in her community. Those facts are not disputed. A new book called Seventy Times Seven by Alex Mar is a forensic study of what happened before and after that day and her focus is on Paula Cooper - a 15-year-old girl sentenced to death for her crime. So far, so grim, but this is also a story of forgiveness and radical empathy. Alex Mar joins Anita. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey
10/11/23·57m 20s

Nour Swirki in Gaza, Baroness Falkender's secrets, Divorce, Alzheimer's, Hot flushes

We have been bringing you women's voices from Israel and Gaza since the start of the war. Yesterday, you will have heard on the programme Rachel Goldberg, mother of a 23-year-old hostage Hersh Goldberg Polin, kidnapped by Hamas from a music festival in Israel. Today, we hear from a mother in Gaza. Nour Swirki is a journalist with two children living in Khan Younis, a city in the southern strip of Gaza, with her husband, mother and sister - they have had to leave their home in Gaza City for safety reasons and relocate to the south - a fraught journey many more Palestinians are expected to make. Due to the difficulties in speaking live to guests in Gaza, we asked Nour to record for us voice notes explaining the situation she and her family are currently in. She and her husband continue to work as journalists while her wider family look after her children - a son and daughter aged 10 and 12.The ABC News Breakfast guest host Imogen Crump has been praised for helping to normalise symptoms of perimenopause, after she experienced a severe hot flush on live television. Emma Barnett asks her about what happened.Research from the University of Bristol demonstrates that women can lose out financially when they divorce. The number of couples seeking legal advice during divorce proceedings is falling, and old-fashioned procedures that disadvantage women are being used. To find out more, and get advice on how to make sure you are not penalised financially, Emma speaks to financial planner Megan Jenkins and family lawyer Amanda McAlister.The NHS is launching a new study into Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, which affects around twice as many women as men. The study, a joint project with Alzheimer’s Research UK and Alzheimer’s Society, will use a blood test to detect for the disease at an early stage. There is currently no single test for Alzheimer's and patients can wait years for a diagnosis. Dr Susan Mitchell, Head of Policy at Alzheimer’s Research UK, one of the charities leading this study talks to Emma.Emma talks to journalist Linda McDougall about her new biography of Marcia Williams, who went on to become Baroness Falkender. Linda hopes to shift public perception of the Baroness as a Svengali figure who influenced Prime Minister Harold Wilson during the sixties and seventies, and gain recognition for her achievements for the Labour Party. Linda's alternative history is called Marcia Williams, The Life and Times of Baroness Falkender.Presenter: Emma Barnett Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
09/11/23·57m 31s

Jilly Cooper, Rachel Goldberg – mother of hostage Hersh Goldberg-Polin, Women & binge drinking, Perinatal pelvic health service.

Jilly Cooper began her career as a journalist, wrote columns on marriage, sex and housework for the Sunday Times, and numerous works of non-fiction before turning to romance novels - to great success. She has sold more than two million copies of her books including: Riders, Rivals, and Polo - taking us into the glamorous worlds of show jumping and classical music. Her latest novel Tackle! takes us to the football pitch and features her legendary hero Rupert Campbell-Black. Jilly joins Emma to talk about football, why there is less sex in her novels now, and her view on Prime Minister Rishi Sunak reading her books. Yesterday marked a month since Hamas launched its unprecedented attack on Israel in which 1,400 people were killed and more than 200 men, women and children taken hostage. One of those seized and kidnapped was Hersh Goldberg-Polin - a 23-year-old dual Israeli American citizen who was attending the Supernova music festival - the site of which became a massacre of a majority of young people - more than 250 people at the hands of Hamas. Hersh lost an arm during that attack but is still believed to be alive. Since then more than 10,300 people have been killed in Gaza according to the Hamas-run health ministry in retaliatory air strikes by Israeli forces demanding the return of its citizens. Emma speaks to Hersh's mother Rachel Goldberg.A new report by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development, which compared alcohol consumption across 38 countries, British women top the list as the heaviest binge drinkers alongside Denmark. The OECD found that 26% of British women reported binge drinking at least once a month - defined as having at least six drinks in a single session. Emma discusses the issues with Dr Helen Garr, GP and Medical Director of NHS Practitioner Health, a mental health and addiction service for healthcare professionals; and Catherine Gray, the author of The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober.The government has announced £11 million in funding for the NHS in England to roll out a dedicated perinatal pelvic health service across all trusts. The aim of these new perinatal pelvic health services will be to help educate and assess women during pregnancy and after a traumatic birth – but how will it work? And is it enough? Emma speaks to Jacqui Barrett, who had a traumatic birth and was incontinent for a year, Professor Swati Jha, consultant gynaecologist and spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, and the Conservative MP Maria Caulfield, who is the Women’s Health Minister. Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio engineer: Gayl Gordon
08/11/23·57m 28s

Caster Semenya, King's Speech, Jude Rogers on Kirsty MacColl

Caster Semenya is one of the most decorated athletes of her generation but she is also one of the most scrutinised. The South African shot to fame in 2009 after winning the 800 metres at the World Championships in Berlin. Her performance was so astonishing it was met with questions about her sex and gender, with some asking publicly if she was really a woman. Caster's career, for all its highs, has been defined by a battle between her and the sport's governing body World Athletics about her right to compete. Caster joins Emma to discuss her career as she releases her new book A Race to be Myself. Kirsty MacColl wrote and sang some of the most iconic pop songs of the eighties and nineties. She tends to be remembered best for Fairytale of New York, and for her untimely death in 2000. However, as a comprehensive new box set of her work, See That Girl, demonstrates, her influence and importance as an artist extends far beyond this. Music journalist Jude Rogers wrote an essay for the box set, and joins Emma in studio.This morning, we'll have the first King's Speech in more than 70 years. In this morning's speech, the King is expected to include around 20 bills, focusing on criminal sentencing and smoking, among other things. A bill to change the leasehold system is also expected to be included. The BBC's Iain Watson gives us a run through of what to expect and Jo Darbyshire from the National Leasehold Campaign joins Emma to discuss why they want the leasehold system to be scrapped.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
07/11/23·55m 51s

MP rape allegations, Mothers' march, Melissa Caddick

An unidentified Conservative MP has been accused of rape by several women. These allegations are mentioned in a new book by former cabinet secretary Nadine Dorries. It comes after reports the Conservative party's former chairman, Sir Jake Berry, wrote to the police to make them aware of the claims after leaving the post last year. The deputy Prime Minister, Oliver Dowden, has denied a cover-up by the party when he was the chairman. Emma Barnett hears the reaction of Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor at The Spectator, and Conservative MP Caroline Nokes, Chair of the Women and Equalities Committee.A group of mothers under the umbrella of Just Stop Oil are planning a slow march to demand an end to new oil and gas licences and to call for a secure liveable future for their children. Just Stop Oil's tactics around the country, from blocking roads to halting theatre productions, are controversial. Emma is joined by two of the protesting mums. When con woman Melissa Caddick vanished from her luxurious eastern Sydney home in November 2020 - with only her partially decomposed foot found washed up on a beach months later, it set off a frenzy in Australia. Regulators suspect the 49-year-old stole nearly £16m from more than 60 clients, including many of her family and friends, to help fund a lavish lifestyle. Chief investigative reporter at the Sydney Morning Herald, Kate McClymont, joins Emma to discuss.We hear about a development in the case of Agnes Wanjiru, a 21-year-old Kenyan woman who was found stabbed to death at a hotel in the garrison town of Nanyuki in 2012. Witnesses said she was last seen leaving the hotel bar with a British soldier, and her body was found in a septic tank at the hotel nearly three months later. A Kenyan judge concluded after an inquest in 2019 that she had been murdered by one or two British soldiers. As yet, nobody has been convicted. Kenyan police have now flown to the UK to question British soldiers and officers about the case. Emma speaks to Sunday Times journalist Hannah Al-Othman.Sarah Whalley is the producer and director of Forests, an episode of Planet Earth III. She was pregnant during filming and chose to name her child Forest. Sarah talks to Emma about how the isolation of her pregnancy during lockdown was mirrored when they filmed a Hornbill bird in its nest for the first time.
06/11/23·57m 22s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Author Alex O'Brien on what playing poker can teach you, Maternity care & Sprinter Bianca Williams

This week, the Maternity Safety Alliance group has called for a full statutory public inquiry into maternity safety in England. They joined Jess to explain why they’re calling for this inquiry as did Presenter Krupa Padhy, who has produced a documentary on Radio 4 which investigates this issue. Writer and comedian Alison Larkin avoided love most of her adult life but in her 50s, she found true love for the first time with an Indian climate scientist. Then he died. Alison joins Krupa to tell her all about her new show based on this experience, Grief…Comedy at the Soho Theatre.British sprinter Bianca Williams has had lots of success in Athletics competitions for almost a decade but in recent weeks it has been an investigation into an incident which happened three years ago that has put her back into the news. She joins Krupa to discuss her stop and search ordeal.Singer-songwriter and cellist Ayanna Witter-Johnson has collaborated with a prestigious range of artists from Andrea Bocelli to Anoushka Shankar. She has now joined forces with London Symphony Orchestra Percussion Ensemble to create a new album, Ocean Floor. She joins Anita to discuss it.Have you ever played poker? Did you think about how playing it could influence your life decisions? Science writer and poker player Alex O’Brien has written a new book, The Truth Detective, which explores how the game's rules and strategies help us to better navigate the world and make better choices. She spoke to Jess about the life lessons she’s learned from playing – and why she’s teaching her daughter.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Claire Fox
04/11/23·53m 51s

Cellist Ayanna Witter-Johnson, Women & renting, Catherine Dalton cricketer, Women's peace petition, Maggie Murphy CEO, Lewes FC

There is huge pressure in the rental market and women are being hit hardest of all, according to The Financial Times. Average rents have increased so much that “there are almost no affordable one-bedroom lets in London and the East of England for the average single mother”, according to ONS and rental market data analysed by the Financial Times. Women, and especially single mothers, are being forced to relocate away from networks of family and friends and even their children’s schools, in order to find somewhere affordable to live. Amy Borrett, a Data Journalist at the Financial Times and Victoria Benson, CEO of Gingerbread, the charity for single parent families, join Anita Rani to discuss the issues.   The singer/songwriter and cellist Ayanna Witter-Johnson has collaborated with a prestigious range of artists from Andrea Bocelli and Anoushka Shankar to Nitin Sawhney and Akala, as well as touring as part of Peter Gabriel’s band.  She has now joined forces with the London Symphony Orchestra Percussion Ensemble.  Their new album Ocean Floor explores stories relating to Ayanna’s ancestral heritage, culture and identity, and blurs the boundaries between chamber music, jazz and soul.  Ayanna performs in the studio, alongside Neil Percy, the LSO’s Principal Percussionist.A hundred years ago, nearly 400,000 ordinary women in Wales signed a petition calling on the women of America to join them in demanding a world without war. Today a purple plaque is being unveiled in Aberystwyth to commemorate Annie Hughes Griffiths who led the delegation of Welsh women who brought the petition to the US and to the President.  Dr Jenny Mathers, a senior lecturer in International Politics at Aberystwyth University, is co-editor of the book The Appeal 1923-23: The Remarkable Story of the Welsh Women's Peace Petition which is being launched today at the National Library of Wales. Catherine Dalton is making waves in professional cricket, having just become the first woman to be hired as a men’s fast-bowling coach. A cricketer for Essex, Catherine has played four one day internationals and four T-20 internationals for Ireland - and she'll soon be joining the Pakistan Super League side The Maltan Saltans for their 2024 season. In 2017, Lewes FC became the first English club to split its budget and resources equally between the men’s and women’s teams. It's just been announced the club's owners - made up entirely of its fans - voted in favour of moving forward with potential new investment in their women's team. It would come from Mercury 13, a consortium bidding to acquire women's football clubs in Europe and Latin America. Maggie Murphy, CEO of the club, and celebrated change-maker on the Woman's Hour Power List this year, explains why this is a big moment for how women's football could change and grow as its popularity continues to rise. Presented by Anita Rani Producer: Louise Corley
03/11/23·53m 59s

Covid Inquiry, Child-free friends, Afghans in Pakistan, Alison Larkin

Former deputy cabinet secretary Helen McNamara gave evidence at the Covid Inquiry yesterday, saying that she thought that the culture in Number 10 was toxic and sexist. She was particularly critical of the explicit and misogynistic language the former chief advisor Dominic Cummings used to describe her. Krupa Padhy is joined by Lucy Fisher, Whitehall Editor for The Financial Times, and Jill Rutter, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Government, to discuss what this says about the treatment of women at the heart of government.Journalist Rebecca Reid talks to Krupa about child-free friends and how she thinks they don't understand that she needs to be selfish now that she has a young child. Pakistan has ordered all unauthorised Afghan asylum seekers to leave the country. Pakistan is home to over four million Afghan migrants and refugees, about 1.7 million of whom are undocumented, according to the authorities. As Afghanistan's neighbour, Pakistan, has seen people travel across the border for safety for four decades, from the 1979 Soviet invasion through to the more recent return of the Taliban in 2021, Krupa talks to Zarghuna Kargar, an Afghan Journalist at BBC News, about the impact of this decision on women.The noughties was an incredibly hostile decade in which to be female, according to the writer Sarah Ditum.  It was the time when the traditional media of television, film and newspapers was joined by the internet; and the fame that resulted for nine iconic women: Britney, Paris, Lindsay, Aaliyah, Janet, Amy, Kim, Chyna and Jen came at a price. Sarah examines how each of these women changed the concept of ‘celebrity’ forever, often falling victim to it, in her new book Toxic.The writer and comedian Alison Larkin is the author of The English American, an autobiographical novel about an adopted English woman who finds her birth mother and Jane-Austen-like romance in the US. Alison had avoided love for most of her adult life. However, in her 50s she found true love with an Indian climate scientist who had also immigrated to the US. Then he died. After 30 years living in America, Alison is in the UK to perform her one woman show Grief... a Comedy which opens at the Soho Theatre in London on Monday. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
02/11/23·56m 26s

AI and child sexual abuse, Alex O’Brien, Molly Manning Walker

As the Artificial Intelligence Safety Summit starts at Bletchley Park today, we look at the growing issue of AI generated child sexual abuse imagery. Jessica Creighton speaks to Emma Hardy from the Internet Watch Foundation and to Professor Gina Neff, Executive Director of the Minderoo Centre for Technology and Democracy at Cambridge University. Science writer and poker player Alex O’Brien explores how the game's rules and strategies could help us to navigate the world, in her new book The Truth Detective. She joins Jessica in the studio.A recent report from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health says that climate change is causing an existential threat to the health and wellbeing of all children. Their President Dr Camilla Kingdon tells Jessica why that is, and what can be done.How do you navigate sex and consent as a teenager? How To Have Sex is the debut feature film of director Molly Manning Walker. It follows three best friends on a hedonistic post-GCSE trip to a party resort in Greece. As they fill their days sunning, clubbing and drinking, they also deal with troubling first sexual encounters and wrestle with issues of consent. Molly joins Jess to discuss the inspiration behind the film. Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Lottie Garton
01/11/23·57m 16s

Failures in maternity care, Spain's Princess Leonor turns 18, Women's Ballon d'Or

A group of families affected by failures in NHS maternity care are calling for a full statutory public inquiry into maternity safety in England. Emily Barley from the Maternity Safety Alliance group told Jessica Creighton why she thinks fundamental reform is needed. And presenter Krupa Padhy draws on her own personal story of baby loss in her BBC Radio 4 investigation, How safe is maternity care?The Covid inquiry is already under way and has heard about an internal report into the culture at the top of Government in the early months of the pandemic. This found that female staff were talked over and ignored. So what is the impact on the workplace when women can't speak out? And how can women get their voices heard in the workplace? Barbara Nixon is a success and leadership coach and she joined Jessica to discuss.There is a new superstar in women's football. Spain and Barcelona midfielder Aitana Bonmatí has won one of the sport's most presitgious awards... the Ballon d'Or. She is also one of five women nominated for the BBC Women’s Footballer of the Year award. Jo Currie, the BBC's Women's Football Correspondent, outlines the nominees.Princess Leonor of Spain turns 18 today and has been swearing allegiance to the country. So who is the young princess, and what role might she play in Spanish public life? Rafa de Miguel is the UK and Ireland correspondent for the Spanish newspaper El Pais and he joined Jessica to discuss.Producer: Hannah Sander Presenter: Jessica Creighton
31/10/23·57m 11s

Bianca Williams, Sandra Hüller, Living with your parents too long

Bianca Williams and her partner, fellow athlete Ricardo dos Santos, were stopped outside their home in London in July 2020. They had their three-month-old baby with them in their car. Both were handcuffed and searched on suspicion of having drugs and weapons. None were found and neither was arrested. A police Misconduct Hearing was held involving the five officers present. Last week that hearing found that two Met officers must be sacked as the stop and search was found to have amounted to gross misconduct - allegations against three other officers were not proven. The two officers have since been dismissed. Bianca joins Krupa Padhy to discuss how she's been affected by the experience.Living at home too long - An Italian court has ruled that a 75-year-old Italian woman can evict her “big baby” sons in their 40s. So how long is too long to live at home? We talk to Journalist Adriana Urbano.Actor Sandra Hüller on her two Oscar nominations for roles in Anatomy of the Fall – where she plays a wife suspected of murdering her husband - and The Zone of Interest where she plays Hedwig Höss, the wife of a Nazi commander. Amina Noor from London was found guilty at the Old Bailey last week of taking a three-year-old British child to Kenya for female genital mutilation in 2006. We talk to Jaswant Narwal the Chief Crown Prosecutor for CPS London North on the wider implications of the case.And Ellen Miller from Refuge, tells Krupa about her concerns for survivors of domestic abuse and stalking now that GP practices across England have been instructed to grant access to patients' medical records through the NHS app and other online portals. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Sue Maillot
30/10/23·57m 32s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Leigh-Anne Pinnock, Rescuing seal pups, Tell-all celebrity memoirs

Leigh-Anne Pinnock - a name you may know, as a member of one of the biggest girl bands in the world, Little Mix. This year - almost two years since the band announced a hiatus - Leigh-Anne has embarked on her own solo career. She tells Anita Rani about her new memoir Believe, all about her life growing up, what it was really like going through The X Factor and how she found her voice. Ukraine claims it has identified 20,000 children who it alleges have been abducted by Russia since the start of the war. Arrest warrants have been issued to President Putin and his Commissioner for Children's Rights. It's the subject of the latest work from film-maker Shahida Tulaganova, who joins us to discuss her ITV documentary Ukraine's Stolen Children.Lizzi Larbalestier has cared for 139 seals in her home in Cornwall. She also helped set up a new seal hospital with the British Divers Marine Life Rescue, and has just won an animal action award from the International Fund for Animal Welfare. Ruth Birch and Julia Curry are a couple from South Wales. They met as young women in the British Army, but had to leave because of the pressure they were under to lie about their sexuality and conceal their relationship. The stress led to them breaking up, but 20 years later they reunited. They join us to share their story.Britney Spears has been in the news again after spilling personal stories in a memoir. Are women being pressured to overshare in order to sell books? And are men also expected to publicise their personal lives? Nina Stibbe, whose newest memoir is Went to London, Took the Dog, and Caroline Sanderson, Associate Editor of The Bookseller, joins us to discuss. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai
28/10/23·56m 7s

Leigh-Anne Pinnock, Black British Book Festival, Gesbeen Mohammad

Leigh-Anne Pinnock has embarked on her own solo career, almost two years after her band, Little Mix, called a hiatus - and has already released two songs. Now she's got a new book out, Believe, all about her life growing up, what it was really like going through the X Factor and how she found her voice. She joins Anita Rani to discuss it all.The Black British Book Festival is now in its third year. It aims to celebrate new and emerging Black British authors across all genres of literature. To find out more, Anita speaks to author and events producer Selina Brown, who launched the festival, and Margaret Busby, Britain’s first black woman publisher, who is also currently President of English PEN, one of the world's oldest human rights organisations that campaigns for freedom of expression. Gesbeen Mohammad is the producer and director of Inside Iran: The Fight For Freedom, a new documentary that has taken more than a year to make. It’s a story told through the eyes of ordinary Iranian women who took to the streets when Mahsa Amini died in September 2022. Gesbeen tells Anita about why these women chose to tell their stories, and what the current situation is in Iran.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
27/10/23·56m 0s

Tell-all celebrity memoirs, child poverty, and 'de-banking'

