Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

By BBC Radio 4

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Episodes

Harriet Harman, Southall Black Sisters, Author Cathy Rentzenbrink, Medium friends

A record-breaking number of women MPs have been elected following Labour's win at the general election. It's also the first time in parliamentary history that the proportion of women elected is more than 40%. Harriet Harman, the now ex-Labour MP and former Mother of the House, gives her reaction.Three women who say they were the victims of a racial attack have had the charges of assault made against them by their assailant discontinued by the CPS. Selma Taha, the executive director for advocacy group Southall Black Sisters, and Danae Thomas, two of the women, join Anita Rani to talk about what impact the charges being dropped has had, and how they’re hoping this might impact further action against racist violence against women and girls.Cathy Rentzenbrink is known for her non-fiction books – but now she’s written a second fiction novel – Ordinary Time. It tells the story of Ann, a reluctant vicar’s wife, and her grappling with ideas of marriage, duty and temptation. She joins Nuala McGovern to discuss.A recent article in the New York Times coined the phrase "medium friends" to describe “not our besties, but more than just acquaintances.” Anita talks to Dr Susan MacDougall, a social anthropologist at Oxford University, and to Shazia Mirza, a comedian and writer, about friendship levels.Women are turning to increasingly risky ways to get weight-loss drugs, like Ozempic and Wegovy, as online prescribers become more stringent about who they will give them to. Two young women tell Woman’s Hour’s Melanie Abbott about using drugs they buy on the black market, despite the potential dangers. Plus Professor Kamila Hawthorne from the Royal College of GPs talks to Nuala. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
13/07/2457m 35s

Southall Black Sisters, Audrey Powne, Dr Michael Mosley's exercise snacking

Three women who were the victims of a racial attack have had the charges of assault made against them by their assailant discontinued by the CPS. Selma Taha, the executive director for advocacy group Southall Black Sisters, and Danae Thomas, two of the women, join Anita Rani to talk about what impact the charges being dropped has had, and how they’re hoping this might impact further action against racist violence against women and girls. Saturday’s Wimbledon champion will be a first time winner in SW19. Czech player Barbora Krejcikova will face Italy’s Jasmine Paolini after they each won their semi-final – one of the semi-finals was the longest on record! Anita is joined by BBC Sport’s Karthi Gnanasegaram from the commentary box at Wimbledon. The Australian vocalist, pianist and trumpeter Audrey Powne was drawn to jazz from a young age. Her style ranges from hook-laden synth pop songs to long form cinematic soundscapes, RnB ballads and free jazz improvisations. She has recently released her debut album, From The Fire, and she joins Anita to talk about her work, the inspiration behind the album and to perform live in the studio.Radio 4 and Woman’s Hour are remembering Dr Michael Mosley’s life and work. "Exercise snacking” is one of the approaches that Dr Mosley tried out on his Radio 4 podcast Just One Thing. Marie Murphy, Director of the Physical Activity for Health Research Centre at the University of Edinburgh and Professor of Exercise and Health at Ulster University, explains how you can boost your fitness even if you don’t have much time for exercise. WOW (Women of the World) has published a new anthology, allowing young women from across the globe to pen a letter about issues most important to them. Anita speaks to two of its contributors, Mwinono Chumbu from Malawi and Olivia Mandle from Spain.Presented by Anita Rani Producer: Louise Corley
12/07/2452m 6s

The future of the two-child benefit cap, Women of Windrush opera, what is next for Kamala Harris?

The Department for Work and Pensions has just published statistics on the number of people affected by the so-called two-child benefit cap, which restricts child tax credit and universal credit to the first two children in most households. Some campaigners have called the cap the biggest driver of the rise in child poverty in the UK and are demanding the new Labour government scrap it immediately. So what is the future of the policy? Anita Rani talks to BBC political correspondent Hannah Miller, to Sara Ogilvie, Director of Policy, Rights and Advocacy at the Child Poverty Action Group and to mother of three Olympia.Women of the Windrush is an opera which portrays the stories of women who travelled to the UK from the West Indies between the 1940’s and the 1960’s. It is being re-staged as part of the Re-discover Festival from StreetWise Opera which celebrates the impact of African and Caribbean heritage on contemporary British culture. Anita is joined by Festival’s director, the soprano Opera singer Abigail Kelly and Dr. Shirley Thompson OBE composer of Women of the Windrush.Will Kamala Harris step in as a the Democratic nominee in the US elections? Anita talks to Shannon Felton Spence, Communications and Political Strategist at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center in Boston..And a recent article in the New York Times coined the phrase "medium friends" to describe “not our besties, but more than just acquaintances.” What is the significance of the mid-table friendship? Anita talks to Dr Susan MacDougall, a social anthropologist at Oxford University and to Shazia Mirza, a comedian and writer.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Laura Northedge
11/07/2453m 2s

Nusrit Mehtab, Author Cathy Rentzenbrink, Olympian Hannah Mills

Irish soldier Cathal Crotty was given a three-year suspended sentence after beating Natasha O'Brien unconscious in May 2022. Now, in the latest development, he is due to be formally discharged from the Defence Forces. Nuala hears Natasha's reaction and speaks to Diane Byrne, a spokeswoman for the Women of Honour group, to hear what impact this could have. Hannah Mills is the most successful female sailor in Olympic history, having won medals at the London, Rio and Tokyo Olympic Games. Now she’s taking part in the Sail Grand Prix, an international sailing competition. Ahead of the finals this weekend, Hannah joins Nuala to talk about the work going into making the sport more gender equitable. Nusrit Mehtab spent 30 years serving in the Metropolitan Police before resigning, citing her own mental health and a toxic culture as reasons. Now she’s written a memoir looking back on her career. Nusrit joins Nuala to talk about the more shocking revelations as well as what it was that kept her going.Cathy Rentzenbrink is known for her non-fiction books – but now she’s written a second fiction novel – Ordinary Time. It tells the story of Ann, a reluctant vicar’s wife, and her grappling with ideas of marriage, duty and temptation. Cathy joins Nuala to tell us more.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lottie Garton
10/07/2457m 26s

Review of the Nursing and Midwifery Council, Black market weight loss drugs, Composer Undine Smith Moore

Former Chief Prosecutor Nazir Afzal speaks to Nuala McGovern about his independent culture review of the Nursing and Midwifery Council, which is the independent regulator for nurses and midwifes in the UK. The report is highly critical, finding that a "dysfunctional culture" at the council has "threatened public safety and puts nurses at risk." Sir David Warren, Chair of the Council also joins them to respond to the findings of the report.Women are turning to increasingly risky ways to get weight loss drugs, like Ozempic and Wegovy, as online prescribers become more stringent about who they will give them to. Two young women tell Woman’s Hour’s Melanie Abbott about using drugs they buy on the black market, despite the potential dangers. Plus Professor Kamila Hawthorne from the Royal College of GPs explains the dangers of taking unregulated drugs.A new Radio 3 documentary looks at the life and work of 20th Century American composer Undine Smith Moore. Presenter Dr Samantha Ege tells Nuala about the woman affectionally called “The Dean of Black Women Composers”. She explains how Moore’s radical, experimental composition ‘Soweto’ helped her find her anger and heal after trauma.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Olivia Skinner
09/07/2455m 40s

Harriet Harman and election reaction, Sports Day, France Me Too

There are a record number of women MPs in the new parliament. Nuala McGovern is joined by former Mother of the House and now chair of the charity the Fawcett Society, Harriet Harman, who wants to set up a Women’s Caucus made up of female MPs. We also have political reaction from journalists Rachel Cunliffe and Caroline Wheeler.Is sports day something that teaches children invaluable life lessons, or simply an annual event that demoralises? Nuala is joined by journalist Esther Walker and comedian Helen Thorn to discuss further. The French film industry has been under the spotlight in recent months after allegations of sexual assault and harassment by women against directors and actors. Last month, the French parliament agreed to create a commission to investigate sexual and gender based violence in the industry and other cultural sectors. Some of the allegations have been put forward by the actor and director Judith Godrèche who joins Nuala on the programme to discuss the issues.Yorkshire County Cricket Club has retrospectively awarded caps to women’s players who have represented their county to recognise their commitment and their importance to the Club – spanning nearly 90 years of history. Jane Powell, President of Yorkshire County Cricket Club who captained England and played for Yorkshire for 12 years from 1980 to 1991, and also received a cap herself joins Nuala to discuss. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Emma Pearce
08/07/2457m 18s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Jonathan Meijer interviewed on fathering over 550 babies by sperm donation, Gabby Logan, Lisa Jewell

A new series was released this week on Netflix. It is called Man with 1,000 Kids, and Netflix is billing it as the true story of Jonathan Meijer, a man accused of travelling the world, deceiving women into having his babies - via sperm donation - on a mass scale. Nuala McGovern talks to Jonathan Meijer, the sperm donor, to mums Natalie and Suzanne, who had a baby conceived with Jonathan’s donor sperm, to Natalie Hill, the executive producer who pitched the original idea for these films to Netflix and to Rachel Cutting, director of compliance and information at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), the UK’s independent regulator of fertility treatment.Gabby Logan joins Krupa Padhy to talk about her new book The Midpoint Plan. She’s challenging the stereotype of middle age. With fewer insecurities, children leaving home and perhaps a bit more money in the bank, she believes we should see it as the best point in our lives. Plus, if we look after ourselves in midlife, we’ll be happier in old age.Summer is here, which means it's wedding season, and brides-to-be across the country are asking themselves the eternal question: what do I wear for the occasion? Kathryn Wheeler, who married earlier this year, decided to do something that old superstitions advice against: make her own wedding dress. In the process, she learned much more than just sewing skills. She also learned a life lesson, to embrace imperfections.It’s 25 year since the New York Times’ best-selling author Lisa Jewell published her first novel, Ralph’s Party. Since then she’s written another twenty-one novels, and more recently a number of dark psychological thrillers, including Then She Was Gone, The Family Upstairs and the award winning None of This is True. She joins Krupa Padhy to discuss her latest work – Breaking the Dark – which is a Jessica Jones Marvel crime novel, exploring the world of the private detective and former superhero. By the time she was 19, Michelle De Swarte had gone from a council estate in London to the catwalks of Manhattan. Her twenties were a swirl of parties and high end glamour but by her thirties she was broke and in need - as she once put it - of a “new personality”. Desperate to find a way out of fashion, she reinvented herself as a stand-up comedian. Michelle De Swarte joins Nuala to talk about putting some of her own experiences into a new BBC comedy, Spent.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Rebecca Myatt
06/07/2443m 40s

Lisa Jewell, Baby Babble, Bluebella rugby ad, Genre Fiction - Romance/Romantasy

It’s 25 year since the New York Times’ best-selling author Lisa Jewell published her first novel, Ralph’s Party. Since then she’s written another twenty-one novels, and more recently a number of dark psychological thrillers, including Then She Was Gone, The Family Upstairs and the award winning None of This is True. She joins Krupa Padhy to discuss her latest work – Breaking the Dark – which is a Jessica Jones Marvel crime novel, exploring the world of the private detective and former superhero. Over the summer Woman’s Hour is looking at ‘genre fiction’. Today we start the series with the ever-popular genre of romance and its new sub-genre, romantasy. Lindsey Kelk published her first romance novel I Heart New York in 2009. Her new novel Love Story is just that, as well as being an interrogation of the very concept of romantic fiction. Sarah A. Parker’s romantasy novel When the Moon Hatched went from an independently published TikTok sensation to Sunday Times bestseller. Both authors join Krupa to discuss the stigma and success of the romance genre.A video of a 19 month old baby babbling has gone viral after people noticed she had a Scouse accent. The video, which shows baby Orla chatting away to her Mum’s friend, has been viewed more than 20 million times. To explain what’s going on when babies and very young children are learning language, and how can they have an accent before they can properly speak, Krupa is joined by Professor Julian Pine, Professor of Psychology at the University of Liverpool.A recent advertising campaign for Bluebella the underwear brand, features three of the GB women's rugby team members in the brand’s lingerie, on a rugby pitch. The campaign has had a mixed response. Krupa discusses with rugby journalist, Victoria Rush, and Sarah Bellew, head of communications for Women in Sport a charity that tackles gender inequality in sport.More than 150 pages of court transcripts from a 2006 grand jury criminal investigation into Jeffrey Epstein were released to the public on Monday. A judge in Florida ordered the release of the documents which had been kept secret for nearly two decades. They included first hand testimony from teenage victims as young as 14. To discuss the significance of this Krupa speaks to Emma Long, Head of American Studies at the University of East Anglia Presented by Krupa Padhy Producer: Louise Corley
04/07/2457m 27s

Jonathan Meijer interviewed on fathering over 550 babies by sperm donation; women impressionist artists

A new series has been released this morning (3 July) on Netflix. It is called Man with 1,000 Kids, and Netflix is billing it as the true story of Jonathan Meijer, a man accused of travelling the world, deceiving women into having his babies - via sperm donation - on a mass scale. Nuala talks to Jonathan Meijer, the sperm donor, to mums Natalie and Suzanne, who had a baby conceived with Jonathan’s donor sperm, to Natalie Hill, the executive producer who pitched the original idea for these films to Netflix and to Rachel Cutting, director of compliance and information at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), the UK’s independent regulator of fertility treatment.A new report from AutoTrader has found that there's a stark gender divide when it comes to going green with your vehicle choice. Hyper-masculine marketing, highly technical jargon and anxieties around running out of charge are just some of the reasons they give on why women feel excluded from making the switch to electric vehicles. Nuala talks to Erin Baker, who is the editorial director at AutoTrader and author of the report. It’s 150 years since the first Impressionist exhibition was held in Paris in 1874. The artists involved included Monet, Renoir, Degas, Morisot, Pissarro, Sisley and Cézanne, and just one female artist was included in that first exhibition, Berthe Morisot. But women artists were involved with Impressionism, and 150 years on, the National Gallery of Ireland is holding an exhibition to put their work front and centre. The director, Caroline Campbell, joins Nuala McGovern to talk about the exhibition, Women Impressionists, and the four female pioneers who were integral to the artistic movement.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Laura Northedge
03/07/2457m 7s

Professor Dame Carol Robinson, Leader Interview: The Conservative’s Maria Caulfield for Rishi Sunak, Michelle De Swarte

British scientist Dame Carol Robinson, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford and a trailblazer in the field of mass spectrometry, will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award during this year’s European Inventor Award 2024 ceremony. She will be first ever British winner. She is receiving the award not just for her outstanding work but also for championing women in STEM. She joins Nuala McGovern to explain why she’s passionate about women in science. Woman’s Hour has already spoken to five of the seven main political parties in the run up to the general election. Today, Nuala speaks to Maria Caulfield, Minister of State for Mental Health and Women’s Health Strategy, representing the leader of the Conservative party, Rishi Sunak. Woman's Hour invited Labour's Sir Keir Starmer on to the programme as part of our series of party leader interviews ahead of the general election. Labour did not put forward a representative for this interview, so we hear from Ione Wells, BBC political correspondent, about Labour's manifesto pledges regarding women.By the time she was 19, Michelle De Swarte had gone from a council estate in London to the catwalks of Manhattan. Her twenties were a swirl of parties and high end glamour but by her thirties she was broke and in need - as she once put it - of a “new personality”. Desperate to find a way out of fashion, she reinvented herself as a stand-up comedian. Michelle De Swarte joins Nuala to talk about putting some of her own experiences into a new BBC comedy, Spent. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Olivia Skinner
02/07/2457m 23s

Leader interviews: Reform UK's Ann Widdecombe for Nigel Farage, Wimbledon

Gabby Logan joins Krupa Padhy to talk about her new book The Midpoint Plan. She’s challenging the stereotype of middle age. With fewer insecurities, children leaving home and perhaps a bit more money in the bank, she believes we should see it as the best point in our lives. Plus, if we look after ourselves in midlife, we’ll be happier in old age.Monday 1st July marks the first day of this year’s Wimbledon. Players will be donning their whites to play at the All England Club. Molly McElwee, freelance sports journalist joins us live from Wimbledon to discuss the women we should be on the lookout for and who might rise to the top over the next two weeks.Woman’s Hour has invited the leaders of all the main political parties for an interview in the run-up to the General Election. Today, in place of the Reform UK leader Nigel Farage, Krupa is joined by Ann Widdecombe, the party’s Immigration and Justice spokesperson. France's Far Right National Rally made big wins in the first round of France's snap elections. The National Rally party came first with 33 percent of the vote, with the left wing Popular Front alliance on 28% and President's Emmanuel Macron's centrist alliance suffering the largest losses and coming third with just over 20 percent of the vote. In the past, supporters for National Rally have predominately been men but now French women are said to be bucking the trend and supporting the National Rally. Marta Lorimer, lecturer in politics at Cardiff University explains what these results mean.Summer is here, which means it's wedding season, and brides-to-be across the country are asking themselves the eternal question: what do I wear for the occasion? Kathryn Wheeler, who married earlier this year, decided to do something that old superstitions advice against: make her own wedding dress. In the process, she learned much more than just sewing skills. She also learned a life lesson - to embrace imperfections. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Kirsty Starkey
01/07/2457m 3s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Cyndi Lauper, Accusations of assault in tennis, Sofie Gråbøl, Helen Heckety, Demetrescence, Corinne Baile

Girls Just Want to Have Fundamental Rights' has become a popular placard at women's rights events around the world. The singer behind the anthem that inspired it is none other than Cyndi Lauper. She joins Anita Rani to reflect on her 40-year career, becoming a feminist figure and performing on the iconic Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury.Wimbledon starts next week and amongst the usual pre-match discussions about favourites and performances, there’s also been a serious conversation about how top-level tennis handles allegations of domestic abuse. Clare McDonnell is joined by the host of the Tennis podcast, Catherine Whitaker to discuss recent cases.Danish actress Sofie Gråbøl is best known to British viewers for her role as Sarah Lund in Scandi Noir crime drama The Killing. Now she’s returning to our cinema screens in a new film, Rose. Sophie plays Inger, a woman with serious mental health challenges, who takes a bus trip to Paris with her sister, Ellen. She discusses how she researched the character of Inger, by talking to the real woman that she is based on.Novelist Helen Heckety joins Nuala to talk about her debut work, Alter Ego. It’s about a young woman who decides to leave her old life behind and move to a new place where no one knows she is disabled. Helen, who has a physical disability that can sometimes be invisible, was compelled to write about a disabled character she had never seen represented in literature.The term ‘matrescence’ has been around since the 70s, but it’s only recently becoming more commonly known as a concept. It describes the process of becoming a new mother, and the emotional and physical changes you go through after the birth of your child. But then how should we talk about the experience of matrescence when your kids are teenagers, you’re in mid-life and you start the menopause? The parenting expert and childcare author Sarah Ockwell-Smith has a name for that – inspired by a Greek goddess, she calls it ‘demetrescence' and she explains all to Nuala McGovern.Corinne Bailey Rae's latest album is a complete departure from her previous work. Black Rainbows is inspired by a trip to Stony Island Arts Bank, a Chicago-based archive of black art and culture. The record spans punk, rock, experimental jazz, electronica and more. She joins Anita for a very special performance live from the Woman's Hour Glastonbury picnic table.Presenter: Claire McDonnell Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Rebecca Myatt
29/06/2448m 48s

Live from Glastonbury: Cyndi Lauper, Corinne Bailey Rae & DJ Ritu

'Girls Just Want to Have Fundamental Rights' has become a popular placard at women's rights events around the world. The singer behind the anthem that inspired it is none other than Cyndi Lauper. She joins Anita Rani to reflect on her 40-year career, becoming a feminist figure and performing on the iconic Pyramid Stage. Corinne Bailey Rae's latest album is a complete departure from her previous work. Black Rainbows is inspired by a trip to Stony Island Arts Bank, a Chicago-based archive of black art and culture. The record spans punk, rock, experimental jazz, electronica and more. She joins Anita for a very special performance live from the Woman's Hour Glastonbury picnic table. Would you ever go to a festival on your own? Woman's Hour listeners give their tips for how to do a festival solo. Glastonbury is the biggest festival in the UK, hosting around 200,000 people over five days. It’s a massive operation that involves security, transport, food, water, and electricity-supply infrastructure and 11,000 people are there as staff and volunteers. So who are some of the women working hard behind the scenes to make it all possible? Two of them join Anita live: Jade Dunbar is the stage manager at Circus Big Top, and Martina Brown owns Jerk Village, a stall serving Jamaican food.This year Glastonbury hosts its first ever dedicated South Asian space, Arrivals. It’s been created, designed and built by a South Asian team and is a collaboration between South Asian collectives. Anita talks to revered icon of the 90s underground scene DJ Ritu and to up and coming star DJ Nadi who are both performing at Arrivals.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Emma Pearce
28/06/2452m 39s

Adult orphans, Accusations of assault in tennis, Leader interview: John Swinney

In the next of the Woman’s Hour interviews with the leaders of the main political parties in the run-up to the General Election, Clare McDonnell speaks to John Swinney, Scotland’s First Minister and leader of the Scottish Nationalist Party. What does it mean to be an adult orphan? Does the term still apply if you lose both parents when you’re no longer a child? Playwright Naomi Westerman was writing about death rituals when she lost her whole family, turning the academic into the deeply personal. Naomi talks to Clare about her experiences and is joined by Flora Baker, the author of The Adult Orphan Club.Wimbledon starts next week and amongst the usual pre-match discussions about favourites and performances, there’s also been a serious conversation about how top-level tennis handles allegations of domestic abuse. Clare is joined by the host of the Tennis podcast, Catherine Whitaker to discuss recent cases. Marine biologist Christine Figgener went viral after sharing a video of a turtle with a plastic straw lodged in its nose, bolstering the campaign to get rid of plastic straws altogether. She joins Clare to discuss her new book about her efforts to protect sea creatures, My Life With Turtles. Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Olivia Skinner
27/06/2457m 18s

Sofie Gråbøl, Christine Jardine, Women and Equalities spokesperson for the Liberal Democrats, Grace Campbell on abortion

Woman’s Hour has invited the leaders of all the main political parties for an interview in the run-up to the General Election. Today, in place of the Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey, Nuala McGovern is joined by Christine Jardine, the party’s Women and Equalities spokesperson.Danish actress Sofie Gråbøl is best known to British viewers for her role as Sarah Lund in Scandi Noir crime drama The Killing. Now she’s returning to our cinema screens in a new film, Rose. Sophie plays Inger, a woman with serious mental health challenges, who takes a bus trip to Paris with her sister, Ellen. She discusses how she researched the character of Inger, by talking to the real woman that she is based on. At the start of the month, comedian Grace Campbell wrote candidly about her mental health struggles after having an abortion and the response to her piece has been overwhelming. She speaks to Nuala about her experience, being pro-choice and how she’s sharing this as part of her stand-up. Last weekend protests were held in four cities in the Republic of Ireland calling for justice after a serving soldier was given a suspended sentence for an attack on a woman which left her unconscious and with a broken nose. The Irish Defence Forces have confirmed that a review has been launched. Yesterday the protests continued outside the Dail, the Irish Assembly and Natasha was given a standing ovation inside as she watched from the public gallery. Presented by Nuala McGovern Producer: Louise Corley
26/06/2457m 16s

Women voting in Northern Ireland, playwright and actor Faith Omole, Sarah Ockwell Smith on ‘demetrescence’

With just over a week to go until the UK heads to the polls for the general election, what’s the situation for women voters in Northern Ireland? BBC Northern Ireland political correspondent Jayne McCormack joins Nuala McGovern to discuss what political candidates there are offering women.Days ahead of a UN summit on Afghanistan, which is set to exclude Afghan women, reports are surfacing from teenage girls and young women arrested by the Taliban for wearing 'bad hijab' that they have been subjected to sexual violence and assault in detention. Zarghuna Kargar joins Nuala.The term ‘matrescence’ has been around since the 70s, but it’s only recently becoming more commonly known as a concept. It describes the process of becoming a new mother, and the emotional and physical changes you go through after the birth of your child. But then how should we talk about the experience of matrescence when your kids are teenagers, you’re in mid-life and you start the menopause? The parenting expert and childcare author Sarah Ockwell-Smith has a name for that – inspired by a Greek goddess, she calls it ‘demetrescence' and she explains all to Nuala.Faith Omole is best known as an actress but now she’s well on the way to be know at least as well for her writing too. Last week her first performed play, My Father’s Fable, premiered at Bush Theatre in London. It tells a gripping story of grief, belonging, and a family on the edge. And in a BBC first, Radio 3’s Georgia Mann will be at Glastonbury this year. She is opening the Crow’s Nest stage on Friday, spinning classical tunes in a DJ set. She joins Nuala McGovern to discuss how she has selected the music for her set and how prepared she is for camping.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Laura Northedge
25/06/2455m 48s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Rachel Stevens, Woman's Hour Election Debate, Jill Halfpenny, Interracial Marriage in the US

Rachel Stevens was one of the founding members of S Club 7, the pop band that took the world by storm in the early 2000s. She joins Anita to talk about her memoir Finding my Voice: A story of strength, belief and S Club, which covers her time in the hit-making band, her solo career and what it's been like being in the public eye.In a special extended 90 minute programme, Nuala McGovern hosted the Woman's Hour Election Debate. Senior women from the main political parties of Great Britain outlined their priorities for women and answered your questions.Taking part were: Scottish National Party spokesperson for Consular Affairs and International Engagement Hannah Bardell; Reform UK candidate Maria Bowtell; Green Party spokesperson for Housing and Communities Ellie Chowns; Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats Daisy Cooper; Conservative Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work Mims Davies; Labour's Shadow Minister for Industry and Decarbonisation Sarah Jones and Plaid Cymru’s Westminster Leader Liz Saville Roberts.Actor Jill Halfpenny has starred in popular TV series such as Byker Grove, Coronation Street, EastEnders and The Cuckoo. She won an Olivier Award for her role in the musical Legally Blonde and she won the second series of BBC 1's Strictly Come Dancing. But, two tragic events have framed Jill’s life story; when she was four years old her dad died suddenly of a heart attack. Then in 2017, in similarly tragic circumstances, her partner Matt died. Jill talks to Clare about confronting her grief head-on, something she examines in her new book, A Life Reimagined.For over a century, many Americans believed that interracial marriage was illegitimate and until the late 1960s, the American legal system supported that belief. Wedding Band: A Love/Hate Story in Black and White is a play written in the 1960s that explores the impact of these laws. Anita is joined by Monique Touko, the director of a new production of the play, and American historian Dr Leni Sorensen who had a black father and white mother in 1940s California.Can you ever really be just best friends with the love of your life? Laura Dockrill talks to Nuala about the thrills and awful heartache of first love, the inspiration for her first adult novel, ‘I love you, I love you, I love you.’Presenter Clare McDonnell Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Louise Corley
24/06/2456m 22s

Helen Heckety, Taylor Swift’s UK tour, Football and domestic abuse

Novelist Helen Heckety joins Nuala to talk about her debut work, Alter Ego. It’s about a young woman who decides to leave her old life behind and move to a new place where no one knows she is disabled. Helen, who has a physical disability that can sometimes be invisible, was compelled to write about a disabled character she had never seen represented in literature.According to The Times, Labour – if elected – would make it easier for people to legally transition by removing the need for them to prove they have lived as their preferred gender for two years. They will instead be given a two-year cooling off period after applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate. The Labour Party say there is nothing new in their policy on this. Nuala is joined by Geri Scott senior political correspondent at the Times to discuss. This weekend marked the final dates of Taylor Swift’s Eras tour in the UK - until she returns again in August. The show has been described as a ‘masterpiece’ and ‘seven shades of incredible.’ Journalists Polly Vernon and Anna Willis were lucky enough to attend, and they join Nuala to go over their highlights. Have you been enjoying Euro 2024? While many fans are cheering on their teams, there are some who dread these major sporting tournaments. Research by Lancaster University found that cases of abuse increased by 38% when England lost a football match and by 26% when they won or drew. The BBC’s Daniel Sandford, has been out with Sussex Police, who have been supporting potential victims. He joins Nuala along with Nik Peasgood, Chief Executive of Leeds Women’s AidToday marks the start of World Female Ranger Week, an initiative set up by adventurer and conservationist Holly Budge. It is estimated that only 11% of rangers across the world are female. These women do an important but dangerous job, protecting wildlife from poachers. Holly is also the founder of How Many Elephants, an anti-poaching conservation charity. She joins Nuala to talk on how her adventures led to becoming an advocate for female rangers and animal conservation.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Maryam Maruf Studio Manager: Donald McDonald
24/06/2456m 55s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Paloma Faith, right wing women leaders in the EU, Emma Caldwell case, Chaka Khan

Paloma Faith is an award-winning singer, songwriter and actor. She has released six albums, including her most recent The Glorification of Sadness, received a BRIT Award, been a judge on The Voice UK as well as an actor in films such as St Trinian’s and TV’s series Pennyworth. She is also the mother of two daughters. She joins Clare to discuss her book – MILF - in which she delves into the issues that face women today from puberty and sexual awakenings, to battling through the expectations of patriarchy and the Supermum myth.Far-right parties across Europe made significant gains in the European elections, and women have been at the forefront of this right-wing shift in several countries. Right-wing groups which include those led by Italian prime minister Giorgia Meloni, France’s Marine Le Pen and Germany’s Alice Weidel are set to gain further seats in European parliament. To hear about the female leaders of Europe’s far-right and what this shift could mean for women, Anita is joined by the host of EU Confidential Politico's Sarah Wheaton and Shona Murray, Europe correspondent for Euronews.Nearly 300 rapes and sexual assaults reported by sex workers during the Emma Caldwell murder investigation were not dealt with by police at the time, the BBC has learned. 276 reports of sex crimes made by sex workers working in Glasgow during the murder inquiry were filed away and not acted upon. Investigate journalist Sam Poling, whose work was pivotal in bringing Emma Caldwell’s killer, Iain Packer, to justice in February of this year, joins Clare McDonnell to discuss, along with former Detective Sergeant Willie Mason.The American singer-songwriter, Chaka Khan, known as the Queen of Funk, is celebrating her 50th anniversary in music this year. With hits such as Ain't Nobody, I Feel for You and the anthem I'm Every Woman her music has sold an estimated 70 million records, winning her 10 Grammy Awards. She is curating Meltdown 2024 at the Royal Festival Hall, and opens the festival tomorrow night. She shares her plans and discusses her favourite songs.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Rebecca Myatt
22/06/2442m 57s

Stealthing conviction, Jill Halfpenny, Henry VIII's Queens

Stealthing is the crime of removing a condom during sex without consent and is a form of rape. Clare McDonnell discusses why this is an under-reported crime with Metropolitan Police Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Local Policing, Helen Millichap, who leads the Met’s focus on violence against women and girls, and Gemma Lindfield, Barrister at Five St Andrew's Hill Chambers.Actor Jill Halfpenny has starred in popular TV series such as Byker Grove, Coronation Street, EastEnders and The Cuckoo. She won an Olivier Award for her role in the musical Legally Blonde and she won the second series of BBC 1's Strictly Come Dancing. But, two tragic events have framed Jill’s life story; when she was four years old her dad died suddenly of a heart attack. Then in 2017, in similarly tragic circumstances, her partner Matt died. Jill talks to Clare about confronting her grief head-on, something she examines in her new book, A Life Reimagined.Experts from across the world from a broad range of academic disciplines including psychology, medicine, policy studies, law and humanities are coming together with an aim to research an area which some say is underfunded and poorly understood. 4M Conference 2024 organiser, Professor Gemma Sharp, from the University of Exeter's School of Psychology, joins Clare to talk about her vision.The wives of Henry VIII are often reduced to the simplistic rhyme, ‘Divorced, Beheaded, Died. Divorced, Beheaded, Survived’. But a new exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, Six Lives: The Stories of Henry VIII’s Queens, seeks to focus on the stories and identities of these six individual women – rather than their infamous husband – and their transformation into popular icons. Clare is joined by curator Charlotte Bolland.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Bob Nettles
21/06/2456m 46s

Rachel Stevens of S Club, The motherhood penalty, Interracial marriage in the United States, Sexual assault during therapy

Rachel Stevens was one of the founding members of S Club 7, the pop band that took the world by storm in the early 2000s. She joins Anita to talk about her memoir Finding my voice: A story of strength, belief and S Club, which covers her time in the hit-making band, her solo career and what it's been like being in the public eye.Anita is joined by Ella Janneh who has won a civil case against her former therapist, over claims he raped her during a therapy session at his clinic in London. She has been awarded more than £200,000 in damages. A day after the incident in 2016, she went to the Metropolitan Police, but the case was dropped two years later. Ella explains why she decided to pursue a civil case and how she’s been affected. Two new studies from Scandinavia suggest that having children doesn’t harm women’s pay, at least not in the long run. Christian Odendahl, the European economics editor at The Economist, talks Anita through the findings of the new research into the “motherhood penalty.”For over a century, many Americans believed that interracial marriage was illegitimate and until the late 1960s, the American legal system supported that belief. Wedding Band: A Love/Hate Story in Black and White is a play written in the 1960s that explores the impact of these laws. Anita is joined by Monique Touko, the director of a new production of the play, and American historian Dr Leni Sorensen who had a black father and white mother in 1940s California.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Olivia Skinner
20/06/2457m 31s

Laura Dockrill, female surgical teams, Chinese #MeToo

A survey published today by Women in Football shows that 88% of women working in the industry believe they have to work harder than men to achieve the same recognition and benefits - the research also found that 74% of men agree with them. It also found that 89% of women working in the game have experienced discrimination in the workplace. Nuala speaks to Yvonne Harrison, Chief Executive Officer Women in Football.Can you ever really be just best friends with the love of your life? Laura Dockrill talks to Nuala about the thrills and awful heartache of first love, the inspiration for her first adult novel, ‘I love you, I love you, I love you.’Having more women on surgical teams is associated with fewer complications for patients and a lower rate of morbidity after 90 days, a major study from Canada has found. The lead author of the study Dr Julie Hallet explains the findings and Nuala is joined by Ms Tamzin Cuming, consultant colorectal surgeon and Chair of the Royal College of Surgeons of England's Women in Surgery Forum. . On Friday a prominent activist in China’s #MeToo movement, Sophia Huang, was sentenced to five years in prison for "subversion against the state”. As a journalist, Sophia reported ground-breaking stories about sexual abuse victims and gender discrimination. Journalists Jessie Lau and Lijia Zhang join Nuala live in the studio to bring us up to date with the latest in her case and discuss the wider experience of women in China.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Laura Northedge
19/06/2457m 37s

Woman's Hour Election Debate

In a special extended 90 minute programme, Nuala McGovern hosts the Woman's Hour Election Debate. Senior women from the main political parties of Great Britain outline their priorities for women and answer your questions. Taking part are: Scottish National Party spokesperson for Consular Affairs and International Engagement Hannah Bardell; Reform UK candidate Maria Bowtell; Green Party spokesperson for Housing and Communities Ellie Chowns; Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats Daisy Cooper; Conservative Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work Mims Davies; Labour's Shadow Minister for Industry and Decarbonisation Sarah Jones and Plaid Cymru’s Westminster Leader Liz Saville Roberts.
18/06/241h 29m

‘Sextortion diary’, dealing with a terminal diagnosis, Judy Garland impersonator

Last week, listener Charlotte got in touch with the programme to share her story. She was diagnosed with terminal cancer in April and was told she might only have months to live. She talks to Nuala about staying optimistic, juggling the admin of an illness with childcare, and the impact it’s having on her family. Adrienne Betteley, Strategic Advisor for End of Life Care at Macmillan Cancer Support, discusses dealing with a terminal diagnosis, how best to tell your children, and the support that's available.Tinessa Kaur has become the first Sikh woman to win the prestigious Young Pro-Bono Barrister of the Year award 2024 .She dedicates around 30 hours a week to her pro bono work in underrepresented communities. Her journey to the Bar hasn’t been easy, At just 17, while pursuing her A levels, she faced homelessness in Leicester where she lived. Now 32, the pupil barrister is hoping to inspire others from underrepresented backgrounds to pursue a career in the profession.Debbie Wileman is the British singing sensation who captured world-wide attention during the pandemic when her uncanny impersonations of Judy Garland went viral. She’s since performed at Carnegie Hall and now she'll be making her West End debut as Judy – while still doing day job at an optician’s.Producer: Maryam Maruf Studio Managers: Emma Harth and Duncan Hannant
17/06/2452m 25s

Elite rower Helen Glover, Leader Interview: Carla Denyer, Les Amazones d'Afrique, Ozempic

Earlier this month, the British Olympic Association announced the 42 athletes selected to represent Team GB in rowing at 2024 Olympic Games in Paris. Among them is the two-time Olympic gold medallist Helen Glover competing at this level for the 4th time as part of the Women’s four. In 2015 Helen was ranked the top female rower in the world and went on to become the first mother to row for Team GB in 2021. Now having had three children she has her sights set on the podium once more - joining the ranks of other athletes who've achieved sporting success after having a family - cyclist Dame Laura Kenny, sprinter Shelly Ann Fraser Pryce, and tennis players Elina Svitolina and Serena Williams. Helen joins Anita Rani.In the next of the Woman’s Hour interviews with the leaders of the main political parties in the run-up to the General Election, Anita speaks to Carla Denyer, co-leader of the Green Party of England and Wales. Weight loss drugs are now easily available on line with dozens of pharmacies including Boots and Superdrug offering them. For women weight loss is a multi-million pound industry with so many of us concerned about the numbers on the scales. Ozempic and other drugs involving semaglutide are available on the NHS - only for patients who are severely obese or who have type 2 diabetes. But this morning there are newspaper reports stating that some healthy weight young women, who don't have these conditions, are buying Ozempic to get ‘beach body ready’ and ending up in A&E. Doctors report seeing increasing numbers of people of a healthy size using weight-loss injections — with life-threatening consequences. Dr Vicky Price is a consultant in acute medicine and president-elect of the Society for Acute Medicine.Meltdown festival opens at the Southbank Centre in London on Friday. Anita Rani hears from one the acts selected by the legendary American singer/songwriter Chaka Khan. It's the pan-African, all female super group Les Amazones d'Afrique, who shot to global fame in 2017, when President Obama included one of their songs among his 20 favourite tracks of the year. They were formed in Mali in 2014, with the goal of campaigning for gender equality and eradicating ancestral violence. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Editor: Karen Dalziel
14/06/2452m 52s

