ZOE Science & Nutrition

ZOE Science & Nutrition

By ZOE

The world’s top scientists explain the latest health, nutrition, and gut health research and translate it into practical advice to improve your health & weight. Join ZOE Science & Nutrition, on a journey of scientific discovery. Hosted by Jonathan Wolf.

Episodes

9 longevity practices: Secrets from the blue zones with Dan Buettner

Do you want to live to 100? Dietary patterns, community, environment, and stress management play pivotal roles in longevity. From Sardinia's matriarchal villages to Okinawa's garden-rich diets, this episode takes us on a tour of insights. It's not just about living longer, it's about thriving.In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by Dan Buettner and Prof. Tim Spector to discuss the secrets of a longer, healthier life. Together, they journey through the world’s blue zones, rare global hotspots where celebrating your 100th birthday is common. The guests also address the threats to these longevity havens and the decline of traditional diets.Dan Buettner is an American National Geographic fellow and New York Times bestselling author. He’s also an explorer, educator, and creator of the Netflix series “Live to 100,” which discovers five unique communities where people live extraordinarily long and vibrant lives.Tim Spector is a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, director of the Twins UK study, scientific co-founder of ZOE, and one of the world’s leading researchers. He's also the author of Food for Life, his latest book on nutrition and health.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Gut health tips from ZOE Science & Nutrition: Download our FREE gut guide.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00 Introduction01:09 Quickfire questions02:33 What are Blue Zones?04:43 Why do people in Blue Zones live longer?06:48 What is a Centenarian?09:00 What are Blue Zone diets?11:49 Foods for longevity15:03 Why are these foods good for us?19:15 Why Blue Zone diets are seasonal and inexpensive 22:30 Is eating meat 5 times a month healthy for us?27:42 Why are the Blue Zones disappearing?31:25 Blue Zone tactics to reduce stress36:02 Can stress reduce life expectancy?40:36 Why unconscious physical activity is best45:07 How can we make our lives more ‘Blue Zone’ like?47:23 The number one thing you can do to add years to your life is…48:53 Dan's stress reduction techniques51:39 What is Dan’s daily diet?53:16 SummaryMentioned in today's episode:Telomere shortening and the transition to family caregiving in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study from PLOS OneBooks and series from Dan Buettner:The Blue Zones Challenge: A 4-Week Plan for a Longer, Better LifeThe Blue Zones Secrets for Living Longer: Lessons From the Healthiest Places on Earth<a...
22/02/24·1h 2m

The surprising truth about histamine intolerance

We've probably all heard of “antihistamines,” medications that can ease symptoms of hay fever and other allergies. But what is “histamine”? It’s a vital chemical that our bodies produce, and it plays a role in a number of functions that support our health. Histamine intolerance seems to be increasingly common, but it’s difficult to diagnose. Some people may not be aware that they have it or how to treat it.In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan speaks with Dr. Will Bulsiewicz, ZOE’s U.S. medical director, to learn more about this flourishing area of research — and the best ways to identify and treat histamine intolerance.Will is a board-certified gastroenterologist, and New York Times bestselling author of the microbiome book Fiber Fueled.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Also, find top tips for gut health from ZOE Science & Nutrition: Download our FREE gut guide.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Mentioned in today’s episode: Resistant potato starch supplementation reduces serum histamine levels in healthy adults with links to attenuated intestinal permeability published in Journal of Functional FoodsHistamine and histamine intolerance published in The American Journal of Clinical NutritionHistamine intolerance: The current state of the art published in BiomoleculesIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here.
15/02/24·30m 33s

Beat stress with science: 4 key techniques for stress relief with Dr Rangan Chatterjee

Stress is a main factor contributing to ill health, and Dr. Rangan Chatterjee believes that it’s the number-one cause of the illnesses he treats. In today's episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Rangan sheds light on the causes of stress, ranging from sleep deprivation and overwhelming workloads to a lack of quality time with others.You’ll learn how “microdoses” of stress can reach a tipping point, why recognizing these doses is key, and which powerful strategies can help you cope.Are you ready to transform your relationship to stress?Dr. Rangan Chatterjee is regarded as one of the most influential medical doctors in the U.K. He wants to change how medicine is practiced for years to come, and his mission is to help 100 million people around the globe live better lives. He’s a professor of health communication and education at the University of Chester, and he hosts one of the most listened-to health podcasts in the U.K. and Europe — Feel Better, Live More has had over 200 million listens to date and is listened to and watched by over 8 million people every month.  If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Find 10 tips for a healthier life from ZOE Science & Nutrition — download our FREE guide.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00 Introduction01:24   Quickfire Questions04:24   What is stress?08:00 Our bodies respond to physical and emotional stress in a similar way10:48 How much stress is bad for us?16:17 How do micro stress doses affect us?20:08 Modern life stress is different!23:16 Stress is the number 1 cause of disease today29:37 Do women and men perceive stress in the same way?30:54 Breathing techniques for stress reduction36:28 Movement and exercise for stress reduction41:32   How to make new behaviors into habits43:37   The impact of human touch49:04   The power of journaling52:54 SummaryMentioned in today’s episode: The impact of daily gentle touch stimulation on maternal-infant physiological and behavioral regulation and resilience from Infant Mental Health Journal Fogg Behavior Model from behaviourmodel.orgThe Stress Solution and Feel Better in 5 by Dr. Rangan ChatterjeeEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
08/02/24·1h

Mushrooms as medicine: Uncovering the health secrets of fungi

They’re not a plant or an animal — fungi are their very own kingdom of life. And their unique composition means they offer novel, often unbelievable, benefits to our health. Certain species of fungi are currently used to treat conditions ranging from cancer to depression. The love of mushrooms (or mycophilia) has grown in recent years. And at the heart of this movement is biologist Dr. Merlin Sheldrake, author of the bestseller Entangled Life: How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds and Shape Our Futures. In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan, Merlin, and ZOE Co-Founder Prof. Tim Spector ask: Why are mushrooms so special?If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction 1:42 - Quickfire round3:04 - What are fungi?8:40 - The connection between fungi, plants & gut health14:10 - The human impact on fungi19:41 - Mushrooms and mental health 28:01 - Fungi as medicine35:34 - Why should we eat mushrooms40:39 - How to introduce more mushrooms into your diet46:56 - How often should you eat mushrooms51:17 - Summary56:01 - OutroMentioned in today’s episode: Potential role of ergothioneine rich mushroom as anti-aging candidate through elimination of neuronal senescent cells from Brain ResearchMedicinal mushrooms in adjuvant cancer therapies: An approach to anticancer effects and presumed mechanisms of action from NutrireImmunomodulatory effect of mushrooms and their bioactive compounds in cancer: A comprehensive review from Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
01/02/24·58m 4s

What to eat for your health - according to science

From fads to fallacies, misconceptions have permeated diet narratives for decades. So, we dig in and demystify to forge a personalized path toward sustainable well-being.In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by Prof. Christopher Gardner and podcast regular Dr. Sarah Berry. Christopher is a professor of medicine at Stanford University and the director of nutrition studies at the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Sarah is an associate professor in nutrition at King’s College London and chief scientist at ZOE.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Find top tips for better gut health from ZOE Science & Nutrition — download our FREE gut guide.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00 Intro01:00 Quick fire questions02:30 Why do people go on diets?05:07 Is it too late to change your diet?06:28 How to adopt a better diet lifestyle in the long term11:06 What are the worst diets for our health?16:47 Why is there such a big gap between the scientific evidence and what we see on the shelves?19:49 What should we do to improve our diet?25:40 Do whole foods make us feel more full?31:14 What does plant based mean and how does it tie in with the mediterranean diet?32:14 Why is fiber so good for us?35:50 Is it healthy to have fat in your diet?37:03 Are reduced fat foods in supermarkets as good as they claim to be?39:33 Low carb vs low fat study45:07 What dietry revalations can we expect to see this year?52:15 Summary57:39 Goodbyes/OutroMentioned in today’s episode: Life expectancy can increase by up to 10 years following sustained shifts towards healthier diets in the United Kingdom in Nature Popular dietary patterns: Alignment with American Heart Association 2021 dietary guidance: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association in AHA JournalsCardiometabolic effects of omnivorous vs vegan diets in identical twins: A randomized clinical trial in JAMA Network Ultra-processed diets cause excess calorie intake and weight gain: An inpatient randomized controlled trial of ad libitum food intake in Cell MetabolismEffect of low-fat vs low-carbohydrate diet on 12-Month weight loss in overweight adults and the association with genotype pattern or insulin secretion: The DIETFITS randomized clinical trial in JAMA NetworkIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.
25/01/24·1h

The truth about the Mediterranean diet

Each day this week, we examine one of the world’s most popular diets. Putting the latest scientific evidence under the microscope, we’ll discover these diets' true impact on your health.Today, we’re talking about the Mediterranean diet. This indulgent diet champions vegetables, beans, fish, and even red wine, all with a liberal helping of extra virgin olive oil.However, this relatively high-fat diet undergoes many regional adaptations, and the wide range of options can be confusing, even intimidating, if you’re not that confident in the kitchen.In this special episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Christopher Gardner, Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford Prevention Research Center. Together, they discuss this diet's potential health benefits and pitfalls. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to https://zoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalised nutrition program.Top tips for better gut health from ZOE Science and Nutrition — Download our FREE gut guideFollow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Introduction00:42 Topic Intro02:42 What is the concept of the Mediterranean diet?04:22 Why do we have more data on this diet?06:08 What are the main differences between this and other diets?07:30 How much meat is in the Mediterranean diet?08:20 Is the Mediterranean diet a “whole food” diet?09:10 How do whole grains fit into this diet?10:06 Where do oils and legumes come into this?11:31 What happens when you switch from a US/UK-centric diet to a Mediterranean diet?13:23 What is going on inside the body to deliver the health benefits?14:08 What are the possible challenges of the Mediterranean diet?16:05 Keto vs. Mediterranean diet study19:09 What's the verdict?19:50 OutroMentioned in today’s episode: Adherence to Ketogenic and Mediterranean Study Diets in a Crossover Trial: The Keto-Med Randomized Trial, from Nutrients              Effect of a ketogenic diet versus Mediterranean diet on glycated hemoglobin in individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus, from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition                                                                           Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here.
24/01/24·20m 26s

Does calorie counting improve your health?

Each day this week, we’re examining one of the world’s most popular diets. Putting the latest scientific evidence under the microscope, we’ll find out these diets' true impact on your health.Today, we’re talking about the century-old paradigm of weight management — calorie counting. Rooted in the law of thermodynamics, the notion is simple: Consuming fewer calories than expended results in weight loss.While seemingly straightforward, the practical application of calorie counting can prove challenging, with many of us underestimating our calorie intake or finding it difficult to maintain this diet long-term.In this special episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Christopher Gardner, Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford Prevention Research Center. Together, they explore this diet's complexities, addressing its potential and pitfalls. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to https://zoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalised nutrition program.Top tips for better gut health from ZOE Science and Nutrition — Download our FREE gut guide Follow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Introduction00:42 Pre warning00:52 Topic Intro01:20 Why is calorie counting so popular?02:40 Does it matter what you eat or only about total calorie intake?04:14 What happens in your body when you eat fewer calories?07:08 What does the science say now?08:35 How does your metabolism change when you cut calories?10:29 Why is the diet still so officially accredited?11:23 What's the verdict?12:30 OutroMentioned in today’s episode: Energy compensation and metabolic adaptation: "The Biggest Loser" study reinterpreted, from Obesity                                       Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here.
23/01/24·13m 3s

The carnivore diet exposed: Healthful or harmful?

Each day this week, we’re examining one of the world’s most popular diets. Putting the latest scientific evidence under the microscope, we’ll find out the true impact of these diets on your health.Today, we’re talking about the carnivore diet, a zero-carb approach centered on meat, fish, eggs, and minimal dairy while excluding all plant foods and alcohol.Advocates claim it can help with autoimmune conditions, type 2 diabetes, and weight loss, asserting that our ancestors thrived eating this way. However, there are questions about nutrient deficiencies and excessive saturated fat intake with this diet.In this special episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Christopher Gardner, Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford Prevention Research Center. Together, they explore its purported advantages and drawbacks.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalised nutrition program.Top tips for better gut health from ZOE Science and Nutrition — Download our FREE gut guide Follow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Introduction00:42 Topic intro01:10 Why would anyone want to follow the carnivore diet?01:45 What are people eating on this diet?01:59 What would happen if you ate this way?02:53 Can we get all the essential nutrients we need to live from this diet?03:37 What are the claimed benefits of this diet?04:21 Could you live on this diet long-term?05:18 What are the differences between animal carnivores and us?07:08 Are there any studies to show what happens when you follow it?08:32 Why aren't there any official studies on the carnivore diet?09:56 What's the verdict?10:25 OutroMentioned in this episode:Behavioral characteristics and self-reported health status among 2029 adults consuming a “Carnivore Diet”, from Current Developments in Nutrition                                    Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here
22/01/24·10m 57s

Does the paleo diet hold the secret to health?

Each day this week, we’re examining one of the world’s most popular diets. Putting the latest scientific evidence under the microscope, we’ll find out the true impact of these diets on your health.Today, we’re talking about the paleo diet, rooted in the idea of emulating our hunter-gatherer ancestors after concerns about the impact of a modern westernized diet packed with highly processed foods.However, the diet often involves consuming increased amounts of saturated fats, primarily from meat. This is associated with heightened cholesterol levels and heart disease risk.In this special episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Christopher Gardner, Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford Prevention Research Center. Together, they dissect the diet’s potential benefits, pitfalls, and sustainability. If you want to discover the right foods for your body, head to https://zoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Introduction00:42 Topic intro02:05 Is the paleo diet a logical diet based on where we came from?03:03 What’s so appealing about the stone age diet?04:19 What’s the difference between paleo diets now and our authentic ancient diets?05:30 What are the theoretical health benefits if you were to follow the paleo diet?06:32 What are the downsides of following the paleo diet?07:09 How closely does the ancestral paleo diet match our modern paleo diet?09:25 What's the verdict?10:04 OutroIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here
21/01/24·10m 36s

Are low-fat diets bad for your health?

Each day this week, we’re examining one of the world’s most popular diets. Putting the latest scientific evidence under the microscope, we’ll find out these diets' true impact on your health.Today we’re talking about the low-fat diet, popularised in the 1970s and fueled by the belief that fat was the culprit behind heart disease and weight gain.However, the aftermath saw a surge in low-quality carbs. Food manufacturers, in the quest for low-fat options, replaced fats with sugar and refined grains, resulting in us opting for low-quality carbs over whole foods and whole grains.In this special episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Christopher Gardner, a professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford Prevention Research Center. Together, they unravel the complexities of the low-fat diet, addressing its potential and pitfalls. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to https://zoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program. Top tips for better gut health from ZOE Science and Nutrition — Download our FREE gut guideFollow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Introduction00:42 Topic Intro02:11 Why do people still follow low fat diets today?03:56 What happens in the body when you cut out fat?05:26 Does a low fat diet make you healthier?07:01 Is it possible to have a healthy low fat diet?09:49 If you choose a low fat diet with healthy carbs, is it better than a high fat diet?11:39 What happens if you remove all fat from your diet?12:06 What's the verdict?12:35 OutroIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here.
20/01/24·13m 8s

The keto diet uncovered: The truth about fat vs. carbs

Each day this week, we’re examining one of the world’s most popular diets. Putting the latest scientific evidence under the microscope, we’ll find out these diets' true impact on your health.Today we’re talking about the keto diet, a global phenomenon favoring fats over carbs, lauded for potential health benefits like improved blood sugar control and weight loss.Yet, the allure of keto does come with downsides. With a dearth of fiber and essential nutrients — as well a reputation for being notoriously difficult to keep on top of long-term — many find ketosis elusive.In this special episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Christopher Gardner, a professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford Prevention Research Center. Together, they unravel the keto diet's complexities, addressing its potential and pitfalls. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Top tips for better gut health from ZOE Science and Nutrition — Download our FREE gut guideFollow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Introduction00:42 Topic Intro01:54 Why would anyone follow the keto diet?02:59 What's the theory behind cutting carbs and switching to fat?04:16 What happens in your body if you follow keto correctly?05:59 What are the possible health benefits of switching to the keto diet?06:34 What are the downsides to following the keto diet?07:54 Keto diet study10:01 What's the verdict?11:37 OutroIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.Episode transcripts are available here.
19/01/24·12m 9s

How to master healthy eating habits with James Clear

Many of us want to make positive changes to our eating patterns in January. But it’s not easy. Ultra-processed foods, for example, are everywhere. So how can we make healthy habits stick?In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by James Clear and Dr. Federica Amati, who offer strategies for overcoming obstacles and changing the way we eat, so we can all have longer, healthier lives. James Clear is a writer, speaker, and author of the number-one New York Times bestseller Atomic Habits. Dr. Federica Amati is a medical scientist and an Association for Nutrition-accredited nutritionist, as well as the head nutritionist at ZOE.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Get top tips for better gut health from ZOE Science & Nutrition — download our FREE gut guide.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:01:46 – Quickfire round04:39 – New Year’s Resolutions08 :47 – Why is it hard to achieve goals? What role do food companies play?13:04 – Self-identity driven goals rather than result driven20:14 – The challenge ultra-processed foods pose27:30 – How to think about making changes to support New Year’s resolutions29:24 – James’ 4 laws, make it: obvious, attractive, easy, satisfying 33:57 – Make it obvious: how your environment40:00 – How you social circle and community affects your habits43:50 – 3rd law: make it easy 47:19 – How many times do you need to do something to make it a habit53:13 – 4th law: make it satisfying55:07 – How can we approach healthy food with our children?58:27 – Summary and outroMentioned in today’s episode:Atomic Habits by James ClearIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.
18/01/24·1h 3m

How to add a decade to your life with Andy Galpin

Most people need to do more exercise. Despite us being aware of its obvious benefits to our health, we can still struggle to get active. So, what’s holding us back? A persistent injury, lack of free time, or simply not knowing how to get started? Dr. Andy Galpin believes it’s always possible to incorporate exercise. With evidence-based exercise regimes, he’s on a mission to make a fitter future achievable for everyone.In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Andy ask: How can you improve your fitness to live a long, healthy life? If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Top tips for better gut health from ZOE — Download our FREE gut guide. Follow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 - Introduction1:03 - Quickfire round4:16 - Definition of kinesiology, fitness, strength training, and cardio 11:57 - How do you measure fitness?13:37 - Fitness and its impact on longevity18:41 - Strength and its impact on longevity 23:06 - Strength training and its link to brain health31:22 - Lowering blood pressure with strength training 40:15 - How to start strength training45:07 - Summary and outro Mentioned in today’s episode: Demand Coupling Drives Neurodegeneration: A Model of Age-Related Cognitive Decline and Dementia. (2022) from Cells Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.
11/01/24·50m 4s

