Coronavirus: What You Need To Know

Coronavirus: What You Need To Know

By ITV News

A regular podcast from ITV News, with our team of specialist correspondents plus guests providing information, advice and analysis you can trust about the COVID-19 outbreak in the UK and around the world.

Episodes

Will the lifting of Covid restrictions have an impact on the NHS - and how do staff feel about it?

Are frontlines workers in the NHS worried about the lifting of Covid restrictions, when the health service still faces the challenge of winter pressures? When it comes to patients, are they getting the care where and when they need it? In this episode Faye Barker speaks to ITV News Health Editor Emily Morgan to find out what you need to know.
27/01/2216m 46s

Will we need to learn to live with Omicron and what does a future with Covid look like?

Is it now finally the time that we just learn to live with Covid? With moves to ease off on restrictions and talk of an “endemic”- is this really the beginning of the end of the pandemic? If so, can we ever live our lives the same again, or has our behaviour changed forever? In this episode ITV News Presenter Faye Barker speaks to psychologist Dr Nilufar Ahmed, a Lecturer in Social Sciences at Bristol University, and also to Paul Hunter, a professor of medicine at the University of East Anglia. They give us some hints of what a future with Covid may look like.
14/01/2222m 58s

What does the Omicron surge mean for the new school term in January?

Can we keep our schools open in January or does the surge of Omicron signal more disruption for children and their families? In this episode, ITV News Presenter and Reporter Faye Barker talks to Dr David Strain, a senior clinical lecturer at the University of Exeter Medical School, to find out if we can send our children back to school with confidence.He tells us what we need to know, discusses how Omicron may be more dangerous for children and how delaying the start of the new school term in 2022 may benefit us all.Stay up to date with the latest Coronavirus news, information and advice at itv.com/news
22/12/2118m 44s

Booster jabs: How much protection do they give? Your questions answered

The booster programme in the UK is being accelerated, but how much protection do the vaccines give?In this episode, regular podcast guest Dr Sarah Jarvis and Interim Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, Dr Thomas Waite join ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain to answer your questions about the latest changes.Among the questions this episode: Will schoolchildren be given booster jabs? Is the vaccine safe for pregnant women? And what to do if you’re immunosuppressed.Stay up to date with the latest Coronavirus news, information and advice at itv.com/news
14/12/2111m 47s

No10 Christmas party: Inside story of ITV News scoop on leaked video and the fallout

UK Editor Paul Brand and Political Editor Robert Peston discuss with Mary Nightingale how ITV News broke the story of No10 staff laughing about a Covid-rule-breaking party in Downing Street last Christmas.Paul, who obtained the leaked video, reveals the process of breaking the story, while Robert discusses the backlash.Remember to like, subscribe, and rate us five stars.
09/12/2128m 9s

Covid: How do you keep safe this Christmas?

Are we facing a nightmare before Christmas? Is Covid going to crush our plans once again, thanks to the new Omicron variant of the virus? Or can we find ways to enjoy the festive season safely with our friends and family?
In this episode ITV News presenter and reporter Faye Barker speaks to psychotherapist Noel McDermott to help us navigate some of the anxieties around this festive season, as we face a second Christmas with Covid.
06/12/2126m 47s

Could rising cases in Europe affect the UK?

Why are Coronavirus restrictions being ramped up in parts of Europe and how concerned should we be here in the UK about the rise in cases elsewhere?Is there a chance that measures like mandatory vaccines for everyone and even further lockdowns could be considered in the UK, or is all of that behind us?In this episode ITV News’s Faye Barker talks to Prof Martin McKee, Professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to find out what you need to know.
23/11/2121m 29s

Compulsory vaccines for NHS staff - what impact could it have?

Covid-19 vaccines will be mandatory for frontline NHS workers in England from Spring - but could the decision cause staff to leave?The vast majority of NHS workers in England have been double-jabbed but around 100,000 remain unvaccinated.
In this episode, ITV News Presenter and reporter Faye Barker speaks to Health Editor Emily Morgan about the government’s stricter measures and if compulsory vaccines will see NHS workers leave their posts. 
Plus, we look at a new covid nasal spray being trialled at Oxford University that could be more effective than jabs.
09/11/2118m 34s

Compulsory vaccines for NHS staff - what impact could it have?

Covid-19 vaccines will be mandatory for frontline NHS workers in England from Spring - but could the decision cause staff to leave?The vast majority of NHS workers in England have been double-jabbed but around 100,000 remain unvaccinated.
In this episode, ITV News Presenter and reporter Faye Barker speaks to Health Editor Emily Morgan about the government’s stricter measures and if compulsory vaccines will see NHS workers leave their posts. 
Plus, we look at a new covid nasal spray being trialled at Oxford University that could be more effective than jabs.
09/11/2118m 34s

UK Covid cases are rising again - how worried should we be?

Why are cases of coronavirus in the UK so high right now, and how worried should we be? Why do so many other countries have lower case numbers, and would the government’s 'Plan B' of restrictions in England - including a return to wearing facemasks and working from home - make a significant difference alongside vaccines?In this episode, ITV News Presenter and reporter Faye Barker speaks to Ravi Gupta, Professor of Clinical Microbiology at Cambridge University, who is also on New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group.
22/10/2115m 11s

Will 'no jab no job' become the reality - and is it legal?

Will no jab no job really become the reality?Could the UK follow America’s biggest firms in demanding fully vaccinated staff?And what can and can’t bosses do to employees who refuse to be jabbed?ITV News presenter and reporter Faye Barker speaks to HR expert Kate Palmer to find out what you need to know.
01/10/2114m 7s

How divided are parents on jabs for 12 to 15 year olds?

How have parents responded to vaccines being given to 12 to 15 year olds? What guidance is available for parents and children worried about the jabs? And what happens if a child wants to overrule their parents?ITV News presenter and reporter Faye Barker is joined by Kerry-Jane Packman from the charity Parentkind to answer all those key questions.Kerry-Jane explains why parents are clearly split on the issue of vaccines for teenagers and why mental health has risen to become the number one concern for those raising schoolchildren during the pandemic.Plus she spotlights the one big positive that has arisen from such a tough time in education.
24/09/2115m 5s

Why are the Covid care heroes so unhappy about the new £12bn social care tax?

Health and social care is set to get a funding boost of £12 billion a year. So what does it mean for taxpayers? Is it enough to solve the NHS's pandemic backlog? And why are many carers so unhappy about it?ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini is joined by UK Editor Paul Brand to answer all those key questions and simplify the many complicated issues surrounding care funding.We also hear from a frontline carer left angry and upset as she attempts to support her 98-year-old patient, who is left grieving her twin sister.And Paul explains why the carers who were clapped for during the pandemic now fear their hopes of getting more support for themselves may now have passed for many years to come.
09/09/2119m 54s

How can crowded events be made Covid-safe?

How much is the summer festival season to blame for the current rise in cases? What can be done to make crowded events safer? And are young people getting together en masse really aware of the risks of Covid and long covid?Faye Barker puts those questions to Dr David Strain, an acute physician and lecturer at the University of Exeter Medical School, who has been playing a leading role in the British Medical Association’s Covid response, in particular Long Covid with the NHS taskforce.We also hear what the organiser of the Leeds Festival told ITV News in defence of holding mass gatherings in a pandemic, plus from 16-year-old Tilly from east Devon, who was among several thousand festivalgoers to catch Covid at this summer's Boardmasters festival in Cornwall. She describes her Covid-era festival experience, when it became clear that the soar throat she returned with hadn't come from five days of screaming and shouting, and why she'd still do it all over again.
08/09/2114m 41s

What can be done to make crowded events safer?

How much is the summer festival season to blame for the current rise in cases? What can be done to make crowded events safer? And are young people getting together en masse really aware of the risks of Covid and long covid?Faye Barker puts those questions to Dr David Strain, an acute physician and lecturer at the University of Exeter Medical School, who has been playing a leading role in the British Medical Association’s Covid response, in particular Long Covid with the NHS taskforce.We also hear what the organiser of the Leeds Festival told ITV News in defence of holding mass gatherings in a pandemic, plus from 16-year-old Tilly from east Devon, who was among several thousand festivalgoers to catch Covid at this summer's Boardmasters festival in Cornwall. She describes her Covid-era festival experience, when it became clear that the soar throat she returned with hadn't come from five days of screaming and shouting, and why she'd still do it all over again.
07/09/2114m 41s

Can children defy their parents if jabs are rolled out to under-16s?

Could children defy their parents if vaccines are rolled out to under-16s? Can the UK cope with the current rise in Covid cases? And are booster jabs now inevitable heading into winter?ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini finds out what you need to know from our outgoing Science Editor Tom Clarke.In his final podcast appearance, Tom explains the government's current stance on jabs for 12 to 15 year olds and the international evidence of vaccines' impact on children.And he goes on to deliver all the latest news about vaccine effectiveness and booster jabs heading into a new school year and the autumn for the wider population.
02/09/2118m 10s

Needle phobia - what can solve the fear-fuelled vaccine hesitancy issue?

Does the idea of a needle injection make your skin crawl? And what impact does the common phobia have on people not getting the jab?ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini gets answers from Professor Daniel Freeman, who led a major pandemic study into needle phobia, and Dave Smithson from Anxiety UK, who offers ways to overcome the fear experienced by one in four adults.The pair share the shuddering feelings that build up in sufferers when faced with a jab, the origins of the phobia and the various steps that can be taken to face the fear.Plus, they offer thoughts on why the fears are more likely to appear among women than men and advice on dealing with other pandemic-related worries.Here are the helpful links mentioned in the episode:Anxiety UK's injection phobia fact sheet and booklet: https://www.anxietyuk.org.uk/anxiety-type/injection-phobia/ Anxiety UK's Covid-19 vaccine support: https://www.anxietyuk.org.uk/covid-19-vaccine-support/
25/08/2114m 0s

The truth behind the shocking vaccine miscarriage lies online

Claims that vaccines are causing miscarriages are shocking people online - so what’s the truth?Are pregnant women or unborn children at any risk when it comes to the jabs? And how can you search for answers without googling yourself down a worry-filled rabbit hole?ITV News presenter and reporter Faye Barker welcomes back Dr Raj Mathur, the chair of the British Fertility Society, to set these matters straight once again.Raj explains why selective statistics are fuelling the myths online and outlines the genuine risks that not getting the vaccine could pose for pregnant women and their unborn children.For extra guidance, he advises: https://www.rcm.org.uk/vaccine-facts/https://www.britishfertilitysociety.org.uk/covid-19/faqs/and @VikiLovesFACS on Twitter
20/08/2117m 11s

What do the latest travel changes mean for your summer holiday? Your questions answered

The summer holidays are here, and the travel rules have changed again.Seven countries have been bumped onto the green list, India is set to come off the red list and travel between France and England will become quarantine-free once more for those who are double jabbed.In this episode, Which? Travel Editor Rory Boland joins ITV News Presenter Lucrezia Millarini to discuss what you need to know before jetting off, from travel insurance to pre-departure PCR tests.Plus, Rory answers listeners questions and shares his hassle-free holiday destinations.Stay up to date with the changing travel situation in the UK and abroad with news, information and advice at itv.com/holidaynews
06/08/2123m 40s

How can clinically extremely vulnerable people be protected after 'Freedom Day’?

England’s so-called 'Freedom Day’ is fast approaching with almost all Covid restrictions set to be lifted.While some are happy about being able to party in-person, many of the 3.8 million people who are classed as clinically extremely vulnerable are feeling anxious. In this episode, ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini is joined by Health Editor Emily Morgan to discuss what the new changes are and what this means for those who have spent the past year shielding. We hear from Jane Leahy who is in remission from blood cancer and has been at home throughout the pandemic to remind us of the challenges some people face. Emily also shares advice on what you can do to protect others and her thoughts on the future of shielding.
16/07/2114m 7s

Why do vaccine fertility myths persist and how can you tell fact from fiction?