Britney Spears has been in the news again after spilling personal stories in a memoir. Are women being pressured to overshare in order to sell books? And are men also expected to publicise their personal lives? Nina Stibbe, whose newest memoir is Went to London, Took the Dog, and Caroline Sanderson, Associate Editor of The Bookseller, joined Emma Barnett to discuss.Mary Turner Thomson found writing a memoir cathartic after discovering that her husband, William Allen Jordan, was not a spy as she had been told. He was actually a bigamist and a conman. Her story is now a documentary series, The Other Mrs Jordan: Catching the Ultimate Conman, which is available on ITVX. She and her daughter Eilidh told Emma about the day they discovered William's real identity.A report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and Heriot Watt university says the number of children in the UK living in destitution has nearly trebled since 2017. Why are families struggling, and what could be done to help? Abby Jitendra, Principal Policy Adviser at the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, and Sophia Worringer, Deputy Policy Director at the Centre for Social Justice, joined Emma. We also heard from Kimberley in Fife who contributed to the report.Dame Alison Rose, the former chief executive of NatWest, has been found to have breached data protection laws after she publicly discussed the closure of Nigel Farage’s account with NatWest subsidiary bank Coutts. In the UK, banks closed more than 343,000 accounts in the last financial year. Gina Miller, the woman who spearheaded the anti-Brexit campaign before the 2016 referendum, was 'de-banked' and has called for an investigation into the practice.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Hannah Sander
26/10/23·57m 28s

Israel-Gaza war, Monica Dolan, Kathryn Mannix

As the Israel-Gaza war continues, aid groups are calling for a ceasefire in Gaza as power shortages threaten the lives of vulnerable patients, including women and children. UN agencies have estimated that one-third of hospitals in Gaza and nearly two-thirds of primary health care clinics have had to shut due to damage or a lack of fuel. The Israeli government says Hamas is stock-piling thousands of litres of fuel. The biggest aid provider in Gaza, the UN, says its fuel will run out tonight, unless it gets fresh supplies - hospitals in Gaza are already limiting services to critical cases only. Emma Barnett hears from Save the Children's Soraya Ali, as well as women's voices from Gaza and Israel.Lizzi Larbalestier has cared for 139 seals in her home in Cornwall. She also helped set up a new seal hospital with the British Divers Marine Life Rescue, and has just won an animal action award from the International Fund for Animal Welfare.Actor Monica Dolan joins Emma to talk about starring in a new film about the undiscovered artist Audrey Amiss. Amiss was tipped for artistic greatness, but ended up cycling between mental hospitals and menial jobs for decades, and was sadly never exhibited, or recognised in her lifetime. Typist Artist Pirate King comes out this Friday.What normally happens as someone dies? These questions and others are answered in a new short animation ‘Dying for Beginners’. Kathryn Mannix is a retired palliative care doctor, who’s made it her mission to demystify what happens as we die. She’s worked with Theos Think Tank to produce the video, and will also be giving their annual public lecture on the public understanding of dying at the Royal Society for Medicine on 1st November. Kathryn joins Emma.
25/10/23·57m 38s

Ruth Birch and Julia Curry, Liza Mundy, Lyse Doucet and Tal Hochman, Cindy Thomas and Laura Barton

Liza Mundy is the bestselling author of Code Girls, a book about the American women who broke codes during the Second World War. Her new book details the lives of spies and intelligence agents behind some of the biggest operations in postwar history including locating Osama bin Laden, and rescuing the schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram.Around 80 Israeli rights groups have signed a letter calling on the organisation UN Women to condemn acts of violence against women by Hamas. The letter was addressing a statement issued by UN Women, a United Nations entity which aims to be a global champion of women and girls – which they said ‘ignored the atrocities that took place on Oct 7th’. Emma Barnett speaks to Tal Hochman from the Israeli Women’s Network who are one of the organisations involved and also by Lyse Doucet the BBC’s Chief International Correspondent.According to a new trial published in the journal of Clinical Psychiatry involving 80 people from Massachusetts General Hospital - heated yoga sessions could lead to reduced depressive symptoms in adults with moderate-to-severe depression. The trial findings suggest that the combination of yoga and heat should be considered as a potential treatment for individuals experiencing depression. Hot yoga instructor Cindy Thomas and writer and broadcaster Laura Barton talk about the survey.Ruth Birch and Julia Curry are a couple from South Wales. They met as young women in the British army, but had to leave because of the pressure they were under to lie about their sexuality and conceal their relationship. You were not allowed to be gay or lesbian in the UK military until the year 2000. The stress led to them breaking up, but twenty years later they reunited, and now campaign on behalf of fellow LGBT veterans. Ruth and Ju feature on You Had Me at Hello, a podcast where ordinary people tell their love stories. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
24/10/23·57m 41s

Ukrainian children in Russia, Fanny Mendelssohn, Men designing clothes for women

Ukraine claims it has identified 20,000 children who it alleges have been abducted by Russia since the start of the war. Arrest warrants have been issued to President Putin and his Commissioner for Children's Rights. It's the subject of the latest work from film maker Shahida Tulaganova, whose documentary Ukraine's Stolen Children airs on ITV tonight. Now you may have heard of German composer Felix Mendelssohn but what about his sister, Fanny? A composer in her own right, Fanny was long ignored by the classical music world in favour of her brother. And despite being forbidden a musical career, Fanny persevered and composed 450 works. A new documentary, Fanny The Other Mendelssohn, explores her life and features never-before-heard or recorded pieces by her. Its director, BAFTA winner Sheila Hayman is also Fanny’s 3x great granddaughter and she joins Emma to discuss it.An extra course of chemotherapy could cut the risk of death from cervical cancer by up to two fifths, according to a new study by scientists. The drugs used are already licensed for use in the UK so those involved say it should be straightforward to roll out because the treatment is 'cheap and accessible'. GP Dr Phillipa Kaye who is also an ambassador for Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust and Comedian, Ambassador for Eve Appeal and cervical cancer survivor Karen Hobbs both join Emma Barnett to discuss it.Designer Sarah Burton has stepped down as Creative Director of the fashion brand Alexander McQueen, meaning that there are now only a tiny number of women designing clothes for the rest of us. So why are there so few female designers at the top fashion houses? And does it actually make a difference when the clothes women wear are designed by men? Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
23/10/23·56m 45s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Coleen Rooney, IVF add-ons, Online safety, Talking on the phone, Singer Mica Millar

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has launched a ratings system to let patients see which IVF add-ons are backed-up by evidence. Emma Barnett is joined by Professor Tim Child, chair of the HFEA's Scientific and Clinical Advances Advisory Committee, and Jessica Hepburn, who spent over £70,000 on unsuccessful fertility procedures.In October 2019, Coleen Rooney was concerned by articles appearing in newspapers that could only have come from stories on her private Instagram account. She laid a trap for the account she suspected of the leak, and then told the world ‘It was…Rebekah Vardy’s account’. Rebekah Vardy, who continues to deny she was the source of those stories, sued Coleen for libel. In a radio exclusive, Coleen speaks to Emma about her side of the story, told in a new documentary: The Real Wagatha Story.Jazz/soul singer Mica Millar is performing as part of the London Jazz Festival in November. She joins Anita Rani to talk about her new album, Heaven Knows, which she wrote while recovering from a spinal injury during lockdown. Britain's long-awaited Online Safety Bill is days away from becoming law. Emma talks to legal expert Joshua Rozenburg about what will be in the act. She’s also joined by Baroness Kidron, who has been very involved in getting the act through the Houses of Parliament, and Rashik Parmar, CEO of BCS, the chartered institute of IT, about the future of online safety.Are we becoming afraid of our phones? A recent survey suggest half of 12 to 26-year-olds don't answer the phone to their parents and a third of them feel awkward speaking on the phone generally. Emma speaks to Helen Thorn, a writer, podcaster and comedian and to 17-year-old Iona Cooke Mcintosh. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
21/10/23·54m 29s

Maternity services, Resigning as a bridesmaid, Mica Millar, Poet Safiya Sinclair

A new report out today from the CQC - the Care Quality Commission - says that almost two thirds of maternity units provide dangerously substandard care that puts women and babies at risk. It has rated 65% of maternity services in England as either "inadequate" or "requires improvement", an increase from 54% last year. And yesterday saw the first debate in Parliament about birth trauma and the injuries suffered by some women in labour. The Conservative MP Theo Clarke has campaigned for better support for mothers following her own traumatic experience after giving birth to her daughter in August 2022. She gave her powerful testimony to Parliament in an effort to get birth trauma added to the women's health strategy and improve perinatal care for women. First we hear from Chief Executive of the CQC, Ian Trenholm, and then consultant obstetrician Dr Daghni Rajasingham.After Ruhama Wolle took on the bridesmaid mantle three times in the space of 18 months, she decided to never say yes to the role, ever again. She penned an open letter resigning from all future bridesmaid requests, addressed to all her family and friends in Glamour Magazine US, where she works as Special Projects Editor. She joins Anita Rani to talk about why she’s opted out of the type of friendship being a bridesmaid requires.A prize-winning poet and currently Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Arizona State University, Safiya Sinclair, has now written a stunning memoir, How to Say Babylon. It looks at her childhood and teenage years growing up in an ultra-strict Rastifari family in Jamaica, and how literature and poetry changed the trajectory of her life.The soul/jazz singer Mica Millar has amassed almost five million streams on Spotify, and her debut album has been championed by the likes of Trevor Nelson and Jamie Cullum. This summer she’s had sold out shows, festival appearances at Love Supreme and the Cheltenham Jazz Festival, plus opening slots for Gregory Porter and Lionel Ritchie. Mica is to perform at the Union Chapel as part of London Jazz Festival’s opening weekend in November. She discusses recording her new album, Heaven Knows, during lockdown, while recovering from an accident.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey
20/10/23·52m 44s

Dr Lisa Cameron MP, Saffron Coomber & Yero Timi Biu, Julia Fox, IVF add-ons

Dr Lisa Cameron was the SNP MP for East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow from 2015 until a week ago when she decided to join the Conservative Party. She has described the move as equivalent to leaving an abusive marriage. In her first radio interview since her defection, she joins Emma Barnett to discuss what led to her making this decision.Listeners who have been through IVF treatment will be familiar the extra – and often very expensive – add-on services that many clinics recommend. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), the fertility regulator, has now launched a ratings system to let patients see which add-ons are backed-up by evidence. Strikingly, not one of them has been given the highest "green" rating. Professor Tim Child chairs the HFEA's Scientific and Clinical Advances Advisory Committee. Jessica Hepburn spent over £70,000 on unsuccessful fertility procedures and now campaigns about the fertility industry. They joined Emma to discuss.Three Little Birds is a new ITV series written by Lenny Henry which follows three women who emigrate from Jamaica to England in the 1950s - post-Windrush. The series is inspired by the stories of Lenny Henry’s family who, although had positive experiences of being helped as new arrivals, also shared accounts of physical and racial abuse when they reached the UK. Saffron Coomber who plays ‘Chantrelle’ and director Yero Timi Biu talk about the show.Julia Fox is an actor, artist and fashion icon, as famous for her breakout role in the film Uncut Gems as she is for her spectacular avant-garde fashion choices. She became tabloid fodder after a brief relationship with Kanye West. Her memoir Down the Drain describes a troubled childhood of sex, drugs and abusive relationships in Italy and New York. She tells Emma how her high-fashion image allows her to escape the male gaze.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Steve Greenwood.
19/10/23·56m 41s

Coleen Rooney, Shadow Chancellor, Rachel Reeves MP, Poet Becky Hemsley.

If the current polls are to be believed the next chancellor of the exchequer could be a woman. That woman would be Rachel Reeves, the current shadow chancellor and the MP for Leeds West. Originally from Lewisham, South London, she attended a state school, made it to Oxford University then into the world of finance working as an economist for the Bank of England. Labour have yet to announce their manifesto and detailed costed policies to put to the electorate, but we can examine the philosophy behind Labour’s economic thinking because Rachel has just published her latest book, The Women Who made Modern Economics, and hear how they have influenced her own thinking. In October 2019, Coleen Rooney posted on social media that she had been concerned by articles appearing in newspapers that could only have come from stories on her private Instagram account. So she laid a trap for the account she suspected of the leak, and then told the world ‘It was…Rebekah Vardy’s account’. Immediately dubbed ‘Wagatha Christie’ - Rebekah Vardy, who continues to deny she was the source of those stories, sued Coleen for libel. A High Court judge ruled in Coleen Rooney’s favour last year and she is now putting her side of the story in a documentary series on Disney Plus called Coleen Rooney: The Real Wagatha Story. She speaks to Emma Barnett in a radio exclusive interview. British poet Becky Hemsley has self-published four collections of her work and has been top of the Amazon poetry chart twice now - most recently around International Women's Day last March. Originally a primary school teacher, she now focuses solely on her poetry. She joins Emma to explain why and to perform some of her poetry live.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Bob Nettles
18/10/23·57m 4s

Israel-Gaza war, Talking on the phone, Online safety, Baby stealers in Kenya

As the war in Israel and Gaza heads into its 10th day, Emma talks about the role of hostages in this conflict with Rachel Briggs the CEO of Clarity Factory and an associate fellow at Chatham House. BBC's Chief International Correspondent Lyse Doucet also provides an update about the humanitarian situation in Gaza.Are we becoming afraid of our phones? A recent survey suggest half of 12 to 26 year olds don't answer the phone to their parents and a third of them feel awkward speaking on the phone generally. But are we any different? Emma talks to Helen Thorn, a writer, podcaster and comedian and to 17-year-old Iona Cooke Mcintosh.Britain's long-awaited Online Safety Bill setting tougher standards for social media platforms has been agreed by parliament and is days away from becoming law. It will regulate online content to help keep users safe, especially children, and to put the onus on companies to protect people from the likes of abusive messages, bullying and pornography, Emma talks to Legal expert Joshua Rozenburg about what will be in the Act and also to Baroness Kidron who has been very involved in getting the act through the houses of parliament and to Rashik Parmar the CEO of BCS the chartered institute of IT about the future of online safety.In 2020, an undercover investigation by the BBC’s Africa Eye exposed a network of baby stealers and traffickers in Kenya. It sparked public outcry in the country and led many officials to make public promises of government action. Journalist Njeri Mwangi went undercover to cultivate a network of whistle-blowers in these trafficking networks. She’s revisited those impacted by the trade in a second documentary, What Happened to the Baby Stealers.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
17/10/23·57m 9s

Madonna, Polish elections, Diana Parkes, Unconventional setups

The queen of pop returned to London's O2 this weekend for her Celebration Tour, performing more than 40 songs from her four-decade career. During her opening performance on Saturday, 65-year-old Madonna thanked her children for supporting her while she was ill earlier this year with a 'serious bacterial infection' which saw her admitted to intensive care for several days and forced her to postpone the tour. Some of her children then joined her on stage. Emma Barnett speaks to two women who were there - Sabrina Barr from Metro online and Helen Brown, Chief Album Critic for The Independent.Exit polls from yesterday's general election in Poland suggest the governing right-wing Law and Justice Party has lost its majority in parliament. Three opposition groups are predicted to get enough seats to form a government if they can agree a coalition. The biggest of the three is the Civic Coalition, led by the former head of the European Council, Donald Tusk - who has already claimed victory. Women have played an important role in these elections with the issue of abortion taking centre stage since a near total ban was announced by the government in 2021, sparking protests across the country. The BBC's Eastern Europe Correspondent, Sarah Rainsford, is in Warsaw and joins Emma.Diana Parkes, Joanna Simpson’s mother, has campaigned for months to stop the man who killed her daughter, Robert Brown, being allowed out of prison. Halfway through his 26-year sentence for her manslaughter, he was due for automatic release from prison next month. However, it has been announced that the Justice Secretary has blocked this and referred the case to the Parole Board. Diana joins Emma to share her response to the decision.As climate ministers meet in Luxembourg today ahead of the COP28 summit next month in the United Arab Emirates, an exhibition looking at the relationship between women and ecology around the world is running at the Barbican in London. Emma talks to Alona Pardo, the lead curator of RE/SISTERS: A Lens on Gender and Ecology.Do you have an unconventional living arrangement with your partner? Last week we spoke to Caroline and Niel, who remained in the same house after they split up but now Caroline's new partner is living with her ex. It got very complicated! We wanted to see how many of you are in similar situations, and how that has worked. Listener Amy got in touch to say she has been together with her partner Richie for 19 years but they have never lived together, even after they got married. She joins Emma in studio.
16/10/23·56m 20s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Dawn French, Shirley Ballas, Violinist Esther Abrami, Pelvic Pain

Dawn French has been making people laugh as a writer, comedian and actor, for more than 30 years. Her celebrated shows include French and Saunders, The Vicar of Dibley, and Jam and Jerusalem. She joins Emma Barnett to discuss her new book about the hilarious gaffes that she has made in life, as part of her one-woman mission to celebrate what it means to be gloriously, messily human, rather than striving for Instagram-style-perfection.It’s one of the things we’re most embarrassed to talk about – pain when having sex. This is something that Professor Katy Vincent, academic gynaecologist, and Dr Lydia Coxon, researcher in Pain in Women, are hoping to change. They join Emma alongside BBC presenter Sophie Law to talk about an open panel they held to try and get women to talk about their pelvic pain, and address the taboo around talking about periods, sex and women’s pelvic health.'My Boyfriend Lives with with My Husband,' was the intriguing headline of an article in the Guardian newspaper recently. While Caroline and the children she shares with her husband Niel live in Cheltenham, Neil is living with Caroline's boyfriend in Scotland. Both Caroline and Niel describe their unconventional family living arrangements to Emma, they explain how it came about and why it works for them.The new BBC drama series The Reckoning has started on BBC One. It tells the story of Jimmy Savile, who for decades was one of the UK’s most influential celebrities forging friendships with politicians and royalty and raising millions for charity. But after his death in 2011, it transpired he was also one of the country’s most prolific sexual predators, abusing hundreds of people, many of them children. The series, which stars Steve Coogan as Jimmy Savile, explores how he was able to hide in plain sight and use his celebrity status, powerful connections and fundraising activity to gain uncontrolled access to vulnerable young people. Sam Brown was abused by Savile from the age of 11. Her story is depicted in episode 3 of the series, and she speaks to Emma.Violinist Esther Abrami was handpicked by Julian Lloyd Webber as one of 30 under 30 to watch, and she is the first classical musician to win the ‘Social Media Superstar’ category at the Global Awards. With more than 400,000 followers on TikTok, Esther joins Emma to discuss her new album, Cinema.Shirley Ballas is best known for being one of the judges on BBC Strictly Come Dancing and her stellar career in Latin dance that earnt her the title, ‘Queen of Latin’. She joins Krupa Padhy to talk about Strictly, the menopause and her new book, Murder on the Dancefloor.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
14/10/23·53m 0s

Shirley Ballas, Bed Bugs, Everything Now writer Ripley Parker

Shirley Ballas is best known for being one of the judges on BBC Strictly Come Dancing and her stellar career in Latin dance that earnt her the title, ‘Queen of Latin’. She joins Krupa to talk about Strictly, the menopause and her new book, Murder on the Dancefloor. Last weekend’s earthquake in Western Afghanistan killed 1,300 people and injured many more according to UN figures. UNICEF have said more than 90% of those who died were women and children, as they were more likely to have been at home. Krupa speaks to Salma Braham, Afghanistan Country Director for the International Rescue Committee. She joins live from Kabul. Bed bugs are everywhere in the news. The actress Sue Elliott Nicholls joins us to describe the shame she felt when her house became infested. Social media influencer and author “Queen of Clean” Lynsey Crombie says with education and vigilance bed bugs can be avoided in the first place. She shares her top tips on actions we should take now and what we must avoid. Serious issues relating to cervical screening services in parts of Northern Ireland have led to 17,500 women having their smear tests re-checked as part of a major review of cervical screening dating back to 2008. Failures in screening has led to some abnormal tests not being followed up. Marie-Louise Connolly, the BBC’s NI Health Correspondent joins us to explain, together with a patient, we are calling Susan, who has been affected by previous failures within the screening system.Ripley Parker is the 22-year-old writer and creator of the new Netflix series Everything Now. She joins Krupa to talk about why the series is so important to her, and how it came from her own personal experiences as a teenager. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Emma Pearce
13/10/23·57m 19s

Dawn French, Laura Linney, Israel-Gaza conflict, Unconventional living

Nearly 350,000 people have been displaced in Gaza, since Israel launched retaliatory air strikes and created a blockade of the area. In Gaza's hospitals, where thousands of people are being treated, power is running out. Women and children are chief among those affected. Emma speaks to Lyse Doucet, the BBC’s Chief International Correspondent, Najla Shawa, a humanitarian worker who lives in the west side of Gaza City with her family and Adele Raemer, a grandmother in Israel. Emmy winning actor, Laura Linney, joins Emma Barnett to discuss her new film, The Miracle Club, in which she stars alongside other film icons, Maggie Smith and Kathy Bates. Emma asks her how much she misses playing Wendy Byrde in the much-acclaimed long-running TV series Ozark.'My Boyfriend Lives with with My Husband,' was the intriguing headline of an article in the Guardian newspaper recently; While Caroline and the children she shares with her husband Niel live in Cheltenham, Niel is living with Caroline's boyfriend in Scotland. Both Caroline and Niel describe their unconventional family living arrangements to Emma and explain how it came about and why it works for them. Dawn French has been making people laugh as a writer, comedian and actor, for more than 30 years. Her celebrated shows include French and Saunders, The Vicar of Dibley, and Jam and Jerusalem. She joins Emma to discuss her new book about the hilarious gaffes that she made in life, as part of her one-woman mission to celebrate what it means to be gloriously, messily human, rather than striving for Instagram-style-perfection. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Steve Greenwood
12/10/23·56m 47s

Dr Katalin Kariko - Nobel Prize winner, latest on Israel Gaza, Pelvic pain and pain in sex, The International Day of the Girl.