Graves of stillborn babies, Chaka Khan, Climate seniors, Right wing women leaders in the EU

Up until the 1980s, stillborn babies were swiftly taken from their mothers who weren’t always told what had happened to them. Now one of those mothers is calling for an apology after finding the grave of her stillborn son more than five decades after he was born. Gina Jacobs talks to Anita about how she found where her son Robert had been buried and how she’s working to help other women do the same. In April the European Court of Human Rights passed a landmark ruling saying that Switzerland was violating the human rights of its citizens by inadequate action on climate change. The case was launched by a group of Swiss women over 65 called "climate seniors", calling for better protection of women's health from the effects of climate change. But yesterday, the Swiss parliament voted to reject the ruling, saying that it already has an effective climate change strategy. Elisabeth Stern, one of the climate seniors, joins Anita to share her reactions to the news. The American singer-songwriter, Chaka Khan, known as the Queen of Funk, is celebrating her 50th anniversary in music this year. With hits such as Ain't Nobody, I Feel for You and the anthem I'm Every Woman her music has sold an estimated 70 million records, winning her 10 Grammy Awards. She is curating Meltdown 2024 at the Royal Festival Hall, and opens the festival tomorrow night. She shares her plans and discusses her favourite songs.Far-right parties across Europe made significant gains in the European elections, and women have been at the forefront of this right-wing shift in several countries. Right-wing groups which include those led by Italian prime minister Giorgia Meloni, France’s Marine Le Pen and Germany’s Alice Weidel are set to gain further seats in European parliament. To hear about the female leaders of Europe’s far-right and what this shift could mean for women, Anita is joined by the host of EU Confidential Politico's Sarah Wheaton and Shona Murray, Europe correspondent for Euronews.A new report has found that women artists made up just 2% of the most-played songs on Irish radio in the past year. To find out why women aren’t getting more airplay in Ireland, Anita is joined by Linda Coogan Byrne, the founder of Why Not Her? which champions gender diversity in the Irish culture sector. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Olivia Skinner
13/06/2454m 25s

Paloma Faith, Leader interview: Rhun Ap Iorwerth, Parents with learning difficulties

Paloma Faith is an award-winning singer, songwriter and actor. She has released six albums, including her most recent The Glorification of Sadness, received a BRIT Award, been a judge on The Voice UK as well as an actor in films such as St Trinian’s and TV’s series Pennyworth. She is also the mother of two daughters. She joins Clare to discuss her book – MILF - in which she delves into the issues that face women today from puberty and sexual awakenings, to battling through the expectations of patriarchy and the Supermum myth.In the first of our Woman’s Hour interviews with the leaders of the main political parties in the run-up to the General Election, Clare McDonnell is joined by Rhun ap Iorwerth, who leads Plaid Cymru, or the Party of Wales.A new study in England says that a third of cases where newborns are at risk of being taken into care involve parents who have learning disabilities or learning difficulties. The research – which was commissioned by the Nuffield Family Justice Observatory – also finds that in over 80% of these cases, the parents’ learning disabilities or difficulties had not been identified until their cases reached court. Clare is joined by the report author Katy Burch, child protection lawyer Reagan Persaud and she also hears from a parent whose children were recently taken into care. And following golfer Rory McIlroy's announcement that he and his wife Erica have "resolved their differences" and dismissed the divorce petition he filed for last month, we ask what keeps some couples returning time and again to particular relationships. Clare talks to behavourial psychologist & relationship coach Jo Hemmings.Presented by Clare McDonnell Producer: Laura Northedge
12/06/2457m 5s

Naomi Klein, Thornaby FC, folk singer-songwriter Aoife O’Donovan, author Lucy Foley

Thornaby Football Club’s committee is facing criticism after they announced that the Teeside-based club would be dropping all of its women’s section. First team manager Abbey Lyle tells Clare McDonnell what this means for the women and girls in the club, the support they’ve received since, and what it says about grassroots women’s sport. Clare also discusses the issues with Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, former Paralympian and Chair of Sport Wales and the CEO of Women in Sport, Stephanie Hilborne.Clare talks to the Canadian writer and social activist Naomi Klein about her book Doppelganger, now out in the UK in paperback. The book is a result of her being mistaken for another Naomi – Wolf, for years. Naomi Klein uses her doppelganger as a metaphor to explain many of the issues facing the modern world, from climate change and politics, to obsession with wellness and the ways we parent our children. British writer Lucy Foley began her career writing historical fiction before making an extremely successful switch to crime and thrillers, and with New York Times bestsellers The Paris Apartment and The Guest List under her belt, Lucy has sold more than five and half million books. She joins Clare to discuss her latest novel, The Midnight Feast, which takes place during the opening of a luxury wellness retreat and explores the clash between the insta-ready super-rich and some very disgruntled locals.Grammy-award winning American folk singer/songwriter Aoife O’Donovan has released three critically-acclaimed solo albums, is co-founder and front woman of the string band, Crooked Still, and is also one third of the all-female group I’m With Her. Her latest album, All My Friends, is inspired by the passage of the 19th amendment and the evolving landscape of women’s rights in America over the past century. She joins Clare to discuss the themes and to perform live in the studio.Presented by Clare McDonnell Producer: Louise Corley
11/06/2453m 14s

Isabella Tree, Emma Caldwell case, Baroness Delyth Morgan

Nearly 300 rapes and sexual assaults reported by sex workers during the Emma Caldwell murder investigation were not dealt with by police at the time, the BBC has learned. 276 reports of sex crimes made by sex workers working in Glasgow during the murder inquiry were filed away and not acted upon. Investigate journalist Sam Poling, whose work was pivotal in bringing Emma Caldwell’s killer, Iain Packer, to justice in February of this year, joins Clare McDonnell to discuss, along with former Detective Sergeant Willie Mason. Baroness Delyth Morgan, the chief executive of Breast Cancer Now, the largest breast cancer charity, is stepping down after 23 years. She joined Breakthrough Breast Cancer in 1995, where she led fundraising efforts that resulted in the opening of the UK's first dedicated breast cancer research facility in 1999. The crossbench peer, who sits in the House of Lords, joins Clare McDonnell to reflect on her tenure as well as the treatment and outlook for breast cancer. Conservationist Isabella Tree tells Clare about turning her failing farmland estate into one of Europe's most significant rewilding experiments. Her bestselling book about the Knepp Estate project has now been made into a film. Later this week, Wilding is released in cinemas. Virginie Viard, the creative director at Chanel, has announced her resignation from the fashion house. Only three people have held this prestigious position in the brand’s 114-year history: Viard, Karl Lagerfeld, and Coco Chanel. Who is in the frame for this esteemed role? And what will be the impact of a change in creative vision at Chanel on the fashion industry at large? Clare talks to Justine Picardie, writer and biographer of Coco Chanel, and Victoria Moss, fashion director at the Evening Standard. Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Dianne McGregor
10/06/2457m 1s

Plus ones, Swifties, Scotland rape rule, Long-lost siblings

Scotland's most senior law officer has asked nine of the country's judges to overturn an 87-year-old rule on evidence in cases involving rape and other sexual offences. Since she became Lord Advocate in 2021, Dorothy Bain KC has often spoken of her desire to improve the criminal justice system for victims, particularly women and girls. She is now seeking radical changes which would allow more rape cases to reach court. Anita Rani talks to David Cowan, BBC Scotland's home affairs correspondent.A group of state secondary schools in Southwark, south London, has decided to act as a collective and shift their pupils away from smartphones. Children's use of smartphones, particularly in schools, continues to be a hot topic issue, and many schools have decided to create new policies to try and tackle what they call the damaging effects of smartphone use. One of those schools is Ark Walworth Academy in Southwark, and their headteacher, Jessica West, joins Anita to talk about the plans.This evening, Taylor Swift will take to the stage at Murrayfield in Edinburgh for the first part of her UK tour. It is the first of 17 UK dates, which will finish in a record-breaking eight-night run at London's Wembley Stadium. By then, she will have played to almost 1.2 million UK fans. Her international Eras tour is expected to make more than $2 billion (£1.5 billion) by the time she performs her final show in Canada this December. Jolene Campbell, reporter at The Daily Record, talks to Anita about the Swifties who have descended on the city.As a newborn baby in 1968, Helen Ward had been wrapped up warmly in a tartan bag and abandoned in a phone box in Ireland. She would spend years searching for her biological mother, but what she found instead were two full siblings who had also been abandoned as babies. Helen talks to Anita about the story she's spent a lifetime unravelling.As we enter wedding season, some listeners will be spending every weekend for the rest of summer at either a hen do or a wedding. But what is the etiquette when it comes to plus ones? Anita talks to Liz Wyse, Etiquette Adviser for Debrett's and journalist Rebecca Reid.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Tim Heffer
07/06/2456m 48s

Bat for Lashes, Women and D-Day, Author Saima Mir, Sextortion

The singer-songwriter Natasha Khan, known by her stage name Bat for Lashes, joins Anita to talk about her new album, The Dream of Delphi. Named after her daughter Delphi, her new music explores motherhood through lush orchestral sounds. She discusses having a baby during the Covid lockdown and how the experience informed her song-writing. Vengeance is award-winning journalist and writer Saima Mir’s second novel, and the sequel to her crime thriller debut The Khan. The book continues the story of Jia Khan as she’s fighting to keep her position at the head of a crime syndicate her father created, and as the mysterious corpses of men begin to appear around the city. Saima joins Anita in the studio to discuss writing a British Asian crime family, creating the characters she wants to read, and why sisterhood is at the heart of her new novel.The mother of a 16 year-old-boy who ended his life after becoming the victim of a sextortion gang says the tech giant Meta has taken too long to hand over data which might help the investigation into his death. Joe Tidy, the BBC’s first Cyber Correspondent, explains how he’s been investigating Sextortion – a type of online blackmail which involves threatening to share intimate pictures of the victim. Today marks the 80th anniversary of D-Day, when thousands of Allied troops landed on beaches across Normandy, marking the start of the campaign to liberate Nazi-occupied northern Europe. What’s often forgotten is the important role that women played in organising this huge military project and making the D-Day happen. Anita Rani speaks to historian, teacher and writer Shalina Patel, who has told some of these women’s stories in her book The History Lessons, which celebrates stories and people beyond the usual narratives.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Olivia Skinner
06/06/2456m 49s

Tina Fey, Ireland's first 'witch', does young farmer culture have a problem with women?

Tina Fey, a colossus of the comedy world for more than two decades, is also the creative force behind Mean Girls. The original movie in 2004, starring Lindsay Lohan and Rachel McAdams, spawned a Broadway musical in 2018, and many of the songs were featured in this year’s modern movie remake. Tina is now bringing an updated stage version of Mean Girls The Musical to London, opening at the Savoy Theatre this week. She joins Nuala. The youth organisation Young Farmers has been accused of having a problem with how they treat women in the farming community. Young Farmers has more than 23,000 members aged 10-28 and aims to support young people in agriculture and the countryside as well as offering a range of social events for young people. And its at some of these events where journalist Abi Kay has found that incidents of sexual assault and harassment are ‘commonplace’. Abi joins Nuala to discuss.Alice Kyteler was born in 1263 and achieved enormous commercial success and wealth before becoming the first woman to be tried as a witch in Ireland. She is also the protagonist of the novel Bright I Burn which tells the story of an extraordinary woman who courted controversy and paid the price for her vast wealth and frequent marriages. Nuala is joined by the author Molly Aitken.On Monday, candidate registration for Iran’s upcoming snap elections closed and 80 people have signed up for the chance to become the country’s next President. Four of them are women. In the 45 year history of the Islamic Republic, no woman has been allowed to stand for the top office – even though plenty have tried. So why do women keep putting their name forward? BBC World Service Women's Affairs reporter Feranak Amidi explains.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Maryam Maruf Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
05/06/2457m 36s

Abandoned babies, Adventurer Alice Morrison, Being a 'BoyMum'

A newborn baby found earlier this year in East London is the third child abandoned by the same parents. That’s the story being reported by the BBC’s Sanchia Berg, who has been given permission to share the details by a judge at East London Family Court. Sanchia joins Nuala McGovern to tell us more about the story, alongside freelance journalist Louise Tickle, who has previously reported from family courts.Following on from our special phone-in on boys last month, author Ruth Whippman speaks to Woman’s Hour about her new book, BoyMum, which looks at what it means both to be a boy, and to raise a boy. Ruth joins Nuala to discuss what she’s learned from investigating masculinity and boyhood, the impact on girls and boys, and how it’s changed the way she is raising her three sons.The ongoing war in Ukraine has led to a significant shift in the local job market, with more women now doing roles traditionally dominated by men, such as mining. After more than a thousand male workers left their jobs in a coal mine to fight Russia’s invasion, the energy company DTEK allowed women to work underground for the first time in its history. Nuala is joined by Ukrainian journalist and BBC World Service Europe editor, Kateryna Khinkulova to discuss this transformation and what it means for women in Ukraine.Arabian Adventures: The Secrets of the Nabateans is a new two-part documentary on BBC iPlayer that looks into a culture who had women in leadership roles in the 4th century BC. Alice Morrison, adventurer and author, joins Nuala to talk more about what she has discovered about Nabatean women, and what modern-day Saudi Arabian women make of them.
04/06/2457m 21s

Mexico election, Queenie actor, Breast milk donor

Claudia Sheinbaum will become Mexico's first woman president after an historic election win. BBC Journalist Laura Garcia joins Nuala McGovern to discuss what this moment means for the women and girls of Mexico. A new immersive exhibition, Connecting Hearts, by Swansea University, the Human Milk Foundation and artist Leanne Pearce, shows the impact of donating and receiving human milk. One of the paintings is of Claire-Michelle Pearson - a 'snowdrop' donor. She donated over 300 litres of milk after her son, Rupert, died during labour. She tells Nuala how it helped her grieve.Candice Carty-Williams’ debut novel, Queenie, has been adapted into a series for Channel 4. It tells the story of a 25-year-old woman as she straddles two different cultures at the same time as navigating romantic relationships, family stresses and work pressure. Dionne Brown plays Queenie in the series – she joins Nuala to tell us more about the series.A 20-year-old man who allegedly raped a 12-year-old girl in Spain has been acquitted because the court deemed their relationship ‘common’ as members of the Roma community. So what does this mean for the protection of Roma women and girls against violence across Europe? Nuala is joined by Judit Ignácz, from The European Roma Rights Centre, an international organisation working to combat discrimination against the Roma population, to discuss.A new type of blood test can predict the recurrence of breast cancer months or even years before it shows up on scans, which could potentailly pave the way for treatment to start before it becomes incurable. Nuala is joined by Simon Vincent, director of research, support and influencing at Breast Cancer Now, who part-funded this study. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Emma Pearce
03/06/2458m 10s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Ruth Jones, Netball Super League, FGM ban at risk in Gambia, Muses, Hadestown creator Anaïs Mitchell

Ruth Jones joins Nuala McGovern to talk about playing the Mother Superior in a West End production of Sister Act. She discusses getting out of her comfort zone by appearing on stage for the first time since 2018 and working on her fourth novel. Plus what can fans of Gavin and Stacey expect from the Christmas special?This week, the Netball Super League, the UK's elite level domestic competition, relaunched and embarked on what it calls a "new era of transformational change". Anita Rani speaks to Claire Nelson, Managing Director of the Netball Super League, and London Pulse CEO Sam Bird.Politicians in The Gambia are debating whether to overturn the ban on female genital mutilation. Activist Fatou Baldeh MBE explains the impact this discussion is having on the ground and in other countries around the world.From the Pre-Raphaelites to Picasso, Vermeer to Freud, some of the most famous Western artwork involves an artist’s muse. So who are the muses who have inspired great art? How do they embody an artist’s vision? And why has the muse artist relationship led to abuse of power? Nuala was joined by guests including Penelope Tree was one of the most famous models of the 1960s and the muse of her then boyfriend, the photographer David Bailey. Grammy and Tony award-winning songwriter Anaïs Mitchell is the creator of the musical Hadestown – a genre-defying retelling of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth blending folk music and New Orleans jazz. With productions on Broadway and now at the Lyric Theatre in London, Anaïs performed live in the Woman’s Hour studio and talked about the origins and impact of Hadestown.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Louise Corley
01/06/2453m 45s

Trump conviction, FGM ban at risk in Gambia, TV’s Queen of Books

Donald Trump has been convicted on all 34 counts of falsifying business records in his criminal trial in New York. It is the first time a former or serving US president has been convicted of a crime. Anita Rani is joined by New York Times journalist Amanda Taub and political commentator Julie Norman to talk about the woman at the centre of the case, the prosecution's star witness Stormy Daniels.Amanda Ross is one of the most powerful women in publishing who doesn't even work in publishing. She's created and produced many major book-based campaigns on TV over the last 20 years, including Richard & Judy's Book Club and Between The Covers on BBC Two. She personally selects the books featured and has been responsible for launching the careers of many bestselling authors, including Kate Mosse, David Nicholls and Victoria Hislop. Amanda is hosting the Between the Covers Live! UK Tour 2024 and joins Anita to discuss. Politicians in The Gambia are debating whether to overturn the ban on female genital mutilation. Activist Fatou Baldeh MBE describes the impact this discussion is having on the ground and her own experiences of surviving FGM.Singer Abi Sampa has become the first British woman to perform qawwali – a form of Sufi devotional music typically performed by men – at the Royal Albert Hall. Abi, who is also a trained dentist, talks to Anita about her genre-defying Orchestral Qawwali Project which mixes South Asian traditions with western choral music and balancing her careers in music and dentistry. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Maryam Maruf
31/05/2456m 7s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: British cyclist Lizzy Banks, Show-women, Love bombing, Infected blood scandal

On 28 July last year the British cyclist Lizzy Banks received an email from UK Anti Doping to say she had return two Adverse Analytical Findings. The letter stated she faced the prospect of a two-year ban unless she could establish the source. Thus began a ten-month journey investigating, researching and writing submissions to establish how the contamination event occurred. Absolved of any blame, having proved on the balance of probabilities that her test was contaminated, Lizzy speaks to Nuala McGovern about how the process destroyed her mentally, emotionally and professionally.Olivier award-winning theatre maker Marisa Carnesky is taking over an entire street at this years’ Brighton Festival with her show, Carnesky's Showwomxn Sideshow Spectacular, honouring the forgotten women of the circus. Marisa shares with Anita Rani the lost history of ground-breaking women magicians, aerial artists and sword climbers and how their stories are being explored through a new generation of performers.Do you know what love bombing is? One of our Woman’s Hour listeners Lynn got in touch to say it’s something we should be discussing. She joins Nuala McGovern alongside relationship therapist Simone Bose to explain more about what love bombing is, and how we can all look out for the warning signs.The long awaited final report of the public inquiry into the infected blood scandal was published this week, The inquiry was announced in 2017 after years of campaigning by victims. From the 1970s to the early 1990s, approximately 30,000 people were infected with blood contaminated with HIV and Hepatitis C. Over 3,000 have since died, with one person estimated to die every four days in the UK. The affected groups include those who received infected blood via blood transfusions, such as women following childbirth, and individuals with haemophilia—predominantly males—and others with similar bleeding disorders who received contaminated blood products. Around 1,250 people with bleeding disorders, including 380 children were infected with HIV. Fewer than 250 are still alive today. Some transmitted HIV to their partners. Nuala McGovern speaks to Clair Walton, who gave evidence to the inquiry. She has been campaigning for years for the wives and partners who became infected to be heard and acknowledged.Clara Schumann was one of the greatest female musicians of the 19th Century – a virtuoso performer who gave over 1,500 concerts in a 60 year career, all while raising eight children and financially supporting her household. Concert pianist Lucy Parham and actress Dame Harriet Walter join Anita Rani to discuss their concert I, Clara which celebrates the ground-breaking life and work of Clara Schumann in her own right.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Louise Corley
30/05/2456m 59s

Ozempic, Netball Super League, Olivier award-winner Cassidy Janson

As prescriptions for weight loss drugs in the UK increase, Woman’s Hour explores how safe online prescriptions for things like Ozempic and Wegovy are. Fashion stylist Jeannie Annan Lewin tells us how she buys the drugs and how they have helped her. Anita Rani is joined by Alima Batchelor, from the Pharmacists Defence Association, and Professor James Kingsland, Chair of Digital Clinical Excellence. Cassidy Janson won an Olivier Award for her performance as Anne Hathaway in the musical & Juliet. She’s also appeared in Wicked, Chess and in the role of Carole King in the West End production of Beautiful. Cassidy is now performing in Jerry’s Girls at the Menier Chocolate Factory in London, which celebrates the life and legacy of the legendary award-winning Broadway composer Jerry Herman. Cassidy joins Anita and performs live.Yvette Fielding is best known for hosting the TV show Most Haunted, and for being the youngest ever presenter of Blue Peter. She was just 18 when she joined the iconic BBC children’s show in 1987. Yvette joins Anita to talk about her memoir Scream Queen, which charts her journey from child actor to 'ghost hunter'. Today is a big day in the world of women's sport. The Netball Super League, the UK's elite level domestic competition, has relaunched and embarks on what it calls a "new era of transformational change". Anita is joined by Claire Nelson, Managing Director of the Netball Super League, and London Pulse CEO Sam Bird. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Emma Pearce
30/05/2452m 39s

Hadestown creator Anaïs Mitchell, Perfume’s Darkest Secrets, the return of Loaded magazine

Top perfume brands may have the “worst form of child labour” in their jasmine supply chains, a BBC Eye investigation reveals. Jasmine is considered to be one of the most valuable ingredients in some of the world's most iconic perfumes. Nuala McGovern is joined by BBC Eye correspondent Heba Bitar and producer/director of the documentary: Perfume’s Darkest Secrets, Natasha Cox.Grammy and Tony award-winning songwriter Anaïs Mitchell is the creator of the musical Hadestown – a genre-defying retelling of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth blending folk music and New Orleans jazz. With productions on Broadway and now at the Lyric Theatre in London, Anaïs performs live in the Woman’s Hour studio and talks to Nuala about the origins and impact of Hadestown. The 'lad’s mag' Loaded is back - with Liz Hurley once again on the cover. Sarah Ditum, journalist and author of ‘Toxic: Women, Fame and The Noughties’, joins Nuala to give her reaction.In our series of hobbies you've restarted after decades, we hear from Rosie, who rediscovered her childhood roller skates whilst clearing out her parents' house. Now, she does regular roller skating lessons, and absolutely loves it. She tells our reporter Sarah Swadling all about it. What do you know about Nan Shepherd? The Scottish author, poet and naturalist has helped shape Scotland’s recent literary history with her work. A new play, Nan Shepherd: Naked and Unashamed, explores her life and legacy at the Pitlochry Festival Theatre. The play’s writer, Ellie Zeegan joins Nuala to discuss Nan’s legacy. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lottie Garton
29/05/2456m 40s

Ruth Jones, Women and renting, Couples who disagree about having children

Ruth Jones is live in the Woman’s Hour studio to talk about playing the Mother Superior in a West End production of Sister Act. She discusses getting out of her comfort zone by appearing on stage for the first time since 2018 and working on her fourth novel. Plus what can fans of Gavin and Stacey expect from the Christmas special?What happens in relationships when one person wants a family and the other definitely doesn’t? Is missing out on the chance to have children a deal-breaker? Or do some couples decide to stay together, with one person choosing the relationship over a baby? As BBC Radio 4 drama The Archers explores the dynamics between a couple in this situation, Nuala McGovern hears from Joanna Van Kampen who plays Fallon Rogers in The Archers and relationship therapist Cate Campbell.With the cost of renting and living on the rise, housing insecurity is an increasingly harsh reality for many. A survey by Shelter and YouGov found that 54% of women feel that being a renter has held them back. Three young women—Aimee, Rhiannon, and Rebecca—talk about the significant challenges they’ve faced in the rental market, and how this has affected their lives, plans, and sense of stability. Nuala is also joined by Jenny Lamb from Shelter to talk about how to best negotiate renting.Marina Gibson, a leading female angler who runs the Northern Fishing School in North Yorkshire, has called on the Flyfishers’ Club in London to finally open its doors to women. The club, which was established in 1884 and counts the King as a patron, describes itself as a club for gentleman interested in the art of flyfishing. Marina explains why she wants women to be able to join, and how her love of fishing led to a career change. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Olivia Skinner
28/05/2457m 45s

Muses

From the Pre-Raphaelites to Picasso, Vermeer to Freud, some of the most famous Western artwork involves an artist’s muse. So who are the muses who have inspired great art? How do they embody an artist’s vision? And why has the muse artist relationship led to abuse of power? Nuala speaks to art historian and author Ruth Millington and to writer, curator and podcaster Alayo Akinkugbe.Penelope Tree was one of the most famous models of the 1960s and the muse of her then boyfriend, the photographer David Bailey. Despite appearing on the cover of Vogue and being credited by Bailey with kick-starting the flower-power movement, Penelope’s life became increasingly difficult as their relationship began to flounder. These events have inspired Penelope’s loosely biographical novel Piece of My Heart and she joins Nuala to discuss her depiction of life as a ‘60s muse.In ancient Greek mythology, the nine muses are the inspirational goddesses of the arts, science and literature. So who are the nine muses? Nuala speaks to classicist Professor Edith Hall.Dora Maar was as a photographer, painter and poet but is probably most famous as Pablo Picasso’s lover and muse. Author Louisa Treger captures the complexity of this artist and muse relationship in her novel The Paris Muse and joins Nuala to discuss how the inspiration Dora offered Picasso nearly destroyed her.We hear from Liza Lim, a Melbourne-based composer who collaborated with violinist and researcher Karin Hellqvist on a composition called ‘One and the Other (speculative Polskas for Karin)’, exploring Karin’s relationship to her heritage and Swedish musical traditions.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Laura Northedge Editor: Deiniol Buxton
27/05/2457m 40s

India's women voters, Dame Harriet Walter on Clara Schumann, Climate medal winner

As India goes to the polls in the penultimate round of voting in their general election, Anita speaks to the BBC’s Divya Arya in Delhi. They discuss what political issues are most important to women in this election, and how the main parties have been wooing them.Valérie Courtois was recently announced as the winner of the 2024 Shackleton medal for her work revolutionizing climate conservation in the Canadian arctic, most notably for her vision connecting Indigenous Guardians as ‘the eyes and ears on the ground’ to preserve ecosystems. Valérie talks to Anita about leading the movement for indigenous-led conservation and land stewardship.   Carys Holmes is a 17-year-old girl with an ambition to join the British Army. She passed all of her army selection tests but says she was later taken aside and told she was being rejected because of an 'extensive' history of breast cancer in her family. Anita is joined by Carys who explains that the army has now retracted its decision. Emma Norton, a lawyer and Director of the Centre for Military Justice, also joins. Clara Schumann was one of the greatest female musicians of the 19th Century – a virtuoso performer who gave over 1,500 concerts in a 60 year career, all while raising eight children and financially supporting her household. Concert pianist Lucy Parham and actress Dame Harriet Walter join Anita to discuss their concert I, Clara which celebrates the ground-breaking life and work of Clara Schumann in her own right.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Maryam Maruf Studio managers: Donald McDonald and Bob Nettles
24/05/2457m 44s

Show-women, Women and the general election, Smartphone-free kids

There will be a general election on 4 July. Campaigning will start at the end of next week, but already some of the key players are speaking out. What are women's top concerns in this election? What do women want addressed? Anita Rani speaks to Professor Rosie Campbell, professor of politics and director of the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London, who has been looking at women's voting behaviour for many years.Head teachers who are a part of St Albans Primary Schools Consortium have urged parents not to give their children a smartphone until they are aged 14. Anita speaks to Rachel Harper, principal of a primary school in County Wicklow in Ireland about what advice she would offer one year after she and seven other headteachers in her town asked parents not to allow their children phones until they were older.Olivier award-winning theatre maker Marisa Carnesky is taking over an entire street at this years Brighton Festival with her show, Carnesky's Showwomxn Sideshow Spectacular, honouring the forgotten women of the circus. Marisa shares with Anita the lost history of ground-breaking women magicians, aerial artists and sword climbers and how their stories are being explored through a new generation of performers.A Chinese blogger who was jailed for four years for her reporting on the first Covid outbreak in Wuhan, has been released from prison. The media watchdog Reporters Without Borders shared a video showing the blogger, Zhang Zhan, saying she had been released on schedule and thanking everyone for their concern. The former lawyer was jailed after she travelled to Wuhan to document the outbreak in a series of widely-shared online videos. She was due to be freed last week but friends and supporters were concerned when they were unable to contact her. Anita speaks to the Guardian's senior China correspondent Amy Hawkins, who is following the story.Gemmologist Helen Molesworth is the Senior Jewellery Curator at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and Professor of Jewellery at the Geneva University of Art and Design. In her new book, Precious: The History and Mystery of Gems, she explores the geology, symbolism and history of gemstones through some of their famous owners and those that have courted controversy. Helen explores their enduring fascination with Anita.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Bob Nettles
23/05/2457m 39s

Endurance runner Imo Boddy, love bombing, fake food artist

The endurance runner Imo Boddy has smashed the 45-year-old world record and become the fastest known woman to complete the UK Three Peaks. She joins Nuala McGovern live on the programme.Do you know what love bombing is? One of our Woman’s Hour listeners Lynn got in touch to say it’s something we should be discussing. She joins Nuala alongside relationship therapist Simone Bose to explain more about what love bombing is, and how we can all look out for the warning signs.Nuala is joined by the artist Kerry Samantha Boyes whose work you may have seen in the Barbie Movie, or the Lord of the Rings. Kerry makes fake food for a living and her studio, The Fake Food Workshop, will be one of 104 studios open to the public for the Spring Fling art event, which takes place across Dumfries and Galloway this weekend.Some of Britain’s most vulnerable children are being detained and having their freedoms restricted under court orders known as “deprivation of liberty”. The most senior family court judge for England and Wales has called the growing use of the order a “crisis”. The BBC’s Ashley John-Baptiste has heard from young people who have spent parts of their childhood under these orders. Plus, social worker Beverly Bennett-Jones joins Nuala. The Japanese Royal Family is one of the oldest in the world, the same dynasty has ruled for more than 2,500 years. But the current law means that only a male heir can inherit the Chrysanthemum throne and become the Emperor. This has caused a succession crisis in recent years as the Royal Family kept having girls. The BBC’s Tokyo Correspondent Shaimaa Khalil joins Nuala. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Emma Pearce
22/05/2456m 5s

Solving historic rape cases, British cyclist Lizzy Banks, Margaret Leng Tan

A new documentary on BBC Two is looking at how new forensic techniques can help police re-examine old cases involving sexual assault and rape, helping to convict perpetrators from decades ago. Cold Case Investigators: Solving Britain’s Sex Crimes tells the story of three cases that were re-examined. One is that of Karen, who was raped in 1983. She joins Nuala McGovern alongside Detective Constable Hayley Dyas, who helped work on her case and finally get a conviction.On 28 July last year the British cyclist Lizzy Banks received an email from UK Anti Doping to say she had return two Adverse Analytical Findings. The letter stated she faced the prospect of a two-year ban unless she could establish the source. Thus began a ten-month journey investigating, researching and writing submissions to establish how the contamination event occurred. Absolved of any blame, having proved on the balance of probabilities that her test was contaminated, Lizzy speaks to Nuala about how the process destroyed her mentally, emotionally and professionally.The toy piano virtuoso Margaret Leng Tan is a leading force within avant-garde music and the first woman to earn a doctorate from the prestigious Juilliard School of Music in the US. She’s currently in London, performing her sonic autobiography Dragon Ladies Don’t Weep at the Southbank Centre this week. It’s a combination of spoken text, projected images and original music for toy piano, prepared piano, toys and percussion. It focuses on the obsessive compulsive disorder Margaret has had since her childhood. She explains how music helped her accept OCD as an integral part of who she is.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant and Neva Missirian
21/05/2455m 5s

Infected blood scandal, Anita Pallenberg, Feminist theatre

The long awaited final report of the public inquiry into the infected blood scandal is published today, The inquiry was announced in 2017 after years of campaigning by victims. From the 1970s to the early 1990s, approximately 30,000 people were infected with blood contaminated with HIV and Hepatitis C. Over 3,000 have since died, with one person estimated to die every four days in the UK. The affected groups include those who received infected blood via blood transfusions, such as women following childbirth, and individuals with haemophilia—predominantly males—and others with similar bleeding disorders who received contaminated blood products. Around 1,250 people with bleeding disorders, including 380 children were infected with HIV. Fewer than 250 are still alive today. Some transmitted HIV to their partners. Nuala McGovern speaks to Clair Walton, who gave evidence to the inquiry. She has been campaigning for years for the wives and partners who became infected to be heard and acknowledged.Anita Pallenberg was the quintessential 1960s Rock and Roll 'It' girl. A model, actress and artist, she is best remembered as a muse for The Rolling Stones. But a new film about her life, Catching Fire: The Story Of Anita Pallenberg, puts her experiences front and centre and explores her unique creativity and her influence on the sound and swagger of The Stones. Her son Marlon Richards, who is an executive producer on the film, tells Nuala about her wild and intense life.The book Feminist Theatre – Then and Now brings to life the lived experiences of three generations of women working in British theatre over the last 50 years and reveals the struggle to succeed in an industry where gender, race, sexuality, class and parenthood were, and still can be, serious obstacles to success. Nuala is joined by the book’s editor Cheryl Robson and a contributor, the playwright Moira Buffini.Mary Morton has built up an army of 'street stitchers' - volunteers who sit in the parks and streets of Edinburgh and offer to advise on repairing the clothes of passers-by. Mary has not bought clothes for five years after becoming concerned about the impact of textiles on the environment and wants to teach people the skills to be able to repair and continue to wear their clothes. She joins Nuala.
20/05/2456m 28s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Royal Navy exclusive, Tamsin Greig, Period Tracker Apps, Formula One, Sleepwalking, Choral music

A female officer in the military says she was raped by a senior officer who was responsible in the Royal Navy for behaviours and values, including sexual consent. Speaking exclusively to Woman’s Hour, the female officer, who we are calling Joanna, reported the incident and her allegations to the military police who brought charges against the officer. However, the Services Prosecution Authority later said that they wouldn’t be taking the case forward to a military court. The female officer, who feels she has been forced to leave the military, says that her career has been left in ruins, whilst his continues. The Royal Navy has said “sexual assault and other sexual offences are not tolerated in the Royal Navy and anything which falls short of the highest of standards is totally unacceptable" and that since the alleged incident they "have made significant changes to how incidents are reported and investigated." Nuala spoke to Joanna and the Conservative MP and member of the Defence Select Committee, Sarah Atherton.Period tracker apps claim to help women to predict when they might start their period and calculate the best time to attempt to conceive. The Information Commissioner's Office has said that a third of women have used one. A report out this week, however, has raised serious questions about the way in which this data is used. The study, by Kings College London and University College London, examined the privacy policies and data safety labels of 20 of the most popular of these kind of apps. Anita discusses the findings and implications with BBC Technology Reporter Shiona McCallum and the lead author of the study Dr Ruba Abu-Salma from Kings College London.Known for her dramatic and comedic roles on TV, stage and film the Olivier award-winning actor Tamsin Greig is currently performing in The Deep Blue Sea - Terence Rattigan’s 1950’s study of obsession and the destructive power of love - at the Theatre Royal Bath. She joined Nuala to explain the appeal of her latest role and why in 1952 legendary actor Peggy Ashcroft said she felt she had no clothes on when playing this part.Talking about her new book, 'How To Win A Grand Prix', Formula One expert Bernie Collins takes Anita behind the scenes of an F1 team, and explains how she forged a career working as a performance engineer at McLaren for names such as Jenson Button, then became Head of Strategy at Aston Martin, with world champion Sebastian Vettel.Journalist Decca Aitkenhead regularly sleepwalks. She talked to Nuala about her night-time escapades which include finding herself locked out in the middle of the night, eating food she’d find disgusting when awake and incredible strength that has seen her smash furniture to pieces. She’s joined by neurologist and sleep expert Prof Guy Leschziner who explains what’s going on in our brains when we sleepwalk, and how women are affected.How has the role of women in choral music changed? With girls as well as boys now singing in cathedral choirs and more music by female composers being commissioned and performed, women’s voices are becoming increasingly prominent. Composer Cecilia McDowell and singer Carris Jones talk about championing and celebrating women in this traditionally male world.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Rebecca Myatt
18/05/2455m 43s

Lesbian bars, Period Tracker Apps, World champion boxer, Lauren Price MBE

After going viral on social media earlier this year, new bar La Camionera is planning to open a permanent inclusive venue for “lesbians and their friends”. Reporter Martha Owen has been following as they prepare to open and hears why these spaces are important from DJ Yvonne Taylor, event organisers Jess Whiting Boult and Tabs Benjamin, and poet Joelle Taylor. And Anita Rani is joined by filmmakers Erica Rose and Elina Street, creators of The Lesbian Bar Project, to discuss their award-winning series about lesbian bars in the USA and Germany.Period tracker apps claim to help women to predict whenthey might start their period and calculate the best time to attempt to conceive. The Information Commissioner's Office has said that a third of women have used one. A report out this week, however, has raised serious questions about the way in which this data is used. The study, by Kings College London and University College London, examined the privacy policies and data safety labels of 20 of the most popular of these kind of apps. The authors say it is the most extensive evaluation of its kind completed to date. Anita discusses the findings and implications with BBC Technology Reporter Shiona McCallum and the lead author of the study Dr Ruba Abu-Salma from Kings College London.                                                                                                                               Director Amanda Nell Eu discusses her award-winning debut feature film, Tiger Stripes. An imaginative coming-of-age story about a girl who transforms into a jungle cat, it was Malaysia’s official entry to the 2024 Oscars. But this success came at a cost when the film was censored. Last weekend the Olympic Gold Medallist, Lauren Price MBE, became Wales’ first female boxing world champion – winning the WBA, IBO, and Ring Magazine World Titles in spectacular fashion in her hometown of Cardiff by beating WBA welterweight champion Jessica McCaskill. She joins Anita to talk about her achievement, her diverse sporting career and her legacy.Presented by Anita Rani Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Bob Nettles
17/05/2457m 39s