Why do vaccine fertility myths persist? How can you tell fact from fiction? And what is the advice for pregnant and breastfeeding women when it comes to getting the vaccine?Dr Raj Mathur, the head of the British Fertility Society and a working fertility consultant, tells ITV News presenter Faye Barker what you need to know in this episode.He busts the main myths doing the rounds on social media and explains where to look for verified information when it comes to vaccine or fertility concerns.Plus he updates Faye on how he and others are dealing with the backlog of IVF cases after a tricky pause caused by the pandemic last year.
14/07/2114m 36s

How threatening is Delta Plus and could your poo provide the answer?

How widespread is the Delta variant and what is the threat of the new reported Delta Plus virus?ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke tells presenter Lucrezia Millarini what you need to know, before explaining why wastewater from our toilets and other sewage could provide an invaluable and cost effective alert system for new variants.You can view more of Tom's report here: https://www.itv.com/news/2021-06-23/covid-dont-turn-your-nose-up-at-using-waste-water-as-way-of-tracking-coronavirus-outbreaks
25/06/2117m 35s

Children with Long Covid: How bad is it and what help is there?

How big a problem is Long Covid among children? What are the signs and symptoms to look out for? And are young sufferers getting the help they need?ITV News presenter Faye Barker finds out what you need to know from Health Editor Emily Morgan as they're joined by Sammie Mcfarland, who helped found a Long Covid Kids support group while she and her daughter continued to battle the sustained dire after-effects of the virus.We also hear from two young people who have been suffering badly with Long Covid for more than a year and share why help proved particularly hard to find.Plus the guests assess why the creation of new dedicated Long Covid support clinics for children certainly helps but still won't provide a quick fix to this increasing pandemic problem.
22/06/2119m 37s

No jab no job? What are your rights when it comes to work?

Millions of people across the UK are returning or preparing to return to very different working environments - so what are your rights to protect yourself from the virus?Do you have a legally-protected right to change your working hours or days and are you entitled to relocate where you do your work? And can you demand to not work next to a colleague who has not been vaccinated?Plus, if you’re an employer, how do you deal with someone who is refusing to return to work?Kate Palmer, HR expert from employment law consultancy Peninsula, tells Lucrezia Millarini what you need to know.
16/06/2116m 51s

Why scientists demanded the Freedom Day delay

The prime minister has confirmed Freedom Day will be pushed back until July 19.In this episode, recorded a few days before the PM's announcement, Science Editor Tom Clarke explained to Faye Barker why scientists advising the government were desperate for a delay.Central to the case for a delay is the rise of the Delta (formerly Indian) variant, and Tom gives his expertise on whether the race for vaccinations could prevent its continued spread and the measures the government is taking to avoid regressing into a future lockdown.
11/06/2116m 39s

Your pandemic concerns and why 'zero deaths' headlines misled

We asked our audience on social media to let us know their biggest concerns at this stage of the pandemic and the response was overwhelming.So in this episode Lucrezia Millarini finds out what you need to know by running them past Professor Anthony Harnden, who serves both as a key adviser to the government on the vaccine rollout and on the frontline as a GP.He responds to concerns about the June 21 restrictions, the threat of Long Covid, travel worries and outlines why vaccinated people still need to wear masks in public. Plus he explains why he believes the headlines marking zero daily deaths after the recent May bank holiday potentially misled the public.
04/06/2118m 26s

How to deal with awkward behaviours as the restrictions ease

Does the idea of getting an unprompted hug from a friend in public make you feel uneasy? Will we ever shake hands with strangers again? And will mask wearing outlast the pandemic?ITV News presenter Faye Barker shares her personal experience of awkwardness in public and gets helpful advice from Dr Nilufar Ahmed, a behavioural psychologist from the University of Bristol.The pair also discuss ways of dealing with friends and family who are less willing to stick to the rules and, as a summer of potentially no major restrictions nears, talk through how you can handle the latest new normal as bars, restaurants, transport systems and other public places start to get crowded once again.
01/06/2114m 11s

Will lockdown's legacy help or harm LGBT+ people?

The long months of lockdown have forced the closure of events, nightlife, and social gatherings for everyone.But for LGBT+ people they've threatened the future of spaces that are a safe haven, providing a vital community, emotional support and helping to validate identities. So, as society starts to open up again, what legacy could the pandemic leave on these marginalised communities? ITV News UK Editor Paul Brand hears from the co-founder of queer club night Gal Pals, Scarlett Langdon, who explains how their virtual parties reached a wider audience and how they hope to keep that online spirit alive when they reopen for real.And Dr Will Nutland, a sexual health advocate and co-founder of PrEPster, shares how he found ways to help people isolated during the pandemic and how Covid has redefined what 'community' means - amid his own sustained private battle with the virus.
28/05/2119m 49s

WFH - is it ending or is hybrid working here to stay?

"I don't think I do work from home, I think I live at work."For more than a year, many people normally found in offices and other work places have been forced to endure or embrace a very different way of working during the pandemic.But, like it or loathe it, is this era of mass working from home coming to an end?Faye Barker talks to Harriet Minter, author of WFH: How To Build A Career You Love When You're Not In The Office, about the future of work, how to overcome the challenges of remote working and how to discuss with your boss the option of continuing to work remotely. We also hear from a host of people on their experience away from the office, plus a City expert explains why WFH presents both a huge opportunity and a worrying threat to diversity in the workforce.
26/05/2123m 47s

Your questions answered on the Indian variant as cases rise and June 21 lockdown easing looms

With the number of so-called 'Indian variant cases' on the rise, ITV News Presenter Lucrezia Millarini puts your questions to our Science Editor Tom Clarke.Cases of the B.1.617.2 variant, first detected in India, jumped by more than 2,000 in a week in mid-May.So should we be worried by the rise in cases, is the vaccine as effective against this variant, and what does this all mean for the planned easing of lockdown in England on June 21?
21/05/2120m 9s

TV doctor Amir Khan on anxiety, safe travel and hugging

In this special podcast, Dr Amir Khan, the star of TV's GPs Behind Closed Doors, reveals the key concerns he's been receiving from patients at his practice since the restrictions eased on May 17.He gives ITV News presenter Kylie Pentelow his advice for dealing with anxieties at this stage of the pandemic, how he handles patients still waiting on key surgery and what young people he's spoken to have been most concerned about.The author of The Doctor Will See You Now also tells Kylie how she can safely hug her mum, what you can do to safely travel abroad this summer (while offering his own staycation advice closer to him) and why he is seriously concerned about the increased threat from the Indian variant.Plus, he gives you a reminder on how to dine or drink safely in public and busts the persistent myth that he believes has deterred a lot of young people from getting the vaccine.
19/05/2120m 0s

How can you handle pandemic anxieties as restrictions ease?

Life in lockdown has triggered many anxieties so, as restrictions ease, how can you emerge with a healthier mind and body?Renee McGregor helps anxiety sufferers on a daily basis, specialising in sports and eating disorders, and has worked with Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth teams. In this episode she tells Kylie Pentelow why a change to the way people think can alter their feelings and behaviours and present a more honest view of themselves to the world rather than what's projected by so many on social media.Plus, she explains how her own adversities helped her deal with pandemic pressures and offers practical advice for those anxious about going back to the pub or meeting friends indoors.You can read more about Renee at https://reneemcgregor.com/Plus, for other help with anxieties or eating disorders head to this NHS page: https://www.nhs.uk/mental-health/feelings-symptoms-behaviours/behaviours/eating-disorders/overview/Or the Beat Eating Disorders website: https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/support-services/helplines
16/05/2117m 16s

After lockdown divorces spike how can you protect your relationship?

The divorce rate has spiked, online searches to get advice on ending relationships have soared and it's a rare couple who haven't felt a strain or encountered new challenges while in lockdown, whether they've been kept apart or stuck together 24/7. So, for this episode, TV psychologist and relationship coach Jo Hemmings tells ITV News presenter Faye Barker what you need to know to protect your love life as restrictions start to ease.But what about those who have been searching for love in the time of coronavirus?Jo explains why virtual dating has proved a flawed experience for many and how the returning dating scene could be changed forever.But she also offers a big dose of hope as to why relationships could be strengthened post-pandemic.
12/05/2118m 4s

Your questions answered as under-40s to be given AstraZeneca Covid jab alternative

Following the announcement that people under the age of 40 will be offered an alternative to the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine, ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke answers your questions on the matter.
07/05/2116m 36s

Could all care home staff be forced to have the vaccine?

Could all staff at care homes be forced to have the vaccine? Should families get more access rights to visit their loved ones? And is enough being done to care for the nation's carers?Lucrezia Millarini puts those burning questions and more to ITV News UK Editor Paul Brand, who has won awards for his work uncovering the Covid crisis in care homes since the start of the pandemic.Paul examines the debate on vaccination from both sides, shares why some staff remain hesitant to get jabbed despite seeing the impact of the virus on the most vulnerable, plus looks at other big challenges ahead for the industry.
06/05/2117m 58s

What's plunged India into crisis and what's the UK doing to help?

With soaring infection rates and deaths in the hundreds of thousands, India has swiftly become the centre of the world's focus on the pandemic at its worst.For this special episode, Ria Chatterjee is joined by fellow ITV News Reporter Sangita Lal and ITV News's Rundown presenter Rishi Davda to discuss how things have got so bad for the country in such a short space of time - and what the UK is doing to help.Sangita shares what she's learned from talking to doctors across the country, while Rishi shares the range of experiences - and opinions - he's canvassed across Mumbai.Plus, Ria outlines why a lack of leadership and decision making is being blamed for plunging one of the world's largest nations into mass desperation.
30/04/2121m 0s

The extraordinary and very personal testimony of a grieving daughter

After interviewing those stricken by grief in a pandemic which is ravaging her nation, Indian journalist Barkha Dutt has now experienced the pain herself with the death of her father.This powerful interview with Julie Etchingham for ITV's News At Ten was recorded just hours later.Barkha wanted to speak out about the situation in her country and send a clear warning that the desperate scenes in India could have global ramifications.Listen to her extraordinary and very personal testimony.
28/04/219m 11s

Understanding the real reasons for vaccine hesitancy within ethnic minorities

Compassion. Empathy. Understanding. When the issue of vaccine hesitancy is discussed they're often in short supply.ITV News Northern Reporter Sangita Lal attempts to challenge that in the latest edition of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know as she explores the reasons why some ethnic minorities are still, despite some recent improvements, reluctant to get the jab.She's joined by Dr Shehla Imtiaz-Umer, a GP who is part of the British Islamic Medical Association, and Sham Lal, who is an Assistant Professor in Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (and her cousin!).Both attempt to shine a light on the most misunderstood reasons for hesitancy - while Dr Imtiaz-Umer answers the tricky question: how do you persuade someone who refuses to take paracetamol on the grounds that it's artificial that they should take the vaccine?
27/04/2116m 33s

Can our vaccines handle the Indian variant? Plus the 'best news' that's emerged

Can our vaccines handle the various variants that have emerged at this stage of the pandemic?Science Editor Tom Clarke tells Lucrezia Millarini what you need to know on the new threat of the Indian variant and how all the major vaccines are adapting to protect us.He explains why the tweaked vaccines can be fast-tracked without safety fears before the pair share in the "best news" that's emerged for a long time as more evidence shows the vaccines' ability to stave off infections.
23/04/2117m 22s

Covid passports: How close are they and what will they look like?