We heard reports last night from Israel that a massacre had taken place at the weekend in Kibbutz Kfar Aza. Women and children were among the dead and we were told that beheadings had happened too. A group of journalists were taken to the scene by Israeli soldiers. Emma is joined by Bel Trew, Chief International Correspondent for the Independent, who was one of the journalists. And, focusing on women's lives in the region, Emma speaks to Adele Raemer, who survived an attack on her home, and we hear extracts from journalist Plestia Alaqad in Gaza, who sent her audio diary to the BBC. Dr Katalin Kariko's work has had a major impact on people's lives around the world. She tells Emma how the mRNA technology she was working on for decades helped the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech covid vaccines come to be. Now Dr Kariko has been awarded a Nobel Prize. She's a biochemist, Professor at the University of Szeged in Hungary and along with her colleague Professor Drew Weissman, who is at the University of Pennsylvania, she won the prize for the category of Physiology or Medicine.It’s one of the things we’re most embarrassed to talk about – pain when having sex. This is something that Professor Katy Vincent, academic gynaecologist, and Dr Lydia Coxon, researcher in Pain in Women, are hoping to change. They join Emma alongside BBC presenter Sophie Law to talk about an open panel they held to try and get women to talk about their pelvic pain, and address the taboo around talking about periods, sex and women’s pelvic health. Since 2011, October 11 has been declared by the UN as International Day of the Girl Child to recognise girls' rights and the unique challenges girls face around the world. This year Women of the World (WOW) Festival has launched the Young Leaders Directory, inspiring activists from across the world campaigning on topics such as education, period poverty and climate justice. Emma is joined by two young women, Marwa Shinwari from Afghanistan and Ain Husniza from Malaysia to discuss their passions and hopes for the future.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley
11/10/23·57m 5s

Israel-Gaza conflict: Bereaved parents across the divide, musician Esther Abrami, Emily Hunt, Is the future of the Labour Party

After the Hamas attacks at the weekend and Israel’s order of a “complete siege” of the Gaza Strip in response, we talk to two people from the different communities involved. A few years ago, Bassam Aramin lost his 10-year-old daughter, Abir, who was killed by an Israeli soldier, and Robi Damelin lost her 28 year old son, David, after he was killed by a Palestinian sniper. Neither were killed in this latest stage of the Israel-Gaza conflict but as members of a cross-community group called the Parents Circle-Families Forum, they’re uniquely placed to comment on the situation.Esther Abrami was handpicked by Julian Lloyd Webber as one of 30 under 30 to watch, and she is the first classical musician to win the ‘Social Media Superstar’ category at the Global Awards. With more than 400,000 followers on TikTok, Esther joins Emma Barnett to discuss her new album, Cinema, and to perform live in the studio.Women dominated headlines at the Conservative Party conference last week. But is the future of the Labour Party female? Rachel Cunliffe, Associate Political Editor at the New Statesman, and Alice Thomson, columnist and interview at The Times, bring us the latest news from Liverpool.The Government’s official independent rape advisor Emily Hunt has decided to walk away from her role. She advised the government in the run-up to the landmark 2021 End-to-End Rape Review - which has successfully increased the number of rape cases getting to court to pre-2016 levels. But she has said that her own experiences within the justice system as an abuse victim have left her feeling unsafe. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Tim Heffer and Gayl Gordon
10/10/23·54m 31s

Israel-Gaza conflict, Endometriosis test, Sam Brown - Savile survivor

Images of children, mothers and grandmothers are flooding media and social media two days after a coordinated attack by Hamas on Israel. Israel has since declared war. Emma Barnett speaks to the BBC's Anna Foster, who is in Israel, not far from Gaza, who talks about the impact on women on both sides of the conflict. Also Emma hears from the son of a 74-year-old Israeli former headmistress and Arabic teacher who is believed by her family to have been kidnapped from her home, and Alicia Kearns MP, Chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee.A new test could cut the time it takes to diagnose endometriosis from an average of eight years to just eight days. Researchers at the University of Hull have developed a test that uses a urine sample instead of a laparoscopy, an invasive surgical procedure that is currently used to diagnose the condition. Emma is joined by Dr Barbara Guinn, Reader in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Hull, to discuss.The new BBC drama series The Reckoning starts tonight on BBC One. It tells the story of Jimmy Savile, who for decades was one of the UK’s most influential celebrities forging friendships with politicians and royalty and raising millions for charity. But after his death in 2011, it transpired he was also one of the country’s most prolific sexual predators, abusing hundreds of people, many of them children. The series, which stars Steve Coogan as Jimmy Savile, explores how he was able to hide in plain sight and use his celebrity status, powerful connections and fundraising activity to gain uncontrolled access to vulnerable young people. Sam Brown was abused by Saville from the age of 11. Her story is depicted in episode 3 of the series, and she joins Emma.
09/10/23·57m 38s

Gunner Jaysley Beck’s mother, Organist Anna Lapwood, Menopause tribunal, Mary McAleese, Grace Dent

Female teenage soldier Jaysley Beck is believed to have taken her own life after a period of relentless sexual harassment from one of her bosses, an Army investigation has found. Gunner Beck was serving in the Royal Artillery and was found dead at Larkhill Camp in Wiltshire in December 2021. Her mother, Leighann McCready, speaks to Emma Barnett.Nicknamed 'the Taylor Swift of classical music', Anna Lapwood is one of the world's most famous organists, and Director of Music at Pembroke College, Cambridge. To encourage more women to try the instrument, Anna initiated the social media hashtag #playlikeagirl. She joins Emma to talk about her music and her new album, Luna.We hear from Karen Farquharson who has been awarded £37,000 at an employment tribunal after her boss told her she used the menopause as an “excuse for everything”. She tells Emma how the process has impacted her and why she wants to help other women.This week marked the start of a Catholic synod that will take place throughout October in the Vatican to discuss the direction of the Catholic Church. Emma talks to former Irish president Mary McAleese about why she thinks women should play a bigger role. And the food writer Grace Dent joins Anita Rani to talk about her new book, Comfort Eating, inspired by her podcast of the same name. She'll explain why she's so fascinated by the foods that make us feel better behind closed doors.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
07/10/23·54m 4s

Food writer Grace Dent, Artist Shirin Neshat, History of enslaved women, Actor Mei Mac

We hear from food writer Grace Dent about her new book, Comfort Eating, inspired by her podcast of the same name. She'll explain why she's so fascinated by the foods to make us feel better behind closed doors.The Iranian visual artist Shirin Neshat’s latest work is called The Fury. It is a short film and series of photographs which explore the sexual exploitation of female political prisoners in Iran. Shirin left Iran as a teenager to study in the US and has lived in exile there since the 1990s. Her art is known for posing questions about how the female body is perceived within Islam and Iranian culture. She talks to Anita Rani about bringing The Fury to London and why she has chosen to deviate from her usual style and include the nude form.Gloria Daniel is the descendant of John Isaac Daniel, who was a slave. After finding out more about her family history and the lives of her ancestor, as well as other slaves, she has started the organisation TTEACH (Transatlantic Trafficked Enslaved African Corrective Historical) Plaques. She joins Anita to tell us about the exhibition they are currently holding, ’50 PLAQUES & PLACES’, which includes the testimonies and artwork of women.Mei Mac is an Olivier award nominee who has taken on the lead role of Kim in the ‘untitled f*ck m*ss s**gon play' at the Young Vic. The play tackles over a century's worth of stereotypes about Asian women in drama, parodying Madame Butterfly, Miss Saigon and South Pacific. Mei tells Anita about confronting prejudice in theatre, 'the bamboo ceiling' and why she has set up a mentorship scheme for British East Asian and South East Asian actors.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey
06/10/23·57m 30s

Gunner Jaysley Beck's mother, Wild Hope, Earth Mama, Dangerous dogs

An Army investigation has found that 19-year-old soldier Jaysley Beck is believed to have taken her own life after a period of relentless sexual harassment from one of her bosses. The gunner was serving in the Royal Artillery, and was found dead at the Larkhill army camp in Wiltshire in December 2021. Her mother Leighann McCready joins Emma along with Emma Norton, Director and Solicitor for the Centre for Military Justice.Poet Donna Ashworth has released a new collection of her work, Wild Hope. It is a selection of poems and passages that she hopes will help people to find hope in an increasingly pressurised world. She joins Emma to talk about why she picked up poetry in her 40s, and how it has changed her life.Savanah Leaf is a Team GB volleyball player turned film director, whose feature film Earth Mama is playing at the London Film Festival this week. Having competed in the 2012 Olympics, Savanah turned to filmmaking as a hobby when recovering from an injury. She joins Emma to discuss the transferable skills between sports and directing and tackling the US foster care system in her directorial debut.Lakaydia Reynolds was walking through a park in south London on her way to a driving lesson when she was attacked by three dogs. The dog’s owner tried to intervene, but the dogs injured her arm, legs and face. A stranger saw the attack and filmed it happening, rather than moving to intervene. The footage was uploaded to social media, where it has been viewed tens of thousands of times. Emma talks to Lakaydia about what she experienced. Susie Kahlich founded Pretty Deadly Self Defense and offers listeners tips on how best to defend themselves in a dog attack.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
05/10/23·56m 7s

Mary McAleese, Isabel Hardman, Kitty Donaldson, Emma Reed Turrell, Viv Groskop, Dr Bernadette Jenner

Starting today a Catholic synod will take place throughout October in the Vatican to discuss the direction of the Church. Delegates will consider the way in which all members participate and decide the future direction of key issues such as the role of women. Emma Barnett talks to the former Irish president Mary McAleese about the issues facing the Church. Rishi Sunak will today give his first Conservative Party conference as Prime Minister – but his moment in the spotlight is under threat from the women in his party. Home Secretary Suella Braverman has been called the “front-runner” for next leader after her speech, while Liz Truss became the surprise breakout star of conference. So is the future of the Conservative Party now female? Kitty Donaldson, UK Political Editor at Bloomberg News, and Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor of The Spectator, join us from the Conservative Party conference in Manchester. And what can ordinary women learn from Liz Truss about bouncing back from a public failure? Writer Viv Groskop and Psychotherapist and podcaster Emma Reed Turrell discuss the lessons women can learn from Liz Truss’s return to the spotlight. The UK’s first and biggest study into pre-eclampsia which can affect the kidneys, liver and brain can cause seizures in women has been launched. The study will monitor women before pregnancy, during and after birth to find out why some women develop the conditions and the long term health implications.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Bob Nettles
04/10/23·57m 35s

Doctors' strike, Organist Anna Lapwood, Máiría Cahill, Suffragette medal

It's day two of the 72-hour joint strike by junior doctors and consultants in the NHS. Dr Helen Neary, deputy chair of the BMA's consultant's committee and consultant anaesthetist in paediatrics and BBC’s Health Correspondent Nick Triggle joins Emma to discuss the strike and parts of the Health Secretary's speech today.Nicknamed the Taylor Swift of classical music, Anna Lapwood is one of the world's most famous organists, and Director of Music at Pembroke College, Cambridge. To encourage more women to try the instrument, Anna initiated the social media hashtag #playlikeagirl. She joins Emma to talk about her music and her new album Luna.Máiría Cahill grew up in a staunchly Republican family and community in west Belfast. At the age of 16 she says she was serially sexually assaulted and raped by a member of the IRA, and was later subjected to months of meetings about that trauma by the IRA, including being brought face to face with her alleged attacker. In 2014 Máiría waived her anonymity and has been relentless in her campaign to expose those who abused their power, and to get an apology for the way she was treated from senior Sinn Fein politicians. Máiría has written a memoir, Rough Beast, and joins Emma to talk about it.Glasgow Women’s Library is the UK’s only accredited woman’s history museum. For the last 32 years they’ve championed feminist stories from Scotland and beyond through their research, exhibitions and artefacts that have all been donated. However, for the first time they’re entering an auction to bring a piece of Scottish suffragette history back home. Emma Barnett speaks to operations director Sue John on the day of the auction.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
03/10/23·55m 38s

Performance artist Marina Abramovic, Universities and sexual misconduct, Nicole Scherzinger, Finances and friendship

The world renowned Serbian performance artist Marina Abramovic talks to Emma Barnett about a major exhibition of her work across five decades at the Royal Academy in London. Universities are said to be spending increasingly more of their time investigating complex sexual misconduct cases raised by students. But how equipped and effective are universities at investigating such cases? Professor Steve West, Vice Chancellor of the University of the West of England, Eleanor Laws KC, leading criminal barrister and Geraldine Swanton, a lawyer working with the higher and further education sector discuss.The American performer Nicole Scherzinger came to our attention as the lead singer of the Pussycat Dolls. She has since carved out a successful solo career as well as being a judge on television talent shows including The X Factor. Eight years after she was nominated for an Olivier Award for her portrayal of Grizabella in Cats, Nicole has now returned to the West End stage where she stars as Norma Desmond in a new production of the musical Sunset Boulevard.The cost of living has put a strain on people’s budgets and a recent report from Carnegie UK Trust suggests around a third of people are not even seeing their friends because they can’t afford to. Danielle Bayard Jackson, a female friendship coach and Otegha Uwagba, author of We Need to Talk about Money discuss navigating friendships and money.Author Ysenda Maxtone Graham talks about her new book Jobs for the Girls which gives a snapshot of British women's working lives from 1950s.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
02/10/23·57m 23s

Russian journalist-in-exile Elena Kostyuchenco, Karen Farquharson, Teleri Glyn Jones, Nerys Evans, Innes Fitzgerald

After the invasion of Ukraine by Russia on 24 February 2022, Elena Kostyuchenco, one of Russia’s most fearless independent journalists, crossed into Ukraine to report on what was happening in the country. The paper she had worked at for 17 years, Novaya Gazeta, was shut down just months later in response to her reporting. Elena’s latest book, I Love Russia, gives a rare insight into her homeland, bringing us voices we have never heard. She speaks to Emma Barnett. We hear from Karen Farquharson who has been awarded £37,000 at an employment tribunal after her boss told her she used the menopause as an “excuse for everything”. In a separate case, a woman assisted by the Equality and Human Rights commission says her menopausal symptoms should be considered, in her case, as a disability. The economist Vicky Pryce comments on the potential implications of the case. We talk to BBC Wales political correspondent Teleri Glyn Jones about the victimisation of a whistle-blower and a complainant who made allegations of a serious nature about the Plaid Cymru MS Rhys ab Owen. Both say they were harassed by a family member of the MS who has been suspended from his party since last November pending an investigation by the Welsh Parliament’s standards watchdog. Emma Barnett also talks to former Plaid Cymru politician Nerys Evans who recently produced the damning report into Plaid’s sexual harassment complaints procedures earlier this year. Innes Fitzgerald is the current under 17s UK number one in the 3000 metres and she’s made the conscious decision to no longer fly to any championships or running events abroad. She’s been nominated for Young Athlete of the Year in the BBC Green Sports Awards. She joins Emma to tell us more. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Sue Maillot
02/10/23·57m 45s

Nicole Scherzinger, Finances of friendship, Asha Puthli

The American performer Nicole Scherzinger came to our attention as the lead singer of the Pussycat Dolls. She has since carved out a successful solo career with albums, serving as a judge on television talent shows including The X Factor. Eight years after she was nominated for an Olivier Award for her portrayal of Grizabella in Cats, Nicole has now returned to the West End stage where she stars as the immortal Norma Desmond in a new production of the musical Sunset Boulevard. She joins Anita to discuss taking on this iconic role.The cost of living has put a strain on people’s budgets and a recent report from Carnegie UK Trust suggests around a third of people are not even seeing their friends because they can’t afford to. To discuss how to navigate the finances of friendship Anita talks to Danielle Bayard Jackson, a female friendship coach and Otegha Uwagba, author of We Need to Talk about Money. Singer-songwriter and producer Asha Puthli is regarded as one of the most successful vocalists to come out of India. Referred to as a cosmopolitan pioneer of jazz, funk, soul and electronic dance music who has recorded ten solo albums for labels like EMI and CBS/Sony she joins Anita Rani to discuss 50 years in music.India’s Supreme Court has issued a handbook of 40 words which judges should avoid when describing women in writing judgments or filing cases before courts. Ranjana Kumari is the Founder and Director of the Centre for Social Research, a women's rights organisation based in New Delhi. She joins Anita to talk about how sexist views have played a role in disadvantaging women in India’s courts. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Emma Pearce
29/09/23·56m 43s

Marina Abramovic, GB News, Dehenna Davison MP, Taylor Swift Symposium

Marina Abramović, the world renowned Serbian performance artist, refers to herself as the “godmother of performance art”. Her pioneering work explores the relationship between the performer and the audience; one of her works saw her sit across from each visitor, staring into their eyes. She has repeatedly subjected herself to physical and mental extremes, including exhaustion, pain and even the possibility of death. Now at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, she presents key moments from her career and talks them through with Emma.A comment made by the broadcaster and self-styled anti-woke campaigner, Laurence Fox, about political reporter, Ava Evans, on GB News on Tuesday has led to his suspension. Now the man he was speaking to, Dan Wootton, has also been suspended as a presenter on the channel. Ava called the comments "really nasty" and said she has since received threats online. Emma speaks to Rebecca Whittington, the committee lead on this issue for the organisation Women in Journalism and Online Safety Editor at Reach PLC.Dehenna Davison MP was part of the ground breaking group of Conservative MPs who in 2019, won dozens of seats in former Labour areas known as the Red Wall. She was elected by voters in Bishop Auckland in the North East as their first ever Conservative MP and was the first Conservative female MP to reveal she is bi-sexual. Last year she made it into the Government as a junior minister in Michael Gove’s Levelling Up Department, but despite this promotion and being see as one of the most energetic and active of the new MPs, in November 2022 she announced she wouldn’t be standing for election again. Last week she stood down as a minister, citing chronic migraine as the cause. Emma Barnett talks to Dehenna about her health, her life in politics and her plans for the future. A university in Melbourne is preparing to host the first ever Taylor Swift Symposium, or Swiftposium as it’s being called, with researchers gathering to discuss the singer through a variety of subjects. Dr Jennifer Beckett is one of the organisers behind the event and Emma to discuss the plans for early 2024.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
28/09/23·57m 44s

Dame Joan Collins, Universities and sexual misconduct, Dr Ophira Ginsburg - a feminist approach to cancer

Dame Joan Collins has dominated the stage and screen for over seven decades, starting her career at just 17. Best known for her roles in the 1980s TV phenomenon Dynasty and Hollywood Golden Age films, she has written a new memoir Behind the Shoulder Pads: Tales I Tell My Friends. She speaks to Emma about her glittering career, sexism in Hollywood and turning 90. Students are more likely than other groups of people to be subjected to sexual assault. A study soon to be published by researchers at Oxford University has found that one in four female students at the university had experienced some sort of sexual assault in the preceding year. Now, universities are said to be spending increasingly more of their time investigating complex sexual misconduct cases. But how equipped and effective are they in investigating such cases? And why are students putting their faith in university hearings rather than going to the police?  Emma discusses with Professor Steve West, Vice Chancellor of University of West of England, Eleanor Laws KC, leading criminal barrister and Geraldine Swanton, a lawyer working with the higher and further education sector.A new report from a commission at the medical journal The Lancet looks at how cancer disproportionately impacts women. “Women, Power and Cancer” puts the case forward for an intersectional feminist approach to cancer - with the goal of transforming the ways women interact with the cancer health system. The commission has been headed up by Dr Ophira Ginsburg from the National Cancer Institute in the US.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley
27/09/23·57m 36s