Women in Formula One, Monstrum, Sex education, Bridgerton dresses

Schools in England should not teach about gender identity, according to new draft guidance from the government, due to be published in full today. There is also a plan to ban sex education for under-nines. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has said the new guidance would ensure children were not "exposed to disturbing content". Anita Rani talks to Elaine Dunkley, BBC Education Correspondent to find out the latest.Talking about her new book, 'How To Win A Grand Prix', Formula One expert Bernie Collins takes Anita behind the scenes of an F1 team, and explains how she forged a career working as a performance engineer at McLaren for names such as Jenson Button, then became Head of Strategy at Aston Martin, with world champion Sebastian Vettel. Yesterday senior coroner Martin Fleming issued a warning after Georgia Brooke was fatally strangled or "choked" by her boyfriend, Luke Cannon, during sex. Mr Cannon was himself found dead the following day. The coroner described the practice of choking as "dangerous" and said "it all too often ends in fatal consequences". Georgia Brooke was twenty-six when she died in 2022. In his conclusion, Mr Fleming said that while there was no evidence that her boyfriend had intended to kill his girlfriend during the incident, he had used "excessive" force. Anita speaks to Fiona Mackenzie, the leader of the We Can't Consent to This campaign which was formed as a response to the increasing number of women and girls killed and injured in violence that is claimed to be consensual. 16-year-old Eleanor Shenderey from North Yorkshire has gone viral on social media after posting herself wearing handmade historical outfits. From the Tudors and the Victorians to the TV show Bridgerton, she has been inspired to make over 300 dresses - some of which have taken months to complete. Eleanor joins Anita to discuss how and why she does it. Lottie Mills won the BBC Young Writers’ Award in 2020 for her short story, The Changeling. It will now feature in her debut book, 'Monstrum,' alongside a collection of modern fairy tales, telling the experiences of characters excluded and othered by their societies. Lottie has cerebral palsy and hopes the book will challenge the representation of disability in fiction. She talks to Anita about how growing up with a disability, she always understood herself through stories: Greek mythology and British folklore; Shakespeare’s plays and Victorian fairy tales.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
16/05/2457m 14s

Beth Mead, Women and choral music, Eating disorders

Over half of female footballers book pitches, only to find they’ve been reallocated to men. With twice as many women as men considering quitting the sport because of this, Arsenal forward and England Lioness Beth Mead tells Nuala McGovern about her concerns.A BBC investigation published today has highlighted the concerns of parents of vulnerable children sent hours away from home for urgent eating disorder treatment. They say there isn’t enough specialist mental health hospital care available locally on the NHS and they want an end to the postcode lottery. We hear from Donna whose daughter Annie had to be based far from her family and BBC Yorkshire investigations journalist Louise Fewster also joins Nuala.Mexican author and academic Cristina Rivera Garza has just won a Pulitzer Prize for her book about her sister, who was murdered in 1990. It’s called Liliana’s Invincible Summer: A Sister’s Search for Justice. Cristina joins Nuala to explain why she feels she wrote it with, not about, her sister, whose name and image are now carried at demonstrations against gender violence.How has the role of women in choral music changed? With girls as well as boys now singing in cathedral choirs and more music by female composers being commissioned and performed, women’s voices are becoming increasingly prominent. Composer Cecilia McDowell and singer Carris Jones talk about championing and celebrating women in this traditionally male world.
15/05/2456m 50s

Birth trauma, Sleepwalking, Lolita Chakrabarti

How many women have decided not to have more children after a traumatic birth? The UK’s first inquiry into traumatic childbirth has found that too often poor care is normalised, with devastating effects on women’s mental and physical health. Nuala McGovern talks to one Woman’s Hour listener who decided she couldn’t face having another child after a traumatic birth, and to the author of the report, Dr Kim Thomas, about its recommendations. Journalist Decca Aitkenhead regularly sleepwalks. She talks to Nuala about her night-time escapades which include finding herself locked out in the middle of the night, eating food she’d find disgusting when awake and incredible strength that has seen her smash furniture to pieces. She’s joined by neurologist and sleep expert Prof Guy Leschziner who explains what’s going on in our brains when we sleepwalk, and how women are affected. New analysis from the TUC, the Trades Union Congress, says that more than 1.5 million women have dropped out of the workforce because of long-term sickness. The figure marks a 48% increase compared with five years ago. Nicola Smith, Head of Economics at the TUC, tells Nuala McGovern what may be stopping women from returning to work. Award-winning playwright and actor Lolita Chakrabarti discusses her new Radio 3 play, Calmer. All about motherhood and chaos, it follows three generations of ultra-successful women in one family - but their lives are not as ‘good’ as they appear on paper.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Olivia Skinner
14/05/2457m 20s

Royal Navy Exclusive, Sarah Atherton MP, Tamsin Greig, singer-songwriter Lauren Mayberry

A female officer in the military says she was raped by a senior officer who was responsible in the Royal Navy for behaviours and values, including sexual consent. Speaking exclusively to Woman’s Hour, the female officer, who we are calling Joanna, reported the incident and her allegations to the military police who brought charges against the officer. However, the Services Prosecution Authority later said that they wouldn’t be taking the case forward to a military court. The female officer, who feels she has been forced to leave the military, says that her career has been left in ruins, whilst his continues. The Royal Navy has said “sexual assault and other sexual offences are not tolerated in the Royal Navy and anything which falls short of the highest of standards is totally unacceptable" and that since the alleged incident they "have made significant changes to how incidents are reported and investigated." Nuala hears from Joanna and the reaction from the Conservative MP and member of the Defence Select Committee, Sarah Atherton. Known for her dramatic and comedic roles on TV, stage and film the Olivier award-winning actor Tamsin Greig is currently performing in The Deep Blue Sea - Terence Rattigan’s 1950’s study of obsession and the destructive power of love - at the Theatre Royal Bath. She joins Nuala to explain the appeal of her latest role and why in 1952 legendary actor Peggy Ashcroft said she felt she had no clothes on when playing this part.The singer-songwriter Lauren Mayberry of CHVRCHES is taking part in a new BBC Radio 6 Music initiative Change The Tune. It is an on air, digital and social media initiative to raise awareness of the impact that online abuse has on the lives of artists. She joins Nuala to discuss her experience and to talk about embarking on a solo career.Presented by Nuala McGovern Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Bob Nettles
13/05/2455m 27s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Foster caring, Liz Carr on assisted dying, Sabrina Ali on Dugsi Dayz, Rachel Chinouriri

The number of children in care is continuing to rise each year, and thousands of new foster carers are needed. The comedian and writer Kiri Pritchard-McLean has done just that. During lockdown, Kiri and her partner embarked on a journey to become foster carers in north Wales and she’s ‘evangelical’ about the role. It’s the subject of her new seven-month comedy tour, Peacock.The debate on assisted dying is often framed around the issues of choice for the terminally ill, but what about the rights of the disabled? Actor and disability rights campaigner Liz Carr has major concerns about potential changes to the law that she believes could leave people with disabilities at risk. She joins Clare McDonnell to discuss her documentary “Better Off Dead” which explores the debate from the perspective of disabled people.Four girls sitting in detention on a Saturday at their local Mosque are stuck in darkness after a power outage. To pass the time, they tell Somali folktales and bond in a modern day take on The Breakfast Club. That’s the scene for Dugsi Dayz, performing now at the Royal Court Theatre. The writer and actor Sabrina Ali told Hayley Hassell all about it.What would happen if you could only speak the truth – and not even tell white lies? That’s the subject of a new book by Radhika Sanghani, called The Girl Who Couldn’t Lie. Radhika herself hasn’t lied for two years – she told Clare why she wanted to write the book and the things she’s learnt from telling only the truth.Singer songwriter Rachel Chinouriri is one of the music industry’s rising stars, gaining plaudits from celebrity fans, including Adele, Sophie Turner and Florence Pugh, for her nostalgic Indie sounds. Rachel talks about her first album, What A Devastating Turn Of Events, which is an intimate exploration of her experiences and relationships.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Deiniol Buxton
11/05/2451m 44s

Whooping cough, Shirley Conran, Lying, Afghanistan tourism

Five babies have died from whooping cough this year as cases continue to rise in England. Medical doctor Dr Saleyha Ahsan, who currently has whooping cough herself, joins Clare McDonnell to discuss. Author, journalist and campaigner Dame Shirley Conran has died aged 91, days after receiving her damehood. Journalist Felicia Bromfield joins Clare to discuss her legacy. What would happen if you could only speak the truth – and not even tell white lies? That’s the subject of a new book by Radhika Sanghani, called The Girl Who Couldn’t Lie. Radhika herself hasn’t lied for two years – she joins Clare to talk about why she wanted to write the book and the things she’s learnt from telling only the truth. Despite the challenges posed by the Taliban regime, economic instability, poor infrastructure, and the ongoing suppression of women's rights, foreign tourism is reportedly increasing in Afghanistan. The country's authorities have begun training hospitality professionals and assert that Afghanistan is safe for foreigners, with all visitors welcomed and treated equally, including foreign women, they say. Sascha Heeney, who has recently visited Afghanistan, and Afghan journalist Zarghuna Khargar join Clare to discuss. Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Dianne McGregor
10/05/2457m 14s

Liz Carr on assisted dying, Money in relationships, Singer Rachel Chinouriri

The debate on assisted dying is often framed around the issues of choice for the terminally ill, but what about the rights of the disabled ? Actor and disability rights campaigner Liz Carr has major concerns about potential changes to the law that she believes could leave people with disabilities at risk. She joins Clare McDonnell to discuss her documentary “Better Off Dead” which explores the debate from the perspective of disabled people. Singer songwriter Rachel Chinouriri is one of the music industry’s rising stars, gaining plaudits from celebrity fans, including Adele, Sophie Turner and Florence Pugh, for her nostalgic Indie sounds. Rachel performs live in the Woman’s Hour studio and talks about her first album, What A Devastating Turn Of Events, which is an intimate exploration of Rachel’s experiences and relationships. Money is a topic many of us don't feel comfortable talking about. Be it in a romantic relationship, with our parents or even with our friends. But it's a topic that financial psychotherapist Vicky Reynal says is vitally important when it comes to our relationships. She joins Clare to discuss her new book, Money on Your Mind: The Psychology Behind Your Financial Habits, and how working on our financial wellbeing can help us in our lives.The former head of the Spanish Football Federation, Luis Rubiales, will stand trial for sexual assault over his behaviour in the Women's World Cup game against England last summer. He gave an unsolicited kiss to player Jenni Hermoso which was caught on camera and broadcast to billions worldwide, provoking fierce backlash and a national debate over sexism in Spain. Spain based sports journalist Molly McElwee explains the reaction in Spain. Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Olivia Skinner
09/05/2453m 20s

Safer sport for women, novelist Nadine Matheson, Sabrina Ali on Dugzi Dayz

Now that women’s sport is advancing, we need clear safeguarding rules for women and girls about what is and isn’t okay when it comes to talking about female health outside the realm of medicine. That’s the call from Baz Moffat, one of the co-founders of The Well HQ, which aims to break barriers in women’s sport and champion education about female health. She joins Hayley Hassell to tell us more about their new Safer Sport poster campaign and why it’s needed.Once one of Russia's biggest pop stars, Manizha represented the country at the Eurovision Song Contest in 2021. Then Russia invaded Ukraine and Manizha used her songs and her platform to share her anti-war views. Subsequently her concerts were cancelled, her music banned and Manizha's safety, both in real life and online, has been compromised. She talks to Hayley about her life and her new single Candlelight.How do we keep children safe online? Hayley is joined by Esther Ghey and Marinna Spring to discuss Ofcom's new safety codes of practice.Bestselling author Nadine Matheson is a criminal defence lawyer and uses her own experiences in the world of criminal law to build her stories and characters. She talks to Hayley about the new book - ‘The Kill List’ - and why there aren’t more black female detectives in crime novels. Four girls sitting in a Mosque in detention are stuck in darkness after a power outage. To pass the time, they tell Somali folktales and bond in a modern day take on The Breakfast Club. That’s the scene for Dugsi Dayz, performing now at the Royal Court Theatre. The writer and actor Sabrina Ali joins Hayley in the Woman’s Hour to tell us more about it.Presenter: Hayley Hassell Producer: Laura Northedge Studio Producer: Neva Missirian
08/05/2456m 9s

Losing your possessions, Defining honour abuse, Foster caring

What’s like to start again with nothing? On New Year's Eve of 2018, journalist Helen Chandler-Wilde lost everything she owned in a storage unit fire in Croydon, where she'd stowed all her possessions. She has written about it in the book, Lost & Found - 9 life-changing lessons about stuff from someone who lost everything. She joins Hayley Hassall to describe her experience and explain why we get so emotionally attached to our belongings.The BBC Series I Kissed a Girl started over the weekend... it's the first UK dating show for gay women. Dannii Minogue hosts the show where ten single women are matched up with a partner to see if sparks will fly and the women will find love. In the first episode, all the women are matched with a partner and start getting to know each other. Comedian Catherine Bohart and TV critic Daisy Jones discuss.The number of children in care is continuing to rise each year, and every year thousands of new foster carers are needed. The comedian and writer Kiri Pritchard-McLean has done just that. During lockdown, Kiri and her partner embarked on a journey to become foster carers in north Wales and she’s ‘evangelical’ about the role. It’s the subject of her new seven-month comedy tour, Peacock.The charity Karma Nirvana has today written to the victims and safeguarding minister Laura Farris, calling for the government to introduce a statutory definition of honour abuse. The charity’s executive director Natasha Rattu explains why, alongside a woman we are calling ‘Dana’ who is a victim of this abuse, who describes her experiences and what a statutory definition would mean to her.Presenter: Hayley Hassall Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
07/05/2457m 14s

How to age well: A Woman's Hour special

We are all ageing, if we're lucky, so in this Woman's Hour special programme, we're exploring how women can age well. Anita Rani is joined by a panel of women of different ages to talk about the possibility of re-invention and the wisdom of age, as well as the difficulties and barriers women face as they get older. What we can learn from each other and how can women of different generations support each other? Author and psychologist, Dr Sharon Blackie’s book, Hagitude: Reimagining the Second Half of Life, explores stories of little-known but powerful elder women in European myth and folklore – with the hope of inspiring women now. She joins Anita to discuss what we can learn from these stories and the power she feels we can gain if we embrace getting older. NHS GP Dr Radha Modgil is often to be found on BBC Radio 1’s Life Hacks. Radha joins the discussion to explain the things we can do specifically to age well. She highlights exercise and nutrition, as well as the real need for women to have purpose in their lives, no matter what age they are and how that can impact our ageing both physically and mentally. Our reporter Martha Owen meets Lindi, Sue & Celia in the British Library in London, at a meeting for the Older Peoples Advisory Group – a forum for older community members – hosted by Age UK Camden. They give their thoughts on ageing, what they’ve enjoyed most about getting older and why dancing trumps housework. Cally Beaton was formerly a top TV exec, then she swapped the boardroom for the stage and became a comedian at the age of 45. Ten years later, she now refuses to make self-deprecating jokes in her sets. She joins Anita to discuss what it's like ageing in the public eye, defying her age and the importance of advice from older – and younger – women. The writer and content creator Pippa Stacey's perceptions of ageing have changed because of her experience of a chronic illness. Pippa was diagnosed with ME, also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, while she was at university. She joins Anita to reflect on the impact of the physical changes she has experienced, the pressures young women are under and why she wants to listen to older, and wiser, women. Presenter: Anita Rani Guest: Sharon Blackie Guest: Dr Radha Modgil Guest: Cally Beaton Guest: Pippa Stacey Reporter: Martha Owen Producer: Claire Fox Editor: Erin Riley Studio Engineer: Giles Aspen
06/05/2457m 55s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Co-parenting, Plastic pollution, ACL injuries, Perinatal suicide

What is it really like to be a co-parent? Hayley Allen’s son spends the weekdays with his dad and she takes care of him at the weekends. Carly Harris’ two children spend 80% of their time with her and are looked after by their dad every other weekend. Clare talked to Hayley and Carly about the difficulties and benefits of co-parenting.As talks reach a conclusion in Ottawa this week on a legally binding global treaty on plastic pollution, we speak to film director and campaigner Eleanor Church. Her documentary, X Trillion, comes out this week, and takes the viewer on an all-female expedition to the North Pacific gyre, where much of the world's plastic waste ends up.The risk of ACL injuries in female football players is up to six times higher than their male counterparts. Leeds Beckett University is leading a new study into why this risk rate is so high and the impact on athletes. Knee surgeon to the sports stars Andy Williams explains why this may be happening and footballer Emma Samways, of Hashtag United in Essex, tells us about her ACL injury from earlier on this year.Perinatal suicide, while thankfully rare, is the leading cause of maternal death in the UK. A new study from King’s College London is the first of its kind to focus on the causes. The perinatal period runs from the start of pregnancy to a year after giving birth – and the suicide rates among these women has recently risen. Clare spoke to Dr Abigail Easter, the lead researcher, and Krystal Wilkinson, who shares her own experience.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Annette Wells Editor; Erin Riley
04/05/2428m 50s

Listener phone in: Boys - what's it's like to be one in 2024?

On today's Woman's Hour phone-in we ask what it's like to be a boy in 2024 and how society is shaping our future men. On Monday we spoke to Catherine Carr about her Radio 4 series About the Boys. She spoke to boys up and down the country about how they felt about subjects like sex and consent, masculinity, friendship, life online and education and she found out that boys were experiencing confusing and often troubling messages about their role in society. She joins us, along with Richard Reeves, the President of the American Institute for Boys and Men to take your calls about boys.Please get in touch with your experiences and thoughts about boys; from bringing them up to being one.The phone lines open at 0800 on Friday 3 May. Call us on 03700 100 444 or you can text the programme - the number is 84844. Texts will be charged at your standard message rate. On social media we're @BBCWomansHour. And you can email us through our website.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer Laura Northedge Studio Manager: Bob Nettles
03/05/2457m 31s

Woman's Hour special: How is porn shaping our sex lives and relationships?

Over the past few weeks, Woman’s Hour has been having a frank conversation about pornography. Four women spoke about how porn has shaped their relationships, sex lives and self-image. Three men spoke openly together about their attitudes to and experience of porn. The film-maker Erika Lust explained why she wants to make ‘ethical’ porn and Dr Fiona Vera-Grey explains what she’s found out through the research and surveys she has done about pornography and by talking to 100 women for her book Women On Porn. In this special podcast episode, our reporter Ena Miller guides you through the stories and conversations you might have missed.Presenter/Reporter Ena Miller Live item Producer: Emma Pearce Series Producer: Erin Riley
03/05/241h 44m

Lawyer Harriet Wistrich, Chef Asma Khan, ACL injuries and women

Lawyer Harriet Wistrich is the founder and director of Centre for Women's Justice. She joins Anita Rani to talk about her new book, Sister in Law, which looks into 10 of her hard-won cases over 30 years. They include Sally Challen’s appeal against her conviction for the murder of her husband, the victims of the taxi driver John Worboys, and the women caught up in the 'Spy Cops' scandal. Cases that she says demonstrate that "terrifyingly often, the law is not fit-for-purpose for half the population".Boris Johnson's son Wilf's fourth birthday party has been gaining attention online, after pictures were shared on social media of his celebration featuring a monster truck bouncy castle with separate ball pit, and a bespoke balloon display. Have we finally reached the point of the ridiculous when it comes to children's parties? Journalist Anna Tyzack, who wrote an article about this very subject in the i newspaper, and one half of the comedy duo Scummy Mummies, Helen Thorn, join Anita to discuss. The risk of ACL injuries in female football players is up to six times higher than their male counterparts. Leeds Beckett University is leading a new study into why this risk rate is so high and the impact on athletes. Knee surgeon to the sports stars Andy Williams explains why this may be happening and footballer Emma Samways, of Hashtag United in Essex, tells us about her ACL injury from earlier on this year.Chef Asma Khan has just been named as one of the 100 most influential people of the 2024, by the Time magazine. Asma is the founder of the London restaurant, Darjeeling Express, which has a women-only kitchen, mostly made up of South Asian immigrants over the age of 50. Asma has been a vocal champion for gender equality, and she talks about the change she wants to see in the restaurant industry.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Olivia Skinner
02/05/2457m 15s

Co-parenting, Homelessness and women, Dr Jessica Taylor

Being evicted from your home is an incredibly distressing time for anyone. Something 56-year-old Heidi Dodson is about to experience, she's being evicted by her private landlord from her home. She approached her local council for priority housing but was declined. In a letter from Thurrock Council, she was told she should be able to function 'reasonably well' if she ends up on the streets. Thurrock Council say they are 'truly sorry for the language used in this letter and the distress it has caused. Heidi speaks to Clare McDonnell along with Polly Neate, Chief Executive of housing charity Shelter. What is it really like to be a co-parent? Hayley Allen’s son spends the weekdays with his dad and she takes care of him at the weekends. Carly Harris’ two children spend 80% of their time with her and are looked after by their dad every other weekend. Clare talks to Hayley and Carly about the difficulties and benefits of co-parenting.Dr Jessica Taylor is a best-selling author and chartered psychologist who runs the research consultancy VictimFocus. Her new book, Underclass, is a memoir, detailing her childhood on a council estate in Stoke, the trauma and abuse she suffered and her journey to becoming a professional campaigning on behalf of other victims. Jessica joins Clare to talk about why she wanted to write it.As the second wife of Henry VIII Anne Boleyn’s life and death have been well-documented but what about her sister Mary? A new play, The Other Boleyn Girl, has opened at Chichester Festival Theatre based on Philippa Gregory's best-selling novel. Lucy Phelps plays Mary and Freya Mavor is Anne – they join Philippa Gregory in a conversation with Clare. Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Emma Pearce
01/05/2457m 36s

Sex and choking, Online Abuse and work, Plastic pollution

Research by internationally-renowned sex expert Dr Debby Herbenick from 2020 found that 21% of women had been choked during sex, with this being nearly twice as prevalent among adults under 40. Why are more young people including this as part of their sex lives and what are both the short and long-term health consequences? Dr Debby and Medical Director of the Institute for Addressing Strangulation, Dr Catherine White, talk to Clare McDonnell.As talks reach a conclusion in Ottawa this week on a legally binding global treaty on plastic pollution, we speak to film director and campaigner Eleanor Church. Her documentary, X Trillion, comes out this week, and takes the viewer on an all-female expedition to the North Pacific gyre, where much of the world's plastic waste ends up.What sort of responsibilities do employers have towards women who are abused online because of their job? Dr Rebecca Whittington is the Online Safety Editor for Reach Plc, which publishes newspapers including The Mirror and The Express. She explains how she protects journalists from online harm. Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Neva Missirian
30/04/2457m 30s

Boys, Lyra McKee, Perinatal suicide, South African elections

Catherine Carr has two teenage sons and, through talking to them and to other parents of teenaged boys, she became aware that boys were experiencing confusing and often troubling messages about their role in society. Catherine decided to speak to boys directly and, in a series which is running all week on Radio 4, About the Boys features the voices of teenage boys around the country discussing topics like sex and consent, masculinity, friendship, life online and education. She joins Clare McDonnell to talk about what she has learned.The trial of three men charged with the murder of Belfast journalist Lyra McKee begins today. Lyra McKee died aged 29 in April 2019 after being hit by a bullet during rioting in Londonderry/Derry. Her death made headlines all over the world, and her funeral was attended by hundreds of people, while thousands more watched online. BBC Ireland Correspondent Jennifer O'Leary speaks to Clare from outside court in Belfast.Perinatal suicide, while thankfully rare, is the leading cause of maternal death in the UK. A new study from King’s College London is the first of its kind to focus on the causes. The perinatal period runs from the start of pregnancy to a year after giving birth – and the suicide rates among these women has recently risen. Clare speaks to Dr Abigail Easter, the lead researcher, and Krystal Wilkinson, who shares her own experience.This week marks 30 years since South Africa’s first democratic elections following the end of apartheid. Millions of South Africans braved long queues to take part after decades of white minority rule which denied black people the right to vote. Clare talks to the BBC's Nomsa Maseko about her own memories of 30 years ago, and what has happened in her country since.
29/04/2457m 21s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Zeinab Badawi, Fisherman Ashley Mullenger, Stalking, Singing and periods

The deaths of 21-year-old Diane Jones and her two young children, in a house fire in October 1995 shocked the community of Merthyr Tydfil. The police originally thought it was an accident - but in the days following the fire launched a triple murder investigation after petrol was found on the carpet. Just months later, Annette was charged with triple murder, manslaughter and arson with intent to endanger life. She was found guilty with the charge of arson and sentenced to 13 years. After two-and-a-half years, her conviction was overturned - but it troubled Annette until her death in 2017. Annette’s daughter, Nicole Jacob, is delving into her mum’s story in a new podcast, Wrongly Accused: The Annette Hewins Story. We hear from the journalist and broadcaster Zeinab Badawi to discuss her first book, An African History of Africa: From the Dawn of Humanity to Independence. The book has taken her seven years to research, travelling across 30 countries. She explains how the female African leaders that shaped their countries have often been written out of history.Ashley Mullenger's life changed unexpectedly when she signed up for a fishing trip on the coast of Norfolk. In her memoir, My Fishing Life, it follows her journey from a 9-5 office job, into the overwhelmingly male fishing industry to becoming Fisherman of the Year in 2022. Rhianon Bragg spoke to Woman’s Hour back in February about her concerns for her safety regarding the imminent release of her ex-boyfriend from prison, despite the fact that a Parole Board ruled a few months earlier that such a move would not be safe. In February 2020, Gareth Wynn Jones was given an extended determinate sentence of 4.5 years in prison, with an extended licence period of five years for the crimes of stalking, false imprisonment, making threats to kill and possession of a firearm. Now two months since his release and coinciding with National Stalking Awareness Week, we hear from Rhianon and also Emily Lingley Clark of the Suzy Lamplugh Trust.At the start of the year, acclaimed opera singer Sophie Bevan MBE took to Twitter to ask if other female singers also had voice struggles around the time of their periods. This led to her discovery of premenstrual vocal syndrome, which is when hormone changes cause vocal issues. She talks about the impact this has had on her career, alongside Dr Alan Watson, specialist in the biology of performance at the University of Cardiff.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Annette Wells
27/04/2456m 14s

Weinstein conviction overturned, Fishing, Comeuppance, Ballet pumps

Harvey Weinstein, the disgraced Hollywood film producer, has had his 2020 rape conviction in New York overturned. The New York Court of Appeals has ruled that he did not receive a fair trial, because prosecutors called witnesses whose accusations were not part of the charges against him. The trial was pivotal in the #MeToo movement, the awareness campaign against sexual abuse. Katie Razzall, the BBC’s Culture and Media Editor, and Rowena Chiu, who claimed she was sexually assaulted in a hotel room by Harvey Weinstein when she was his personal assistant in 1998, join Anita Rani to discuss the impact of the new ruling. In 2012, Ashley Mullenger signed up for a fishing trip on the coast of Norfolk which would change the course of her life. Her memoir, My Fishing Life, follows her journey from a 9-5 office job, into the overwhelmingly male fishing industry, to becoming 'Fisherman of the Year', in 2022. Ashley joins Anita to talk about stormy weather, new and old boats, friendship on the water and her personal tale of self discovery and acceptance. As part of the returning noughties fashion trends, ballet pumps are back. The flat, round-toed leather shoes that can be worn with anything. But why are they back? And should we be embracing them or avoiding them? Fashion Editor at The Times Harriet Walker joins Anita to discuss.The Comeuppance is a new play on at the Almeida Theatre in London where five former high-school friends meet up, 20 years on, to reminisce and reconnect. Instead, they end up drinking, fighting and ruing the disappointments of their middle-aged lives. Ursula, Caitlin and Kristina are played by Tamara Lawrance, Yolanda Kettle and Katie Leung who all join Anita in the Woman’s Hour studio.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Donald MacDonald
26/04/2457m 36s

BRCA1, Open relationships, Wrongly Accused: The Annette Hewins Story

The system of one word ratings for schools in England 'should stay' and has 'significant benefits' according to the government. It said the grades, such as 'Inadequate', 'requires improvement' 'good' and "outstanding" gave parents an important summary of local schools. Teaching unions have called for more nuanced ratings  Simon Kidwell  is the President of the school leaders union the NAHT and joins Anita Rani to explain.The Internet Watch Foundation annual report has said that children under six are being manipulated into “disturbing” acts of sexual abuse while parents think they are playing safely on household devices. They say 2023 was “the most extreme year on record”, finding more than 275,000 webpages containing child sexual abuse with a record amount of “category A” material. IWF’s CEO Susie Hargreaves joins Anita to discuss the report’s findings. The deaths of 21-year-old Diane Jones and her two young children, in a house fire in October 1995 shocked the community of Merthyr Tydfil. The police originally thought it was an accident - but in the days following the fire launched a triple murder investigation after petrol was found on the carpet. Just months later, Annette was charged with triple murder, manslaughter and arson with intent to endanger life. She was found guilty with the charge of arson and sentenced to 13 years. After two-and-a-half years, her conviction was overturned - but it troubled Annette until her death in 2017. Annette’s daughter, Nicole Jacob, is delving into her mum’s story in a new podcast, Wrongly Accused: The Annette Hewins Story. Cassie Werber’s new novel Open Season features a romantic relationship between two couples who are exploring the possibilities of open relationships. It’s a world that Cassie herself in familiar with in real-life with her husband, and she joins Anita to discuss the inspiration for her book. Beaux Harris lost her mother, grandmother and aunt to cancers caused by the same gene mutation – called BRCA1. Two years ago, Beaux discovered she has the same BRCA1 gene mutation. Anita talks to Dany Bell from Macmillan and to Beaux about her story and how she’s now chosen to fundraise to pay for preventative treatment. Presented by Anita Rani Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Bob Nettles
25/04/2457m 19s

Zeinab Badawi, Singing and periods, How is the debate over abortion shaping the US election?

The broadcaster Zeinab Badawi joins Krupa Padhy to discuss her first book, An African History of Africa: From the Dawn of Humanity to Independence. The book has taken her seven years to research, travelling across 30 countries. She explains how the female African leaders that shaped their countries have often been written out of history. At the start of the year, acclaimed opera singer Sophie Bevan took to Twitter to ask if other female singers also had voice struggles around the time of their periods. This led to her discovery of premenstrual vocal syndrome, which is when hormone changes cause vocal issues. She talks about the impact this has had on her career, alongside Dr Alan Watson, specialist in the biology of performance at the University of Cardiff.Democrats in the US state of Arizona are attempting to repeal a law from 1864 that bans nearly all abortions. Also the US Supreme Court will hear arguments in an Idaho hospital case, on whether hospitals can override state abortion restrictions in order to save a mother’s life. New York Times correspondent Elizabeth Dias explains how abortion rights are shaping this year’s presidential election and which camp could benefit from the abortion debate. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Olivia Skinner
24/04/2456m 50s

Kitty Ruskin's year of casual sex, The Girls of Slender Means, ARFID

Ten Men, A Year of Casual Sex is a new book from the author Kitty Ruskin. It follows a year of her life when she attempts to embody Samantha from Sex and the City and enjoy all the advantages of being young, free and single. As she details 10 men in 10 chapters, the stories range from sexy and funny to at times deeply confronting and violent, including rape. Kitty joins Krupa Padhy to discuss.Today, the government has accepted an amendment to the Victims and Prisoners Bill they say could be a big step forward for rape victims. The amendment will help ensure extra protection for victims’ counselling notes, by raising the threshold that needs to be met for the police to ask for them. It’s something that charities like Rape Crisis and the End Violence Against Women Coalition have been campaigning for. Joining Krupa is Baroness Gabby Bertin, the Conservative peer who tabled the amendment.According to new research, people who are 65 think that old age begins just before you turn 75. However, 74-year-olds think old age starts at 77. Women think old age starts later than men do. So when are you 'old' and what does 'old' mean? Krupa speaks to Steph Daniels who re-joined her local hockey team at 75, after a 40-year gap, and has just started managing a band again.ARFID stands for Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder. Commonly underdiagnosed as picky eating, we’ll hear how the eating disorder manifests in children and what it’s like for parents. Krupa speaks to a mother, Lisa Hale, whose son has the condition and Professor Sandeep Ranote, Clinical Spokesperson for the eating disorders charity BEAT.An adaption of Muriel Spark’s novel The Girls of Slender Means is currently on at The Royal Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh. Set in the summer of 1945, it follows the adventures of a group of young women who are caught between hope and unhappiness. As each girl grapples with what happened in the war, they begin to imagine what lies ahead of them in peacetime. Actress and writer Gabriel Quigley tells Krupa how she felt adapting the words of one of the greatest British novelists.
23/04/2457m 29s

Peres Jepchirchir, Rhianon Bragg and stalking, Nitazenes, Tortured poets

The Kenyan distance runner Peres Jepchirchir won yesterday’s elite women's London Marathon, breaking the women’s only record with her time of 2:16:16. She beat the previous record set in 2017 of 2:17:01. This was the fastest time in a race without male pace makers. More than 50,000 people ran and some gave themselves an even bigger challenge than just running the course. Laura Bird from St Ives in Cambridgeshire ran with a fridge strapped to her back - aiming to earn a place in the Guinness Book of Records. Peres and Laura both join Krupa Padhy.Rhianon Bragg spoke to Woman’s Hour back in February about her concerns for her safety regarding the imminent release of her ex-boyfriend from prison, despite the fact that a Parole Board ruled a few months earlier that such a move would not be safe. In February 2020, Gareth Wynn Jones was given an extended determinate sentence of 4.5 years in prison, with an extended licence period of five years for the crimes of stalking, false imprisonment, making threats to kill and possession of a firearm. Now two months since his release and coinciding with National Stalking Awareness Week, we hear from Rhianon and also Emily Lingley Clark of the Suzy Lamplugh Trust.Taylor Swift’s latest album, The Tortured Poets Department, has just been released. We thought it was a great excuse to look at the female poets, past and present, who could be considered ‘tortured’… Or is it more of a male trope? Classicist and author of Devine Might, Natalie Haynes, and Irish Indian poet Nikita Gill discuss.A BBC investigation has traced how a deadly form of synthetic drugs have been getting into the UK from China - and exposed the role of major social media platforms. Nitazenes, which are illegal in the UK, have been linked to more than 100 deaths in England and Wales since June 2023. We hear from Claire Rocha, whose son died after taking drugs unknowingly laced with Nitazene, and Caroline Copeland, a senior lecturer in toxicology and pharmacology at King’s College London.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Emma Harth
22/04/2457m 19s

Woman's Hour special: Breaking The Cycle

Over the past few weeks, Woman’s Hour has been telling the stories of young people, staff and parents involved in SHiFT in Greater Manchester. SHiFT is a new approach to helping young people at risk of getting into serious trouble and it is all about relationships. Skilled professionals called ‘guides’ work with teenagers for an 18-month period and they just keep showing up. Our reporter Jo Morris went out and about with the team and spoke to teenagers and a mum about the impact of this new approach.In this special podcast episode, our presenter Nuala McGovern guides you through the stories you might have missed.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Reporter: Jo Morris Producer: Erin Riley
21/04/2458m 9s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Ruth Wilson, Young women and voting, Jing Lusi

This week, Ruth Wilson explains why she’s running this year’s London Marathon for an Alzheimer’s research, following in the footsteps of her father who ran the first London Marathon in 1981.Tuesday was the deadline to register to vote in the local elections on May 2nd. The most recent data suggest that 4.3 million young people in England aren’t currently registered. We hear from Sharon Gaffka, who’s supporting the Give an X campaign, that's calling on young people to get involved. A survey by the youth led charity My Life My Say also says that fewer than 1 in 6 of young women trust politicians and more than four in 10 believe their vote won’t make a difference in an election. We also hear from Rosie Campbell, Professor of Politics and Director of the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership at King’s College London, to explain the trends behind the latest data.Social media platform Meta disabled Soul Sisters Pakistan for 43 hours earlier this month due to an intellectual property violation. Soul Sisters Pakistan was set up 11 years ago by the entrepreneur and activist Kanwal Ahmed as a support system for women to discuss topics considered taboo in Pakistani society, such as sex and divorce. In the past, the group has been accused by some of promoting divorce and 'wild' behaviour. With over 300,000 members, who dub themselves soulies, In 1927 journalist Sophie Treadwell attended the sensational trial of Ruth Snyder, a New York woman accused murdering her husband. Ruth was found guilty, along with her accomplice lover Henry Judd Gray, and both were executed by electric chair in January 1928. Those events inspired Sophie Treadwell to write the play Machinal, which premiered on Broadway later that year. A recent production has just transferred from the Theatre Royal Bath to the Old Vic in London and its star, Rosie Sheehy, along with US academic Dr Jessie Ramey join Jessica to discuss the case of Ruth Snyder and why Machinal still resonates with audiences today.Professor Netta Weinstein of the University of Reading, is the co-author of a new book, Solitude: The Science and Power of Being Alone and joins us to discuss the benefits of solitude.Jing Lusi stars as DC Hana Li in ITV’s new thriller Red Eye, set on a plane flying between London and Beijing. She joins Jessica Creighton to talk about what it’s like to play a lead role for the first time, and how important it is to see British East Asian women as the main progatonistPresenter Anita Rani Producer Annette Wells
20/04/2455m 58s