Inflammation and your gut: Expert guidance to improve your health

Did you know that you can potentially extend your life by 10 years if you eat the right foods and that this is even possible if put into practice later in life? Inflammation is the cause of most diseases and illnesses, if you would like to learn how to reduce inflammation then look no further!In today’s episode, Prof. Tim Spector and Dr Will Bulsiewicz delve into the gut microbiome, how it reacts to different foods and overall well-being. We learn about microbial diversity and its pivotal role in reducing inflammation.Dr. Will Bulsiewicz is board-certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology. He’s also a New York Times bestselling author. Dr. B has won multiple awards and distinctions for his work as a clinician. Prof. Tim Spector is a Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King’s College London, director of the Twins UK study, Scientific co-founder at ZOE, and one of the world’s leading researchers. He's also the author of Food for Life, his latest book focusing on nutrition and health.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Top tips to control your gut from ZOE Science and Nutrition - Download our FREE gut guideFollow ZOE on InstagramAudio Timecodes:00:00  Introduction01:14    Quick Fire Questions03:27   What is Inflammation?07:40   Why is too much inflammation bad for you?09:06  This is at the core of most diseases…19:07    How blood sugar levels affect inflammation24:22   What is the role of Gut and the gut barrier?15:22 How does food affect inflammation?23:47    What is the role of Gut and the gut barrier?28:06   Gut microbes love good food!30:09   Inflammation and Gut Microbes: A two-way Street35:00   More plants and fermented food will reduce inflammation40:15    We need microbiome diversity45:45   Non-Dietary Approaches to Reduce Inflammation47:57    Benefits of Time-Restricted Eating52:01    SummaryMentioned in todays episode:Gut microbiota targeted diets modulate human immune status from CellThe Big IF Study: What did we find? From ZOEPREDICT: The world's largest in-depth nutritional research program from ZOEIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.
04/01/24·1h

How to eat in 2024: 7 essential strategies

Happy New Year! Thinking about extreme dieting this January? Think again. There are easy ways to eat well and boost your immune system while still enjoying every mouthful. In today’s episode, Tim and Sarah break down seven essential strategies for eating healthily in 2024. They also debunk common misconceptions, emphasize the importance of food quality, and encourage you to focus on the sheer enjoyment of what you eat. Dr. Sarah Berry is an associate professor in the department of nutritional sciences at King's College London and chief scientist at ZOE. Prof. Tim Spector is one of the world's top 100 most cited scientists and scientific co-founder of ZOE.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow Tim on InstagramFollow Sarah on InstagramFollow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00    Introduction02:30     Why does what we eat matter?04:14    Are most people in the West eating well?05:45    What are the risk factors of a bad diet?07:20    Strategy #1: Food is more than fuel10:38    Food is an energy source for our gut microbes14:25    Strategy #2: Fat is not your enemy18:00    Breaking the low fat diet myth21:30    Strategy #3: Eat more Plants25:11    What are plant based foods?29:56    Strategy #4: Reduce ultra processed foods34:38     What are the food guidelines with ultra processed food?39:18    Strategy #5: Reduce your blood sugar spikes42:59    Which carbohydrates are healthy?52:00    Strategy #6: Eat fermented foods56:25    Do probiotics have the same effect as eating fermented foods?1:00:22 Strategy #7: Stick to an eating window1:08:43    SummaryMentioned in todays episode:The Big IF Study from ZOEIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here
01/01/24·1h 13m

10 tips to help you live healthier: Part 2

In this special two-part episode, we’re taking a journey back through all of our episodes to bring you 10 actionable tips that will have a big impact on your nutritional health. Here, in part two, we’ll find out why you should stop counting sheep and how fidgeting can boost your health. These are evidence-backed tips to help you live and eat healthier.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalised nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 Introduction01:30 Which oil is best?06:45 Plants and the microbiome10:37 Move after eating16:40 Give your gut a rest23:20 Getting to sleepWhich oil is best?https://zoe.com/learn/podcast-fats-and-oils Plants and the microbiomehttps://zoe.com/learn/podcast-what-gut-microbiome-testing-can-reveal Move after eating to manage blood sugar https://zoe.com/learn/podcast-improving-blood-sugar-control-with-exercise Give your gut a rest https://zoe.com/learn/podcast-intermittent-fasting Getting to sleephttps://zoe.com/learn/podcast-the-secrets-of-good-sleepIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here
28/12/23·32m 59s

10 tips to help you live healthier: Part 1

In this special two-part episode, we’re taking a journey back through all of our episodes to bring you 10 actionable tips that will have a big impact on your nutritional health. Here, in part one, we’ll explore whether you actually need to spend more on organic food, why snacking can help your diet, and plenty more. These are evidence-backed tips to help you live and eat healthier.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalised nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Introduction 01:57 Snacking8:44 Ultra-processed foods14:58 Organic food21:00 Fermented foods28:47 ProteinSnacking https://zoe.com/learn/podcast-how-snacking-impacts-your-health Ultra-processed foodshttps://zoe.com/learn/podcast-ultra-processed-foodOrganic food https://zoe.com/learn/podcast-the-truth-about-organic-foodFermented foodshttps://zoe.com/learn/podcast-fermented-foods-gut-health Proteinhttps://zoe.com/learn/podcast-should-i-eat-more-protein Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.
21/12/23·34m 11s

Why unhealthy carbs are making you sick, and what to do about it

Do you realize how closely your diet affects your general health and well-being? Have you ever wondered how advertising affects what you eat? How much do you think your childhood diet is affecting your health in the long run?  In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by Prof. Walter Willett to discuss the importance of carefully considering what you eat and making decisions that support your health.Professor Walter Willett, from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, is the world's most cited nutritional scientist — with over 2,000 publications and several books to his name. Prof. Willett has focused much of his work over the last 40 years on the development and evaluation of methods to study the effects of diet on the occurrence of major diseases. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00    Introduction01:42    Quickfire questions04:07    What is the average Western diet today?08:01    Why is so hard to get a straight answer on diet and disease?10:15    The latest understanding on the link between diet and disease14:31    Carbohydrates: distinguishing the beneficial from the detrimental17:47    The hidden truths behind refined starches and sugary beverages27:06    Diet is a public health issue32:18     How bad is red meat consumption and soy alternative?46:09    Exploring the impact of childhood dietary habits on lifelong health54:21    Is it too late to change what we eat and benefit from it?58:10    Walters view on the current American diet guildelines    1:05:15  What is the influence of vitamin supplements on sustaining peak vitality?1:09:13  How the traditional Mediterranean diet can prevent diseases    1:11:07   SummaryMentioned in today’s episode:Diet assessment methods in the Nurses' Health Studies and contribution to evidence-based nutritional policies and guidelines from the American Journal of Public healthDiet, lifestyle, and genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes: A review from the Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study 2, and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study from Current Nutrition ReportsAssociation between healthy eating patterns and risk of cardiovascular disease from JAMA Internal Medicine The Mediterranean diet: Science and practice from Public Health NutritionBooks:<a...
14/12/23·1h 17m

Could this diet solve your gut issues?

Do you know what FODMAPs are? Many of us aren’t aware of these cryptic carbohydrates hidden in everyday foods.How can undigested FODMAPs cause bloating, gas, and other symptoms as they ferment in your gut? In today’s episode, Dr. Will Bulsiewicz, ZOE’S U.S. medical director and a board-certified gastroenterologist, teaches us about FODMAPs and how to tell if a low-FODMAP diet could be right for you. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Mentioned in today’s episode:Nutritional, microbiological and psychosocial implications of the low FODMAP diet from Journal of Gastroenterology and HepatologyPersonal view: Food for thought — Western lifestyle and susceptibility to Crohn's disease. The FODMAP hypothesis from Alimentary Pharmacology & TherapeuticsLow fermentable, oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyol diet in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis from NutritionLow fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet improves symptoms in adults suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) compared to standard IBS diet: A meta-analysis of clinical studies from PLoS OneNutritional, microbiological and psychosocial implications of the low FODMAP diet from the Journal of Gastroenterology and HepatologyFollow ZOE on Instagram. Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
07/12/23·25m 10s

How body fat impacts health and aging

As we age, the distribution of our body fat changes, particularly around menopause.  Most people think of body fat as bad, but fat tissue plays a number of hugely important roles in our health.In today’s episode of ZOE Science and Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Dr. Sarah Berry and Prof. Deborah Clegg. Together, they debunk the myth that fat is bad, enlighten us about why body fat is distributed where it is, and explore the differences in fat distribution between men and women. Deborah Clegg is a professor and Vice President for Research at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso. Her research focuses on sex differences in metabolism, adipose tissue, and the brain and the impact this has on our health. Dr. Sarah Berry is one of the world's leading experts on human nutrition. She has run more than 20 randomized clinical trials looking at how humans respond to different fats.Head to zoe.com/podcast if you want to uncover the right foods for your body and get 10% off your ZOE membership.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 Intro04:00 What is body fat?06:32 What is healthy fat?07:52 Female vs male body fat11:56 Why is belly fat the most unhealthy?19:43 Waist to hip ratio21:24 How estrogen affects fat distribution27:41 Perimenopause symptoms31:01 Fat cells producing estrogen36:00 Hunger the menopause38:46 Weight gain and the menopause40:54 Physical changes in men42:28 Exercise and fat distribution 43:26 What to eat during menopause46:37 Estrogen supplementsMentioned in today’s episode: The evolutionary impact and influence of oestrogens on adipose tissue structure and function from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 2023Menopause is associated with postprandial metabolism, metabolic health and lifestyle: The ZOE PREDICT study from EBioMedicine 2022 Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
30/11/23·55m 18s

Exercise myths busted: Practical steps to sustain your health

Admit it, exercise isn't everyone's favorite pastime. Of course, our ancestors weren't hitting the gym by choice — our evolution has wired us to stay active, and this natural activity actually slows down the aging process. The good news is that you can achieve the benefits without feeling like you're "exercising."In today’s episode, Prof. Daniel Lieberman debunks exercise myths. He also teaches us how exercise impacts our health and how learning from our evolution can unlock the secrets of a longer life.Daniel Lieberman is a paleoanthropologist at Harvard University. He’s the Edwin M. Lerner II Professor of Biological Sciences and a professor in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology. He’s best known for his research on the evolution of the human mind and the human body.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00     Introduction01:34    Quickfire questions03:22    The  Rudyard Kipling view of our ancestors04:54    Is exercise good for us and why do most of us hate it?06:19    For millions of years, people were physically active for 2 reasons only…15:38    Our bodies have evolved to save calroies and preserve energy18:31    It’s normal to think your life is normal22:27    We need to exercise because we don’t move enough!34:00   Diet, exercise and sleep can prevent these diseases…39:54    The active Grandparent hypothesis43:10    Study of men matriculating as undergraduates at Harvard University49:44    How can we enjoy keeping physically active?01:00:00   The importance of weights exercise01:06:43   SummaryMentioned in today’s episode: Three generations of HSPH researchers explore health benefits of exercise from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthStanford marshmallow test experiment, a summary from Simply PsychologyWe also mention Daniel’s book Exercised: The Science of Physical Activity, Rest and Health, and you can find it here.Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
23/11/23·1h 7m

We risked it all! Does ZOE work? Here's what our latest trial results show

We’ve been working for the past 2 years on a randomized controlled trial of ZOE membership. Participants used personalized nutrition advice to try to improve their health — and the results are fascinating. In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan, Sarah, and Tim ask: How did ZOE hold up as part of this trial?If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes01:03 - Quickfire round02:10 - Sarah’s first impression of Jonathan05:29 - What is an RCT10:20 - What is ZOE and how does it work14:14 - What did the RCT participants experience16:16 - Using cookies to measure blood sugar20:07 - What is blood fat25:02 - What happens once you’ve done your tests26:17 - Recent dietary changes Jonathan, Sarah and Tim have made34:52 - How are you guided through the ZOE program37:19 - Control group vs ZOE group41:23 - Results of the ZOE RCT45:03 - Do other wellness products have RCTs47:57 - Will the results be greater after a year of ZOE54:44 - Does the ZOE membership work57:02 - The difference between ZOE and other medical devices58:44 - Summary and outroIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover itDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Mentioned in today’s episode:Epidemiology of constipation in Europe and Oceania: A systematic review published in BMC Gastroenterology Recent advances in understanding and managing chronic constipation published in F1000ResearchHuman Postprandial Responses to Food and Potential for Precision Nutrition published in Nature MedicineMicrobiome connections with host metabolism and habitual diet from 1,098 deeply phenotyped individuals published in Nature MedicinePostprandial glycaemic dips predict appetite and energy intake in healthy individuals published in Nature MedicineEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.
16/11/23·1h 3m

How to prevent heart disease, according to science

Heart disease is among the top five causes of death globally, and it’s the first in the United States and United Kingdom. In the U.S., it causes 1 in 5 deaths.But what is heart disease, exactly? Can we take steps to avoid it? Prof. Eric Rimm, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is here to enlighten us. In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Eric explore what we can do to reduce our chances of getting heart disease. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to zoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram. Timecodes:00:15 - Intro01:07 - Quick fire questions02:10 - Biggest myth about Heart Disease03:2 6 - What is Heart Disease?08:03 - What is a stroke?10:29 - What are the differences in Heart Disease symptoms between men and women?12:51 - Did you know that…14:24 - The multi-decade diet study21:24 - The 4 ways to lower chances Heart Disease28:16 - Weight and Heart Disease32:09 - What can you do to reduce Heart Disease risk?34:30 - Exercise and Heart Disease risk37:11 - Body Weight and Heart Disease risk38:01 - Diet and Heart Disease risk41:06 - Sleep and Heart Disease risk46:18 - What is the cutting edge research in Heart Disease?49:35 - Summary53:18 -  ConclusionMentioned in today’s episode: Optimal dietary patterns for prevention of chronic disease from Nature MedicineFrequency, type, and volume of leisure-time physical activity and risk of coronary heart disease in young women from CirculationDiet, lifestyle, biomarkers, genetic factors, and risk of cardiovascular disease in the Nurses’ Health Studies from the American Journal of Public HealthDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.
09/11/23·55m 22s

The surprising truth about lectins

What are lectins, and are they dangerous? These “antinutrients” have come under attack and were recently the subject of a dietary fad fueled by a popular book. As always, there’s more to the story.In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by Dr. Will Bulsiewicz to dive deep into the world of lectins. They dissect questionable studies, debunk myths, and offer expert advice about how to approach foods containing these misunderstood compounds.Will is a board-certified gastroenterologist with 14 years of experience. He’s also the New York Times best-selling author of Fiber Fueled and ZOE’s U.S. medical director. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on Instagram.Mentioned in today’s episode:Lectins as bioactive plant proteins: A potential in cancer treatment from Critical Reviews in Food Science and NutritionPlant-derived lectins as potential cancer therapeutics and diagnostic tools from BioMed Research InternationalA legume-based hypocaloric diet reduces proinflammatory status and improves metabolic features in overweight/obese subjects from the European Journal of NutritionDietary legume consumption reduces risk of colorectal cancer: Evidence from a meta-analysis of cohort studies from Scientific ReportsIntake of legumes and cardiovascular disease: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis from Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesLegume consumption is inversely associated with type 2 diabetes incidence in adults: A prospective assessment from the PREDIMED study from Clinical NutritionThe effects of legume consumption on markers of glycaemic control in individuals with and without diabetes mellitus: A systematic literature review of randomised controlled trials from NutrientsEffects of dietary pulse consumption on body weight: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition The "white kidney bean incident" in Japan from Methods in Molecular BiologyFructan, rather than gluten, induces symptoms in patients with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity from GastroenterologyIs there a...
02/11/23·25m 5s

Aging and longevity reimagined: Is mindfulness the secret?

Can the power of your thoughts help defy aging? Could your mind help improve your eyesight or even heal wounds faster? These ideas might seem far-fetched, but our guest, Harvard Professor Ellen Langer, has spent four decades uncovering the real science behind this.In this episode, discover how to harness your mind-body connection to enhance your well-being.Ellen Langer is an American professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1981, she became the first woman ever to be tenured in psychology at Harvard. Prof. Langer studies the illusion of control, decision-making, aging, and mindfulness theory.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:00:00 Introduction01:48    Quickfire questions04:34    The mind and body should be understood as one unit05:42 The counterclockwise study06:51 Chambermaid exercise study09:33    What is Mindfulness?10:59 All of the misery we experience is a function of our mindlessness14:47    Mindful optimism23:12    Everything should be different, every day of your life25:33    How Ellen approaches a simple eyesight test    28:21 We have more control over our health and lives than we think…33:35    Placebos could be our strongest medicines…39:00    Blood sugar study results44:50    How to approach mindfulness54:05    SummaryMentioned in today’s episode: Ageing as a mindset: A counterclockwise experiment to rejuvenate older adults sponsored by Catholic University of the Sacred HeartMind-set matters: Exercise and the placebo effect from Psychological ScienceThe Mindful Body and Mindfulness, two books by Prof. LangerEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.
26/10/23·56m 17s

Resistance training: How to stay strong as you age

Do you feel like your muscles are shrinking or getting weaker? Many people gradually lose muscle mass as they get older. And this leads to an increased risk of falls, osteoporosis, and fractures. When it comes to your muscles, it’s a case of use them or lose them. But what is the most effective way to use our muscles and maintain strength? Ex-bodybuilder and professor of exercise science Brad Schoenfeld tells us how. And it’s easier than you might think!In today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Brad ask: How can you maintain muscle mass as you age? If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 - Introduction 1:25 - Quickfire round2:38 - How do our muscles work3:01 - Why are muscles important for our health5:15 - The loss of muscles and how to prevent it8:19 - Resistance training - How it builds muscles11:24 - Nutrition and muscle growth13:01 - How muscle growth changes with age17:45 - Resistance training vs Cardio20:20 - How to do resistance training28:11 - No time to exercise?30:28 - What weight to train with36:10 - How menopause affects muscle maintenance41:13 - Summary and outroMentioned in today’s episode: Effects of resistance training on muscle size and strength in very elderly adults from Sports MedicineStrength and hypertrophy adaptations between low- vs. high-load resistance Training from The Journal of Strength and Conditioning ResearchEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
19/10/23·47m 26s

The surprising link between dementia and oral health

More than 50 systemic health conditions — including Alzheimer’s, diabetes, and heart disease — are associated with oral disease. The link between systemic and oral conditions is always microbial, inflammatory, or both. So, how can we look after our gums to improve our health?In today’s episode, Jonathan and Prof. Alp Kantarci pose the question: How does the health of your oral cavity shape your general health?Dr. Alp Kantarci is a professor, scientist, dentist, oral health researcher, periodontist, dental implant surgeon, and senior member of staff at the Forsyth Institute, an independent research institute that focuses on the connections between oral health and overall wellness. Dr. Kantarci is also a faculty member at Harvard University School of Dental Medicine. He has published more than 190 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has presented more than 170 talks and posters at dental and medical congresses.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Timecodes:01:35 - Quickfire questions04:11 - What is oral health?08:35 - How is our oral health connected to the health of the rest of our body?11:01 - Oral microbiome18:48 - Why does bad oral health affect the rest of the body?22:47 - How much does the state of our oral health contribute to dementia?25:48 - The link between oral health and diabetes28:31 - The link between oral health and cardiovascular diseases32:41 - What are the key steps to look after our oral health?35:36 - Alp’s view on mouthwash37:51 - Oral health & probiotics42:22 - Impact of food on our oral health45:45 - Does sparkling water affect our oral health?50:04 - Summary52:34 - Goodbyes52:41 - OutroMentioned in today’s episode: Dementia and the risk of periodontitis: A population-based cohort study from the Journal of Dental Research.Microglial response to experimental periodontitis in a murine model of Alzheimer’s disease from Scientific Reports.Fusobacterium nucleatum dissemination by neutrophils from the Journal of Oral Microbiology.Safety and preliminary efficacy of a novel host-modulatory therapy for reducing gingival inflammation from Frontiers in Immunology.Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
12/10/23·54m 43s

Unlock longevity: Dr. Peter Attia's essential strategies

Dr. Peter Attia doesn’t want a slow death. He doesn’t want his final years to be defined by poor mental and physical faculties that only worsen as the years roll by. But, by making changes to his lifestyle today, he’s taking control of his health tomorrowIn today’s episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Peter ask: How can you maintain your health as you age? Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition programFollow ZOE on InstagramTimecodes:00:00 - Introduction 1:29 - Quickfire round3:14 - Healthspan vs lifespan09:52 - The difference between slow and quick death 12:23 - What diseases cause slow death13:34 - Acting before there’s a problem16:17 - Is it too late to improve my future health19:20 - How to improve modern medicine25:07 - The importance of blood sugar33:03 - The centanarian decathlon34:00 - Cardio training38:00 - Strength training40:43 - Summary and outroMentioned in today’s episode: The inequities in the cost of chronic disease from the National Council on Aging                                Early lesions of atherosclerosis in youth from the Journal of the American Nutrition AssociationCoronary heart disease causes and risk factors from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood InstituteEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
05/10/23·46m 23s

Cardio exercise: How much do you really need?