Sexism in football, Mum rage, China's MeToo

The managing director of AFC Wimbledon has resigned after being secretly recorded making sexist and abusive comments about a female colleague, just two months after publicly committing to tackling sexism as part of the Her Game Too campaign. Emma Barnett gets reaction from Lewes FC Chief Executive Maggie Murphy and Yvonne Harrison, CEO of Women in Football.Minna Dubin is the author of Mum Rage: The Everyday Crisis of Modern Motherhood. It's a book inspired by her own experiences and she then spent three years speaking to other mothers, to build up a picture that goes beyond her own domestic sphere.In 2021, prominent Chinese journalist and #MeToo activist Sophia Huang Xueqin was arrested and jailed. Unseen for the last two years, the Chinese Government announced that her closed-door trial began on Friday. Journalist Jessie Lau joins Emma to discuss the latest in this case.Emma talks to author Ysenda Maxtone Graham about her new book Jobs for the Girls which gives a snapshot of British women's working lives from 1950, through cardigans and pearls, via mini-skirts and bottom-pinching, to shoulder pads and the ping of the first emails in the early 1990s.
26/09/23·57m 36s

Tina Sinatra, Meg Winterburn and Willow Grylls on a new TV drama about the serial killer Peter Sutcliffe, Dame Christine Lenehan

Claiming to tell unknown stories about the iconic singer, alongside songs some of his much-loved songs, this world premiere musical hopes to reflect his enduring legacy. His youngest daughter Tina, one of the producers, and the director and choreographer of the show, Kathleen Marshall join Emma Barnett.We discuss the possible decision to cancel another part of the high speed rail link - HS2 - and the impact it could have on women with Dr Mary-Ann Stephenson, co-director of the Women's Budget Group, a Feminist Economic Think Tank and Zoe Billingham, Director of the IPPR North - based in Manchester.Between 1975 and 1980, Peter Sutcliffe murdered 13 women and attempted to murder at least seven more across the North of England.  A new ITV drama series, The Long Shadow, portrays the women who were killed, and their families, as well as the hardworking but flawed and misogynist police investigation.  Joining Emma are Willow Grylls, executive producer of the show and Meg Winterburn, who worked on the investigation as a police sergeant.Exclusive research shared with Woman’s Hour claims that £60m is ‘wasted’ in England every year on Tribunals for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. Local authorities ‘fight’ thousands of parents of disabled children about what support the child gets and where they go to school  – but 'lose' 96% of those cases. This comes on the day that one of the country’s leading experts delivers a valedictory lecture after a 40 year career advocating for disabled children. Dame Christine Lenehan, Director of the Council of Disabled Children, part of the National Children’s Bureau, Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
25/09/23·57m 2s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Russell Brand accuser 'Alice' broadcast exclusive, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie & Doon Mackichan

Emma Barnett hears from one of the women alleging she was assaulted by Russell Brand. Speaking for the first time since accusations became public, 'Alice', who has accused Russell Brand of sexual assault when she was a teenager, says Brand's emphatic denial of the allegations of rape and sexual abuse against him is "insulting". 'Alice', who had a relationship with Brand when she was 16 and he was 30, says she wants to start a conversation about changing the age of consent. On her first day back at the Woman's Hour helm after maternity leave, Emma gets some advice and reflection from someone who returned to work after a similar break, the global literary force that is Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Author of bestselling books including Half of a Yellow Sun and Americanah, plus essays and short stories, she has just released her first children’s book, Mama’s Sleeping Scarf. You’ll no doubt be familiar with the book Frankenstein - but how much do you know about its author Mary Shelley? That’s a question that led director, Lucy Speed, and producer, Deborah Clair, to write, direct and produce their new play that’s about to start touring in the UK. Conception - Mary Shelley: The Making of a Monster tells the story of a journey of self-discovery, as the Frankenstein author returns, years later, to Lake Geneva where she wrote her famous novel. The play is hitting the stage around the 200th anniversary of the first publication of the novel under Mary Shelley’s name - having originally been published anonymously. Artist and author Fleur Pierets embarked on a performance art project with her wife, Julian, in 2017, aiming to get married in all the countries where same-sex marriage was legal at the time. But their dream was cut short when Julian was diagnosed with late-stage brain cancer in early 2018 and died six weeks later. It’s a story Fleur has put down on paper in her book, Julian, which has just been translated into English and released in the UK. Since the 1980s, the comedian and actor Doon Mackichan has been a TV regular, starring in programmes like Two Doors Down, Smack the Pony and Brass Eye. She has also played plenty of roles on stage. She dissects how today’s culture still expects women to adhere to stereotypes, some of which she refuses to act out, as described in her memoir, My Lady Parts.Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Sarah Crawley
23/09/23·56m 29s

'Sharenting', Blood Scandal, Mary Shelley, British Gymnastics

Have you heard of the term 'sharenting'? That’s when a parent, caregiver or relative shares content about their child’s life, such as news, videos, images, online. Some have even turned it into a lucrative business. The psychologist Dr Elaine Kasket was an habitual 'sharent', chronicling her young daughter’s life on social media. But then four years ago at the age of nine, her daughter told her she didn’t like her doing it, so she stopped. Elaine’s written about 'sharenting' and her experiences in a chapter in her new book Reboot: Reclaiming Your Life in a Tech-Obsessed World. She joins Jessica Creighton along with her daughter Zoe. British Gymnastics has published a list of 62 banned coaches and members, as part of its response to the damning Whyte Review published in 2022, which detailed 'systemic' issues of physical and emotional abuse in the sport. The campaign group Gymnasts for Change has accused the governing body of "serious institutional betrayal" for not including more people on the list, who they believe meet the criteria. We heard from the co-founder of Gymnasts for Change, Claire Heafford and BBC Sports correspondent Natalie Pirks.In the 70s and 80s, nearly 5,000 people with haemophilia contracted HIV or Hepatitis C after being infected by tainted blood clotting products. Over 2,800 people died including women and children in what was described as 'the worst treatment disaster in the history of the NHS’.  With an ongoing public inquiry, we spoke to Sunday Times Political Editor Caroline Wheeler, who has interviewed countless victims and has been following the story for 20 years.You’ll no doubt be familiar with the book Frankenstein - but how much do you know about its author Mary Shelley? That’s a question that led director, Lucy Speed, and producer, Deborah Clair, to write, direct and produce their new play that’s about to start touring in the UK. Conception - Mary Shelley: The Making of a Monster tells the story of a journey of self-discovery, as the Frankenstein author returns, years later, to Lake Geneva where she wrote her famous novel. The play is hitting the stage around the 200th anniversary of the first publication of the novel under Mary Shelley’s name - having originally been published anonymously. Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Kirsty Starkey
22/09/23·57m 37s

Iran hijab bill, BMX champion, CIISA, Doon Mackichan, Maternity in Sierra Leone

Iran’s parliament has approved the Hijab and Chastity Bill, under which women will face up to 10 years in prison if they defy the country’s mandatory hijab rules. This comes a year after the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini who was detained by Iran's morality police for allegedly violating rules requiring women to cover their hair. Emma Barnett speaks to Samaneh Savadi, an Iranian feminist activist who specialises in international law.A new independent standards body, the Creative Industry Independent Standards Authority, is being set up in the UK so that concerns over behaviour can be raised and investigated confidentially. Emma talks to its CEO, Jen Smith.Sarah-Jane Nichols, former BMX racing world champion, talks to Emma about qualifying for the world championships 36 years after she first retired from the sport.Since the 1980s, the comedian and actor Doon Mackichan has been a TV regular, starring in programmes like Two Doors Down, Smack the Pony and Brass Eye. She has also played plenty of roles on stage. Doon talks to Emma about her recollections of those parts and dissects how today’s culture still expects women to adhere to stereotypes, some of which she refuses to act out, as described  in her memoir, My Lady Parts.Isata Dumbuya is a midwife who is striving to reduce maternal mortality rates in Sierra Leone, a country where 717 in 100,000 women die in childbirth every year. She has dedicated her career to helping mothers-to-be and joins Emma to talk about the new maternal centre she is setting up.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Steve Greenwood
21/09/23·57m 35s

Climate Change Policy, Girlhood, Feminisation of the workplace

The BBC has revealed that the Prime Minister is considering a major shift on key climate action policies. These changes include pushing back a ban on sales of new petrol and diesel cars to 2035 and delaying the 2026 ban on off-grid oil boilers to 2035. The economist Kate Raworth joins Emma to discuss her reaction to this news. If you’re on TikTok, “girl”-based trends are everywhere you look these days. From girl dinner to girl math, lazy girl job to hot girl walk, the list goes on. Girl math is the latest trend, with a hashtag with over 360 million views. Is it about reclaiming girlhood - or is it sexist and infantilizing? Behavioural scientist and author Professor Pragya Argawal and host of the “Adulting” podcast Oenone Forbat join Emma to discussThe Met Police have announced that they aim to change the demographic of the Parliamentary and Diplomatic Protection Unit – where both Wayne Couzens and David Carrick worked - to have 20% women in the next two years. But why should it fall to women to improve workplace behaviours? To discuss, Emma is joined by Police and Crime Commissioner Katy Bourne and workplace commentator Julia Hobsbawm.Artist and author Fleur Pierets embarked on a performance art project with her wife, Julian, in 2017, aiming to get married in all the countries where same sex marriage was legal at the time. But their dream was cut short when Julian was diagnosed with late stage brain cancer in early 2018 and died six weeks later. It’s a story Fleur has put down on paper in her book “Julian”, which has just been translated into English and released in the UK.TikTok clips uses: samcity and VIDA GLOWPresenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
20/09/23·56m 52s

Russell Brand allegations & a 'staggered age of consent' with Baroness Helena Kennedy & Gudrun Young KC, Dr Susan Gilby

Yesterday on Woman's Hour, one of Russell Brand's alleged victims, 'Alice', called for a conversation around changing the age of consent in the UK, to what she called 'a staggered age of consent'. It would mean individuals between the ages of 16 and 18 could legally have sex with one another, but there would be legislation in place to prevent adults having relations with 16 to 18-year-olds, as there is the potential for a power imbalance in this dynamic. Emma Barnett speaks to Baroness Helena Kennedy and Gudrun Young QC. Lucy Letby was recently convicted of murdering seven infants and attempting to kill six others while working within the Countess of Chester Hospital’s neonatal unit between June 2015 and June 2016. We talk to Dr Susan Gilby who joined the hospital trust as medical director and then chief executive a few weeks after Letby was arrested. Two weeks ago, Birmingham City Council issued a 114 notice which means they can’t balance the books to meet their spending commitments this year.  The tipping point appears to have been a £750 million equal pay settlement and it’s feared many more councils could be in a similar position. Emma talks to Heather Jameson, Editor of the Municipal Journal and to Peter Marland from the Local Government Association which represents councils in England about the problems they’re facing.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
19/09/23·57m 38s

Russell Brand accuser 'Alice' broadcast exclusive, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Emma Barnett hears from one of the women alleging she was assaulted by Russell Brand. Speaking for the first time since accusations became public, 'Alice', who has accused Russell Brand of sexual assault when she was a teenager, says Brand's emphatic denial of the allegations of rape and sexual abuse against him is "insulting". 'Alice', who had a relationship with Brand when she was 16 and he was 30, says she wants to start a conversation about changing the age of consent.One woman who spoke out earlier this year is the TV producer turned novelist and screenwriter Daisy Goodwin. She accused Daniel Korski, a former special advisor who was in the running at the time to be Conservative candidate for London Mayor, of groping her at an event in 10 Downing Street in 2013. Daniel Korski vehemently denies this and subsequent allegations of sexual misconduct. Daisy joins Emma in studio.On her first day back at the Woman's Hour helm after maternity leave, Emma gets some advice and reflection from someone who returned to work after a similar break, the global literary force that is Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Author of bestselling books including Half of a Yellow Sun and Americanah, plus essays and short stories, she has just released her first children’s book, Mama’s Sleeping Scarf.Fearless is the title of the new book from make-up business owner and makeover specialist Trinny Woodall. You'll probably know Trinny best for her show What Not To Wear, alongside best friend Susannah Constantine in the early 2000s. Trinny has more recently launched a multi-million pound make-up business and skincare company, Trinny London. She speaks to Emma about reinventing herself in her 50s.
18/09/23·57m 26s

Nadiya Hussain, Women's reproductive survey, The Knock, AI and IVF, Arlo Parks

Since winning the Great British Bake Off in 2015, Nadiya Hussain has published seven cookery books, presented numerous TV shows and been awarded an MBE for services to broadcasting and the culinary arts. Nadiya joins Anita Rani to talk about her latest book and BBC Two series, Nadiya’s Simple Spices. She also celebrates the women in her family. A survey launched last week by the Government is calling on women in England aged 16 to 55 to share their experiences of reproductive health - from periods, contraception to pregnancy and the menopause. But the decision to only speak to women up to the age of 55 has provoked a backlash. Dr Shazia Malik, a consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist and a sub-specialist in reproductive medicine, gives her reaction. In a new series called The Knock, we’ve heard the stories of two women whose lives were changed when they were told that a loved one had been arrested for sexual offences against children. Deborah Denis, Chief Executive of the Lucy Faithfull Foundation, and Rachel Armitage, Professor of Criminology the University of Huddersfield spoke about the impact of 'the knock' on the families and friends of men arrested for these crimes. Some British women are now being offered IVF treatment using artificial intelligence. How might AI improve the chances of a successful pregnancy? Suzanne Cawood, Director of Embryology at the Centre for Reproductive and Genetic Health, explains. Mercury Prize-winning musician Arlo Parks has turned her hand to poetry with her debut book, The Magic Border. It combines original poetry, song lyrics and images.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
16/09/23·57m 10s

Anniversary of the death of Mahsa Amini, Comedian and author London Hughes, Dr Elise Inglis memorial, The Knock discussion

It’s been one year since the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini sparked protests and outrage across the world. Anita Rani is joined by author Arash Azizi and human rights researcher Azade Pourzand to take a look at where women in Iran stand now, and the long-term impact that’s still being felt.Dr Elsie Inglis was a Scottish woman known as the ‘Serbian Mother from Scotland’, who founded four Scottish Women’s Hospitals in Serbia during World War One. Together with more than 1,000 woman from Britain and the Commonwealth, she helped to save the lives of allied and enemy soldiers alike. To find out more about her and why she isn’t better known in the UK, Anita speaks to three women who are in Serbia to honour her memory at a special ceremony: Carole Powell, Dr Iram Kamran Qureshi and Caroline Ferguson.This week, in a new series called The Knock, we’ve heard the stories of two women whose lives were changed when they were told that a loved one had been arrested for sexual offences against children. Anita talks to Deborah Denis, Chief Executive of the Lucy Faithfull Foundation, and Rachel Armitage, Professor of Criminology the University of Huddersfield about the impact of 'the knock' on the families and friends of men arrested for these crimes. They’ll discuss what support families need, and what they are calling for.The comedian London Hughes has written a memoir, Living My Best Life, Hun. In it, she details her decision to leave the UK, where she experienced bullying and rejection, and go to live in LA, where she quickly became a star. She joins Anita to talk about writing her memoir, turning rejection into opportunity and romanticising her life.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
15/09/23·57m 31s

Nadiya Hussain, Morocco earthquake, Equal pay, Wilderness

Last week, Birmingham City Council effectively declared bankruptcy, issuing a section 114 notice, after it admitted an equal pay liability of £760m. Now the GMB, the UK's third largest Trade Union, says female care workers in Sunderland have been underpaid for years compared with the mostly male litter-pickers, and are making a similar claim against their council. Anita hears the latest from Rhea Wolfson, head of the GMB's National Equal Pay Department.Since winning the Great British Bake Off in 2015, Nadiya Hussain has published seven cookery books, presented numerous TV shows and been awarded an MBE for services to broadcasting and the culinary arts. Nadiya joins Anita to talk about her latest book and BBC Two series, Nadiya’s Simple Spices, in which she concentrates exclusively on recipes from her Bangladeshi heritage, and creates recipes with eight spices. The death toll from last Friday’s earthquake in Morocco has reached nearly 3,000 people. Three hundred thousand people are said to have been affected, including 100,000 children. The aftermath of earthquakes poses numerous challenges to women and children who are said to suffer the most during humanitarian emergencies. Anita speaks to Ridwana Wallace-Laher, CEO of the Penny Appeal, who has been working in Morocco, and the actor Laila Rouass, a British-Moroccan representative for Education for All, a charity which provides schooling for girls in Morocco.Wilderness is a new Prime Video psychological thriller series which stars Jenna Coleman and Oliver Jackson-Cohen. It's the story of a young British couple, Liv and Will, who seemingly have it all. But their glamorous new life in New York changes dramatically when Liv learns Will has been seeing another woman. Liv's heartbreak turns into fury and revenge. Anita is joined by Marnie Dickens, the writer and creator of the series. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Bob Nettles
14/09/23·57m 37s

The Killing Kind author Jane Casey, AI in IVF treatment, The Knock - Evie's story

Crime author Jane Casey joins Nuala McGovern to talk about a new six part TV adaptation of her best selling book The Killing Kind. The legal thriller starring Emma Appleton has themes such as stalking and coercion as she plays a lawyer who tries to rebuild her life after getting too close to a former client. Emma also joins Nuala in the studio.In the second part of our series The Knock, Jo Morris talks to a woman we are calling Evie who chose to stand by and support her brother after he pleaded guilty to sex offences against children. Why did she make that decision and what has it cost her?Some British women are now being offered IVF treatment using artificial intelligence. The software is used to help select the best embryo for implantation. So how might AI improve the chances of a successful pregnancy? Nuala is joined by Suzanne Cawood, Director of Embryology at the Centre for Reproductive and Genetic Health, a private clinic in London, which has been using AI and offering it as an 'add-on' to patients. We also hear the regulator the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority's position on such practices.In a historic ruling, the Mexican Supreme Court has decriminalised abortion at the federal level. The two leading candidates in next year’s elections in will both be women, meaning that Mexico expects to have its first ever female leader. So, is the country having a feminist revolution? Nuala speaks to Daniela Philipson-Garcia, a PhD scholar and specialist on Mexico's gender policies.
13/09/23·57m 32s

Dr Shazia Malik, Charlotte Regan, Female surgeons, Poison pen letters, The Knock special series

They say current disparities in women’s health across England mean there are far too many cases where women’s voices are not being heard. But the decision to only speak to women up to the age of 55 has provoked a backlash. Nuala McGovern is joined by consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist Dr Shazia Malik, a sub-specialist in reproductive medicine.The film Scrapper follows 12-year-old Georgie living happily alone in a council house in London following the death of her mum. But when her absent father Jason turns up out of the blue, her world is disrupted. We talk to director Charlotte Regan about her debut feature film who says she wanted to show British working class life as something that can be joyful and fun.A new survey shows that nearly a third of female NHS surgeons have been sexually assaulted by a colleague over the past five years. Nuala speak to Tamzin Cuming, a consultant surgeon and chair of the Women in Surgery forum at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, who says it’s a #MeToo moment for surgery.Before the age of social media, there was still plenty of trolling in written form. Emily Cockayne, author of the new book Penning Poison, joins Nuala to discuss her research into the history of poison pen letters; that is, messages sent anonymously, seemingly with the intention to unsettle the recipient. Emily has traced the stories of such missives to all corners of English society from 1760 to 1939.We start our new series 'The Knock' which details the stories of two women whose lives were changed when they were told that a loved one had been arrested for sexual offences against children.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Tim Heffer Reporter Jo Morris
12/09/23·57m 5s