They're the cause of furious arguments but appear closer than ever before.So why all the fuss about Covid passports? How close are we to getting them, what will they look like and will you need one to go to the pub or club?UK Editor Paul Brand gives Lucrezia Millarini all the answers and much more in this episode, to leave you with everything you need to know.Paul also explains the difference between domestic and international passports, and uses his political know how to predict exactly when these polarising passports could become a reality.
20/04/2116m 9s

The truth about the blood clots vaccine link (from the doctor who discovered it)

What are the signs and symptoms of the blood clots that have been linked to the AstraZeneca vaccine?
Science Editor Tom Clarke gets the answers from the authority on the subject: Prof Marie Scully, who first spotted the rare side effects in a patient at University College London Hospital.She explains to Tom how her medical breakthrough has already changed the way patients are being treated, and outlines why these blood clots are so rare and differ from other clots experienced by users of the pill, for example.Plus, Prof Scully explains why British tests show a different reality to our European neighbours on the potential impact of the clotting - and why it's vital that people are not deterred from still getting vaccinated.
16/04/2114m 40s

What to say - and not say - to someone who's grieving (with Jim Carter)

While the spectre of death has loomed over all our lives during this pandemic, the topic remains one of the hardest to talk about, both in polite and private conversation.In this podcast episode, Kylie Pentelow talks to Jane Murray from Marie Curie and the charity's ambassador Jim Carter, the actor best known for his role as Carson from Downton Abbey, about how to sensitively break this taboo.All three share examples of what to say and not say to someone who is grieving, the most appropriate offer of help, plus how to approach practical topics life funeral plans before it's too late.Finally, Jim describes his own experiences of losing his parents at very different ages and the impact talking - and not talking - about their deaths had on his and his sibling's lives.
13/04/2121m 3s

AstraZeneca: Should under-30s get a second dose? Were side-effects inevitable?

After the announcement that under-30s will be offered an alternative to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine over rare blood clot safety concerns, Mary Nightingale puts all your key questions to Science Editor Tom Clarke.What should people under-30 already jabbed with AstraZeneca do about their second dose? What are the symptoms of blood clots and could aspirins help? Is vaccine mixing safe and were side effects inevitable?Tom offers his guidance on all of the above and a lot more.
08/04/2123m 46s

Long Covid: what's being done to help sufferers and why does it affect women more than men?

More than one million people are estimated to be suffering the many symptoms of Long Covid, with tens of thousands battling it for a year.Channel 5 reporter Ruth Liptrot is among them and joins ITV News Presenter Faye Barker and Health Editor Emily Morgan for this special episode of the podcast.So what symptoms are associated with Long Covid, why does it affect women more than men and what's being done to help the many people suffering despite never being in hospital with the virus?
01/04/2118m 46s

How to deal with crowd anxiety when lockdown ends

The end of lockdown will be widely cheered in public, but for many it'll worsen privately held anxieties about the steps to re-enter social life.Does the prospect of heading to crowded supermarkets, travelling on packed commuter trains or huddling together with strangers at an all-standing gig fill you with worry?You're certainly not alone, and help is here. Kylie Pentelow speaks to Alex and Dave from the charity Anxiety UK to discuss the kinds of fears the end of lockdown can trigger and what can be done to deal with them.If you are seeking support for anything anxiety-related head to anxietyuk.org.uk and if you have any mental health worries the charities mind.org.uk or samaritans.org can help.
24/03/2115m 13s

Why all the fuss over the AstraZeneca vaccine and how will supply delays affect you?

It's safe and effective, so why all the fuss over the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine? And how will the impending supply delays affect you receiving a dose?Science Editor Tom Clarke delivers all the answers and more to ITV News Presenter Lucrezia Millarini in this edition after the EU regulator gave its backing to the vaccine.Tom also explains how his own blood clot risk ranks compared to being struck by lightning, the issue raised in Norway and Germany that has gained attention and why there'll be a big vaccine boost in the UK come spring.
19/03/2115m 12s

How to talk to someone who's reluctant to get the vaccine

Over 20 million people in the UK have been given the first dose of a Covid-19 vaccine, but why are some people still hesitant to take up the offer?Kylie Pentelow chats to paediatrician, TV doctor and now volunteer vaccinator Dr Ranj Singh about how to speak to friends and relatives who are reluctant to have the vaccine.In this episode, Dr Ranj discusses training with St. John's Ambulance, whether the jab is safe for pregnant women and helping BAME communities access the right information. He answers common questions and concerns to make sure you're armed with the facts before you get booked in.For more information about the vaccine visit the Oxford Vaccine Group https://www.ovg.ox.ac.uk/ or visit the NHS website https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/coronavirus-vaccine/
09/03/2124m 20s

Could vaccines be made compulsory? Are asthmatics being ignored?

You asked the key vaccine questions. We got the answers…

Could they be made compulsory for work? Should asthmatics take greater priority?
 Will we need vaccine passports to eat at a restaurant or drink at the pub?
 Are there long-term side effects to the vaccine? And what do you do if you've booked a holiday but haven't had the jab yet?ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini puts all those burning questions on the vaccine rollout (and many more) to Professor Anthony Harnden, who advises the government as deputy chair of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation.
04/03/2120m 12s

How to keep your spirit of adventure alive in lockdown

No one on earth travels quite like Johnny Ward.The adventurer is the only person to have visited every nation on the planet, both poles and most of the main peaks but - like everybody else - he has seen his movements severely limited by the pandemic.So how has Johnny adapted his wanderlust and active ambitions in these strange times? What advice does he have for those keen to keep a spirit of adventure alive in lockdown? And is he really set to row the Atlantic ocean despite not being able to swim?Listen to his wonderfully engaging conversation with Kylie Pentelow to discover all the answers.Johnny is rowing to raise money for HUMEN, the UK mental health charity preventing men from suffering in silence and dying too young. Find out more at https://www.wearehumen.org/
02/03/2114m 45s

Back to school - Top tips to get ready for the big return

As a working mother of three, ITV News Presenter Faye Barker is among millions of parents and guardians preparing to send their children back to the classroom from March 8 after months of home schooling.In this episode, 

Erin Price, the head of school at Ramsgate Holy Trinity in Kent, joins Deirdre Kehoe of the Young Minds charity to give Faye everything she - and you - need to know.

So what can she and others do before the big return? What practical steps can be taken to give children the confidence to relearn the daily act of learning in school? And will it matter if they haven't done all their homework?!Plus, what impact has the pandemic had on this generation of school pupils? Our guests share their informed opinions on whether the absence from regular school life really will lead to a so-called 'lost generation'.
25/02/2128m 55s

How close are vaccine passports and can tourism recover?

Vaccine passports - allowing those jabbed to travel - could give holidaymakers a fast tracked route back to the continent. So how far away are they and even once travel does return, will traditional tourist cities or cruise ships recover?Few at the ITV News are as well travelled as our Europe Editor James Mates.Stationed for large parts in Italy, he has remained active across the continent and answers those questions above in an engaging conversation with Lucrezia Millarini.
23/02/2125m 54s

How safe are the vaccines and will we need annual boosters?

If you follow ITV News on Twitter you'll have seen us put a message out to our audience recently, asking: “Do you have questions or concerns about the current UK vaccines rollout?”It turns out many of you did.So in this episode of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know, Lucrezia Millarini gets all the answers from Professor Anthony Harnden, who advises the government on the vaccine rollout as the deputy chair of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation.Prof Harnden - who also administers the jabs in his role as a GP - addresses concerns about the safety of the vaccines, the prospect of future annual booster jabs, the AstraZeneca jab's effectiveness against the South Africa variant of the virus and even when lockdown might end.
15/02/2129m 55s

How to get a good night's sleep in lockdown

It may feel like it at the time but if you've been finding your sleep disrupted in lockdown you're very much not alone.Professor Jane Falkingham from the University of Southampton has studied the negative impact of lockdown on sleep and found it an increasing problem across the nation.In this episode, she shares her key findings with Lucrezia Millarini before James Wilson - aka The Sleep Geek - is on hand to give his professional advice to help you conquer your sleep woes.So stay listening for information on daytime nap strategies, the impact of eating and drinking before bedtime and what to do the next time you wake in the wee small hours of the night.
12/02/2122m 57s

Jabs for kids? Mixing vaccines? JVT answers your key Covid concerns

In this special episode of the podcast, ITV News presenter Nina Hossain puts a wide range of audience questions to England’s Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam.Professor Van-Tam, who has won his own loyal audience for his straight-talking guidance throughout the pandemic, addresses concerns over the AstraZeneca vaccine, the extended gap between the two jabs, the impact of mixing vaccines and the likelihood of summer holidays. 
He also answers questions on the prospect of vaccinated people meeting again, the potential to contract Covid-19 after getting the vaccine, why people with mild asthma are not considered a vaccination priority and much more, including the “groundless concerns” over the vaccine’s impact on fertility.Plus stay listening to the end for an update on the health of Professor Van-Tam’s mum and - utterly trivially but still something many of you wanted to know - will we be seeing him on Strictly Come Dancing?
10/02/2128m 44s

The fake vaccine scam emails - and how to spot them

Email scammers feed on a crisis so it's no surprise that criminals have looked to exploit the global pandemic to try to steal money and data from unsuspecting victims.In this episode Lucrezia Millarini speaks to Adenike Cosgrove from the cybersecurity researcher firm Proofpoint, who are working to expose the fraudsters.These are the examples of fake emails disguised as vaccine alerts or health official warnings that Proofpoint have detected: https://www.proofpoint.com/us/blog/threat-insight/attackers-use-covid-19-vaccine-lures-spread-malware-phishing-and-becSo how do you spot these fraudulent emails? What actions can you take to protect yourself from cyber criminals? And what should you do if you realise you have fallen victim to a scam?Adenike shares everything you need to know to keep yourself safe online.
05/02/2119m 57s

How to deal with homelife hell (with Tired and Tested comedimum Sophie McCartney)

Her song parody videos as a Tired and Tested mum on Instagram and Facebook have won Sophie McCartney a huge online audience during the pandemic.But what ITV News presenter Faye Barker wants to know is: are Sophie's comic mash-ups born from gritty experience or is the mother-of-two secretly having a lot of fun in lockdown?It doesn't take Sophie long to set the record straight and reveal her struggles, as Faye shares her own tricky experiences of homeschooling her three children - before Deirdre Kehoe of the charity Young Minds gives them - and you - valued advice on how to handle homelife hell.So stay listening for the best ways to deal with your stress levels, difficult questions about the pandemic, a sudden child meltdown and much, much more. Plus, hear Faye's son Thomas's lovable misunderstanding when asked whether he misses his friends from school.
02/02/2132m 2s

The practical ways to stay positive in lockdown

Lockdown - or any restricted living across the UK - presents a major challenge for everyone's mental health while the pandemic continues to rage. So how can you cope with the winter woes as we all continue to live largely indoors with even exercise largely restricted?Psychologist Elissa Makris of Thrive - a game-based mental health app endorsed by the NHS - talks Kylie Pentelow through several ways you can adapt your actions and ways of thinking to find positivity in negative surroundings.For more help with mental health head to https://www.mind.org.uk/
27/01/2118m 3s

How deadly are the new Covid variants and can they defy our vaccines?

UK. South Africa. Brazil. The new variants of the Covid-19 vaccines - originating here and in Africa and South America - are now common parlance but how deadly are they and can the current vaccines protect against them?With some concerning news emerging from South Africa, Science Editor Tom Clarke explains everything you need to know on the various variants to Lucrezia Millarini. Why do they occur? Can we expect more? And why could there be more undetected variants in the US that we may not know about? Tom will explain all...
19/01/2122m 15s

How long does vaccine immunity to Covid really last?