Solitude, Apprentice winner Rachel Woolford, Personal space, Kids and smartphones

Nearly a quarter of five-to-seven-year-olds now have their own smartphone according to OFCOM. Social media use also rose in the same age group over the last year with nearly two in five using the messaging service WhatsApp, despite its minimum age of 13. The communications regulator in its annual study of children's relationship with technology warned parental enforcement of rules 'appeared to be diminishing'. It also said the figures should be a 'wake up call' for the industry to do more to protect children. Anita Rani is joined by Daisy Greenwell, co-founder of a campaigning organisation Smartphone Free Childhood.Earlier this week Reverend Grace Thomas posted a photo on social media of a male passenger having chosen to sit next to her on a practically empty bus. The attached message read, 'Please don't do this… it immediately puts me on edge. I can't be alone in this, surely.' It turns out she wasn’t; her post has attracted more than 10 million views, 150,000 likes and hundreds of comments that include women with similar experiences. Reverend Grace joins Anita along with Michael Conroy, founder of Men At Work, who trains professionals that work with boys and young men.On average, we spend one-third of our waking life alone. Anita talks to psychologist Netta Weinstein, Professor of Psychology at the University of Reading, who has co-written a new book called Solitude: The Science and Power of Being Alone. Whether you love it or try to avoid it, she explains the benefits of being alone and gives us some tips on how to be better at it. The final episode of the 18th series of The Apprentice aired last night. After a battle that saw boutique gyms go head-to-head with a pie delivery service, Lord Alan Sugar decided to invest two hundred and fifty thousand pounds into a luxury gym business run by Rachel Woolford. Anita speaks to the entrepreneur about her victory.This weekend it’s the 100 year anniversary of the death of Marie Corelli, the promoter of Shakespeare’s house and a bestselling novelist in her own right; she outsold HG Wells and Arthur Conan Doyle, publishing 25 books which were devoured in their millions by English readers, Americans and those in the colonies. Anouska Lester, an academic talks to Anita about Marie Corelli.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Donald MacDonald
19/04/2457m 7s

Ruth Wilson, periods and concussion, Ashley Storrie on BBC comedy Dinosaur, sewing for mental health

Ruth Wilson explains why she’s running this year’s London marathon for an Alzheimer’s charity, following in the footsteps of her Father who ran the first London marathon in 1981. During the Women's Rugby Six Nations, the Welsh Rugby Union is using a new technique to assess the impact a player's periods can have when they suffer a concussion. It's the first time data on concussion and periods has been gathered collectively and the hope is it'll help players adapt their training if necessary. Jo Perkins, Head Physio of the Welsh women's squad explains the research. ITV's Kate Garraway has taken to social media to express her frustration at her local council still sending post to her late husband, Derek. What can you do to make post-death administration simpler and less distressing? Jessica is joined by founder and CEO of the Good Grief Trust, Linda Magistris, to give advice. Ashley Storrie is the star and co-creator of a brand new BBC comedy series called Dinosaur. It centres around Nina, whose sister has just announced she’s getting married to someone she’s known for six weeks. Ashley joins Jessica to talk about why it was important to her to play an autistic woman, as she is autistic herself, and how writing the series is her dream job.And can sewing improve your mental health? Following Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe’s interview on Woman’s Hour about how sewing helped her while she was imprisoned, Jessica Crighton hears from other keen sewers about the impact it’s had on their lives.Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Olivia Skinner
18/04/2457m 16s

Cricketer Nat Sciver-Brunt, Smacking, Hypochondria, Police drama Blue Lights, Soul Sisters Pakistan

Nat Sciver-Brunt is the first English woman to be honored as Wisden's leading cricketer in the world. She joins Jesscia Creighton to discuss the accolade and her career in the sport. Smacking children should be made illegal in England and Northern Ireland, say the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. Striking a child is already illegal in Scotland and Wales, and in many other countries around the world. Dr Rowena Christmas, Chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners, talks about the ban in Wales, which she was instrumental in bringing in, and which has been in place for the last two years.A self-described hypochrondriac, the author Caroline Crampton's new book A Body of Glass is a personal memoir and history of this elusive conditon. Beginning in the age of Hippocrates she joins Jessica to discuss the gendered history of this outdated term and her realtionship with it. The actor Sian Brooke returns as Grace Ellis for the second series of Blue Lights on BBC One. She joins Jessica to talk about the role, and what she's learnt from diving into the world of policing in Belfast. Social media platform Meta disabled Soul Sisters Pakistan for 43 hours earlier this month due to an intellectual property violation. Soul Sisters Pakistan was set up 11 years ago by the entrepreneur and activist Kanwal Ahmed as a support system for women to discuss topics considered taboo in Pakistani society, such as sex and divorce. In the past, the group has been accused by some of promoting divorce and 'wild' behavior. With over 300,000 members, who dub themselves soulies, she joins Jessica to discuss.Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Dianne McGregor
17/04/2457m 28s

Hollywood film producer Deborah Snyder, Young women and voting, Machinal star Rosie Sheehy

Deborah Snyder has produced some of the biggest blockbusters and action franchises in the last decade including Wonder Woman, 300 and Watchmen. Her newest work, Rebel Moon - Part Two: The Scargiver arrives on Netflix this week. It's the second instalment of the Rebel Moon series, a space opera set in a fictional galaxy with a female protagonist. Deborah produced it alongside her husband and long-term creative collaborator, director Zack Snyder. She joins Jessica Creighton live in the studio.A proposed new UK tournament for women's tennis at The Queen's Club in London is facing a set-back. They need to convince the men's professional tennis circuit that they won't damage the grass for the men's tournament at the same club the following week. The week-long women's event would be staged for the first time in 2025, and would replace Eastbourne as the only Women's Tennis Association 500 event, taking place in the UK in the run-up to Wimbledon. Jess speaks to tennis broadcaster Catherine Whitaker to discuss.Today is the deadline to register to vote in the local elections on May 2nd. The most recent data suggest that 4.3 million young people in England aren’t currently registered. Jessica speaks to Sharon Gaffka, who’s supporting the Give an X campaign, calling on young people to get involved. A survey by the youth led charity My Life My Say also says that fewer than 1 in 6 of young women trust politicians and more than four in 10 believe their vote won’t make a difference in an election. Also joining Jessica is Rosie Campbell, Professor of Politics and Director of the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership at King’s College London, to explain the trends behind the latest data.In 1927 journalist Sophie Treadwell attended the sensational trial of Ruth Snyder, a New York woman accused murdering her husband. Ruth was found guilty, along with her accomplice lover Henry Judd Gray, and both were executed by electric chair in January 1928. Those events inspired Sophie Treadwell to write the play Machinal, which premiered on Broadway later that year. A recent production has just transferred from the Theatre Royal Bath to the Old Vic in London and its star, Rosie Sheehy, along with US academic Dr Jessie Ramey join Jessica to discuss the case of Ruth Snyder and why Machinal still resonates with audiences today.
16/04/2457m 22s

Jing Lusi, Fatal stabbings in Sydney, Australia, Declaration of the Rights of the Child

Australian police investigating the fatal stabbing of six people at the crowded shopping centre in Bondi Junction, Sydney say they're looking into whether the attacker deliberately targeted women. Joel Cauchi killed five women - and a male security guard who tried to intervene - before he was shot dead by police. Eight of the twelve injured who went to hospital, including a baby, are also female. To find out more Jessica Creighton is joined by BBC Australia correspondent Katy Watson based in Sydney.Jing Lusi stars as DC Hana Li in ITV’s new thriller Red Eye, set on a plane flying between London and Beijing. She joins Jessica Creighton to talk about what it’s like to play a lead role for the first time, and how important it is to see British East Asian women as the main progatonist.Ten years ago 276 Nigerian school girls were abducted by the Islamist group Boko Haram from their school in Chibok, a town in the north-east of Nigeria. A decade later, dozens of the girls are still missing and kidnappings are once again on the rise in Nigeria. Jessica is joined from Lagos by BBC Africa Senior reporter Yemisi Adegoke.2024 marks the centenary of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child. First written by British feminists, it was adopted by the League of Nations in 1924. Today we know it as the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Dr Emily Baughan, Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of Sheffield explains the role women played in its creation. Plus, Danielle Scott, Assistant Vice Principal at Green Gates Academy, explains how the rights are still being used in schools today.A real life experience of a mugging in New York inspired Imogen Wade to write a poem which has just won the National Poetry Competition, coming first out of 19000 entries. She joins Jessica to share her poem and, as a counsellor, to explain how the act of writing helped her to process the experience.Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Donald MacDonald
15/04/2457m 21s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Juliet open letter, Vogue’s Chioma Nnadi, Female Psychopath

This week, it was announced that 883 actors, writers, comedians and creatives had signed an open letter in support of Francesca Amewudah-Rivers, the star in a new production of Romeo & Juliet, due to run in London's West End next month. The open letter came after a statement was published by the Jamie Lloyd Company, "Following the announcement of our Romeo & Juliet cast, there has been a barrage of deplorable racial abuse online directed towards a member of our company..." It was co-authored by actor Susan Wokoma who told us about the open letter.We hear from the new head of British Vogue Chioma Nnadi, a London born, fashion journalist, podcaster and the first black woman to lead the title.We hear the stories of women living in a women’s refuge in London.Do you remember our segment on female psychopaths? We hear from one woman who has been officially diagnosed with the condition, M.E Thomas.The pioneering feminist, journalist and activist Gloria Steinem made a name for herself in the 1960s and 70s through her journalism, which included going undercover at the New York Playboy Club to expose exploitative working conditions. She co-founded the Women's Action Alliance and in 1972 she co-founded Ms Magazine, putting conversations about gender equality, reproductive rights and social justice in the spotlight, and bringing the issues of the women's rights movement into the mainstream. Gloria has just celebrated her 90th birthday and tells us about the current state of reproductive rights in the US, the importance of community and hosting her own women's talking circle.Could we be happier and more successful if we acted like toddlers? Dr Hasan Merali, Paediatric emergency medicine physician, Associate Professor at McMaster University and author of Sleep Well, Take Risks, Squish the Peas, tells us what we can learn about self-improvement from toddlers.And we have music from the singer songwriter Rebecca Ferguson.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
13/04/2452m 58s

Marian Keyes, Juliet open letter, Swiss climate victory

Irish author Marian Keyes writes funny, clever novels about life including: Rachel’s Holiday, Anybody out There, Grown Ups, Angels. She covers issues such as addiction, break-ups, baby loss, anxiety, depression and love, with women at the heart. We all make mistakes, but when do we stop making the same one over and over again? This is the question at the heart of Marian’s latest novel: My Favourite Mistake. She joins Anita Rani to discuss that, mistakes, perimenopause and ‘feathery strokers’.In a landmark case, the European Court of Human Rights ruled that Switzerland was violating the human rights of its citizens by inadequate action on climate change. A group of more than 2,000 older Swiss women launched the case nine years ago, calling for better protection of women's health from the effects of climate change. The Court's ruling is binding and can trickle down to influence the law in 46 countries in Europe. Anita talks to one of the senior women who brought the case, Elisabeth Stern, and the group's lawyer, Jessica Simor. Almost 30 years ago, Nicole Brown and her friend Ron Goldman were stabbed to death in Los Angeles. The prime suspect was OJ Simpson, Nicole’s ex-husband and a well-known NFL player turned actor. What followed remains one of the most famous murder trials in history, televised and watched by millions. He was acquitted of the murders of Nicole and Ron. He did plead no contest to charges of ‘spousal battery’ – what we now call domestic violence. And he was later found liable for the deaths in a separate civil case. OJ Simpson died on Wednesday at the age of 76. To talk about the impact his trial had on the perception of violence against women in the US is Sarah Baxter, Director of the Marie Colvin Center for International Reporting and former Deputy Editor of The Sunday Times. This week, it was announced that 883 actors, writers, comedians and creatives had signed an open letter in support of Francesca Amewudah-Rivers, the star in a new production of Romeo & Juliet, due to run in London's West End next month. The open letter came after a statement was published by the Jamie Lloyd Company, "Following the announcement of our Romeo & Juliet cast, there has been a barrage of deplorable racial abuse online directed towards a member of our company..." It was co-authored by actors Susan Wokoma and writer Somalia Nonyé Seaton and Susan joins Anita to talk about the issues.On 6 April 1999, Mamma Mia! opened in the West End. As the show celebrates its 25th anniversary, Woman's Hour celebrates the music of one of the most popular and successful musicals of all time. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
12/04/2456m 17s

Gloria Steinem at 90, Rebecca Ferguson, Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe

The pioneering feminist, journalist and activist Gloria Steinem made a name for herself in the 1960s and 70s through her journalism, which included going undercover at the New York Playboy Club to expose exploitative working conditions. She co-founded the Women's Action Alliance and in 1972 she co-founded Ms Magazine, putting conversations about gender equality, reproductive rights and social justice in the spotlight, and bringing the issues of the women's rights movement into the mainstream. Gloria has just celebrated her 90th birthday and joins Emma Barnett to talk about the current state of reproductive rights in the US, the importance of community and hosting her own women's talking circle.Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe spent six years being held by the Iranian regime after visiting her family there in 2016. When she was finally released, she chose to speak first to Woman's Hour, in May 2022. Nazanin shared then what life was like in Iran's most notorious prison, how she survived being away from her daughter and her view on - as she put it - being used a political pawn between Iran and Britain. She returns to Woman's Hour for Emma's last programme, to talk about what she's been doing since she came home.From the X Factor to Lady Sings the Blues, Rebecca Ferguson has become one of the UK’s most successful soul vocalists, renowned for her unique, crisp, husky vocals. Her hit albums include Heaven, Freedom and Superwoman. She has duetted with Lionel Ritchie, Andrea Bocelli and Christina Aguilera, and collaborated with John Legend and Nile Rodgers. Rebecca has also become a notable campaigner for change. Last year she was one of the main contributors to the government's Misogyny in Music report and played an integral part in the introduction of the Creative Industries Independent Standards Authority to protect women. She performs live in the studio, and talks to Emma about her work.
11/04/2453m 55s

The Cass Review, Back to Black, Female Psychopath

The long awaited Cass Review, published on Wednesday by paediatrician Dr Hilary Cass, calls for gender services for young people to match the standards of other NHS care. Emma Barnett is joined by the former BBC journalist Hannah Barnes, now Associate Editor at The New Statesman and author of Time To Think - the inside story of the collapse of the Tavistock's gender service in children. Alison Owen is the powerhouse British film producer behind the new biopic of Amy Winehouse, Back to Black, released this Friday. In it, the actor Marisa Abela recreates many of Amy’s iconic performances, recordings and her most famous paparazzi moments. Alison joins Emma to discuss why she wanted to make the film, which comes out almost 13 years after Amy’s death.Childlessness not out of choice is a difficult subject to discuss. Those who have experienced it are usually left to grieve and heal alone. Those who have friends and family members wrestling with infertility don’t even know how to talk about it. A new book with 22 personal stories about involuntary childlessness hopes to offer a support group for almost-parents. Emma Barnett talks to the author of ‘No One Talks About This Stuff’ Kat Brown and one of the contributors Rageshri Dhairyawan about their experiences.Do you remember our segment on female psychopaths? We’ll hear from one woman who has been officially diagnosed with the condition. M.E Thomas speaks to Emma about living with psychopathy. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
10/04/2456m 35s

Vogue's Chioma Nnadi, Life in a women’s refuge, Parents jailed after son’s mass shooting

Emma Barnett talks to the new head of British Vogue Chioma Nnadi, a London born, fashion journalist, podcaster and the first black woman to lead the title. Forensic psychologist Jillian Peterson and legal expert Tim Carey on the sentencing of Jennifer and James Crumbley, the parents convicted of manslaughter after their 15-year-old son brought a gun to school in Michigan and killed four of his classmates. We hear the stories of women living in a women’s refuge in London. And the latest on the stabbing of a Bradford mum at the weekend.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Phil Lander
09/04/2457m 25s

Westminster honeytrap scam, What we can learn from toddlers, Saudi Arabia

Dame Andrea Jenkyns MP has become the first woman to publicly speak about being a victim to the suspected Westminster honeytrap scam. What does the scam mean for politics? And what do we mean by honeytrap? Former deputy chief whip Anne Milton joins Emma Barnett to discuss, along with political correspondent at The Sun, Noa Hoffman.During the late 90s and the early 2000s, belly button piercings were everywhere. They were made popular by celebrities like Naomi Campbell, Britney Spears and Beyoncé. The trend slowly faded away in the 2010s, but with 90s and Y2K fashion back in style - so is the belly button piercing. Fashion Director at The Sunday Times, Karen Dacre, got one the first time around, and Dr Helge Gillmeister, Reader of Psychology at the University of Essex, has studied the appeal of the belly button piercing. They join Emma to discuss naval piercings. Could we be happier and more successful if we acted like toddlers? Dr Hasan Merali, Paediatric emergency medicine physician, Associate Professor at McMaster University and author of Sleep Well, Take Risks, Squish the Peas, tells Emma what we can learn about self-improvement from toddlers.The WTA Finals this year will be held in Riyadh, Saudia Arabia. The decision has drawn criticism from female tennis legends such as Martina Navratilova, because of the state of women’s rights in the country, but others including Billie Jean King support the move. What is life like for women in Saudia Arabia today? And why has the WTA chosen them to host the finals? Emma speaks to sports journalist Molly McElwee and Professor at the LSE Middle East Centre, Madawi Al-Rasheed. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
08/04/2457m 34s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Pregnancy discrimination, Girls State and Carly Pearce

An employment tribunal has ruled that describing an expectant mother as 'emotional' at work was discrimination. Described as a David and Goliath case, Nicola Hinds, who had been an account manager at Mitie, a FTSE 250 company, represented herself. The judge upheld her claims of pregnancy discrimination and constructive dismissal saying she was 'inexcusably' ignored by her boss and portrayed as 'hormonal'. She is now in line to receive compensation.A new documentary film, Girls State, spotlights the girls hoping they will become the first female President of the United States. It follows a real-life mock government programme attended by teenage girls in Missouri. The American Legion, who run the programmes, hold separate programmes for boys and girls in all fifty states in the US. Emma is joined by the film-maker Amanda McBain and Emily Worthmore, one of the girls who stands for Governor, the highest position in the mock government.It’s almost the end of Ramadan 2024 – the month of fasting observed by Muslims all over the world. But what’s it like to be a modern woman, potentially on your period, and still going through Ramadan? We hear from Mehreen Baig from the podcast Not Even Water and Hodo Ibrahim, co-host of The Oversharers podcast, on the challenges and advantages of being a Muslim woman in Ramadan.A new play at the Hampstead Theatre – The Divine Mrs S - explores the life of Sarah Siddons, who was the first truly respected female actor in theatre, achieving a huge level of celebrity at the end of the 18th century. April De Angelis’ backstage comedy explores the origins of celebrity culture and portrays Siddons, played by Rachael Stirling, as a pioneer in command of her own image and craft. We hear from April and Rachael about what inspired them to bring Siddons back to life.And we have music and chat with one of Country Music’s biggest female stars, Carly Pearce, who went from working at Dollywood aged 16 to becoming a Grammy and three-time Country Music Association winner.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
06/04/2453m 2s

Rwanda genocide, Bowie's hairdresser, womanhood during Ramadan

Ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Rwanda genocide on Sunday, April 7th, BBC journalist Victoria Uwonkunda returns to the counry for the first time after fleeing the genocide as a child in 1994, to find out how the country, and its people, are healing.Lots of our favourite pop - or rock - stars have had iconic looks to go along with their music. Suzi Ronson is the woman behind a hairstyle many of us will recognise - the red spiky hair of Ziggy Stardust, a character and onstage persona created by David Bowie. Her new memoir, Me and Mr Jones: My Life with David Bowie and the Spiders from Mars, talks about her time with the band during the 70s and meeting her late husband, guitarist Mick Ronson.It’s almost the end of Ramadan 2024 – the month of fasting observed by Muslims all over the world. But what’s it like to be a modern woman, potentially on your period, and still going through Ramadan? Anita speaks with Mehreen Baig from the podcast Not Even Water and Hodo Ibrahim, co-host of The Oversharers podcast, on the challenges and advantages of being a Muslim woman in Ramadan.You'll likely see the price of getting your nails done go up as of Monday, on what's being called the National Nail Tech Price Increase Day. While you might be paying around £40 to get your nails done, your nail technician would only take home around £7 an hour, once you take away the costs of things like tools and products. Amy Guy is the founder of Nail Tech Org and Rochelle Anthony owns her own salon, and they talk about what the price rise means to them.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Cecelia Armstrong
05/04/2457m 9s

Pregnancy discrimination, Prue Leith, Femcels, Social workers on screen

An employment tribunal has ruled that describing an expectant mother as 'emotional' at work was discrimination. Described as a David and Goliath case, Nicola Hinds, who had been an account manager at Mitie, a FTSE 250 company, represented herself. The judge upheld her claims of pregnancy discrimination and constructive dismissal saying she was 'inexcusably' ignored by her boss and portrayed as 'hormonal'. She is now in line to receive compensation. Nicola joins Emma Barnett.82% of social workers are women, and they are fed up of seeing themselves portrayed as baddies on screen. Social Work England says they end up depicted in dramas as dragging children away from their families. Reporter Melanie Abbott talks to social worker in training Ceira Walsh about the impact on her. And Sarah Blackmore from Social Work England and screenwriter Emma Reeves, responsible for Elaine the Pain in the Tracy Beaker series, discuss with Emma Barnett what changes could be made.Emma speaks to Dame Prue Leith, the chef, author and TV personality, who took part in her first ever catwalk this week at the age of 84. She wore clothes designed by the brand Vin and Omi, who've collaborated with the King to use plants grown in his garden to make their sustainable clothes. What are femcels? The female version of incels, or involuntary celibates. are the subject of a new Channel 4 documentary, Emma speaks to Dr Jilly Kay from Loughborough University to hear more about research into this group and what their online activity looks like.
04/04/2457m 32s

Girls State, Author Holly Gramazio, First female prime minister of the DRC

In the run-up to local elections in England and Wales, the Local Government Alliance have called for the law to change around publicising local councillors' home addresses. This is after some councillors are warning that a recent upsurge of abuse and threats is forcing large numbers of women to quit their roles in local government. Emma Barnett speaks to viral lockdown star Jackie Weaver about being a woman in local government. Judith Suminwa Tuluka has been appointed the first ever female prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo. A former planning minister, she’s relatively unknown – so what does this mean for the DRC, and the women who live there? Emma finds out more about the new prime minister with BBC Monitoring’s Beverley Ochieng and the co-founder of a DRC NGO, Anny Modi.How did 77 women from the same Cambridge college end up working at Bletchley Park during the war? Dr Sally Waugh, an alumna of women-only Newnham College, has uncovered a previously unknown contingent of female codebreakers and other staff who were recruited to conduct top secret work as undergraduates. Emma speaks to her to find out more.A new documentary film, Girls State, spotlights the girls hoping they will become the first female President of the United States. It follows a real-life mock government programme attended by teenage girls in Missouri. The American Legion, who run the programmes, hold separate programmes for boys and girls in all fifty states in the US. Emma is joined by the film-maker Amanda McBain and Emily Worthmore, one of the girls who stands for Governor, the highest position in the mock government.Games writer and author Holly Gramazio’s debut novel explores a world where an endless supply of husbands emerges from the attic. But when you can change husbands as easily as a lightbulb, how do you know when to stick with the one you’ve got? Holly joins Emma, live in the Woman’s Hour studio. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
03/04/2456m 56s

Scotland's hate crime law, Motherhood and art, Actor Rachael Stirling

Scotland's new hate crime law came in to effect yesterday. The Act creates a crime of "stirring up hatred" relating to age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, transgender identity or being intersex. To discuss the concerns some women have Emma Barnett is joined by Susan Smith, co-director of the group For Women Scotland, and The Times journalist John Boothman.A new play at the Hampstead Theatre – The Divine Mrs S - explores the life of Sarah Siddons, who was the first truly respected female actor in theatre, achieving a huge level of celebrity at the end of the 18th century. April De Angelis’ backstage comedy explores the origins of celebrity culture and portrays Siddons, played by Rachael Stirling, as a pioneer in command of her own image and craft. Emma talks to April and Rachael about what inspired them to bring Siddons back to life. Why have women with children long struggled to be taken seriously as artists? Acts of Creation: On Art and Motherhood looks at the joys and heartaches, mess, myths and mishaps of motherhood through over 60 artists and 100 artworks. Art critic Hettie Judah who curated the exhibition and artist and senior lecturer at the Royal College of Art Hermione Wiltshire who has two pieces of work displayed in it join Emma. In January 2023, Eleanor Williams was found guilty of perverting the course of justice after inflicting injuries on herself and then posting pictures of them claiming they were a result of rape and grooming. Why would she lie? That’s the subject of a new podcast, Unreliable Witness, which looks into what happened before, during and after the accusations made by Eleanor. Sky News Specialist Producer Liz Lane joins Emma to talk about the new discoveries about the story she made while looking into what happened.
02/04/2457m 32s

Women in Country Music

From Beyoncé's new country album to Shania headlining Glastonbury, country music is reaching new heights of popularity. Who are the women leading the charge, who are the icons who inspired them, and how many barriers are still left to be broken?We speak to one of its biggest female stars, Carly Pearce, who went from working at Dollywood aged 16 to becoming a Grammy and three-time Country Music Association winner.We explore the sexism still facing women in the industry as female singers remain dramatically underrepresented on US country radio, charts and awards. We also discuss the growth of the genre in the UK, why it's inspired countless films and TV shows, and its history and icons from Dolly Parton and Linda Martell to Patsy Cline.We're joined by Marissa Moss, author of Her Country; Beverly Keel, co-founder of Change The Conversation; Alex Hannaby, Head of UK at Big Machine; Simeon Hammond Dallas, singer-songwriter; Helen Brown, arts journalist; Professor Francesca Royster, author of Black Country Music; Nicole Taylor, screenwriter; and Zoe Hodges, music journalist.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Louise Corley
01/04/2452m 41s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Katie Price, Anne Hathaway and Jessica Chastain, Biba exhibition

Model turned TV personality Katie Price joins Clare McDonnell to talk about her views on young women getting cosmetic surgery, after having several procedures herself.It’s 60 years since the first Biba shop opened and the Fashion and Textile Museum in London have just launched a new exhibition: The Biba Story - 1964-1975. On until September, it explores how the fashion phenomenon blossomed to become the world’s first lifestyle label. Nuala McGovern speaks to its founder, Barbara Hulanicki, and the curator of the exhibition, Martin Pel.Australian politician Georgie Purcell is the youngest woman in the parliament of the state of Victoria. From posting TikToks about animal rights, politics, and beer, to archiving her life achievements with tattoos and sharing photos of herself pole dancing – she is definitely not your average politician. She’s also been a target of almost constant sexist attacks and abuse, which on occasions made her fear for her life. Georgie talks to Nuala about why she's still determined to get more women into politics.Described as a grim portrayal of human nature, Mothers’ Instinct is a film about the darker side of maternal love. Academy Award-winning actresses Jessica Chastain and Anne Hathaway play best friends raising sons of the same age in the same neighbourhood. The psychological thriller follows their apparently picture-perfect life in Sixties suburbia. The two friends in real life join Nuala to discuss.TM Payne, or Tina, spent the last two decades working in the criminal justice system, specialising in domestic abuse. She’s now turned her hand to writing and is set to publish her first crime novel on the 1 April. She talks about her years in policing and her new-found passion for fiction.And MOBO Award-winning singer and songwriter, Zara McFarlane, one of the UK's leading jazz vocalists. She will be appearing at this year’s Cheltenham Jazz Festival. Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
30/03/2452m 17s

Katie Price, A decade of same-sex marriage, From policing to crime-writing

Model turned TV personality Katie Price joins Clare McDonnell to talk about her views on young women getting cosmetic surgery, after having several procedures herself.Today marks ten years since the first marriages of lesbian couples in England & Wales. We speak to women impacted by this change in law, and what being able to marry in a same-sex couple - rather than have a civil partnership - meant to them, a decade ago. All week we’ve been looking at a new way of supporting young people at risk of getting into trouble. Our reporter Jo Morris has been meeting them, their parents and some of the SHiFT ‘Guides’ at a practice in Greater Manchester . Today Jo meets the youngest of them, Robyn. She’s only 27 and came to SHiFT after working in a school. She wanted to be able to do more for the children in her charge and has very personal reasons for feeling a connection with young people who need help. TM Payne, or Tina, spent the last 2 decades working in the criminal justice system, specialising in domestic abuse. She’s now turned her hand to writing and is set to publish her first crime novel on the 1st of April. She talks about her years in policing and her new-found passion for fiction.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Engineer: Emma Harth
29/03/2457m 2s

Biba exhibition, Pupil behaviour, Australian politician Georgie Purcell, Breaking the cycle

Nearly one in five teachers working in England has been hit by a pupil, according to a new BBC commissioned survey of 9,000 teachers. The survey, gathered between February and March this year, also found that 15% of secondary school teachers say they have experienced sexual harassment from a pupil when working at a school. The teacher workforce is predominantly female, 76% of teachers are women. Nuala McGovern is joined by Dr Patrick Roach, General Secretary of teacher’s union NASUWT. It’s 60 years since the first Biba shop opened and the Fashion and Textile Museum in London have just opened a new exhibition: The Biba Story - 1964-1975. On until the 8 September, it explores how the fashion phenomenon blossomed to become the world’s first lifestyle label. Nuala speaks to its founder - Barbara Hulanicki - and the curator of the exhibition - Martin Pel. Australian politician Georgie Purcell is the youngest woman in the parliament of the state of Victoria. She’s also a former stripper who holds degrees in law, and communications and politics. From posting TikToks about animal rights, politics, and beer, to archiving her life achievements with tattoos and sharing photos of herself pole dancing – she is definitely not your average politician. She’s also been a target of almost constant sexist attacks and abuse, which on occasions made her fear for her life. Georgie talks to Nuala about why she's still determined to get more women into politics. In the fourth part of our series, Breaking The Cycle, a boy who was groomed and trafficked by a gang tells his story. He was kicking a football with a mate when a man in a flash car pulled up and befriended them. Soon that 14-year-old was going missing from home and selling drugs from a 'trap' house in a seaside town far away. He describes how isolated and frightened he felt and the sheer relief when it was all over. His 'guide' from a new practice called SHiFT has helped him to understand what happened and how to stay out of trouble. Our reporter Jo Morris met them. Today marks 30 years since the beginning of BBC Radio 5 Live. Once having a reputation for being ‘bloke radio’, many well loved and respected female broadcasters including Naga Munchetty and Rachel Burden have taken over the airways. Nuala hears from presenter and broadcaster Eleanor Oldroyd, who has been at the station from the very beginning, to discuss what has changed for female broadcasters and women’s sport. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Claire Fox
28/03/2457m 18s

Stoning of Women in Afghanistan, Jazz with Zara McFarlane, AI job losses & women

The leader of the Taliban has declared on state television that women who commit adultery will be stoned to death. Nuala McGovern speaks to the former deputy speaker of the Afghan Parliament, Fawzia Koofi. We look at the legacy of children's TV executive Kay Benbow, hailed as “Queen of the Beebies”, who has died with historian Dr Emily Baughan and producer Anne Wood.Our reporter Jo Morris talks to the mum of a young man who got into serious trouble with drugs in the third in our series Breaking The Cycle about SHiFT a new approach to helping young people at risk of going off the rails. A new report by the Institute for Public Policy Research warns of an AI "jobs apocalypse" which will have the greatest impact on women and young people. We talk to Carsten Jung from the IPPR and to AI Expert Prof. Gina Neff.And live music from Zara McFarlane who's appearing at this year’s Cheltenham Jazz Festival. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Steve Greenwood
27/03/2453m 46s

Killed Women campaign, Anti-ageing products and young girls, France birth rate

Killed Women is a group formed of relatives of women who were murdered in domestic abuse situations. They are campaigning to get the minimum sentence for domestic homicide raised, so it’s the same as if the victim was killed on the street. Julie Devey, a member of Killed Women whose daughter Poppy was stabbed to death in bed, joins Nuala McGovern alongside Clare Ward KC, who led last year’s independent review into Domestic Homicide Sentencing. When and if a woman chooses to have children is becoming one of the defining issues of our time. It's an issue of great concern to Emmanuel Macron, the President of France - where there were 1.8 births for every woman last year. He's announced plans to incentivise people to have more children including reforming parental leave and free fertility checks for everyone at the age of 25. To discuss this Nuala is joined by Stefania Marassa, Associate Professor of Economics at Cergy Paris University and Sarah Harper, Professor of Gerontology at the University of Oxford.Last week, a chain of pharmacies in Sweden banned the sale of anti-aging skincare products to customers under 15. The measures come amid a growing trend of young girls’ interest in high-end skincare products, after seeing them used by influencers on YouTube and TikTok. Nuala speaks to Monika Magnusson, The CEO of Apotek Hjärtat, the company which introduced the age restriction, and Abby Robbins, a mother from the UK, who has first-hand experience of this trend. In the second part of our series Breaking The Cycle the SHiFT guide Eva has received a crisis call from one of the young people she works with. Though she's worried about him she's pleased that he reached out, it shows he is beginning to trust her. Jo Morris reports from SHiFT in Greater Manchester. It's a new approach to supporting teenagers at risk of getting into serious trouble. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lottie Garton
26/03/2457m 13s

Anne Hathaway and Jessica Chastain, Breaking the cycle, Musih Tedji Xaviere

Described as a grim portrayal of human nature, Mothers’ Instinct is a film about the darker side of maternal love. Academy Award-winning actresses Jessica Chastain and Anne Hathaway play best friends raising sons of the same age in the same neighbourhood. The psychological thriller follows their apparently picture-perfect life in Sixties suburbia. The two friends in real life join Nuala McGovern to discuss.A new BBC study of elite British sportswomen shows that many are training and chasing medals for Great Britain while earning surprisingly low wages. The 143 female athletes who responded were above the age of 16, and were competing for their country in senior sport or at top club level. Some women had considered giving up sport, because of the cost of living now. Nuala is joined by Becky Grey, BBC Sport journalist who has been working on this study.In the first in a new series, Breaking The Cycle, following the work of the SHiFT team in Greater Manchester. Set up to help young people at risk of getting into serious trouble the approach is all about relationships. A 'Guide' works with a child and their family for at least 18 months and just keeps showing up. Our reporter Jo Morris went out and about with the team over the first year of the practice. Today, Sally Dicken from SHiFT paints a picture of the young people they are trying to help and explains the problems SHiFT has been set up to tackle.These Letters End In Tears follows the story of two girls, Bessem and Fatima, as we learn the price they pay for falling in love. In Cameroon, where the book is based, same-sex relationships are punishable by law. The author, Musih Tedji Xaviere, has made a huge personal sacrifice bringing this story to life, and joins Nuala in the studio.Reporter: Jo Morris
25/03/2457m 20s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Laura Kenny, Actor Vicky Knight, baby loss certificates

Dame Laura Kenny, Britain's most decorated female Olympian, talks to Emma Barnett about her sporting career, motherhood and her decision to quit cycling.Friday’s Woman’s Hour came live from Doncaster which came bottom of one league table for opportunities for women entrepreneurs in the UK last year, according to the website money.co.uk which analysed data from the Office for National Statistics. So we wanted to find out why. Anita was joined by BBC Radio Sheffield’s Paulette Edwards to speak to local entrepreneurs across the city. We hear from Rachel Stockey, Head of Entrepreneurial Skills at the Entrepreneurship Institute at King’s College, London as well as Amy Furniss who set up a business selling dried flowers in 2020 during the Covid lockdown.On 27 February, Emma Barnett spoke to Zoe Clark-Coates, who runs the baby loss and bereavement charity The Mariposa Trust, about her campaign for baby loss certificates. They were introduced in England in February for parents who’ve lost a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy. Emma shares her own story and also speaks to a woman who’s decided it’s not for her, and another who applied straight away and has now received four baby loss certificates.The new film Silver Haze is based on recollections of real events in actor Vicky Knight’s childhood, including when she survived an arson attacked aged just eight. Vicky talks to Emma about blending her real childhood experiences with the narrative of the film, and why she wanted to tell her story.Have you ever had a nagging feeling that something wasn’t quite right? A gut reaction or a tingly spidey-like sense that tells you something is off? Author of Emotional Labour, Rose Hackman joins Emma to explain why we need to stop calling it 'women’s intuition'.John Lennon told them that ‘girls don’t play guitar’, but these four girls from 1960s Liverpool were determined to prove him wrong. Mary, Sylvia, Valerie and Pamela formed Britain's first female rock'n'roll band The Liverbirds, and went on to tour stadiums across Europe, record two hit albums and play with the Kinks, Rolling Stones and Chuck Berry – all in the space of five years. Emma talks to the two surviving members of the band about their incredible story.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Emma Harth
23/03/2454m 30s

Who wants to be a female entrepreneur?