Millie Bobby Brown, Arlo Parks, Martha's Rule

Millie Bobby Brown is a 19-year-old actress best known for her award-nominated performance as Eleven in Stranger Things, and for producing and starring in Enola Holmes. Now she has written a debut novel, Nineteen Steps, based on her grandmother’s life in the East End of London during the Second World War. She joins Nuala to talk about why she wanted to write the novel and why it’s so personal for her.In recent months there’s been increasing momentum for what has been called Martha’s rule which would give patients the power to get an automatic second medical opinion from other experts. This comes after the death of 13-year-old Martha Mills who died in hospital. An inquest concluded that her death had been preventable. So what difference could Martha’s Rule make to how much say patients have to question the decisions made by doctors? Paediatrician and health campaigner Dr Guddi Singh wants to empower people so that medical care works in their best interests and joins Nuala. Three quarters of police officers and staff accused of violence against women are not suspended by their force. That’s according to a joint investigation by the Independent newspaper and Refuge Charity. Nuala is joined by Ellie Butt, Head of Policy at Refuge. Mercury Prize Winning Musician Arlo Parks has turned her hand to poetry with her debut book, The Magic Border. It combines original poetry, song lyrics and images and she joins Nuala for an interview and live reading of one of the poems.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Emma PearceOpener 00:00 Martha’s Rule 01:23 Police accused of violence against women 12:50 Millie Bobby Brown 23:49 Arlo Parks 42:48
11/09/23·57m 2s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Economic Abuse, Should there be a Minister for Men? Rebuilding my life: Martine Wright

Economic abuse was officially recognised under the Domestic Abuse Act in 2021, yet a new study from the charity Surviving Economic Abuse suggests victims are still being let down by the police and the courts. Their CEO Nicola Sharp-Jeffs joins to tell us more about their findings, alongside ITV broadcaster Ruth Dodsworth who shares her own personal experience.On Tuesday’s programme, the Conservative MP for Don Valley, Nick Fletcher, championed the idea of a Minister for Men. He says statistics show that 75% of people taking their lives are men, that the life expectancy of men is 3.7 years lower than it is for women, that 83% of rough sleepers are men. On Wednesday we heard your views - could a Minister help tackle some of the issues many young men seem to be struggling with, such as masculinity, pornography, consent and their role in society? Could a Minister for Men also make life better for women? And could it be a way to tackle the rise of influencers such as Andrew Tate – a self-declared misogynist?Have you ever been in a 'situationship'? It's sort of a relationship but you're not exclusive. It's the subject of the debut novel of Taylor-Dior Rumble. The Situationship is published by Merky Books and it's been termed the label's first Rom-Com. Rebuilding My Life series: When Martine Wright was rescued from the wreckage of a bombed Tube train on what became known as 7/7, her injuries were so severe that she could not be identified. Both her legs were amputated above the knee. 18 years on, Martine speaks about her road to recovery, physically and emotionally.Is Belfast the new city of love? Well, it’s the backdrop to new Sky Atlantic romcom The Lovers, which follows local supermarket worker Janet and her love affair with English TV presenter, Seamus O’Hannigan who has a whole other life, and a girlfriend, back in London. Roisin Gallagher, who plays Janet, talks about filming in her hometown and the changing perceptions of Northern Ireland’s capital.Presenter; Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Sarah Crawley
09/09/23·56m 40s

Economic Abuse, Michal Oshman, Roisin Gallagher, Barbershop Quartet, Mum shaming

Economic abuse was officially recognised under the Domestic Abuse Act in 2021, yet a new study from the charity Surviving Economic Abuse suggests victims are still being let down by the police and the courts. Their CEO Nicola Sharp-Jeffs joins to tell us more about their findings, alongside ITV broadcaster Ruth Dodsworth who shares her own personal experience.What would you do if you weren’t afraid? That is the question Michal Oshman is asking in her latest book. As the former Head of Company Culture at TikTok and International Leadership Development Executive at Facebook, she is no stranger to success. But Michal says that she has spent most of her life hiding anxiety and fear under this success - and uses her book to explore how we can all replace uncertainty with purpose for a better life. She joins Anita Rani to discuss.You might have seen in the papers and online that the actress Sophie Turner and the singer Joe Jonas are getting divorced. The couple met back in 2016 on Instagram, and were married a year later. They have two daughters together, but earlier this week released a joint statement saying they have 'mutually decided to amicably end' their marriage. However, TMZ reported that a source claimed that they had very different lifestyles. Sophie Likes to party, while Jo stays at home, they reported. Olivia-Anne Cleary is a senior editor and writer who felt compelled to write an article about it for Glamour magazine, Can We Please Stop Mum Shaming. She joins Anita to discuss.When you think of traditional barbershop singers you probably think of men. But there are just as many female acapella singing groups as male. The Ladies Association of British Barbershop Singers has around 60 clubs as members. And Mountain Harmony Chorus, the only one in Wales, wrote to Woman's Hour during Listener Week, inviting us to one of their rehearsals. We hear from our reporter Melanie Abbott who went along.Is Belfast the new city of love? Well it’s the backdrop to new Sky Atlantic romcom, The Lovers, which follows local supermarket worker Janet and her love affair with English TV presenter, Seamus O’Hannigan who has a whole other life, and a girlfriend, back in London. Roisin Gallagher, who plays Janet, joins Anita to talk about filming in her hometown and changing perceptions of Northern Ireland’s capital.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Bob Nettles
08/09/23·43m 44s

Primodos debate, Rebuilding my life: Wiz Wharton, Cricket umpire pay

Today MPs from all parties are holding a debate on a controversial pregnancy testing drug used widely in the 1960s and 1970s. It's expected that MPs from all parties will speak, including former Prime Minister Theresa May. In May, the High Court rejected a claim for compensation saying it could not proceed because there was no new evidence linking the tests with foetal harm. Marie Lyon, Chairwoman of the Association for Children Damaged by Hormone Pregnancy Tests and Hannah Bardell MP, Vice Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group On Hormone Pregnancy Testing, join Nuala McGovern. In the last in our series Rebuilding My Life, Nuala speaks to Wiz Wharton, author of Ghost Girl, Banana. Wiz was sectioned under the Mental Health Act 24 years ago, which led to a diagnosis of bipolar. She was forced to confront her demons and work out what needed to change, including owning her identity as a British-Chinese woman and learning how to stand up to the racism she had experienced all her life. Exclusive reporting from The Guardian this week shows that cricket umpires were paid three times more to officiate the men’s Hundred this summer than the women’s. It comes just days after the England and Wales Cricket Board announced that the women’s teams will get the same match fees as the men’s. Nuala speaks to journalist Raf Nicholson.One of the last surviving Bletchley Park codebreakers has died aged 99. Margaret Betts was just 19 when she was headhunted to work on the project. Nuala speaks to Tessa Dunlop, author of The Bletchley Girls, to find out a bit more about her.Dame Shirley Bassey will become the first female solo artist in British history to be honoured with a stamp series. Welsh music journalist Jude Rogers joins Nuala.
07/09/23·57m 29s

Listener phone in - should there be a Minister for Men? Could the role ultimately help women?

On yesterday's programme, the Conservative MP for Don Valley, Nick Fletcher, championed the idea of a Minister for Men. He says statistics show that 75% of people taking their lives are men, that the life expectancy of men is 3.7 years lower than it is for women, that 83% of rough sleepers are men and that 96% of the prison population is men. Do you agree with Nick? Could a Minister help tackle some of the issues many young men seem to be struggling with, such as masculinity, pornography, consent and their role in society? Could a minister for men also make life better for women? And could it be a way to tackle the rise of influencers such as Andrew Tate – a self-declared misogynist?Today Nuala McGovern talks to Michael Conroy, the founder of Men at Work, which focuses on unpicking some of the social influences on the values and beliefs of boys and young men – and how some of those influences can manifest in a range of problematic behaviours. Hear him and have your say live on air by calling Nuala. The phone lines open at 0800 on Wednesday 6 September. Call us on 03700 100 444 or you can text the programme - the number is 84844. Texts will be charged at your standard message rate. On social media we're @BBCWomansHour. And you can email us through our website.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer Lisa Jenkinson Studio Managers: Donald McDonald and Emma Harth
06/09/23·57m 38s

Nick Fletcher MP, Rebuilding my life: Martine Wright, Food writer Bee Wilson, Filmmaker Celine Song

Ukraine's First Lady, Olena Zelenska, has given a very personal interview to the BBC 18 months after the Russian invasion and subsequent war in her country. In it, she speaks about having to live in a different location to her husband, President Zelensky, and her fears for her children's future. The BBC's Yalda Hakim joins Nuala McGovern.A male politician is calling for a Minister for Men. Nick Fletcher, the Conservative MP for Don Valley, believes that men face such serious difficulties in today’s society that they need a specific champion. The second in our Rebuilding My Life series. When Martine Wright was rescued from the wreckage of a bombed Tube train on what became known as 7/7, her injuries were so severe that she could not be identified. Both her legs were amputated above the knee. Eighteen years on, Martine speaks to Nuala about her road to recovery, physically and emotionally.Past Lives is the directorial debut from the New York playwright turned filmmaker Celine Song. She tells the story of Nora and her childhood sweetheart, Hae Sung, who she left behind in Seoul when her family immigrated to Canada. But they reconnect years later in New York, when Nora is happily married - and grapple with what they are to each other now… and whether they missed their chance.Do you wish you cooked more but don't know where to start? Yotam Ottolenghi called Bee Wilson 'the ultimate food scholar'. She's the author of six books on food-related subjects. Now she's written her first cookbook, The Secret of Cooking: Recipes for an Easier Life in the Kitchen. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucinda MontefioreOpener 00:00 Olena Zelenska 01:40 Nick Fletcher 09:10 Rebuilding My Life - Martine Wright 24:29 Past Lives 37:35 Bee Wilson 45:51
05/09/23·57m 25s

Radioactive chapatis, Hostage negotiation, Non-birth mothers, Japanese women in politics

In 1969, migration to the UK was increasing with Britain becoming home for thousands of foreign settlers. In Coventry, 21 women of Indian origin booked what were supposed to be routine appointments with their local GP. Little did they know that these appointments would result in them becoming subjects of a controversial medical experiment, in which they were given chapatis laced with radioactive components. Over the next 50 years, memories of the experiment have continued to resurface as campaigners, such as Labour MP Taiwo Owatemi, try to track down participants and their families whilst calling on Parliament to open an inquiry into the findings. Nicky Perfect knows what it’s like to live much of her life on high alert. From joining the police at the age of 18, working in the Met Police Firearms unit to eventually joining the elite New Scotland Yard Hostage and Crisis Negotiation Unit. She’s brought people safely down from rooftop stand-offs, worked to resolve gang kidnappings and terrorist incidents. Now she’s written about her experiences in Crisis: True stories of my life as a hostage negotiator.Listener Carla Mercer contacted Woman’s Hour asking for a discussion on parenting from the perspective of a non-birth mother in a single-sex relationship. She is the non-birth mother to her seven-year-old daughter and five-year-old twin boys. She is separated from her ex-partner who is the children’s birth mother. Author and journalist, Lotte Jeffs is the “other mother” to a four-year-old girl with her wife, who gave birth to their daughter. She is co-author of The Queer Parent: Everything You Need to Know From Gay to Ze. Political parties in Japan are boosting their support to get more women into office. The country’s ruling party and opposition party are both offering financial incentives- pledging a million Japanese Yen, about £5400, in aid for each new female candidate. And many would say the country sorely needs more women in politics- with the World Economic Forum showing only 10% of the country’s parliamentary positions are held by women. Rei Murakami is the President of the Murakami Foundation, and has set up a politics training school with this goal in mind. Hanako Montgomery is a Tokyo-based journalist. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Kirsty StarkeyOpener 00:00 Radioactive Chapatis 02:12 Nicky Perfect 12:16 Women on Wheels 30:20 Non-Birth Mothers 35:44 Japanese Women in Politics 46:45
04/09/23·57m 27s

DIY fertility tests, Sudan conflict, Rebuilding my life

A BBC investigation has found that at least five women have died after family courts allowed fathers accused of abuse to apply for contact with their children. Some took their own lives, and one had a heart attack outside a court. Nuala McGovern is joined by Dr Elizabeth Dalgarno who led the research in to this. We often talk to women about the immediate impact of traumatic life-changing events. But what happens after the dust has settled? This week on Woman’s Hour, we are inviting you to listen to three women’s experiences of picking up the pieces. Claire Russell lost her partner Mark to suicide in 2018, and miscarried their baby a few weeks later. Claire tells Nuala about how she began to recover. Since the conflict in Sudan erupted again in April, there have been reports of the increased use of sexual violence against women and girls. More than four million women and girls are at risk of sexual violence across Sudan, according to the World Health Organization. Nuala speaks to CNN’s Nima Elbagir and to Duaa Tariq who is in Khartoum.How reliable is DIY fertility testing in helping you plan for a baby? A recent report in the British Medical Journal has found that some DIY tests that were sold in the UK to measure oestrogen levels may have given misleading results. The report's author, Emma Wilkinson, joins Nuala alongside Dr Ippokratis Sarris, Consultant in Reproductive Medicine and Director of King’s Fertility. Have you ever been in a 'situationship'? It's sort of a relationship but you're not exclusive. It's the subject of the debut novel of Taylor-Dior Rumble. The Situationship is published by Merky Books and it's been termed the label's first Rom-Com. Taylor-Dior joins Nuala in the studio. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Emma Pearce
04/09/23·57m 37s

Hostage negotiator Nicky Perfect, Sarah Beeny, Chelsea Women Manager Emma Hayes, Mothers with bipolar, Bad lists

Nicky Perfect has spent most of her life in highly fraught and dangerous situations, working as a hostage negotiator. Now she’s written about her experience in a new book: Crisis: True Stories of my Life as a Hostage Negotiator. She joins Nuala McGovern to talk about some of the things she learnt along the way.The TV presenter Sarah Beeny has spent much of her life in the unpredictable world of property renovation. Her latest book, The Simple Life - How I found Home, is about the many homes she's lived in. While she was writing it, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Sarah speaks to Nuala about her perspective on language around cancer, and why she loves having a chaotic home.Emma Hayes is the manager of Chelsea Women Football Club. In her time, they have won six Women’s Super League titles, five FA Cups and two League Cups. Emma joins Hayley Hassall to discuss football, motherhood, women's health, and leadership – which is the subject of her new audiobook, Kill the Unicorn.The Pulitzer prize-winning production Next to Normal is currently on stage at the Donmar Warehouse in London. It features a suburban wife and mother living with bipolar and haunted by her past. Actor Caissie Levy, who plays Diana, and birder and environmentalist, Mya-Rose Craig, share their experiences with Nuala. Did you hear our special Bank Holiday programme about lists? They pop up everywhere in life – and can be good, or bad. Nuala discusses some historically bad lists with authors Helen Lewis and Anne Sebba.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lottie GartonOpener 00:00 Nicky Perfect 01:23 Sarah Beeny 10:41 Emma Hayes 23:10 Bipolar Mothers 35:49 Bad Lists 44:09
02/09/23·56m 6s

Emma Hayes, manager of Chelsea FC Women, Karis Anderson on Tina Turner, Rose Matafeo and Emma Sidi on Starstruck

Emma Hayes has been manager of Chelsea Women football team for more than a decade, a reign made remarkable by six Women’s Super League titles, five FA Cups and two League Cups. Emma joins Hayley Hassall to discuss leadership in football and beyond, motherhood and women's health. Emma Hayes’ new audiobook, Kill the Unicorn, explores how her experience coaching elite female athletes has lessons for all of us. On 24 May, the iconic singer Tina Turner died at the age of 83. For the last five years her life and music have been portrayed on stage in London’s West End to endless audiences keen to continue to enjoy her songs and watch the highs and lows, particularly of her early life, marriage to Ike Turner and then the revival of her career as a solo artist. Karis Anderson has recently taken on the role of Tina and joins Hayley in the Woman’s Hour studio. Women in Afghanistan are turning to nursing as one of the few remaining professions they are permitted to do under the Taliban. But nursing itself is facing a crisis in the country. Former BBC Persia journalist Bahaar Joya is now a nurse in London. She describes the training she wants to provide for nurses in Afghanistan, and what the women there are telling her.The hit BBC Three and HBO rom-com series Starstruck is back on our screens with its third season - following the main character Jessie and her best friend Kate through their late 20s and early 30s in London. Rose Matafeo has co-written the show and plays Jessie and Emma Sidi plays Kate. They join Hayley to discuss their characters and their friendship.Presented by Hayley Hassall Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineers: Andrew Garratt & Sue Maillot00:00 OPENER 02:38 EMMA HAYES 23:52 TINA TURNER 36:45 AFGHAN NURSE 47:19 ROSE MATAFEO AND EMMA SIDI
31/08/23·54m 50s

Scottish rape survivors, Writer Natasha Walter, New research on the Y chromosome and male infertility

A group of women who were raped by the same man are now coming together to campaign for better treatment for survivors of rape in the Scottish justice system. After his sentencing, the women were photographed arm-in-arm outside the high court in Glasgow, having forged a close bond. Catriona Renton, reporter and presenter for BBC Scotland, joins Nuala. Writer and activist Natasha Walter joins Nuala to discuss her new, very personal book, Before the Light Fades: a memoir of grief and resistance. One day in December 2017 Natasha's mother Ruth took her own life. Natasha overwhelmed, by grief and guilt starts to look back through Ruth's history, trying to understand how her life led to this death. Last week scientists in America announced that they have taken an important step in understanding the human genome- our genetic blueprint- by decoding the Y chromosome which is passed from male parent to male offspring and determines biological sex and fertility. Professor Chris Barratt, head of Reproductive Medicine at Ninewells Hospital and the University of Dundee Medical School explains the implications of this research in relation to male infertility. Next to Normal is a Pulitzer prize-winning production currently on stage at the Donmar Theatre in London. At its heart Diana Goodman is a suburban wife and mother living with bipolar and haunted by her past. We speak to actor Caissie Levy playing Diana and birder and environmentalist, Mya-Rose Craig whose recent book Birdgirl talked about the impact on her and her family of having a mother with the same diagnosis. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucinda MontefioreOpener 00:00 Rape 01:20 Natasha Walter 10:32 Y Chromosome Breakthrough 22:23 Bipolar Mothers 30:19
30/08/23·41m 43s

Sarah Beeny, Rebekah Staton, Spanish football kiss update, Deborah Bonello on Narcas

The TV presenter Sarah Beeny has spent much of her life in the unpredictable world of property renovation. You'll find her in programmes such as Help! My House is Falling Down and Sarah Beeny’s New Life in the Country. Her latest book, The Simple Life - How I found Home, is about the many homes she's lived in and her latest move to a former dairy farm in Somerset. While she was writing it she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Sarah joins Nuala McGovern.Nuala speaks to actor Rebekah Staton, who stars in the new BBC drama The Following Events Are Based on a Pack of Lies. It follows two women who have nothing in common - except conman and celebrated so-called ecopreneur Rob. Staton plays Alice Newman, who had been trying to move on from Rob’s schemes that left her family penniless and his subsequent disappearance - until she sees him one day by chance.The Spanish Football Federation's regional leaders have called on their president, Luis Rubiales, to resign. He faces widespread criticism for kissing footballer Jenni Hermoso on the lips at the World Cup ceremony in Sydney just over a week ago. Hermoso has said the kiss was not consensual. Now his mother has gone on hunger strike in protest against the treatment of her son. Nuala speaks to Semra Hunter, Spanish football journalist.VICE Journalist Deborah Bonello has written about the hidden power women wield in Latin American drug cartels for her first book, Narcas. It is the first in-depth exploration of these women. She joins Nuala to discuss.And the next in our series Women on Wheels - where we hear women speak about the cars that mean or meant a lot to them. Today, we hear from listener Rachel. Her choice of a Morris Minor bemused her friends and family but the adventures she had in it still make her smile.00:00 OPENER 01:54 JENNI HERMOSO 13:57 SARAH BEENY 29:14 LAS NARCAS 41:58 WOMEN ON WHEELS 46:41 REBEKAH STATON
29/08/23·57m 26s

Lists: How and why we make them, The psychology behind list-making, Lists in the public domain, Music and lists

To discuss the how and why of lists, Nuala is joined by Joanna Nolan, author of the book, Listful, and Lucy Ireland Gray, who put together a collection of about 200 shopping lists that she found discarded over the course of nearly 20 years in and around Hertfordshire, where she lives.We consider the psychology of lists - in particular why and whether lists are good or bad for our mental health and creativity. Artist Alice Instone, Joanna Nolan, author of Listful, and Madeleine Dore, the author of, I didn’t do the thing today: On letting go of productivity guilt, join Nuala.Lists in the public domain - with Nuala to discuss the good and bad of lists historically and in contemporary times, are journalist and writer Helen Lewis, author of Difficult women: A history of feminism in eleven fights, and writer Anne Sebba, author of 10 non-fiction books. Her most recent book is Ethel Rosenberg: A Cold War Tragedy.The place of lists in music - songs with lists, the charts, playlists and more. Nuala is joined by Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Corinne Bailey Rae, whose album, Black Rainbows, is out in September, and music journalist Jude Rogers, the author of The sound of being human: How music shapes our lives.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
28/08/23·56m 8s