How long does immunity to Covid-19 last after you’ve been infected or received the vaccine?Since the pandemic began it's one of the main questions we’ve wanted to answer.Now the SIREN study - the world’s largest investigation into Covid infections - has found antibodies protect us for far longer than the original estimation of three months.In this episode, Science Editor Tom Clarke speaks to the study lead Professor Susan Hopkins, senior medical adviser to Public Health England, about how she recruited 32,000 NHS staff to help her and - crucially - what they found.Among the questions Susan answers are: Are you at risk of getting Covid again? Even if you are protected, can you still pass it on? And what is known so far on how effective the vaccines are against the new variants?
15/01/2111m 58s

Top tips to help you cope with the home school challenge

The closure of schools across the UK amid national lockdowns in England and Scotland has intensified pressure on parents and guardians yet again as weeks of home schooling resume.So what can they do to help children - and themselves - cope with the stressful challenge of turning the home once again into a classroom?Kerry-Jane Packman of the charity Parentkind tells Lucrezia Millarini what you need to know to ease the stress of home schooling, explains who you can reach out to for help and offers other little tips to rethink the learning process.For more information online head to https://www.parentkind.org.uk/ or the government site https://www.gov.uk/home-education - while for support with your mental health head to https://www.mind.org.uk/ or https://youngminds.org.uk/ for support for children.
12/01/2114m 22s

When could lockdown end and are vaccines being rolled out fast enough?

The start of 2021 feels like a critical moment in the fight against coronavirus.Record levels of daily cases fuelled by a new variant of the virus and the national lockdowns in England and Scotland and mass restrictions in Wales and Northern Ireland mean there are few reasons to be cheerful.Yet the mass rollout of two vaccines shows there is an end in sight.So how far from normality are we? And is everything being done fast enough?ITV News Health Editor Emily Morgan answers those questions as she tells Lucrezia Millarini all you need to know on the biggest health issues at this stage of the pandemic.
07/01/2120m 24s

How to save money in this tightened Covid Christmas

Christmas is often a time belt-strings are loosened but this year's social restrictions and the economic hardship caused by the pandemic have increased the financial pressures of the season.So how can you spend your money wisely amid the present giving and preparations for this year's limited festivities in our first - and hopefully last - Covid era Christmas?ITV News presenter Kylie Pentelow speaks to Ellie Austin-Williams, a financial coach and founder of the This Girl Talks Money blog, who offers her advice on whether to spend, save or borrow and also explains why she's not a fan of the term "budget" even amid the pandemic pinch.
16/12/2016m 19s

The first vaccine patient and the Pfizer rollout explained

In this special edition, Science Editor Tom Clarke speaks to the chair of the UK vaccine task force Kate Bingham on the day history is made in the battle against Covid-19 with the first vaccines being administered in Britain. Kate delivers all you need to know about the rollout, how the vaccine will be delivered across the globe and also talks about its legacy as the NHS launches its biggest ever vaccine campaign. And before that we meet the first person in Britain to receive the Pfizer vaccine. Margaret Keenan, a retired jeweller from Northern Ireland, tells Health Editor Emily Morgan how it feels to make history just before her 91st birthday.
08/12/2025m 33s

Pfizer boss Ben Osborn answers the key vaccine questions

In this special edition of the podcast, Science Editor Tom Clarke talks to Ben Osborn, the UK boss of pharmaceuticals giant Pfizer, after the breakthrough news that the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine has been judged safe for use in the UK.Tom puts all the key questions to Ben, including how many doses can be delivered, whether the UK should have ordered more of its vaccine compared to the alternative vaccines, why the Pfizer is more expensive than others and why people can be confident to take the vaccine.
03/12/2011m 55s

Why you can't compare vaccines but Oxford's is cause for celebration

At first glance it appears that, at 70%, Oxford-AstraZeneca's vaccine offers less potential protection against Covid-19 than the 95% protection potentially provided by vaccines being developed by Pfizer and Moderna. However, in this podcast edition, Professor Jen Rogers tells Science Editor Tom Clarke why there is very legitimate cause for celebration at the Oxford University interim data results. And she goes on to explain why attempts to compare the three leading vaccines are quickly flawed, along with everything else you need to know about the latest breakthrough in the battle against the pandemic.
25/11/2014m 53s

The key Covid stats (plus more vaccine good news)

For ITV News's resident Covid-19 statistician, Professor Jen Rogers, keeping across the deluge of data on the pandemic is an occupational hazard.But what can the rest of us do to make sense of the standout statistics which have filled the news headlines for months?Jen shares her expert advice with Lucrezia Millarini, while also reacting to the latest update on the advances towards a long-awaited viable vaccine.
19/11/2010m 46s

What you need to know about the breakthrough vaccine

Everyone’s excited about the vaccine breakthrough by developers Pfizer and BioNTech.But what does the study tell us? When can you get it? And, crucially, how do we know that it's both effective and safe?

ITV News's Covid-19 statistician - a clinical trial specialist - Prof Jen Rogers tells Science Editor Tom Clarke exactly what you need to know in this special podcast.Including, why we should take confidence from a small number of cases
, why the 90% effectiveness isn’t certain
, how and when we’ll know if the vaccine is safe and what happens before the vaccine gets to the public.
11/11/2013m 58s

How to deal with an addiction in lockdown

“Addiction is an illness of isolation.”So says Michael Rawlinson of Action on Addiction in this conversation with ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini. He says he has seen a clear rise in the number of people battling addictions - be it alcohol, drugs, gambling, pornography or other vices - since the UK began a national lockdown back in March.Now the nation is locked down for a second time, how can people cope with addictive behaviour thriving amid the restrictions, what help is available and how could you help a friend or loved one who is suffering?For guidance and more detailed advice head to www.actiononaddiction.org.uk
05/11/2015m 14s

What are the chances of catching Covid-19 at the cinema?

Life amid a pandemic has thrown up so many challenges and mathematician David Sumpter accepts that crunching the numbers can't solve all of our problems.Yet the author of The Ten Equations That Rule The World: And How You Can Use Them To Improve Your Life tells Lucrezia Millarini that some relatively simple maths could help guide you while making decisions during the crisis.In this podcast, he explains the key numbers to track in gauging the spread of the virus and how maths can help reassure people over the risk of catching Covid-19 while going to the cinema or sending children to school. For those finding entertainment a little hard to find at home, he even has a formula to judge whether it's worth your time to binge-watch another box set or not.
22/10/2021m 32s

How critical is the current health crisis as we head into winter?

Many have called the autumn surge in UK virus cases a critical moment in the coronavirus crisis, amid ever-changing local restrictions.Health Editor Emily Morgan updates ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale on what this means for the country's health as a nation as we head into the winter.How prepared is the NHS? Why has England's test and trace system performed so poorly? And what other challenges lie ahead as we head to the end of 2020?
16/10/2016m 33s

ITV News journalists reflect on how reporting on coronavirus changed their personal lives

In the history of post-war television news there has never been a story like the 2020 coronavirus pandemic. And, of course, with several months still to go until the end of the year, it is far from over. In this special edition of the podcast, ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale is joined by three colleagues to share their experiences of reporting on the first six months of the pandemic. Along with Mary, Asia Correspondent Debi Edward, International Affairs Editor and Presenter Rageh Omaar and ITV Granada’s Political Correspondent Hannah Miller all contributed their reflections on covering the crisis in a new book, Reporting Coronavirus.In this episode, they discuss how news was kept on air and online, from Debi's initial reports of a mystery virus that "still didn't have a name" to the radically changed lives and livelihoods people across Britain had to adapt to as the tragedy of avoidable deaths mounted.Rageh shares the moment he did what "no reporter is supposed to do" less than an hour before going on air to present News At Ten, while Hannah explains how a WhatsApp message turned the story of a blind man into a national concern.Plus, Mary shares the reality of life in the news studio and the unorthodox steps taken to keep the public informed throughout the crisis so far, before Debi explains why we may never discover the truth about the outbreak.
27/09/2036m 24s

Can we save our jobs? Robert Peston reveals his two biggest concerns

“The critical issue is not whether the economy as a whole will recover - it will. But it’s the nature of the recovery which matters.”While optimistic that Britain will restore economic order following the pandemic crash, Robert Peston is less confident on the future of our collective workforce.It's a topic he has been investigating for the Tonight programme and readily admits, to presenter Julie Etchingham on this special podcast, that he's been "slightly obsessed with for years and years and years".You can watch his full report on Tonight: Can We Save Our Jobs? on ITV at 7.30pm on Thursday 24 September - or thereafter on the ITV Hub, at itv.com/hub/itv.Here, in this extended conversation, he explains to Julie what he learned from his many hours of filming and his key conversations with experts - and shares the two key concerns he has for those both in and out of work in 2020.However, Robert also argues why he is confident humans will always have jobs to do amid fears of robots replacing vast areas of our workforce.
23/09/2025m 35s

Is this the perfect time to radically change your way of living?

While we’ve all adjusted to a new way of living these past six months, anthropologist James Suzman argues the time is right to really push for radical change in our lives. The author of Work: A History of How We Spend Our Time tells ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini what would have been viewed at the start of 2020 as “ridiculously radical” is ready for re-evaluation and embracement.“Something like a pandemic … is a great stimulus for making people think about potential new futures for themselves,” James argues. “I think we need to be brave and experimental.”The end of city centres as we know them? No more working in offices? Only work a few hours a week? James may be coming way out of left field but is armed with researched arguments after years of studying a remarkable group of people who enjoy all of the above in their daily lives. So - on your behalf - Lucrezia ultimately asks: could this really work in modern post-pandemic Britain?
18/09/2018m 22s

The Apprentice's Linda Plant on the WFH debate and key advice for businesses and workers

She's best known as Alan Sugar's fearsome interviewer on The Apprentice so how will Linda Plant deal with being in the hotseat herself?ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini puts Linda through her paces in an engaging debate on whether working from home should become a permanent part of our working lives.It's fair to say Linda is not a fan of the concept, but does Lucrezia get a little bit of flexibility out of her by the end of the debate?As the CEO of the Linda Plant Academy, the esteemed business leader then offers her expert advice for businesses and workers adapting to the new environment of the pandemic.Plus, stay listening for her key tips for making your CV stand out and how to impress in an interview - and what to do when answering a question to which you don't really know the answer.
11/09/2021m 34s

Jack Reacher's Lee Child and Lemn Sissay on their Covid-19 reading challenge

Months of lockdown has given many people more time than ever to reconnect with reading - but it also brought an almighty halt to the publishing industry's summer offerings.A rush of new titles is being released this autumn and smash hit Jack Reacher author Lee Child - speaking from Colorado - and esteemed poet and broadcaster Lemn Sissay - from Hackney, east London - share their thoughts on a year like no other in the book industry with ITV News Correspondent Rupert Evelyn.Both writers had the challenging task of sifting through some of 2020's outstanding novels for the Booker Prize longlist of a dozen titles and they share the experience with Rupert, explain how the industry can deal with the threat of Covid-19 and what you can do to reinvigorate your reading into winter.Plus they explain why there will ultimately be only one winner as the finest original novel in this unforgettable year.
04/09/2020m 58s

What you need to know now kids are back at school

Aside from the threat to our health, one of the biggest disruptions from this pandemic has been the impact on children’s education across the UK.
Home schooling has been the norm for so many households, but by the first week of September the majority of the UK’s secondary and primary pupils will be back at school.  
ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini is joined on this edition of the podcast by John Jolly from the charity Parentkind to tell you what you need to know about the big return.
30/08/2020m 23s