Not all of us want to go to the gym 5 times a week, but what if there was a way to do quick, short high intensity 20 second exercises and still reap benefits - or does that sound too good to be true?Javier and Jonathan break this down as they look at recent studies and results, optimizing exercise routines to achieve the desired health benefits, taking into account factors like intensity, duration, and frequency as well as discussing the effect of working from home vs commuting to the office.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Follow ZOE on InstagramMentioned in today’s episode:The Effects of High Intensity Interval Training vs Steady State Training on Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity; from The Journal of Sports and Science MedicineEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.
28/09/23·18m 46s

Gut microbiome testing: What can it reveal about your health?

Your gut microbiome, a bustling community of microorganisms, is a vital player in your overall health. It doesn’t just impact your digestive system — it has a profound influence on your brain health and well-being.However, the gut microbiome is a complex, long misunderstood realm, and figuring out how it affects daily life can leave even the most dedicated health enthusiasts scratching their heads. Here at ZOE, we’ve transformed our understanding of this bustling microbial world, where both “good” and “bad” gut bacteria reside.In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks with Prof. Nicola Segata and Prof. Tim Spector to explore how ZOE's microbiome testing and unique microbiome health scores provide personalized insights into your gut health.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Nicola Segata is a professor and principal investigator at the Laboratory of Computational Metagenomics, at the CIBIO department of the University of Trento. His background is in metagenomics, machine learning, microbiome research, and microbial genomics.Tim Spector is ZOE's scientific co-founder and one of the world's top 100 most cited scientists.Timecodes:00:00 Introduction01:41 Quick fire questions03:38 Why should we care about gut microbes?07:00 How many different microbes do we have in our gut?11:37 Why would we want to measure our microbiome?13:15 Can we change our microbiome?18:00 Is it possible to make a dramatic change in your microbiome over time?20:21 What does the latest data tell us about improving our diet?23:24 How does the ZOE micobiome gut test work?27:07 What goes on in the lab to get these results?30:54 Is there enough information in the gut microbiome to make a full health assessment?34:20 What can our microbes tell us about diseases?35:55 What useful information does the microbiome test show us?36:51 Are we still making new discoveries in the microbiome?41:03 Do different microbes prefer specific foods?43:14 How do different lifestyles around the world change your microbiome?47:44 5 simple tips to improve gut health50:45 How rapidly can you damage your microbiome?53:58 Can taking painkillers regularly negatively impact the microbiome?56:10 Summary60:03 Goodbyes/OutroMentioned in today’s episode: The person-to-person transmission landscape of the gut and oral microbiomes from Nature Sharing of gut microbial strains between selected individual sets of twins cohabitating for decades from PLoS OneA genetic gift for sushi eaters from NatureFind Nicola on ResearchGate and X.Episode transcripts are available <a...
21/09/23·1h 3m

The shocking damage ultra-processed foods cause to your brain

There’s been a surge in our consumption of ultra-processed foods, especially in the United Kingdom and the United States, where these foods contribute about two-thirds of people’s caloric intake. Also a cause for concern is emerging evidence of ultra-processed foods’ detrimental effect on our brain health and overall well-being.When most of our calories come from ultra-processed foods, the risk of chronic physical and mental health conditions escalates. Scientists are now uncovering the intricate mechanisms behind this relationship, particularly concerning the effects of these foods on our brains.In today’s episode, we welcome back Prof. Felice Jacka, OAM. Felice is an Alfred Deakin professor of nutritional psychiatry and the director of the Food & Mood Centre at Deakin University, in Australia. She’s also the founder of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research and the world’s leading researcher on food’s impact on our brain and mental health.Now, she’s back on the show to delve deeper into the effects of ultra-processed foods on mental health and the brain, specifically the hippocampus, an area responsible for learning and memory.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 Intro01:19 Quick fire questions04:17 What is ultra processed food?05:37 What is the NOVA classification?08:18 How does food impact the brain?10:33 What does the hippocampus do to influence our brain function?12:58 Is there a link between the size of the hippocampus and quality of diet?13:45 Is there a link between the quality of diet and depression?20:37 What are the effects of long term dietary habits?21:33 Is there a link between poor diet and dementia23:18 Is there a link between autism and diet?24:00 How real is the link between diet and dementia?24:57 What is the oral microbiome?28:16 New trial between whole foods and vitamin enriched nutritional foods29:28 How does processing foods impact the makeup of foods on a molecular level?32:10 How does the biodiversity around us affect our body?33:08 How does the industrialized food environment impact us?35:50 How strong is the evidence for this? is it comparable to smoking?39:12 Practical tips to help with our diet40:07 How does reducing consumption of UPF affect us?41:25 How to cut down on UPF44:04 Is it too late to change your diet?45:39 Does exercise impact our brain?47:41 Summary52:57 Goodbyes/OutroMentioned in today’s episode: The SMILES trial published in BMC Medicine Ultra-Processed Food Consumption and Mental Health published in NutrientsWestern diet is associated with a smaller hippocampus also in BMC Medicine Learn more about Felice on the Food & Mood Centre’s website.Follow Felice on Instagram.Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like
14/09/23·53m 55s

Food before exercise: What does science say?

Get science-based nutrition advice straight to your inbox: https://bit.ly/3ExWxCG Most of us like to have breakfast before we exercise in the morning, but what happens if we don’t eat anything first? The issue goes beyond weight loss and exercise timing to involve blood sugar, insulin sensitivity, and other — perhaps unexpected — aspects of your health.In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Professor Javier Gonzalez ask: Should we exercise on an empty stomach?If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get 10% off your personalised nutrition program.Mentioned in today’s episode:Lipid metabolism links nutrient-exercise timing to insulin sensitivity in men classified as overweight or obese from The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Body composition changes associated with fasted versus non-fasted aerobic exercise from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition The Acute Effects of Interrupting Prolonged Sitting Time in Adults with Standing and Light-Intensity Walking on Biomarkers of Cardiometabolic Health in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis from Sport Medicine Exercising Tactically for Taming Postmeal Glucose Surges from Hindawi Exercise-stimulated glucose uptake — regulation and implications for glycaemic control from Nature Reviews EndocrinologyFollow ZOE on Instagram. Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.
07/09/23·12m 19s

Skin aging and acne: What you should do

As a listener to this show, you’ve probably heard of the gut microbiome. But did you know that your skin has its own microbiome? Recent evidence suggests that these microbiomes are vital for our skin health. So, what should we do? Which foods make an impact? And if we want our skin to look healthier, how about those collagen supplements that many of you have asked us about? In today’s episode, our guest is Dr. Justine Kluk, a consultant dermatologist with a specialist interest in acne. Justine is a member of the British Association of Dermatologists, the Royal Society of Medicine, and the Royal College of Physicians. ZOE’s Chief Scientist Dr. Sarah Berry also joins as a cohost to explore these ideas. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 Intro02:01 Quick Fire questions03:52 What does skin do?04:51 Why is the skin so important?06:34 Is there a correlation between aging skin and health?07:41 What is the skin microbiome?11:46 Is exposure to the natural environment beneficial for children?12:39 Can we change the skin microbiome?13:32 Would an oral or topical probiotic help improve our skin microbiome15:11 What can we do to help support the skin barrier?15:39 Can overwashing/scrubbing disturb your skin?16:40 Why does acne matter?18:37 Is acne just found in teenagers?19:12 What effect does menopause have on your skin?20:36 What impact does diet have on acne?22:14 Are diets with high glycemic content bad for acne?23:01 What is happening to create the effects of acne?24:23 Is there a connection between our gut health and skin health?25:15 Practical advice for people with acne28:16 Diet tips to help support healthy skin29:51 How has the ZOE diet gone down in Jonathan and Justine's household?32:54 How can the ZOE diet help with day-to-day cooking habits?35:46 What causes skin aging?37:44 What can we do to slow down skin aging?39:55 Do collagen supplements work to keep your skin youthful?41:52 How can retinol help your skin?42:30 3 things that could help keep your skin young43:31 Top nutrition skin myths45:50 How important is it to apply sun protection?46:36 How does stress impact our skin?48:38 Questions for Jonathan54:57 Summary & OutroMentioned in today’s episode: Mortality is written on the face from The Journals of Gerontology: Series AToo clean, or not too clean: the hygiene hypothesis and home hygiene from Clinical & Experimental AllergyImpact of outdoor nature-related activities on gut microbiota, fecal serotonin, and perceived stress in preschool children from Scientific ReportsJustine shares more in-depth skincare and acne information at drjustinekluk.com and as @drjustinekluk on Instagram Follow ZOE on Instagram. Episode transcripts are available <a href="https://joinzoe.com/learn/category/podcasts"...
31/08/23·59m 26s

The great calorie deception: Are food labels misleading?

Millions of us are counting calories every day. But do we know if those numbers truly reflect the energy we get from eating?It’s about time that we debunked the “one-size-fits-all” approach to calorie counting and unmasked the outdated methodologies that contribute to inaccuracies in food labeling.In today’s episode, Jonathan and Dr. Sarah Berry ask: How exactly do we measure calories, and is calorie counting actually effective?Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoeMentioned in today’s episode:The Wilbur Olin Atwater Papers from the United States Department of AgricultureIs there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it. Episode transcripts are available here.
24/08/23·20m 25s

Antibiotics: The surprising truth about probiotics and what to do instead

Antibiotics are one of the greatest discoveries of the 21st century. Since their inception, they’ve saved countless lives, but these miracle drugs come at a cost. In some cases, they can seriously affect your health or can even be life-threatening.In today’s episode, Jonathan puts himself under the microscope. After an injury forced him to take antibiotics, he shows you the effect they had on his own gut bacteria.Jonathan’s joined by Dr. Will Bulsiewicz and Prof. Tim Spector, who explore the impact of different types of antibiotics, how they affect your bacteria in the short and long term, and how we can reverse the unwanted effect of these drugs. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 Intro00:15 Jonathan’s Intro00:50 Quickfire round01:40 Jonathan’s accident 04:00 Unpacking clindamycin11:40 Antibiotic-associated diarrhea 14:45 Side effects prevention advice22:20 Jonathan’s gut at 7 days 27:50 Fermented foods27:00 Tips for building your gut back up41:30 Benefits vs. risks48:00 Summary 51:20 OutroMentioned in today’s episode:Post-antibiotic gut mucosal microbiome reconstitution is impaired by probiotics and improved by autologous FMT from CellSaccharomyces boulardii: What makes it tick as successful probiotic? From the Journal of FungiFollow ZOE on Instagram.Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.
17/08/23·53m 27s

Butter vs. margarine: What does science say?

Whether you’re frying, baking, or topping your toast, most of you will eat either butter or margarine at some point today. The fact that these spreads are such a staple means that we need to know their effects on our health. And It might surprise you to learn that this impact has changed quite dramatically over the past 20 years.In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Dr. Sarah ask: Which is healthier, butter or margarine? Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on Instagram. https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Mentioned in today’s episode:Margarine from Science Direct      Margarines: Historical approach, technological aspects, nutritional profile, and global trends from Food Research InternationalReduction of LDL-cholesterol as a result of the change from butter to soft margarine from Polish Archives of Internal MedicineAmericans' per capita consumption of margarine & butter from the USDAEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
10/08/23·23m 56s

Healthy aging: The surprising power of your social life

Unfortunately, many of us spend our later years in poor health. But is this avoidable? And can we actually increase our healthy years?While aging is inevitable, there are steps we can take to minimize its effects on our health. And surprisingly, some of these steps have nothing to do with exercise or diet. Simply spending time with others can provide countless benefits to us as we age.But how can we maintain these connections? Does retirement affect our social interactions? And can attitude alone keep you healthier in your later years?In today’s episode, one of the world’s top experts on aging, Prof. Rose Anne Kenny, joins us to explore these ideas. Rose Anne is a world-leading geriatrician at Trinity College Dublin, where she leads a huge, long-term study on aging. She’s also the author of the number one international bestseller Age Proof: The New Science of Living a Longer and Healthier Life.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:13 - Quickfire round01:14 - What’s the biggest myth about aging?04:18 - What is aging?07:43 - Aging process predictors13:50 - Our growing elderly population15:14 - Retirement19:21 - Study on aging and social interaction24:57 - Importance of social participation27:38 - Studying the effects of loneliness29:56 - Combating loneliness31:13 - How attitude affects aging33:20 - Social interaction online36:08 - Creating social relationships48:42 - Summary and OutroMentioned in today’s episode: The Dunedin Study, a long-term study designed to investigate broader questions of child health and development from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Research UnitThe Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) from Trinity College DublinYou can buy Rose Anne’s book here.Follow ZOE on Instagram.Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
03/08/23·45m 38s

Chronic diarrhea? Here's what to do | Dr. Will Bulsiewicz

We’ve all had unpleasant toilet experiences in our time. It can be distressing to deal with and not something we like talking about. But when does normal diarrhea become chronic? And when do we need to seek medical care? In today’s episode, Jonathan and Dr Will ask what is chronic diarrhea and how can we rule out something more serious? Will also shares tricks of the trade to ease your symptoms and tells us how our amazing guts work to keep our whole body healthy.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get10% off your personalized nutrition program.Mentioned in today’s episode:Chronic Diarrhea by Garrett J. Descoteaux-Friday; Isha Shrimanker from the National Library of MedicineChronic Diarrhea by Cleveland Clinic  Diarrhea From John Hopkins MedicineDiarrhea From Stamford Medicine Healthcare  Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI) From Loma Linda University Health Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.
27/07/23·19m 8s

The truth about organic food - according to science

What does "organic" food mean? And how do you know if something's organic?Of course, foods tell you if they're organic in massive letters on the packaging. And they cost way more. But what makes a food organic? Is eating organic better for your health? And are the benefits worth the expense?Luckily, Professor Tim Spector is here today with answers. Tim is one of the world's top 100 most cited scientists, a scientific co-founder of ZOE, and the author of the bestselling book Food for Life: The New Science of Eating Well.Stick around until the end, and you'll also find out the answer to a question we get often: Does Tim eat organic?Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro01:21 - Quickfire round02:36 - What is organic food?03:06 - Pesticides vs insecticides08:06 - Diseases09:15 - Herbicide risks16:03 - Nutrient comparison 18:21 - Natural chemical defences20:32 - Does Tim Eat organic food?22:15 - Foods high in chemicals25:32 - Organic and cost 26:56 - Washing food31:11 - Summary and outroMentioned in today’s episode: Organic food consumption and the incidence of cancer in a large prospective study of women in the United Kingdom from the British Journal of CancerAssociation of frequency of organic food consumption with cancer risk from JAMA Internal MedicineImpacts of dietary exposure to pesticides on faecal microbiome metabolism in adult twins from Environmental HealthFollow ZOE on Instagram.Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
20/07/23·36m 21s

What’s the best natural sugar substitute?

Get science-based nutrition advice delivered straight to your inbox. https://bit.ly/46BPTYz Are you trying to eat less sugar? If you are, you might have tried a natural sugar alternative. Stevia, robinia honey, coconut sugar, agave… the list of these table sugar replacements seems to be growing day by day. But what even are these alternatives? Are they really natural? And do they offer us a healthier way of getting that sweet taste?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Dr. Sarah ask: What are natural sugar alternatives, and are they healthier than table sugar? Follow ZOE on Instagram. https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Mentioned in today’s episode:The artificial sweetener erythritol and cardiovascular event risk from Nature Medicine                    Effects of D-allulose on glucose tolerance and insulin response from BMJ Open Diabetes Research & CareEffects of stevia on glycemic and lipid profile of type 2 diabetic patients from the Avicenna Journal of PhytomedicineAgave syrup: Chemical analysis and nutritional profile from the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public HealthAre natural sugar alternatives healthier? from Harvard Health PublishingAlternative sugars - agave nectar from British Dental JournalEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.
13/07/23·14m 10s

Is dairy good or bad for you?