Listener Week: Psychedelics, Strongwomen, Kleptomania, Living funerals, Being a refugee, Women in heavy metal

A Listener Week Weekend Woman’s Hour Special, where you – our listeners – decide what you want to hear on the programme.Our listener Rachel asked us to explore the potential of using psychedelic drugs in medicine, and whether these drugs might affect women differently to men. Anita Rani is joined by Professor David Nutt, Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London; and Catherine Bird, Senior Clinical Trials Manager at the Centre for Affective Disorders at Kings College London.Eric, a listener, suggested we find out more about Vulcana, the Victorian strongwoman known for her 'jaw-dropping feats of strength and her breath-taking beauty'. Author Rebecca F John and Sam Taylor, Britain’s Strongest Woman 2020, join Nuala McGovern to talk about strongwomen past and present. A listener who we’re calling Jane tells Nuala about her addiction to shoplifting. She wanted to highlight her experience and her struggle to cope with her compulsion - and explains her anxiety about regularly breaking the law. Listener Nelly has asked us to talk about living funerals. She was inspired by Kris Hallenga, the founder of the CoppaFeel breast cancer awareness charity, who has stage 4 breast cancer and who held a living funeral for herself. Nuala hears from Jenna, whose sister had a living funeral.Franceska Murati is a 27-year-old businesswoman and this year’s Miss Central London. At four years old, she arrived in the UK having escaped war-torn Kosovo, smuggled in the back of a lorry. She shares her story.And our listener Laura wanted us to look at heavy metal and the role women play in the scene. Nuala speaks to Lindsay Bishop, who conducted 10 years of field work for her PhD on the subject and Becky Baldwin, a bassist from the band Fury.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
26/08/23·56m 6s

Listener Week: Generative AI, Female thatchers, Big noses, Communal living

For Listener Week, you, our listeners, decide what we cover on the programme.Listener Liane has tasked the programme with a deep dive into the impact of generative Artificial Intelligence on the workforce. She’s concerned that AI risks making humans “obsolete” and “has the capacity to replace millions of people's creative ideas, artwork, writing, music, their skills in language, invention and interpretation in seconds.” We speak to Dame Diane Coyle, the Bennett Professor of Public Policy at Cambridge University, and Christina Colclough, founder of the Why Not Lab specialising in the futures of work.Listener Deb emailed in to shine a light on the work of her daughter Daisy and her partner Anna, thatchers who have worked on rooves all over Devon. Our reporter Sarah Swadling caught up with them at work on a cottage near Okehampton.How do you feel about your nose? Once considered a symbol of beauty and power in ancient Rome, having a slightly larger facial feature nowadays can have a different meaning for some. Do you embrace it in its natural form or have you ever thought about changing it? We speak to Radhika Sanghani, who started the #sideprofileselfie campaign; and Karolina who decided to have a rhinoplasty.Listener Annette has often thought about living with her female friends in old age but she doesn’t know how to go about it. To answer her questions, we speak to architect Anne Thorne, who has recently built Cannock Mill CoHousing with 25 other households. And Mim Skinner, author of Living Together, a book about intentional communities in the UK and beyond. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Studio Manager: Gayl Gordan00:00 OPENER 02:17 AI AND AUTOMATION 17.45 TRAIL 18:57 FEMALE THATCHERS 32:00 BIG NOSES 45:51 COMMUNAL LIVING
25/08/23·57m 49s

Listener Week: Psychedelics, Peripheral friendship, Posthumous conception, Beach Guardian

For Listener Week, you, our listeners, decide what we cover on the programme.Listener Rachel asked Woman's Hour to explore the potential of using psychedelic drugs in medicine and whether these drugs might affect women differently to men. Academics have been researching psilocybin as a possible new treatment for depression, PTSD and anorexia, when used in conjunction with therapy. Anita Rani is joined by Professor David Nutt, Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London; and Catherine Bird, Senior Clinical Trials Manager at the Centre for Affective Disorders at Kings College London.Helen, a listener, wanted Woman's Hour to highlight the importance of peripheral friendships. These are casual acquaintance relationships; the people in your life that you don’t see often, or your co-workers who give you joy, or kindness, but aren’t your close family. Anita meets Helen and they talk to Dr Gillian Sandstrom, a senior lecturer in the Psychology of Kindness at Sussex University, who has studied these relationshipsPosthumous conception is when assisted reproductive technology is used to establish a pregnancy and produce genetic offspring following the death of a parent. Listener, Lauren McGregor, wrote to Woman's Hour wanting to discuss the importance of having the legal paperwork properly completed and signed should you ever find yourself in a situation when you have to consider this. Anita is joined by Lauren and a family lawyer, who has experience of working with fertility law, Louisa Gheveart.Earlier this year, research from the University of Portsmouth showed there are 100 times more microplastics in the coast around the UK than there were six years ago. Anita talks to the marine biologist and PhD student Emily Stevenson who is on a mission to clean up the patch of Cornwall’s north coast where she grew up. Emily founded Beach Guardian in 2017 with her dad to try to empower local communities to combat plastic waste along the coastline.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Giles Aspen00:00 Opener 02:28 Psychedlics 17:12 Peripheral Friendship 30:45 Posthumous Conception 46:18 Beach Conservation
24/08/23·57m 23s

Listener Week: Is it ever good to give up on dreams? Working class women & university, Living funerals

For Woman's Hour's Listener Week, you, our listeners, decide what we cover on the programme.Nuala McGovern is joined by Monica and chartered psychologist Catherine Hallissey to discuss when it might be the right decision to give up on your dream. We'd like to hear your views on the issue. Have you decided to change course or realised a goal isn’t meant to be?Earlier this month, we heard the experiences of young people who are opting to live at home while they study at university because of the cost of living. That prompted a listener, Dr Pam Woolner from Newcastle University, to get in touch to tell us about the latest research by her colleague Dr Sam Shields. It looks into the experiences of working class women going to university and the challenges they face. Sam is senior lecturer in Education at Newcastle University and joins Nuala along with the writer Jessica Andrews who was the first in her family to go to university, leaving her home in the north-east of England to study in London.    One of our listeners got in touch to tell us that his daughter had discovered a previously unseen poem by Georgiana the Duchess of Devonshire, who you may know about from the Keira Knightley film, The Duchess. We’ll be bringing you that poem and discussing why the duchess was such an influential political figure in her day.And Nelly has asked us to talk about living funerals. She was inspired by Kris Hallenga, the founder of the CoppaFeel breast cancer awareness charity, who has stage 4 breast cancer and who held a living funeral for herself.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Andrew Garratt00:00 OPENER 01:43 LIVING FUNERALS 22.46 WORKING CLASS ACADEMICS 35.45 DUCHESS POEM 46.57 GIVING UP ON DREAMS 5439 CLOSE
23/08/23·56m 56s

Listener Week: Ukrainian women soldiers, Long lost families, Strong women, Refugees, Eating Alone

For listener week, you, our listeners, decide what we cover on the programme.Listener Liz got in touch to say she wanted to know more about the women fighting on the front line in Ukraine. Nuala McGovern is joined by BBC journalist and reporter Olga Malchevska, whose home in Kyiv was bombed at the start of the war. She’s been back to Ukraine to meet three women who are fighting for their country – we’ll hear from one of them who was severely injured when the car she was in drove over a landmine. As a child Julie De’Ath always wished she had an older brother, ‘an easy pass to get a boyfriend’, she said. Two years ago at the age of 67, she finally got one when she received a message on Facebook from a man claiming to be that brother. Her mother had given birth to a baby boy in the 1940s but being unmarried at the time, gave him up for adoption. It was a secret her mother took to her grave. Julie contacted Woman’s Hour as part of Listener week to share her story for the first time. We also speak to her long-lost half-brother, Tom, and to Miriam Silver, Consultant Clinical Psychologist, who specialises in parenting and children who have been adopted. Victorian strongwoman Vulcana was known for her jaw-dropping feats of strength and her breathtaking beauty. Listener Eric suggested her story to us. He asked that we talk to author Rebecca F John, whose historical novel, Vulcana, fictionalises her life. She tells Nuala about the remarkable, and trailblazing, performer. Plus, Sam Taylor, Britain’s Strongest Woman 2020, tells us what it’s like being a modern-day strongwoman. Franceska Murati is a 27-year-old businesswoman and this year’s Miss London. But there’s more to this beauty queen that meets the eye. At 4 years old, she arrived in the UK alongside her parents and older sister. They had escaped war-torn Kosovo, smuggling themselves on the back of a lorry. She shares her story.It’s something we’ve all probably done at one point or another - eating alone. Whether that’s taking yourself out to a restaurant you’ve always wanted to go to, grabbing a meal while you’re on a solo trip, or cooking for just yourself at home. But despite how common eating alone is - given that in 2022 the Office of National Statistics showed almost one in three households in the UK were people living alone - some might say there’s still a stigma around it. So how do we get around it? Nuala talks to Woman’s Hour listener Julia Georgallis and food writer Clare Finney.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Kirsty Starkey00:00 Opener 01:34 Ukraine Female Soldiers 16:08 Long Lost Family 30:05 Strong Women 39:19 Franceska Murati 49:42 Eating Alone
22/08/23·57m 13s

Listener Week: Women's World Cup final, Shoplifting, Heavy metal

For listener week you, our listeners, decide what we cover on the programme. It might not have been World Cup glory for England's Lionesses but they still made history and have inspired many along the way. To take a look back at that history, Nuala is joined by two listeners: Sue Whyatt, who played for England in 1972, and successfully got her international cap following an email to us at Woman’s Hour, and Jo Clark, co-founder of Baller FC. A listener speaks to Nuala about her addiction to shoplifting - fully aware that it's a criminal offence and not something that should be condoned, she wanted to highlight her story on the programme. Listener Laura wanted us to look at heavy metal and the role women play in the scene. Nuala speaks to Lindsay Bishop, who conducted 10 years of field work for her PhD on the subject and Becky Baldwin, a bassist from the band Fury. Sue Stewart explains why she got in touch with Woman’s Hour to tell us about the impact on her of the book Matrescence by Lucy Jones. Matrescence is the time during pregnancy, childbirth and early motherhood when women undergo far-reaching changes which Lucy Jones argues are more profound, wild and long lasting than we have ever been led to believe. We speak to Lucy and to Sue. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Emma Pearce00:00 Opener 02:35 Football 16:53 Kleptomania 34:43 Mid trail 35:53 Heavy Metal 47:06 Mastresence
21/08/23·56m 22s

Women's World Cup final, Surviving a WWII Japanese prison camp, Care leavers, 'Older-age orphans', Nasa astronaut Christina Koch

Former Lioness and England's top female goal scorer, Ellen White, on England reaching the Fifa Women's World Cup final. VJ day was on Tuesday, marking the anniversary of Japan's surrender, and the end of World War Two. Olga Henderson was 13 in 1945, starving in a camp in Singapore alongside other young internees. Now 91, Olga talks about her time in the camps recalled in her new – and first - book, In the Shadow of the Rising Sun. A survey of 10,000 university students found that only 14% of pupils who had been in the care system progressed to higher education by age 19, compared to 47% of all other pupils. Kim Emenike, who was in care as a child, and Katharine Sacks-Jones, Chief Executive of the charity Become, which supports young care leavers, discuss the challenges they face. Many baby boomers are experiencing the death of their parents much later than previous generations. The journalist Helen Bullough and clinical psychologist Dr Linda Blair discuss the impact of being parentless in older age. Imagine being the first woman to travel to the Moon. The Nasa astronaut Christina Koch has been chosen as one of the four crew members who will orbit the Moon in the spacecraft Orion, as part of Nasa’s Artemis II mission in November next year. TV presenter Sarah Greene, most well-known for her work on Blue Peter and Going Live is back on our screens with a brand-new BBC 1 quiz show, The Finish Line. She reflects on her career and tells us all about her new role. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
19/08/23·57m 19s

Ellen White, How to ask for a pay rise, astronaut Christina Koch, Morning-after pill

Sunday sees the Women's World Cup final between England and Spain and to mark it we are joined by England's top female goal scorer, Ellen White. By the time of Ellen's retirement after last year’s Euros, she'd scored 52 goals in 113 international appearances. She joins Anita from Sydney to discuss the magic of Sarina Wiegman and her advice for the Lionesses ahead of Sunday's match.Has anyone asked for a pay rise yet? With everything costing more and wages not quite keeping up, maybe it's time we did. Historically women are less likely to ask for a pay rise with a recent survey suggesting half of men have asked for a rise but only 37% of women have. Anita is joined by businesswoman and entrepreneur Sharmadean Reid to discuss.Imagine being the first woman to travel to the Moon. The Nasa astronaut Christina Koch is edging closer to that entry in the history books. She has been chosen as one of the four crew members who will orbit the Moon in the spacecraft Orion, as part of Nasa’s Artermis II mission in November next year. All going well, the Artemis programme will continue in 2025 as Nasa and its partners attempt to land the first woman and first person of colour on the surface of the Moon. Anita speaks to Christina all about it.A new study has found that the morning-after pill is made more effective when taken with an anti-inflammatory painkiller. The study found taking the morning-after pill combined with piroxicam - a drug used for arthritis pain - prevented 95% of pregnancies, whereas taking the morning-after pill alone prevented 63%. Anita is joined by the President of The Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health at The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Dr Janet Barter, to discuss the significance of these findings. Ligwina Hananto is an Indonesian stand-up comedian journeying to Europe for the first time to appear at the Edinburgh Fringe. She joins Anita to talk about what it’s like to be a hijab-wearing comedian in a conservative Muslim society, and why she feels like she lives a double life.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Bob Nettles00:00 Opener 01:30 Ellen White 15:34 How to Ask For a Pay Rise 28:58 Christina Koch 43:00 Contraception 48:04 Mrs Hananto
18/08/23·57m 34s

Lionesses' legacy, Sarah Greene, Care leavers, Abortion

England are through to the final of the FIFA Women’s World Cup for the first time in history. But while the Lionesses are excelling in Australia and New Zealand, what’s it like for girls playing football back in the UK? Are they feeling the impact of England’s success? Samerah, Charlotte, and Isabelle, teenagers involved in the Football Beyond Borders programme, share their experiences, and Anita speaks to Ceylon Andi Hickman, the charity’s director of external relations, about how to ensure the legacy of the World Cup reaches girls from all backgrounds.A 22 year old woman has denied carrying out an illegal abortion during lockdown. Bethany Cox was accused of two charges on Tuesday in relation to using drugs and poison to end a pregnancy in July 2020. She pleaded not guilty to the charges in court and has been released on bail. Anita Rani speaks to Hannah Al-Othman, a reporter for the Sunday Times who was in court.It's A level results today across the UK for hundreds and thousands of students. The proportion of A or A* grades is 27.2% down from a peak of nearly 45% in the pandemic. That means it is more or less back to where it was in 2019, the last year of exams before COVID. Grainne Hallahan, senior analyst from TES Magazine, looks into how girls performed. In 2023, a survey of 10,000 university students found that only 14 percent of pupils who had been in the care system progressed to higher education by age 19, compared to 47 percent of all other pupils. Anita is joined by Kim Emenike, who was in care as a child and Katharine Sacks-Jones, Chief Executive of the charity, Become, which supports young care leavers to discuss the challenges they face.TV presenter Sarah Greene, most well-known for her work on Blue Peter and Going Live is back on our screens with a brand new BBC 1 quiz show, The Finish Line. She joins Anita Rani to reflect on her career and to tell us all about her new role. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Steve Greenwood00:00 Opener 01:21 Football 20:19 Abortion 27.49 Exam results 36:42 Care leavers Uni 45:58 Sarah Greene
17/08/23·57m 37s

Martine McCutcheon, anxiety & the perimenopause, Who is Fani Willis? Period huts in Nepal

Martine McCutcheon describes her rising anxiety levels to do with the perimenopause. Who is Fani Willis? On Monday 14 August a grand jury in Fulton County, Georgia voted to charge Mr Trump and 18 others with attempting to overturn the 2020 election result in the state. The woman taking on his case is District Attorney Fani Willis. Kimberley Peeler Allen the co-founder of HHFA, a national organization building the political power and leadership of Black women from the voting booth to elected office, joins Nuala. Should parents of disabled children and those with long term health conditions be kept in the loop, even when the young person turns 18 and is an adult? We hear from parents devastated to be excluded, who say they are not listened to, sometimes until it’s too late. And the Royal College of Psychiatrists tells Woman’s Hour they want to see the period of transition to be extended past 18 and up to the age of 25. In Nepal there have been reports of a 16-year old girl who has died as a result of the illegal practice of chhaupadi. This is where menstruating women are forced to stay in huts outside their home due to the centuries-old belief that they are unclean and untouchable during menstruation. Journalist Shristi Kafle joins us from Nepal.  The Invincibles is the untold story of one of the most successful women’s football team of World War One. And as the spirit of the Sterling Ladies lives on in the Lionesses epic Women’s World Cup adventure this summer a play about them opens at the Queens Theatre in Hornchurch Essex early next month. Playwright Amanda Whittington and actor Yanexi Enriquez join Nuala. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucinda Montefiore00:00 Opener 02:10 Martine Mccutcheon 13:53 Fani Willis 26:24 Post - 18 40:03 Period Huts 46:40 The Invincibles
16/08/23·57m 39s

Youngest Afghan mayor, Romanticising your life, surviving WWII Japanese prison camp, Big tech & sexuality

Today marks two years since the re-taking of Afghanistan by the Taliban. We speak to Afghanistan's youngest female mayor, Zarifa Ghafari, who was elected mayor of the conservative central city of Maidan Shahr in 2018, aged 23, and survived three assassination attempts while still living in the country. During one of these attempts, her father was killed. Following the Taliban’s return to power in August 2021, she fled Afghanistan along with her husband, mother and siblings. But she still receives daily death threats from the Taliban despite fleeing to Germany two years ago.Across social media, everyday activities such as making dinner for yourself, going for a walk or buying yourself flowers have been transformed into acts of feminist empowerment. The hashtag for the trend - ‘Romanticise your life’ - has over 1.5 billion views. Should we all be romanticising our lives more? Journalists Ellie Muir and Chanté Joseph look at the pros and cons of the trend.Women with poor mental health have an almost 50% higher risk of having a pre-term birth, that's according to a study of 2 million pregnancies in England. The research found that one in 10 women who had used mental health services before their pregnancy had a pre-term birth, compared with one in 15 who did not. We hear from one of the reports authors, Louise Howard, who is professor emerita in women’s mental health at King’s College London. Today is VJ day which marks the surrender of Japan and therefore the end of World War Two. Olga Henderson was 13 in 1945, starving in a camp in Singapore alongside other young internees. Now 91, Olga will join us in the studio to talk about her time in the camps recalled in her new – and first - book, In the Shadow of the Rising Sun.Journalist Ellie House is bisexual. But before she had even realised that, it felt like Big Tech had already worked it out, with some sites regularly recommending her LGBTQ content. Ellie joins Nuala to speak about her quest to understand how recommendations systems really work, and the risks and rewards of being queer online. She’ll also tell us about speaking to people for whom these kind of recommendations could become potentially life-threatening. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Kirsty Starkey00:00 Opener 02:00 Afghanistan 11:38 Romanticise Your Life 21:04 Pregnancy 30:54 Olga Henderson 45:47 Big Tech
15/08/23·57m 41s

Women's football World Cup, 'Older-age orphans', Channel swimming with a stoma, Caroline Moran, Women's feet

The Lionesses are through to the Women's World Cup semi-final on Wednesday against co-hosts Australia. Reaching semi-finals of major tournaments is what England "are known for", says defender Lucy Bronze. Lucy's mum, Diane Bronze and former Lioness and football comemntator Anita Asante discuss. Many baby boomers are experiencing the death of their parents much later than previous generations. The journalist Helen Bullough and clinical psychologist Dr Linda Blair discuss the impact of being parentless in older age. Gill Castle will be the first person to attempt to swim the channel with a stoma. She's documenting her journey to crossing the channel in The Stoma Swimmer - a new audio series for BBC Sounds.What would happen if the apocalypse happened in the middle of a hen party? Caroline Moran, known for writing Raised by Wolves, has written a brand new comedy for BBC Two looking at just that. She joins Nuala to talk about why she wanted to create the series, Henpocalypse, and what to expect. How much can you tell a woman's life story through her feet? Emma McConnachie, who is a podiatrist and a spokesperson for the Royal College of Podiatry, explains how our feet change as we age. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Dianne McGregorOpener 00:00 Football 01:55 Older Orphans 13:36 Henpocalypse 30:09 Swim 39:36 Women and feet 48:21
14/08/23·57m 33s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Megan Thee Stallion, Students Living at Home, Sarah de Lagarde, Dr Nadia Nadim