Woman’s Hour is joined by BBC Radio Sheffield in Doncaster for a special live panel show to find out how to be a successful female entrepreneur.Woman’s Hour presenter Anita Rani and BBC Sheffield presenter Paulette Edwards talk to local business women and experts about how to start and sustain a thriving business. They investigate how the stubborn barriers of funding, childcare and confidence are still holding women back and explore the interventions needed to bring about lasting change, so more women and girls can choose to turn their great ideas into successful and lasting businesses. On the panel are: Amy Furniss, a nurse from Doncaster who turned entrepreneur with a dried flowers business; Akeela Mohammed, who sold her two nurseries in Doncaster and now wants to open a Desi café; Rachel Stockey, Head of Entrepreneurial Skills at the Entrepreneurship Institute, who empowers women to make waves by practising her Seven Skills of Entrepreneurial Mindset; Christine Hockley, Managing Director of Funds at the British Business Bank in Sheffield, who is one of a small number of the country’s female investors; and Emma Jones, who in 2005 set up Enterprise Nation, which aims to provide expert advice and support for small businesses. Presenters: Anita Rani and Paulette Edwards Producer: Rebecca Myatt SM: Phil Booth
22/03/2454m 18s

Waspi women, Dr Jen Gunter, The Liverbirds, Child poverty

A long-awaited report on how women born in the 1950s were affected by increases to their retirement age - the so-called WASPI women, which stands for women against state pension inequality - has been published today. It recommends compensation and says the Department for Work and Pensions failed to adequately inform the women affected. Emma Barnett hears from Steve Webb, former pensions minister from 2010 to 2015, when changes to pension ages were accelerated, and to Frances Neil, a WASPI coordinator in Essex.Dr Jen Gunter is a gynaecologist and author based in California, with a huge global following, known for calling out products marketed to women which claim to address their neglected health issues but have no evidence base and could be harmful. In her latest book, simply called Blood, she tackles the menstrual cycle and myths ancient and modern associated with it. Jen joins Emma in studio.John Lennon told them that ‘girls don’t play guitar’, but these four girls from 1960s Liverpool were determined to prove him wrong. Mary, Sylvia, Valerie and Pamela formed Britain's first female rock'n'roll band The Liverbirds, and went on to tour stadiums across Europe, record two hit albums and play with the Kinks, Rolling Stones and Chuck Berry – all in the space of five years. Emma talks to the two surviving members of the band about their incredible story.Figures out today show that 4.3 million children in the UK are living in poverty. Emma speaks to Sara Ogilvie, Policy Director at Child Poverty Action Group and to Jo, a lone parent living in Greater Manchester with a 14-year-old son and on a low income.
21/03/2457m 23s

Baby loss certificates, 'Women's intuition', Carolynne Hunter & energy bills

On 27 February, Emma Barnett spoke to Zoe Clark-Coates, who runs the baby loss and bereavement charity The Mariposa Trust, about her campaign for baby loss certificates. They were introduced in England in February for parents who’ve lost a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy. Emma shares her own story and also speaks to a woman who’s decided it’s not for her, and another who applied straight away and has now received four baby loss certificates. Have you ever had a nagging feeling that something wasn’t quite right? A gut reaction or a tingly spidey-like sense that tells you something is off? Author of Emotional Labour, Rose Hackman joins Emma to explain why we need to stop calling it 'women’s intuition'. Carolynne Hunter cares for her 14-year-old daughter who has severe cerebral palsy. She spoke out about her rising household costs back in 2022 and Oscar-winning actress Kate Winslet paid her energy bill. Carolynne joins Emma to give an update on her life since then. It's been announced that a breast cancer drug - Pembrolizumab, sold under the brand name Keytruda - could help thousands more women than previously thought. Emma finds out more from Dr Liz O'Riordan, retired breast surgeon who has had breast cancer herself, twice.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Phil Lander
20/03/2457m 25s

Actor Vicky Knight, Conscription, Author Lesley Pearse

The Shadow Chancellor Rachel Reeves is today delivering a speech in which she’ll promise to ‘reform the Treasury’. If Labour were to win the next General Election, she would be the first female Chancellor the UK has seen. But what would her economic plans mean for women? And how do they compare to the current government’s? Economic Adviser Vicky Pryce and Journalist Lucy Fisher join Emma Barnett to discuss. Bestselling novelist Lesley Pearse has written 31 books and sold over 10 million copies worldwide. But she didn’t start writing until her mid-30s, and it would be another 13 years before her first novel was published. Now Lesley has written an autobiography of her extraordinary life – from a difficult childhood to making shepherd’s pie for David Bowie. She joins Emma to tell her story. Denmark is set to become the latest country to extend military conscription to women. This comes as Russia has warned the war there could spin out of control and expand geographically. What’s it like for women living in the Nordic countries, three of whom have now introduced female conscription? Emma speaks to The Guardian’s Nordic Correspondent Miranda Bryant and Nora Tangseth from the Organisation of Representatives of the Norwegian Conscripts who is in the Norwegian Army.The new film Silver Haze is based on recollections of real events in actor Vicky Knight’s childhood, including when she survived an arson attacked aged just eight. Vicky talks to Emma about blending her real childhood experiences with the narrative of the film, and why she wanted to tell her story. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
19/03/2457m 31s

Olympian cyclist Dame Laura Kenny, Actor Imogen Poots, Pornography series

Dame Laura Kenny, Britain's most decorated female Olympian, talks to Emma Barnett about her sporting career, motherhood and her decision to quit cycling.Are we staying in more since the pandemic? We talk to Kate Nicholls OBE, CEO of UK Hospitality, and Ellen Scott, Acting Digital Content Director at Stylist Magazine. Our pornography series continues with 'Elaine', a woman in her late 60s who's worried about her husband's porn use. Followed by a discussion about the effect habitual porn use has on our brains with Dr Paula Hall, a Sexual & Relationship Psychotherapist, and Professor Valarie Voon, Neuropsychiatrist and Neuroscientist at the University of Cambridge.Actor Imogen Poots is starring in a new film about the English heiress turned IRA bomber and art thief Rose Dugdale called Baltimore. Imogen tells Emma about her approach to the role. After today’s programme aired, the news broke that Rose Dugdale has died aged 83.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Andy Garner
18/03/2457m 24s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Irish folk singer Cara Dillon, The Hampstead Paedophile Hoax, Maximalism

Cara Dillon won the All Ireland singing trophy aged only 14 and has gone on to receive countless awards and accolades including Album Of The Year at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards. She has worked for Disney – singing the title song to the animated movie Tinkerbell and the Great Fairy Rescue, and topped the charts with dance remixes. She joins Emma to discuss her book and a new album – Coming Home – in which she brings storytelling, poetry, and song, offering personal memories and stories inspired by her native Co. Derry, and exploring themes of family, identity and home.The government in South Korea has said the country’s birth rate has fallen to a record low, despite it having spent billions on initiatives to encourage women to have more children. It dropped to 0.72 in 2023 - and for a population to hold steady, that number should be 2.1. Why are women in the country deciding not to have children? BBC journalist Yuna Ku in Seoul explains.We continue our series looking at how porn in shaping our sex and relationships today by speaking to Dr Fiona Vera-Gray. She says that when we think about porn we still mostly think about men, men as the producers and the consumers and women as the product. Her new book, Women On Porn, details the experiences of one hundred women and their views on porn and she joins Emma in the studio.For the first time, four mums are speaking out about what it was like to be at the centre of a conspiracy that went viral, even reaching the USA. Accused: The Hampstead Paedophile Hoax is a new documentary that looks at what happened to them. Director Emily Turner and mum ‘Anna’ (not her real name) join Emma Barnett to talk about why they wanted to speak out and share this story.The Women's Six Nations begins later this month. Wales, Scotland, Ireland, France and Italy are taking part as well as England who are looking to build on the glory of 2023, when they sealed the grand slam in front of nearly 60,000 spectators at Twickenham, a record crowd for a women’s game. We'll continue to cover the Six Nations as it gets underway but to kick us off Emma is joined by England Rugby player Meg Jones.In recent years, maximalism has been all the rage in the interior design world. Patterns on patterns and riotous colours. But what are the pros and cons of adding personality to your home? Pottery artist, Mary Rose Young and Kate Sandhu, interiors influencer and founder of Kate Sandhu Renovation, join Emma to discuss.
16/03/2453m 1s

Men & porn, Women's Diaries, South Korea birth rate

As part of our ongoing series on pornography and how it’s shaping our relationships, we’ve heard from many of our female listeners whose attitudes and feelings towards porn vary greatly. Men are still the major consumers and producers of porn, so today we hear from some of them. Clare McDonnell is joined by the Times journalist Sean Russell, a man in his 30s, and two listeners: Jake, who is in his 40s, and also Gabriel, who is in his 60s. The three share how porn has shaped their sex and relationships.Do you keep a diary? Why and who for? Is it for yourself or for potential readers in the future? And does it allow you to express emotions that have no other outlet? These are just some of the themes explored in Secret Voices: A Year of Women's Diaries, which has been billed as the first comprehensive anthology of solely female diarists. Compiled by the historical biographer Sarah Gristwood, it features entries from over the past four centuries, from the likes of Florence Nightingale, Beatrix Potter, Audre Lorde and Emma Thompson.The government in South Korea has said the country’s birth rate has fallen to a record low, despite it having spent billions on initiatives to encourage women to have more children. It dropped to 0.72 in 2023 - and for a population to hold steady, that number should be 2.1. Why are women in the country deciding not to have children? BBC journalist Yuna Ku in Seoul explains.Have you ever asked yourself: “Does my bum look big in this?" According to major UK clothes retailer, this question is no longer a bad thing. In fact, we should be aiming for it. They’ve taken big knickers to a whole other level, launching a new form of shapewear with bum padding, adding extra volume and curvature to your derriere. Anna Murphy is the Times’ Fashion Director. She’s tried out a similar model and explains her reaction.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
15/03/2457m 28s

Folk singer Cara Dillon, Diane Abbott and racist abuse, Haiti

Folk singer Cara Dillon joins Emma Barnett to discuss her book and a new album – Coming Home – which explores themes of family, identity and home. Host of the UK’s first ever maths summit, mathmetician Anne-Marie Imafidon talks about hosting the UK's first ever maths summit and the importance of the subject for business.Seven out of 10 candidates who've been selected to stand for the Conservative Party at the next election are men, according to new data gleaned by the journalist Michael Crick. We speak to him and the Charlotte Carew Pole, the Director of Women2Win, which aims to get more women into politics.Journalist Monique Clesca on the latest situation in Haiti, where powerful gangs have killed thousands and are using rape to "instil fear" Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Engineer: Gayl Gordon
14/03/2452m 48s

IVF clinic license suspended, Porn series, 'Queens' wildlife programme

A new law will be introduced in the House of Commons at lunchtime today to clear the names of the hundreds of sub-postmasters wrongly convicted for theft and false accounting. To discuss what this means Emma Barnett is joined by Jo Hamilton, a former post sub-master who was wrongly charged with stealing £36,000 from the Hampshire village post office she ran and BBC Economics Correspondent Andy Verity. A fertility clinic in London has recently had its license suspended over what are being called “significant concerns” about the unit. Homerton Fertility Centre says there had been three separate incidents that highlighted errors in some freezing processes - meaning some people’s embryos were lost. Emma Barnett talks to the Telegraph’s Health Editor Laura Donnelly and Dr Ippokratis Sarris from King’s Fertility.We continue our series looking at how porn in shaping our sex and relationships today by speaking to Dr Fiona Vera-Gray. She says that when we think about porn we still mostly think about men, men as the producers and the consumers and women as the product. Her new book, Women On Porn, details the experiences of one hundred women and their views on porn and she joins Emma in the studio. A new ground-breaking wildlife series is launching this week. National Geographic’s ‘Queens’ focuses on female-led animal societies, and shows their lives away from the usual male fights and hunts. The seven-part series was produced by a women-led team and narrated by the actress Angela Bassett. Emma talks to the series co-executive producer and writer Chloe Sarosh. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce Studio Manager: Emma Harth
13/03/2457m 1s

Body shaming in dance, Author Charlotte Wood, Mothers’ Manifesto

A group of mums called Mothers' Manifesto are on day three of a five-day hunger strike in front of Parliament. They’re trying to draw attention to food insecurity and the plight of mums who have to go without food to ensure their children can eat. Today they’re meeting MPs to campaign for universal free school meals. Organiser Emma Hopkins tells Emma Barnett what they’ll be asking for.A former dancer has brought a legal case against her performing arts school alleging verbal and emotional abuse in the form of body shaming, along with allegations that the school had failed in its duty of care to her as a pupil. Last month, the case was settled out of court, and she received a pay-out, although the school did not admit liability. Her lawyer believes this successful claim is the first time a dancer has taken a dance school to court over body shaming. The woman and her lawyer speak to Emma about what happened. The woman has a court order in place to keep her anonymous, so we are not naming her. In recent years, maximalism has been all the rage in the interior design world. Patterns on patterns and riotous colours. But what are the pros and cons of adding personality to your home? Pottery artist, Mary Rose Young and Kate Sandhu, interiors influencer and founder of Kate Sandhu Renovation, join Emma to discuss.Charlotte Wood’s latest novel, Stone Yard Devotional, is set in a small convent hidden in the stark plains of the Australian outback. The main character is a middle-aged woman who takes refuge with the nuns as she grieves the loss of her parents. Charlotte joins Emma to talk about the inspiration for this book and what happened when, as she was writing it, she and her two sisters were all diagnosed with breast cancer. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
12/03/2457m 36s

The Hampstead Paedophile Hoax, Jennie Lee MP, England Rugby player Meg Jones

For the first time, four mums are speaking out about what it was like to be at the centre of a conspiracy that went viral, even reaching the USA. Accused: The Hampstead Paedophile Hoax is a new documentary that looks at what happened to them. Director Emily Turner and mum ‘Anna’ (not her real name) join Emma Barnett to talk about why they wanted to speak out and share this story. The photograph gracing the front pages this morning of the Princess of Wales with her children, reportedly taken by Prince William - was the first image of Kate to be released by Kensington Palace since her planned abdominal surgery in January. Photo agencies, including Reuters and Associated Press, have retracted the photo over concerns it has been "manipulated". Emma speaks to Alexandra Shulman - Former Editor of British Vogue and journalist - who knows Catherine, the Princess of Wales - from having advised her about designers for her wedding dress through to their work together when she placed her on the front cover of British Vogue's centerary issue. Catherine, the Princess of Wales later released a statement apologising "for any confusion" the photograph caused. It continued: "Like many amateur photographers, I do occasionally experiment with editing". In 1929 Jennie Lee, a miner’s daughter from Scotland, became a socialist MP at the age of only 24 – at a time when she wasn’t even legally old enough to vote. Married to the Welsh Labour politician Aneurin “Nye” Bevan, founder of the NHS, his life and their relationship is currently on stage at the National Theatre in London in a new play called Nye. Actor Sharon Small, who plays the woman considered by many a pioneer for women in politics, is in the Woman’s Hour studio. She and Emma are joined by historian, Lyndsey Jenkins, lecturer in modern history at Oxford University.The Women's Six Nations begins later this month. Wales, Scotland, Ireland, France and Italy are taking part as well as England who are looking to build on the glory of 2023, when they sealed the grand slam in front of nearly 60,000 spectators at Twickenham, a record crowd for a women’s game. We'll continue to cover the Six Nations as it gets underway but to kick us off Emma is joined by England Rugby player Meg Jones.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engingeer: Donald MacDonald
11/03/2455m 1s

Weekend Woman’s Hour – Music artist Raye, COPA 71 and Imelda May on the Yeats sisters

The South London singer-songwriter Raye joins Emma Barnett following her record-breaking six wins at the Brit awards last weekend. Raye tells us about her grandma Agatha who joined her on stage after winning Best Album for My 21st Century Blues. She also talks about being a woman in the music industry and the strength she has found from fellow female musician Charli XCX.A new documentary, Copa 71, follows the trailblazing women who headed to Mexico for an unofficial Women's World Cup in 1971. Woman's football had been banned in many countries including the UK for 50 years. Unperturbed 6 teams gathered and played in front of crowds of 100,000 fans. One of those players, Chris Lockwood joins Anita Rani alongside co-director of the film Rachel Ramsay.On the 3rd March 2021, Sarah Everard was murdered by Wayne Couzens, an off-duty police officer. The incident sparked national outrage and a surge in fighting violence against women and girls. Three years on, how much has changed? Emma Barnett speaks to the Detective Inspector who interviewed Wayne Couzens, Nick Harvey.Imelda May talks about her new documentary Lily and Lolly: The Forgotten Yeats Sisters, on Sky Arts. Elizabeth and Susan Yeats (also known as Lolly and Lily) founded a women-only arts and crafts guild to promote women’s economic and cultural independence. Overshadowed by their famous brothers, W.B Yeats and Jack Butler Yeats…until now.The author Liz Jensen’s son Raphael was a wildlife biologist, an environmental activist, and a prominent member of Extinction Rebellion. In 2020, at the age of 25, he unexpectedly collapsed and died due to an unknown heart condition. Liz speaks to Emma about her new memoir, Your Wild and Previous Life, about her process of grief, hope and rebellion.
09/03/2456m 21s

Women's Football in '71, Mollie King, Female psychopaths

A new documentary, Copa 71, follows the trailblazing women who headed to Mexico for an unofficial Women's World Cup in 1971. Woman's football had been banned in many countries including the UK for 50 years. Unperturbed 6 teams gathered and played in front of crowds of 100,000 fans. One of those players, Chris Lockwood joins Anita Rani alongside co-director of the film Rachel Ramsay.On International Woman's Day Maidenhead MP and former Prime Minister Theresa May has announced she is standing down at the next election, telling the Maidenhead Advertiser she has taken the “difficult decision” after 27 years representing the constituency. She becomes the 63rd Tory MP — and the most senior — to announce that they will not be standing again in 2024. She says that causes such as tackling modern slavery were taking an "increasing amount" of her time - as a reason for her stepping down now. We hear from David Lee - deputy editor for the Maidenhead Advertiser who broke the story and assistant editor at the Spectator Isabel Hardman.What’s it like being the first, directly elected female Mayor of Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone? Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr talks about her career in politics and a new BBC Africa documentary which follows her run up to elections. New research suggests that female psychopaths could be up to 5 times more common that we previously thought. So what are the main differences between men and women when it comes to psychopathy? How do you deal with a woman who fits the bill? And what could the wider impacts of this study be in terms of our court systems and other societal sectors? We hear from Dr Clive Boddy, an Associate Professor of corporate psychology at the University of Anglia Ruskin who’s conducted this research. And Estelle Moore, clinical and forensic psychologist and chair of the London Psychological Professions Network. The Radio 1 presenter and singer Mollie King joins Anita to discuss her Red Nose Day challenge for Comic Relief – a 500km cycle across England, setting off from London and crossing the finish line in Hull, the hometown of her late father. She explains it’s the first time she’s cycled on a road, how she plans to navigate busy city centres, winding country roads, and unsteady terrain, and her fitness journey since giving birth to her daughter in 2022. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
08/03/2456m 59s

Nikki Haley, Pornography series, Author Liz Jensen

Nikki Haley has officially dropped out of the race to become Republican candidate for US President. So what does this mean for the upcoming elections, for women voters and also for women in politics? Emma Barnett speaks to political strategist at the Harvard Belfer Center, Shannon Felton Spence and director of the US and Americas at Chatham House, Leslie Vinjamuri.The author Liz Jensen’s son Raphael was a wildlife biologist, an environmental activist, and a prominent member of Extinction Rebellion. In 2020, at the age of 25, he unexpectedly collapsed and died due to an unknown heart condition. Liz speaks to Emma about her new memoir, Your Wild and Previous Life, about her process of grief, hope and rebellion. On Friday 22nd March, Anita will take Woman's Hour to Doncaster and join forces with BBC Radio Sheffield for a special panel edition of Woman's Hour - Who wants to be a female entrepreneur? Ahead of that, Emma talks to BBC Radio Sheffield presenter Paulette Edwards who is spending a day at Opportunities Doncaster Live, where school girls have gone to find out about local business opportunities and how to develop their entrepreneurial minds. Continuing our series opening up the conversation around pornography and its impact on sex and relationships, our reporter Ena Miller talks to a woman we are calling Sophie. She believes porn has shaped her sex life and the desires of her sexual partners in a negative way, and explains why she thinks this is the case.Who do we want to be to our children when we’re dead and gone? And how do we want them to remember us? These questions are posed by the play The Hills of California currently on stage in London. Set in Blackpool in 1976, the Webb Sisters are returning to their mother’s run-down guest house, as she lies dying. Olivier award-winning actor Laura Donnelly, who plays the mother Veronica, joins Emma.Presenter: Emma Barnett Reporter: Ena Miller Producer: Lottie Garton
07/03/2457m 24s

Raye, Women swimming the Channel, Anita Hill, Adaptive fashion

The South London singer-songwriter Raye joins Emma Barnett following her record-breaking six wins at the Brit awards last weekend. Raye tells us about her grandma Agatha who joined her on stage after winning Best Album for My 21st Century Blues. She also talks about being a woman in the music industry and the strength she has found from fellow female musician Charli XCX.The English channel has always held an allure for endurance swimmers the world over, but the first British woman to complete it was Mercedes Gleitze. She achieved this feat in 1927 and a new film, Vindication Swim, recreates that moment in history. Kirsten Callaghan plays Mercedes, she joins Emma along with the current channel swimmer Sarah Philpott to explain what it’s like to spend that long in open water, and what drives women to do it.It’s the Oscars this weekend, the first ceremony since the Academy introduced new diversity rules for all candidates. But almost seven years since the start of the Me Too movement - has Hollywood really become a safer place for the women who work there? According to the latest survey by the Hollywood Commission, which was set up in 2017 to help stop workplace harassment and discrimination in the entertainment industry, there's still a lot of work to do. Emma speaks to the chair of the Hollywood Commission, the activist, academic and author Anita Hill.If you had 20 minutes with the Prime Minister what would you use your time to ask? Grazia magazine, ahead of International Women's Day this week, chose to focus on the personal and the domestic in a series of three videos which have had a lot of reaction online. Lindsay Nicholson, writer and former editor of various women's magazines including Good Housekeeping and Cosmopolitan, joins Emma to discuss.Children with a disability, or limited mobility, often need some type of adjustment to garments so they can wear them. It’s known as adaptive clothing and whilst there are a growing number of brands offering this, they’re not widely available on the high street. My next guests are trying to raise awareness of this with a fashion show. Andrea Jester is a leading hand and upper limb plastic surgeon at Birmingham Children’s Hospital, and Carmen Burkett is a fashion lecturer at South and City College in Birmingham. They’ve teamed up to put Andrea's young patients - or models as they’ve become - in touch with student designers.
06/03/2456m 4s

Historic abortion law change in France and Pornography series

Two years after the US Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to abortion, lawmakers in France yesterday made history by enshrining this right in their country's constitution - it was a global first. We talk to Stephanie Hennette-Vauchez about the change.Singer-songwriter Sarah Jane Morris performs live.We look at what's behind the cuts to Birmingham City Council's budget - equal pay or a new IT system? With Heather Jameson, editor of the Municipal Journal and Dr James Brackley, lecturer in accounting at Sheffield University.In the next part of our series about porn, Ena Miller talks to ‘Sam’ who, from an early age, measured herself by the women she saw in pornography.  And Imelda May talks about her new documentary Lilly and Lolly: The Forgotten Yeats Sisters, on Sky Arts. Elizabeth and Susan Yeats (also known as Lolly and Lilly) founded a women-only arts and crafts guild to promote women’s economic and cultural independence. Overshadowed by their famous brothers, W.B Yeats and Jack Butler Yeats…until now.Presenter: Emma Barnett Reporter: Ena Miller Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Steve Greenwood
05/03/2453m 42s

Sarah Everard's murder 3 years on, Jess Phillips MP and Baroness Ruth Davidson, singer CMAT

On the 3rd March 2021, Sarah Everard was murdered by Wayne Couzens, an off-duty police officer. The incident sparked national outrage and a surge in fighting violence against women and girls. Three years on, how much has changed? Emma Barnett speaks to the Detective Inspector who interviewed Wayne Couzens, Nick Harvey, and former Detective Superintendent Shabnam Chaudri.If you’ve browsed through political podcasts recently, you’d be forgiven for thinking the guys have got that particular market cornered. There’s The Rest is Politics with Rory Stewart and Alastair Campbell, Political Currency with Ed Balls and George Osborne, and Politics at Jack and Sam’s. That may be about to change, with an all-female line-up on new podcast Electoral Dysfunction, featuring Sky News political editor Beth Rigby, Labour MP Jess Phillips and Conservative peer and former Scottish party leader Ruth Davidson. Jess and Ruth join Emma Barnett to tell her what they’ll be covering.Poet Hollie McNish is back with a new book, with her unique and hugely relatable take on all kinds of taboos, on subjects ranging from friendships, parenthood and breastfeeding, to periods, UTIs and vulvas. Her live readings are often blush inducing, with plenty of adult content and strong language. She’s talking to Emma Barnett about her inspiration behind the book of poetry and prose ‘Lobster and other things I’m learning to love’. Ciara Mary-Alice Thompson, better known as CMAT, is an Irish singer, songwriter, and musician. Playing country-tinged pop, both of her albums have topped the Irish Albums Chart. She was longlisted for the BBC's Sound of 2024 and joins Emma fresh from the BRIT awards, where she was nominated for Best International Artist. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
04/03/2452m 56s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Actor Samantha Morton, Alabama IVF, Andi and Charlotte Osho

The twice Oscar-nominated actor Samantha Morton has just received the Bafta Fellowship: a lifetime achievement award which recognises an outstanding contribution to film and television. She grew up in the social care system and began working in film and television at the age of 13. In a moving speech at the Baftas last week, Samantha dedicated the award to every child in care today.Both Republicans and Democrats in the US state of Alabama are trying to find a legal solution that would protect access to IVF treatment, after a court ruling cast doubt on its future. Alabama's Supreme Court ruled earlier this month that frozen embryos have the same rights as children. Jenny Kleeman speaks to lawyer Eric Wrubel, who specialises in fertility law and Kristia Rumbley who has three frozen embryos at a fertility clinic in Alabama.People in their early 20s are more likely to be out of work because of ill health than those in their early 40s, according to a new report. Lindsay Judge, Research Director at The Resolution Foundation, which carried out the research, explains how young women are particularly affected and are one-and-a-half times more likely to experience poor mental health than young men.Last July, comedian, actor and author Andi Osho joined spoke to us about her second novel, Tough Crowd. During the interview Andi revealed she was also editing her mother’s memoirs – a legacy for her three children. Charlotte Osho has now published The Jagged Path, and she joins Emma along with her editor/daughter Andi.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
02/03/2443m 55s

Female history in 101 objects, Big hair, Toilet training and schools, Primodos

A parliamentary committee has issued a new and scathing report about Primodos - a pregnancy test drug issued by doctors between the1950s and 1970s. The All Party Parliamentary Group on Hormone Pregnancy Tests says claims there is no proven link between Primodos and babies being born with malformations is “factually and morally wrong". The report claims evidence was “covered up” that it's possible to “piece together a case that could reveal one of the biggest medical frauds of the 20th century”. Around 1.5 million women in Britain were given hormone pregnancy tests which was 40 times the strength of an oral contraceptive pill. We hear from Hannah Bardell the SNP MP for Livingstone and a member of the APPG and Marie Lyon who gave birth to a daughter with limbs that were not fully formed - she had been prescribed Primodos. She has been campaigning for nearly 50 years.One in four children starting school in England and Wales are not toilet-trained, according to teachers who now spend a third of their day supporting pupils who are not school-ready, a report has found. That’s according to the early-years charity, Kindred2 who polled 1,000 primary school staff and 1,000 parents. Only 50% of parents think they are solely responsible for toilet-training their child, while one in five parents think children do not need to be toilet-trained before starting reception. What’s the reality in schools and whose responsibility is it? We hear from Steve Marsland, Headteacher, Russell Scott Primary school in Denton, Greater Manchester.Last week we got excited about big hair having a comeback after Miley Cyrus’ backcombed tresses at the Grammys made headlines. The larger-than-life hair-do was a fun change from the straight hair that has dominated fashion for decades. But it didn't last long - Paris Fashion Week is now in full swing and we’re back to the slicked back buns. So, will big hair ever truly come back and why did it fall out of fashion? Hair historian Rachael Gibson, and academic, and author of Don’t Touch My Hair, Emma Dabiri join Anita Rani to discuss big hair.In a new series, Woman’s Hour is starting frank and open conversations about how porn has shaped lives and relationships. Reporter Ena Miller has spoken to a woman who had to decide where to draw the line around her partner’s porn use, and we revisit an interview with Erika Lust, the adult filmmaker whose work focusses on female pleasure and ethical production.Anita takes a walk through female history looking at 101 objects with the writer Annabelle Hirsch. There are artefacts of women celebrated by history and of women unfairly forgotten by it, examples of female rebellion and of self-revelation. They delve into a cabinet of curiosities ranging from the bidet and the hatpin to radium-laced chocolate and Kim Kardashian’s ring.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
01/03/2457m 36s

Alabama IVF, Porn series, Tattoos

Both Republicans and Democrats in the US state of Alabama are trying to find a legal solution that would protect access to IVF treatment, after a court ruling cast doubt on its future. Alabama's Supreme Court ruled earlier this month that frozen embryos have the same rights as children. Jenny Kleeman speaks to lawyer Eric Wrubel, who specialises in fertility law and Kristia Rumbley who has three frozen embryos at a fertility clinic in Alabama.How is porn shaping our sex lives? In a new Woman’s Hour series we want to start an honest conversation about how the availability and content of porn affects what we do, how we feel and what we expect. Today, our reporter Ena Miller talks to a woman who had to decide where the line was for her around her husband's porn use. Is the boys' club in tattooing over? A new book, Tattoo You, celebrates the most innovate and trailblazing tattoo artists from across the world – two thirds of which are women, non-binary and trans artists. Tattoo expert Alice Snape and tattoo artist Tanya Buxton discuss shifts in the industry and the future of tattooing.The tale of the relationship between actress Tippi Hedren and director Alfred Hitchcock is told as part of a new play, Double Feature. In her memoir, Tippi accused Hitchcock of sexual assault. Joanna Vanderham, who plays Tippi, and Helen O’Hara, a film critic, join Jenny to explore how the play portrays that tumultuous relationship. Presenter: Jenny Kleeman Producer: Emma Pearce Reporter: Ena Miller
29/02/2457m 43s

Yvette Cooper on Raneem's Law, Porn review, Andi and Charlotte Osho, Lucia Keskin

Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper is calling for 'Raneem’s Law' in memory of a 22-year-old woman who was stabbed to death by her ex-husband. Raneem Oudeh spoke to police five times in less than two hours before her ex-husband killed her and her mother Khaola Saleem in 2018. One of Labour’s proposals is for domestic abuse specialists in 999 control rooms so that victims speak to an expert from their first call. Emma speaks to Yvette Cooper in her first broadcast interview on the issue and also to Raneem’s aunt, Nour Norris, who is backing the proposals.In a new Woman’s Hour series we want to start an honest conversation about how the availability and content of porn affects what we do, how we feel and what we expect from sex and relationships. Today we begin by speaking to the woman leading the Independent Pornography Review for the government looking at the legislative and regulatory framework around pornography. The Conservative peer Baroness Gabby Bertin joins Emma in the studio.Last July comedian, actor and author Andi Osho joined spoke to us about her second novel, Tough Crowd. During the interview Andi revealed she was also editing her mother’s memoirs – a legacy for her three children. Charlotte Osho has now published The Jagged Path and she joins Emma along with her editor/daughter Andi.A new sitcom called Things You Should Have Done starts on the 29th February on BBC Three. It follows Chi, who's parents have died and has to learn how to fend for herself. It was written by comedian Lucia Keskin, who also stars as Chi. She joins Emma to talk about the series and where her inspiration came from.
28/02/2457m 40s

Nadine Shah, Vivian Oparah, Baby loss certificates, Amber Heard trolling

Through her songs, the Mercury prize nominated singer/songwriter Nadine Shah has explored mental health, the refugee crisis and feminism. The subject matter of her last album, Kitchen Sink, included themes of fertility, tradition and identity told through the stories of women at different stages of their lives. Now Nadine’s latest work - Filthy Underneath – is a raw collection of songs which chronicle a period of unprecedented turbulence in her life from grief to addiction and PTSD.The new podcast Who Trolled Amber? investigates allegations that Amber Heard was trolled online by an army of AI bots after her trial with Johnny Depp. Podcast host Alexi Mostrous and Professor Gina Neff, Executive Director of the Minderoo Centre for Technology and Democracy at the University of Cambridge, discuss this and the wider implications of abuse of women online.                                                                                                           Parents across England who lost a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy can now apply for a baby loss certificate as part of a new government scheme. Babies who are born dead after 24 weeks are officially registered - but this doesn’t happen for babies born before that stage. Every year there are thought to be a quarter of a million miscarriages and more than 11,000 hospital admissions for losses because of ectopic pregnancies. Now, campaigners say they’re thrilled that families will finally get the acknowledgement that their baby existed - for however short a time. Emma Barnett speaks to one such campaigner - Zoe Clark-Coates – who runs the baby loss and bereavement charity The Mariposa Trust and campaigned for these certificates for nine years.                                                                                                  Vivian Oparah played the female lead in British hit film Rye Lane, for which she was Bafta-nominated this year. She's now starring in a new TV comedy thriller called Dead Hot, playing the sister of a man who's mysteriously disappeared. Vivian joins Emma in the Woman's Hour studio.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineers: Emma Harth & Gayl Gordon
27/02/2453m 6s

Actor Samantha Morton, Mary Beard, Leap year proposals

The twice Oscar-nominated actor Samantha Morton has just received the Bafta Fellowship: a lifetime achievement award which recognises an outstanding contribution to film and television. She grew up in the social care system and began working in film and television at the age of 13. In a moving speech at the Baftas last week, Samantha dedicated the award to every child in care today. 2024 is a leap year and 29 February is the day when traditionally women are "allowed" to propose to their male partner.  We hear your stories and discuss the tradition with wedding speech writer Heidi Ellert-McDermott, and Dr Vera Beckley-Hoelscher, an academic at Royal Holloway, University of London.People in their early 20s are more likely to be out of work because of ill health than those in their early 40s, according to a new report . Lindsay Judge, Research Director at The Resolution Foundation, which carried out the research, explains how young women are particularly affected and are one-and-a-half times more likely to experince poor mental health than young men. And Emma speaks to the world-famous classicist Mary Beard about Legion - the new exhibition at the British Museum, about life in the Roman army. Mary will share stories of some remarkable women who lived in Roman military bases. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer:Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Emma Harth
26/02/2457m 18s

Kelsey Parker, Ukraine's children, Black girls in education, Aisling Bea

It has been almost two years since the death of The Wanted star Tom Parker after he was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour in 2020 aged 33. His wife, Kelsey Parker, announced last month that, after a lot of reflection, it was time to take off her wedding rings. Kelsey tells Anita Rani about the decision and how she has dealt with her grief. The Ukrainian government says it has identified 20,000 children who have been abducted by Russian forces. This week saw 11 Ukrainian children reunited with their families. The BBC’s Hague Correspondent, Anna Holligan, and filmmaker Shahida Tulaganova, who directed the ITV documentary Ukraine’s Stolen Children, discuss. Wicked Little Letters is a new black comedy film set in Littlehampton in the 1920s. It follows two neighbours, deeply conservative Edith Swan played by Olivia Colman and rowdy Irish single mother Rose Gooding played by Jessie Buckley. When Edith and other residents begin to receive poisonous pen letters full of obscenities, potty mouthed Rose is charged with the crime. The director, Thea Sharrock joined Emma Barnett to discuss this true story, and the parallels with trolling on social media today. How do black girls and women experience education in Britain today? Sociologist Dr April-Louise Pennant of Cardiff University joined Emma to discuss why Black Caribbean girls are excluded from school at double the rate of white girls and why intersectionality means the issue of afro hair continues to affect black girls' education today. She explores these issues and more in her book, Babygirl, You’ve Got This! Experiences of Black Girls and Women in the English Education System. The comedy and acting star Aisling Bea grew up in County Kildare in Ireland and in 2011 became the first woman for 20 years to win the prestigious stand-up competition So You Think You’re Funny? She spoke to Emma about her latest show, Alice and Jack.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
24/02/2456m 14s

Kelsey Parker, 'Sharenting', Maternity leave

It has been almost two years since the death of The Wanted star Tom Parker after he was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour in 2020 aged 33. His wife, Kelsey Parker, announced last month that, after a lot of reflection, it was time to take off her wedding rings. Kelsey joins Anita Rani in the Woman’s Hour studio to discuss this decision and how she has dealt with her grief.What is the impact of 'sharenting' on the first generation of kids who grew up with it? Dorothy Koomson's new thriller, Every Smile You Fake, follows the daughter of a parenting influencer who has mysteriously disappeared. Anita speaks to Dorothy and Dr Emma Nottingham about sharenting and the proposed legislation in the US and France to regulate it.Tomorrow is the second anniversary of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Oksana Grytsenko is a Ukrainian playwright and freelance journalist covering the war for various newspapers including the Wall Street Journal. She joins Anita to discuss living in Ukraine two years into the war, what is acceptable to write about whilst living through a conflict and the opening of her play focused on a family of women living in a village occupied by Russian soldiers.The first Police and Crime Commissioner to take maternity leave, Emily Spurrell, joins us on the programme. On becoming pregnant, she realised no maternity provision existed for the role and took matters in to her own hands. She joins Anita alongside Tim Durrant, Programme Director at the Institute for Government, who’s currently researching maternity leave provisions for elected officials. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Emma Pearce
23/02/2457m 6s