Decades ago, there were reams of adverts instructing us to drink our milk so we don’t break our bones. But in the decades since, public opinion toward dairy is very different, and the scientific community has largely debunked these ideas. Many of the health-conscious among us choose to avoid it altogether. Our reasons range from a belief that dairy leads to inflammation, to acne, or even to an increased risk of heart attack due to high levels of saturated fat.  But have we fallen into the same trap we often do, bouncing from one extreme to another? Could cutting out dairy mean we miss out on vital nutrients? Or could it hold the secret to a healthy gut microbiome?Today, Jonathan is joined by ZOE regulars and renowned experts, Dr. Sarah Berry and Prof. Tim Spector.In this episode, you’ll not only find out whether you should eat dairy or cut it out, but you’ll also hear two leading nutritional scientists try to reach an agreement on how to translate the latest research into actionable advice. And hopefully, they’ll still remain friends afterward. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:13 - Jonathan’s Intro01:38 - Quickfire round02:45 - Biggest myth about dairy04:15 - Does dairy cause inflammation? 10:38 - Bone fragilaty16:03 - Cheese and Yogurt16:59 - Full fat vs semi skinned17:27 - Milk and cholesterol21:03 - Fermented dairy23:00 - dairy and microbes26:03 - Saturated fats26:51 - Cheese quality 31:15 - Summary33:03 - Goodbyes33:14 - OutroFollow ZOE on Instagram.Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.
06/07/23·35m 23s

The truth about menopause supplements

More than half of women who go through menopause find its symptoms distressing. In fact, 10% leave their jobs because of the burden.It’s no wonder that a huge selection of supplements claim to relieve menopause’s unpleasant effects. But do they actually work? Which products are backed by clinical evidence, and which are just “menowashing”?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Dr. Sarah Berry ask: What’s the evidence behind menopause supplements?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Mentioned in today’s episode:Introduction to menopause from John Hopkins MedicineWhat is menopause? from The National Institute on AgingWhat you should know about hormone therapy and menopause from the Columbia University Irving Medical CentreMenopause symptoms in depth from the National Center For Complementary and Integrative HealthMenopause supplements: Effectiveness, side effects, and safety from Medical News TodayThe role of diet in managing menopause symptoms from Nutrition BulletinRevealing the evidence-based diet solutions to managing your menopause symptoms from Nutrition BulletinEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.
29/06/23·15m 36s

How snacking impacts your health

Evidence shows that all over the world, people are snacking more — with the United Kingdom and the United States leading the way in unhealthy snacking habits. But what exactly counts as a snack? And is all snacking unhealthy?Snacking can be a confusing and controversial topic. There are various opinions and myths about what's good for you. Many people struggle to make healthy choices, while others may be unaware of the impact of snacking habits on their gut health and overall well-being.In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by ZOE regulars and renowned experts Sarah Berry and Tim Spector for an enlightening discussion that will help you snack smarter. Armed with the latest scientific research, they unravel the complexities of snacking and share evidence-based insights on what's truly beneficial for your body. Along the way, they cover healthy options, snack timing, and what we should all be avoiding.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 Introduction01:23 Quick Fire Questions04:03 What is a snack?04:55 How much energy comes from snacks?05:40 Cultural differences with snacks08:33 What happens when we snack?10:29 Are some healthy looking bars actually bad for us?12:16 Do ulta-processed snacks make us hungrier?13:57 What effect do additives and emulsifiers have?15:04 Results of study on healthy vs unhealthy snacks15:22 What impact does snacking have on our gut?18:00 Why could snacking be unhealthy?18:56 What are the concerns around snacking frequency?19:50 Does the quality of your snack make a difference?21:31 Could skipping breakfast be healthy for us?23:17 Does timing of snacking have any influence on our health?28:42 How could time-restricted eating benefit us?32:20 What is the impact of snacking on weight gain?34:15 What impact does snacking have on blood sugar?36:25 How people on different routines react to snacking38:27 What does the recent ZOE research show us on the topics of snacking?40:16 How bad is late night snacking for our health?42:19 How should we be snacking?46:30 How has snacking changed over time?47:26 Actionable advice on snacking52:52 How much do your meals impact snacking?56:50 Summary59:40 Goodbyes59:44 OutroIn today’s episode:Meal patterns across ten European countries – results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/public-health-nutrition/article/meal-patterns-across-ten-european-countries-results-from-the-european-prospective-investigation-into-cancer-and-nutrition-epic-calibration-study/A662BDB7A9AD3631BD6AD98946FE765F# What is a snack, why do we snack, and how can we choose better snacks? A review of the definitions of snacking, motivations to snack, contributions to dietary intake, and recommendations for improvement https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4863261/Snacking on whole almonds for 6 weeks improves endothelial function and lowers LDL cholesterol but does not affect liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors in healthy adults: The
22/06/23·1h

How to stop diarrhea and what NOT to do

We’ve all wrestled with diarrhea at some point. It comes in many forms. And being able to read these differences can help us understand what’s going on inside us and how we should treat it. In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Dr. Will ask: What are the health risks associated with diarrhea, and how can we treat it? Follow ZOE on Instagram.If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get10% off your personalized nutrition program.Mentioned in today’s episode:Diarrhea, a global overview from the World Health Organization (WHO) Key takeaways from a University of Oxford analysis of the global impact of antimicrobial resistanceEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com, and we’ll do our best to cover it.
15/06/23·17m 47s

The menstrual cycle decoded: Lifestyle tips to ease your symptoms, with Hazel Wallace

How much do you know about menstrual cycles? About half of us are more informed than the other half. The menstrual cycle has great significance, affecting various aspects of health. And more than 90% of people who get their periods experience premenstrual symptoms. However, misconceptions and limited understandings abound, leaving many people in the dark.In today’s episode, we’re joined by Hazel Wallace. She’s a medical doctor, nutritionist, and author of The Female Factor. She’s here to give us an education about the menstrual cycle. Dr. Hazel Wallace describes how the cycle affects almost every aspect of the body, from heart health and sleep to metabolism. She also explains whether there’s scientific evidence behind “cycle syncing.”Whether or not you’ve had a menstrual cycle, you’ll learn a lot from this episode. If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinZOE.com/podcast, and get 10% off your personalized nutrition program.Timecodes:00:00 Introduction00:36 Quick fire questions03:49 What is the menstrual cycle?05:42 What is the luteal phase?06:54 When does the menstrual cycle begin?07:43 How regular are menstrual cycles - Do they change over time?08:29 What is actually happening during the menstrual cycle?09:41 What role does oestrogen have in hormonal changes?10:48 How does the menstrual cycle affect performance in athletes12:05 How does the menstrual cycle affect women?16:30 Are cravings real? Why do they happen?18:21 What is PMS and what do people experience?20:11 Is there much research behind PMS?21:40 What is PMDD?23:16 How do you identify PMDD?26:17 What is cycle syncing?27:43 What role does nutrition have in reducing symptoms during the cycle30:22 Can regular exercise improve symptoms?33:52 How is sleep impacted by the menstrual cycle?37:41 How does this impact our immune system?38:56 Why is there such little research into this area?41:13 How has the exclusion of women in research impacted us?44:14 Menstrual cycle tracking - what is it and how can you do it?46:31 How can tracking help?47:26 What diet can help symptoms?49:31 How does the menstrual cycle affect the microbiome?52:07 How can intermittent fasting affect the menstrual cycle?54:59 Summary58:00 Goodbyes58:11 OutroMentioned in today’s episode:The Effects of Menstrual Cycle Phase on Exercise Performance in Eumenorrheic Women https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32661839/Hazel’s book is available to buy hereFollow Hazel: https://twitter.com/ThefoodmedicFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Episode...
08/06/23·56m 36s

Conquer IBS: 3 steps to healthier digestion

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a lot more common than you might think. In fact, it affects 1 in 10 people globally. Yet there are still a lot of questions about why it occurs and how best to treat it. Could new research connecting gut health to mental health help us unravel its mysteries?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Dr. Will ask: What exactly is IBS, and how does it connect to our brains? Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Referenced in today’s episode:FODMAP Diet: What you need to know from Johns Hopkins MedicineLarge-scale genetic study reveals new clues for the shared origins of irritable bowel syndrome and mental health disorder from the University of CambridgeIrritable bowel syndrome: A chronic sequelae of acute gastroenteritis from GastroenterologyWilliam Olser: Biographical overview from the National Library Of Medicine  IBS: What you need to know from the National Center For Complementary and Integrative HealthIrritable bowel syndrome (IBS) overview from Johns Hopkins MedicineEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to explore? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.
01/06/23·21m 58s

Protein & exercise: The secrets of healthy aging?

As we age, our bodies undergo numerous changes, including a decline in muscle mass and cognitive function. For many of us, exercise and diet play crucial roles in maintaining our health and well-being. But how can the protein we eat affect our abilities to exercise and stay healthy as we age?It can be difficult to separate fact from fiction when it comes to the effects of protein. How much do we need? Is it better to eat protein before or after exercise? And what roles do protein and exercise play in brain function?In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by Prof. Ben Wall, an expert in nutritional physiology at the University of Exeter. Together, they unpack the latest scientific research on the connection between protein consumption and exercise.Prof. Ben Wall shares his insights into the optimal amount and timing of protein intake for building and maintaining muscle mass, as well as the potential impact of exercise on cognitive function and brain health into later life. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:12 Introduction28:21 Quick Fire Questions02:54 Do we need to eat proteins right after exercise?03:34 What is protein?04:45 Why should we care about exercise?05:36 How does exercise help with healthspan?07:41 What are the benefits of exercise?07:57 Does exercise improve brain function?11:23 Where do our muscles come into this conversation?12:09 What constitutes an unhealthy muscle?13:00 What's the difference between a healthy and unhealthy muscle?14:18 How does protein fit into the idea of healthy muscles?16:03 What about the concept of breaking muscle. Is it good for us?18:13 Do we need more protein to help build muscle?20:07 What is the anabolic window and Is it a myth?21:54 Is it fine to listen to our hunger pangs post exercise?23:01 How does protein impact menopause and bone health?25:04 Is there a maximum amount of protein our bodies can absorb?28:14 What is the right amount of protein to eat?30:02 What is an 'adaptive response' to exercise?31:17 How much higher RDA do we need if we are exercising?33:31 Are we already eating enough protein?35:51 Why does muscle mass change as we age?36:18 Do we put on weight when we age?36:59 How do our bodies respond to protein as we age?41:38 How to balance protein and exercise42:33 Where should we get our protein from?46:43 Plant vs animal based protein products51:26 Summary55:12 Goodbyes55:27 OutroMentioned in today’s episode: Ingested protein dose response of muscle and albumin protein synthesis after resistance exercise in young men: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19056590/Anabolic signaling deficits underlie amino acid resistance of wasting, aging muscle: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15596483/Food for our future: The nutritional science behind the sustainable fungal protein — mycoprotein: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10131050/Follow Ben on Twitter :<a...
25/05/23·56m 1s

The surprising health impact of eating too fast

We’ve probably all been reprimanded for eating too fast at the dinner table or suffered the dreaded “itis” from eating way too much food at a family gathering. Our society and the systems we’ve developed to feed it have ballooned to such a point that they easily override our natural bodily systems that tell us when we’ve had enough to eat. When nearly 50% of the United States population is projected to have obesity by 2030, can something as simple as changing the speed with which we eat really be an effective tool for weight loss and sustaining a healthy body?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask:  What is eating rate and does it have any impact on our health?Studies referenced in the episode:Does Eating Fast Make You Gain More Weight?Eating slowly increases the postprandial response of the anorexigenic gut hormones, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 Association between eating rate and obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis Eating too fast may lead to weight gain, heart disease Is eating too quickly bad for your health? How Important Is Eating Rate in the Physiological Response to Food Intake, Control of Body Weight, and Glycemia? A systematic review and meta-analysis examining the effect of eating rate on energy intake and hunger Effects of eating rate and eating topography on meal size and satiety The effect of eating rate on satiety in healthy and overweight people – A pilot study Association between Self-Reported Eating Rate, Energy Intake, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population Association between Self-Reported Eating Rate, Energy Intake, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Multi-Ethnic Asian PopulationControl of overweight and obesity in childhood through education in meal time habits. The ‘good manners for a healthy future’ programme*Eating slowly led to decreases in energy intake within meals in healthy womenDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like...
18/05/23·19m 25s

HRT for menopause: is it safe?

Menopause is a time of significant hormonal changes which can lead to a range of symptoms that can severely impact quality of life for many women. So, a drug that promises to reduce these symptoms is incredibly welcome, but it has been steeped in controversy.HRT (Hormone replacement therapy) has been widely debated, with conflicting information about its effectiveness, with some suggesting HRT is outright dangerous. In fact, a massive study twenty years ago linked it to an increased risk of breast cancer.  As a result, the numbers of women taking HRT plummeted. So should HRT be avoided at all costs? In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by the author of that very study and esteemed Professor JoAnn Manson, alongside Dr. Sarah Berry to explore the science behind HRT.Professor JoAnn Manson is a professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and one of the world's most experts on HRT and menopause having run multiple enormous studies to uncover the effects of hormone replacement therapy on women’s health.With the help of ZOE regular Dr. Sarah Berry, they delve into the science behind HRT, empowering listeners to make informed decisions about treatment for symptoms of the menopause.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 Introduction00:12 Jonathan's introduction01:33 Quick Fire Questions03:27 What is the menopause?04:10 What is the perimenopause?05:46 What is the state of the current conversation on the menopause?07:13 Should women seek help about the menopause?07:58 Why do some women have symptoms and others not?09:15 Yougov and ZOE study results on the menopause11:35 Why is the menopause getting more attention now?13:39 Should we be taking these symptoms seriously?17:10 What else can be done asides from HRT?18:49 Studies on the relationship between diet and menopause symptoms19:35 What can help alleviate symptoms?21:23 Are there any specific foods that can help improve symptoms?23:37 Are menopause specific supplements effective?24:50 How does HRT work?26:26 Is HRT just oestrogen?30:59 Does testosterone have a use for menopause?31:58 What is the controversy behind HRT?35:56 What's the latest advice and health risks?38:11 When should you stop hormone therapy?40:43 Do symptoms persist when you come off of hormone therapy?42:00 How long does HRT take to start working?43:07 How does HRT affect weight management?45:15 Summary48:04 Goodbyes48:25 OutroCheck the trials mentioned in today’s episode: MsFlash: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4731298/ZOE Menopause Study: https://joinzoe.com/learn/menopause-metabolism-studyPEPI Trial: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7807658/Follow Sarah: https://twitter.com/saraheeberryFollow ZOE on Instagram: <a...
11/05/23·48m 44s

Omega-3 supplements: why you're (probably) wasting your money

“Omega 3s,” - we’ve all seen the name Omega 3s advertised on labels from nuts to seeds and even eggs! But are these fats healthy for us, or is this just another food myth?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: Is fish oil and omega 3 intake essential or is this just another food myth?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:High-fat meals rich in EPA plus DHA compared with DHA only have differential effects on postprandial lipemia and plasma 8-isoprostane F2α concentrations relative to a control high–oleic acid meal: a randomized controlled trialIntake of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and risk of cardiovascular disease mortality: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studiesOmega-3 fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseaseThe 3 most Important Types of Omega-3 Fatty AcidsREDUCE-IT EPA trial shows association between higher EPA levels, reduced CV events Dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E after myocardial infarction: Results of the GISSI-Prevenzione trialOmega-3 Fatty Acids for the Management of Hypertriglyceridemia: A Science Advisory From the American Heart AssociationEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Email us at podcast@joinzoe.com and we’ll do our best to cover it.
04/05/23·19m 22s

How ultra-processed foods wreak havoc on your body

Ultra-processed foods have become ubiquitous in modern diets. Many of us eat them regularly without understanding their potential impacts on our health. From hidden additives to addictive properties, these highly processed foods can pose risks. Navigating the complex world of ultra-processing can be challenging, and many people struggle to understand what to avoid, how to break unhealthy habits, and make positive changes to their health.In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by a special guest, Dr. Chris van Tulleken, to explore the science behind ultra-processed food.Dr. Chris van Tulleken is an infectious diseases doctor at University College Hospital, in London, and one of the BBC’s leading science presenters. Chris shares the groundbreaking research from his own lived experiments, including the now famous study with his twin brother Xand. His book Ultra-Processed People is out now.Jonathan and Chris are joined by ZOE regular Tim Spector. Drawing from their combined expertise, our guests provide practical tips and advice, empowering listeners to make informed choices and take control of their diets.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:31 Introduction02:14 Quick Fire Questions05:25 Start of Chris's journey in nutrition06:47 Discordant twins - How can twin studies help us?08:51 What part do genetics play in our differences in health?12:52 What were the potential consequences of weight gain?15:20 What is ultra processed food (UPF)?16:54 What's the difference between processed and ultra processed food?18:52 Is ultra processing purely about profit?21:13 Examples of ultra processed foods (UPF)23:13 ZOE UPF survey - How much does the ZOE community eat?25:28 Are the products that say they're healthy lying to us?26:12 Are certain ingredients hidden by UPF?27:44 Is low fat yoghurt that good for us?30:39 Is UPF just junk food?32:56 Kevin Hall’s UPF study34:19 What makes UPF addictive?36:34 Chris' ultra processed food experiment39:12 Could food manufacturers make healthier UPF?41:23 How do we solve the issue of UPF as a society?45:26 Practical advice for cutting down on UPF51:37 Summary55:15 Goodbyes55:27 OutroFollow Chris on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DoctorChrisVTFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Episode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Get in touch and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
27/04/23·58m 18s

Why eating nuts makes you healthier, according to science

In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: If nuts are so full of fat, can they really be good for us?There is no shortage of variety when it comes to the mighty (yet humble) nut and the ways we consume them. Dried, chopped, made into butter or roasted (over an open fire, anyone?) these little guys provide the nutrients our brains and bodies need in surprisingly high quantities. From industrially farmed to indigenously hand-harvested, the story of these nuts is, well…nuts!In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: If nuts are so full of fat, can they really be good for us?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:Red-rumped agouti8 Health Benefits of NutsAre nuts good for you?Avoiding nuts and seeds for better gut health? You shouldn’tNuts and their Effect on Gut Microbiota, Gut Function and Symptoms in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled TrialsAre fatty nuts a weighty concern? A systematic review and meta-analysis and dose–response meta-regression of prospective cohorts and randomized controlled trials Why are scientists so intrigued by the food matrix?Pecans acutely increase plasma postprandial antioxidant capacity and catechins and decrease LDL oxidation in humans The surprising nutritional benefits of nutsWalnut consumption and health outcomes with public health relevance—a systematic review of cohort studies and randomized controlled trials published from 2017 to present If Almonds Bring You Joy, Enjoy More For Fewer Calories Are nuts bad for you? Why the calorie counts for almonds don’t add upEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? <a href="https://fascinateproductions.co.uk/contact/"...
20/04/23·15m 49s

Protein: are you getting enough?

Proteins, carbs, and fats …  most people understand what the last two are. Carbs are sugars, and fat is, well, fat. It's protein that’s so important to our diets, but so often misunderstood — by the general public, that is.Since the 1950s and 1960s, scientists have been measuring how protein affects our performance, how it supports and maintains the body’s structure, and how best to incorporate it into our diets. From big steaks to protein shakes, tofu to seitan, protein is more available now than ever before. With so many options, surely we’re getting enough protein? In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks with a leading nutritional researcher to find out.Christopher Gardner is a professor at Stanford University and a member of ZOE’s scientific advisory board. He’s pioneering the movement to redefine how we understand the quality of our protein intake.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide 03:02 - Quickfire questions04:19 - What is protein?08:07 - Can our bodies make the proteins we need?08:37 - The mechanism for our bodies creating amino acids.09:33 - What is an essential amino acid?10:45 - Crazy study Stanford scientists did to find the Estimated Average Requirement of protein.15:24 - How much protein should we consume?18:15  - How much protein do we already consume?23:02 - Can our bodies store protein?24:02 - What happens to excess protein in our bodies?24:51 - Protein Scam Alert!25:28 - Stanford Study: Does the type of protein we consume affect physical performance?28:15 - Protein requirements for kids and pregnant women.31:05 - What is Amino Acid Distribution?33:03 - Are plants missing certain amino acids?33:47 - How is AAD like the game of Scrabble?38:30 - What is the healthiest source of protein?38:41 - Dr. Gardner’s case for changing the way we define “protein quality” in the US41:33 - Jonathan’s summary43:59 - Goodbyes 44:42 - Outro  Episode transcripts are available here.Follow Chris: https://twitter.com/GardnerPhDStudies mentioned in this episode.Maximizing the intersection of human health and the health of the environment with regard to the amount and type of protein produced and consumed in the United StatesDiet for a Small Planet by Frances Moore LappéPerspective: The Public Health Case for Modernizing the Definition of Protein QualityFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Is there a nutrition topic you’d like us to cover? Get in touch, and we’ll do our best to cover it. 
13/04/23·46m 57s

Trans fats: how worried should you be?