Tom Bradby gets the answers to your key coronavirus questions

News At Ten anchor Tom Bradby is joined by ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke to answer all your key questions on the coronavirus pandemic.The Q&A session was driven by our Facebook users on Tuesday night as the pair appeared live and reacted to the incoming queries before appearing on News At Ten.Which included... How close are we now to a vaccine? How are cases going up but deaths and hospital admissions declined? Is it really safe for children to go back to school? What are the chances of another national lockdown? Plus, many more.Listen for the answers and subscribe to the podcast to stay informed on the latest episodes to help you find out what you need to know on all aspects of life amid the pandemic.
28/08/2020m 41s

TV’s star GP Dr Amir Khan on how you can protect your health

We're almost six months into pandemic in the UK and many of us have adjusted to our drastically different lifestyles. But are you doing enough to protect your health?As society becomes a little too relaxed with the lessened restrictions across summer, how can you ensure that you're not only placing yourself at greater risk of contracting the virus but also avoiding passing it on.Dr Amir Khan has become a familiar face to more than just his patients as the star of TV’s GPs Behind Closed Doors and shares the highs and lows of his career in a new book, The Doctor Will See You Now.Now the Bradford-based doctor shares his expertise advice and outlines what you need to know about the main health challenges his patients report to him with Kylie Pentelow.
20/08/2017m 29s

Tom Bradby on the healthy way to handle news fatigue

How do news outlets reach an audience that wants to switch off from information that affects everybody's health? And why should you avoid avoidance strategies?Around a third of people in the UK say they are now actively avoiding information about the coronavirus - a figure that jumps to 46% among 25-34 year olds.News At Ten anchor Tom Bradby joins fellow ITV News presenter Lucrezia Millarini and Professor Bruce Hood of the University of Bristol to discuss how bulletins are put together and shaped with the audience's well-being in mind in a time of crisis.Tom shares what he learned from his own experience of mental struggles in recent years and describes the new sense of purpose he's felt while presenting throughout the outbreak.And Bruce offers key advice for how to avoid falling into the trap of avoidance strategies, while also not chasing down every update on the virus.
07/08/2027m 15s

Ben Fogle on the benefits of escaping from your surroundings

Usually found up a mountain or racing across a remote part of the world, adventurer Ben Fogle's schedule has been shaken up since the pandemic hit. Kylie Pentelow checks in with the broadcaster to find out how he handled staying so close to home for so long and reconnected with the English countryside.He explains how a humble veg patch has helped him with parenting and how you can take advantage of the great outdoors.
05/08/2013m 21s

Pursuing an alternative career and life goals after lockdown - tips from a celebrity mentor

Many of us are setting new life goals in lockdown but how do you actually achieve them once things 'go back to normal'? Hollywood mentor to A-list celebrities Susie Pearl joins Kylie Pentelow to discuss all thing fulfilment and happiness. Just a year ago Susie was diagnosed with a brain tumour and given six weeks to live. But getting in touch with her creative side - and writing a book on the subject - she found new ways to cope with big life changes.Susie, author of The Art of Creativity: 7 Powerful Habits to Unlock Your Full Potential, explains how we can create health for ourselves by the way we think and feel and what we should do to stay positive post-lockdown.
30/07/2017m 54s

World War Z author on the scary reality of new germ warfare threat

When people like Max Brooks warn of a new germ warfare threat, you have to listen.The World War Z author had already imagined how the world would deal with a virus crisis years before 2020 happened - and has been proven eerily right over the last few months. The writer of new title Devolution had researched the spread of pandemics and isolated living long before they became a shocking reality in lives across the globe.So accurate is his research for his fiction stories that the son of Hollywood legends Max Brooks and Anne Bancroft has become a prominent figure in his own right, lecturing at West Point as a disaster expert.So who better to talk ITV News Political Correspondent Daniel Hewitt through the current crisis?Max explains why the problems for the US don't rest entirely at Donald Trump's door, describes the details of the emerging threat that has him most worried and also evaluates Britain's response.Plus he gives Daniel an update on how his comedian father is handling the virus since the pair teamed up for a Don'tBeASpreader viral video that was seen around the world.Oh, and the former Saturday Night Live writer's funny too.
27/07/2016m 4s

Can smokers quitting in record numbers keep it up?

Smokers have quit the habit in record numbers as people in the UK renew focus on their health amid the pandemic. Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) estimates one million people have stopped smoking since April, the biggest fall for a decade.“We did check our numbers more than once, I can tell you!” Hazel Cheeseman, the director of policy at the campaigning public health charity, tells Kylie Pentelow.Hazel shares the various social factors which may have changed people’s habits and explains why the charity expect some of the quitters to return to smoking. But is it clear smoking makes Covid-19 symptoms worse? And is vaping any better? Plus, for those still smoking but keen to quit, stay listening for help on the best first steps.You can also read more from people who have quit here: https://www.todayistheday.co.uk/success-stories/And visit this NHS site for more tips on going smoke free: https://www.nhs.uk/smokefree
23/07/2019m 31s

The threat of anti-vaxxers and how to spot conspiracy theories

If you’ve been avidly tracking coronavirus information online then it’s likely that you’ll have encountered posts, memes and articles by anti-vaxxers.Social media accounts warning against the claimed harm of a potential vaccine - which has yet to have been produced - have gained almost 20% more followers during the pandemic.The claims - some of which have gained celebrity endorsement - are shared across YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and include a number of conspiracy theories.So how can you spot a debunked theory being presented as fact and what’s the harm of the anti-vaxx message in terms of us gaining 'herd immunity' to beat the virus?Professor Stephan Lewandowsky, psychologist at the University of Bristol and author of The Conspiracy Theory Handbook, explains to ITV News Presenter Lucrezia Millarini why it’s so dangerous and what you can do to avoid being duped by false information.
21/07/2018m 29s

Melinda Gates: Trump’s coronavirus policy has caused ‘needless deaths’

Melinda Gates talks to ITV News Presenter Julie Etchingham on the progress made for a vaccine, gender divides and Donald Trump’s mishandling of the crisis.More than 138,000 people have died in the US after contracting the virus, resulting in heavy criticism of the Trump administration. Alongside her husband, Microsoft founder Bill, Melinda has been supporting work to create a Covid-19 vaccine, giving £596m to research being carried out at the University of Oxford.She updates Julie on the progress made and also addresses Mr Trump’s decision to remove the US from the World Health Organisation, his chances of reelection and the lack of women in power.
17/07/2014m 41s

Hollywood's Goldie Hawn on how to help children through this crisis

She may be one of the most famous names - and faces - in Hollywood, but for the past two decades Goldie Hawn has been dedicated to helping a generation of children deal with a rise in anger, aggression, anxiety and depression.The Private Benjamin and First Wives Club star tells Julie Etchingham - exclusively for ITV Tonight - how the science behind her MindUp programme can help those growing up in this time of crisis cope.She also addresses the steps she took to handle her own panic attacks at a young age, discusses the challenges facing America in 2020 and shares her thoughts on how the film-making industry will respond to the pandemic.Plus she shares the direct advice she would give to parents in the UK who are trying to guide their own children through the coronavirus crisis while struggling themselves.
15/07/2025m 5s

Expert advice on finding love at a time of social distancing

Psychologist Jo Hemmings is a familiar face on ITV and here the relationship and dating coach shares her advice for love-seeking listeners with Kylie Pentelow. The lockdown restrictions made traditional dating impossible - so how did people cope with virtual dates and what has she learned from talking to her regular clients during the pandemic? Jo shares why a phone call is actually more valuable than a video call for testing chemistry, explains why lockdown has brought some benefits to people hunting for love and gives her advice for what not to put on a dating profile right now. Plus, how do people starved of love and affection avoid jumping in too soon into a relationship as lockdown eases?
15/07/2016m 18s

Can the NHS cope with the next phase of Covid-19?

Even before the outbreak of a global pandemic, we were all used to hearing that the NHS was stretched to breaking point, suffering a shortage of staff and beds, and lacking vital investment.So what state is the National Health Service in after four months of battling coronavirus?Health Editor Emily Morgan has been a frequent visitor to hospitals across the country during the period to see how frontline doctors, nurses and patients have been coping.She explains to ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale how the NHS has adapted to spotting the signs of Covid-19, what has happened to people on waiting lists and what clinicians think about easing lockdown.
14/07/2019m 4s

Expert advice for booking your summer holiday and flight prices

The long-awaited reopening of borders for UK travellers has fuelled huge enthusiasm for summer holidays.So what's the new reality of travelling abroad and how can you plan for a safe trip?The Sun Travel Editor Lisa Minot tells ITV News Presenter Lucrezia Millarini what you need to know before booking your holiday, packing for a trip and prepping to board a plane for the first time in months. If you're keen to holiday closer at home, Lisa offers her advice for booking staycations.Plus she gives her verdict on how likely Lucrezia's planned holiday to Ibiza later this year will go ahead.
10/07/2015m 14s

Florida’s pub mistake that the UK can learn from

It’s one of the go-to destinations for a sun-filled summer holiday, but Florida has been far from immune from Covid-19.ITV News International Affairs Editor Rageh Omaar talks to Fort Lauderdale mayor Dean Trantalis on how his county and the state itself has handled the virus and learned along the way.Mayor Trantalis has a direct warning for the UK based on his experience of what happened when Florida reopened its bars and restaurants. As he says: “It’s an education curve that we all have to go through until we find a vaccine, until we find a cure.”So how is he balancing the cost of lives with the cost of livelihoods and what are the new restrictions for people flying from the UK to holiday in Florida once regular travel resumes?
10/07/2010m 10s

How the gym experience will change when they reopen

The government's green light for gyms to reopen ends months of fitness goers being locked out of their usual places of workout.On the eve of the announcement Pure Gym ceo Humphrey Cobbold and Professor Greg Whyte told ITV News Presenter Lucrezia Millarini what gymgoers could expect when they return.With Pure Gym already open abroad, a working template is there for social distancing measures.But how do they work in practice? Will gyms introduce temperature testing? And can we really expect to not touch our faces while sweating on a treadmill?
09/07/2024m 54s

The lessons learned travelling around a tourist-free Europe

While everyone else has been largely restricted from travel these past four months, Emma Murphy has been almost permanently on the go - far away from home.The ITV News Correspondent has been switching back and forth between Italy, Spain, Portugal and France, reporting from some of the world's most famous tourist sites now free of tourists - or as she describes it to ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale "with more pigeons than people".So what has she learned from our near neighbours' approach to coronavirus and how does it compare with the UK? What do people need to know before embarking on the new kind of travel? And after reporting from war zones in the past, how has this experience of tracking a pandemic affected her?Plus find out what's the one thing - besides your passport and your mask - that you can't afford to leave home without...
08/07/2021m 16s

Will the UK's four nations stay united after coronavirus?

The four-nation approach to handling coronavirus has seen the UK divided like never before.Rather than be led by the UK government, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have all adopted their own set of rules and restrictions while facing the pandemic. So what does that mean for the future of the UK? Will there be a demand for more power to be devolved to the nations once lockdown is over? Will decision-making in the UK ever be the same again?To answer those heavyweight questions, ITV Cymru Wales Political Editor Adrian Masters talks to two people with insider knowledge of how power is wielded in the UK, Matt Greenough and Lauren McEvatt.
07/07/2025m 51s

Comic Marcus Brigstocke on Zoom gigs and joking about the coronavirus

Marcus Brigstocke has become a household name as a comedian - so what has life been like for the TV star now he’s only able to broadcast from his own home?He spoke to Kylie Pentelow about the challenges he and others have been facing in lockdown and whether it’s right to joke about the coronavirus.Plus he explains how a new Drive-In Club venture will get people out to see live stand-ups again, from the comfort of their car seats.
03/07/2020m 26s

How do you grieve when you can't give your loved ones a hug?