The rapper Tory Lanez has been sentenced to 10 years for the shooting of fellow musician Megan Thee Stallion. She required surgery to remove bullet fragments from her foot after he shot her following a party in 2020. BBC entertainment correspondent Chi-Chi Izundu joins Clare McDonnell to discuss.New research by The Sutton Trust reveals that more than a third of A-level students in England are considering living at home if they get into their preferred university. And in some cases, choosing lower-ranking universities because they are closer to home. Rebecca Montacute, head of research for the Sutton Trust, explains the findings. Hayley Hassall also hears from future student, Lori Cobon, and her mother Rachel.A few months ago, Sarah de Lagarde came on Woman's Hour to share her incredible story of survival. She had fallen on to the Tube tracks at a north London station and was run over by two Tube trains. She lost her right arm and leg as a result. Today, Sarah returns with a newly fitted bionic arm, made possible with the support of a crowdfunding campaign. She speaks to Hayley about her recovery.More than 60 women have made allegations of rape, sexual assault and sexual harassment against the US comedian and actor Bill Cosby. But only one woman, Andrea Constand, was able to gain a criminal conviction. In 2018, he was sent to prison for three to 10 years on three counts of aggravated indecent assault. At the time, it was celebrated as a major win for the #MeToo movement. Less than three years later, he was freed when the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturned his conviction on a legal technicality. In a new two-part documentary exclusively for ITVX from 10 August, The Case Against Cosby, Andrea tells her story.It's been two years since the Taliban retook power in Afghanistan and during that time women and girls have found many curtailments on their liberty. Dr Nadia Nadim is Afghanistan's most successful and most influential female footballer. She fled to Denmark following the death of her father and has gone on to play for the Danish national team over 100 times. Dr Nadim joins Hayley to discuss her career and her hope for women and girls back home in Afghanistan.Presenter: Hayley Hassall Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Tim Heffer00:00 Opener 01:26 Megan Thee Stallion 07:48 Students Living At Home 16:45 Sarah De Lagarde 26:01 Andrea Constand 36:38 Fertility Anxiety 44:25 Afghanistan
12/08/23·56m 36s

Andi and Miquita Oliver, Jacqueline Springer, Emma Rawicz, Afghanistan's most successful female footballer - Dr Nadia Nadim

Mother and daughter duo, Andi and Miquita Oliver, have started a new podcast, Stirring it Up, where they ask guests to join them at their kitchen table. They join Hayley Hassall to talk on how this format harks back to their roots, their passion for sharing food and stories, the challenges they’ve faced as women at different life stages in broadcast, and growing up together in London’s Ladbroke Grove. It's been two years since the Taliban retook power in Afghanistan and during that time women and girls have found many curtailments on their liberty. Dr Nadia Nadim is Afghanistan's most successful and most influential female footballer. She fled to Denmark following the death of her father and has gone on to play for the Danish national team over 100 times. Dr Nadim joins Hayley to discuss her career and her hope for women and girls back home in Afghanistan. Last week we spoke to the children’s charity, the NSPCC, who talked about how the school summer holidays can be a particularly difficult time for some children. And Hayley talks to Ruth, who has worked on the helpline for over a decade, and Brad, who made that call. Emma Rawicz is an award-winning young saxophonist and composer, already making waves on the UK music scene, and described as "an astonishing new talent" by Jamie Cullum. Emma is a recipient of the 2021 Drake Yolanda Award, winner of Best Newcomer at the 2022 Parliamentary Jazz Awards, as well as being a finalist in the BBC Young Jazz Musician competition.  She joins Hayley to chat and perform live in the studio. Women and Hip Hop with music journalist Jacqueline Springer and the latest on the devastating Maui Fires with Chair of the Island Council Alice Lee.Presenter: Hayley Hassall Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Michael Millham00:00 Opener 02:06 Maui Wildfire 07:16 Andi and Miquita Oliver 17:02 Afghanistan 32:50 Reporting Child Abuse 40:14 Women and Hip Hop 47:53 Emma Radwicz
11/08/23·54m 34s

Barbie in China, The Hundred: women's cricket, Women & student loans, Why university students are staying at home

New research by the Sutton Trust reveals that more than a third of A-level students in England are considering living at home if they get into their preferred university. And in some cases, chooing lower-ranking universities because they are closer to home. Rebecca Montacute, head of research for the Sutton Trust, explains the findings. Hayley also hears from future student, Lori Cobon, and her mother Rachel. The summer of cricket continues with The Hundred. Hayley finds out the latest news from Beth Barrett-Wild, who is Director of Women’s Professional Game with the England and Wales Cricket Board, the ECB, and number eight on the Woman’s Hour Power list. Hayley is also joined by England cricketer Nat Sciver-Brunt, who is ranked number one in the world and is Captain of Trent Rockets Women. Barbie the film is a surprising hit in China, exceeding box office expectations. Why are feminists flocking to see it and how does it compare with other films released there this summer? To find out more, Hayley speaks to Frances Hisgen, Research Programme Manager for the Project on China’s Global Sharp Power at Stanford University in the US and Jingfei Li, a lecturer at Shanghai Vancouver Film School in China.Many young people will be looking forward to starting university and thinking about their student finances. Nicola Robinson got in touch to say that she believes women like her who took out a student loan in England have been unfairly penalised. She tells her story. Hayley also discusses the issues with Sabina Mackenzie and Katie Watts, Head of Campaigns at Money Saving Expert. Presented by Hayley Hassall Producer: Louise Corley Studio engineer: Andrew Garratt00:00 Opener 02:56 Students Living at Home 16:36 Student Loans 34:13 Women on Wheels 40:03 Barbie in China 48:31 Cricket 100
10/08/23·57m 26s

Megan Thee Stallion, Fertility Anxiety, Colombian striker Linda Caicedo

The rapper Tory Lanez has been sentenced to 10 years for the shooting of fellow musician Megan Thee Stallion. She required surgery to remove bullet fragments from her foot after he shot her following a party in 2020. BBC entertainment correspondent Chi-Chi Izundu joins Clare McDonnell to discuss.Do you have fertility anxiety? Today we are discussing why some women fear they can’t easily have children, despite having no known health issues. The journalist Sophie Gallagher joins Clare alongside Dr Ellie Cannon, an NHS GP and author. 18-year-old Linda Caicedo has been one of the break-out stars of this year’s FIFA Women’s World Cup. The Colombian player’s journey so far includes a professional and international debut at 14, a cancer diagnosis at 15, and a move to one of the most well-known clubs in the world. BBC Sport reporter Emma Smith joins us to explain her meteoric career.Lorna Rose Treen is an award-winning comedian who has taken her one-woman character comedy show Skin Pigeon to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival for the first time this year. Being a performer at the Fringe is fun but can be gruelling – so how does it work? Lorna has recorded an exclusive audio diary for Woman’s Hour to give us a peek behind the scenes. Spiritual healing is extremely popular in many countries in the Middle East and North Africa. But the practice is unregulated and that means women are vulnerable to sexual exploitation. An investigation by BBC News Arabic has uncovered allegations of widespread sexual abuse by healers in Sudan and Morocco. Clare McDonnell is joined by the BBC’s Hanan Razek and Senior Women's Rights Researcher at Human Rights Watch, Rothna Begum, to discuss.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Emma Pearce00:00 Opener 02:53 Megan Thee Stallion 10:42 Fertility Anxiety 25:54 Linda Caicedo 35:29 Lorna Rose Treen 47:53 Spiritual Healing
09/08/23·56m 46s

The case against Bill Cosby, Live music from Chloe Matharu, The world of incels, Texas abortion law

A judge in Texas has ruled that women who experience pregnancy complications are temporarily exempt from the state's abortion bans. The ruling comes after a group of thirteen women and two doctors sued the state of Texas in March of this year, calling for a clarification of the law. However, the injunction is only temporary until the lawsuit is decided - and the state of Texas has appealed the ruling. Dr Emma Long, Associate Professor in American History and Politics at the University of East Anglia, joins Clare McDonnell to explain the significance of the ruling.Author and researcher Dr Julia Ebner has spent the last two years immersed in one of the darkest corners of the internet, the world of incels. She has been pretending to be an unhappily single, unemployed, male in his late 20s who is tired of feminism. This is part of her decade-long work going undercover investigating different extremist movements and how they pose a risk to democracy. Her new book, Going Mainstream, looks at the rapid spread of extremism into our mainstream social and political discourse. Chloe Matharu is an award-winning, singer songwriter and harpist. She has cultural roots in Scotland, Wales and the Punjab, and draws inspiration from her time in the Merchant Navy and the natural world as experienced at sea. Her debut album, Small Voyages, was selected for Celtic Music Radio’s Album of the Year. At Celtic Connections she was awarded the revered Danny in February this year. She joins the programme live in the studio to talk about her music and to perform The Silkie of Sule Skerry.More than 60 women have made allegations of rape, sexual assault and sexual harassment against the US comedian and actor Bill Cosby. But only one woman, Andrea Constand, was able to gain a criminal conviction. In 2018, he was sent to prison for three to 10 years on three counts of aggravated indecent assault. At the time it was celebrated as a major win for the #MeToo movement. Less than three years later, he was freed when the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturned his conviction on a legal technicality. In a new two-part documentary exclusively for ITVX from 10 August, The Case Against Cosby, Andrea tells her story.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Kirsty Starkey00:00 Opener 02:50 Texas abortion 13:16 Julia Ebner 29:58 Chloe Matharu 38:52 Andrea Constand
08/08/23·54m 48s

Sarah De Lagarde's bionic arm, Women's World Cup update, Kim Sherwood on writing Bond

A few months ago, Sarah de Lagarde came on Woman's Hour to share her incredible story of survival. She had fallen on to the Tube tracks at a north London station and was run over by two Tube trains. She lost her right arm and leg as a result. Today, Sarah returns with a newly fitted bionic arm, made possible with the support of a crowdfunding campaign. She speaks to Hayley about her recovery journey.As England’s Lionesses face Nigeria in the knock out stages of the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup, Hayley Hasssall is joined by BBC sports reporters Mimi Fawaz and Anna Thompson to discuss all the action.MPs are warning that the use of smart technology and connected devices in facilitating domestic abuse is becoming a growing problem. The Culture, Media and Sport Committee has found that smart products in the home are being used to 'monitor, harass, coerce and control' victims. Committee Chair and Conservative MP Dame Caroline Dinenage joins Hayley.Priya Hall decided to use her experience of trying to start a family within a same-sex couple as the basis for her stand-up comedy debut at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. She speaks to Hayley about the unfairness that same-sex couples face when it comes to accessing fertility treatment.With the blessing of creator Ian Fleming’s estate, the latest literary instalment of James Bond is based in a modern world, and written by a woman. Hayley speaks to author Kim Sherwood on her experience of writing for the iconic series.
07/08/23·57m 22s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Loneliness & health, Concepts of Renaissance beauty & Rock Follies musical

All this week on Woman’s Hour we’ve been discussing the topic of loneliness as women and young people are statistically more likely to experience it. We hear from the psychiatrist Dr Farhana Mann from UCL about the impact of loneliness on our health.Jodie Ounsley is the world’s first ever deaf female rugby sevens international player, and she was part of the Woman’s Hour Power List of women in sport. She also uses TikTok to show others what it’s like to live with hearing loss. She talks about being a sportswoman, as well as one of the brand new TV Gladiators.The children’s charity NSPCC says that its Helpline received over 1,000 contacts last year about children experiencing coercive and controlling behaviour, a form of domestic abuse. The school summer holidays can be a particularly difficult time for some of these children. If you are worried about someone, what should you do? We hear from Paddi Vint, Development Manager for the NSPCC and a woman we call Margaret, who experienced coercive control in a previous relationship.Would you use fig and pine nut hand scrub? Or perhaps some tree gum anti-wrinkle cream? Just a few of the 16th century beauty recipes Professor Jill Burke has included in her new book, How to be a Renaissance Woman. Jill discusses 16th century women’s body anxieties and the men who wrote beauty tips for them.Actor and writer Georgie Grier has shared a post on social media after her opening show at the Edinburgh Fringe had just one person in the audience. She’s had replies of support and encouragement from thousands of people, including comedian Jason Manford. She tells us what it was like to perform to one person, and how she feels about the reaction she’s getting.Rock Follies was a 1970s TV series about an all-female rock band, The Little Ladies, trying to make their mark on a male-dominated music industry. A new musical adapted from the TV series is currently on in Chichester. We hear from Rula Lenska, who played Q in the original TV series, and Zizi Strallen, who has taken on the stage role.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
05/08/23·55m 15s

Netball World Cup, Comedian Georgie Grier, Can design heal loneliness?

Actor and writer Georgie Grier has shared a post on social media after her opening show at the Edinburgh Fringe had just one person in the audience. She’s had replies of support and encouragement from thousands of people, including comedian Jason Manford. She joins Anita to talk about what it was like to perform to one person, and how she feels about the reaction she’s getting.The Women’s Netball World Cup is hotting up and Anita is joined by the BBC’s Katharine Merry to look ahead to Sunday’s final. She also tells us how netball is impacting girls in the host city of Cape Town. All this week we’ve been talking about loneliness. Today we ask: Is it possible to design cities and public spaces with social connection at their heart? Anita is joined by Erin Peavey, an architect and well-being design leader at HKS and by Joanna Yarrow, a Non-Executive Director at property developer Human Nature.What do you consider before buying an item of clothing? The cost? The brand? Journalist and TikTok creator Andrea Cheong says we’ve never been taught how to shop and that breaking up with fashion is like leaving behind a bad boyfriend. Andrea joins Anita to discuss her new book Why Don’t I Have Anything to Wear? Woman’s Hour has been closely following the Women’s Football World Cup in Australia and New Zealand this year. Dr Kerry Peek has also been keeping a close eye on the action – but for different reasons. She is one of the ‘concussion spotters’, who for the first time in the women’s game have been deployed to monitor players for head injuries during matches. She joins Anita Rani to explain her research into why women footballers sustain more concussions than men.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Emma Pearce
04/08/23·57m 37s

Loneliness, Lucy Calcines, Nicole Travolta, Kids at risk

All this week on the programme we are looking at the topic of loneliness. Women are statistically more likely to be lonely and so in today's programme we will look at ways to cope with those feelings and if it's possible to reframe them. Anita is joined by Radio 4's All in the Mind presenter Claudia Hammond and author of Alonement, Francesca Specter. The comedian Nicole Travolta is taking her one-woman show Doing Alright to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. It chronicles her life as a compulsive shopper, how she freed herself from debt, shame and the weight of a famous last name, one spray tan at a time. When she is not dressed up in a wig doing impressions, she can also be found performing comedy around LA. The children’s charity NSPCC says that its Helpline received over one thousand contacts last year about children experiencing coercive and controlling behaviour, a form of domestic abuse. The school summer holidays can be a particularly difficult time for some of these children. If you are worried about someone, what should you do? Anita is joined by Paddi Vint, Development Manager for the NSPCC and a woman we call Margaret, who experienced coercive control in a previous relationship. The Cuban-Spanish singer-songwriter Lucy Calcines joins Anita to sing live, ahead of her headline performance at the UK’s largest Latin music and dance festival this weekend. She shot to fame after her appearance on the Voice TV show in 2020, when she achieved a four chair turn by superstar coaches Meghan Trainor, Sir Tom Jones, Olly Murs and will.i.am. Anita will also be joined by the festival organiser, Amaranta Wright, to talk about all things Latin.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Bob Nettles
03/08/23·54m 5s

Accusations against Lizzo, Power Lister Jodie Ounsley, Concepts of renaissance beauty, Loneliness, Rock Follies musical

The singer Lizzo, and her production company, are being sued by three former dancers. They have been accused of sexual and racial harassment, disability discrimination, false imprisonment and creating a hostile work environment. Tom Murray, Senior Culture Reporter for the Independent, tells Nuala exactly what’s in the lawsuit. Rock Follies was a 1970s TV series about an all-female rock band, The Little Ladies, trying to make their mark on a male-dominated music industry. A new musical adapted from the TV series is currently on in Chichester. Nuala is joined by Rula Lenska who played Q in the original TV series and Zizi Strallen who has taken on the stage role.Jodie Ounsley is the world’s first ever deaf female rugby sevens international player, and she was part of the Woman’s Hour Power List of women in sport. She also uses TikTok to show others what it’s like to live with hearing loss. She joins Nuala to talk about being on the Power List, as well as being one of the brand new Gladiators.All this week we’re looking at loneliness, and today we’re asking: what impact does it have on society at large? To discuss Nuala is joined by Noreena Hertz, an economist and author of The Lonely Century, where she explores how increasing isolation has consequences for our economy and our democracy. Would you use fig and pine nut hand scrub? Or perhaps some tree gum anti-wrinkle cream? Just a few of the 16th century beauty recipes Professor Jill Burke has included in her new book How to be a Renaissance Woman. Jill joins Nuala to talk about sixteenth-century women’s body anxieties and the men who wrote them beauty tips.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lottie Garton
02/08/23·55m 42s

Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen, Air pollution and pregnancy, BookTok, Loneliness and health

Frances Haugen is the former Facebook employee turned whistleblower who extracted more than 22,000 pages of documents from the company revealing its inner workings. She believes they show the company prioritising profit over the safety of its users. Frances has since campaigned for greater transparency and accountability for social media firms, giving evidence to the US Senate as well as MPs here in the UK. And she's written a book, The Power of One, about her experience. But what has prompted one woman to take on one of the biggest companies in tech? And what has been the personal cost?All this week on Woman’s Hour we are discussing the topic of loneliness as women and young people are statistically more likely to experience it. Today Nuala speaks to the psychiatrist Dr Farhana Mann from UCL about the impact of loneliness on our health.A new community has formed on TikTok where content creators share their top reading recommendations and bring plots to life. BookTokkers are mainly female, as are their followers. With the social media giant now launching its own book awards, just how influential is the BookTok community to both followers and the publishing industry? Nuala is joined by Holly McLoughlin, who posts as “the caffeinated reader” and Assistant Literary Editor for The Times Susie Goldsbrough.New research has found that almost half of black mothers living in London do not feel sufficiently educated on the impact of air pollution during pregnancy, despite 89% of respondents feeling concerned about air pollution in their local area. Nuala speaks to Dr Karen Joash is a consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist at Imperial College NHS Trust and expert adviser to Global Black Maternal Health, a platform that aims to connect and empower black maternal health movements across the world.Lucy Bronze MBE is the most capped Lioness playing in the Women’s Football World Cup this year. Her mum, Diane, recorded a special message for Woman's Hour wishing Lucy and the team good luck ahead of England’s last group stage game against China today.
01/08/23·57m 15s

Author Jane Fallon, Two mothers talk about daughters' deaths, Netball World Cup, Young women and loneliness, Nouhaila Benzina

In 2018, two new mothers died weeks apart after giving birth in two Kent hospitals from a herpes infection. Kimberley Sampson and Samantha Mulcahy both had c-sections and contracted herpes before or around the delivery of their babies. That’s according to an inquest into their deaths that has just concluded - that their mothers, Nicola Foster and Yvette Sampson, say doesn’t give enough answers as to what actually happened. Both Nicola and Yvette joins Nuala to talk about their daughters and what’s next in their fight for the truth.Morocco defender Nouhaila Benzina has made history by becoming the first player to wear a hijab at a World Cup. Nuala discusses with Shaista Aziz, co-director of the Three Hijabis, a trio of British Muslim women working to make football free of racism and discrimination.Before becoming a full-time writer, Jane Fallon was a multi-award-winning television producer behind shows such as This Life, Teachers and 20 Things to Do Before You’re 30. She has written a dozen best-selling novels including Getting Rid of Matthew and Got You Back, which is being made into a musical with music by Roxette. She joins Nuala to discuss her latest book, Over Sharing, and its themes of influencers, projecting the perfect life on social media, fake profiles, revenge and 'frenemies'.All this week on the programme we’re looking at loneliness and in particular loneliness among young women. This is because the stats tell us that young people are the age group most likely to say they are lonely – and women of any age are more likely to say they are lonely than men. Today Nuala is joined by two women who tell us about their experience of loneliness. Beth McColl is 30 and Rachael Devine is 33. The Women’s Netball World Cup is underway in Cape Town. It’s the first time the competition has been held in Africa - and will see 16 teams battling it out for a place in the final on 6 August. Broadcaster Kath Merry is in South Africa following all the action, and updates Nuala McGovern on the latest news.Presented by Nuala McGovern Producer: Louise Corley
31/07/23·57m 13s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Men and stopping sexist behaviour, Grenfell play, Date Stacking