Trans fats have a bad reputation. But we now know a lot more about these fats than we did when the first horror stories about them emerged. So, based on the latest science, just how worried should we be?Listen to today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition to find out. Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:Hydrogenation of Unsaturated Fats and Trans FatsEffects of dietary fatty acids and carbohydrates on the ratio of serum total to HDL cholesterol and on serum lipids and apolipoproteins: a meta-analysis of 60 controlled trials, published in The American Journal of Clinical NutritionAssociation of dietary, circulating, and supplement fatty acids with coronary risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis, published in Annals of Internal Medicine Potential of trans fats policies to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from coronary heart disease in England: cost effectiveness modelling study, published in British Medical JournalWHO calls for action to totally eliminate trans fat, ‘a toxic chemical that kills’Trans fatty acids - are the effects only marginal? - published in American Journal of Public HealthFats and oils in human nutritionA trans European Union difference in the decline in trans fatty acids in popular foods: a market basket investigation, published in British Medical JournalCountries with regulations against industrially produced trans fats tripled over the past yearEpisode transcripts are available here.Is there a topic you'd like us to cover on the show? Email us to let us know!
06/04/23·15m 22s

'Miracle' weight loss drug Ozempic is approved. But does it work?

A miracle weight loss drug that’s approved in the US and the UK and has few side effects?Ozempic is going viral on social media. Users are posting dramatic before and after pictures of their weight loss. An Ozempic trend is allegedly blossoming in Hollywood, and famous personalities like Elon Musk claim to have taken it. Many remain doubtful, dismissing the craze as just another internet scam preying on people’s insecurities. However, earlier this month - semaglutide - the drug’s active ingredient, was approved as a weight loss treatment by the UK’s National Health Service. Even the most sceptical are taking note.Jonathan speaks to Dr Robert Kushner the lead investigator of the huge phase 3 clinical trial that evaluated the safety and effectiveness of semaglutide. He is a founder of the American Board of Obesity Medicine and hailed the drug as a ‘game-changer’ in regards to the treatment of obesity.Please be aware: Dr. Kushner is also a consultant on the medical advisory board for Novo Nordisk - the company that manufactures semaglutide.Dr Robert Kushner is a Professor of Medicine at Northwestern University and a founder of the American Board of Obesity Medicine. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:03:17 – Quickfire questions04:20 – What is Ozempic, and how does it work?05:54 – Treating obesity like diabetes10:24 – The ‘gamechanger’ Semiglutide clinical trial14:19 – The role our ancestors play in our weight17:16 – Short-term weight loss vs long-term weight loss18:40 – Myths about obesity21:53 – Obesity, a modern problem23:56 – Other outcomes of the clinical trial26:59 – The side effects of Semiglutide31:45 – Risks of using Semiglutide without medical supervision33:05 – Is Semaglutide linked to cancer?36:59 – Can you take it If you’re not obese?39:15 – The long term commitment of Semiglutide42:49 – Will I put on weight if I stop taking it?46:01 – Is this the end of obesity49:30 – Summary52:28 – Outro Episode transcripts are available here.Dr. Robert Kushner’s book, Six Factors to Fit: Weight Loss that Works for You!, is available to buy hereFollow Dr. Robert Kushner here Studies mentioned: Once-Weekly Semaglutide in Adults with Overweight or Obesity Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/ Want to create your own podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life.
30/03/23·53m 2s

Nightshade vegetables: hazard or health food?

Nightshade vegetables — even the name is ominous. Some people believe they exacerbate arthritis and can cause inflammation. So, should we avoid them?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Will ask: What are nightshade vegetables, and how can they benefit our bodies?Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:Potato glycoalkaloids and adverse effects in humans: an ascending dose study Effect of red pepper on symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome: preliminary study Treatment of arthritis with topical capsaicin: a double-blind trial In defence of potatoes: How resistant starch from potatoes affects the gut microbiota Health benefits of eating tomatoes emerge Episode transcripts are available here.Want to create your own podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life.
23/03/23·15m 28s

Michael Mosley: 4 habits that changed his life

If you had to do just one thing to improve your health, what would it be?Our busy lives mean it can be difficult to keep up healthy habits, and with so much conflicting advice out there it’s tricky to separate fact from fiction. In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by medical doctor, journalist, and presenter Michael Mosley, who is alongside ZOE regular Tim Spector, to discuss Michael’s four key habits to improve our health. Michael’s latest book ‘Just One Thing’ explores these habits and has seen him speak to singing scientists and eccentric iceman to healthy habit experts and evangelists. And of course, being Michael, he tried every habit out himself. We talk about which methods are the most effective, which he has incorporated into his life, and how he makes his new habits stick.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 Introduction00:12 Topic introduction01:38 Quick Fire Questions03:24 Michael's simple changes to improve health04:26 Are cold showers good for you?05:54 How long do you need to be immersed in cold water for the benefits to work?06:40 Can cold showers improve mental wellbeing?10:25 Potential dangers of cold water swimming11:58 Do cultural differences present different outcomes across the world?13:08 Can these small stressors help us?13:28 What is the theory behind this working?15:21 Will this work for everyone or is this very personalized?17:45 What effects does breathing have on your health?18:57 How breathing exercises affect our brain21:23 How do you keep up the breathing exercises?22:36 ZOE app breathing exercise24:44 Is there a difference between breathing through your nose and your mouth?26:04 How important are plants and nature for our health?29:21 Can exposure to nature improve things like mental health and even gut health?31:01 Can herbs also help improve our health?31:27 What are the benefits of exercise?32:42 What are endocannabinoids?33:41 Are preferences for exercise genetic?35:12 Is it endorphins that make us feel good after / during exercise?36:31 How exercise affects us is extremely personalized38:42 How do we encourage people who don't enjoy exercise to do it?40:13 Tips to improve your exercise routines43:08 Are there benefits to walking downhill?45:42 Summary48:34 Goodbyes49:08 OutroEpisode transcripts are available hereMichael Mosley’s book is available to buy hereFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Have an idea for a podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life.
16/03/23·51m 24s

Everything you've heard about lactose is wrong

Lactose is usually only discussed in the context of intolerance. This intolerance can make us feel bloated, gassy and uncomfortable. But from cow’s milk to yoghurt and even breast milk, lactose is everywhere! So, can it really be that bad for us?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, we’re joined by Dr Will B. to find out. Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:Nature: How humans’ ability to digest milk evolved from famine and diseasePubMed Central (PMC)Effects of Prebiotic and Probiotic Supplementation on Lactase Deficiency and Lactose Intolerance: A Systematic Review of Controlled TrialsPubMed Central (PMC)Improving lactose digestion and symptoms of lactose intolerance with a novel galacto-oligosaccharide (RP-G28): a randomized, double-blind clinical trialPubMed Central (PMC)Impact of short-chain galactooligosaccharides on the gut microbiome of lactose-intolerant individualshttps://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/lactose-intolerance The Importance of Lactose in the Human Diet: Outcomes of a Mexican Consensus Meeting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6893676/ Episode transcripts are available here.Want to create your own podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life.
09/03/23·15m 12s

Best of gut health - anniversary edition

Gut health is a topic we talk about a lot at ZOE. The gut doesn’t just fight disease, it boosts our mood, processes energy and so much more. Today’s bonus episode journeys through everything we’ve learnt about gut health so far. And what a myth-busting journey it is!In this episode, Jonathan delves into the microbiome, highlighting the most useful tips from conversations with ZOE’s U.S. Medical Director and resident gut health expert, Will Bulsiewicz, and Tim Spector, one of top 100 most cited scientists and author Food for Life. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro01:27 - Is bacteria bad for us?04:10 - How is the microbiome affected by what we eat?10:00 - What happens to the gut when fasting?11:53 - Why bacteria eats the inside of our bodies13:59 - What causes heartburn?17:00 - What’s going on with gas and bloating?19:09 - Tell-tale signs of constipation22:42 - How to treat constipation25:52 - Other signs of an unhealthy gut27:20 - Why do doctors ask about your trips to the bathroom?29:37 - Tips for tackling an unhealthy gut31:40 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Will’s book is available to buy here.Tim’s book is available to buy here.Full length episodes mentioned:Signs of an unhealthy gutGut bacteria and fasting: meet the night crew - The Big IF DailiesGas and bloating: the causes and how to stop itYour gut is full of bugs: why this is great newsThe ultimate guide to constipationHeartburn: Why it happens and what you can doReferenced in today’s episode: A redefinition of constipation from King’s College LondonThe State Of The Nation’s Gut, a report from the U.K.-based Love Your Gut initiativeEpidemiology of constipation in Europe and Oceania: A systematic review published in BMC Gastroenterology Recent advances in understanding and managing chronic constipation published in F1000ResearchThe Bristol Stool ScaleZOE’s <a...
07/03/23·33m 10s

The future is here: AI and personalized healthcare with Eric Topol

If you were to ask Siri, Alexa, or ChatGPT for medical advice right now, that would be a terrible idea. But with recent developments in technology, this looks set to change. AI has become more intelligent, wearable devices - more accurate, and personalized medicine - increasingly mainstream.But is any of this safe? Should we really trust machines with our health? And will any of this actually happen?In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to Eric Topol to explore how artificial intelligence may transform your next trip to the doctor.Eric Topol is one of the top 10 most-cited researchers in medicine, the author of 3 bestselling books on the future of medicine, and a practising cardiologist.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide If Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction00:11 - Topic introduction01:53 - Quickfire questions04:17 - Doctor-patient relationship05:49 - Jonathan’s story with Eric 08:02 - How has medicine changed?13:54 - Is there an optimistic future for medicine, utilising AI?17:46 - How close are we to utilizing AI-based solutions in medicine?23:09 - Self-diagnosis and preventative care27:05 - Is prevention possible through AI?32:33 - Personalized healthcare41:51 - Summary43:45 - Goodbyes44:01 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Eric on Twitter: https://twitter.com/EricTopolFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Have an idea for a podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life.
02/03/23·45m 19s

Eggs: are they good for me?

Eggs are nutrient-dense and have a long shelf life. Compared with many other protein sources, they’re on the cheaper side. But they’re not as popular as they used to be. And a lot of this comes down to a debate about cholesterol.In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: What’s the truth about eggs?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Episode transcripts are available here.Want to create your own podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life. 
23/02/23·16m 30s

How to maximize health in your later years

Why do some people remain fit and healthy in their later years while others become increasingly frail?  Researchers from Kings College London have been following thousands of twins for 30 years in an effort to understand how each of us ages differently. And some of their findings will surprise you!In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to Claire Steves to better understand what all this means, shedding light on how aging works and what we can do about it:Dr. Claire Steves is a senior lecturer at King's College London, a medical doctor, and the clinical director at TwinsUKDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction00:10 - Topic introduction01:39 - Quickfire questions03:16 - Claire’s work during the pandemic05:17 - What happens in our bodies when we age?08:26 - Genes and aging09:33 - What factors affect aging?11:39 - Effects of physical activity12:23 - Microbiome effects on aging13:33 - Claire’s research19:11 - What evidence is there that we can slow the effects of aging?21:44 - What are some modifiable factors that can help reduce aging effects?23:06 - Alzheimer's and dementia28:21 - Stimulating your brain29:45 - The importance of social interaction for the brain31:02 - Diet. health and aging35:27 - Menopause37:30 - Actionable advice about maximizing health while aging39:14 - The biggest myth about aging42:20 - Summary43:41 - Goodbyes43:50 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available hereFind Claire’s publications hereThe UK’s largest adult twin registry - Twins UKFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Have an idea for a podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life.
16/02/23·44m 56s

The ultimate guide to constipation

The formal definition for constipation is ‘Having fewer than three bowel movements per week’. But, did you know that you can have a bowel movement every day and still be constipated? Recent data has shown that a quarter of people worldwide have at one point reported symptoms, suggesting that there is so much more to constipation than simply infrequent bowel movements.In today’s short-ish episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Will attempt to dispel some misconceptions about constipation and empower you to have better bowel movements.  Studies referenced in today’s episode: A redefinition of constipation by King’s College London, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology (2019) hereThe State Of The Nation’s Gut, Love Your Gut hereEpidemiology of constipation in Europe and Oceania: a systematic review from Prichard & Bharucha via BMC Gastroenterol hereRecent advances in understanding and managing chronic constipation from Peppas, Alexiou, Mourtzoukou & Falagas via F1000Research hereDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Follow Sarah on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theguthealthmd/ This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
09/02/23·20m 13s

How to eat well on a budget

The cost of living has soared. Energy prices have doubled, and food costs have gone up enormously. As a result, the weekly shopping bill can be shocking. For some, this is merely an inconvenience. But many others face the awful choice between heating their home and maintaining their usual diet. The consequence is that many of us are throwing cheaper ingredients into our shopping baskets to save money. So does this mean that eating healthy is an indulgence that be dropped in favour of cheap ultra-processed food? Or is it still possible to eat healthily on a budget?In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to Dr. Rupy Aujla and Tim Spector to better understand how to eat healthier while spending less:Dr. Rupy Aujla is a medical doctor who, since 2015, has been teaching people to cook their way to health. He’s the founder of The Doctor’s Kitchen and has recently turned his efforts to healthy cooking on a tight budget.Tim Spector is a co-founder of ZOE and one of the world's top 100 most cited scientists.Buy Rupy’s book here. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction00:10 - Topic introduction02:12 - Quickfire questions with Rupy03:33 - Quickfire questions with Tim04:22 - What’s one swap you can make today if you’re trying to eat well, for less?05:07 - What has Dr. Rupy been up to?06:58 - Do you need to give up eating healthy foods when economizing?08:23 - Options when you’re on a budget09:31 - Batch cooking16:00 - Is it expensive to have healthy and good quality foods?17:54 - Recipe adherence20:24 - Advice for people cooking on their own23:53 - How long does food last?25:24 - How nutritious are canned & frozen foods?28:23 - About protein38:31 - What’s the one food you should spend more money on?41:34 - Summary42:29 - Can you have a healthier diet as a consequence of being on a budget?43:23 - Goodbyes43:26 - OutroGet Tim’s book here.Episode transcripts are available here.Find delicious recipes to cook here.Follow Rupy on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/doctors_kitchen Follow Tim on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tim.spectorFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Want to create your own podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life. 
02/02/23·44m 37s

Signs of an unhealthy gut

Our gut helps fight disease. It processes energy for us and boosts our mood. So, having a healthy gut is extremely important – but there’s still a lot we don’t know. Gut biome tests are a new, exciting technology, but are they the be-all and end-all for dietary decision-making? And are there simpler ways — and tastier ways, perhaps — to tell what’s happening inside our bodies?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Dr. Will ask: What are the signs of an unhealthy gut? And how can we improve our gut health?Referenced in today’s episode: The Bristol Stool Scale. https://www.bladderandbowel.org/bowel/bowel-resources/bristol-stool-form-scale/ ZOE’s Blue Poop Challenge: https://www.joinzoe.com/bluepoopBlue poo: Impact of gut transit time on the gut microbiome using a novel marker published in Gut https://gut.bmj.com/content/70/9/1665Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
26/01/23·20m 55s

How to improve blood sugar control with exercise

Blood sugar is one of the rare nutrition topics where everyone agrees: We should avoid big peaks and dips and aim for a steady curve. Spikes cause inflammation, accelerate aging, and lead to type 2 diabetes. Crashes make us feel moody and tired, and crave foods we don’t need. We can control our blood sugar through what and how we eat. But something else affects our blood sugar — physical activity. Exercise has a profound effect on your blood sugar response. Together with your food choices, being physically active helps you keep your blood sugar level even.In this episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan speaks with Javier Gonzalez and Sarah Berry to find out how exercise affects our blood sugar response — even when we’re fasting — and how much exercise we need to do to benefit.Javier Gonzalez is an associate professor of human physiology at the University of Bath whose research focuses on the interaction between diet and exercise.Sarah Berry is one of the world's leading experts on human nutrition. She has personally run over 20 randomized clinical trials looking at how humans respond to different fats.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction00:12 - Topic introduction01:39 - Quickfire questions02:55 - Is a 30-minute walk as good as 30-minute cardio?03:39 - What is blood sugar and why should we care about it?05:10 - Blood sugar control throughout the day07:43 - Why is it important to know about blood sugar?09:01 - Blood sugar control12:25 - How exercise affects blood sugar14:17 - The power of fidgeting16:12 - Effects of higher intensity exercise17:00 - Lower intensity exercise vs higher intensity exercise18:41 - Intermittent fasting and blood sugar24:43 - Personalization26:35 - What types of exercises can you do to control blood sugar?29:12 - Cardio vs resistance training34:21 - Blood fats & exercise42:15 - 3 tips on leveraging exercise to control blood sugar and blood fats43:14 - Summary44:25 - Goodbyes44:37 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Javier on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gonzalez_jtFollow Sarah on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drsarahberry/ Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Have an idea for a podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life.
19/01/23·45m 56s

Foods to lower your cholesterol

More than half of us have high cholesterol — and new research suggests that having even slightly raised levels in our 30s could significantly increase our chances of developing heart disease. Medication is a common fix, but it comes with side effects. So, today we’re looking at how much changing our diets can help. In this short (ish) episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: Can we lower our cholesterol by changing our diets? Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:‘Association between Carbohydrate Intake and Serum Lipids’ from the Journal of the American Nutrition Association here‘The Mediterranean Diet And Cardioprotection: Historical Overview And Current Research from the Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare here‘Direct comparison of dietary portfolio vs statin on C-reactive protein’ from the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
12/01/23·19m 41s

Should we be worried about strep A?