“You’ve got my cousins just crying and you can’t do anything.”In this emotional extended edition of the podcast, Charlene White tells fellow ITV News Presenter Julie Etchingham how hard it was to attend a socially-distanced funeral.Lockdown measures have changed how we pay our respects. Funeral mourners are limited to just a handful of close family members and passing a tissue to a teary relative could land you in trouble.Charlene explains how the stripped back process was a world away from the nine-nights - a traditional Jamaican wake that lasts for several days - she is used to and why her aunt's send-off still feels unfinished.She also discusses why coronavirus has felt so close to home in her community and discusses the reaction she got to highlighting the disproportionate impact of the virus on ethnic minorities and black people.Charlene and Julie also discuss the explosion of the Black Lives Matter protest movement in the wake of the death of George Floyd in the US and the prospects of lasting change in British society and family conversations across the UK.
02/07/2036m 1s

How do you recover after lockdown ruins your big career moment?

The introduction of lockdown impacted so many people’s working lives.For Stephen Laughton it stopped short his career’s ambition. The playwright had been working hand to mouth before finally seeing one of his plays, One Jewish Boy, open to packed audiences and rave reviews in London’s West End.Then a week later the introduction of lockdown shut theatres, blocked crowds and left his play with no certain date of return.Which meant TV and film deals were all put on pause, leaving Stephen in real uncertainty. Speaking from New York, he describes his experience to ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale, discusses the impact on the industry and offers a spirited defence of the need for the arts in all our lives.Plus he has a message for theatre director-turned-Hollywood heavyweight Sam Mendes.
01/07/2015m 23s

Does lockdown easing worry you? Follow this advice

“You’ll have some people celebrating and being thrilled. You’ll have other people really terrified of making those first steps into the communities they once felt completely at peace within.”So says TV presenter and psychologist Emma Kenny on how different people are likely to respond to the easing of lockdown measures. She has timely advice for those suffering from ‘return anxiety’ as things in society begin to resemble what life was like pre-pandemic. The Manchester-based psychologist talks Kylie Pentelow through key strategies for dealing with common concerns, like stepping out in public, sending children back to school or preparing to mix with a lot of people after months of isolated living.
30/06/2020m 46s

How can lockdown improve our lives and the way we work?

Lockdown has drastically changed the way we live our lives.While the dramatic restrictions have hindered so many freedoms, some have found benefits from the simplification of their daily lives.Could it be that once the lockdown is over, people will look to retain some elements of this newfound simpler form of living? Or will the pace of 'normal' life overrun our best intentions?In this episode, psychotherapist John Halker explains to ITV Channel's Gary Burgess how we could use what we've learned to appreciate amid the pandemic to improve society and the way we work. What are the steps we can take to better appreciate our own lives?
23/06/2016m 20s

Meghan Markle and Alexa Chung's hairstylist on how you can get a safe haircut

Are you desperate for a haircut? The wait could soon be over with salons and hairdressers hopeful of reopening by summer.Hairdressers to the stars George Northwood explains to Kylie Pentelow how salons like his are taking steps to reopen safely, why he’s expecting to deal with some drastic DIY cuts and why lockdown has made him rethink what getting a haircut means to people. George - whose clients include Meghan Markle and Alexa Chung - says he and other salon owners are not prepared to compromise on safety and those coming in for cuts must understand it won't be the same as their pre-lockdown haircut experience.Plus, he discusses his experience of the past few months and how he replied to the "few requests" he received to give a sly trim to his clients at the height of lockdown.
22/06/2020m 2s

How has lockdown affected house prices and renting?

Despite the strict stay-at-home restrictions at the start of lockdown, some brave people continued to move home - often through forced circumstances.Mary Nightingale speaks to Monica Menniti who was stuck living with her ex-fiancé when lockdown started and had an anything-but-ideal experience when she moved into a studio flat in London which she'd only seen through a virtual viewing.Miles Shipside from Rightmove.com then explains how lockdown has affected the way people search for their next home - and the way people advertise their properties.And as our nation prepares to potentially change its way of life dramatically whenever the post-pandemic begins, he gives his thoughts on how that could impact on the houses we want to live in as more and more people work from home (WFH).
19/06/2021m 34s

Duncan Goodhew on how swimming can be safe

ITV News Presenter Kylie Pentelow speaks to British swimming legend Duncan Goodhew on the future of the nation’s favourite form of exercise.“It’s the longest time I’ve been out of the water. It’s not been easy,” he admits as he and other avid swimmers endure a third month of pools being shut across the UK with no return date in sight.The Olympic golden boy at Moscow 1980 is now president of the Swimathon charity and explains the actions he wants to see taken to get pools back open amid lockdown. He explains why swimming pools should not be prioritised behind gyms and the changes which could be made to limit the spread of the virus.Duncan also explains the action he wants government to take to help save under-threat pools and questions the role of lifeguards in the short term.And he asks whether the 2m rule should apply to swimmers, while arguing pools can be made viable for the whole community.
18/06/2019m 30s

Q&A: Should we wear PPE that covers our eyes?

Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs on ITV every Monday night, puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis, CEO of the British Retail Consortium Helen Dickinson and Political Correspondent Daniel Hewitt.Among the questions this week: Should we wear PPE that covers our eyes? Will social distancing make our immune systems weaker? And how will retailers be able to cope now the shops have re-opened?Plus we hear from a viewer who is worried their newborn granddaughter won't be able to travel abroad as they have been unable to register her birth.You can listen to previous episodes of the Coronavirus: Q&A on this podcast feed or check out the full programme on our YouTube page.
17/06/2014m 5s

Everything you need to know about the Premier League return

The national sport is back on June 17 as wall-to-wall football comes to living rooms and smartphones across the UK. The Premier League insists footballers are safer on the pitch than at the supermarket, but how will the games in empty stadia work in practice and what happens if an outbreak of the virus hits one of the 20 teams?Sports Editor Steve Scott talks Mary Nightingale through all the issues, including the prospect of Liverpool clinching their first title in 30 years at the home of their city rivals Everton: will the fans really follow the law and stay away?
16/06/2024m 12s

What can the UK learn from a country now declared virus-free?

The Faroe Islands has become one of the first countries in the world to declare itself Covid-19 free.Scotland Correspondent Peter Smith speaks to member of parliament, Kristina Háfoss, who explains how a swift in the strategy brought in in March has succeeded.She argues there were disadvantages as well as advantages to fighting a pandemic among a relatively small population. And she explains what other nations could learn from its approach, particularly its testing regime.
15/06/2023m 18s

UK's first hotels to reopen - but how will they be safe?

Northern Ireland is the first country in the UK to confirm it will reopen its hotels.July 20 is set to be the day guests are welcomed back for a night or an extended stay away from home. So how will social distancing work and can hotels really ensure there will be no spread of the virus as people stay from one night to the next?UTV's Gareth Wilkinson spoke to Claire Hunter of the Marine Hotel in Ballycastle as she prepared to pioneer the new normal in her industry.The interview was recorded prior to the Republic confirming it is opening hotels at the end of June rather than be in sync with Northern Ireland.
12/06/2024m 31s

The part of the British Isles where the pubs and schools are open

The pubs are open, along with restaurants and cafes, and the kids are back at school - while the hairdressers are back in business. And all on the British Isles. While the UK may be in lockdown, the British Crown dependency Guernsey has managed to return its islanders to something that looks very much like normal life. One person earning an enormous amount of credit for that success is Dr Nicola Brink, the director of public health for Guernsey and Alderney.In this fascinating discussion with ITV Channel’s Gary Burgess she explains how she and colleagues initiated a test and trace system months ago, introduced phrases of household bubbles and engaged the community to drive the changes which has led to lockdown easing. With more than 40 days without a new reported case of Covid-19, it’s led to Guernsey being dubbed the New Zealand of the Northern Hemisphere.
11/06/2017m 46s

Can we trust China's claims about the virus?

The World Health Organisation has praised China for its response to Covid-19 but some people are sceptical.ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale talks to Asia Correspondent Debi Edward who has been reporting from both Beijing and Wuhan since the outbreak started.Debi has interviewed families who have lost loved ones from coronavirus and questioned health officials about what is and isn't being reported. With just over 84,000 cases in the country compared to the UK's staggering 290,000, what has China done well and is it sharing everything it knows about the virus?
10/06/2024m 32s

Q&A travel special: Can I go on holiday abroad in July?

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of ITV News' weekly programme, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night. The programme puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis and travel writer Simon Calder.Among the questions this week: Can I go on holiday abroad in July? Will I be able to get a refund for a flight if I'm shielding? And how can I socially distance at an airport?Plus we find out who should be wearing face coverings and how to properly remove them.You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.
09/06/2015m 13s

Will anti-lockdown stance bring down Bolsonaro in Brazil?

Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro has left a country divided with his handling of the coronavirus outbreak.ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale talks to correspondent Juliet Bremner who has been reporting from the South American country during the outbreak. From protests on Rio de Janeiro’s iconic Copacabana Beach to the bedside of patients in São Paulo, we get the latest at how the country - which has been recording over 1,000 deaths a day - is coping.Juliet explains what's next for the nation and if Covid-19 will be Bolsonaro's downfall.
05/06/2026m 22s

What you need to know before taking stuff to charity shops

Charity shops in England can re-open on 15 June but will they be able to cope with the donations coming their way as we all declutter our homes in lockdown?ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale chats to Oxfam GB's Chief Executive Danny Sriskandarajah about the challenges shops are facing. He discusses the measures the charity is taking to keep staff safe and ensure customers won't bring coronavirus home on secondhand goods.Oxfam estimate half a billion more people will be pushed into poverty because of the outbreak - will charity shops be able to help?To find out more about the charities coronavirus emergency response appeal visit www.oxfam.org.uk
04/06/2017m 29s

Q&A: When will doctors surgeries reopen for normal appointments - and can I have a barbecue in my back garden?

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of ITV News' weekly programme, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night. The programme puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Political Correspondent Carl Dinnen.Among the questions this week: When will doctors surgeries reopen for normal appointments? Do I need need to let a gas engineer into my house? And how long are asymptomatic people infectious for? Plus we find out how to have a safe barbecue as lockdown measures ease in England.You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.
02/06/2015m 35s

Q&A: Is it safe for teachers to go back to school, can children under five get tested - and how do I tell my flatmate to stop travelling?

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of ITV News' weekly programme, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night. The programme puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi.Among the questions this week: Can children under five get tested? What should teachers and students do to stay safe once schools return? And how can I tell my flatmate to stop travelling? Plus we hear from a viewer with two jobs who wants to know if they will be able to do both when businesses open up.You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.
26/05/2013m 43s

How close are we to a coronavirus vaccine?

The race is on to create a vaccine for coronavirus, but how close are we?ITV correspondent Peter Smith is joined by Professor Emma Thomson from Glasgow's Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation to talk about their latest vaccine trial with NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde and the University of Oxford.The vaccine was recently trialled in monkeys with some success and now frontline health workers are being recruited to see if healthy people can be protected against coronavirus.Professor Thomson explains why human trials can be risky and what will happen if there's a second wave. We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
22/05/2023m 44s

The country that's reported no coronavirus deaths

Vietnam is one of the few countries to have reported no coronavirus deaths. ITV correspondent Peter Smith is joined by Vietnamese journalist Sen Nguyen who has been following the outbreak since it started. She explains why masks have been key while tracing apps have been unimportant. No community transmissions have been detected in Vietnam since mid-April, so what can other nations learn from the country's success?We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
21/05/2019m 58s

Q&A: Do I have to send my children back to school, does everyone need to wear a mask - and when will operations resume?

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of ITV News' weekly programme, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night. The programme puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.In this week's episode, ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi.Among the questions is one involving a four-year-old wondering when her dad can go forward with a postponed hip operation and whether asthmatics should wear face coverings. Plus, we find out what your rights are if you don't want to send your children back to nursery or school.You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
19/05/2015m 53s

Can drugs be repurposed to find a cure for coronavirus?