What role should men play in stopping sexist behaviour? Several campaigns have aimed to tackle this, the most recent being the Mayor of London’s Maaate initiative. To discuss we're joined by Karen Whybro, a woman’s safety consultant and Graham Goulden, the former Chief Inspector at Police Scotland who now offers training to organisations to improve team culture.This year marks the sixth anniversary of the Grenfell Tower fire where 72 people lost their lives. A new play created from interviews conducted with a group of survivors has opened at the National Theatre. Grenfell: in the words of survivors follows the lead up to the disaster, the night of the fire, and the Grenfell Inquiry which followed, and is still ongoing. We're joined by its writer Gillian Slovo and actor Pearl Mackie.‘Date stacking’ is the latest trend being tried by single people to find love, quickly. The concept, designed to save time by squeezing in several dates in the space of a few hours, went viral on TikTok earlier this year. But can you really decide if you like someone while preparing for the next date? We discuss the pros and cons with journalist Roisin Kelly and dating strategist Johnny Cassell.Anna Sewell was the author of Black Beauty, one of the bestselling novels of all time. Despite suffering ill health throughout her life, she managed to rouse the conscience of Victorian Britain and make her mark upon the world. Dr Celia Brayfield tells us about her life and the impact of the book on animal rights.How much time would it take to photograph every single item in your home? Photographer Barbara Iweins spent four years documenting the 12,795 objects she owns. She explains the inspiration behind the project.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Sarah Crawley
29/07/23·43m 40s

Women's Football World Cup, Black Beauty, Women in the city, Italian Lifeguard

In their second game of the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup, England’s Lionesses face Denmark. Woman’s Hour will be following the game live, bringing you updates and analysis from our special guests. Baller FC was started by a group of friends who were tired of trying to find a pub to watch women’s football matches, only to find that the game wasn’t playing, or the atmosphere was unwelcoming. Their women’s football watching parties now attract crowds of fans queueing out the doors of their venues. We drop in to their Haggerston viewing party to hear the fan’s reactions to the game. Krupa is also joined by former Lioness Claire Rafferty and CEO of Lewes Football Club, Maggie Murphy at half-time to give their thoughts on the Lionesses’ performance so far. Was Dame Alison Rose held to a higher standard because she’s a woman? That’s the question being asked in an article in today’s Guardian after the NatWest chief executive resigned earlier this week. The boss of NatWest subsidiary Coutts also resigned – but the Chair of the bank says he will stay. So what’s it like being a woman in the city? Are you held to different standards than the men? Krupa hears from the economist Vicky Pryce and former corporate banker Heather Melville.Anna Sewell wrote just one book, published in 1877, which went on to become one of the bestselling novels of all time. Its full title:  Black Beauty: His Grooms and Companions. The Autobiography of a Horse Translated from the Original Equine. Despite suffering ill health throughout her life and dying just five months after the book was published, Anna Sewell managed to rouse the conscience of Victorian Britain and make her mark upon the world.  Dr Celia Brayfield, a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at Bath Spa university, has now written a book about Anna Sewell, Writing Black Beauty: Anna Sewell and the story of Animal Rights. She joins Krupa to discuss. How was your first day at work? Did you make a lasting impression? Well a 19 year old from Pontinia, Italy started her new job as a lifeguard and on her first day, she made a triple rescue, saving 5 lives...and all this before her essential equipment had arrived! Noemi Marangon joins Krupa live from Bufalara Beach to tell her story.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Director: Tim Heffer
28/07/23·57m 26s

Sinead O'Connor tribute, Singapore is scheduled to execute a woman, Scottish women artists, Date stacking, Femorabilia.

The Irish musician and activist Sinéad O Connor has died, aged 56. She was best known for her single Nothing Compares 2 U, released in 1990, which reached number one and brought her worldwide fame. She was outspoken in her social and political views, and released 10 studio albums during her career. We hear a special performance that Sinéad gave to Woman’s Hour in 2013, and Krupa speaks to the journalists Sinéad Gleeson and Una Mullally about her legacy.Singapore is due to execute a woman for the first time in almost 20 years, according to human rights advocates. Singaporean national Saridewi Djamani was sentenced to the mandatory death penalty in 2018, after she was convicted of drug trafficking. Krupa discusses with BBC Correspondent Nick Marsh.As a part of this year’s Edinburgh Festival a major exhibition called Scottish Women Artists: 250 Years of Challenging Perception opens tomorrow. It celebrates women artists and their contributions to the Scottish art scene. A series of new artworks has been created, to show in and alongside the exhibition. Krupa speaks to artist Sekai Machache and the director of Dovecot Studios Celia Joicey.‘Date stacking’ is the latest trend being tried by single people to find love, quickly. The concept, designed to save time by squeezing in several dates in the space of a few hours, went viral on TikTok earlier this year. It’s not a totally original idea, it’s a slowed down version of speed dating, which was popular in the 1990s. A new study suggests it takes us 42 minutes and 29 seconds to decide if we want to see someone again. But can you really decide if you like someone while preparing for the next date? Krupa discusses the pros and cons with journalist Roisin Kelly who has tried out stacking her dates and Johnny Cassell, dating and lifestyle Strategist. Tired of the limited options for female fans, football historian Professor Jean Williams was inspired to make her own football memorabilia out of upcycled clothes. She joins Krupa from Australia (where she’s attending her seventh Women’s World Cup) to explain women’s football’s self-made culture.Presented by Krupa Padhy Producer: Louise Corley
27/07/23·57m 11s

Men and stopping sexist behaviour, Beauty Salons close in Afghanistan, Chief Midwife

What role should men play in stopping sexist behaviour? Several campaigns have aimed to tackle this, the most recent being the Mayor of London’s Maaate initiative. To discuss Nuala is joined by Karen Whybro who is a Woman’s Safety Consultant and Graham Goulden, the former Chief Inspector at Police Scotland, and who now offers training to organisations to improve team culture. The play, Beneatha's place, currently running at the Young Vic, shows the main character Beneatha in two different periods of her life. First, in 1959, as a young black activist. Then 50 years later, as a renowned Dean of an American university. With Nuala to talk about the play is Cherrelle Skeete who plays Beneatha and Nicola Rollock, Professor of Social Policy and Race at King's College London who worked as a cultural consultant to the play.Earlier this month the Taliban ordered the closure of women’s beauty salons in Afghanistan. Faranak Amidi speaks to Shekiba Habib from BBC Pashto and Aaliya Farzan from BBC Dari about this latest restriction.The International Confederation of Midwives has appointed the world’s first ever Chief Midwife. Professor Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent joins Nuala to talk about the challenges midwives face across the world, and how she hopes to combat them. The podcast The Girlfriends follows a group of women coming together to investigate their ex-boyfriend. It begins in 1989 when a man named Bob Bierenbaum moved to Las Vegas. When a group of his ex-girlfriends discover that his wife, Gail Katz, went missing and is presumed dead, they go from dating him to investigating him. Almost 30 years later, Carole Fisher, one of the women who dated Bob, joins Nuala to discuss how she finally got justice for Gail.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Emma Pearce
26/07/23·57m 13s

Narcissistic mothers, Grenfell play, Orca whale mothers & their sons

Over the last few months we have been hearing the stories of women who believe that they were raised by mothers who have Narcissistic Personality Disorder. And, a woman who has been labelled a narcissist by her daughter. Today, two psychotherapists who have worked extensively in this field, Dr Jan McGregor Hepburn and Helen Villiers, who has an MA in working therapeutically with adult children of narcissists, join Nuala to answer some of the questions raised by the powerful testimonies heard in the series. Have you ever witnessed a mature, grown male sticking close to – and being very dependent on - his mother? These are the words used to describe new findings from on-going research on orca whales. Carried out by the Centre for Whale Research and Exeter University, it studied orcas in the coastal waters between Vancouver and Seattle, to find that older "post-menopausal" orca mothers protect their adult sons from fights. But, while these four or five-tonne males benefit from this maternal protection, female offspring do not receive the same attention. Lead Researcher from the University of Exeter, Charli Grimes, speaks to Nuala. This year marks the sixth anniversary of the Grenfell Tower fire where 72 people lost their lives. A new play created from interviews conducted with a group of survivors of the fire has opened this month at the National Theatre. Grenfell: in the words of survivors follows the lead up to the disaster, the night of the fire, and the Grenfell Inquiry which followed, and is still ongoing. The final report into the disaster is due to be published later this year. Nuala is joined by writer Gillian Slovo and actor Pearl Mackie. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucinda Montefiore Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
25/07/23·57m 10s

Post botulinum toxin experiences, Photographing all your objects, FGM

There has been a significant increase in the number of non-surgical aesthetic procedures over the past decade. And now the largest academic survey to date in the UK has just been published, relating the lived experience of over 500 people who have experienced an adverse event following administration of Botulinum Toxin. The study finds that a lack of awareness of reporting structures and the lack of regulation within the UK’s cosmetic injectables sector represents a significant public health challenge. Nuala is joined by the senior author of the study Ash Mosahebi, Professor of Plastic Surgery, and by Genee Schock who took part in the survey and runs a side effects support group for people impacted.How much time would it take to photograph every single item in your home? Photographer Barbara Iweins spent four years documenting the 12,795 objects she owns. Barbara wanted 'to see the representation – flat on the ground – of a mother and her children.' She joins Nuala.Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza is the leader of the opposition in Rwanda. She talks to Nuala about the challenges facing women and girls in Rwanda as well as the proposed UK-Rwanda asylum plan.Tributes are being paid to the former Labour MP Ann Clwyd, who has died at the age of 86. Not only Wales' longest-serving woman MP, Ann also became known as a passionate human rights campaigner, committing herself to many causes, including the banning of FGM - female genital mutilation - in the UK. In 2003 she introduced the Female Genital Mutilation Act, making it illegal to take a girl out of the UK to undergo FGM in another country. Nuala is joined by Hibo Wardere, anti-FGM activist and author of Cut.
24/07/23·50m 35s

Mina Smallman, Flexible working laws, Dr Gladys McGarey, Barbie set design and The Wizard of Oz

The law on flexible working changed this week. New rules should make it easier for employees to argue for a flexible working arrangement. It’s the culmination of years of hard work and campaigning for more family friendly workplaces. Anita speaks to the Minister for Small Business, Kevin Hollinrake, and Amy Butterworth from the flexible working consultancy Timewise.Dr Gladys McGarey, cofounder of the American Holistic Medical Association, began her medical practice at a time when women couldn't even own their own bank accounts. She’s now 102 years old and still practicing as a doctor. She started medical school just before the Second World War, married a fellow doctor, Bill and together they practised medicine and had six children. Dr Gladys joins Nuala to talk about her new book, The Well-Lived Life.The mother whose daughters were murdered, and their photographs then shared on a police WhatsApp group, speaks to Nuala from the launch of a new organisation designed to help stamp out misogyny, sexism and racism in the police. Mina Smallman has become an activist since the death of her daughters in 2020, and she wants to see change. The Irish singer-songwriter Roisin Murphy first rose to fame in the 90s as one half of the electronic pop duo Moloko. She has gone on to have a successful solo career and has a new album out soon. She joins Anita live in the studio to talk about her music and creating this latest album.As the film Barbie opens in cinemas today, Set Decorator Katie Spencer and Production Designer Sarah Greenwood discuss how they created Barbieland in a real life space, the invasion of everything pink, and how they approached the film having never played with Barbies themselves.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
22/07/23·53m 7s

Barbie, Spain's election, Rallycross driver Catie Munnings, Author and comedian Andi Osho

As the film Barbie opens in cinemas today, Set Decorator Katie Spencer and Production Designer Sarah Greenwood discuss how they created Barbieland in a real life space, the invasion of everything pink, and how they approached the film having never played with Barbies themselves.This Sunday, Spain is holding a general election, after the current Prime Minister, Pedro Sanchez, dissolved parliament in May and called for a snap election. Aitor Hernández-Morales, a reporter for Politico Europe and Professor of Gender Studies at LSE Mary Evans discuss some of the issues of concern around gender equality, women's rights, gender based violence and the rights of the LGBTQ+ community. A video showing two women being paraded naked by a mob in the state of Manipur has sparked outrage and protest throughout India. To discuss the background to this case and how women's bodies have become a battleground during conflict, Anita hears from the BBC's Geeta Pandey from Delhi.The stand-up comedian and actor Andi Osho has just written her second novel, ‘Tough Crowd’. It is the story of Abi, a wannabe-comedian, who meets Will and quickly falls in love. However the relationship is complicated because her new beau is a dad. Andi joins Anita to talk about some of the themes of her writing; blended families, grassroots comedy and the power of friendships. Rally driver Catie Munnings joins Anita to discuss taking part in the World Rallycross Championships taking place this weekend. She's also an ambassador for Girls on Track, which works to encourage girls into the motorsport industry.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
21/07/23·57m 12s

Roisin Murphy, World Cup 2023, US abortion, Flexible working

The law on flexible working changes today. This should make it easier for employees to argue for a flexible working arrangement. It’s the culmination of years of hard work and campaigning for more family friendly workplaces. Anita speaks to the Minister for Small Business, Kevin Hollinrake, and Amy Butterworth from the flexible working consultancy Timewise. An investigation by BBC Newsnight and the British Medical Journal (BMJ) has uncovered a row over controversial research about the impact of abortion on the mental health of women. An independent panel resigned from the British Journal of Psychiatry after their recommendation to withdraw the research, which is still being used in US legal cases about abortion access, was not followed. Newsnight’s Science Correspondent Kate Lamble joins Anita to discuss what has happened.The 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup kicks off today in New Zealand and Australia. It’s set to be the largest ever, both in terms of viewing figures and the number of fixtures. But the tournament starts against a backdrop of uncertainty. This morning came the news of a shooting which left two people dead in the centre of Auckland, New Zealand. And off-pitch there have been frustrations around pay and treatment of the women’s teams. Kathryn Batte, Women's Football Correspondent for the Daily Mail talks to Anita.The Irish singer-songwriter Roisin Murphy first rose to fame in the 1990s as one half of the electronic pop duo Moloko, with hits such as Sing it Back and The Time is Now. She has gone on to have a successful solo career with award-nominated albums including Hairless Toys and Róisín Machine. Her upcoming album ‘Hit Parade’ is produced in collaboration with electronic music auteur DJ Koze and is due for release in early September. She joins Anita live in the studio to talk about her music and to perform her single 'Fader' with James McCredie on guitar.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Bob Nettles and Duncant Hannant
20/07/23·52m 26s

Police Accountability, Wizard of Oz, Phubbing, World Cup song

The mother whose daughters were murdered, and their photographs then shared on a police WhatsApp group gives a keynote speech this morning at the launch of a new organisation designed to help stamp out misogyny, sexism and racism in the police. Mina Smallman has become an activist since the death of her daughters in 2020. Nuala McGovern will speak live to our reporter Melanie Abbott who will be at the launch and to Mina Smallman.Are you guilty of 'phubbing'? This means snubbing someone to look at your phone. New research into the effects on married couples has found that couples who regularly phub each other have lower marriage satisfaction. To discuss the issue Nuala is joined by Claire Cohen, author and journalist, who says she is guilty of this.Having graduated from drama school only three years ago Georgina Onuorah takes on the role of Dorothy in a new production of The Wizard of Oz currently on stage at the London Palladium. She joins Nuala in the Woman’s Hour studio to sing ‘Over the Rainbow’ live.Over 80% of legal practitioners feel that the family court, when dealing with private law cases, is likely to retraumatise victims and survivors of domestic abuse. That’s according to a survey by the Office of the Domestic Abuse Commissioner which was published in a report yesterday. Nuala is joined by Nicole Jacobs, the Domestic Abuse Commissioner to find out what the report revealed. Nuala also hears from a Woman’s Hour listener who is critical of the way that the family court works.Today a new song, Call Me A Lioness, is released to coincide with the start of the Women's World Cup. The drummer on the track, Al Greenwood from the band The Sports Team, joins Nuala in the studio. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Emma Pearce
19/07/23·54m 23s

Zoe Saldaña, Yomi Adegoke, Guardianship, Lunar module engineer

Zoe Saldaña has appeared in the top three grossing movies of all time – Avatar, Avatar: Way of Water and Avengers: Endgame. You may know her as Uhura in the Star Trek reboot films, Gamora in Guardians of the Galaxy, or as Neytiri in Avatar. Now Zoe is taking a break from sci-fi and fantasy to star in a new, Earth-based TV series called Special Ops: Lioness. It’s a spy thriller about a covert programme that trains and dispatches women around the world as undercover operatives. Zoe joined Nuala to record an interview last week, before the US actors’ strike was called. The Metropolitan Police has started using counter-terrorism tactics to hunt down the 100 worst male sexual predators targeting women. Nuala gets the reaction of former Inspector of Constabulary Zoe Billingham, who led the 2021 review of the policing response to violence against women and girls, calling for it to be treated with the same priority as terrorism. 15 countries in the Middle East and North Africa still apply laws that require women to either 'obey' their husbands or seek their permission to leave the marital home, work, or travel. That’s according to a new report from Human Rights Watch, which compares the state of male guardianship laws across the region. The report finds that, although women’s rights activists have been successful in winning some freedoms, new restrictions are still being implemented – particularly in areas of conflict such as Yemen and Syria. Rothna Begum, Senior Women's Rights Researcher, joins Nuala to explain the findings.Yomi Adegoke is the co-author of the bestselling guide, Slay in Your Lane: A Black Girl’s Bible. Now she’s stepping into the world of fiction with her debut novel, The List. Journalist Ola and her fiancé Michael are getting married in a month, but their excitement is shattered when a database of men in the world of media, and allegations of sexual harassment against them, is anonymously posted online. And Michael is on it. How will the couple navigate the fall out? Yomi joins Nuala to talk about why she wanted to write this story.For the first time in fifty years, humans will soon be returning to the moon. Sara Pastor is the project manager and Chief Engineer of the International Habitation module – the place where astronauts will live and study scientific findings in space as part of the Artemis Mission, set to happen in the next few years. Sara joins Nuala to talk about why this is such an important project for human exploration, and how women are at the centre of it.
18/07/23·57m 26s

Hope Powell, Dr Gladys McGarey, Deirdre O'Kane, suicide and young women

Nuala McGovern is joined by one woman who has had a huge impact on the women's game over many years - Hope Powell - the former Lioness head coach will discuss England's chances, the growth of the game and how to continue building a legacy for women's sport. A fifth of young women suffering a mental health crisis were asked if they were on their period, a new survey has found. Research by the prevention charity Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) also found that women’s calls for help were sometimes dismissed. We talk to Wendy Robinson, Head of Services at Suicide prevention charity, Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) Dr Gladys McGarey, cofounder of the American Holistic Medical Association, began her medical practice at a time when women couldn't even own their own bank accounts. Now a 102 and still practicing as a doctor, she was born in India in 1920. She started medical school just before the Second World War, married a fellow doctor, Bill and together they practised medicine, first in Ohio, then In Arizona. They also produced six children. Dr Gladys has now written a book, The Well-Lived Life.Deirdre O'Kane became a stand-up comic in 1996, getting to the finals of the BBC New Comedy Awards of that year. A co-founder of Comic Relief in Ireland, she also fronted her own talk shows, Deirdre O’Kane Talks Funny on RTÉ as well as a brand-new series, The Deirdre O’Kane Show on Sky Max. One of Ireland’s favourite comedians, she is also known for acting roles such as Chris O’Dowd’s Moone Boy and the biopic of philanthropist and children’s rights stalwart Christina Noble called Noble, for which she received an IFTA Award. Deirdre joins Nuala to discuss her wide-ranging career and her new stand up show Demented, which is coming to London’s Soho Theatre this week.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Gayl Gordon
17/07/23·57m 44s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Welfare Support at Sandhurst, Women Plumbers, Flying with Children

In her only broadcast interview, Louise Townsend, the mother of Olivia Perks who took her own life in 2019 whilst at Sandhurst Military Academy, speaks to Woman’s Hour. Louise discusses her view that there was a lack of welfare support from the academy towards her late daughter and what steps need to be taken to ensure it doesn’t happen again.According to the ONS, only 2.4% of plumbers are women. We speak to two female plumbers about why that figure is so low and whether they recommend the job to other women. Sovay Berriman runs the company PlumbMaid and is based in Cornwall, and Lysette Hacking, worked as a plumber f