Mistresses, Ultrasound 'bra', Diane Foley, Black girls in education

It is has been 11 years since the American journalist James Foley was kidnapped in northern Syria, and nearly a decade since his mother, Diane Foley, discovered he had been beheaded by Islamic State fighters. Diane has written a book with the novelist Colum McCann, called American Mother, in which she recounts the story of her son’s kidnapping and murder, and her campaign to improve the chances of Americans wrongfully detained abroad. She joins Emma Barnett in the studio.In the UK, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer; around 55,000 women are diagnosed every year. Emma speaks to Professor Canan Dagdeviren, who has invented a piece of wearable tech that fits inside a bra which may lead, one day in the future, to the creation of an ultrasound bra, able to screen for breast cancer in between check-ups. Canan featured on the BBC’s 100 Women list for 2023 and first sketched the idea at her aunt Fatma’s bedside, who had been diagnosed with breast cancer.From Queen Camilla to Monica Lewinsky, has the perception of mistresses changed in recent decades? Someone who believes that the so-called 'other woman' has had a cultural rebrand is the author Madeleine Gray, who has written a novel about an affair - but from the perspective of the mistress. Green Dot follows 24-year-old Hera who starts a messy relationship with an older married colleague. Madeleine joins Emma to discuss.How do black girls and women experience education in Britain today? Sociologist Dr April-Louise Pennant of Cardiff University joins Emma to discuss why the adultification of black girls means that Black Caribbean girls are excluded from school at double the rate of white girls and why intersectionality means the issue of afro hair continues to affect black girls' education today. She explores these issues and more in her book, Babygirl, You’ve Got This! Experiences of Black Girls and Women in the English Education System.Presenter: Emma Barnett Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
22/02/2457m 12s

Ukraine children, Director of Wicked Little Letters Thea Sharrock, The implications of a new AI study on the brain

This week marks two years since Russia began its full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Ukraine's government says it has identified 20,000 children who have been abducted by Russian forces. Now Qatar has brokered the third and largest deal, which will see eleven Ukrainian children reunited with their families. Emma speaks to the BBC’s Hague Correspondent, Anna Holligan and film maker Shahida Tulaganova, who directed the ITV documentary, Ukraine’s Stolen Children.Wicked Little Letters is a new black comedy film set in Littlehampton in the 1920s. It follows two neighbours, deeply conservative Edith Swan played by Olivia Colman and rowdy Irish single mother Rose Gooding played by Jessie Buckley. When Edith and other residents begin to receive poisonous pen letters full of obscenities, potty mouthed Rose is charged with the crime. The director, Thea Sharrock, joins Emma.A new scientific paper from researchers at Stanford University using AI has shown the ability to spot consistent differences between men and women's brains. Gina Rippon,  neuroscientist and author of The Gendered Brain & Professor Melissa Hines, director of the Gender Development Research Centre at the University of Cambridge join Emma.How much do you know about your female ancestors? There’s a growing trend in finding out more about our family histories – but it’s harder to find details about women than men. Founder and director of the genealogy service Eneclann, Fiona Fitzsimons and Ailsa Burkimsher who successfully campaigned for mothers' names to be on marriage certificates join Emma.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
21/02/2456m 50s

Tracey Crouch MP, Marina Litvinenko, Author Kiley Reid

Former government minister Tracey Crouch has joined the list of MPs who’ve said they won’t be standing at the next general election. She won the former Labour seat of Chatham and Aylesford in 2010 and has turned it into a healthy majority of more than 18,000 for the Conservatives. A self confessed 'sports nut', in 2015 she attained her dream job as sports minister and oversaw the government’s football governance review. In 2018 she resigned in protest at the government’s 'unjustifiable' refusal to speed up plans to curb controversial fixed odds betting terminals. Four years ago as the pandemic hit, she was diagnosed with breast cancer, and following treatment went on to raise £153,000 for cancer charities. She joins Emma Barnett to talk about her decision to leave politics and her plans for the future. Yulia Navalnaya, the widow of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny who was announced dead in a Russian prison last week, has directly accused the Kremlin of poisoning and killing him and has vowed to continue his fight to change Russia. Someone who has been following this story intently is Marina Litvinenko, the widow of Alexander Litvinenko, who exposed corruption in Russia and died in a London hospital in 2006 after ingesting tea which contained radioactive polonium. The European Court of Human Rights found Russia was responsible for the killing of Mr Litvinenko in 2021. Marina joins Emma.Can you have a true friendship or relationship if one of you has more money than the other? Novelist Kiley Reid dominated bestseller lists with her debut, Such A Fun Age, which skewered white liberal guilt. Her new book, Come And Get It, returns to themes of race, class, and above all money. Set on a campus in southern America, it follows students and academics whose behaviour is shaped by money. Kiley joins Emma in studio.Women get more gain from exercise than men. That's the suggestion of a new study of 400,000 people. 140 minutes of moderate exercise a week reduced women's risk of premature death from any cause by 18% compared with being inactive. Men needed 300 minutes of exercise for a similar gain. Joining Emma to discuss is Baz Moffat, former Team GB rower and co-founder of The Well, an organisation that works to challenge the status quo for women in health, fitness and sport.
20/02/2457m 18s

Aisling Bea, Profile of Yulia Navalnaya, Carmen Smith, Wellness v stoicism

The comedy and acting star Aisling Bea grew up in County Kildare in Ireland and in 2011 became the first woman for 20 years to win the prestigious stand-up competition So You Think You’re Funny? Her Bafta-winning sitcom This Way Up firmly established her as a presence to be reckoned with on our TV screens- last year she played the lead in the film based on Take That’s music, Greatest Days, and she regularly pops up on US TV and movies. She joins Emma Barnett to discuss her latest show, Alice and Jack, which has just begun on Channel 4.Following the death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, we look at the role of his wife, Yulia Navalnaya, and whether she might become the new face of the opposition. Yulia is due to speak with European foreign ministers in Brussels today. To discuss, Emma is joined by the Spectator's Russia correspondent, Owen Matthews, who was Bureau Chief for Newsweek in Moscow for more than a decade, and Sarah Rainsford, BBC Eastern Europe Correspondent who was expelled from Russia after many years, and is now based in Warsaw. Carmen Smith is 27 and set to become the youngest peer in the House of Lords. Carmen will replace Plaid Cymru’s only member of the Lords,  Dafydd Wigley (the Rt, Hon Lord Wigley) who is retiring aged 80, and was a previously leader of Plaid.  Carmen will be known as Baroness Smith of Llanfaes, the village where she grew up. She joins Emma to talk about the challenges ahead, the reaction to her selection and why she wants to join a body she believes should be abolished. Can Ancient Greek theories revolutionise our modern day lives? Australian author Brigid Delaney seems to think so. She talks to Emma about swapping wellness for stoicism, alongside classicist Professor Edith Hall.Presenter: Emma Barnett Produced by: Louise Corley Studio engineer: Steve Greenwood
19/02/2457m 11s

Lorraine Kelly, Paralympian Lauren Rowles, Chief Constable Sarah Crew

Lorraine Kelly CBE has been described as the queen of morning television. Now after a lifetime of wanting to, she has written her first novel, The Island Swimmer, a story of family secrets, island communities and overcoming fear. Lorraine joins Anita Rani to discuss her novel, her life and her 40-year career.It’s been almost 40 years since most UK coal miners went on strike over pit closures and proposed redundancies. It was one of the most divisive conflicts of a generation – but what role did women play? And how did it change things for them? Nuala McGovern is joined by two women who were there at the time – Lisa McKenzie and Heather Wood – to share their experiences. Violence and abuse against shop workers rose to 1,300 incidents a day last year. That’s according to new figures from the British Retail Consortium. Nuala hears from Michele Whitehead, a workplace rep for the Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers, on what it’s like for her. Four years ago, Avon and Somerset Police offered Channel 4 unprecedented access to its Counter Corruption Unit, the people who police the police. Emma Barnett speaks to their Chief Constable, the first woman to hold the post, about why she made the decision to let the cameras in, and the consequences of doing so.Lauren Rowles is a two-time Paralympic Gold, World and European champion rower, who was on the Woman’s Hour Power List of Women in Sport. This summer she’s hoping to break a record at the Paris Paralympics – she tells Nuala about that, and her work away from sport advocating for LGBTQ+ people and those struggling with their mental health. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
17/02/2456m 47s

Lorraine Kelly, Actor and boxer Kali Reis, Presenter Gemma Cairney

Lorraine Kelly CBE has been described as the queen of morning television. She joined TV-am as their Scottish correspondent in 1984 and, save for a brief maternity leave 30 years ago, has barely left the schedules since - for the last 14 as host of ITV’s Lorraine. Now after a lifetime of wanting to, she has written her first novel, The Island Swimmer, a story of family secrets, island communities and overcoming fear. Lorraine joins Anita Rani to discuss her novel, her life and her 40-year career.The deaths of three women in one week, all allegedly murdered by their husbands, has caused outrage in Somalia and sparked days of protests over the country’s femicide rates. Police have named the suspects in all three killings, which took place in the first week of February, as the dead women’s husbands. Two of the victims were pregnant. The BBC's Fardowsa Hanshi, a video journalist with the Somali Service explains what's going on.Kali Reis is the breakout star of True Detective: Night Country. As the series nears its finale on Sky Atlantic on Monday, Kali joins Anita in the Woman’s Hour studio to talk about going from a career in boxing to acting with Jodie Foster. She is also an indigenous rights activist, who has Native American and African heritage, and was the first indigenous woman fighter to become a World Champion.Last month, Woman's Hour discussed a shocking report which warned of endemic misogyny and discrimination in the music industry. MPs from the Women and Equalities Committee found that sexual harassment and abuse is common. That report has resonated with many – and not just in the music industry. Award-winning broadcaster Gemma Cairney has written a piece in The Guardian about her experience, saying she’d battled racism and misogyny in creative industries for years. Gemma tells us about the reaction to her piece. Professor of Media, Culture and Communications at Brunel University Sarita Malik will explain why Gemma’s experience is so widespread in broadcasting.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Neva Missirian
16/02/2457m 51s

Rain Newton-Smith, Paralympian Lauren Rowles, Homelessness

In April last year, The Guardian exposed allegations of rape, sexual assault and harassment at the Confederation of British Industry (CBI). Rain Newton-Smith took over as Chief Executive and pledged to reform the culture of the organisation. As she approaches a year in the job, Rain speaks to Nuala McGovern about what progress has been made. She also gives her reaction to the news that the UK fell into recession in December 2023.It’s been nearly a year since we announced the Woman’s Hour Power List, celebrating incredible women in the world of sport. Today we are joined by one of those who placed on the list ahead of her attempt to break a record at this summer's Paris Paralympics. The two-time Paralympic Gold, World and European champion British rower Lauren Rowles is training hard for what she hopes will be her third Paralympic Gold and joins Nuala to discuss her glittering career and her work away from sport advocating for LGBTQ+ people and those struggling with their mental health.  Lorna Tucker ran away from home at the age of 14 and ended up living on the streets of Soho in London. Now a filmmaker, her latest release, Someone’s Daughter, Someone’s Son, has forced her to revisit life on the streets, both from her own perspective and those currently sleeping rough. Writer Helen Russell moved to Denmark a decade ago and wrote a bestselling book, The Year of Living Danishly. Several books and three children later, she has now turned her attention to the parenting culture of Denmark and other Nordic nations. Her new book is How to Raise a Viking: The Secrets of Parenting the World's Happiest Children. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucy Wai
15/02/2457m 47s

Surviving cancer five times, Government's independent rape advisor, Miners’ strike 40 years on, My Life with the Walter Boys

Violence and abuse against shop workers rose to 1,300 incidents a day last year, up by 50% in the year to September 2023. That's according to new figures by the British Retail Consortium. Nuala hears from Michele Whitehead, a workplace rep for USDAW who has worked at a convenience store in Wolverhampton for 20 years.Dr Natalie Yates-Bolton is 57 and has survived cancer five times. The senior lecturer in nursing was first diagnosed at the age of 22 whilst still at university. She's had 11 operations, 30 sessions of chemotherapy and 55 rounds of radiotherapy. Natalie joins Nuala McGovern to discuss what’s helped her get through three decades of cancer care. Professor Katrin Hohl is the new independent advisor to the Government on rape. She joins Nuala to discuss her new role, and her priorities for change. Forty years ago next month most of the coal miners in the UK went on strike over pit closures and proposed redundancies. The strike lasted a year and was one of the most divisive conflicts of a generation. On Sunday, BBC Two is broadcasting Miners’ Strike: A frontline Line Story, which features personal testimony from men and women on the frontline of the strike. Nuala’s joined by two women who were there at the time to discuss their experiences: Lisa McKenzie appears in the film and was a teenager when her dad was on the picket lines and Heather Wood was also very active in the strike. My Life with the Walter Boys is a teen drama on Netflix that hit 12 million views in it’s first week alone. It was adapted from a book written by Ali Novak when she was just 15 years old. She joins Nuala to talk about the transformation of her book to a hit series along with the executive producer who adapted the story, Melanie Halsall.Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Dianne McGregor
14/02/2457m 38s

Joanne Froggatt and Dr Rachel Clarke, Minette Batters, NFU, Israel/Gaza war

A forthcoming three-part ITV drama Breathtaking, set in a fictionalised London hospital, tells the devastating impact of the Covid-19 pandemic through the eyes of Acute Medical Consultant Dr Abbey Henderson. The series is based on Dr Rachel Clarke’s book of the same name. She worked on Covid wards and is also one of the writers on the series. Dr Henderson is played by Joanne Froggatt, known for many roles including Downton Abbey, Sherwood and Angela Black. They join Emma Barnett to discuss.The "orange peel theory" is as trend where one person in a couple will ask their partner to peel an orange for them. As Valentine's Day approaches, what are the small gestures that mean so much? The ways you show your love? Minette Batters is standing down as President of the National Farmers' Union after six years of leading the organisation. She joins Emma to talk about her tenure leading the farming world, and what it felt like to be the first woman to do so.We've been looking at the experiences of women from both Israel and Gaza on the programme this week, asking what are the main issues facing women on each side as the war continues in to its fifth month. Today Emma speaks to Ayelet Razin Bet Or the Legal Adviser to the Association of Rape Crisis Centres in Israel. Ayelet has been travelling the world in recent months highlighting the horrific evidence of rape, sexual violence and mutilation of women during the October 7 brutal attacks by Hamas that killed 1,200 people and says she feels hugely let down and even betrayed by the response she has seen, particularly from other women. She also talks about her concerns for the 14 female hostages still being held by Hamas. To listen to our discussion about women in Gaza, please head to BBC Sounds to find it in yesterday's episode.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Giles Aspen
13/02/2457m 45s

Bryony Gordon, Israel-Gaza war, Chief Constable Sarah Crew

Four years ago, Avon and Somerset Police offered Channel 4 unprecedented access to its Counter Corruption Unit, the people who police the police. The result is a three-part documentary series called To Catch A Copper. Emma Barnett speaks to Sarah Crew, Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset Police, about why she made the decision to let the cameras in, and the consequences of doing so.Bryony Gordon is the bestselling author of The Wrong Knickers, You Got This and Mad Girl. She won the MIND Making a Difference Award for changing the perception of mental health in the media, and even ran the London Marathon in her underwear! She joins Emma to discuss binge eating, OCD, menopause and her new book - Mad Woman. As the Israel-Gaza war enters its fifth month, we’re looking at what the impact is on women and children. Tomorrow, Emma will hear from women in Israel. Today, she speaks to BBC Arabic journalist Dalia Haidar and Frances Leach from ActionAid to hear more about what life is like at the moment for Palestinian women and children in Gaza. The three-time Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has confirmed she will retire this year after the games in Paris. The 37-year-old, regarded as one of the greatest sprinters of all time, won the 100m title in 2008 and 2012. Former Team GB sprinter Katherine Merry joins Emma to discuss the announcement. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
12/02/2457m 46s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Rhianon Bragg, Businesswoman and entrepreneur Emma Grede, Amelia Earhart’s legacy

Rhianon Bragg was held hostage at gunpoint by her ex-boyfriend, Gareth Wyn Jones, for eight hours. He was sentenced in 2020 for stalking, false imprisonment, making threats to kill and possession of a firearm. Now, despite a parole board panel saying they are not satisfied it would be safe, he is being released from prison. Rhianon tells us about how her relationship with Wyn Jones developed, what happened at the end, and how she feels about him coming out of prison.Ambika Mod stars as Emma in the new Netflix adaptation of David Nicholls’ much-loved novel One Day. She acts opposite Leo Woodall as Dex, and their comedic romance plays out over 14 episodes and 20 years. You may have seen Ambika as Shruti, the junior doctor with a pivotal plot line in the BBC labour ward drama This is Going to Hurt. She tells us about taking on this lead role.On Thursday Kate Garraway returned to Good Morning Britain following the death of her husband, Derek. She spoke about her reaction to being called a widow for the first time, by a delivery man, apologising for her loss. We hear from Poorna Bell, a journalist and author who lost her husband in 2015, and Karen Sutton, host of The Widow Podcast, who became a trained grief coach after her husband died in 2016.New sonar images from deep in the Pacific Ocean might have located the wreckage of Amelia Earhart’s missing plane. Has Earhart’s disappearance finally been solved, or has the obsession with this mystery distracted us from the pioneering woman herself? Pilot Katherine Moloney and historian Dr Darren Reid discuss Amelia Earhart, her legacy, and women in aviation today.Emma Grede, a native East Londoner, now a thriving businesswoman in the US, is known for her entrepreneurial prowess and successful collaborations with the Kardashian sisters. Emma is a driving force behind iconic brands like Good American and Skims. She will soon be making her mark as a guest investor on an upcoming episode of BBC’s Dragon's Den.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
10/02/2455m 40s

TikTok sleuths, Widows, Politicising Taylor Swift, Surgery critics 'silenced'

Yesterday, Kate Garraway returned to Good Morning Britain following the loss of her husband, Derek. She spoke about her reaction to being called a widow for the first time, by a delivery man, apologising for her loss. Anita Rani speaks to Poorna Bell, a journalist and author who lost her husband in 2015, and Karen Sutton, host of The Widow Podcast, who became a trained grief coach after her husband passed away in 2016. Anita Rani talks to a woman who says a cosmetic surgery clinic tried to silence her after she reported concerns about her eye operation. Signature clinic is taking five people in total to court after they posted negative reviews or comments on support groups. A judge has thrown out an attempt to get a gagging order against one of them. BBC reporter Melanie Abbott speaks to the woman concerned. And that woman's solicitor tells Anita what she thinks this judgement means for free speech. A trend is surfacing on social media, where women reach out to one another with a request - Can you find out if my partner is cheating on me? Anita speaks to Becky Hayes from The Laura and Becky Show podcast, who is creating social media content out of these requests and a journalist who has researched the subject, Beth Ashley, for a discussion on the morality of social media investigators. Although payments are not taken for these requests and identities are kept secret, some might ask whether it’s appropriate to make humorous content, out of what could possibly be very devastating news for someone. And without the context of the relationship to inform them, whether the trend invade people’s privacy. Fans are eagerly waiting to see if Taylor Swift will make it from Tokyo to Las Vegas in time to support her American footballer boyfriend Travis Kelce at the US Super Bowl this Sunday. Many in the Trump camp are watching closely too, as right-wing conspiracy theories run wild that the pop megastar might use the event to influence the presidential elections. What is going on? Anita talks to BBC reporter Holly Honderich, based in Washington.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
09/02/2457m 34s

Vapes, Phoebe Dynevor and Amelia Earhart's legacy

A BBC investigation has uncovered evidence that vapes are being used to groom children into sexual or criminal exploitation. Last week, the Prime Minister announced that disposable vapes are set to be banned as part of plans to tackle the rising number of young people taking up vaping - measures will also be introduced to prevent vapes being marketed at children and to target under-age sales. However, there are concerns that banning the sale of vapes will encourage children to seek them elsewhere. Emma Barnett is joined by the BBC’s Hayley Hassall and the Children’s Commissioner for England Dame Rachel de Souza. Apparently, if you’re a middle-aged couple and your sex life has faded away you may be experiencing the “couplepause”. The therapist and writer Lucy Cavendish joins Emma to explain what this is and how to get the spark back. Actor Phoebe Dynevor, best known as Daphne Bridgerton in the Netflix blockbuster series, joins Emma in the studio. Her most recent role, as an ambitious hedge fund manager in the film Fair Play, has earned her a nomination for the EE Rising Star award at this year’s Baftas.New sonar images from deep in the Pacific Ocean might have located the wreckage of Amelia Earhart’s missing plane. Has Earhart’s disappearance finally been solved, or has the obsession with this mystery distracted us from the pioneering woman herself? Pilot Katherine Moloney and historian Dr Darren Reid discuss Amelia Earhart, her legacy, and women in aviation today.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
08/02/2457m 35s

Businesswoman and entrepreneur Emma Grede, Crystal Hefner, Social media algorithms and misogyny

Emma Grede, a native East Londoner, now a thriving businesswoman in the US, is known for her entrepreneurial prowess and successful collaborations with the Kardashian sisters. Emma is a driving force behind iconic brands like Good American and Skims. She will soon be making her mark as a guest investor on an upcoming episode of BBC’s Dragons' Den, and she joins Emma to explain how she's learned more from her business failures, and what she looks for in a potential investment.The Welsh government has intervened in the running of the fire service in South Wales - after a toxic culture of misogyny and sexual harassment was uncovered during a review. In what's been called an unprecedented move, four Government-appointed commissioners have been brought in to restructure management. Emma speaks to Hannah Blythyn, Deputy Minister for social partnership and Member of the Senedd. Crystal Hefner, spent almost ten years of her life inside the Playboy Mansion after meeting founder and editor of Playboy magazine - Hugh Hefner - when she was 21. She became one of his infamous ‘girlfriends’ before marrying him, travelled the world and attended lavish parties. She has now written a book, Only Say Good Things: Surviving Playboy and Finding Myself, in which she provides an insight into her time spent at the mansion and her experiences of beauty standards and objectification. New research suggests social media algorithms prioritise serving harmful and misogynistic content to young people – with a fourfold increase across just five days shown to the study’s test personas. How do we keep young people safe online – particularly on social media sites? Emma discusses this issue with the report author, Dr Kaitlyn Regehr and Will Gardner from online safety organisation Childnet.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Steve Greenwood
07/02/2457m 27s

Rhianon Bragg, Women of Substance, ultramarathon runner Allie Bailey

Rhianon Bragg was held hostage at gunpoint by her ex-boyfriend, Gareth Wyn Jones, for eight hours. He was sentenced in 2020 for stalking, false imprisonment, making threats to kill and possession of a firearm. Now, despite a parole board panel saying they are not satisfied it would be safe, he is being released from prison. Rhianon speaks to Emma about how her relationship with Wyn Jones developed, what happened at the end, and how she feels about him coming out of prison.The Prime Minister has upset some people by seeming to take a bet with TalkTV presenter Piers Morgan over his Rwanda policy. Rishi Sunak told presenter Rachel Burden on BBC 5 Live that he wanted to show his commitment to his immigration policy. Rachel joins Emma to discuss what the bet tells us, alongside Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor at the Spectator.Ultrarunner Allie Bailey is the first woman to have run the length of the Panama Canal and she’s completed more than 200 marathons and almost 80 ultramarathons. She joins Emma to talk about her new book “There is No Wall” which details how she was doing a lot of her running at the height of her struggles with alcoholism, depression and mental breakdowns.What can women artists’ work tell us about their addictions? Sally Marlow is a Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London. She’s been looking at five women artists for a BBC Radio 3 series, Women of Substance, to find out what their work can tell us about their addictions. She joins Emma to discuss researching Billie Holiday in particular, and what the lyrics of Billie's songs reveal about alcohol use in women.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
06/02/2457m 21s

Ambika Mod, Forgiveness, Grandparent classes, Grammys

Ambika Mod stars as Emma in the new Netflix adaptation of David Nicholls’ much-loved novel One Day. She acts opposite Leo Woodall as Dex, and their comedic romance plays out over 14 episodes and 20 years. You may have seen Ambika as Shruti, the junior doctor with a pivotal plot line in the BBC labour ward drama This is Going to Hurt. She joins Anita Rani in the Woman’s Hour studio to talk about now taking the lead.A new programme on Radio 4, Forgiveness: Stories from the Front Line, explores how you survive and restore your life, when something truly appalling is done to you. Anita is joined by the founder of the Forgiveness Project, Marina Cantacuzino and Marian Partington, whose sister Lucy was murdered by Fred and Rosemary West in 1973.Grandparent antenatal classes give grandparents-to-be the chance to brush up on practical skills and get key advice on how to look after young kids again. Anita talks to Dr Francesca Dooley, founder of Happy Parents Happy Baby where she runs grandparent classes, and Francesca’s mother Beverly Bonora who was in her first ever class.Taylor Swift has made history at the Grammys by winning album of the year for a fourth time. Billie Elish, SZA and Miley Cyrus also took home major awards. Even Jay-Z got in on the act, calling out the fact that his wife Beyonce has never won album of the year. Anita discusses with Jude Rogers, arts and culture journalist for the Guardian and Observer and Tschepo Mokoena, freelance culture writer and author of Beyonce, Lives of Musicians.
05/02/2456m 20s

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Candace Bushnell, Lisa St Aubin de Terán, Ideological Gender Gap

The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, whose column in the New York Observer was the inspiration behind the TV series, joins Anita in the studio. The real-life Carrie Bradshaw is bringing her one-woman show about creating the hit series to the West End and then doing a UK tour.After 20 years of silence, prize-winning author Lisa St Aubin de Terán is back with a new book. Aged 16, Lisa married a Venezuelan landowner-turned-bank robber; she eventually ran away from him with her young daughter only to end up trapped in a castle with the Scottish poet George MacBeth. From there she eloped to Italy and in 2004 she settled in north Mozambique, establishing the Teran Foundation to develop community tourism. She lived there until 2022 when a cyclone took the roof off her house, and returned to London with a bag full of manuscripts including her memoir, Better Broken than New. She joins Emma in studio.A new study says that an ideological gap has opened up between young men and women in countries on every continent. These increasingly different world views could have far-reaching consequences. One of the leading researchers in gender studies Dr Alice Evans, Senior Lecturer in the Social Science of Development at King’s College London tells Emma why Gen Z is two generations, not one. Emma also speaks to Professor Rosie Campbell, Director of the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London.Emma talks to the TV presenter Kaye Adams about her 10-year battle with HMRC over their claim she owed almost £125,000 in unpaid taxes. Best known for her role on the Loose Women panel show, she also hosts the morning show on BBC Radio Scotland. She says the protracted legal case has left her feeling “utterly, utterly beat up and gaslit”, despite her vindication.From cute cat memes to plush toys, a new exhibition at Somerset House explores the power of cuteness in contemporary culture. But is buying into a cute aesthetic regressive or even sexist, or can cute be reclaimed as a form of protest? And how would you feel, as a grown woman, about being labelled 'cute' or 'adorable'? To discuss, Emma is joined by Dr Isabel Galleymore, a consultant on the Cute exhibition; and the journalist Vicky Spratt.Have you ever thought about where your name came from? Perhaps you were named after a favourite relative, a character in a movie or maybe your parents just liked the sound of it. Photographer Deirdre Brennan wanted to mark the 1500th anniversary of Saint Brigid, one of the patron saints of Ireland. To do this, she photographed Brigids all over Ireland and asked them how they felt about their name. She joins Emma to discuss the project - as does one of the Brigids involved in her project - Brigid McDonnell, a sheep farmer from County Antrim, Northern Ireland.
03/02/2457m 31s

Candace Bushnell, No Queens in Europe, Early Years recruitment

Anita Rani speaks to Roopam Carroll, who recently sold her nursery business, and Ellen Broome, Head of Family and Childcare at the charity CORAM.Since the abdication of Queen Margarethe II of Denmark, there are no Queens in Europe. This is the first time this has happened since Queen Isabella of Spain was crowned in 1833. Will this make a difference in Europe? What difference have previous Queens in Europe made? Royal commentator Caroline Aston and journalist Emily Andrews join Anita to discuss. The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, whose column in the New York Observer was the inspiration behind the TV series, joins Anita in the studio. The real-life Carrie Bradshaw is bringing her one-woman show about creating the hit series to the West End and then doing a UK tour. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
02/02/2457m 16s

Kaye Adams, Chemical attack, Gender gap, Saint Brigid

Nine people have been injured after a man threw a 'corrosive substance' over a mother and her two girls in Clapham, south London, yesterday evening. The family, three responding police offices and three other people who tried to help were taken to hospital after the attack. Witnesses described a "horrific" scene. Police are searching for the subject. Emma Barnett spoke to a solicitor Ayesha Nayyar, who has previously represented victims of acid crime. Emma talks to the TV presenter Kaye Adams about her 10-year battle with HMRC over their claim she owed almost £125,000 in unpaid taxes. Best known for her role on the Loose Women panel show, she also hosts the morning show on BBC Radio Scotland. She says the protracted legal case has left her feeling “utterly, utterly beat up and gaslit”, despite her vindication.A new study says that an ideological gap has opened up between young men and women in countries on every continent. These increasingly different world views could have far-reaching consequences. One of the leading researchers in gender studies Dr Alice Evans, Senior Lecturer in the Social Science of Development at King’s College London tells Emma why Gen Z is two generations, not one. Emma also speaks to Professor Rosie Campbell, Director of the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London.Have you ever thought about where your name came from? Perhaps you were named after a favourite relative, a character in a movie or maybe your parents just liked the sound of it. Photographer Deirdre Brennan wanted to mark the 1500th anniversary of Saint Brigid, one of the patron saints of Ireland. To do this, she photographed Brigids all over Ireland and asked them how they felt about their name. She joins Emma to discuss the project - as does one of the Brigids involved in her project - Brigid McDonnell, a sheep farmer from County Antrim, Northern Ireland.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Steve Greenwood
01/02/2457m 31s

Arlene Foster, french women and high heels

Former Northern Ireland First Minister and DUP leader Arlene Foster joins the programme to talk about a return to devolution in Northern Ireland and the fourth anniversary of Brexit. Author Fiona Williams is out with her debut novel, The House of Broken Bricks. She joins Emma to talk about the ways in which the book relates to her real life in terms of navigating issues of race and belonging, and why she wanted to write a story so intertwined with nature. Thames Valley Police has referred itself to the policing regulator after a BBC investigation revealed that officers ridiculed an assault victim while watching body-worn video that showed her groin. Emma speaks with the BBC's Noel Titheradge about his investigation as well as Harriet Wistrich about misogyny in the UK police force.It’s out with heels and in with trainers. That’s what is happening in France where, according to a poll, women are falling out of love with high heels - instead going for a chunky boot or comfortable trainer. To discuss this fashion shift, Emma is joined by Professor of Fashion History Dr Serena Dyer and French shoe designer Marie Laffont.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Cece Armstrong Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
31/01/2457m 24s

Misogyny in the music industry, author Lisa St Aubin de Terán, cervical smears

A new report comes out today by the Women and Equalities Select Committee about the serious problems faced by women in the music industry. To tell Emma Barnett what's in it is the Chair of the Women and Equalities Committee and Conservative MP Caroline Nokes. Emma also gets the reaction of academic and business research consultant Vick Bain.Sky Sports presenter Jo Wilson has been gracing our screens since 2011, but what you might not have known is that Jo has also lived with Stage 3C cervical cancer. After a difficult birth experience in 2020, she was reluctant to book a smear test, but convinced herself to do it 19 months later leading to her diagnosis. Her treatment was successful, and she is now speaking out about her personal experience in a bid to encourage women to take up their smear tests. NHS data shows that almost a third of women in England did not attend their test last year. Emma speaks to Jo and to Theresa Freeman-Wang, consultant gynaecologist and clinical advisor to Jo’s Trust.After 20 years of silence, prize-winning author Lisa St Aubin de Terán is back with a new book. Aged 16, Lisa married a Venezuelan landowner-turned-bank robber; she eventually ran away from him with her young daughter only to end up trapped in a castle with the Scottish poet George MacBeth. From there she eloped to Italy and in 2004 she settled in north Mozambique, establishing the Teran Foundation to develop community tourism. She lived there until 2022 when a cyclone took the roof off her house, and returned to London with a bag full of manuscripts including her memoir, Better Broken than New. She joins Emma in studio.Last week we spoke about the record low birth rate in China as the country struggles to revert effects of the decades long one-child-policy. Today, we turn our attention to Japan. The population of the world’s third biggest economy has been declining for 16 years. An ageing workforce, combined with the country's strict immigration control, has, among other things, led to significant labour shortages. Could women be Japan’s hidden asset? Emma speaks to Moeka Iida, The Economist’s reporter and researcher in Tokyo.
30/01/2457m 5s

Fasting and women, Conscription, Cuteness exhibition

Following the speech last week by the head of the British Armed Forces calling for a new ‘citizen army’, we look at what this could look like and what role women would play. Emma Barnett speaks to former RAF Group Captain Kathleen Sherit the author of Women on the Front Line, and to Diane Allen, a retired Army Lieutenant Colonel. It's been reported that the Prime Minister Rishi Sunak fasts for 36 hours at the start of each week. He is said to stop eating by 5pm on a Sunday and doesn't permit himself to touch food again until 5am on a Tuesday, and allows himself to drink only black coffee and water. It is said that he has followed this practice for years. Emma is joined by Dr Saira Hameed to discuss fasting and how men and women should approach it differently. Amy and Anu are identical twins, but just after they were born, they were taken from their mother and sold to separate families. Years later they connected online and realised they were among thousands of babies in Georgia stolen from hospitals and sold, some as recently as 2005. Emma speaks to one of the twins, Amy Khvitia, and also Fay Nurse, a BBC journalist behind a new documentary, Georgia’s Stolen Children. From cute cat memes to plush toys, a new exhibition at Somerset House explores the power of cuteness in contemporary culture. But is buying into a cute aesthetic regressive or even sexist, or can cute be reclaimed as a form of protest? And how would you feel, as a grown woman, about being labelled 'cute' or 'adorable'? To discuss, Emma is joined by Dr Isabel Galleymore, a consultant on the Cute exhibition; and the journalist Vicky Spratt.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
29/01/2457m 24s

Long Covid, Professor Jo Phoenix tribunal victory, Paying children for chores

Hundreds of doctors - led by campaign group Long Covid Doctors for Action - are planning to sue the NHS over claims that inadequate PPE provision has left them with Long Covid. Dr Nathalie MacDermott, joins Emma Barnett to discuss. Do you pay your children to do the chores around the house? The journalist Helen Carroll faced an online backlash after revealing she pays her son £40 a month to load the dishwasher everyday. To navigate the thorny issue, Sue Atkins, Parenting Coach and Author of Parenting Made Easy joins Anita Rani to discuss. In an exclusive interview, Emma speaks to the academic Professor Jo Phoenix who has won an unfair dismissal claim against the Open University after she was compared with “a racist uncle at the Christmas table” because of her gender-critical beliefs. China is experiencing its biggest population drop in six decades. In an attempt to recover from the ‘one-child policy’ introduced in 1980, the government are now urging women to have more children. But a large amount of women in China are saying no – they don’t want children, or to get married. Ty Dr Ye Liu from King’s College London and Cindy Yu, host of the Spectator’s Chinese Whispers podcast, discuss. Rapper Princess Superstar speaks to Emma about finally hitting the big time after a 30-year career in the music industry. Her song, Perfect, features on the soundtrack of the blockbuster film Saltburn. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
27/01/2457m 9s

Lauren Sequeira, Rape misconceptions, Singer Julia Bullock

False beliefs about what does and doesn’t constitute rape are more deeply ingrained in young people than we might think. The Crown Prosecution Service has conducted research into what these misconceptions are, and the impact they’re having on the justice system when it comes to rape convictions. Anita Rani is joined by Baljit Ubhey from the CPS and Andrea Simon from End Violence Against Women to hear more.Julia Bullock is an American classical singer. Her debut solo album, Walking in the Dark, was nominated for a Grammy award. Next week, she is bringing her mixed-media project History’s Persistent Voice to London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. It shines a light on the words, work and experiences of Black American and British artists, and includes new songs commissioned from leading Black women composers. She joins Anita to discuss her music, her influences and her passions. Journalist Helen Carroll faced a backlash online when she revealed she pays her son £40 a month to load the dishwasher. This sparked a discussion - were you paid as a child to do household chores? Or do you think children should just be doing things around the house anyway without money? Parenting coach and psychologist Sue Atkins joins Anita to discuss. Domino Day is a brand new series coming to BBC Three which combines the world of modern dating with the world of the supernatural. Series writer Lauren Sequeira speaks to Anita about why the show’s themes of modern relationships and female empowerment are so important to her, and why she wanted to show witches in a whole new light. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton
26/01/2456m 47s

Long Covid, Holocaust Memorial Day, Princess Superstar

Hundreds of doctors - led by campaign group Long Covid Doctors for Action - are planning to sue the NHS over claims that inadequate PPE provision has left them with Long Covid, according to Sky News. One of those, Dr Nathalie MacDermott, joins Emma Barnett to discuss it. Emma is joined by the rapper Princess Superstar who, after a 30-year career, has finally hit the big time following her song, Perfect, featuring on the soundtrack for the blockbuster film Saltburn. Ahead of Holocaust Memorial Day, we speak to three Jewish women - one, a survivor who was born in a concentration camp - about how you keep teaching the lessons of the Holocaust as fewer and fewer survivors are around to tell their stories. The Chancellor Jeremy Hunt is facing pressure to fix "unfair" child benefit rules. Campaigners like Martin Lewis have called for it to be a focus of the Budget in March as he says single income families are being penalised. Emma talks to the chair of the Treasury Select Committee, the Conservative MP Harriet Baldwin, and Tom Waters from the Institute for Fiscal Studies.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
25/01/2457m 18s

Claire Waxman, Victims' Bill, China birth rate, D-Mer Study, Academy Award nominations