ITV Scotland correspondent Peter Smith chats to Professor Haas about his work repurposing existing drugs to find a cure for Coronavirus. He talks about how the research is going and what this means for returning to normality.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
16/05/2015m 34s

Should Scotland come out of lockdown?

ITV Scotland correspondent Peter Smith spoke to Professor and Chair of Global Public Health at Edinburgh University Devi Sridhar. They discuss how scientists around the word are responding to COVID-19 and what mistakes were made in the early days on the outbreak.Professor Sridhar sits on the advisory committee to the Scottish Government and offers her thoughts on what the country needs to do next.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
15/05/2021m 41s

Are we drinking more alcohol because of coronavirus?

With the pubs closed and socialising limited to video calls, how have our alcohol habits changed?Kylie Pentelow chats to CEO of Alcohol Change UK Richard Piper. In this episode, he offers advice on how to keep a check on how much alcohol we're consuming and how to deal with the pressures of drinking.If you're worried about alcohol and would like help and advice, support is available at alcoholchange.org.uk.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
14/05/2026m 12s

Q&A: What do the new lockdown rules mean, how long does it take to recover from the virus - and can you still have a church wedding?

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of ITV News' weekly programme, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night. The programme puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.In this week's episode, ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi.Among the questions this week: can my dog spread the virus, is it possible to have a false-negative result, and will my wedding be cancelled?You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
12/05/2013m 4s

Does my child have coronavirus? Dr Ranj Singh offers advice for parents

With a new inflammatory condition reportedly linked to Covid-19, how do you know what's making your child ill?Kylie Pentelow chats to paediatrician and TV presenter Dr Ranj Singh. In this episode, he offers advice on what to do if you think your child has coronavirus and also shares his tips on how to talk to children about the outbreak.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
09/05/2017m 27s

Should we be taking more vitamins during lockdown? Tips on how to keep healthy while in isolation

With the majority of us spending our time indoors, Public Health England is recommending we take Vitamin D - something we normally get from sunlight.Kylie Pentelow gets the lowdown on taking extra supplements. Nutritionist and author Hannah Richards explains why a daily dose of Vitamin D could not only protect your body but also boost your mood. We also find out what effects isolation could have on our wellbeing. We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
08/05/2016m 3s

How do you repatriate millions of stranded citizens during the coronavirus lockdown?

Since the coronavirus outbreak an estimated 1.3 million Brits have returned to the UK - from Basra to Bangladesh, Morocco to New Zealand. But how do you organise such a huge scale operation when so many countries are on lockdown?In this episode ITV News International Affairs Editor Rageh Omaar speaks to Director-General for COVID-19 response at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office Menna Rawlings and spokesperson of Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs Lior Haiat to find out how they have repatriated nationals from virtually every corner of the globe.Together they explain what's been going on behind the scenes and how they have helped bring back each other's citizens.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
07/05/2017m 19s

Why is my dog acting strangely during lockdown? Advice on keeping your canine happy in isolation

People aren't the only ones affected by the nationwide lockdown, dogs have also sensed something odd is going on.Kylie Pentelow speaks to dog behaviourist Louise Glazebrook to find out why your pet might be acting strangely during lockdown.Owner of 'The Darling Dog Company' Louise shares her tips on keeping your dog entertained indoors and how to prepare your pooch for 'normal' life going forward.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
06/05/2019m 5s

Q&A: How long does it take to recover from the virus, can you still scatter your ashes abroad - and how do you get around 'refund bingo'?

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of ITV News' weekly programme, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night. The programme puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.In this week's episode, ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis, travel journalist Simon Calder and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi.Among the questions this week: how do you know when you've fully recovered from the virus? Can your employer make you work when furloughed? And can you still scatter your ashes abroad?Plus, we find out how holidaymakers can get around 'lockdown refund bingo'. You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
05/05/2017m 30s

What can Europe's largest study tell us about the virus?

In this episode, ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke and Health Correspondent Emily Morgan speak to Peter Openshaw, Professor of Experimental Medicine at Imperial College London. He is one of three leaders of the largest study in Europe analysing hospital admissions due to COVID-19. Nearly 17,000 participants have been recruited for The Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium or ISARIC to find out why some people getting gravely ill and dying, where others have no symptoms at all.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
01/05/2015m 25s

Are hospices the new 'forgotten frontline' in the UK's coronavirus crisis?

During this pandemic, we've heard a lot about the challenges faced by the UK's hospitals and care homes, where so far more than 26,000 people have died after testing positive for Covid-19.In this episode, we look at another sector under pressure - hospices. Demand for their services during the outbreak have risen significantly: hospices are caring for three times as many patients as this time last year. ITV News Correspondent Daniel Hewitt has been reporting on what's happening in our hospices. He talks to Mary Nightingale about the concerns he's heard from hospice staff about protective equipment after they were denied access to government supplies. He's also been talking to patients, some of who fear that because of the restrictions in place, they'll die without their families by their side.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
30/04/2022m 2s

How you can stay happy during lockdown

With so many changes to our lives at the moment, can we still find happiness? Kylie Pentelow chats to Sir Anthony Seldon, one of the founders of charity Action for Happiness. In this episode, he offers practical advice and tips to stay happy during lockdown, including a 'daily pause' every morning.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
29/04/2017m 37s

Sir Trevor McDonald on coping with life in lockdown, what he misses most, and how coronavirus is like no other story he's seen before

Sir Trevor McDonald is none other than quite simply the biggest name in news in British broadcast history. Joining ITN in 1973, he's best known for presenting ITV's News at Ten from 1992 and becoming a familiar face on our screens. He retired from presenting in 2008, receiving a series of awards along the way, including a knighthood in 1999. Sir Trevor continues to present documentaries and spends a lot of time watching sport - but all of that is on hold right now, during what he says is an 'immense, international' story of the likes he has never seen before.Sir Trevor speaks to his former ITV News co-presenter Julie Etchingham about how he is coping in lockdown and what he's doing to pass the time. As an 80-year-old, what does he think about older people potentially being asked to stay at home for longer while the rest of the country eases out of lockdown? Drawing on his time as a former Diplomatic Editor reporting on international politics, Sir Trevor also shares his thoughts on how Donald Trump is dealing with the pandemic in America. And as a big sports fan, tells Julie what he thinks about the prospect of the return of football, but being played behind closed doors - and reveals the sporting tournament he's going to miss so much this summer that he likens its cancellation to being 'close to an end of part of civilisation as we know it'...We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
28/04/2021m 40s

Q&A: Two elderly sisters' lockdown dilemma, the facts about blood groups - and do you have to accept vouchers for cancelled flights?

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of ITV News' weekly programme, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night. The programme puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.In this week's episode, ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi.Among the questions is one involving two elderly sisters living alone separately and whether they can visit each other; whether certain blood groups are more susceptible to Covid-19 and what to do if you get offered a voucher from your airline for a cancelled flight instead of a refund. Plus, we answer viewers' questions on whether can you catch coronavirus from air conditioning and mosquitoes.You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition every Monday evening on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
27/04/2013m 16s

How often should you be cleaning your home to keep it virus-free? Advice from the 'Queen of Clean'

We're all washing our hands more often and being more aware about cleanliness at the moment - but just how much do you need to clean your home to make it as virus-free as possible?Kylie Pentelow speaks to author, businesswoman, and TV personality Lynsey Crombie - known as the 'Queen of Clean' - for tips and advice on what to clean in the home, and how regularly - as well as what to do about cleaning your mobile phone and post and food deliveries.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
23/04/2020m 20s

Should we all be wearing face masks now?

It's one of the big questions of the moment - should we all be wearing face masks?The current advice from the UK government and the World Health Organisation is that face masks should only be worn by those with coronavirus symptoms, as well as health care workers. A review is happening right now to see whether the UK should start urging the public to wear face masks.Some countries have already changed their guidance - in America, it's recommended people wear cloth face masks when outside their homes. And the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has called for people to wear non-medical face masks or coverings like scarves or bandanas when travelling. There's also the question of how effective face coverings are in stopping the spread of Covid-19.ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan and ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke speak toTrisha Greenhalgh, professor of primary care health sciences at the University of Oxford, who explains why she thinks we should all start wearing face coverings, which are different to the surgical face masks needed by frontline NHS workers.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
22/04/2017m 46s

Why is coronavirus disproportionately affecting the UK's BAME communities?

In today's episode we look at why a disproportionate number of people from black, Asian and other ethnic minority backgrounds are dying from coronavirus in the UK.The government has launched a review to try to find out. On Monday, the NHS released figures showing that, out of all Covid-19 deaths in English hospitals, 16.2 per cent of patients were from black, Asian and ethnic minority communities. That compares to BAME people accounting for 13 percent of the population in England and Wales, according to the last census. And in our health service, people from BAME backgrounds have accounted for two thirds of NHS deaths so far.So what's happening? ITV News' Rageh Omaar has been investigating this issue. He speaks to Mary Nightingale about the socio-economic and cultural factors that are playing a part.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe so you get the latest ones straightaway. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
21/04/2021m 7s

Q&A: Does the BCG vaccine protect against coronavirus, can key workers be furloughed - and can you still get your dog groomed?

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of ITV News' weekly programme, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night. The programme puts your questions to key public figures involved in making the big decisions affecting our lives at the moment, plus our resident health and consumer affairs experts.This week, ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts viewers' health and consumer questions to Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi.Among the questions this week: can key workers be furloughed under the government's Job Retention Scheme, is it safe to have an operation in hospital right now, and what's the truth behind claims that people with the BCG vaccine might be protected against Covid-19?You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition every Monday evening on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
20/04/208m 35s

GPs could 'quite possibly' have Covid-19 vaccine by Christmas - professor working on UK trial gives us the details

A vaccine for Covid-19 is seen as the way out to end the lockdowns that are crippling economies around the world - because easing lockdowns without a vaccine in place could see health services overwhelmed with coronavirus cases. But the big question is: when will a vaccine be ready? A global race is happening right now to fast-track efforts to develop one. Among the teams involved is one from the Jenner Institute at the University of Oxford - they plan to start human trials of a vaccine in the coming days.ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke and ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan spoke to Professor Adrian Hill, Director of the Jenner Institute at the University of Oxford. He told us about the trial he's involved in, and why he thinks it will be the first one to finish testing this summer, and - if all goes well - how GPs could be giving the vaccines to patients by the end of the year. He also explained why waiting for coronavirus cases to drop would actually harm efforts to quickly develop a vaccine. The Oxford trial is receiving funding as part of a government vaccine taskforce announced on Friday.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
17/04/2018m 53s

NHS Nightingale chief nurse: We're not through the worst yet

A number of new NHS Nightingale hospitals are opening across the UK - existing buildings like exhibition centres which are rapidly transformed into field hospitals in just a matter of weeks, ready to treat coronavirus patients.Some are already treating patients, including the largest Nightingale, which is in London - it can treat up to 4,000 patients if needed. Next week, the first one in the West Country will open, in Bristol.ITV News' Kylie Pentelow speaks to Hayley Peters, the nurse in charge of the new unit at the University of the West of England, which will have 1,000 beds. We find out how coronavirus patients will be treated, the kind of care they'll receive - and if there's a need for the hospital at all. We also ask about what's being done to manage the mental health of NHS staff at such a challenging time.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
16/04/2014m 34s

Why do some people die from coronavirus while others don't know they even have it?