This year, cases of an invasive bacterial infection are rising earlier than usual in the US, the UK and other countries across Europe. The group A Streptococcus bacteria - commonly known as Strep A - usually only causes mild illness. However, things have become severe in some cases, with several children dying in recent weeks.So, should we be worried? And what symptoms should we look out for to help us identify this illness in ourselves and our families?In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by world-leading expert on the subject: Shiranee Sriskandan is a professor of Infectious Diseases at Imperial College London whose scientific research focuses specifically on Strep A bacteria. Regular guest and ZOE co-founder Tim Spector also joins, and as one of the world’s top 100 most cited scientists, Tim has been closely following infectious diseases in the community through the ZOE Health Study. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00   Introduction00:10   Topic Introduction01:40 Quickfire Questions03:15 What is Strep?04:04 How common is Strep?05:02 Seasonality of Strep and symptoms in different climates05:30 What makes this year different?06:31 Can Strep make other illnesses worse?07:07 We've already seen signs of Strep rising over time, is this due to lockdown?09:36 How worried should we be about Strep infections?10:10 Group A Strep will often get better on its own11:07 The risk of rarer invasive infections is greater as the pool of cases increases11:59 Immune response to Strep A can increase chances of Rheumatic Fever13:35 What is Rheumatic Fever?14:59 What are the symptoms of Strep A16:53 How to treat Strep Throat18:12 What is the relationship between Strep A and Scarlet Fever18:53 Who gets Scarlet Fever and what are the symptoms?19:34 What are the distinguishing features between covid and other sore throats20:53 Do children get more fevers if they are younger?22:54 What to do if you think your child has strep throat24:01 Can you get rapid tests for Strep A?24:25 Why has Strep throat been seemingly more prominent in the US than the UK25:41 Different health services around the world and their respective responses to Strep27:36 Should we be testing and treating?30:15 What role does differing attitudes to healthcare play in this?32:02 Should we be cautious about using antibiotics for Strep A?33:51 What potential problems are there around antibiotics?36:00 Would a vaccine be the answer to stopping Strep in its tracks?38:41 Tim's top tips to boost your immunity this winter41:06 SummaryEpisode transcripts are available hereRead about Tim Spector’s ZOE Health Study hereFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Have an idea for a podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life. 
05/01/23·45m 40s

How to make New Year’s resolutions stick

Welcome to 2023! Whether you partied last night or went to bed early, we’re all in the same boat: a new year means thinking about new year’s resolutions. This tradition dates back 4000 years, so it’s certainly stood the test of time. But are new year’s resolutions a good idea? Or simply a get way to set yourself up to fail? Perhaps science has something to say about this.In this episode, Jonathan speaks with Tara Swart and Sarah Berry, who share techniques that will give you the best chance of sticking to your New Year’s resolutions. They also discuss whether these promises are a good idea in the first place. Tara Swart is a medical doctor, a neuroscientist, and the author of The Source: Open Your Mind, Change Your Life. She also has her own podcast, called Reinvent Yourself.Sarah Berry is one of the world's leading experts on human nutrition. She has personally run more than 20 randomized clinical trials looking at how humans respond to different fats.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction00:10 - Topic introduction01:54 - Quickfire questions02:32 - Making good choices for the New Year without it being hard work04:28 - Why do we do New Year resolutions and is it a good idea?07:07 - How to achieve New Year’s resolution goals?09:18 - Scientific evidence about how to achieve goals09:53 - What is neuroplasticity16:02 - 4-step process to change your brain18:36 - How to approach weight loss resolutions23:07 - Avoiding dieting as a New Year’s resolution25:49 - The science of habits33:07 - Tips & actionable advice40:02 - Quitting alcohol43:26 - Summary44:00 - Goodbyes44:11 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Get Tara’s book here.Follow Tara on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drtaraswartFollow Sarah on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drsarahberry/ Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Have an idea for a podcast? Contact Fascinate Productions to bring it to life. 
01/01/23·45m 36s

The health benefits of eating together

You might think what you eat and when are the only factors that play into the health of your diet. But recent research has shown that who you eat with can also play a role. And it could even make your food taste better!In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: Can eating with other people really improve your food? Studies referenced in today’s episode: Associations of family feeding and mealtime practices with children's overall diet quality, published in Appetite here‘Diet and Health Benefits Associated with In-Home Eating and Sharing Meals at Home’ from International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health here‘The Protective Role of Family Meals for Youth Obesity: 10-year Longitudinal Associations’ from the U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services hereDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Follow Sarah on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drsarahberry/ This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
29/12/22·12m 54s

Tim Spector’s journey from health crisis to healthy eating - a chapter from Food for Life

What should I have for dinner? A question you no doubt ask yourself daily. But I bet you don't spend too long coming up with an answer. ZOE's scientific co-founder, Tim Spector, has been trying to answer this question for a decade.If you're a regular listener, you probably know him well. Five years ago, he published the best-selling book, The Diet Myth, and just last month, he released the follow-up, Food for Life, the New Science of Eating Well. In this episode, you'll hear a chapter from the book titled “So Now What Should I Have for Dinner?”Tim Spector is a co-founder of ZOE and one of the world's top 100 most-cited scientists.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Get Tim’s book here.Timecodes:00:00 - Intro01:44 - Chapter 11. So now what should I have for dinner? 14:00 - Personalizing my diet26:15 - Five final tips27:00 - Outro--Follow Tim on Instagram: www.instagram.com/tim.spectorEpisode transcripts are available here.This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
22/12/22·28m 6s

Should you worry about gluten?

The last decade saw a rise in gluten-free diets. But the number of us with diagnosed gluten intolerance each year hasn’t changed. Eliminating gluten is the only treatment for those with celiac disease, but the rest of us could be doing more harm than good by embracing ultra-processed, gluten-free foods. In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Will ask: Should you be worried about gluten?Studies referenced in the episode: ‘Health Benefits and Adverse Effects of a Gluten-Free Diet in Non–Celiac Disease Patients’ from Gastroenterol & Hepatology here‘The Gluten-Free Diet: Recognizing Fact, Fiction, and Fad’ from The Journal of Pediatrics here’Is There Evidence to Support the Claim that a Gluten-Free Diet Should Be Used for Weight Loss?’ from the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics hereFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
15/12/22·13m 54s

The secrets of good sleep

We all know how good it feels to drift into deep sleep and wake up feeling refreshed. The positive effects of a good night’s sleep affect every aspect of our lives. We feel energetic, focused, and ready to take on the day’s challenges.  But the long-term effects of bad sleep are less known. It turns out, they have a huge impact on our health and even how long we live.  In this episode, Jonathan speaks with Prof. Matthew Walker to learn what the latest science says about improving our sleep — to give us more energy and better health. They also discuss whether how we sleep changes how our bodies respond to food.Matthew Walker is a sleep expert, a professor of neuroscience at UC Berkeley, and founder of the Center for Human Sleep Science. He’s also the author of Why We Sleep. Matt and his team are currently working with ZOE scientists to research the links between sleep, nutrition, and health.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:33 - Episode start01:22 - Quickfire questions02:48 - What’s the biggest myth about sleep»04:09 - What is sleep?07:46 - Why do we sleep?10:29 - REM14:22 - How does Matt study sleep?16:18 - What happens when you don’t get enough sleep?22:48 - Collaboration with ZOE28:16 - Sleep and menopause32:38 - Tips on how to sleep better33:23 - Sleep regularity35:12 - How do you find out about your chronotype?37:20 - Bedroom temperature38:04 - Lighting39:04 - Caffeine and Alcohol effects on sleep44:22 - Making your room like a cave44:57 - The influence of screens on your sleep47:03 - Summary48:14 - Goodbyes48:35 - OutroGet Matt’s book here.Listen to Matt’s podcast here.'How people wake up is associated with previous night’s sleep together with physical activity and food intake' - Read the paper: here.Find out your chronotype here.Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
08/12/22·50m 55s

Heartburn: why it happens and what you can do

The acid in your stomach is so powerful it can dissolve metal. Luckily, your stomach is fine-tuned to deal with its acidic fluid, but the rest of your body isn’t quite as hardy. So, if acid escapes from your stomach and reaches your esophagus, it can cause a painful sensation in the chest — this is heartburn. It isn’t rare, with more than 1 billion people suffering from it globally. In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Will ask: Why do we get heartburn, and what’s the best way to deal with it?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:‘Prevalence and clinical spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota’ from Gastroenterology here‘Proton-pump inhibitors and risk of fractures: an update meta-analysis’ from Osteoporos Int. here‘Proton pump inhibitors alter the composition of the gut microbiota’ from BMJ  hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
01/12/22·13m 4s

The truth about vitamin supplements

Good information about vitamins is hard to find. With over 70% of Americans and 40% of Brits using them, it's a hugely lucrative market, which means numerous voices in the media and online pusing a pro-vitamin agenda. All without the scientific evidence to support their claims. So do we need vitamins to lead a healthy life? Or could these supplements actually cause serious health complications?In this episode, Jonathan speaks with Prof. JoAnn Manson and Dr. Sarah Berry to better understand how vitamin supplements affect our health.JoAnn Manson is a professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and one of the world's most cited researchers. She’s run multiple enormous studies with over 20,000 participants to uncover the real effects of vitamin supplementation on our health.Dr. Sarah Berry is one of the world's leading experts on human nutrition, who has personally run over 20 randomized clinical trials looking at how humans respond to different fats.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction02:29 - Quickfire questions04:27 - Why are people confused about supplements?05:17 - Which supplement does the majority of the population benefit from taking and why?05:51 - What are dietary supplements and vitamins?09:33 - Why is there so much advertising suggesting supplements?10:54 - JoAnn’s research14:07 - About vitamin C15:15 - Megadosing19:51 - VITAL and COSMOS trials25:13 - Should we take vitamin D27:37 - Omega-332:48 - Variation & personalization36:51 - Actionable advice on supplements38:45 - Should children take supplements?42:13 - Should we all take a standard dose multivitamin?44:54 - Summary46:25 - Goodbyes46:57 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Check the trials mentioned in today’s episode: AREDS 2, COSMOS, Physicians' Health Study II, VITALFollow Sarah: https://twitter.com/saraheeberryFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
24/11/22·48m 1s

Menopause: Does diet play a part?

It's a condition that affects half the population, but there are countless unanswered questions about menopause. The symptoms vary significantly from person to person, including sleep problems, hot flashes, weight gain, and an increased risk of heart disease. In one of the largest studies to date, ZOE researchers have uncovered a link between menopause and our diets — and this could hold the key to reducing the severity of menopause symptoms. In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: what role does diet play during menopause? Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Follow Sarah on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drsarahberry/ Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode: ‘Why we are all being let down by the lack of research into menopause’ from Mosaic here‘Menopause’ from the Nature Reviews Disease Primers here‘What is Menopause?’ from the National Institute of Aging hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
17/11/22·14m 23s

How your gut affects your mental health

In a lab in Ireland, a group of scientists stand around a stainless steel table. One of them is holding a device, not unlike a small turkey baster. His free hand plunges into a box on the table and retrieves a mouse.  Using his device, he administers the brown solution within…rectally. This unfortunate soul has just received a fecal microbiota transplant. The donor was not another mouse but a human being. And the person in question had symptoms of severe depression. Jonathan speaks to John Cryan, author of the study that showed a relationship between gut and brain. In this episode, we learn more about his fascinating research, how microbes may affect our brain, and to eat to appease your gut bugs. John Cryan is a professor at University College Cork and a world-leading researcher into the relationship between our brain and our gut microbiome.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Introduction02:05 - Quickfire questions03:26 - Are there links between the gut and the brain?06:31 - The gut-brain axis09:17 - How do gut bacteria affect our brains?11:12 - Why does John call the microbiome “the chamber of secrets”?14:20 - Does the microbiome explain drug side effects?15:51 - Are there links between our microbiomes and mental health?20:40 - If we improve our microbiome health can we improve our mental health?24:58 - Can food help improve the microbiome and thus improve mental health?28:33 - Microbiome’s effect on behavior29:54 - Actionable advice34:43 - Microbiome in adolescence37:18 - Summary38:26 - Goodbyes38:48 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow John: https://twitter.com/jfcryanFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
10/11/22·40m 3s

Cooking oils: what to use and when

We use it to fry, roast, or dress a salad. Cooking oil is a kitchen staple. But it's hard to know which is healthiest for each scenario.In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: what cooking oils should you use and when? Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:‘Heated vegetable oils and cardiovascular disease risk factors’ from Vascular Pharmacology here‘Does cooking with vegetable oils increase the risk of chronic diseases?: a systematic review’ from British Journal of Nutrition here‘Culinary oils and their health effects’ from British Nutrition Foundation  hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
03/11/22·13m 49s

Will fermented foods improve my gut health?

Fermentation is a hot craze in fancy restaurants around the world. And fermented foods, like kombucha and kimchi, are even sold in corner stores. Listeners of this show will have heard that fermented foods might benefit our gut health. But these foods make us uneasy. The idea of letting food rot, then eating it goes against everything our parents taught us. So, is fermentation scary and dangerous? This episode will show you why it's not only safe but beneficial to eat fermented foods, and that fermenting foods is something you can try at home. Jonathan speaks to Tim Spector and Sandor Katz — whom the food magazine CHOW calls a provocateur, trendsetter, and rabble-rouser — to better understand the fabulous world of fermentation. Sandor Katz is a food activist who is widely credited with reintroducing fermentation to the US and the UK, calling himself a fermentation revivalist.Tim Spector is a co-founder at ZOE and one of the top 100 most cited scientists in the world.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:13 - Topic introduction02:21 - Quickfire questions04:10 - Isn’t fermentation niche?05:05 - What is fermentation?07:36 - Why did our ancestors ferment their food?08:54 - How is fermentation preserving food?12:45 - What are the impacts on our health of eating fermented foods?16:27 - How to make kimchi19:00 - What is kefir?20:25 - Why are fermented foods good for our health24:19 - Why don’t we have to worry about bacteria in fermented foods?29:36 - What are the best fermented foods to get started with?34:16 - Can you purchase fermented foods at stores?39:26 - 5 tips for people interested in trying fermented foods42:42 - Summary44:17 - Listener’s question: What’s the most unusual food that you’ve fermented?45:16 - Goodbyes45:24 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Sandor: https://www.instagram.com/sandorkraut/Learn Sandor’s sauerkraut recipe here.Get Sandor’s book here.Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
27/10/22·46m 31s

How fasting affects energy and mood - The Big IF Dailies

Have you ever lost your temper because you were hungry? Feeling short-tempered when you’re overdue a bite to eat is an almost universal experience, with its own adjective - ‘hangry’. If missing just one meal turns you into a grump, you may think that fasting would turn you into the Incredible Hulk. However, new data suggests this might not be the case. In this daily episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Dr Sarah Berry joins Jonathan to answer the question: how does fasting affect your energy and mood?This episode is part of a limited series to celebrate the launch of The Big IF Study: The world’s largest clinical study to discover how intermittent fasting affects our mood, energy and hunger levels. Want to know if intermittent fasting can work for you? Take part for FREE: joinzoe.com/thebigifDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
26/10/22·6m 12s

3 meals a day VS little and often - The Big IF Dailies

Can you make it from lunch to dinner without a snack? Tradition tells us that three meals a day is the right way to eat, but times have changed, and many of us now choose to eat little and often. The debate continues as to which is better. Today, we discuss new data that could settle this once and for all.In this daily episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Dr Sarah Berry to answer the question: should we eat little and often or 3 meals a day?This episode is part of a limited series to celebrate the launch of The Big IF Study: The world’s biggest clinical study to discover how intermittent fasting affects our mood, energy and hunger levels.  Want to know if intermittent fasting can work for you? Take part in the Big IF Study for FREE: joinzoe.com/thebigifDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
25/10/22·6m 31s

Gut bacteria & fasting: meet the night crew - The Big IF Dailies

Nowadays, food can be delivered to your door with just a few swipes of your smartphone. The result? Many of us eat more frequently, at any time of the day. And this may have some downsides. New research shows that for our gut bacteria to perform their helpful activities, we may have to embrace the dietary patterns of our ancestors. In today’s daily episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Tim Spector to answer the question: How do gut bacteria repair your gut while fasting?This episode is part of a limited series to celebrate the launch of The Big IF study: The world’s biggest clinical study to discover how intermittent fasting affects our mood, energy and hunger.  Want to know if intermittent fasting can work for you? TAKE PART for FREE: joinzoe.com/thebigifDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
24/10/22·6m 16s

Does calorie counting work? - The Big IF Dailies

Food package labels can be complex. With so much information, many of us set a beeline for the calorie number, but there’s more going on in food than just the amount of energy. How much value is there in counting calories, and should you continue? The latest science could make you reconsider. In today’s daily episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Dr Sarah Berry to answer the question: Does calorie counting work?This episode is part of a limited series to celebrate the launch of The Big IF study: The world’s biggest clinical study to discover how intermittent fasting affects our mood, energy and hunger.  Want to know if intermittent fasting can work for you?  TAKE PART for FREE: joinzoe.com/thebigif This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
23/10/22·8m 14s

Should you avoid late-night snacks? - The Big IF Dailies

We’ve all been there at least once, hovering by the fridge and looking for something to graze on just before bed. What you eat after dark can disrupt your sleep and digestion. Yet new evidence suggests that when we snack is less important than what we snack on, so suddenly that midnight snack may not be a guilty pleasure after all.  In today’s daily episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Dr Sarah Berry to answer the question: should you avoid late-night snacks?This episode is part of a limited series to celebrate the launch of The Big IF Study: The world’s biggest clinical study to discover how intermittent fasting affects our mood, energy and hunger.  Want to know if intermittent fasting can work for you? TAKE PART for FREE: joinzoe.com/thebigifDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
22/10/22·6m 13s

What breaks a fast? - The Big IF Dailies

Fasting has been shown to improve our metabolism, slow disease and potentially increase our life span. While world religions have practiced fasting for millennia, the trend of fasting has soared in popularity in the last decade. Not all fasts are made equally and there are a lot of different rules to follow. Some purists argue that you’re only allowed water while fasting others believe there can be more flexibility during your period of abstinence. In today’s daily episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan is joined by Tim Spector to answer the question: what breaks a fast? This episode is part of a limited series to celebrate the launch of The Big IF Study: The world’s biggest clinical study to discover how intermittent fasting affects our mood, energy and hunger levels.  Want to know if intermittent fasting can work for you? Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide TAKE PART for FREE: joinzoe.com/thebigifThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
21/10/22·7m 6s

5 foods I got wrong - Tim Spector

Where were you in 2015? President Obama was in the White House, The UK was a member of the European Union, and you couldn’t escape Bruno Mars's global smash: Uptown Funk. More importantly, 2015 marked the release of Tim Spector’s first book: The Diet Myth.If you think the world has felt different since 2015, wait until you hear about the advances in nutritional science. Since then, Tim has had a chance to rethink his position on dietary staples like bread, milk, ultra-processed foods and more. He’s put everything he’s learnt into his new book Food for Life: The New Science of Eating Well. In this episode, Tim speaks with Jonathan about what he got right, where he went wrong, and what the future holds for the world of nutrition. Tim Spector is a co-founder at ZOE and one of the world's top 100 most cited scientists.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:10 - Topic introduction02:33 - Quickfire questions03:19 - Has Tim changed his opinion on anything while writing his new book?03:55 - Tim’s new book: Food for Life05:41 - Today’s topic: 5 foods Tim got wrong06:55 - #1: Bread10:16 - What has Tim’s opinion changed about bread?12:23 - #2: Personalization15:15 - How has Tim’s breakfast changed?22:05 - #3: Milk25:04 - Skim milk vs whole milk27:48 - What kind of milk does Tim have?29:43 - #4: Mushrooms32:37 - #5: Ultra-processed foods40:30 - Summary42:17 - Will Tim write another book?42:49 - Goodbyes42:53 - OutroPre-order Tim’s book here.Episode transcripts are available here.Check the trial mentioned in today’s episode here. This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
20/10/22·44m 23s

What does science say about intermittent fasting?