The Victim’s and Prisoner’s Bill heads to the House of Lords today for the Committee Stage. What is it trying to achieve, and what difference will it make to women? Emma is joined by the Independent London Victim’s Commissioner, Claire Waxman OBE, and a woman who will share her personal experience of a partner convicted of child sexual abuse who, under the current law, still had access to his daughter. China is experiencing its biggest population drop in six decades. In an attempt to recover from the ‘one-child policy’ introduced in 1980, the government are now urging women to have more children. But a large amount of women in China are saying no – they don’t want children, or to get married. To discuss this further, Emma is joined by Dr Ye Liu from King’s College London and Cindy Yu, host of the Spectator’s Chinese Whispers podcast. D-MER is a relatively unknown condition that could affect around nine percent of mothers who breastfeed. Emma speaks to Charlie Middleton from the University of Dundee, who is leading a study into the condition to find out more about it, and Beth Strachan, who has D-MER and is currently breastfeeding. The Oscar nominations are out, and many feel that there are some key women who haven’t made the list, but should have. Among these are Barbie director Greta Gerwig and actor Margot Robbie – although Ryan Gosling has been nominated for his role in the movie. There’s only one woman director nominated – Justine Triet. Are women being snubbed? Film journalist Karen Krizanovich joins Emma to discuss.Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Donald MacDonald
24/01/2457m 20s

Professor Jo Phoenix tribunal victory, Actor Sarah Greene

In an exclusive interview, Emma Barnett speaks to the academic Professor Jo Phoenix who has won an unfair dismissal claim against the Open University after she was compared with “a racist uncle at the Christmas table” because of her gender critical beliefs.New York Times writer Amanda Taub brings us the latest news from the US Presidential race.Irish actor Sarah Greene on her new project, an eight-part series – Sexy Beast – which has just launched on Paramount+. And we hear about a campaign to get a new portrait of Margaret Bondfield, the first female government minister, commissioned and hung in Parliament with MP Alison McGovern and historian Professor Pam Cox.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
23/01/2457m 26s

DJ Paulette, Abortion, Vinted co-founder, Childcare

Award-winning DJ Paulette has been in the music industry for more than 30 years. She got her start at the famous Haçienda nightclub in Manchester but has DJ'd all over the world. Her book, Welcome to the Club: The Life and Lessons of a Black Woman DJ, tells some of the tales of her career so far and shines a light on many other women in the electronic dance music industry. Paulette joins Emma Barnett.New guidance from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to healthcare workers says that suspected illegal abortions should not be reported to the police. This guidance, which applies to England and Wales, follows some recent cases where women have been convicted of having illegal abortions. Emma is joined by former Chief Superintendent at the Metropolitan Police Parm Sandhu, and Associate Professor in Criminal Law and Criminal Justice at Durham University Dr Emma Milne to discuss.Buying second-hand clothes is fashionable again, thanks to online marketplaces like Vinted, Depop and eBay. Emma talks to Vinted co-founder Milda Mitkute about what it takes to turn an idea into a successful business and why she decided to leave the company in 2017 when her first child was born.Is the Government's key childcare promise to parents in trouble? One newspaper is reporting that thousands of parents are being warned they won't be able to access the offer of free childcare to under twos this year. Emma gets the view of providers from Neil Leitch, Chief Executive of the Early Years Alliance which represents 14,000 nurseries, pre-schools and childminders, and June O'Sullivan CEO of LEYF nurseries.
22/01/2456m 14s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Jodie Comer, Vicky McClure, Jameela Jamil

The Killing Eve star Jodie Comer joins us to discuss her latest film, The End We Start From. The protagonist is a new mum, who has to navigate a flooded Britain with her baby. Jodie also reflects on the powerful response to her play Prima Facie, and the impact of fame on her life.According to a new report by the charity Brainkind, up to one in two survivors of domestic abuse in the UK may be living with an undiagnosed brain injury. We speak to Steffy Bechelet from Brainkind and Dr Annemarie Burns, a consultant clinical neuro-psychologist.Vicky McClure joins us to discuss her new role as explosives expert Lana Washington in a new series of Trigger Point. How often do you feel weary and depleted? The burnout coach and historian Anna Schaffner discusses her book, Exhausted: An A-Z for the Weary.They were known as Israel’s “eyes on the border.” These were female Israeli border soldiers - who raised concerns about suspicious Hamas activity on the Gaza border in the run up to the October 7 attack - but those concerns went unheard by higher ranking officers. Hamas killed at least 1,200 people in that attack and took about 240 hostages, around 130 of whom are still being held. Since then, nearly 25,000 civilians have been killed in the Israeli bombardment that followed, according to the Hamas-run health ministry. We speak to the BBC’s Alice Cuddy and the author Mary Ann Sieghart.The actor and activist Jameela Jamil has made headlines over the years for her provocative, sometimes sweary social media posts, often calling out celebrity culture for promoting unrealistic ideals. She reflects on cancel culture and her resolution to post online with more 'grace and empathy'.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Erin Riley
20/01/2456m 28s

Vicky McClure, Mean Girls, Women’s Health Strategy update

Vicky McClure is back on our screens as explosives expert Lana Washington in a new series of Trigger Point. Well known for her stand-out roles in Line of Duty and This is England, Vicky also set up the Dementia Choir, and recently received a MBE for services to drama and charity.The classic teen drama film Mean Girls has been remade as a musical film and it opens in the UK today.  Author Holly Bourne, who writes young adult fiction, and film critic Christina Newland discuss its enduring themes.2024 will be the biggest year ever for democracy as more than four billion people across the world go to the polls. To mark this historic milestone, the FT has launched Democracy, 2024, a short film series to examine what democracy will look like in the year ahead. Anita Rani talks to FT editor Roula Khalaf and the comedian Aditi Mittal, who has contributed to the series.Dame Professor Lesley Regan, the Women’s Health Ambassador for England, gives an update on the progress of the Government’s Women's Health Strategy.And the latest on the situation for women and girls in Afghanistan with BBC journalist Zarghuna Kargar.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Emma Harth
19/01/2454m 19s

Jodie Comer, Olivia Attwood, Da'Vine Joy Randolph

The actor Jodie Comer became a household name playing the glorious baddie Villanelle in BBC drama Killing Eve, and she has gone on to win multiple awards for her work on screen and stage. She joins Emma Barnett now to talk about her latest film, The End We Start From. Think 28 Days Later meets The Day After Tomorrow with a twist – the protagonist is a new mum, who has to navigate a flooded Britain with her baby.Football commentators Eni Aluko and Lucy Ward are reported to be considering legal action against Joey Barton for his recent online criticisms of them. Eni Aluko has released a video on her Instagram speaking about the effect it has had on her. Where is the line between sexist bullying online and freedom of speech? Emma speaks to Henry Winter, Chief football writer at The Times and Seyi Akiwowo, founder of Glitch UK, a charity working to end online abuse, and author of How to Stay Safe Online.Olivia Attwood knows more than most about the financial – and emotional – cost of cosmetic treatments. The former Love Island contestant and star of The Only Way Is Essex has been open about the surgeries and 'tweakments' she has had. In her new ITV series The Price of Perfection, she goes behind the scenes to watch butts being lifted, lips being filled and breasts being enlarged. But she wants to make sure that teenage girls don’t make the mistakes she herself made.Da’Vine Joy Randolph has just won this year’s Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture for her portrayal of Mary Lamb in Alexander Payne’s new film The Holdovers. It’s about a teacher, pupil and head cook who end up spending Christmas together at a New England boarding school in the early 1970’s. Mary is grieving the loss of her son, who has been killed in Vietnam. Da’Vine has been tipped for more awards recognition to come, and she joins Emma in the Woman’s Hour studio.
18/01/2457m 53s

Jameela Jamil, Claudia Winkleman, Abortion buffer zones, Female Israel border soldiers

The actress Jameela Jamil talks to Emma Barnett about her crusade for gentle exercise and body positivity as well as her new strategy for how she communicates on social media. She’s become one of the internet’s most prominent activists holding the beauty industry and celebrity culture to account for their unrealistic ideals with her provocative online posts. Her outspoken views have led to widely publicised social media spats which she says have left her with the desire to post with more “grace and empathy”. Best known for her role as Tahini in the Netflix series The Good Place she also hosts the podcast iWeigh which declares its “radical inclusivity” agenda where guests talk about what they “weigh” or value in life as opposed to their physical weight. New draft guidance from the Home Office appears to water down previously voted on laws about Safe Access Zones around abortion clinics. To talk about what this could mean for women seeking an abortion, and why the changes might be made, Emma is joined by Jo Gideon, Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent Central and Louise McCudden from MSI Reproductive Choices. They were known as Israel’s “eyes on the border.” These were female Israeli border soldiers - who raised concerns about suspicious Hamas activity on the Gaza border in the run up to the October 7 attack - but those concerns went unheard by higher ranking officers. Hamas killed at least 1,200 people in that attack and took about 240 hostages. Since then, more than 23,000 civilians have been killed in the Israeli bombardment that followed, according to the Hamas-run health ministry. Emma discusses with the BBC’s Alice Cuddy who reported on these soldiers and Mary Ann Sieghart, the journalist and author of “The Authority Gap: Why Women Are Still Taken Less Seriously Than Men and What We Can Do About it”The Traitors is back, we’re a few episodes into this second series of the hit reality TV show and things are hotting up at the Scottish castle, where a bunch of strangers are divided into traitors and ‘Faithful’ then compete to win up to £120,000.  Claudia Winkleman is the host who hand picks the traitors.  She joins Emma. Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley
17/01/2457m 30s

Having more children after 40, Gladiators, Nikki Hayley profile

The first female Radio 1 DJ Annie Nightingale has died at the age of 83. She was a huge trailblazer when it came to breaking down barriers for women in radio. To mark her death, we hear a clip from 2007 when Annie spoke to Martha Kearney on Woman’s Hour.Two female journalists who spent over a year in prison for covering the death of Mahsa Amini have been released on bail by Iranian authorities. Niloufar Hamedi and Elaheh Mohammadi are appealing against their jail sentences and will remain out of prison until a decision is made. Emma Barnett is joined by Women's Affairs Journalist for the BBC World Service Ferenak Amidi to hear more.From Kourtney Kardashian to Sienna Miller, there’s been lots of recent examples of women who have kids early on in life, and then try to conceive with a new partner in their 40s and beyond. Journalist Grace Ackroyd has written candidly about her experience of this – she talks to Emma about having children again at a new stage in life, and the challenges she’s faced.Gladiators is back on our TV screens. The BBC’s reboot of the super popular 90s series was launched this weekend, with new games added to the show. We’ll hear the first impressions from one of the original Gladiators – Diane Youdale, better known as ‘Jet’, who joins Emma to talk about her own experience and advice she would give to the new female gladiators.Ahead of the US election this year, one woman has begun to challenge Donald Trump in the polls for who will be the Republican representative. To find out more about Nikki Haley, Emma is joined by Dr Leslie Vinjamuri, Director of the US and Americas programme at Chatham House, and Julia Manchester, national political reporter at The Hill who is reporting live from this week’s Iowa caucuses. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
16/01/2457m 30s

Domestic abuse and brain injury, Calvin Klein advert, Exhaustion

Up to one in two survivors of domestic abuse in the UK may be living with an undiagnosed brain injury. That's according to a new report by the charity Brainkind. Emma Barnett is joined by Steffy Bechelet from Brainkind and Dr Annmarie Burns, a Consultant Clinical Neuro-psychologist.How often do you feel weary and depleted? Or perhaps just plain exhausted? Anna Schaffner knows these feelings well. Now a coach specialising in helping the exhausted, in her previous life as an academic, as a Professor of Cultural History at the University of Kent, she suffered from burnout. She has now written a book, Exhausted: An A-Z for the Weary.Since 1 January, working parents in England have been able to apply for a code to access new free childcare hours for two-year-olds, which will then kick in on 1 April. The scheme is part of a significant investment in childcare announced by the Government. But one campaigning organisation has found that parents are facing major challenges in securing a code. Joining Emma is Lauren Fabianski from the campaign group Pregnant then Screwed who carried out the survey.After the Advertising Standards Authority banned a Calvin Klein poster featuring the singer FKA twigs for presenting her “as a stereotypical sexual object”, we’re asking, what determines whether an advert is objectifying? Sarah Golding, the CEO of The&Partnership and journalist Rebecca Cope join Emma.Last week, Jade Robertson woke up to find that one of the dresses from her fashion brand Little Lies had sold out overnight – after Taylor Swift was spotted wearing it. Jade joins Emma to talk about what this means for her and her fashion brand. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
16/01/2457m 59s

Weekend Woman’s Hour - Cush Jumbo, Spice Girls Stamp, Assisted Dying

Cush Jumbo is the award-winning actor known for her roles on the stage and screen, from The Good Fight to Macbeth. She joins Clare McDonnell to discuss starring in - and executive producing – the new crime thriller series Criminal Record. Cush stars as DS June Lenker, a police detective locked in a confrontation with an older detective, played by Peter Capaldi, over a historic murder conviction.For the first time, Royal Mail has dedicated set of stamps to a female pop group, to commemorate 30 years since the Spice Girls formed in 1994. Lauren Bravo, a culture journalist and author and DJ Yinka Bokinni joined Emma to talk about it.Last week on Woman’s Hour we heard the candid admission by the former Labour MP and Government Minister, Dame Joan Ruddock that she was ready to end her terminally ill husband's life using a pillow in a bid to end his pain. Her husband the former MP Frank Doran had been suffering from end stage bowel cancer in 2017, and she struggled to get him pain relief medication in the hours before he died. She is now calling for a free vote in the Commons to legalise assisted dying. The public debate around the subject has been revived in recent months by leading figures such as Esther Rantzen - who revealed that she is considering travelling to a Dignitas clinic in Switzerland if her cancer worsens. But others such as Baroness Ilora Finlay, a cross bench peer in the House of Lords and a palliative end of life care expert, are cautioning against a law change. She believes improved access to care and pain relief is the answer when people are dying rather than the taking of lethal drugs. She joins Clare McDonnell to reflect on the new push for a law change.Shere Hite - a name many people will remember, but some may not know. She was a pioneering feminist sex researcher who published her ground-breaking book, The Hite Report: A National Study of Female Sexuality in 1976. The book was seen by many as radical, changing prevailing notions about female sexuality. Shere went on to write and publish several more books, but endured intense and lasting criticism in the US, and eventually moved to Europe and renounced her American citizenship in 1995. She died in 2020. Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated Director, Nicole Newnham felt that despite how influential Shere had been in life, that she has since been forgotten. So Nicole produced the documentary, The Disappearance of Shere Hite, which is released in UK cinemas on January 12th. She joins Krupa to discuss it. As the number of pupils missing a significant amount of their education is about double the level it was before the pandemic, Clare is joined by Ellie Costello, the executive director of Square Peg, a not-for-profit which helps families that struggle with school attendance.
13/01/2456m 39s

Quarterlife crisis, Family Courts, Northern Soul

A pilot scheme to allow journalists to report cases from three family courts in England and Wales is to be extended to almost half of the courts. From the end of January, coverage of cases at 16 more family court centres in England will be permitted. This means 19 of the 43 centres in England and Wales will be part of the Transparency Pilot. Families and individual social workers will be anonymous under the scheme. Krupa Padhy talks to Louise Tickle, a journalist who specialises in reporting on family courts and leads a project for the Bureau of Investigative journalism supporting other journalists to do the same, and Angela Frazer Wicks, Chair of the Family Rights Group and a parent with experience of the family justice system.Popular psychology tends to define a quarter-life crisis as the confusion, stress and anxiety individuals in their 20s and 30s feel about their goals, beliefs and relationships as they seek direction in life and look to find their place in the world. Satya Doyle Byock, a clinical psychotherapist based in the US is the author of the new book Quarterlife: The Search for Self in Early Adulthood and she joins Krupa to talk about young people's struggles with the push and pull of meaning and stability.Northern Soul is commonly associated with Northern England and the 1970s. But mother and daughter duo Levanna and Eve are turning this on its head. Through Levanna’s viral dance videos on social media and Eve’s DJing at their events in Bristol, they’re bringing Northern groove to the South West, all whilst introducing a new generation to the genre. They speak to Krupa about the release of their new album, Wonderful Night.Shere Hite was a pioneering feminist sex researcher who published The Hite Report: A National Study of Female Sexuality in 1976. The book was seen by many as radical, changing prevailing notions about female sexuality. It laid out the views of 3,500 women on sexuality and the female orgasm, but it was derided by some, including Playboy, which dubbed it the "Hate Report". Shere went on to write and publish several more books, but endured intense and lasting criticism in the US, and eventually moved to Europe and renounced her American citizenship in 1995. She died in 2020. Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated director Nicole Newnham felt that despite how influential Shere had been in life, that she has since been forgotten. So, Nicole produced the documentary, The Disappearance of Shere Hite, which is in UK cinemas from 12 January. She joins Krupa to discuss it.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan HannantPresenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
12/01/2455m 42s

Zara Aleena's aunt, Spice Girls stamps, surge in scabies

Farah Naz, the aunt of murdered law graduate Zara Aleena, tells of her concerns that her niece’s killer has allegedly been caught having sex with a prison worker. Jordan McSweeney is serving a life sentence at high security Belmarsh Prison in South London.For the first time, Royal Mail has dedicated set of stamps to a female pop group, to commemorate 30 years since the Spice Girls formed in 1994. We talk to Lauren Bravo, a culture journalist and DJ Yinka Bokinni. We hear about the start of a new landmark Radio 4 documentary series called Child which follows a child’s development from fertilisation to first birthday from its creator India Rakusen.There’s been a surge in the number of scabies cases and experts are warning there’s an acute shortage of treatments which is turning it into a major public health threat. Emma Barnett talks to Dr Tess McPherson about who is most at risk from catching it and how best to avoid it.And we talk to barrister Harriet Johnson about a study which suggests rape convictions are 20% less likely in cases where victims give pre-recorded evidence. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Emma Harth
11/01/2456m 39s

Cosmetic surgery reviews, Speed dating, Bangladesh elections, Assisted dying & palliative care

Woman’s Hour investigates the cosmetic surgery clinic taking legal action when patients post unfavourable reviews. Kate Kronenbach tells reporter Melanie Abbott she was disappointed when she had an operation to remove fat from her arms after losing 10 stone, and received a solicitor’s letter when she wrote about her experience on the Trustpilot website. Action has also been taken against five others. The Free Speech Union is supporting them in their case. Clare McDonnell discusses the story with Melanie and speaks to the Union and to patient campaigner Dawn Knight. Is speed-dating making a comeback? Apathy over dating apps seems to be pushing both men and women towards the kind of speed dating that was so popular in the nineties. But is it better than online dating? And does it work? Clare is joined by writer Radhika Sanghani and relationship counsellor Suzie Hayman to discuss.Bangladeshi PM Sheikh Hasina won a controversial fourth consecutive term in Parliamentary elections last elections last Sunday. The opposition party called it a 'sham' election, coming after mass arrests of her political opponents and refused to participate. The leader of the Opposition former PM Khaleda Zia – also female - is under house arrest. Between them the two women have dominated Bangladeshi politics since 1991. BBC News South Asian Correspondent, Samira Hussain, joins Clare McDonnell to tell us more about these leaders and the political situation in Bangladesh. Last week on Woman’s Hour we heard the candid admission by the former Labour MP and Government Minister, Dame Joan Ruddock that she was ready to end her terminally ill husband's life using a pillow in a bid to end his pain. Her husband the former MP Frank Doran had been suffering from end stage bowel cancer in 2017, and she struggled to get him pain relief medication in the hours before he died. She is now calling for a free vote in the Commons to legalise assisted dying. The public debate around the subject has been revived in recent months by leading figures such as Esther Rantzen - who revealed that she is considering travelling to a Dignitas clinic in Switzerland if her cancer worsens; and the late Dame Diana Rigg, who made a recording before her death making the case for assisted dying. But others such as Baroness Ilora Finlay, a cross bench peer in the House of Lords and a palliative end of life care expert, are cautioning against a law change. She believes improved access to care and pain relief is the answer when people are dying rather than the taking of lethal drugs. She joins Clare McDonnell to reflect on the new push for a law change.Presented by Clare McDonnell Producer: Louise Corley
10/01/2457m 36s

Midwife shortages, Dating at 81, Jackie Mag anniversary

The number of midwives in England has increased by just 7% over the last year and some NHS Trusts in England have more than one in five midwifery jobs vacant, according to BBC research. The Royal College of Midwives says staffing gaps have to close. The BBC’s Health Correspondent Catherine Burns joins Clare McDonnell to talk about what her investigation into maternity units in England has discovered, and to share the story of Farzana, who had to give birth on her own after midwives said they were too busy to answer her calls.Carole Stone must have one of the best address books ever. A former producer of BBC Radio 4’s Any Questions, for years Carole has run 'salons' and parties bringing together hundreds of interesting people - politicians, actors, journalists. Carole’s partner, the TV broadcaster Richard Lindley, died four years ago. Carole joins Clare to discuss how and why she is looking for another soulmate at the age of 81. Could the next leader of North Korea be a woman? Clare gets the latest from lead correspondent at NK News, Jeongmin Kim, and hears more about what life is like for women on the ground with North Korea expert, Professor Hazel Smith.As the number of pupils missing a significant amount of their education is about double the level it was before the pandemic, Clare is joined by Ellie Costello, the executive director of Square Peg, a not-for-profit which helps families that struggle with school attendance. It’s 60 years this week since Jackie, the magazine for teenage girls, was first published. At its peak, it was selling more than a million copies a week. To celebrate the anniversary, Clare is joined by Nina Myskow, Jackie’s first female editor, and Wendy Rigg, a teenage fan who achieved her dream of working on Jackie.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Lottie Garton
09/01/2457m 24s

Cush Jumbo, Church leader survivors, Exonerated sub-postmistress

Cush Jumbo is the award-winning actor known for her roles on the stage and screen, from The Good Fight to Macbeth. She joins Clare McDonnell to discuss starring in - and executive producing – the new crime thriller series Criminal Record. Cush stars as DS June Lenker, a police detective locked in a confrontation with an older detective, played by Peter Capaldi, over a historic murder conviction.A BBC investigation into one of Africa’s most influential pastors has uncovered hundreds of allegations of abuse, including a number of British victims. TB Joshua, who founded the Synagogue Church of All Nations in Nigeria, built an evangelical empire that drew presidents, Premier League footballers and millions of followers from across the globe - including from towns and cities across the UK. Multiple victims claim they repeatedly tried to raise the alarm with British authorities, including the Foreign Office, but an adequate investigation “never took place”. Two UK survivors of his abuse - Rae and Anneka - join Clare to discuss their experiences as ‘disciples’, why they left and the law changes they hope will result from this exposure.The Post Office Horizon scandal is once more dominating the headlines. Today, a petition calling for the former Post Office chief executive Paula Vennells to lose her CBE has received more than one million signatures, and yesterday the Prime Minister told the BBC the Government was reviewing options to help victims of the scandal. More than 700 branch managers were convicted of false accounting, theft and fraud based on faulty software. Currently, a public inquiry into the scandal is ongoing and the Metropolitan Police is investigating the Post Office over potential fraud offences arising from the prosecutions. One of the women who was falsely accused was Jo Hamilton. Her story has been told in the ITV drama Mr Bates vs. The Post Office, where she was played by the actor Monica Dolan. Jo joins Clare.What do you do if your child refuses to go to school? Today, the Government is expected to announce funding for a new initiative aimed at tackling school absences in England. More than a fifth of secondary school pupils in England are persistently absent. The new scheme will see funding for school attendance mentors, an initiative which has been trialled in a pilot by the charity Barnardos. Clare speaks to Nadine Good from the charity, and hears from head teacher Simon Kidwell.
08/01/2457m 22s

Weekend Woman's Hour - Women in the metaverse, Author Vanessa Chan, Women and negotiation

Police are investigating what is possibly the first crime of its kind: a British schoolgirl playing a game in the metaverse was allegedly sexually assaulted by a group of online strangers. Given that this happened in a virtual reality game, it is not yet clear whether there is any crime here to prosecute. We hear from Helen Rumbelow from The Times, and her colleague Sean Russell, who has gone into the metaverse as both a man and a woman, and was struck by how different it was.How much of your daily life do you spend negotiating? Perhaps at work, or with your children – or even in-laws? Mum and a mic on Instagram, Jane Dowden, discusses the negotiations she has with her twins, and clinical psychologist Catherine Hallissey tells us what goes on in our brains while we’re negotiating, and the best way to do so with family.Is farming getting easier for women? New research out this week suggests that women working in agriculture are finding life worse now than they did 10 years ago. This comes as more women are showing an interest in pursuing farming as a career – with some agricultural colleges enrolling record numbers of girls onto their courses. We hear from Emily Norton, a female farmer and agricultural commentator, as well as Bridgette Baker, a young farmer who recently graduated, to find out their experiences in farming.Violinist Izzy Judd trained at the Royal Academy of Music and was an original member of the string quartet Escala, who shot to fame on Britain’s Got Talent in 2008. She met her husband Harry on the McFly Wonderland tour. Following marriage and three small children, Izzy has written two books - Dare to Dream and Mindfulness for Mums. She has now returned to her love of playing the violin, with a forthcoming EP - Moments, and a single - Somewhere in My Memory. The Storm We Made is a new book by the debut author Vanessa Chan. Set in what we know today as Malaysia across two timelines - British colonialism and Japanese colonialism - it follows bored housewife Cecily who risks it all to become a spy for a general. But her decisions have huge repercussions for her and her family. Vanessa Chan tells us about her book which was fought over in a seven-way auction by publishers in the UK.Steph Daniels gave up hockey in her 30s to teach PE and English and manage an all-female synth pop group called Zenana. However, in her 70s, she saw an advert for Bedford Hockey Club and decided to dust off her sticks. Since then, she’s even attended a trial for the over-70s England team and vows to try again next year. She tells us about reigniting old passions.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
06/01/2453m 13s

Women and music in 2023, Nicole Jacobs, Women in farming

Female artists dominated the 2023 music scene. New figures from the British Phonographic Institute reveal that Miley Cyrus, Taylor Swift, Billie Eilish, Olivia Rodrigo, Raye, Dua Lipa, Ellie Goulding and many more - spent a record-breaking 31 weeks in the number one spot in the UK Singles Chart. But that’s not all... they had seven of the top 10 singles and even took the top vinyl album spot. Why was 2023 so good for female artists? And will it continue? We ask global music business lecturer and podcaster, Karlyn King, and music journalist Jo Kendall.Domestic Abuse Commissioner Nicole Jacobs says new Government plans to get rid of shorter jail sentences in England and Wales put women at risk. The new sentencing bill currently making its way through Parliament aims to give what are known as suspended sentences where people may have instead been given jail terms of 12 months or less. Estimates from the Office for National Statistics show around 2.4 million people - 1.7 million of those being women - suffered from domestic abuse in the year to March 2022.We're a few days into the new year - and maybe you're trying to start some new healthy habits, or even hygiene habits. And for some that's desperately needed - a new survey from the bathroom suppliers Showers to You shows that out of 2,200 UK residents, almost one in ten only wash their towels twice a year. 5% of men have admitted to washing towels once a year - compared to 1% of women. Professor Sally Bloomfield from the International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene explains what we should be doing to protect ourselves and others.Is farming getting easier for women? New research out today suggests that women working in agriculture are finding life worse now than they did 10 years ago. This comes as more women are showing an interest in pursuing farming as a career – with some agricultural colleges enrolling record numbers of girls onto their courses. Claire McDonnell speaks to Emily Norton, a female farmer and agricultural commentator, as well as Bridgette Baker, a young farmer who recently graduated, to find out their experiences in farming.Women’s Health magazine is an iconic brand in the UK and read globally by millions of people monthly. Women’s Health Editor-in-Chief Claire Sanderson has just made history as the first woman globally to also be appointed Editor-in-Chief of Men's Health. Claire joins Woman’s Hour to discuss what it means to be a woman editing a men’s magazine, whether there is a crossover with what women and men are reading and, in an age where we’re worried about body image, are these magazines useful?Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
05/01/2455m 51s

Dame Joan Ruddock, Katherine Parkinson, Negotiating care with siblings, Author Vanessa Chan

Katherine Parkinson has graced our TV screens for almost two decades, from Doc Martin and The IT Crowd to Humans and Here We Go. Now she has a comedy drama airing on ITV called Significant Other, in which she plays one half of an odd couple - neighbours who meet in highly unusual circumstances. She joins Clare McDonnell to discuss. Former Labour MP and government Minister Dame Joan Ruddock tells Clare about her call for a free vote in the Commons to legalise assisted dying. She admitted she was ready to end her terminally ill husband’s life to stop his pain. Our New Year's day programme on negotiating provoked one listener to write to us: 'I would love you to cover negotiations between carers and their parent with dementia. Another world! As is negotiating between carer and their siblings'. Professor June Andrews, who’s a fellow of the Royal College of Nursing and an author of Carers and Caring, and Dr Lis Boulton, Health and Care Manager at the charity Age UK, discuss. The Storm We Made is a new book by the debut author Vanessa Chan. Set in what we know today as Malaysia across two timelines - British colonialism and Japanese colonialism - it follows bored housewife Cecily who risks it all to become a spy for a general. But her decisions have huge repercussions for her and her family. Vanessa Chan joins Clare to discuss her book which was fought over in a seven-way auction by publishers in the UK. Steph Daniels gave up hockey in her 30s to teach PE and English and manage an all-female synth pop group called Zenana. However, in her 70s, she saw an advert for Bedford Hockey Club and decided to dust off her sticks. Since then, she’s even attended a trial for the over-70s England team and vows to try again next year. She joins Clare to talk about reigniting old passions.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Dianne McGregor
04/01/2457m 24s

Shakespeare's Women, Izzy Judd, Women in the metaverse

A new play - Shakespeare’s Women - transports ten of Shakespeare’s female characters from the 16th century to 2024, placing them in the same domestic abuse support group. Written by Lorien Haynes, this dark comedy gradually exposes each woman’s darkest secrets and asks what would happen if these protagonists survived their men and traditional narratives, to become flesh and blood today? Lorien and the director Jude Kelly, join Emma Barnett in the Woman’s Hour studio.Violinist Izzy Judd trained at the Royal Academy of Music and was an original member of the string quartet Escala, who shot to fame on Britain’s Got Talent in 2008. She met her husband Harry on the McFly Wonderland tour. Following marriage and three small children, Izzy has written two books - Dare to Dream and Mindfulness for Mums. She has now returned to her love of playing the violin, with a forthcoming EP - Moments, and a single - Somewhere in My Memory. Izzy joins Emma to talk about her music and motherhood.Police are investigating what is possibly the first crime of its kind: a British schoolgirl playing a game in the metaverse was allegedly sexually assaulted by a group of online strangers. Given that this happened in a virtual reality game, it is not yet clear whether there is any crime here to prosecute. Emma is joined by Helen Rumbelow from The Times and her colleague Sean Russell, who has gone into the metaverse as both a man and a woman, and was struck by how different it was.In 2015, BAFTA-winning film-maker Leslee Udwin decided that making programmes to raise awareness about issues like rape was not enough for her. Her investigation India’s Daughter - about Jyoti Singh Pandey who was raped, tortured and killed by six men on a bus in Delhi in 2012 – asked why men rape women. Leslee spoke to one of the attackers, who blamed the victim. Leslee decided to campaign for a revolution in education, not just in India, but in the UK and theoretically, every country. Her aim is to equip all children with the tools to ‘think equal,’ and reduce violence against women. She joins Emma.
03/01/2453m 51s

Lavinia Greenlaw, Lindsay Duncan, the Irish mother and baby homes scandal

The names of Jeffrey Epstein's associates are likely to be published today, after a judge in the US ordered the release of court documents. Epstein took his own life after he was accussed of sexually abusing and trafficking underage girls. Names connected to him have previously been anonymised as John or Jane Doe; but now around 170 people, mostly men, will have their association with the former financier made public. Joan Smith, journalist and author, and Georgina Calvert-Lee, an equality lawyer at Bellevue Law, tell Emma Barnett what the list will mean.Lavinia Greenlaw is one of the country's leading poets and has now published a selected edition of her work, covering three decades of writing. She tells Emma about her new role as poetry editor at Faber, the first woman to hold the position. She is now the custodian of a back catalogue that includes TS Eliot, Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes, and the gatekeeper for aspiring poets of the next generation.It is ten years since journalist Alison O’Reilly revealed that up to 796 babies were buried in a mass, unmarked grave in the grounds of a former mother and baby home in Galway in Ireland. The Irish government has promised compensation but none has been paid out. Is this now about to change? Alison joins Emma to discuss the latest developments.And how far would you go to help a friend? In Lindsay Duncan's new drama, Truelove, on Channel 4, a drunken reunion at a funeral leads a group of friends to make a pact: they will support each other in assisted dying rather than let a friend suffer alone. Lindsay tells Emma how a thriller starring a cast in their 70s and 80s is turning the police procedural on its head.Producer: Hannah Sander Presenter: Emma Barnett
02/01/2455m 14s

Women and Negotiations

A special Woman's Hour episode all about women and negotiation. Nicky Perfect is the former Deputy Head of the elite New Scotland Yard Hostage and Crisis Negotiation Unit. She has travelled the world teaching negotiation and working with the Government on international operations. She’ll be joining Hayley Hassall throughout the programme sharing her own experiences and advice, and taking us through how what she learnt can be used in our everyday lives.What has been the role of women in negotiations historically? Professor Margaret Macmillan specialises in British Imperial and International History from the 19th to the 20th Century. In those days, negotiations never involved women on paper – but that wasn’t always the case in reality. She joins Hayley to tell us more. Nomi Bar-Yaacov has been all over the world mediating and negotiating international conflicts. She’ll tell Hayley some of her experiences, as well as how these negotiations happen, and the different roles women play.How much of your daily life do you spend negotiating? Perhaps at work, or with your children – or even in-laws? Mum and a mic on Instagram, Jane Dowden, joins Hayley to chat through negotiations she has with her twins, and clinical psychologist Catherine Hallissey will talk about what goes on in our brains while we’re negotiating, and the best way to do so with family. At the end of last year, the largest negotiations including delegates from all over the world took place – COP28, the United Nation's climate summit. Rachel Kyte was there – and at several previous COPs as well, having served as special representative of the UN secretary-general and chief executive officer of Sustainable Development for All among other roles. She’ll tell Hayley all about how negotiations like COP work behind-the-scenes, including the strops and the drama that lead eventually to world-changing commitments. Presenter: Hayley Hassall Producer: Lottie Garton
01/01/2456m 23s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Dame Siân Phillips, Highflying care-leavers, 'Trouser-less' trend

Just 14% of care leavers go to university, compared to 47% of young people who didn’t grow up in care, according to a report by the think tank Civitas. The figures have barely changed over the past 10 years and at the current rate of progress, it will take 107 years to close the gap. Two care-experienced young women who did manage to smash the so-called care ceiling share their experiences with Krupa; Rebecca Munro, who graduated with a masters in business and is now an Education Liaison Officer at the University of St Andrews and Lucy Barnes, a barrister.Up to half of women will have a UTI at some point in their life. Earlier this year the NHS launched a new awareness campaign which the filmmaker and author Kate Muir has criticised for not mentioning vaginal oestrogen as a treatment. Kate joins Krupa Padhy alongside Dr Olivia Hum, a GP who is on the Council of the British Menopause Society.Actor Dame Siân Phillips’ life and career are explored in a new documentary, Siân Phillips at 90. She joins Krupa to talk about some of her acting roles, including playing Emmeline Pankhurst in a BBC drama in the 1970s, what it was like being married to Peter O’Toole, and what she’s doing now.Terri Lyne Carrington, a multi-Grammy-winning drummer and jazz artist, saw a distinct lack of songs by female composers being learned by jazz musicians - and decided to fix it. As a ‘gender justice advocate’ she decided to create a project, the New Standards: 101 Lead Sheets By Women Composers, and an accompanying album which won a Grammy, to shine a light on female jazz composers. She joins Nuala McGovern to discuss the project and jazz and gender justice on our special programme about women digging for the truth.Would you swap your trousers for a pair of statement knickers? Julia Hobbs from Vogue tells Krupa about the new trouser-less trend that's been sweeping the catwalks and social media, and the reactions she got when testing it out on the London Underground.As a nation we eat more sprouts than any other country in Europe but it’s a vegetable that, like marmite, divides opinion. Anita Rani is joined by plant pathologist Dr Lauren Chappell and the brassica research expert Dr Rachel Wells to explain how sprouts are being engineered to taste sweeter and withstand climate change. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Donald MacDonald
30/12/2355m 11s

Dame Siân Phillips, Abuse of vulnerable elderly, Clemency Burton-Hill

Actor Dame Siân Phillips’ life and career are explored in a new documentary, Siân Phillips at 90. She joins Krupa Padhy to talk about some of her acting roles, including playing Emmeline Pankhurst in a BBC drama in the 1970s, what it was like being married to Peter O’Toole, and what she’s doing now.Clemency Burton-Hill MBE, is an award-winning broadcaster, podcaster, author, journalist and musician. She joins Krupa to discuss Journal of Wonder - the newest book in her bestselling Year of Wonder series - which takes you from January to December with classical music suggestions for every day.The power of attorney system can sometimes be abused to take advantage of older people. Krupa is joined by Carolyn Stephens, who shares her story of becoming estranged from her elderly father after he met a woman on a singles holiday. He later agreed to grant power of attorney to the woman, which resulted in him being placed in a care home without his family knowing. Journalist Sue Mitchell, who shares the details of the whole affair in an upcoming radio documentary, also joins Krupa to talk about why she wanted to tell Carolyn’s story. Co-founder of The Onion Collective, Jess Prendergast, tells Krupa how she and her friends created the social enterprise East Quay Watchet in Somerset after they were frustrated by the lack of opportunities in their local town. Plus local ‘craftivist’ Lyn Barlow tells us about exhibiting her textile art in the new gallery and what the new enterprise means to her. Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Lottie Garton
29/12/2356m 12s

Highflying care-leavers, Freebirths, 'Trouser-less' trend

This summer, the region of Manipur in India made headlines after two women were viciously attacked and assaulted by a mob of men. With a similar case happening this month in the south west of the country, Krupa Padhy is joined by Geeta Pandey, BBC Women and Social Affairs Editor in Delhi, and Professor of Modern Indian History at the University of Nottingham, Dr Uditi Sen, to find out why these incidents continue to happen and whether anything is being done at a higher level to stop them.Just 14% of care leavers go to university, compared to 47% of young people who didn’t grow up in care, according to a report by the think tank Civitas. The figures have barely changed over the past 10 years and at the current rate of progress, it will take 107 years to close the gap. Two care-experienced young women who did manage to smash the so-called care ceiling share their experiences with Krupa; Rebecca Munro, who graduated with a masters in business and is now an Education Liaison Officer at the University of St Andrews and Lucy Barnes, a barrister.A freebirth is defined as giving birth without a healthcare professional in attendance. It is also known as an unassisted birth. Anecdotally, more women are making this choice in the UK - but why? What sort of experiences are they having and is it a safe and responsible decision? Krupa speaks to Naomi Nygaarda, a psychotherapist and a mother who chose to freebirth both her children and Mavis Kirkham, a retired midwife and emeritus Professor of Midwifery at Sheffield Hallam University and co-editor of Freebirth Stories, a collection of stories from women choosing to give birth this way. Would you swap your trousers for a pair of statement knickers? Julia Hobbs from Vogue tells Krupa about the new trouser-less trend that's been sweeping the catwalks and social media, and the reactions she got when testing it out on the London Underground.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth
28/12/2357m 21s

UTI treatment, Being dumped by text, Lighthouse keeper

Up to half of women will have a UTI at some point in their life. Earlier this year the NHS launched a new awareness campaign which the filmaker and author Kate Muir has criticised for not mentioning vaginal oestrogen as a treatment. Kate joins Krupa Padhy alongside Dr Olivia Hum, a GP who is on the Council of the British Menopause Society. Dr Ronny Cheung speaks to Krupa about the double-edge sword of children building their immunities in their early years and the disruption caused to working parents and carers. What do parents need to know about caring for a child with seasonal colds and coughs? Sally Snowman is the last official lighthouse keeper in the United States and at the end of this month she will retire after two decades of service. She's the first and last woman to be the lighthouse keeper for Boston Light in Massachusetts. She joins Krupa to discuss what it's like being a lighthouse keeper and how she feels about leaving it.We know that Christmas and New Year, although filled with joy for some, can put a really big strain on relationships and it can be a time when people in an unhappy relationship decide to end them. But is there ever a good way to break up a relationship? And is it ever acceptable or kinder to end something by text? Krupa is joined by Olivia Petter, journalist and author of Millennial Love and Vicky Spratt, journalist and documentary maker.The award winning comedian, writer, playwright and actor Meera Syal – known for her comedy series such as Goodness Gracious Me and The Kumars - has been talking to Ros Akins on Radio 4’s Media Show, we can hear some of that interview.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Emma Pearce
27/12/2357m 23s

Women who dig for the truth

A special Woman’s Hour episode all about women who dig for the truth.Marianne Asher-Chapman from Holts Summit, Missouri has been searching for her daughter, Angie Yarnell, for more than 20 years now. Angie went missing in 2003. Her husband, Michael pled guilty to involuntary manslaughter in 2009. He was released in 2013. He has so far refused to tell Marianne or the authorities where he buried Angie - and Marianne has been unable to find her - despite physically digging in the property where she thinks her daughter may have been buried. She joins Nuala to discuss what she’s done to find her daughter and how she’s now helping other families with missing relatives.Terri Lyne Carrington, a multi-Grammy-winning drummer and jazz artist, saw a distinct lack of songs by female composers being learned by jazz musicians - and decided to fix it. As a ‘gender justice advocate’ she decided to create a project, the New Standards: 101 Lead Sheets By Women Composers, and an accompanying album which won a Grammy, to shine a light on female jazz composers. She joins Nuala to discuss the project and jazz and gender justice on our special programme about women digging for the truth.Many of us have stayed up late, spending the night scrolling through the internet, looking for clues or information we might be on the hunt for. But have you ever felt like you need help to find out something? Someone to confirm your worst fears or set you free? Alison Harris is a private investigator and began her career in investigations later in life. She speaks to Nuala about how being a PI isn’t always the glamorous job we imagine - and what it’s like to find the truth for people.In 2018, Helen McLaughlin and Karen Whitehouse got married in Amsterdam - but they had their day forever changed in their memories, after someone defecated on the floor of a toilet cubicle in the ladies’ bathroom. They enlisted the help of their friend, ‘Detective’ Lauren Kilby to find out who did it - and why. Karen Whitehouse, one of the brides, and ‘Detective’ Lauren join Nuala to talk about their unusual investigation - and why they couldn’t let it go.A name you may be familiar with when it comes to the search for the truth is historian, Philippa Langley. Known now by many as the woman who found King Richard III underneath a car park in Leicester, she’s turned her attention to his nephews, the missing Princes, who for centuries have been said to have been murdered by their uncle, King Richard, after he took the throne. Her new research suggests otherwise - and she joins Nuala to talk all about the search for the truth and what it means to her.
26/12/2355m 3s

The Queen of the Brassicas - the Brussels sprout!