In this episode, we take a closer look at why some people become seriously ill with Covid-19 and why so many of them are dying. The outbreak has claimed the lives of people of all ages - but are there certain groups who are succumbing more to the virus than others?Among those who have died have been people with what are described as 'underlying health conditions' - but what exactly are they and what does that tell us about the disease?ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan and ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke talk to Dr Alison Pittard, a Consultant in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine in Leeds who is from the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
15/04/2014m 59s

How to deal with relationship problems during lockdown

Life in lockdown is bringing many challenges - among them, many people aren't used to spending so much time with your partner.Kylie Pentelow speaks to relationship counsellor Rachael Blackmore about how to deal with conflict during these difficult times.If you or someone you know is struggling in a relationship during lockdown, there is support available on the Relate website: www.relate.org.ukYou can also contact the National Domestic Abuse Helpline or call the free 24 hour hotline on 0808 2000 247. Refuge are also available to help - www.refuge.org.uk.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
14/04/2020m 33s

Government's Chief Scientific Adviser admits UK testing was not scaled up quickly enough - plus your health and consumer questions answered

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of a new weekly TV programme from ITV News, Coronavirus: Q&A, which airs every Monday night.This week, ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain put your questions to the government's Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Patrick Vallance - including on the topic of testing for the virus. He told us that while testing in the UK was "at the right level" at the start of the outbreak, it has "not scaled as fast as it needs to scale". Among the other viewer questions answered by Sir Patrick included why there appears to be a higher incidence of coronavirus amongst minority ethnic groups.GP Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi also answered your health and consumer questions - including what exactly is the risk of pets spreading the virus.You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition every Monday evening on this podcast feed. If you have a health or consumer question you would like our experts to answer on the programme, email coronavirus@itv.com.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
13/04/2015m 55s

Care homes: The 'forgotten frontline' in the coronavirus crisis

In this episode, we look at what’s happening in the UK's care homes during this outbreak. Carers have been telling ITV News that they feel like the ‘forgotten frontline’ in the crisis. ITV News correspondent Paul Brand has been speaking to care home staff over the last couple of weeks. They’ve been telling him about their struggles not only in getting personal protective equipment, but also coronavirus tests - meaning many are having to self-isolate, unable to work and look after vulnerable residents. It's a difficult time for relatives too - with all visits banned, they're only able to talk to their loved ones through a window.Paul talks to Mary Nightingale about what he witnessed on his recent visits to care homes, and the concerns from staff, with many feeling like 'second class citizens' compared to NHS workers.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
09/04/2016m 49s

Is coronavirus keeping you awake at night? Advice from a sleep expert

During these anxious times, it seems coronavirus is keeping many people awake at night, and it could even be causing odd dreams and nightmares.Kylie Pentelow talks to sleep expert Christabel Majendie about why this is happening, and finds out from her the best ways to ensure we have a long, restful night's sleep.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
08/04/2020m 52s

Inside an intensive care unit as staff and patients fight coronavirus - an eyewitness report from the 'red zone'

ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan witnessed the reality of what it is like to treat coronavirus-infected patients on the frontline, after she and an ITV News crew were invited to the Royal Bournemouth Hospital to see the intensive care unit there, known as the 'red zone'.It was the first time cameras in the UK were been allowed to film inside an intensive care unit treating critically ill coronavirus patients.Emily talks to Mary Nightingale about what she saw: the staff on the frontline who are under almost intolerable pressure - made all the more challenging as patients in their final moments cannot be consoled by their loved ones. Emily spoke to patients who successfully recovered from the virus - and explains exactly what treatment coronavirus patients get in intensive care.You can watch Emily's report from inside the Royal Bournemouth Hospital here: https://www.itv.com/news/2020-04-06/it-is-scary-inside-the-intensive-care-unit-where-nhs-staff-and-patients-are-battling-coronavirus/We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
07/04/2019m 21s

Q&A: Boris Johnson in intensive care, should you wear a mask - and the 5G conspiracy theory

In this episode of our podcast, we bring you this week's audio version of a new weekly TV programme from ITV News, Coronavirus: Q&A.ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts your questions to GP Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi. They cover the news which broke on Monday night that Prime Minister Boris Johnson was moved to intensive care after his condition worsened, discuss whether you need to wear a mask, answer questions about pay and bringing your children to the supermarket - plus debunk the conspiracy theory that 5G masts are spreading the virus.You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm - and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition every Monday evening on this podcast feed. If you have a question, email coronavirus@itv.com - and you can get the latest developments on the outbreak at itv.com/news.
06/04/2012m 9s

The 'game changer' antibody test: When will it be ready and how accurate will it be?

Antibody tests have been described by scientists and even the prime minister as a 'game changer'. But what are they, why are they so important - and if they are crucial - why haven’t we got one yet?ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke and ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan speak to Dr Emily Adams, senior lecturer at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, who is helping to validate some of the antibody tests.
03/04/2012m 25s

An intensive care specialist on how ventilators work, why they're crucial and whether the NHS has enough of them

You may have heard a lot about ventilators recently - that hospitals need a lot of them during this crisis, and how important they are in keeping the most vulnerable Covid-19 patients alive. Manufacturers are helping the UK government to make thousands of extra ventilators, the first of which are being sent out to hospitals this weekend. But just how do ventilators work and just how crucial are they?Charlotte Summers, an intensive care specialist at the University of Cambridge, speaks to ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan and ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke about how ventilators are being used during the coronavirus outbreak, the rate of success the equipment has in keeping patients alive, and the new breathing aids that are quickly being developed. Charlotte also tells the NHS has enough ventilators for patients right now - but that situation will change very quickly.We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
02/04/2012m 55s

America braces itself for a grim death toll, how the poorest Americans will be hardest hit - and how will crisis affect Trump?

In today's episode we focus on what's happening in the U.S. On Tuesday night, Donald Trump told the nation that the next two weeks are going to be "very, very painful". The White House projects between 100,000 to 240,000 coronavirus deaths in the US even if social distancing guidelines are maintained. It was a change of tone from the president, who up until recently was hoping that businesses would be able to re-open in time for Easter, just over a week from now.U.S. states are competing against each other to get vital ventilators for their own hospitals, and America's healthcare system means that those who lose their job will also lose their healthcare - a double blow for some of the country's poorest.Mary Nightingale talks to ITV News Washington Correspondent Robert Moore for his analysis of the situation in America. Robert is presenting an edition of ITV's Tonight programme on the outbreak in America - you can watch that at 7.30 on Thursday 3 April on ITV, or on catchup at itv.com (UK users only).We regularly release new episodes of Coronavirus: What You Need To Know - subscribe to be notified of the latest episodes. For the latest coronavirus news, information and advice, go to www.itv.com/news.
01/04/2015m 51s

Q&A: Dominic Raab answers your questions - plus your questions answered on isolation, holidays - and haircuts

In this episode of our podcast, we're bringing you an audio version of a new weekly TV programme from ITV News, called Coronavirus: Q&A.Since the outbreak began, we've been receiving many questions from viewers and readers about the virus and how it's impacting their lives - so Coronavirus: Q&A will put those questions to experts and those in power making the decisions that are affecting everyone right now.In this episode, ITV News Presenter Nina Hossain puts your questions to Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, GP Dr Sarah Jarvis and ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi.You can watch Coronavirus: Q&A live on ITV every Monday at 8pm - and we'll bring you an audio version of each edition every Monday evening on this podcast feed. If you have a question, email coronavirus@itv.com - and you can get the latest developments on the outbreak at itv.com/news.
30/03/2015m 40s

How are you coping? 20 tips to help manage your mental health during the coronavirus outbreak

In this episode, we talk about how we can best manage our mental health amid everything that's going on right now.It's a tough time for everyone, with the outbreak affecting every part of our lives - be it coping with self-isolate, having to home school children, or dealing with job uncertainty. There are big issues for our mental health, whether we usually suffer from problems or not.So what are the practical ways we stay well in our minds over the coming weeks and months?ITV News Presenter Julie Etchingham talks to Alastair Campbell - perhaps best known as Tony Blair's communications chief - but who's also an ambassador for mental health awareness and someone who has been very open about his own struggle with depression.We chat to him about a blog he published this week with 20 tips for guarding again depression and anxiety. You can see that list in full at www.alastaircampbell.org.
27/03/2022m 6s

The situation in Europe: Why is the death toll so high in Italy and Spain?

While the COVID-19 outbreak began in China, the virus has been most deadly in Europe.For the past few weeks, the focus has been on Italy, which has had the highest number of deaths from the virus, at more than 7,500.But in Spain, the crisis there is worsening - it now has the second highest death toll, at more than 4,000 - overtaking China.ITV News Europe Editor James Mates - who recently reported from Italy - speaks to Mary Nightingale about the situation across Europe: the different approaches countries are taking and whether Italy has turned a corner in fighting the outbreak. Plus, with the UK and EU's attention focused on the pandemic, what does this mean for the UK-EU Brexit trade talks that are meant to be finished by the end of this year?
26/03/2024m 8s

What it's like to live under lockdown in China, by our reporter in Beijing

ITV News Asia Correspondent Debi Edward, based in Beijing, has been reporting on the coronavirus outbreak since the first case was confirmed in China's Wuhan province nearly three months ago. Since then, Wuhan and other cities including the capital Beijing have been in lockdown as authorities try to limit the spread of the virus. ITV News Presenter Mary Nightingale chats to Debi about what it's been like to live in China since the outbreak began. China has so far had more than 81,000 cases, and more than 3,100 deaths. And with the lockdown in Wuhan about to come to an end, has China finally turned a corner in battling the virus - or is there still a way to go?
25/03/2021m 24s

What does the lockdown mean for the UK economy and our jobs?

The COVID-19 outbreak is having an unprecedented impact on the UK economy, with unprecedented measures announced by the government to help keep businesses afloat and employees in their jobs.With the UK now on a three-week lockdown, with all but essential shops shut, what now for the UK as economic activity pretty much grinds to a halt? And how does the economy recover from the outbreak - and what long-lasting changes could there be in government ownership of assets like the railways? TV News Political Correspondent Paul Brand talks to ITV News Business and Economics Editor Joel Hills for his analysis.
24/03/2017m 33s

The powerful numbers that show how you can stop the spread of coronavirus by social distancing

ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan and ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke talk to Dr Robin Thompson, Junior Research Fellow in Mathematical Epidemiology at the University of Oxford, who explains the remarkable numbers behind social distancing - and how one individual can stop infecting hundreds or thousands more people by limiting their contact with others.
23/03/2014m 56s

How to talk to your children about the virus and tips to help them cope with school closures

As schools across the UK close today for the foreseeable future, it's an uncertain time for millions of children and young people as they lose the structure of a regular school day. Many, particularly younger children, will also be anxious and concerned about the virus. So how can parents talk to their children about what's happening - and what can you do to help them cope with not being at school for the next few months? ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan and ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke talk to Dr Max Davie, the officer for health improvement at Royal College of Paedatrics and Child Health, for some advice.Subscribe to be notified of new episodes - we'll be regularly releasing new episodes answering key topics around the pandemic. For the latest news, information and advice on coronavirus, go to itv.com/news
20/03/2015m 50s

How coronavirus testing works, why NHS staff aren't being tested - and the good news about a new test on the way

ITV News Science Editor Tom Clarke and ITV News Health Correspondent Emily Morgan explain how the test for coronavirus works, the concern among NHS staff who might be exposed to the virus but aren't being tested - and the new test being developed that could improve our understanding of the pandemic.Subscribe to be notified of new episodes - we'll be regularly releasing new episodes answering key topics around the pandemic. For the latest news, information and advice on coronavirus, go to itv.com/news
18/03/2012m 59s

Your questions answered on health and travel

In the first episode of this new podcast, ITV News presenter Mary Nightingale brings you a Q&A with ITV News Consumer Editor Chris Choi and GP Dr Sarah Jarvis to answer your questions about the latest coronavirus guidance announced by the government on Monday.
16/03/2031m 23s
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