It seems like every day, someone new mentions intermittent fasting. But what is it, exactly? There are myriad options — from the 5:2 diet, with two days of extreme calorie restriction each week, to the warrior diet, which involves eating only raw fruit during the day and a mammoth feast at night. Whatever the approach, intermittent fasting involves restricting the window of time when you eat.Supporters evangelise the benefits, promising weight loss, disease prevention, and even life extension. Currently, the scientific evidence is unclear, but it's an exciting area that may be full of potential. Today, Jonathan speaks with Gin Stephens, who has had a powerful experience of intermittent fasting transforming her health and weight. He also talks to Tim Spector, who will share what science can tell us about intermittent fasting today —  and, interestingly, how much it can’t, yet. Plus, an exciting announcement about how this is set to change.Gin Stephens is a New York Times bestselling author and podcast host.Tim Spector is a co-founder of ZOE and one of the world's top 100 most cited scientists.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:15 - Topic introduction02:44 - Quickfire questions04:38 - ZOE’s intermittent fasting study08:42 - What is intermittent fasting and how it impacted Gin’s life11:50 - Demystifying intermittent fasting14:19 - The science of intermittent fasting23:29 - Starting intermittent fasting25:29 - What am I allowed to have during intermittent fasting?30:07 - The first 28 days of “clean” intermittent fasting32:51 - Intermittent fasting and the microbiome37:00 - Correlation with circadian rhythms38:56 - How important is consistency when time-restricted eating?41:14 - On intermittent fasting & women’s health43:24 - Summary44:35 - Goodbyes44:56 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Join us for the World’s Biggest Intermittent Fasting study at joinzoe.com/fastingFollow Gin: https://www.instagram.com/ginstephensGet Gin’s books here.Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
13/10/22·46m 33s

Fiber: Why it’s important and how to get more of it

Diets rich in fiber are associated with good heart health and metabolic wellbeing. This type of diet can do wonders for our gut microbiome. With so many benefits, relatively low cost, and high availability, fiber should be a staple nutrient in our diets — but most of us have a deficiency. In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Will ask: If fiber is so good for us, why are we not eating enough of it?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/ If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get10% off your personalized nutrition program. Studies referenced in the episode:Read ‘Carbohydrate quality and human health: a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses’ from The Lancet hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
06/10/22·14m 10s

Heart health and aging: Do our blood vessels hold the secret to long life?

60,000 miles long. That’s the length of the tube system inside us that transports blood, oxygen, and nutrients to the cells in our body. If these tubes fail, the result can be fatal. In some cases, it’s a heart attack. In others, it’s a stroke, where the blood supply to the brain is disrupted, and brain cells are damaged or killed. Heart attacks and strokes are a major cause of death in developed countries - but we can take action to reduce the risks. In this episode, Jonathan speaks to a world-renowned physician, scientist, and speaker to gain insights into how looking after this magical pipework could slow down aging. Dr. William Li is a world-leading specialist in blood vessels and preventative health and the author of countless papers on the topic, who possesses the gift for communicating this complex subject in terms we can all understand.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:09 - Topic introduction01:34 - Quickfire questions04:17- Why do blood vessels matter?05:28 - How do blood vessels link to heart health?09:15 - Elasticity of blood vessels13:51 - Can we reverse the stiffening and blockage of blood vessels?19:58 - Does food damage the blood vessels?24:40 - Does high blood pressure affect blood vessels?29:36 - How do aging and diet affect blood vessels?34:16 - Data on reversing blood vessel damage39:00 - How is aging linked to blood vessel health?41:53 - Summary43:05 - Goodbyes43:21 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow William: https://twitter.com/drwilliamliGet William’s book here.Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
29/09/22·44m 21s

Gas & Bloating: the causes & how to stop it

Most of us are familiar with the unpleasant feeling of being bloated. It can happen after eating specific foods or when you experience slower bowel movements. Sometimes, it can be a symptom of an underlying health condition. To take a closer look at issues related to gas and bloating, we’ve invited a special guest this week: superstar gastroenterologist and Zoe’s US Medical Director Will Bulsiewicz.In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Will ask: what are the main causes of gas bloating and how do we stop it?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/ Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:Burden of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in the United States: Results of a Nationally Representative Survey of Over 71,000 Americans + Am J Gastroenterol + here Abdominal bloating is the most bothersome symptom in irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C): a large population-based Internet survey in Japan + Biopsychosoc Med. + here Sensation of bloating and visible abdominal distension in patients with irritable bowel syndrome + Am J Gastroenterol + here  This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
22/09/22·13m 12s

How your food choices affect the planet

Our planet is overheating. Human society is creating too much carbon dioxide, stopping the sun’s warmth from escaping back into space. As earth gets hotter, its ice caps are melting, causing sea levels to rise, and submerging entire communities. Floods, droughts, and wildfires are already becoming much more common.Some effects of climate change are now irreversible, but there is still hope, and adjusting what we eat might play a bigger part than you’d imagine.In this episode, Jonathan speaks with a pioneer in science who will help you understand how your eating habits affect the planet, so you can make informed decisions about the foods you eat and how you prepare them.Sarah Bridle is a professor of food climate and society at the University of York in the United Kingdom. She is on the vanguard of a new field, and her research carefully measures the exact effects of the foods we eat on climate change. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:10 - Topic introduction01:34 - Quickfire questions03:14 - Why does climate change matter?05:40 - Why does food matter for reducing climate change?07:44 - Understanding how different foods affect the climate11:32 - Do I have to go vegan to help stop climate change?13:14 - Are all meats equal in terms of their climate impact?16:20 - How do by-products of animals impact climate?17:22 - Carbon footprint of milk alternatives19:51 - Is a baked potato good for the planet?21:42 - Other things that impact climate change to consider23:33 - Food miles vs air miles?26:48 - Are avocados killing the planet?28:05 - Avocados’ water consumption28:44 - Packaging34:34 - Food waste35:20 - Can a sustainable diet be affordable?36:39 - 3 things to do to reduce your impact on climate change38:58 - Summary40:22 - Goodbyes40:49 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Sarah: https://twitter.com/sarahbridleGet Sarah’s book here.Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
15/09/22·42m 3s

High cholesterol foods: what really happens when you eat them?

Cholesterol in our food has a bad reputation. Many of us think of it as something to try to cut it out of our diet completely.  Yet new research could redeem eggs and other cholesterol-rich foods. In today’s short episode of ZOE Science and Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: what happens when you eat high cholesterol foods? Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:Hyperlipidemia as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease + Prim Care. + hereDietary cholesterol provided by eggs and plasma lipoproteins in healthy populations + Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care + hereThe Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Reverse Cholesterol Transport: A Review + Nutrients + hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
08/09/22·13m 43s

How to make your body clock work for you

In today’s world, we increasingly live our lives late into the night. Whether it's work obligations, socializing, or being glued to a screen, we ignore the sun's rise and fall. But most of us are unaware that a clock is ticking away inside us. It uses light to keep time and tells us when to sleep and eat. Should we listen? Or is this biological clock simply a relic from a past time?In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to a leading authority to unravel the latest science that reveals that this body clock, or circadian rhythm, has a dramatic impact on our health, weight, and mental wellbeing:Russell Foster is an Oxford University scientist who has dedicated his life to studying circadian rhythms. He’s a world leader in the field and the author of Lifetime: the new science of the body clock. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:12 - Topic introduction01:23 - Quickfire questions02:30 - What is the biggest myth about our body clock that drives Russell crazy?03:19 - What are circadian rhythms?06:41 - Why do they matter to us?10:32 - How does your body sync its clock?14:07 - How does the circadian rhythm influence sleep?15:18 - What happens if we don’t live alongside our circadian rhythms?21:26 - What should night workers do?26:45 - Does your circadian rhythm change when going through menopause?29:42 -Is there a circadian rhythm for our gut?33:12 - Will it damage our long-term health to continuously be awake by our small children?35:15 - Summary36:14 - Goodbyes36:36 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Get Russell’s book here.Follow Russell: https://twitter.com/oxscniFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
01/09/22·37m 38s

Artificial sweeteners - worse than sugar?

Artificial sweeteners are everywhere. Not only in diet soft drinks but in many foods that you wouldn’t expect. You’ve probably eaten some today without realising.Sweeteners have been around for over a hundred years yet remain the subject of much debate. It's hard to know how they stack up next to the alternatives.In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: are artificial sweeteners worse than sugar?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in the episode:Stevia Leaf to Stevia Sweetener: Exploring Its Science, Benefits, and Future Potential from The Journal of Nutrition hereChronic Intake of Commercial Sweeteners Induces Changes in Feeding Behavior and Signaling Pathways Related to the Control of Appetite in BALB/c Mice from Biomed Res Int  hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
25/08/22·13m 59s

Can spices improve your health?

Kanchan Koya grew up in a house filled with wonderful fragrances from the spices simmering on her grandmother’s stove. In India, it was a common belief that spices were more than just pleasant tastes. Ancient wisdom said they had medicinal properties, and it was common for household medicine cabinets to store dried spices, not pills.Kanchan grew up to become a molecular biologist, studying in the US at Harvard Medical School. When her lab began to investigate turmeric’s healing properties, the ancient wisdom from her childhood met the scientific inquiry of her adult life - beginning a lifelong obsession with the health benefits of spice.  In today’s episode, Kanchan and regular guest Tim Spector help us understand whether there is any scientific evidence to support the health benefits of spices, the easiest way to add spice to our diet, and which ones to choose.Kanchan Koya is the founder of SpiceSpiceBaby and The Radical Vitality Podcast with a Ph.D. in Biomedicine from Harvard University and training from the Institute of Integrative Nutrition.Tim Spector is a co-founder at ZOE and one of the top 100 most cited scientists in the world.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:10 - Topic introduction01:19 - Quickfire questions02:17 - What is a spice04:23 - How did Kanchan’s passion for spices begin?06:56 - What do we know about how spices affect our health?12:16 - The latest science on spices17:07 - Which spices are best?24:46 - How to start using spices?27:56 - Hacks to start using spices for the best health benefits possible30:55 - Quality of spices 35:45 - Storage of spices36:53 - Summary37:53 - Goodbyes38:47 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Read ZOE’s PREDICT Studies here.Know more about the 5 spices you should embrace here.Follow Kanchan: https://www.instagram.com/chiefspicemamaFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
18/08/22·39m 58s

How healthy are meat and dairy alternatives?

Vegan diets are increasingly popular. As more of us reduce our animal product consumption, countless new meat and dairy alternatives appear on our supermarket shelves. Manufacturers market these products as healthy options (unsurprisingly), but perhaps we shouldn’t be so quick to trust them… In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: are meat and dairy alternatives healthier than their animal-based counterparts?Follow ZOE on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/zoe/ Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in today's episode:How well do plant based alternatives fare nutritionally compared to cow’s milk? hereRisks of ischaemic heart disease and stroke in meat eaters, fish eaters, and vegetarians over 18 years of follow-up hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions
11/08/22·12m 56s

How food can improve your mood

We’ve all felt the effects of food on our mood, so it would stand to reason that dietary intervention for mental health would be well studied and a regularly deployed treatment. But this is far from reality, as historically, psychiatry was only concerned with what happened from the neck up.In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by Felice Jacka, Professor of Nutritional Psychiatry and Director of the Food & Mood Centre at Deakin University. Felice was the driving force behind the landmark study to determine if dietary intervention could help treat the symptoms of moderate to severe depression. With her help, we dive into what the science suggests regarding the relationship between food and our mental health and what foods we can eat to improve it. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:09 - Jonathan’s introduction01:28 - Quick-fire questions02:08 - What do we mean when we talk about 'mood'?03:40 - Is it true that we're much more focused on mental health? 05:11 - How do we think about the relationship between our bodies and our mind today?07:01 - Felice’s journey into psychiatry 08:24 - PHD looking into the relationship between diet and mental health11:44 - The SMILEs Trial13:22 - How much did diet affect the participants in the study?15:40 - How long does it take to see results?16:40 - What role does body weight have in this debate?17:22 - How important is it that we focus on the quality of our diet over calories? 18:20 - What is the gut-brain axis and the microbiota gut-brain axis?19:12 - Gut disorders and mental health issues closely related21:25 - The effects of gut bacteria on the brain21:58 - What is orthorexia and how is that linked to anxiety?23:16 - Is there a risk with using diet to treat mental illness?24:20 - What do healthy diets from across the world have in common?25:52 - Foods to eat more of or less of to improve mood27:24 - Diversity in diet29:12 - Effects of diet on the menopause32:10 - How does our mental health affect how we eat?33:20 - What part does the industrialized food system have to play on a social level?34:14 - How ultra-processed foods impact us37:06 - SummaryEpisode transcripts are available here.Visit The Food and Mood Centre’s website for more information on Deakin University’s world-leading, multi-disciplinary research: https://foodandmoodcentre.com.au/Read Felice’s SMILEs Trail here.Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
04/08/22·42m 28s

Can you reverse damage from a bad diet?

A recent study claims that eating a hotdog reduces life expectancy by 38 minutes, and eating salmon could extend it by 70 minutes. At face value, this data implies you can eat your way to immortality. Taken with a pinch of salt, it suggests you can offset the harm from poor dietary choices. But does food really work this way?In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: can you reverse the effects of a bad diet?  Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/ Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Studies referenced in today's episode:Estimating impact of food choices on life expectancy: A modelling study available hereSmall targeted dietary changes can yield substantial gains for human health and the environment available hereThis podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions
27/07/22·16m 15s

How to control blood sugar spikes

Biochemist Jessie Inchauspe heads into work one morning at a genetics lab in California. During the morning meeting, management offer staff the chance to self-test a new medical device. Jessie accepts. She couldn’t have known this device would take her on a journey of discovery to reshape her health and help countless others do the same.  The device was a continuous blood sugar monitor, and it was this, combined with her academic background, and a remarkable willingness to use herself as a lab rat, that began a journey of discovery into how blood sugar affects our health. In today’s episode, Jonathan is joined by two leading experts on the topic:Jessie Inchauspe is a biochemist, bestselling author, and founder of the Glucose Goddess movement who’s helped hundreds of thousands of people improve their health by making cutting-edge science accessible.Dr. Sarah Berry is one of the world's leading experts on human nutrition, who has personally run over 20 randomized clinical trials looking at how humans respond to different fats.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:10 - Topic introduction01:28 - Quickfire questions02:39 - What is blood sugar?03:29 - Why do we have blood sugar?05:25 - Blood sugar monitoring07:30 - How does blood sugar affect our health?09:12 - Do we want a flat blood sugar?14:03 - Blood sugar responses and menopause19:20 - Personalization in blood glucose responses23:17 - Actionable advice to better control your blood sugar23:55 - Food ordering28:30 - Vinegar and blood sugar34:15 - What foods should I eat to control blood glucose spikes?37:39 - Blood glucose & exercise40:02 - Summary41:45 - Listener question43:03 - Goodbyes43:17 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Buy Jessie’s book here.Read ZOE’s PREDICT Studies here.Follow Jessie: https://www.instagram.com/glucosegoddessFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
21/07/22·44m 23s

Saturated fat: Monstrous or misunderstood?

If you're confused about the health effects of fats, you are not alone. You've probably read the headlines - fats are killing us! Then found claims they’re actually healthy in the same publication the following week.Saturated fats have been touted as the worst of all. While there’s ambiguity around other fat sources, saturated fats are universally demonized.But are they really the super villain we've been led to believe?  Find out in this week’s episode. Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
14/07/22·14m 41s

This is what the Keto Diet does to your body...

Keto has been promoted as a magic bullet for weight loss by its supporters and slammed as dangerous by its opponents. It's no surprise - completely removing almost all carbohydrates is not what most people consider ‘a balanced diet’.With carbs off the table, Keto diets involve a dramatically increased fat intake. At the same time, drastically reducing carbs means starving our gut microbes of the fiber that feeds them. Nonetheless, doctors prescribe keto diets to treat people with severe diabetes and see dramatic improvements, and many healthy people swear by keto for weight loss. On top of this, removing carbohydrates prevents blood sugar spikes and crashes linked to inflammation and disease. In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to a leading nutritional researcher to understand whether or not keto diets are a crazy fad:Christopher Gardner is a professor at Stanford University and a member of ZOE’s scientific advisory board who’s produced a clinical trial of keto diets, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:10 - Topic introduction01:38 - Quick-fire questions05:20 - What is a ketogenic diet? How does it work?08:34 - Why have people become interested in keto?10:16 - To promote ketosis, how low-carb should a diet be?11:46 - Why are randomized trials so important?14:37 - Christopher’s study18:46 - What is a Mediterranean diet?21:31 - Study results25:33 - How sustainable is a keto diet?31:22 - How strictly should you follow the keto diet?32:47 - Diabetes and keto35:36 - Keto’s impact on the microbiome37:57 - Is there a long-term impact on the ability to process carbs?39:51 - Summary41:40 - Listener’s question42:12 - Goodbyes42:32 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Read Chris’ Study here.Follow Chris: https://twitter.com/GardnerPhDFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
07/07/22·43m 36s

Processed foods - convenient or catastrophic?