Our Christmas Day special programme is devoted to the Brussels sprout, with some incredible women for whom they’re playing a key role in their working lives. As a nation we eat more sprouts than any other country in Europe but it’s a vegetable that, like marmite, divides opinion. Originally from the Middle East, they came to Europe as an export of the Roman Empire. We hear how they became known as Brussels sprouts with the head of the Royal Horticultural Society Clare Matterson and the food historian Dr Sue Bailey. Plant pathologist Dr Lauren Chappell and the brassica research expert Dr Rachel Wells explain how sprouts are being engineered to taste sweeter and withstand climate change. Nutritionist Charlotte Hunter says the phytoestrogens in these mini cabbages mean women should be eating more of them. And for ideas about how to cook your sprouts, chef and broadcaster Andi Oliver and her daughter Miquita are on hand, as well as the chef Rosalind Rathouse.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager Neva Missirian
25/12/2355m 4s

Weekend Woman's Hour - Gracie Spinks’s parents, Gatekeeping your perfume, Child-free women at work

23-year-old Gracie Spinks was killed by a man who she had reported to the police for stalking her. The inquest into her death reported several failures by Derbyshire Police in how her case was handled. Now, her parents, Richard Spinks and Alison Ward, are campaigning for Gracie’s Law, which would ensure better training for police officers around stalking, and the appointment of independent stalking advocates. They tell us about Gracie and the changes they want to be made in her memory.Have you got a signature scent – and would you share where you got it from? Whether you are ‘gatekeeping’ your perfume or keen to spread the word about your favourite scent, smell is one of the most evocative and emotive of our senses. We talk all things fragrance with The Guardian's beauty editor, Sali Hughes, and Experimental Perfume Club’s Roshni Dhanjee - why we want to smell unique, gifting perfume, and why smell is so connected to our emotions and identity.‘There is an expectation that women like me – without children - will pick up the slack so the working mums can have time off with their families’. Those are the words of Sam Walsh who has worked every Boxing Day for the last 20 years. She decided to quit her retail job in October because she resented having to work over the Xmas period. Sam, who runs The Non Mum Network Facebook group and website, says working parents shouldn’t be given priority. Kelly Simmons has recently left the Football Association after 32 years with the organisation. Best known for her time as Director of the Women’s Professional Game, Kelly joins Jessica Creighton to discuss her long career and the future of the Women’s Super League, which she helped to launch and transform.Elle and The Pocket Belles describe themselves as an all-girl retro band. They are a vocal harmony group who have been singing together for more than a decade. They’ll be creating more Christmas cheer for us.Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Rebecca Myatt
23/12/2353m 46s

A new drug for hot flushes and night sweats, Combatting loneliness at Christmas

A new drug called Veoza used to prevent hot flushes and night sweats has been approved in the UK. Also known as fezolinetant, it is prescription-only and will be available privately from January. Dr Paula Briggs, chair of the British Menopause Society and consultant in sexual and reproductive health at Liverpool Women’s Hospital joins Jessica to explain the importance for many women of this decision.What would you say to spending Christmas with your friends instead of your family? You may have seen an article this morning in the Independent where the journalist Katie Glass says she'll be having a 'women-only Christmas', sharing the day with four like-minded girlfriends. Some of us may choose to do this intentionally, for others it may not be their first choice but they are making the most of the situation. And sometimes the most unexpected Christmases turn out to be the most fun. Journalist Daisy Finer spent Christmas last year with a female friend, when her children were with her ex-husband, and talks about 'the joy of a very self-centred Christmas'.Have you got a signature scent – and would you share where you got it from? Whether you are ‘gatekeeping’ your perfume or keen to spread the word about your favourite scent, smell is one of the most evocative and emotive of our senses. Joining Jessica Creighton to talk all things fragrance, Guardian beauty editor Sali Hughes and Experimental Perfume Club’s Roshni Dhanjee discuss why we want to smell unique, gifting perfume, and why smell is so connected to our emotions and identity.Can loneliness really take the same toll on your physical and mental health as smoking and lack of exercise? The British Psychological Society says it’s a scourge on society and should be treated as a public health emergency. It’s calling for the Government’s 2018 Loneliness Strategy to be updated to reflect the impact of the pandemic. We talk to Julia Faulconbridge, a consultant clinical psychologist from the organisation, and also Liz Veitch, a retired deputy headteacher who became increasingly lonely after being widowed, moving house and then facing the lockdowns. She was introduced to 19-year-old Ankita Menon, a volunteer with Kissing It Better, whose mission statement is ‘to reduce the isolation of old age by bringing the generations together.’Elle and The Pocket Belles sing live in the Woman’s Hour studio on the last live programme before Christmas. Describing themselves as an all-girl retro band, they are a vocal harmony group who have been singing together for more than a decade. They’ll be creating more Christmas cheer with a couple of seasonal songs.Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Kirsty Starkey
22/12/2351m 13s

Spiking, The pill, Family dynamics at Christmas

The Met Police have reported that cases of spiking - putting alcohol or drugs into another person's drink or body without their consent - have quadrupled in London over the last five years. This week the Home Office set out new provisions to provide training for venue staff and test-kits for customers. Campaigner Sharon Gaffka joins Jessica Creighton to talk about whether that's enough for spiking victims. As we gear up for Christmas, some people might be considering the age-old question: How do you survive the big day without falling out with your family? With unwanted questions about your parenting style, your career or even your love life - tensions can often rise over the brussels sprouts. Camilla McGill is a parent coach and joins Jessica to give us tips on how to manage anxieties and stress with loved ones.A 16-year-old girl died last week from what is thought to have been a blood clot - three weeks after being prescribed the contraceptive pill. According to the NHS, there is a very low risk of serious side effects from taking the pill. Dr Janet Barter is a consultant in sexual and reproductive health at Barts Health NHS Trust in London – she tells Jessica the facts we need to know around the pill.Last year, female-owned businesses received just 2% of all venture capital funding, Parliament’s Treasury Committee found. Entrepreneur Grace Beverley wants to raise awareness of the female funding gap. She joins Jessica to talk about her business model and using her platform to empower women. If you are a woman who is adopted, then the decision to have children of your own can be a complicated one, as your own birth family’s medical history may be a mystery to you. How do you know what you are passing on through your genes? Writer and journalist Katharine Quarmby has been looking into this issue because she has had to grapple with it herself. She joins Jessica to discuss. Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Lottie Garton
21/12/2357m 26s

Mary Earps' SPOTY win, Women's Super League founder Kelly Simmons, Pregnancy sickness

England goalkeeper Mary Earps has been voted BBC Sports Personality of the Year. She was a big part of the Lionesses' win at the Euros in 2022 and was named goalkeeper of the tournament in this year's World Cup. But back in 2019 she was ready to quit the game. Jessica Creighton speaks to Rebecca Myers from the The Sunday Times about Earps' bumpy road to success.Kelly Simmons has recently left the Football Association after 32 years with the organisation. Best known for her time as Director of the Women’s Professional Game, Kelly joins Jessica to discuss her long career and the future of the Women’s Super League which she helped to launch and transform.A breakthrough on why women get pregnancy sickness could open the way to finding a cure. Scientists have discovered a hormone that causes nausea and vomiting in pregnant women, sometimes to the extent that they get Hyperemesis Gravidarum – the most severe form of sickness often resulting in hospitalisation. Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Medicine at Cambridge University Sir Stephen O’Rahilly and CEO of the charity Pregnancy Sickness Support Charlotte Howden join Jessica to discuss the implications of this discovery.Could planning for a simpler, more realistic January be the best way to help your mental health this Christmas? Author and psychological decluttering expert Cathy Madavan and clinical psychologist Dr Emma Hepburn join Jessica to discuss why less might mean more as we move into the new year.'Go to the front line yourself - and die'. Those are the reported words of the wives and girlfriends of Russian soldiers to Vladimir Putin, who they are addressing on a Telegram channel called The Way Home. According to UK estimates, 300,000 military personnel from Russia have died during the war in Ukraine. Jessica gets insights from Dr Jenny Mathers from the Department of International Politics at Aberystwyth University.
20/12/2357m 21s

Kirsty Wark on leaving Newsnight, Sports Personality of the Year

Kirsty Wark joins Emma Barnett to talk about stepping down from Newsnight after 30 years; what she’s planning to fill the extra time with and she also shares some Christmas cooking tips.A new book, A Heart Afire, paints a picture of paediatrician Helen Taussig who dedicated her life to looking after children with heart defects. We hear from author Patricia Meisol.We look at the issues of "workplace housework" - tasks like organising office Christmas parties, sorting the secret santa gifts, decorating the communal spaces - with economist Lise Vasterlund and comedian Cally Beaton.Could a woman win the BBC's annual Sports Personality Of The Year award later today? Now in it's 70th year, we talk to Lady Mary Peters who won the gong in 1972 – the same year she won gold in the pentathlon at the Munich Olympics.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Neva Missirian
19/12/2357m 23s

Gracie Spinks' parents, Child-free women at work, Grandma Wong

23-year-old Gracie Spinks was killed by a man who she had reported to the police for stalking her. The inquest into her death reported several failures by Derbyshire Police in how her case was handled. Now, her parents, Richard Spinks and Alison Ward, are campaigning for Gracie’s Law, which would ensure better training for police officers around stalking, and the appointment of independent stalking advocates. They join Emma Barnett to discuss Gracie and the changes they want to be made in her memory.‘There is an expectation that women like me – without children - will pick up the slack so the working mums can have time off with their families’. Those are the words of Sam Walsh who has worked every Boxing Day for the last 20 years. She decided to quit her retail job in October because she resented having to work over the Christmas period. Sam, who runs The Non Mum Network Facebook group and website, says working parents shouldn’t be given priority. Today is the beginning of the Jimmy Lai trial in Hong Kong - a national security case against the media mogul and pro-democracy activist who has been accused of conspiring to collude with foreign forces. Outside the court is the familiar face of a woman affectionately known as 'Grandma Wong', real name Alexandra. Cindy Yu, Assistant Editor of The Spectator, tells us more about her.The damage being done to girls’ education in Afghanistan has been well documented, but new research suggests the Taliban is causing ‘irreversible damage’ to boys’ education too. Research carried out by Human Rights Watch found that female teachers have been replaced by men with no qualifications, and that boys are subject to brutal punishment. Emma speaks to Sahar Fetrat, the author of the report.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
18/12/2357m 12s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Imelda Staunton, Quitting parties, Mica Paris

Imelda Staunton has played Queen Elizabeth II for the last two series of television drama The Crown. As the final episodes are released this week, she joins us to discuss playing the monarch, and what it’s been like to take on this role since Her Majesty died.How could people step in safely if they see a woman being harassed in public? Former police officer Graham Goulden and criminologist Molly Ackhurst tell us how bystanders can protect themselves while helping others.Soul singer Mica Paris will headline an evening of gospel music on Sky Arts, where she’ll be joined by 10 gospel singers and a four-piece band to perform Christmas songs. She gives us a taste of what to expect on A Gospel Christmas.It's been a year and a half since Roe vs Wade was overturned in the United States, ending the constitutional nationwide right to abortion for millions of women. It remains an issue that divides opinion. The British writer Nazrin Choudhury has directed a short film, Red White and Blue, which follows the character Rachel Johnson, played by Brittany Snow, who is forced to cross state lines in search of an abortion. Should we celebrate quitting a job? When Hannah Witton decided to stop making her successful YouTube and podcast series, Doing It, her friends threw her a surprise quitting ceremony. Hannah tells us whether this party helped, alongside the career coach Soma Ghosh with her advice for anyone thinking of quitting.The bestselling author Louise Doughty joins us to discuss a new ITVX drama based on her novel: Platform 7. She tells us how she has turned male-heavy police procedurals on their head – and why she thinks all middle-aged women long to go on the run.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Sarah Crawley
16/12/2352m 6s

Kinship care, Shane MacGowan's widow Victoria Mary Clarke, 'Red White and Blue', Lora Logic

The government is today unveiling the first ever national Kinship Care strategy, aiming to bring more awareness and more money to family members looking after children that aren’t theirs. Kinship care is when a child lives full time, or most of the time, with a relative, be it grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings, or someone in the wider family network, because their own parents can’t care for them. Anita talks to David Johnston, the Under Secretary of State for Children, Families and Wellbeing at the Department of Education about the new strategy.Shane MacGowan, the legendary songwriter and frontman with The Pogues, died on 30th November. As the classic Christmas anthem Fairy Tale of New York reaches number one in Ireland, Anita speaks to his widow, Victoria Mary Clarke about their life together, his music, his addictions and his legacy. It has been a year and a half since Roe vs Wade was overturned in the United States, ending the constitutional nationwide right to abortion for millions of women. It remains an issue that divides opinion. Anita talks to the British writer Nazrin Choudhury, the director of a new short film on the subject; 'Red White and Blue,' follows the character Rachel Johnson, a single mother in a precarious financial position, who is forced to cross state lines from Arkansas in search of an abortion. Musician Lora Logic was the woman behind the iconic saxophone that was a part of the British Punk-Rock band X-Ray Spex. After almost 30 years, the band are re-releasing their second album, Conscious Consumer. Lora joins Anita to talk about the album, what she’s up to now and what lead singer Poly Styrene would have thought of the re-release.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Sue Maillot
15/12/2355m 28s

Mica Paris, Is Facebook dangerous for kids? Regretting your tattoos

The National Crime Agency has warned parents that Facebook and Instagram are now a danger to children. That’s after Meta, the parent company of the social media sites, made the decision to introduce encrypted messaging. The BBC’s Technology Editor Zoe Kleinman and online safety expert John Carr join Emma Barnett to discuss. Bafta award-winning actor Sheridan Smith has said that she regrets the tattoos she’s got and would never get another one done. It’s a situation that a lot of people find themselves in. Letitia Mortimer, a London-based tattoo artist, talks to Emma about seeing plenty of people wanting to get their tattoos covered or removed over the years. Soul singer Mica Paris will headline an evening of gospel music on television, where she’ll be joined by 10 gospel singers and a dynamic four-piece band to perform moving versions of various Christmas songs. She joins Emma live in the studio to give us a taste of what to expect on A Gospel Christmas and her new album.Two referenda to change Ireland’s constitution regarding gender and family are to be held on International Women’s Day next year. The amendments would broaden the definition of family beyond marriage in the constitution, and there would be reference to carers to recognise all those who provide care. Commentator Laura Perrins and academic and activist Ailbhe Smyth join Emma to discuss why the suggestions are potentially contentious. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton
14/12/2351m 45s

Imelda Staunton on depicting Queen Elizabeth II

How could people step in safely if they see a woman being harassed in public? Former police officer Graham Goulden and criminologist Molly Ackhurst tell Emma Barnett how bystanders can protect themselves while helping others.Imelda Staunton has played Queen Elizabeth II for the last two series of television drama The Crown. She joined us before she started the role, in 2021, to talk about how she was approaching the role, and why it was important to her. She joins Emma Barnett again now that it’s coming to an end – the final episodes of The Crown are released on Netflix this week.Should we celebrate quitting a job? We’ve got divorce parties - how about a quitting party? When award-winning sex educator and author, Hannah Witton decided to stop making her successful YouTube and podcast series, Doing It, her friends and colleagues threw her a surprise quitting ceremony. There was cake, and even a card saying Bye, Bye Don't Come Back. Hannah tells Emma whether this party helped, alongside career coach, and host of the Career Happiness podcast, Soma Ghosh, with her advice for anyone thinking of quitting.There has been a significant increase in the number of women being investigated by police after a suspected abortion, according to a senior consultant gynaecologist, with some women facing high-profile court cases, and other instances where children have been removed from the mother. Abortion is a criminal offence in England and Wales unless it meets strict criteria. Co-chairman of the British Society of Abortion Care Providers Dr Jonathan Lord, who has raised these concerns, joins Emma.Producer: Hannah Sander Presenter: Emma Barnett
13/12/2357m 37s

The future of embryo research, Ofsted inspections, British Gymnastics' complaints procedure

Leading scientists are calling for a change in the law to help IVF patients donate unused embryos to biomedical research after a collapse in donations over the past 15 years. Emma Barnett talks to Professor of Reproductive Physiology at Cambridge University Kathy Niakan and Clare Ettinghausen from the UK's fertility regulator, the HFEA.The new play Glacier is a dark and poignant festive comedy. It follows three women who meet while wild swimming in their local lake one Christmas. They form an unofficial tradition, meeting each year to go for a swim and escape. Escape their responsibilities, life’s stresses, and maybe most of all – their families. We hear from playwright, comedian and podcaster Alison Spittle, and actor Sophie Steer, who stars in the show.We take another look at the world of gymnastics following on from last year's damning Whyte review with labelled the British Gymanstics as "inept and dysfunctional". Since that time, not one complaint of abuse has been upheld by British Gymnastics’ Independent Complaints Process – with every single case over the past three years collapsing. We talk to Claire Heafford from Gymnasts 4 Change about their campaign for a new procedures. As two teaching unions call for a pause in Ofsted inspections following the death of head teacher Ruth Perry, we talk to Paul Whiteman, the General Secretary of the teaching union the National Association of Head Teachers.Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
12/12/2357m 20s

Cancer during pregnancy, Israel-Gaza, Wedding dresses

Israel has accused the United Nations of moving too slowly to respond to accounts that Hamas carried out widespread sexual violence against women in the October 7th brutal attack on Israel. Christina Lamb, Chief Foreign Correspondent for the Sunday Times, has brought the details of this part of the attacks to light joins Emma Barnett.Mandy Abramson runs a bridal shop in Skipton in North Yorkshire. For two years now she’s run a special week in December where she invites women from all walks of life to try on a wedding dress even if they have no plans to marry. She joins Emma to explain why she wants to give everyone a chance to try on their dream dress. When Louise Beevers found a lump in her breast during pregnancy, she was told by her GP that it was hormone related. Four months later she was diagnosed with Grade 3 breast cancer, and despite undergoing treatment the cancer is now incurable. Louise joins Emma alongside the Chief Medical Officer from Macmillan Cancer Support Professor Richard Simcock to discuss why greater awareness about cancer in pregnancy is needed.Bestselling author of Apple Tree Yard, Louise Doughty, on a new ITVX drama based on her novel: Platform 7. She tells Emma Barnett how she has turned male-heavy police procedurals and spy thrillers on their head – and why she thinks all middle-aged women long to go on the run.Emma talks to two women about their hope for peace in Israel. Amira Mohammed is a Palestinian woman who works with young leaders across the Middle East and North Africa; and Danielle Cumpton is a 32-year-old from Israel who works for an organisation that promotes political partnership between Jews and Arabs within IsraelPresenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
11/12/2357m 36s

Ruth Perry's sister, City Girl in Nature, Caring for a spouse, The politics of Christmas presents

An Ofsted inspection "contributed" to the death of head teacher Ruth Perry. That’s the conclusion of senior coroner Heidi Connor. This is the first time Ofsted has been listed as a contributing factor in the death of a head teacher. Ruth Perry had been head of Caversham Primary School in Berkshire for 13 years when she took her own life in January, ahead of an inspection report being made public which had downgraded the school from Outstanding to Inadequate, based on safeguarding concerns. Her death ignited a national debate about the mental health of school leaders and the pressure they are under in terms of inspections. Anita Rani speaks to Ruth Perry’s sister, Professor Julia Waters.   Born and raised in Deptford, south east London, Kwesia didn’t grow up with a lot of nature around her. That’s until she went on a life-changing trip to the Amazon. She’s since created her YouTube channel, City Girl in Nature, to guide other city dwellers into the great outdoors. She speaks to Krupa Padhy about her platform, nature activism work, and winning Best New Voice at the Audio Production Awards for her podcast Get Birding.   Lina Mookerjee had been married to her husband Richard for more than 15 years when he lost both his sight and hearing. Lina is now as much a carer to Richard as she is a wife. Lina and Richard share their story and discuss what they describe as the ‘invisible’ work of carers.   Research suggests that the average Briton spends £300 on Christmas gifts. One woman who is bucking this trend is the writer and journalist Nell Frizzell, who says that her family Christmases have improved since they stopped buying one another gifts. Krupa hears from Nell and Ellie Gibson, comedian and one half of the Scummy Mummies, who is a big fan of gifting every festive season.Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor
09/12/2357m 30s

Ruth Perry's sister Julia Waters, America Ferrera, 'Stuffed'

An Ofsted inspection "contributed" to the death of headteacher Ruth Perry. That’s the conclusion of senior coroner Heidi Connor. This is the first time Ofsted has been listed as a contributing factor in the death of a head teacher. Ofsted are yet to comment on the verdict. Ruth Perry had been head of Caversham Primary School in Berkshire for 13 years when she took her own life in January, ahead of an inspection report being made public which had downgraded the school from Outstanding to Inadequate, based on safeguarding concerns. The school was regraded this summer to Good. Her death ignited a national debate about the mental health of school leaders and the pressure they are under in terms of inspections. Anita is joined by Ruth Perry’s sister, Professor Julia Waters.America Ferrera is an award-winning actress, a director, producer and activist. She shot to stardom with her roles in Ugly Betty and The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants, but you'll most recently have seen her playing Gloria, an assistant to the chief executive of Mattel, in the blockbuster Barbie film, who delivers a powerful monologue on the double standards of being a woman. America joins Anita to talk about how she didn't "set out to be a role model, or to break barriers, or to have a career about defying the norm.” Food has revolved around women for centuries. History of food can provide us with a lens through which we can discover untold stories of women: their joys, struggles and ever-changing roles in society. Pen Vogler, author of “Stuffed," explores such themes in her new book and examines the history and culture of British food through political, social and global upheavals. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan Hannant
08/12/2357m 42s

Conductor Marin Alsop, actor Diana Quick and a campaign to protect domestic abuse victims

Marin Alsop is one of the most famous conductors in the world. Ten years ago, she became the first woman to conduct the Last Night of the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall. Now she is giving the European premiere of Too Hot To Handel: The Gospel Messiah!, a reimagining of Handel’s Messiah Marin tells Hayley Hassell why she wanted to rework the piece, and looks back over her illustrious career as a conductor. The actor Diana Quick joins Hayley to discuss her role as Mrs Wentworth in a new series The Famous Five – and describe how the classic adventures have been brought to life with a new, fresh, modern reimagining of Enid Blyton’s iconic stories.The Centre for Women’s Justice is campaigning to prevent unjust criminalisation of victims and survivors of domestic abuse. Hayley is joined by director of the CWJ, Harriet Wistrich, and former director of Southall Black Sisters, Pragna Patel.What can we tell about medieval women’s lives from studying their skeletons? Dr Sarah Inskip from Leicester University has been part of a team excavating Cambridge graveyards for a new research project called After the Plague. She has found evidence that some medieval women did very strenuous work that changed the shape of their upper bodies; others were trading and travelling across Europe, and many would have existed in chronic pain.Producer: Hannah Sander Presenter: Hayley Hassell
07/12/2356m 39s

Julianne Moore, Dame Mary Berry, Prevalence of forced sterilisation

Academy Award-winning actor Julianne Moore plays Gracie Atherton-Yoo in Todd Haynes’ newest film, May December. The film tells the story of a married couple who were at the centre of a notorious tabloid relationship, and the actress doing research on them for a film about their past. Julianne joins Krupa to talk about the controversies within the film, and how it’s already been tipped for the Oscars. Lina Mookerjee had been married to her husband Richard for more than 15 years when he lost both his sight and hearing. Lina is now as much a carer to Richard as she is a wife. Lina and Richard join Krupa to share their story and discuss what they describe as the ‘invisible’ work of carers. Dame Mary Berry joins Krupa to discuss her one-off TV special ‘Mary Berry’s Highland Christmas.’ She tells us how her Scottish roots have inspired her latest festive recipes and gives us some tips for entertaining this Christmas.The New York Times has just published an investigation into the prevalence of forced sterilisation of disabled women in Europe, even when the procedure is not medically necessary and despite it being banned under multiple international treaties. New York Times reporter Sarah Hurtes met with families who have chosen to sterilise their daughters and women who have undergone sterilisation procedures. She joins Krupa to talk about what she found and we also speak to German politician Katrin Langensiepen who is one of the few visibly disabled members of the European Parliament. She’s pushing for a strict Europe-wide outright ban on non-consensual sterilisation.Presented by Krupa Padhy Producer: Louise Corley
06/12/2357m 28s

Women's Football, Head of Ofcom, The politics of Christmas presents

There are big changes afoot for women’s football. Former England Lioness Karen Carney published a review into the women’s domestic game over the summer and the Government has just announced that it will back all the findings from her report. That includes making the top two tiers professional and giving the sport a dedicated broadcast slot. Baroness Sue Campbell, director of women's football at the Football Association, discusses their decision.The head of Ofcom, Dame Melanie Dawes, talks about her plans to make tech companies stop children accessing online pornography in her first broadcast interview on the subject. Under the new Online Safety Act, which came into effect last month, the regulator has been tasked with coming up with age verification measures. Latest research shows that the average age at which children first see online pornography is 13 - although nearly a quarter come across it by age 11 and one in 10 as young as nine. By 18, 79% have encountered violent pornography depicting coercive, degrading or pain-inducing sex acts.A report out today details for the first time the views of the bereaved families of women killed by men. A woman is killed by a man on average every three days in the UK and the charity Killed Women is campaigning to end this and improve the experiences for families forced to deal with it. The director of Killed Women, Anna Ryder, joins Krupa Padhy to discuss the report’s findings ahead of a planned protest outside Parliament.Now it's only 20 sleeps until Christmas, and for many of you that might mean running around the shops buying all your Christmas presents. But one woman who is bucking this trend is the writer and journalist Nell Frizzell, who says that her family Christmases have improved since they stopped buying one another gifts. Nell and Ellie Gibson, comedian and one half of the Scummy Mummies who IS a big fan of gifting every festive season discuss.Presenter: Krupa Padhy Producer: Kirsty Starkey
05/12/2357m 31s

Stella Creasy MP, Living with one breast, City Girl in Nature

A man has been convicted in court of harassing the Labour MP Stella Creasy. This harassment included reporting her to social services as an 'unfit mother'. A safeguarding review quickly cleared Stella Creasy – but the complaint cannot be removed from her records. Today, she is tabling an amendment to the Victims and Prisoners Bill, to allow councils to delete baseless complaints. Stella Creasy speaks to Krupa Padhy about her fight for justice under a law she herself drafted. She also pays tribute to fellow Labour politician Glenys Kinnock, who died on Sunday.Last week on the programme we heard from Katy Marks, an architect by trade, who discovered after her single mastectomy that there was no bra on the market that was flat on one side. She didn’t want to use a prosthetic and so designed her own. Lots of you got in touch following that item to talk about your own experiences of living with one breast. Krupa is joined by two listeners, Diane Devlin and Laura Homer.Born and raised in Deptford, south east London, Kwesia didn’t grow up with a lot of nature around her. That’s until she went on a life-changing trip to the Amazon. She’s since created her YouTube channel, City Girl in Nature, to guide other city dwellers into the great outdoors. She speaks to Krupa about her platform, nature activism work, and winning Best New Voice at the Audio Production Awards for her podcast Get Birding.Some studies have found that women are more vulnerable to negative health impacts of single-use plastics, and women also form a larger majority of plastic consumers. With COP28 now underway in Dubai, Krupa is joined by Christina Dixon from Environmental Investigation Agency - an NGO which uncovers environmental crime and abuse. She would like to see plastic pollution being given a higher profile in climate talks.What do our shoe choices say about us? A new exhibition at the Arc in Winchester in Hampshire called SHOES: INSIDE OUT looks at our relationship with our footwear. From the functional and practical to the fashionable and extravagant, what can shoes tell us about our social history, modern lives and our aspirations? Krupa is joined by Claire Isbester, co-curator of the exhibition.
04/12/2357m 41s

Weekend Woman's Hour: Emily Blunt, Stammering, Long-distance friendships, Maria Callas' legacy

Research by the charity Stamma shows that 8% of children will start stuttering at some point. Our listener Geri, a mother who’s son has a stammer, got in touch with Woman’s Hour and asked us to discuss the topic. Kirsten Howells from Stamma, Tiktok influencer Jessie Yendle and Geri join Claire McDonnell to share their own experiences and advice.Actor Emily Blunt found fame as the scene-stealing assistant in The Devil Wears Prada, and has since starred in many films including Mary Poppins Returns and A Quiet Place with her real-life husband John Krasinski. She is also in one of this year’s biggest cinematic hits, Oppenheimer. As Christopher Nolan’s blockbuster about the father of the atomic bomb is released on ultra-HD DVD and Blu-ray, Emily Blunt talks to Clare McDonnell about her role as Kitty Oppenheimer, Robert’s wife.How do you keep long-distance friendships going? Clare talks to filmmaker Shannon Haly, who lives in New York and wrote a viral poem about missing her best friend. They are joined by the journalist Rose Stokes who, after having an 18-year long-distance friendship decided to move to live in the same city as her friend.What do women look for in a bra after breast cancer surgery? Clare is joined by Katy Marks, an architect by trade, who discovered after her single mastectomy that there was no bra on the market that was flat on one side. She didn’t want to use a prosthetic and so designed her own, called Uno, which launched on Monday. She’ll be joined on the programme by Asmaa Al-allak who won this year’s Great British Sewing Bee and is a consultant breast surgeon who has made post-surgery lingerie for her patients.Today marks 100 years since the birth of one of opera’s most renowned and influential singers of the 20th century: the iconic heroine, Maria Callas. But what is it about her talent that has transcended the decades? Two sopranos – Alison Langer and Nadine Benjamin – join Anita to describe Maria Callas’ enduring star quality. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Hanna Ward Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
02/12/2354m 35s

Director Adura Onashile, Grieving and Christmas Shopping, Maria Callas's Centenary

In Adura Onashile’s debut film, Girl, mother Grace and daughter Ama have recently arrived in Glasgow and have created a beautiful cocoon for themselves in a council block apartment. But Grace carries deep trauma from her past, and she finds it exceptionally difficult to watch her daughter go out into the world alone. Director Adura Onashile tells Anita why she emphasised the beauty of urban poverty, and how she drew on her relationship with her own mother.Gwyneth Paltrow shared a photo on Instagram holdings hands with her ex-husband Chris Martin's current partner, Dakota Johnson.. But we ask, could you be friends with your ex's new partner? Alexandra Jones, a journalist who wrote a feature for Vogue about why she feels great about having a friendship with her ex’s now wife.Tomorrow marks one hundred years since the birth of one Opera’s most renowned and influential singers of the 20th century: the iconic heroine, Maria Callas. But what is it about her talent that has transcended the decades? Two sopranos – Alison Langer and Nadine Benjamin – join Anita to describe Maria Callas’ enduring star quality. Going shopping after a loved one has died can be a sharp reminder of your loss. Carmel Bones, who recently lost the main three men in her life now finds it hard to go into men’s department stores. Anita speaks to Carmel about her plan to tackle her grief and psychotherapist Julia Samuel gives her advice.Next Sunday, December 3, the annual Radio 4 Christmas Appeal is taking place. Money raised by the Appeal will go to people experiencing homelessness, as well as to support frontline workers and to fund organisations working to end and prevent homelessness. West Mercia Women’s Aid are one of the charities who receive donations to assist some of the women that come to them for help. Anita speaks to Chief Executive, Sue Coleman to find out how important this funding is and why they are focussed on older women vulnerable to domestic abuse.Presented by Anita Rani Producer: Louise Corley
01/12/2355m 2s

Emily Blunt, Pathologist-novelist, Baby formula, Short marriages

Actor Emily Blunt found fame as the scene-stealing assistant in The Devil Wears Prada, and has since starred in many films including Mary Poppins Returns and A Quiet Place with her real-life husband John Krasinski. She is also in one of this year’s biggest cinematic hits, Oppenheimer. As Christopher Nolan’s blockbuster about the father of the atomic bomb is released on ultra-HD DVD and Blu-ray, Emily Blunt talks to Clare McDonnell about her role as Kitty Oppenheimer, Robert’s wife.The price of baby formula has been making the headlines this week. The main brands have been pulled up by the Government’s Competition and Markets Authority for their high pricing. In fact, their research shows that the retail price is a lot higher than the costs to make the product. Joining Clare to discuss the high prices is Sarah Cardell, chief executive of the CMA and Kirsty Jackson, the founder of High Peak Baby Bank, a donation service for families in need up in the Staffordshire area. How common is it for a long relationship to end with a short marriage? What is it about formalising a union, or having a wedding that can be the catalyst for a split? And what are the legal pitfalls that couples might want to avoid? Clare is joined by Eve Simmons, US Health and Wellness Editor for the Daily Mail and Laura Naser, a partner in family law.As Ireland's first female state pathologist, Dr Marie Cassidy helped to solve murders and clarify unexplained deaths for over 15 years. She tells Clare what drew her to this career, how she deals with the emotionally taxing nature of the job and why she's now turned to writing with her debut novel 'Body of Truth'.Presenter: Clare McDonnell Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Duncan Hannant and Neva Missirian
30/11/2356m 31s