The word ‘processed’ has become synonymous with being unhealthy. The mainstream media encourages us to detox from processed food or offers us ‘10 easy ways’ to stop eating it. But nearly everything we consume has undergone some type of processing.In today’s short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: If most of what we eat is processed, can it really be that unhealthy for us? Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
30/06/22·17m 35s

Our ancestors’ diet: surprising discoveries from a 5000 year old iceman

A mummified man found in the mountains of Italy on a nutrition science podcast? Have we gone completely off track? We haven’t - we promise. This unfortunate soul could be the key that unlocks an entirely new understanding of human health. This mummy, discovered in an alpine snow drift by two hikers, gives us a remarkable glimpse into the surprising dietary choices of our ancestors.In today’s episode, Jonathan discovers some secrets held by our ancestors by speaking to two outstanding guests:Frank Maixner works at the Institute for Mummy Studies in Italy and travels the world uncovering the secrets of our ancestors.Tim Spector is a co-founder at ZOE and one of the top 100 most cited scientists in the world.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:10 - Topic Introduction01:45 - What happened thirty years ago high in the mounts on the border between Italy and Austria03:02 - Who was the Iceman?03:39 - What happened to him and what did we discover about him?05:10 - How old was he and what do we know about his lifestyle?06:01 - What was he eating?09:02 - What’s surprising about his health?11:56 - The Iceman & mushrooms13:08 - Iceman’s microbiome14:13 - The most surprising information about the Iceman’s microbiome15:27 - What’s microbiome diversity?17:30 - Iceman’s origins17:56 - The start of a new academic discipline19:41 - Finding out about salt miners21:02 - What did these salt miners eat?23:05 - How plant-based was their diet?23:39 - Did they eat dairy?25:05 - Their diet diversity26:40 - What do their microbiomes tell us?32:31 - What does this mean for us? What is the actionable advice?36:24 - Summary38:16 - Goodbyes38:40 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Frank: https://twitter.com/frankmaixnerFollow Tim: www.instagram.com/tim.spector/Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
23/06/22·39m 55s

Introducing: ZOE Shorts

We’re excited for you to hear our NEW bitesize podcast: ZOE Shorts.Some of you requested some short-form episodes, so we delivered!In between the longer episodes, Jonathan teams up with world-leading nutrition researcher and podcast regular Dr Sarah Berry to tackle one hot topic from nutrition science in just 15 minutes.From saturated fats to vitamins, time-restricted eating and much more, find out the history, the different sides of the argument and, of course, hear what the latest science says from ZOE Science and Nutrition.Think of this podcast as a convenient, healthy snack: easy to consume but keeping you full throughout the day with bitesize nutrition advice and entertainment!Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to joinzoe.com/podcast and get10% off your personalised nutrition program.This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
16/06/22·1m 27s

Superfoods

From blueberries to salmon, kale to acai, it seems like anything and everything can be classed as a superfood these days.Supposedly they can prevent cancer, reduce inflammation, and even help you live longer…In today’s short episode of ZOE Science and Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah look at the history of superfoods and ask: are some foods really more ‘super’ than others? Or is this just another marketing ploy?Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide 10% off your personalised nutrition program.This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions. 
16/06/22·11m 34s

Inflammation, aging and disease. What's food got to do with it?

It’s a biological process that we need to stay alive. Yet too much of it leads to disease and a shorter life. Inflammation is the immune system’s response to an outside event it thinks is dangerous. This stimulus could be an injury, like falling off your bike or an infection by a virus or bacteria. But inflammation can also be triggered by our food in the hours after we eat. But if this natural process is required to protect us from infections and injuries, why is inflammation usually cast in a negative light? Is there something behind this, or is the idea that inflammation is bad a lie, designed to sell magic potions with dubious evidence? In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to two show regulars to unravel all the information about inflammation:Dr. Sarah Berry is one of the world's leading experts on human nutrition, who has personally run over 20 randomized clinical trials looking at how humans respond to different fats.Tim Spector is a co-founder at ZOE and one of the top 100 most cited scientists in the world.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:09 - Topic Introduction02:30 - Quickfire questions04:27 - What is inflammation, why does it happen, and why it’s not always bad10:38 - How is diet related to inflammation?14:15 - Microbiome and inflammation19:31 - What does prolonged inflammation do to your health?23:06 - Can inflammation affect our weight?25:24 - How does inflammation affect aging and menopause?29:21 - How do we reduce our dietary inflammation?33:26 - Should we exclude foods to reduce inflammation?37:06 - Summary38:49 - Goodbyes38:52 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Sarah: https://twitter.com/saraheeberryFollow Tim: https://twitter.com/timspectorFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions
09/06/22·42m 1s

Can bread be healthy?

It’s no exaggeration to say that bread shaped modern humanity - it was the cultivation of wheat for flour that transformed our ancestors from hunter-gatherers to city dwellers. Today, millions of us start the day with a slice of toast, and most lunches in the US and UK are wrapped in a slice of bread or a burger bun as a cheap, flexible, and delicious energy source.But modern industrial processes designed to reduce the time and cost of baking mean today’s bread would be unrecognizable to our ancestors.  Today’s bread tastes good but has lost most of its nutritional content. With most of its fiber gone, and no time for bacteria to work its fermenting magic, bread has become a simple starch, rapidly turned into sugar in our blood and offering little to support our gut bacteria. For this reason, bread is increasingly demonized as an evil carb.In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to two authorities on the subject to ask: Can bread can ever be healthy?Vanessa Kimbel is an author, founder of the sourdough school, and a specialist in bread nutrition and digestibility.Tim Spector is a co-founder at ZOE and one of the top 100 most cited scientists in the world.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:09 - Topic introduction02:14 - Quickfire questions04:08 - Why bread matters05:23 - Is bread empty calories?08:46 - What is bread?11:30 - What is bran?12:16 - The difference between the types of grains14:19 - What is the impact of bread on our microbes?17:03 - What should you look for in bread?18:50 - What sort of bread should you look for?20:10 - Supermarket bread is not fresh!20:42 - On gluten intolerance23:11 - How should we think about sourdough?32:29 - How to know whether sourdough is real or fake?35:47 - Practical advice on how to choose bread38:54 - Summary40:43 - Goodbyes40:55 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Vanessa: https://www.instagram.com/vanessakimbell/Follow Tim: https://twitter.com/timspectorFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
26/05/22·38m 24s

Is Coffee Healthy?

Coffee’s earliest consumption dates back millennia when the tribesmen of Ethiopia used its ground-up berries to help aid concentration during prayer. Arriving in Europe in the 17th century, Coffee quickly began to replace beer and wine as a favourite breakfast drink. In the 20th century, coffee was blamed for high blood pressure and heart attacks, and more recently linked to a rising epidemic of poor sleep. None of this has prevented coffee’s relentless rise. Over 2 billion cups of the stuff are drunk each day. So, is coffee a guilty treat as many of us suspect? Or is it a health drink feeding your good gut bacteria? In this episode, Jonathan speaks with James Hoffmann and Tim Spector to find out. They discuss how coffee affects your gut bacteria, your hormones and your heart, whether decaffeinated coffee is healthy, and discover some of coffee’s most surprising side effects – which could come in handy if you find yourself in the jungle.James Hoffmann is a  leading coffee expert and author of the World Atlas of Coffee and  co-founder & chairman of the Square Mile Coffee Roasters.Tim Spector  is a co-founder at ZOE and one of the top 100 most cited scientists in the world.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:11 - Topic introduction 01:54 - Quickfire questions03:30 - What is coffee and why are we willing to spend money on it?04:51 - Views on coffee08:07 - Health properties of coffee10:24 - How is coffee made?14:32 - Quantities of caffeine in beverages 16:12 - How important is fermentation for coffee flavor?17:20 - What does the fermentation stage look like?19:51 - Fiber & coffee24:00 - Effects of coffee24:54 - How much is too much coffee?26:39 - What time is the best to drink coffee?30:32 - What is decaf and is it safe?34:03 - Does James drink decaf?34:44 - Is decaf as healthy as caffeinated coffee?36:01 - Does coffee quality matter?37:00 - James' coffee preference38:15 - Health side effects of coffee40:25 - Is it healthy to mix coffee with milk?42:48 - James' opinion on coffee with milk44:31 - Summary46:39 - Instagram question: Does coffee dehydrate you? 47:00 - Goodbyes47:17 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow James: https://www.instagram.com/jimseven/Follow Tim: https://twitter.com/timspectorFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions
12/05/22·48m 9s

Your Gut is Full of Bugs: Why This is Great News

You may have heard there are bugs in your gut. But do they matter? Today, the evidence shows the answer is a resounding yes. This ecosystem of tiny microbes living in our bodies is one of the most exciting areas in medical research, linked to everything from metabolic to mental health.So while many of us have heard that gut health is essential, few of us understand why and what we should do to support our gut bacteria.In this episode, Jonathan speaks with Will Bulsiewicz to find out when our microbiome begins to form, the most effective ways to support our gut health, and the role these gut bacteria play in controlling our weight.Will Bulsiewicz is a board-certified gastroenterologist, and New York Times bestselling author of the microbiome book Fiber Fueled.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:11 - Topic introduction01:29 - Quickfire questions 02:55 - What is the microbiome?08:51 - The role of the microbiome?11:52 - The microbiome as an organ?17:01 - Why does the microbiome matter?21:01 - How does the microbiome affect our metabolism and weight?24:12 - Do we have a microbiome before we are born? How does it develop?32:44 - What can you do to improve your gut health?35:55 - Analyzing the microbiome to know more about your relationships 39:24 - 3 health tips to improve our microbiomes 41:42 - Summary44:40 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Will: https://www.instagram.com/theguthealthmd/Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
28/04/22·45m 33s

Fats and oils: What’s the real story?

Today we’re talking about fat, a delicious component of our food with a terrible reputation.  Fats have been broadly associated with weight gain and heart disease until recently.A mountain of new scientific evidence suggests this is wrong and that it's not as simple as ‘all fat is bad’. Indeed, eating more healthy fat might actually reduce heart disease for many people.  In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to Dr Sarah Berry to learn about what science tells us today, whether it is possible to lose weight on a high-fat diet, what oils we should be cooking with, and the different types of fats.Dr. Sarah Berry is one of the world's leading experts on human nutrition, who has personally run over 20 randomised clinical trials looking at how humans respond to different fats.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro02:50 - Episode Start03:08 - Quickfire round04:54 - Can fat ever be healthy?08:53 - Is it possible to put on weight if you’re on a low-fat diet?10:50 - Food accessibility & bioaccessibility13:22 - Understanding the caloric data of fats19:25 - Fats’ relationship with cholesterol23:40 - Food labels aren't necessarily helpful27:45 - What are the best oils to cook with?33:04 - Are there any dangers of cooking with oil?37:43 - Are eggs safe?38:56 - Is fish good for you?42:26 - Summary45:59 - Goodbyes 46:28 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Sarah: https://twitter.com/saraheeberryFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
14/04/22·45m 41s

Is exercise or nutrition more important for weight loss?

Our transformation into coach potatoes happened in the blink of an eye. Only 100 years ago, most people relied on manual work to make their living. Today, things are different. Many of us live our lives in front of a screen. Online shopping and remote work mean some of us don’t need to leave the house at all. So how bad is this for us? The answer is now clear: Low levels of physical activity lead to an increased risk of disease and a lower quality of life in older age. However, when we come to the question of what sort of exercise you should be doing, how often, and how much it contributes to weight loss, the answers might surprise you.In today’s episode, Jonathan speaks to a Human Physiologist to learn about the interactions between diet and exercise and their impact on human health:Dr. Javier Gonzalez is an associate professor of Human Physiology at the University of Bath and also a technical advisor to the athletes in the INEOS Tour de France cycling team.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro02:00 - Episode start: quickfire round03:45 - Why does exercise matter?04:42 - How much exercise do you need to see health benefits? 05:40 - Defining exercise08:16 - How much walking to do to see health benefits?09:03 - What is cardio training & strength training?10:41 - Differences between cardio and strength training12:18 - Importance of strength training15:28 - Is exercise or nutrition more important for weight loss?18:03 - Dr. Javier’s research on fasting & exercise22:16 - Should we exercise in a fasted state?25:26 - Fasting and bone health26:35 - What can we learn from professional athletes?28:03 - How does glycogen get produced?31:55 - How does exercise relate to gut health?33:09 - What we should eat to benefit from exercise35:40 - How to think about protein intake37:26 - How should non-athletes think about food to complement their exercise40:51 - Personalization & differences between men & women43:57 - How important is exercising for menopausal women?45:56 - Summary51:42 - Goodbyes51:53 - OutroEpisode transcripts are available here.Follow Javier: https://twitter.com/gonzalez_jtFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
31/03/22·52m 32s

Menopause: How your body changes and what you can do

There's a condition that leads to an increased risk of heart disease, dementia, and early death that's been affecting people for as long as they've existed. The many symptoms can severely impact quality of life - ranging from headaches and memory problems to anxiety and weight gain. This condition affects more than half of the world's population, but unbelievably its rarely discussed and the scientific research that exists on it is limited. It's called menopause, and it affects 1.2 billion women worldwide. It's not a disease, but the effects can be just as serious for some women.Jonathan talks to the British doctor who's working to educate us about menopause and bring the discussion on the topic into the mainstream.Dr Louise Newson is a GP, menopause specialist and founder of the Newson Health Menopause & Wellbeing Center. Director of the Balance Menopause App and the non-profit Newson Health Research and Education. Founder of The Menopause Charity.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:09 - Jonathan Intro01:11 - Episode start01:24 - What is menopause and why is it important for Dr Louise04:17 - Being hormone-deficient is bleak07:27 - The overall scale of menopause12:41 - What is HRT?17:24 - How little menopause is talked about19:30 - Dr Louise’s push for menopause understanding & education23:02 -What’s the accurate test for perimenopause?28:10 - Understanding hormone deficiency symptoms31:58 - What else can you do besides HRT: Nutrition considerations41:09 - Does your body shape change while menopausal?41:55 - Summary44:06 - Goodbyes44:31 - OutroEpisode transcripts can be found here.Dr Louise’s non-profit organisation about improving and understanding women’s hormone health: https://www.nhmenopausesociety.orgCheck Dr Louise’s app on perimenopause and menopause: https://www.balance-menopause.comFollow Louise: https://twitter.com/drlouisenewsonFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
24/03/22·45m 17s

Alcohol: Can it ever be healthy?

For many of us, it's a ritual to help us wind down after a long day, an excuse to catch up with friends, or a lubricant to an awkward social situation. Alcohol can be delicious, but our relationship with it is often complicated. Good times with friends aren’t without sacrifice, and many of us feel the morning after impact of a few too many drinks. For an unfortunate minority, alcohol can lead to addiction and even death. What we want to know is, can alcohol ever be healthy? Is any amount of alcohol a sure path to an early grave, or could a glass of red wine be the best thing for your heart health? This episode examines these contradictions to see what the science says. Jonathan speaks to two leading scientists to better understand the effects of alcohol:Tim Spector - scientific co-founder at Zoe and one of the top 100 most cited scientists in the worldDr. Sarah Berry - one of the world's leading experts in human nutrition, with over 30 randomised human clinical trials to her nameDownload our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:10 - Jonathan’s introduction01:25 - Episode start01:45 - Tim’s favourite alcohol02:24 - Is red wine healthy?04:56 - How does alcohol relate to our microbiomes?08:41 - What’s the cause of alcohol's positive effects?11:16 - The importance of the amount of alcohol consumed15:47 - Understanding the adverse effects of alcohol17:48 - Why do hangovers get worse with age?21:41 - Does alcohol influence weight?24:48 - Alcoholic beers vs non-alcoholic beers in relation to sugar28:34 - Avoid alcohol if you have these conditions!29:54 - How does fermentation of beer differ from kombucha?32:21 - Organic and natural wine35:10 - Summary38:03 - OutroFollow Sarah: https://twitter.com/saraheeberryFollow Tim: https://twitter.com/timspectorFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
17/03/22·38m 34s

Is Dark Chocolate Good for Weight Loss?

This plant has been used by human beings for thousands of years with samples found in 5000-year-old pottery discovered in the upper Amazon. The Mayans considered it a gift from the gods and used it in their sacred ceremonies, where it was believed to have mystical healing powers. For the Aztecs, it was worth more than gold and given to their victorious warriors. We are talking, of course, about chocolate. Even though our relationship with chocolate spans thousands of years we still can’t agree about it. It seems obvious that something so delicious must be bad for us. Can there be any truth to the claims that chocolate can improve our mood, our health and even our libido? Jonathan speaks to Professor Tim Spector, one of the world's top 100 most cited scientists and author of the diet myth, and Spencer Hyman, one of the world’s leading chocolate experts and founder of the craft chocolate business Cocoa Runners. Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:10 - Jonathan’s introduction01:19 - Lighting round questions, with true/false answers05:49 - Why certain chocolates might be good06:34 - What is fermentation? 09:54 - Which kinds of chocolates are good or bad for you?12:14 - How to figure out the differences in chocolates 14:12 - Why is are chocolates classified the way they are16:20  - Considerations about dark chocolate20:38 - Personalized responses to chocolate23:39 - On chocolate addiction24:55 - How to taste chocolate28:10 - Is smell an indicator as to what happens in our microbiomes?31:52 - 3 things you should know when buying chocolate33:17 - Description of chocolate in nature37:15 - Sugar in chocolate40:29 - Is fruit and nut milk chocolate healthier than dark chocolate?41:27 - How much chocolate do you need for it to be beneficial?42:59 - Should I watch out for lecithins in chocolate?44:52 - Is eating half a bar of chocolate before bed a bad idea?46:24 - Goodbyes & OutroFollow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
10/03/22·47m 11s

Food Intolerances: What's the Story?

1 in 5 people suffer from food intolerances, a figure that’s growing each year. As a result, people are eating increasingly restricted diets, removing dairy, gluten and many other foods from their plates. Unfortunately, they end up eating highly processed foods that damage their gut microbiome and lead to long-term health problems. Even with food restrictions, many people see limited improvements in their symptoms.The whole topic of intolerance is full of pseudoscience, dubious blood tests, and miracle cures.However, in the last few years, we have seen a revolution in our understanding, with gut bacteria now the stars of the show. This new understanding has profound implications for how we should treat our food intolerances. Today we’ll focus on what the latest science says. Jonathan is joined by Will Bulsiewicz, board-certified gastroenterologist, New York Times best-selling author and ZOE's science board member, whose latest book is all about food intolerance.Download our FREE guide — Top 10 Tips to Live Healthier: https://zoe.com/freeguide Timecodes:00:00 - Intro00:09 - Jonathan’s introduction01:29 - Quick-fire questions03:43 - What are food allergies and intolerances?10:33 - The rise of food allergies and intolerances 14:38 - Training your microbes17:13 - How do I know if I have a food intolerance? 19:37 - The difficulty of managing your diet and reintroducing foods21:26 - Can you fix these food intolerances?23:01 - The counter-intuitive approach to improving allergies and intolerances24:54 - What can parents do to prevent allergies in their children?25:39 - How do FODMAPs relate to the step by step exposure concept?26:26 - What is a FODMAP? 27:34 - FODMAP examples27:59 - FODMAP intolerance considerations29:43 -  Celiac disease tests30:36 - Can FODMAPs tolerance be increased?31:40 - What is histamine intolerance and what can you do about it?40:15 - Summary44:22 - Goodbyes44:34 - OutroRead Will Bulsiewicz’s cookbook, “Fiber Fueled: The Plant-Based Gut Health Program for Losing Weight, Restoring Your Health, and Optimizing Your Microbiome” in all major bookstores.Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/This podcast was produced by Fascinate Productions.
10/03/22·45m 18s

Welcome to ZOE Science & Nutrition

Welcome to the brand-new podcast from ZOE, the people behind the world's largest scale nutrition study.ZOE Science & Nutrition is the podcast where the world’s top scientists explain the latest health, nutrition, and gut health research in terms we can all understand. So join us every other Thursday on this journey of scientific discovery!Scientists featured in this trailer: Will Bulsiewicz & Tim Spector OBE. Follow ZOE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoe/
10/03/22·2m 1s
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